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Sample records for apsidal motion rate

  1. Relativistic apsidal motion in eccentric eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Claret, A.; Kotková, L.; Kučáková, H.; Kocián, R.; Brát, L.; Svoboda, P.; Šmelcer, L.

    2010-01-01

    Context. The study of apsidal motion in detached eclipsing binary systems is known to be an important source of information about stellar internal structure as well as the possibility of verifying of General Relativity outside the Solar System. Aims: As part of the long-term Ondřejov and Ostrava observational projects, we aim to measure precise times of minima for eccentric eclipsing binaries, needed for the accurate determination of apsidal motion, providing a suitable test of the effects of General Relativity. Methods: About seventy new times of minimum light recorded with photoelectric or CCD photometers were obtained for ten eccentric-orbit eclipsing binaries with significant relativistic apsidal motion. Their O-C diagrams were analysed using all reliable timings found in the literature, and new or improved elements of apsidal motion were obtained. Results: We confirm very long periods of apsidal motion for all systems. For BF Dra and V1094 Tau, we present the first apsidal-motion solution. The relativistic effects are dominant, representing up to 100% of the total observable apsidal-motion rate in several systems. The theoretical and observed values of the internal structure constant k 2 were compared for systems with lower relativistic contribution. Using the light-time effect solution, we predict a faint third component for V1094 Tau orbiting with a short period of about 8 years. Partly based on photoelectric observations secured at the Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Zagreb, Croatia, in October 2008.

  2. Apsidal motion in five eccentric eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Zasche, P.; Kučáková, H.; Lehký, M.; Svoboda, P.; Šmelcer, L.; Zejda, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: As part of the long-term Ondřejov and Ostrava observational projects, we aim to measure the precise times of minimum light for eccentric eclipsing binaries, needed for accurate determination of apsidal motion. Over fifty new times of minimum light recorded with CCD photometers were obtained for five early-type and eccentric-orbit eclipsing binaries: V785 Cas (P = 2.d70, e = 0.09), V821 Cas (1.d77, 0.14), V796 Cyg (1.d48, 0.07), V398 Lac (5.d41, 0.23), and V871 Per (3.d02, 0.24). Methods: O-C diagrams of binaries were analysed using all reliable timings found in the literature, and new elements of apsidal motion were obtained. Results: We derived for the first time or improved the relatively short periods of apsidal motion of about 83, 140, 33, 440, and 70 years for V785 Cas, V821 Cas, V796 Cyg, V398 Lac, and V871 Per, respectively. The internal structure constants, log k2, for V821 Cas and V398 Lac are then found to be -2.70 and -2.35, under the assumption that the component stars rotate pseudosynchronously. The relativistic effects are weak, up to 7% of the total apsidal motion rate.

  3. Apsidal motion in eclipsing binary GG Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilan, E.; Bulut, I.

    2016-03-01

    The study of apsidal motion in binary stars with eccentric orbit is well known as an important source of information for the stellar internal structure as well as the possibility of verification of general relativity. In this study, the apsidal motion of the eccentric eclipsing binary GG Ori (P = 6.631 days, e = 0.22) has been analyzed using the times of minimum light taken from the literature and databases and the elements of apsidal motion have been computed. The method described by Giménez and García-Pelayo (1983) has been used for the apsidal motion analysis.

  4. Generalized Solution for Binary Star Ephemerides and Apsidal Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hamme, W. V.; Wilson, R. E.

    1998-12-01

    We demonstrate generalized determination of apsidal motion rates (domega /dt's), orbital periods (P's), and period changes (dP/dt's) in binary stars. Our method can use eclipses but is not restricted to eclipse data. A general binary star program solves for domega /dt and/or ephemeris parameters together with other binary star quantities, and combines radial velocities and light curves within a coherent analysis. We can use data that may have large timewise gaps and may be far less than optimally distributed over time. The method is particularly useful when the apsidal period is long and eclipse timings cover only a small part of the cycle. We show apsidal motion results for AS Cam and find a domega /dt of 18.20+/-0.66 arcdeg /100;yr. This result compares to a domega /dt of 13.2+/-1.8 arcdeg /100;yr obtained from a traditional weighted least squares fit to almost 100 years of times of minima, which is 3.3 times smaller than predicted by theory. Other published estimates for the apsidal motion rate are 15.0+/-5.3 arcdeg /100;yr by Maloney, Guinan & Mukherjee (1991, AJ, 102, 256), and 18.3+/-2.6 arcdeg /100;yr by Wolf, \\u{S}arounova & Diethelm (1996, A&AS, 116, 463). Apsidal motion determined from times of minima depends on the value of the eccentricity e. Our result is for e = 0.1633, obtained from the light and velocity solution. The new domega /dt from the general analysis is 2.4 times smaller than theory, with a standard error 3 times smaller than in the traditional method. Our apsidal period of 1978+/-71 year is based on only 30 years of light and velocity curves, or 1.5% of the cycle. The method also works well in measuring period changes in long period giant binaries (such as symbiotics), considering that these stars are typically observed in fragments and that very few show eclipses that are useful as timing ticks. Our dP/dt results for the symbiotic binary AG Peg have implications for its future evolution. Natural extensions of the idea can include other

  5. Apsidal motion in eclipsing binaries: FT Ori and MZ Lac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulut, A.; Bulut, I.; ćiçek, C.; Erdem, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the apsidal motion analysis of two eccentric eclipsing binaries, FT Ori (P = 3.150 days, e = 0.397) and MZ Lac (P = 3.158 days, e = 0.399), have been presented. Their O - C diagrams were studied using all reliable times of minima found in the literature and new values for the elements of the apsidal motion for two systems have been computed. We found long periods of apsidal motion of 538 ± 12 years and 424 ± 6 years for FT Ori and MZ Lac, respectively.

  6. Study of apsidal motion in massive close binary systems. (Spanish Title: Estudio del movimiento apsidal en sistemas binarios masivos)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, G.; Gamen, R.; Fernández-Lajús, E.

    In O+OB close binary systems, superior order momenta of the classical gravitational potential and general relativity effects produce a secular motion of the apsides. This phenomenon, together with theoretical stellar structure models, can be used to estimate the absolute masses of the system components, even for non-eclipsing binaries. We are conducting a spectroscopic study of eccentric close O+OB binaries in order to detect or confirm the existence of apsidal motion, determine its rate, and calculate the absolute masses of the stars. In this work we describe the current status of the project and present some preliminary results obtained for the systems iota Ori A, HD 93205, HD 152248, and HD 165052.

  7. APSIDAL MOTION OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY AS CAMELOPARDALIS: DISCREPANCY RESOLVED

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovski, K.; Kolbas, V.; Southworth, J.

    2011-06-20

    We present a spectroscopic study of the eclipsing binary system AS Camelopardalis, the first such study based on phase-resolved CCD echelle spectra. Via a spectral disentangling analysis we measure the minimum masses of the stars to be M{sub A}sin {sup 3} i = 3.213 {+-} 0.032 M{sub sun} and M{sub B}sin {sup 3} i = 2.323 {+-} 0.032 M{sub sun}, their effective temperatures to be T{sub eff}(A) = 12, 840 {+-} 120 K and T{sub eff}(B) = 10, 580 {+-} 240 K, and their projected rotational velocities to be v{sub A}sin i{sub A} = 14.5 {+-} 0.1 km s{sup -1} and v{sub B}sin i{sub B} {<=} 4.6 {+-} 0.1 km s{sup -1}. These projected rotational velocities appear to be much lower than the synchronous values. We show that measurements of the apsidal motion of the system suffer from a degeneracy between orbital eccentricity and apsidal motion rate. We use our spectroscopically measured e = 0.164 {+-} 0.004 to break this degeneracy and measure {omega}-dot{sub obs} = 0{sup 0}.133{+-}0{sup 0}.010 yr{sup -1}. Subtracting the relativistic contribution of {omega}-dot{sub GR} = 0{sup 0}.0963{+-}0{sup 0}0002 yr{sup -1} yields the contribution due to tidal torques: {omega}-dot{sub cl} = 0{sup 0}.037{+-}0{sup 0}.010 yr{sup -1}. This value is much smaller than the rate predicted by stellar theory, 0.{sup 0}40-0.{sup 0}87 yr{sup -1}. We interpret this as a misalignment between the orbital axis of the close binary and the rotational axes of its component stars, which also explains their apparently low rotational velocities. The observed and predicted apsidal motion rates could be brought into agreement if the stars were rotating three times faster than synchronous about axes perpendicular to the orbital axis. Measurement of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect can be used to confirm this interpretation.

  8. Revisiting the Anomalous Apsidal Motion of the Eccentric Eclipsing Binary DI Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, F. P.; Guinan, E. F.; Barge, L. M.; Mardling, R. A.

    2003-12-01

    In 1985, Guinan & Maloney presented the detailed analysis of the puzzling eclipsing binary system DI Herculis. This system is rare among main sequence stars in that its apsidal motion is dominated by the effects of General Relativity. The GR contribution to its theoretically predicted apsidal motion is 2.34 o/100 y., whereas the theoretically predicted classical contribution (due to tidal and rotational deformation of the component stars) is 1.93 o/100 y. The interesting fact is that the observed apsidal motion, determined from timings of the stars' mutual eclipses, is anomalously low: ˜1 o/100 y., well below the combined theoretical expectation of 4.27 o/100 y. Since Rudkj\\o bing's (1959) announcement of the special nature of DI Her, observers have been measuring light curves and radial velocity curves to determine the orbital parameters of the system and the stellar properties of its components. DI Her consists of two main sequence stars (B5V and B6V) in a 10.55 day eccentric orbit (e=0.489). Observations of times of minima reveal the system's apsidal motion, computed from the changing displacement of the secondary eclipse from the primary eclipse. Four decades of photoelectric measurements show that the observed apsidal motion remains below that predicted. Various explanations for this discrepancy have been offered, with the most promising involving the presence of a third component of the system. In a highly inclined orbit, the third body would diminish the rate of apsidal advance of the close pair. Adding photometry recently taken with the 0.8 m Four College Automatic Photoelectric Telescope, we present a new determination of the apsidal motion for DI Her. We also present the results from a new formalism for studying three-body interactions by Mardling in the DI Her system. This research is supported by NSF/RUI grant AST00-71260, which we gratefully acknowledge.

  9. On the Validity of the Classical Apsidal Motion Formula for Tidal Distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quataert, Eliot; Kumar, Pawan; Ao, Chi On

    1995-12-01

    We check the validity of the widely used classical apsidal motion formula as a function of orbital parameters, stellar structure, and stellar rotation rate by comparing dynamical calculations of the periastron advance with the equilibrium tidal formula. We find that the classical formula gives very accurate results when the periods of the low order quadrupole g, f and p modes are smaller than the periastron passage time by a factor of about 7 or more. However, when this condition is not satisfied, the difference between the classical formula and the exact result can be quite large, and even periastron recession can result. The largest difference arises when one of the low order modes of the star is nearly resonant with an integer multiple of the orbital frequency minus twice the rotation rate of the star. The resonance of higher order g-modes (number of radial nodes greater than about 4) with the orbit is very unlikely to cause significant deviation from the classical result because of their weak coupling to the tidal force and thus their small contribution to the apsidal motion. Resonances involving rotational modes of the star are also unlikely to make much contribution to the apsidal motion because of their small overlap with the tidal force, even though they have periods comparable to the periastron passage time. We apply our work to two famous binary systems (AS Cam and DI Her) which show abnormally small apsidal motion, and conclude that dynamical effects are unimportant for these systems, i.e. the equilibrium tide assumption is an excellent approximation.

  10. Eclipsing binary stars as tests of gravity theories - The apsidal motion of AS Camelopardalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Frank P.; Guinan, Edward F.; Boyd, Patricia T.

    1989-11-01

    AS Camelopardalis is an 8th-magnitude eclipsing binary that consists of two main-sequence (B8 V and a B9.5 V) components in an eccentric orbit (e = 0.17) with an orbital period of 3.43 days. Like the eccentric eclipsing system DI Herculis, and a few other systems, AS Cam is an important test case for studying relativistic apsidal motion. In these systems, the theoretical general relativistic apsidal motion is comparable to that expected from classical effects arising from tidal and rotational deformation of the stellar components. Accurate determinations of the orbital and stellar properties of AS Cam have been made by Hilditch (1972) and Khalliulin and Kozyreva (1983) that permit the theoretical relativistic and classical contributions to the apsidal motion to be determined reasonably well. All the published timings of primary and secondary minima have been gathered and supplemented with eclipse timings from 1899 to 1920 obtained from the Harvard plate collection. Least-squares solutions of the eclipse timings extending over an 80 yr interval yield a smaller than expected apsidal motion, in agreement with that found by Khalliulin and Kozyreva from a smaller set of data. The observed apsidal motion for AS Cam is about one-third that expected from the combined relativistic and classical effects. Thus, AS Cam joins DI Her in having an observed apsidal motion significantly less than that predicted from theory.

  11. Photometric elements, apsidal motion, and the third body in the eclipsing binary V974 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, M. V.; Khaliullin, Kh. F.; Khaliullina, A. I.; Metlov, V. G.; Mossakovskaya, L. V.

    2011-11-01

    We have derived the first photoelectric light curve of the eclipsing binary V974 Cyg from our own photoelectric observations. Analysis of the light curve has yielded the system's photometric elements ( r 1 ≈ r 2 = 0.1192, e = 0.058, L 1 ≈ L 2 = 0.486, and L 3 = 0.028) and absolute parameters ( M 1 ≈ M 2 = 2.2 M ⊙, T eff,1 ≈ T eff,2 = 9500 K, a = 15.0 R ⊙, distance d = 1.29 kpc, age log t = 8.0, t/tMS = 0.11). We have detected apsidal motion with the period U obs = (1140 ± 170) yrs, and the presence of a third body in the system. The orbital parameters derived for the third body are P 3 = 26.5 yrs, e 3 = 0.78, and a 3 sin i 3 = 1.5 AU; and the lower limit for its mass is M 3 > 0.58 M ⊙. The observed apsidal-motion rate is higher than is expected theoretically by a factor of 1.5. The axial rotation of the system's components is not yet synchronized with the orbital motion, probably because V974 Cyg is relatively young and detached.

  12. Orbital evolution and search for eccentricity and apsidal motion in the eclipsing HMXB 4U 1700-37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nazma; Paul, Biswajit

    2016-06-01

    In the absence of detectable pulsations in the eclipsing High Mass X-ray binary 4U 1700-37, the orbital period decay is necessarily determined from the eclipse timing measurements. We have used the earlier reported mid-eclipse time measurements of 4U 1700-37 together with the new measurements from long term light curves obtained with the all sky monitors RXTE-ASM, Swift-BAT and MAXI-GSC, as well as observations with RXTE-PCA, to measure the long term orbital evolution of the binary. The orbital period decay rate of the system is estimated to be {dot{P}}/P = -(4.7 ± 1.9) × 10^{-7} yr-1, smaller compared to its previous estimates. We have also used the mid-eclipse times and the eclipse duration measurements obtained from 10 years long X-ray light-curve with Swift-BAT to separately put constraints on the eccentricity of the binary system and attempted to measure any apsidal motion. For an apsidal motion rate greater than 5 degrees per year, the eccentricity is found to be less than 0.008, which limits our ability to determine the apsidal motion rate from the current data. We discuss the discrepancy of the current limit of eccentricity with the earlier reported values from radial velocity measurements of the companion star.

  13. Orbital evolution and search for eccentricity and apsidal motion in the eclipsing HMXB 4U 1700-37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nazma; Paul, Biswajit

    2016-09-01

    In the absence of detectable pulsations in the eclipsing high-mass X-ray binary 4U 1700-37, the orbital period decay is necessarily determined from the eclipse timing measurements. We have used the earlier reported mid-eclipse time measurements of 4U 1700-37 together with the new measurements from long-term light curves obtained with the all sky monitors RXTE-ASM, Swift-BAT and MAXI-GSC, as well as observations with RXTE-PCA, to measure the long-term orbital evolution of the binary. The orbital period decay rate of the system is estimated to be {dot{P}}/P = -(4.7 ± 1.9) × 10^{-7} yr-1, smaller compared to its previous estimates. We have also used the mid-eclipse times and the eclipse duration measurements obtained from 10-years-long X-ray light curve with Swift-BAT to separately put constraints on the eccentricity of the binary system and attempted to measure any apsidal motion. For an apsidal motion rate greater than 5 deg yr-1, the eccentricity is found to be less than 0.008, which limits our ability to determine the apsidal motion rate from the current data. We discuss the discrepancy of the current limit of eccentricity with the earlier reported values from radial velocity measurements of the companion star.

  14. The motion of the line of apsides of Zeta Phoenicis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslev, K.; Nikolov, A.

    1989-04-01

    The period of the rotation of the line of apsides of the binary system Zeta Phoenicis, described by Nikolov and Maslev (1987) was estimated by representing the density function as a product of a normal Gaussian distribution and an associated Legendre polynomial; the period was found to be about 63 years. It is shown that the asymptotic behavior of this function coincides with the results obtained by Zeldovich et al. (1981), and that the period determined comes close to the period determined by an empirical formula of Batten (1973).

  15. A search for apsidal motion in 4U0115+63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Brodheim, M. J.; Cominsky, L.; Stothers, R.; Rappaport, S.

    1981-01-01

    The measurement of apsidal motion provides one of the few experimental tests of models of stellar interiors. Binary X-ray pulsars are suited for a potentially important application of the apsidal motion test because of their generally close orbits and the precision with which their orbits can often be measured. The orbit of the X-ray pulsar 4U0115+63 was determined by Rappaport et al. (1978). The orbital parameters were determined with sufficient precision to make possible a measurement of apsidal motion if a second observation of the source could be made. However, 4U0115+63 has not been observed to be active since its 1978 outburst. An analysis has, therefore, been conducted of the archival Uhuru data of the first recorded outburst of this source in early 1971. The results of this analysis are combined with the 1978 observations. It is concluded that apsidal motion would have been detectable if the companion were a rapidly rotating star with a mass not less than 30 solar masses.

  16. Apsidal motions of 90 eccentric binary systems in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Jae Woo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Koo, Jae-Rim; Lee, Chung-UK

    2016-07-01

    We examined light curves of 1138 stars brighter than 18.0 mag in the I band and less than a mean magnitude error of 0.1 mag in the V band from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE)-III eclipsing binary catalogue, and found 90 new binary systems exhibiting apsidal motion. In this study, the samples of apsidal motion stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) were increased by a factor of about 3.0 than previously known. In order to determine the period of the apsidal motion for the binaries, we analysed in detail both the light curves and eclipse timings using the MACHO (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) and OGLE photometric data base. For the eclipse timing diagrams of the systems, new times of minimum light were derived from the full light curve combined at intervals of one year from the survey data. The new 90 binaries have apsidal motion periods in the range of 12-897 yr. An additional short-term oscillation was detected in four systems (OGLE-SMC-ECL-1634, 1947, 3035, and 4946), which most likely arises from the existence of a third body orbiting each eclipsing binary. Since the systems presented here are based on homogeneous data and have been analysed in the same way, they are suitable for further statistical analysis.

  17. Apsidal motions of 90 eccentric binary systems in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Jae Woo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Koo, Jae-Rim; Lee, Chung-UK

    2016-04-01

    We examined light curves of 1138 stars brighter than 18.0 mag in the I band and less than a mean magnitude error of 0.1 mag in the V band from the OGLE-III eclipsing binary catalogue, and found 90 new binary systems exhibiting apsidal motion. In this study, the samples of apsidal motion stars in the SMC were increased by a factor of about 3.0 than previously known. In order to determine the period of the apsidal motion for the binaries, we analysed in detail both the light curves and eclipse timings using the MACHO and OGLE photometric database. For the eclipse timing diagrams of the systems, new times of minimum light were derived from the full light curve combined at intervals of one year from the survey data. The new 90 binaries have apsidal motion periods in the range of 12-897 years. An additional short-term oscillation was detected in four systems (OGLE-SMC-ECL-1634, 1947, 3035, and 4946), which most likely arises from the existence of a third body orbiting each eclipsing binary. Since the systems presented here are based on homogeneous data and have been analysed in the same way, they are suitable for further statistical analysis.

  18. Five eccentric eclipsing binaries with the relatively short periods of apsidal motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucakova, H.; Wolf, M.

    2013-11-01

    This text is focused on some information and results of the analysis of the selected eccentric eclipsing binaries with relatively short periods of apsidal motion - V785 Cas, V821 Cas, V796 Cyg, V398 Lac, and V871 Per. Further and more detailed information can be found in the paper in A&A (M. Wolf et al. 2013).

  19. Apsidal Motion and a Light Curve Solution for 13 LMC Eccentric Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasche, P.; Wolf, M.; Vraštil, J.; Pilarčík, L.

    2015-12-01

    New CCD observations for 13 eccentric eclipsing binaries from the Large Magellanic Cloud were carried out using the Danish 1.54 m telescope located at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. These systems were observed for their times of minimum and 56 new minima were obtained. These are needed for accurate determination of the apsidal motion. Besides that, in total 436 times of minimum were derived from the photometric databases OGLE and MACHO. The O - C diagrams of minimum timings for these B-type binaries were analyzed and the parameters of the apsidal motion were computed. The light curves of these systems were fitted using the program PHOEBE, giving the light curve parameters. We derived for the first time relatively short periods of the apsidal motion ranging from 21 to 107 years. The system OGLE-LMC-ECL-07902 was also analyzed using the spectra and radial velocities, resulting in masses of 6.8 and 4.4 M⊙ for the eclipsing components. For one system (OGLE-LMC-ECL-20112), the third-body hypothesis was also used to describe the residuals after subtraction of the apsidal motion, resulting in a period of about 22 years. For several systems an additional third light was also detected, which makes these systems suspect for triplicity. Based on data collected with the Danish 1.54 m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory.

  20. The apsidal motion of the eccentric eclipsing binary DI Herculis - An apparent discrepancy with general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinan, E. F.; Maloney, F. P.

    1985-01-01

    The apsidal motion of the eccentric eclipsing binary DI Herculis (HD 175227) is determined from an analysis of the available observations and eclipse timings from 1959 to 1984. Least squares solutions to the primary and secondary minima extending over an 84-yr interval yielded a small advance of periastron omega dot of 0.65 deg/100 yr + or - 0.18/100 yr. The observed advance of the periastron is about one seventh of the theoretical value of 4.27 deg/100 yr that is expected from the combined relativistic and classical effects. The discrepancy is about -3.62 deg/100 yr, or a magnitude of about 20 sigma. Classical mechanisms which explain the discrepancy are discussed, together with the possibility that there may be problems with general relativity itself.

  1. V346 Centauri: Early-type eclipsing binary with apsidal motion and abrupt change of orbital period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Pavel; Harmanec, Petr; Wolf, Marek; Nemravová, Jana; Prša, Andrej; Frémat, Yves; Zejda, Miloslav; Liška, Jiři; Juryšek, Jakub; Hoňková, Kateřina; Mašek, Martin

    2016-06-01

    New physical elements of the early B-type eclipsing binary V346 Cen are derived using the HARPS spectra downloaded from the ESO archive and also numerous photometric observations from various sources. A model of the observed times of primary and secondary minima that fits them best is a combination of the apsidal motion and an abrupt decrease in the orbital period from 6.^d322123 to 6.^d321843 (shortening by 24 s), which occurred somewhere around JD 2 439 000. Assumption of a secularly decreasing orbital period provides a significantly worse fit. Local times of minima and the final solution of the light curve were obtained with the program PHOEBE. Radial velocities of both binary components, free of line blending, were derived via 2D cross-correlation with a program built on the principles of the program TODCOR. The oxygen lines in the secondary spectra are weaker than those in the model spectra of solar chemical composition. Using the component spectra disentangled with the program KOREL, we find that both components rotate considerably faster than would correspond to the synchronization at periastron. The apside rotation known from earlier studies is confirmed and compared to the theoretical value. Based on observations made with the ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programmes ID 083.D-0040(A), 085.C-0614(A), and 178.D-0361(B).Tables A.2-A.6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A129

  2. Probing the Masses of the PSR JO621+1002 Binary System Through Relativistic Apsidal Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaver, Eric M.; Nice, David J.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Camilo, Fernando; Lyne, Andrew G.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Orbital, spin and astrometric parameters of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0621+1002 have been determined through six years of timing observations at three radio telescopes. The chief result is a measurement of the rate of periastron advance, omega=0 deg.0116 +/-0 deg.0008/yr. Interpreted as a general relativistic effect, this implies the sum of the pulsar mass, m(1), and the companion mass, m(2), to be M=m(1)+m(2)= 2.81 +/-0.30 solar mass. The Keplerian parameters rule out certain combinations of m(1) and m(2), as does the non-detection of Shapiro delay in the pulse arrival times. These constraints, together with the assumption that the companion is a white dwarf, lead to the maximum likelihood values m(1)=1.69((sup +0.30)(sub -0.30)) solar mass and m(2)=0.98((sup +0.32)(sub -0.12) solar mass (68% confidence). The other major finding is that the pulsar experiences dramatic variability in its dispersion measure (DM), with gradients as steep as 0.013 pc/cu cm/yr. A structure function analysis of the DM variations uncovers spatial fluctuations in the interstellar electron density that cannot be fit to a single power law, unlike the Kolmogorov turbulent spectrum that has been seen in the direction of other pulsars. Other results from the timing analysis include the first measurements of the pulsar's proper motion, mu=3.5+/-0.3 mas/yr, and of its spin-down rate, dP/dt=4.7 x 10(exp -20), which, when corrected for kinematic biases and combined with the pulse period, P=28.8 ms, gives a characteristic age of 1.1 x 10(exp 10) yr and a surface magnetic field strength of 1.2 x 10 (exp 9) G.

  3. The α CrB binary system: A new radial velocity curve, apsidal motion, and the alignment of rotation and orbit axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schröder, K.-P.; Rauw, G.; Hempelmann, A.; Mittag, M.; González-Pérez, J. N.; Czesla, S.; Wolter, U.; Jack, D.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new radial velocity curve for the two components of the eclipsing spectroscopic binary α CrB. This binary consists of two main-sequence stars of types A and G in a 17.3599-day orbit, according to the data from our robotic TIGRE facility that is located in Guanajuato, Mexico. We used a high-resolution solar spectrum to determine the radial velocities of the weak secondary component by cross-correlation and wavelength referencing with telluric lines for the strongly rotationally broadened primary lines (v sin(i) = 138 km s-1) to obtain radial velocities with an accuracy of a few hundred m/s. We combined our new RV data with older measurements, dating back to 1908 in the case of the primary, to search for evidence of apsidal motion. We find an apsidal motion period between 6600 and 10 600 yr. This value is consistent with the available data for both the primary and secondary and is also consistent with the assumption that the system has aligned orbit and rotation axes.

  4. Short apsidal period of three eccentric eclipsing binaries discovered in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Kang, Young-Woon

    2014-06-01

    We present new elements of apsidal motion in three eccentric eclipsing binaries located in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The apsidal motions of the systems were analyzed using both light curves and eclipse timings. The OGLE-III data obtained during the long period of 8 yr (2002-2009) allowed us to determine the apsidal motion period from their analyses. The existence of third light in all selected systems was investigated by light curve analysis. The O – C diagrams of EROS 1018, EROS 1041, and EROS 1054 were analyzed using the 30, 44, and 26 new times of minimum light, respectively, determined from full light curves constructed from EROS, MACHO, OGLE-II, OGLE-III, and our own observations. This enabled a detailed study of the apsidal motion in these systems for the first time. All of the systems have a significant apsidal motion below 100 yr. In particular, EROS 1018 shows a very fast apsidal period of 19.9 ± 2.2 yr in a detached system.

  5. Short Apsidal Period of Three Eccentric Eclipsing Binaries Discovered in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Kang, Young-Woon

    2014-06-01

    We present new elements of apsidal motion in three eccentric eclipsing binaries located in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The apsidal motions of the systems were analyzed using both light curves and eclipse timings. The OGLE-III data obtained during the long period of 8 yr (2002-2009) allowed us to determine the apsidal motion period from their analyses. The existence of third light in all selected systems was investigated by light curve analysis. The O - C diagrams of EROS 1018, EROS 1041, and EROS 1054 were analyzed using the 30, 44, and 26 new times of minimum light, respectively, determined from full light curves constructed from EROS, MACHO, OGLE-II, OGLE-III, and our own observations. This enabled a detailed study of the apsidal motion in these systems for the first time. All of the systems have a significant apsidal motion below 100 yr. In particular, EROS 1018 shows a very fast apsidal period of 19.9 ± 2.2 yr in a detached system.

  6. KIC 3749404: A Heartbeat Star with Rapid Apsidal Advance Indicative of a Tertiary Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambleton, K.; Kurtz, D. W.; Prša, A.; Quinn, S. N.; Fuller, J.; Murphy, S. J.; Thompson, S. E.; Latham, D. W.; Shporer, A.

    2016-08-01

    Heartbeat stars are eccentric (e > 0.2) ellipsoidal variables whose light curves resemble a cardiogram. We present the observations and corresponding model of KIC 3749404, a highly eccentric (e = 0.66), short period (P = 20.3 d) heartbeat star with tidally induced pulsations. A binary star model was created using PHOEBE, which we modified to include tidally induced pulsations and Doppler boosting. The morphology of the photometric periastron variation (heartbeat) depends strongly on the eccentricity, inclination and argument of periastron. We show that the inclusion of tidally induced pulsations in the model significantly changes the parameter values, specifically the inclination and those parameters dependent on it. Furthermore, we determine the rate of apsidal advance by modelling the periastron variation at the beginning and end of the 4-yr Kepler data set and dividing by the elapsed time. We compare the model with the theoretical expectations for classical and general relativistic apsidal motion and find the observed rate to be two orders of magnitude greater than the theoretical rate. We find that the observed rate cannot be explained by tidally induced pulsations alone and consequently hypothesise the presence of a third body in the system.

  7. Apsidal rotation in the eclipsing binary AG Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Robert H.; Woodward, Edith J.

    1987-01-01

    New three-filter light curves of AG Per are given. These yield times of minimum light in accord with the known rate of apsidal rotation but do not improve that rate. These light curves and all other published historical ones have been treated with the code EBOP and are shown to give largely consistent geometric and photometric parameters no matter which orientation of the orbit is displayed to the observer.

  8. Eccentricity Inferences in Multi-planet systems with Transit Timing: Degeneracies and Apsidal Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Van Laerhoven, Christa L.; Ford, Eric B.

    2016-05-01

    Hundreds of multi-transiting systems discovered by the Kepler mission show Transit Timing Variations (TTV). In cases where the TTVs are uniquely attributable to transiting planets, the TTVs enable precise measurements of planetary masses and orbital parameters. Of particular interest are the constraints on eccentricity vectors that can be inferred in systems of low-mass exoplanets.The TTVs in these systems are dominated by a signal caused by near-resonant mean motions. This causes the well-known near-degeneracy between planetary masses and orbital eccentricities. In addition, it causes a degeneracy between the eccentricities of interacting planet pairs.For many systems, the magnitude of individual eccentricities are weakly constrained, yet the data typically provide a tight constraint on the posterior joint distribution for the eccentricity vector components. This permits tight constraints on the relative eccentricity and degree of alignment of interacting planets.For a sample of two and three-planet systems with TTVs, we highlight the effects of these correlations. While the most eccentric orbital solutions for these systems show apsidal alignment, this is often due to the degeneracy that causes correlated constraints on the eccentricity vector components. We compare the likelihood of apsidal alignment for two choices of eccentricity prior: a wide prior using a Rayleigh distribution of scale length 0.1 and a narrower prior with scale length 0.02. In all cases the narrower prior decreased the fraction of samples that exhibited apsidal alignment. However, apsidal alignment persisted in the majority of cases with a narrower eccentricity prior. For a sample of our TTV solutions, we ran simulations of these systems over secular timescales, and decomposed their eccentricity eigenmodes over time, confirming that in most cases, the eccentricities were dominated by parallel eigenmodes which favor apsidal alignment.

  9. Dynamics of the Trans-Neptune Region: Apsidal Waves in the Kuiper Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, William R.; Hahn, Joseph M.

    1998-01-01

    The role of apsidal density waves propagating in a primordial trans-Neptune disk (i.e., Kuiper belt) is investigated. It is shown that Neptune launches apsidal waves at its secular resonance near 40 AU that propagate radially outward, deeper into the particle disk. The wavelength of apsidal waves is considerably longer than waves that might be launched at Lindblad resonances, because the pattern speed, g(sub s), resulting from the apsis precession of Neptune is much slower than its mean motion, Omega(sub s). If the early Kuiper belt had a sufficient surface density, sigma, the disk's wave response to Neptune's secular perturbation would have spread the disturbing torque radially over a collective scale lambda(sub *) approx. = r(2(mu)(sub d)Omega/ absolute value of r dg/dr)(sup 1/2), where mu(sub d)equivalent pi(sigma)r(exp 2)/(1 solar mass) and Omega(r) and g(r) are respectively the mean motion and precession frequency of the disk particles. This results in considerably smaller eccentricities at resonance than had the disk particles been treated as noninteracting test particles. Consequently, particles are less apt to be excited into planet-crossing orbits, implying that the erosion timescales reported by earlier test-particle simulations of the Kuiper belt may be underestimated. It is also shown that the torque the disk exerts upon the planet (due to its gravitational attraction for the disk's spiral wave pattern) damps the planet's eccentricity and further inhibits the planet's ability to erode the disk. Key words: celestial mechanics, stellar dynamics - comets: general minor planets, asteroids

  10. Alternating and Sequential Motion Rates in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, John E.; Cotton, Susan; Perry, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alternating motion rate (AMR) and sequential motion rate (SMR) are tests of articulatory diadochokinesis that are widely used in the evaluation of motor speech. However, there are no quality normative data available for adults aged 65 years and older. Aims: There were two aims: (1) to obtain a representative, normative dataset of…

  11. Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, R. J.; Seidelin, S.; Leibfried, D.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Bollinger, J. J.; Amini, J. M.; Blakestad, R. B.; Britton, J.; Home, J. P.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, E.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Shiga, N.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-09-15

    We have measured motional heating rates of trapped atomic ions, a factor that can influence multi-ion quantum logic gate fidelities. Two simplified techniques were developed for this purpose: one relies on Raman sideband detection implemented with a single laser source, while the second is even simpler and is based on time-resolved fluorescence detection during Doppler recooling. We applied these methods to determine heating rates in a microfrabricated surface-electrode trap made of gold on fused quartz, which traps ions 40 {mu}m above its surface. Heating rates obtained from the two techniques were found to be in reasonable agreement. In addition, the trap gives rise to a heating rate of 300{+-}30 s{sup -1} for a motional frequency of 5.25 MHz, substantially below the trend observed in other traps.

  12. Human heart rate variability relation is unchanged during motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, T. J.; Berger, R. D.; Oman, C. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 18 human subjects, we applied a new technique, estimation of the transfer function between instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and instantaneous heart rate (HR), to assess autonomic activity during motion sickness. Two control recordings of ILV and electrocardiogram (ECG) were made prior to the development of motion sickness. During the first, subjects were seated motionless, and during the second they were seated rotating sinusoidally about an earth vertical axis. Subjects then wore prism goggles that reverse the left-right visual field and performed manual tasks until they developed moderate motion sickness. Finally, ILV and ECG were recorded while subjects maintained a relatively constant level of sickness by intermittent eye closure during rotation with the goggles. Based on analyses of ILV to HR transfer functions from the three conditions, we were unable to demonstrate a change in autonomic control of heart rate due to rotation alone or due to motion sickness. These findings do not support the notion that moderate motion sickness is manifested as a generalized autonomic response.

  13. Interactive-rate Motion Planning for Concentric Tube Robots

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Luis G.; Baykal, Cenk; Alterovitz, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Concentric tube robots may enable new, safer minimally invasive surgical procedures by moving along curved paths to reach difficult-to-reach sites in a patient’s anatomy. Operating these devices is challenging due to their complex, unintuitive kinematics and the need to avoid sensitive structures in the anatomy. In this paper, we present a motion planning method that computes collision-free motion plans for concentric tube robots at interactive rates. Our method’s high speed enables a user to continuously and freely move the robot’s tip while the motion planner ensures that the robot’s shaft does not collide with any anatomical obstacles. Our approach uses a highly accurate mechanical model of tube interactions, which is important since small movements of the tip position may require large changes in the shape of the device’s shaft. Our motion planner achieves its high speed and accuracy by combining offline precomputation of a collision-free roadmap with online position control. We demonstrate our interactive planner in a simulated neurosurgical scenario where a user guides the robot’s tip through the environment while the robot automatically avoids collisions with the anatomical obstacles. PMID:25436176

  14. An Iterative Rate-Control Technique for Motion JPEG2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzannes, Alexis P.

    2002-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling the bit rate for image sequences compressed using the Motion JPEG2000 Standard. We propose a computationally efficient iterative technique that is intended for applications where real time (or near real time) encoding is required. Using real world video sequences, we analyze the rate control accuracy and image quality performance of the proposed technique. Although the effectiveness of the technique was demonstrated on high action video sequences, the proposed technique is also applicable to other video sequence encoding applications such as security and surveillance systems or video over the internet.

  15. Motion-compensated non-contact detection of heart rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-12-01

    A new non-contact heart rate detection method based on the dual-wavelength technique is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. It is a well-known fact that the differences in the circuits of two detection modules result in different responses of two modules for motion artifacts. This poses a great challenge to compensate the motion artifacts during measurements. In order to circumvent this problem, we have proposed the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter. Comparing with the time-domain adaptive filter and independent component analysis, the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter can suppress the interference caused by the two circuit differences and effectively compensate the motion artifacts. To make the device is much compact and portable, a photoelectric probe is designed. The measurement distance is from several centimeters up to several meters. Moreover, the data obtained by using this non-contact detection system is compared with those of the conventional finger blood volume pulse (BVP) sensor by simultaneously measuring the heart rate of the subject. The data obtained from the proposed non-contact system are consistent and comparable with that of the BVP sensor.

  16. Realistic glottal motion and airflow rate during human breathing.

    PubMed

    Scheinherr, Adam; Bailly, Lucie; Boiron, Olivier; Lagier, Aude; Legou, Thierry; Pichelin, Marine; Caillibotte, Georges; Giovanni, Antoine

    2015-09-01

    The glottal geometry is a key factor in the aerosol delivery efficiency for treatment of lung diseases. However, while glottal vibrations were extensively studied during human phonation, the realistic glottal motion during breathing is poorly understood. Therefore, most current studies assume an idealized steady glottis in the context of respiratory dynamics, and thus neglect the flow unsteadiness related to this motion. This is particularly important to assess the aerosol transport mechanisms in upper airways. This article presents a clinical study conducted on 20 volunteers, to examine the realistic glottal motion during several breathing tasks. Nasofibroscopy was used to investigate the glottal geometrical variations simultaneously with accurate airflow rate measurements. In total, 144 breathing sequences of 30s were recorded. Regarding the whole database, two cases of glottal time-variations were found: "static" or "dynamic" ones. Typically, the peak value of glottal area during slow breathing narrowed from 217 ± 54 mm(2) (mean ± STD) during inspiration, to 178 ± 35 mm(2) during expiration. Considering flow unsteadiness, it is shown that the harmonic approximation of the airflow rate underevaluates the inertial effects as compared to realistic patterns, especially at the onset of the breathing cycle. These measurements provide input data to conduct realistic numerical simulations of laryngeal airflow and particle deposition. PMID:26159687

  17. Rate-limiting domain and loop motions in arginine kinase.

    PubMed

    Davulcu, Omar; Skalicky, Jack J; Chapman, Michael S

    2011-05-17

    Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphoryl group between ATP and arginine. It is the arthropod homologue of creatine kinase, buffering cellular ATP levels. Crystal structures of arginine kinase, in substrate-free and substrate-bound forms, have revealed large conformational changes associated with the catalytic cycle. Recent nuclear magnetic resonance identified movements of the N-terminal domain and a loop comprising residues I182--G209 with conformational exchange rates in the substrate-free enzyme similar to the turnover rate. Here, to understand whether these motions might be rate-limiting, we determined activation barriers for both the intrinsic dynamics and enzyme turnover using measurements over a temperature range of 15-30 °C. (15)N transverse relaxation dispersion yields activation barriers of 46 ± 8 and 34 ± 12 kJ/mol for the N-terminal domain and I182--G209 loop, respectively. An activation barrier of 34 ± 13 kJ/mol was obtained for enzyme turnover from steady-state kinetics. The similarity between the activation barriers is indeed consistent with turnover being limited by backbone conformational dynamics and pinpoints the locations of potentially rate-limiting motions. PMID:21425868

  18. A geodetic plate motion and Global Strain Rate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Klein, Elliot C.

    2014-10-01

    present a new global model of plate motions and strain rates in plate boundary zones constrained by horizontal geodetic velocities. This Global Strain Rate Model (GSRM v.2.1) is a vast improvement over its predecessor both in terms of amount of data input as in an increase in spatial model resolution by factor of ˜2.5 in areas with dense data coverage. We determined 6739 velocities from time series of (mostly) continuous GPS measurements; i.e., by far the largest global velocity solution to date. We transformed 15,772 velocities from 233 (mostly) published studies onto our core solution to obtain 22,511 velocities in the same reference frame. Care is taken to not use velocities from stations (or time periods) that are affected by transient phenomena; i.e., this data set consists of velocities best representing the interseismic plate velocity. About 14% of the Earth is allowed to deform in 145,086 deforming grid cells (0.25° longitude by 0.2° latitude in dimension). The remainder of the Earth's surface is modeled as rigid spherical caps representing 50 tectonic plates. For 36 plates we present new GPS-derived angular velocities. For all the plates that can be compared with the most recent geologic plate motion model, we find that the difference in angular velocity is significant. The rigid-body rotations are used as boundary conditions in the strain rate calculations. The strain rate field is modeled using the Haines and Holt method, which uses splines to obtain an self-consistent interpolated velocity gradient tensor field, from which strain rates, vorticity rates, and expected velocities are derived. We also present expected faulting orientations in areas with significant vorticity, and update the no-net rotation reference frame associated with our global velocity gradient field. Finally, we present a global map of recurrence times for Mw=7.5 characteristic earthquakes.

  19. Frame rate up conversion via Bayesian motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Ma, Siwei; Gao, Wen

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, a novel block-based motion compensated frame interpolation (MCI) algorithm is proposed to enhance the temporal resolution of video sequences. We formulated motion estimation into MAP framework, and solved it via Bayesian belief propagation. By effectively incorporating a priori knowledge of the motion field and optimizing the whole motion field synchronously, it could derive more accurate motion vectors than traditional methods. Finally, adaptive overlapped block motion compensation (OBMC) is used to reduce blocking artifacts. Experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms other methods in both objective and subjective quality.

  20. 76 FR 1152 - Crosstex LIG, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Crosstex LIG, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing... file a motion to intervene or to protest this filing must file in accordance with Rules 211 and 214 of... or motion to intervene, as appropriate. Such notices, motions, or protests must be filed on or...

  1. Heart Rate and Motion Analysis by GPS in Beach Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Julen; Casamichana, David

    2010-01-01

    Although beach soccer has become increasingly popular in recent years very little scientific research has been conducted into the sport. A pilot study was carried out with the aim of examining the physiological (heart rate) and physical (motion analysis) responses of beach soccer players during competitive matches. Ten players (age 25.5 ± 0.5 years; height 1.80 ± 0.08 m; weight 78.2 ± 5.6 kg.) were studied over five beach soccer matches. The physiological demands were analysed by measuring heart rate (HR) using telemetric devices, while the physical profile was evaluated by recording motion and speed by means of GPS devices. During competitive matches, players obtained a HRmean of 165.2 bpm (86.5% HRmax), with 59.3% of the time participating (TP) corresponding to values above 90% of the HRmax. The distance covered per minute of participation was 97.7 m, with 9.5% of this distance corresponding to high-intensity running and 2.5% to sprint; the work:rest ratio was 1.4:1 and the maximum speed 21.7 km·h-1. These results showed that beach soccer is an intermittent physical activity of greater intensity than other team games. It requires a major contribution from the anaerobic system as emphasis is placed on players making quick bursts of high-intensity activity separated by brief rest periods. Key points The distance covered per minute of play is around 100 m. Beach soccer is an intermittent sport with a work:rest ratio of 1.4:1. The playing surface in beach soccer is an important handicap to obtain maximum speeds. Beach soccer has a high physiological intensity, with more than half of the game is spent at intensities above 90 % of the HRmax. PMID:24149392

  2. 76 FR 76712 - Pelico Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Pelico Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing...). Any person desiring to participate in this rate proceeding must file a motion to intervene or to... proceeding. Any person wishing to become a party must file a notice of intervention or motion to...

  3. How Fast Is Your Body Motion? Determining a Sufficient Frame Rate for an Optical Motion Tracking System Using Passive Markers.

    PubMed

    Song, Min-Ho; Godøy, Rolf Inge

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses how to determine a sufficient frame (sampling) rate for an optical motion tracking system using passive reflective markers. When using passive markers for the optical motion tracking, avoiding identity confusion between the markers becomes a problem as the speed of motion increases, necessitating a higher frame rate to avoid a failure of the motion tracking caused by marker confusions and/or dropouts. Initially, one might believe that the Nyquist-Shannon sampling rate estimated from the assumed maximal temporal variation of a motion (i.e. a sampling rate at least twice that of the maximum motion frequency) could be the complete solution to the problem. However, this paper shows that also the spatial distance between the markers should be taken into account in determining the suitable frame rate of an optical motion tracking with passive markers. In this paper, a frame rate criterion for the optical tracking using passive markers is theoretically derived and also experimentally verified using a high-quality optical motion tracking system. Both the theoretical and the experimental results showed that the minimum frame rate is proportional to the ratio between the maximum speed of the motion and the minimum spacing between markers, and may also be predicted precisely if the proportional constant is known in advance. The inverse of the proportional constant is here defined as the tracking efficiency constant and it can be easily determined with some test measurements. Moreover, this newly defined constant can provide a new way of evaluating the tracking algorithm performance of an optical tracking system. PMID:26967900

  4. How Fast Is Your Body Motion? Determining a Sufficient Frame Rate for an Optical Motion Tracking System Using Passive Markers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Ho; Godøy, Rolf Inge

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses how to determine a sufficient frame (sampling) rate for an optical motion tracking system using passive reflective markers. When using passive markers for the optical motion tracking, avoiding identity confusion between the markers becomes a problem as the speed of motion increases, necessitating a higher frame rate to avoid a failure of the motion tracking caused by marker confusions and/or dropouts. Initially, one might believe that the Nyquist-Shannon sampling rate estimated from the assumed maximal temporal variation of a motion (i.e. a sampling rate at least twice that of the maximum motion frequency) could be the complete solution to the problem. However, this paper shows that also the spatial distance between the markers should be taken into account in determining the suitable frame rate of an optical motion tracking with passive markers. In this paper, a frame rate criterion for the optical tracking using passive markers is theoretically derived and also experimentally verified using a high-quality optical motion tracking system. Both the theoretical and the experimental results showed that the minimum frame rate is proportional to the ratio between the maximum speed of the motion and the minimum spacing between markers, and may also be predicted precisely if the proportional constant is known in advance. The inverse of the proportional constant is here defined as the tracking efficiency constant and it can be easily determined with some test measurements. Moreover, this newly defined constant can provide a new way of evaluating the tracking algorithm performance of an optical tracking system. PMID:26967900

  5. Semi-fixed-length motion vector coding for H.263-based low bit rate video compression.

    PubMed

    Côté, G; Gallant, M; Kossentini, F

    1999-01-01

    We present a semi-fixed-length motion vector coding method for H.263-based low bit rate video compression. The method exploits structural constraints within the motion field. The motion vectors are encoded using semi-fixed-length codes, yielding essentially the same levels of rate-distortion performance and subjective quality achieved by H.263's Huffman-based variable length codes in a noiseless environment. However, such codes provide substantially higher error resilience in a noisy environment. PMID:18267417

  6. 76 FR 79170 - Southcross CCNG Transmission Ltd.; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Southcross CCNG Transmission Ltd.; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate... this rate proceeding must file a motion to intervene or to protest this filing must file in accordance... file a notice of intervention or motion to intervene, as appropriate. Such notices, motions,...

  7. Improving Pulse Rate Measurements during Random Motion Using a Wearable Multichannel Reflectance Photoplethysmograph.

    PubMed

    Warren, Kristen M; Harvey, Joshua R; Chon, Ki H; Mendelson, Yitzhak

    2016-01-01

    Photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms are used to acquire pulse rate (PR) measurements from pulsatile arterial blood volume. PPG waveforms are highly susceptible to motion artifacts (MA), limiting the implementation of PR measurements in mobile physiological monitoring devices. Previous studies have shown that multichannel photoplethysmograms can successfully acquire diverse signal information during simple, repetitive motion, leading to differences in motion tolerance across channels. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a custom-built multichannel forehead-mounted photoplethysmographic sensor under a variety of intense motion artifacts. We introduce an advanced multichannel template-matching algorithm that chooses the channel with the least motion artifact to calculate PR for each time instant. We show that for a wide variety of random motion, channels respond differently to motion artifacts, and the multichannel estimate outperforms single-channel estimates in terms of motion tolerance, signal quality, and PR errors. We have acquired 31 data sets consisting of PPG waveforms corrupted by random motion and show that the accuracy of PR measurements achieved was increased by up to 2.7 bpm when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to individual channels. The percentage of PR measurements with error ≤ 5 bpm during motion increased by 18.9% when the multichannel switching algorithm was compared to the mean PR from all channels. Moreover, our algorithm enables automatic selection of the best signal fidelity channel at each time point among the multichannel PPG data. PMID:26959034

  8. Improving Pulse Rate Measurements during Random Motion Using a Wearable Multichannel Reflectance Photoplethysmograph

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Kristen M.; Harvey, Joshua R.; Chon, Ki H.; Mendelson, Yitzhak

    2016-01-01

    Photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms are used to acquire pulse rate (PR) measurements from pulsatile arterial blood volume. PPG waveforms are highly susceptible to motion artifacts (MA), limiting the implementation of PR measurements in mobile physiological monitoring devices. Previous studies have shown that multichannel photoplethysmograms can successfully acquire diverse signal information during simple, repetitive motion, leading to differences in motion tolerance across channels. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a custom-built multichannel forehead-mounted photoplethysmographic sensor under a variety of intense motion artifacts. We introduce an advanced multichannel template-matching algorithm that chooses the channel with the least motion artifact to calculate PR for each time instant. We show that for a wide variety of random motion, channels respond differently to motion artifacts, and the multichannel estimate outperforms single-channel estimates in terms of motion tolerance, signal quality, and PR errors. We have acquired 31 data sets consisting of PPG waveforms corrupted by random motion and show that the accuracy of PR measurements achieved was increased by up to 2.7 bpm when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to individual channels. The percentage of PR measurements with error ≤ 5 bpm during motion increased by 18.9% when the multichannel switching algorithm was compared to the mean PR from all channels. Moreover, our algorithm enables automatic selection of the best signal fidelity channel at each time point among the multichannel PPG data. PMID:26959034

  9. Low bit rate video coding using robust motion vector regeneration in the decoder.

    PubMed

    Banham, M R; Brailean, J C; Chan, C L; Katsaggelos, A K

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel coding technique that makes use of the nonstationary characteristics of an image sequence displacement field to estimate and encode motion information. We utilize an MPEG style codec in which the anchor frames in a sequence are encoded with a hybrid approach using quadtree, DCT, and wavelet-based coding techniques. A quadtree structured approach is also utilized for the interframe information. The main objective of the overall design is to demonstrate the coding potential of a newly developed motion estimator called the coupled linearized MAP (CLMAP) estimator. This estimator can be used as a means for producing motion vectors that may be regenerated at the decoder with a coarsely quantized error term created in the encoder. The motion estimator generates highly accurate motion estimates from this coarsely quantized data. This permits the elimination of a separately coded displaced frame difference (DFD) and coded motion vectors. For low bit rate applications, this is especially important because the overhead associated with the transmission of motion vectors may become prohibitive. We exploit both the advantages of the nonstationary motion estimator and the effective compression of the anchor frame coder to improve the visual quality of reconstructed QCIF format color image sequences at low bit rates. Comparisons are made with other video coding methods, including the H.261 and MPEG standards and a pel-recursive-based codec. PMID:18291958

  10. Lightweight wrist photoplethysmography for heavy exercise: motion robust heart rate monitoring algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lai, Po-Hsiang; Kim, Insoo

    2015-02-01

    The challenge of heart rate monitoring based on wrist photoplethysmography (PPG) during heavy exercise is addressed. PPG is susceptible to motion artefacts, which have to be mitigated for accurate heart rate estimation. Motion artefacts are particularly apparent for wrist devices, for example, a smart watch, because of the high mobility of the arms. Proposed is a low complexity highly accurate heart rate estimation method for continuous heart rate monitoring using wrist PPG. The proposed method achieved 2.57% mean absolute error in a test data set where subjects ran for a maximum speed of 17 km/h. PMID:26609397

  11. Frame rate upconversion using pyramid structure and dense motion vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun-Geon; Lee, Daeho

    2016-05-01

    We propose a frame rate upconversion (FRUC) method using pyramid structures (PS) and dense motion vector fields (MVFs). In FRUC processes, performance is dominantly dependent on motion compensation, thus motion vectors (MVs) must be precisely estimated. Variable sizes of blocks and large search ranges are needed to estimate the MVs of large objects and large movements; however, we use PS and dense MVFs to estimate MVs for various conditions. In the PS, we first estimate MVs on level 0, which is the most reduced image in the PS (L-1 times downsampling), and MVs on the high levels are estimated except for pixels having large corresponding MVs on the lower levels. Integration of MVFs for all levels is followed by a vector median filter to remove noises. Finally, a motion compensated frame is interpolated by weight-overlapped block motion compensation.

  12. 76 FR 41240 - Northwest Natural Gas Company; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Northwest Natural Gas Company; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case... file a motion to intervene or to protest this filing must file in accordance with Rules 211 and 214 of... or motion to intervene, as appropriate. Such notices, motions, or protests must be filed on or...

  13. Evaluation of the relationship between motion sickness symptomatology and blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Lackner, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the development of symptoms of motion sickness and changes in blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature. Twelve subjects were each evaluated four times using the vestibular-visual interaction test (Graybiel and Lackner, 1980). The results were analyzed both within and across individual subjects. Neither a systematic group nor consistent individual relationship was found between the physiological parameters and the appearance of symptoms of motion sickness. These findings suggest that biofeedback control of the physiological variables studied is not likely to prevent the expression of motion sickness symptomatology.

  14. Motion sickness in cats - A symptom rating scale used in laboratory and flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suri, K. B.; Daunton, N. G.; Crampton, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    The cat is proposed as a model for the study of motion and space sickness. Development of a scale for rating the motion sickness severity in the cat is described. The scale is used to evaluate an antimotion sickness drug, d-amphetamine plus scopolamine, and to determine whether it is possible to predict sickness susceptibility during parabolic flight, including zero-G maneuvers, from scores obtained during ground based trials.

  15. The Influence of the MPAA's Film Rating System on Motion Picture Attendance: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Bruce A.

    A study was undertaken to design and implement an experimental instrument for testing the influence of the Motion Picture Association of America's (MPAA) film rating system on movie attendance. Sixty-five high school students were given synopses of four different fictional films, each of which had been assigned an MPAA rating of G (approved for…

  16. Motion measurement of SAR antenna based on high frame rate camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Cao, R.; Feng, H.; Xu, Z.

    2015-03-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is currently in the marine, agriculture, geology and other fields are widely used, while the SAR antenna is one of the most important subsystems. Performance of antenna has a significant impact on the SAR sensitivity, azimuth resolution, image blur degree and other parameter. To improve SAR resolution, SAR antenna is designed and fabricated according to flexible expandable style. However, the movement of flexible antenna will have a greater impact on accuracy of SAR systems, so the motion measurement of the flexible antenna is an urgent problem. This paper studied motion measurements method based on high frame rate camera, designed and completed a flexible antenna motion measurement experiment. In the experiment the main IMU and the sub IMU were placed at both ends of the cantilever, which is simulation of flexible antenna, the high frame rate camera was placed above the main IMU, and the imaging target was set on side of the sub IMU. When the cantilever motion occurs, IMU acquired spatial coordinates of cantilever movement in real-time, and high frame rate camera captured a series of target images, and then the images was input into JTC to obtain the cantilever motion coordinates. Through the contrast and analysis of measurement results, the measurement accuracy of flexible antenna motion is verified.

  17. 76 FR 76711 - DCP Raptor Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

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  1. 76 FR 39869 - Lee 8 Storage Partnership; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

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  7. Estimation of heart rate variability using a compact radiofrequency motion sensor.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Norihiro; Matsuoka, Narumi; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Abe, Makoto; Homma, Noriyasu; Otake, Hideharu; Kim, Junghyun; Ohtaki, Yukio

    2015-12-01

    Physiological indices that reflect autonomic nervous activity are considered useful for monitoring peoples' health on a daily basis. A number of such indices are derived from heart rate variability, which is obtained by a radiofrequency (RF) motion sensor without making physical contact with the user's body. However, the bulkiness of RF motion sensors used in previous studies makes them unsuitable for home use. In this study, a new method to measure heart rate variability using a compact RF motion sensor that is sufficiently small to fit in a user's shirt pocket is proposed. To extract a heart rate related component from the sensor signal, an algorithm that optimizes a digital filter based on the power spectral density of the signal is proposed. The signals of the RF motion sensor were measured for 29 subjects during the resting state and their heart rate variability was estimated from the measured signals using the proposed method and a conventional method. A correlation coefficient between true heart rate and heart rate estimated from the proposed method was 0.69. Further, the experimental results showed the viability of the RF sensor for monitoring autonomic nervous activity. However, some improvements such as controlling the direction of sensing were necessary for stable measurement. PMID:26603507

  8. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  9. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  10. Electronic Motion Sensors and Heart Rate as Measures of Physical Activity in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedson, Patty S.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews several mechanical and electronic techniques for monitoring physical activity in children. The paper focuses on motion sensors (Large Scale Integrated Sensor and Caltrac Accelerometer) and heart rate, and it presents recommendations for establishing general guidelines for appropriate use of such monitoring devices with children. (SM)

  11. Alternating Motion Rate as an Index of Speech Motor Disorder in Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-Tsai; Kent, Ray D.; Duffy, Joseph R.; Thomas, Jack E.; Weismer, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The task of syllable alternating motion rate (AMR) (also called diadochokinesis) is suitable for examining speech disorders of varying degrees of severity and in individuals with varying levels of linguistic and cognitive ability. However, very limited information on this task has been published for subjects with traumatic brain injury (TBI). This…

  12. The rate of collisions due to Brownian or gravitational motion of small drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Davis, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of the collision rate of two spherical drops undergoing Brownian diffusion or gravitational sedimentation are presented. The diffusion equation for relative Brownian motion of two drops is derived, and the relative motion of pairs of drops in gravitational sedimentation is traced via a trajectory analysis in order to develop theoretical models to determine the collision efficiencies, both with and without interparticle forces applied between the drops. It is concluded that finite collision rates between nondeforming fluid drops are possible for Brownian diffusion or gravitational sedimentation in the absence of attractive forces, in stark contrast to the prediction that lubrication forces prevent rigid spheres from contacting each other unless an attractive force that becomes infinite as the separation approaches zero is applied. Collision rates are shown to increase as the viscosity of the drop-phase decreases. In general, hydrodynamic interactions reduce the collision rates more for gravitational collisions than for Brownian collisions.

  13. High-resolution motion-compensated imaging photoplethysmography for remote heart rate monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Audrey; Wang, Xiao Yu; Amelard, Robert; Scharfenberger, Christian; Leong, Joanne; Kulinski, Jan; Wong, Alexander; Clausi, David A.

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel non-contact photoplethysmographic (PPG) imaging system based on high-resolution video recordings of ambient reflectance of human bodies that compensates for body motion and takes advantage of skin erythema fluctuations to improve measurement reliability for the purpose of remote heart rate monitoring. A single measurement location for recording the ambient reflectance is automatically identified on an individual, and the motion for the location is determined over time via measurement location tracking. Based on the determined motion information motion-compensated reflectance measurements at different wavelengths for the measurement location can be acquired, thus providing more reliable measurements for the same location on the human over time. The reflectance measurement is used to determine skin erythema fluctuations over time, resulting in the capture of a PPG signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. To test the efficacy of the proposed system, a set of experiments involving human motion in a front-facing position were performed under natural ambient light. The experimental results demonstrated that skin erythema fluctuations can achieve noticeably improved average accuracy in heart rate measurement when compared to previously proposed non-contact PPG imaging systems.

  14. 75 FR 70752 - ONEOK WesTex Transmission, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

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  15. Microsaccade rate varies with subjective visibility during motion-induced blindness.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Tse, Peter U

    2009-01-01

    Motion-induced blindness (MIB) occurs when a dot embedded in a motion field subjectively vanishes. Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB. We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it. In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+. These BOLD signal changes observed upon perceptual state changes in MIB could be driven by the change of perceptual states and/or a confounding factor, such as the microsaccade/eyeblink rate. PMID:19357789

  16. Measurement of ion motional heating rates over a range of trap frequencies and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M.; Chiaverini, J.

    2015-04-01

    We present measurements of the motional heating rate of a trapped ion at different trap frequencies and temperatures between ˜0.6 and 1.5 MHz and ˜4 and 295 K. Additionally, we examine the possible effect of adsorbed surface contaminants with boiling points below ˜105 ∘C by measuring the ion heating rate before and after locally baking our ion trap chip under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. We compare the heating rates presented here to those calculated from available electric-field noise models. We can tightly constrain a subset of these models based on their expected frequency and temperature scaling interdependence. Discrepancies between the measured results and predicted values point to the need for refinement of theoretical noise models in order to more fully understand the mechanisms behind motional trapped-ion heating.

  17. Real-time tracking of respiratory-induced tumor motion by dose-rate regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han-Oh, Yeonju Sarah

    We have developed a novel real-time tumor-tracking technology, called Dose-Rate-Regulated Tracking (DRRT), to compensate for tumor motion caused by breathing. Unlike other previously proposed tumor-tracking methods, this new method uses a preprogrammed dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) sequence in combination with real-time dose-rate control. This new scheme circumvents the technical challenge in MLC-based tumor tracking, that is to control the MLC motion in real time, based on real-time detected tumor motion. The preprogrammed MLC sequence describes the movement of the tumor, as a function of breathing phase, amplitude, or tidal volume. The irregularity of tumor motion during treatment is handled by real-time regulation of the dose rate, which effectively speeds up or slows down the delivery of radiation as needed. This method is based on the fact that all of the parameters in dynamic radiation delivery, including MLC motion, are enslaved to the cumulative dose, which, in turn, can be accelerated or decelerated by varying the dose rate. Because commercially available MLC systems do not allow the MLC delivery sequence to be modified in real time based on the patient's breathing signal, previously proposed tumor-tracking techniques using a MLC cannot be readily implemented in the clinic today. By using a preprogrammed MLC sequence to handle the required motion, the task for real-time control is greatly simplified. We have developed and tested the pre- programmed MLC sequence and the dose-rate regulation algorithm using lung-cancer patients breathing signals. It has been shown that DRRT can track the tumor with an accuracy of less than 2 mm for a latency of the DRRT system of less than 0.35 s. We also have evaluated the usefulness of guided breathing for DRRT. Since DRRT by its very nature can compensate for breathing-period changes, guided breathing was shown to be unnecessary for real-time tracking when using DRRT. Finally, DRRT uses the existing dose-rate control

  18. A class of warm Jupiters with mutually inclined, apsidally misaligned close friends.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Rebekah I; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-10-10

    The orbits of giant extrasolar planets often have surprisingly small semimajor axes, large eccentricities, or severe misalignments between their orbit normals and their host stars' spin axes. In some formation scenarios invoking Kozai-Lidov oscillations, an external planetary companion drives a planet onto an orbit having these properties. The mutual inclinations for Kozai-Lidov oscillations can be large and have not been confirmed observationally. Here we present evidence that observed eccentric warm Jupiters with eccentric giant companions have mutual inclinations that oscillate between 35° and 65°. Our inference is based on the pairs' observed apsidal separations, which cluster near 90°. The near-orthogonality of periapse directions is effected by the outer companion's quadrupolar and octupolar potentials. These systems may be undergoing a stalled version of tidal migration that produces warm Jupiters over hot Jupiters, and they provide evidence for a population of multiplanet systems that are not flat and have been sculpted by Kozai-Lidov oscillations. PMID:25301622

  19. Could the 55 Cancri Planetary System Really Be in the 3:1 Mean Motion Resonance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jianghui; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Liu, Lin; Li, Guangyu

    2003-03-01

    We integrate the orbital solutions of the planets orbiting 55 Cancri. In the simulations, we find that not only do the three resonant arguments θ1=λ1- 3λ2+2ω1, θ2=λ1- 3λ2+2ω2, and θ3=λ1- 3λ2+(ω1+ω2) librate, respectively, but the relative apsidal longitude Δω also librates about 250° for millions of years. The results imply the existence of the 3:1 resonance and the apsidal resonance for the studied system. We emphasize that the mean motion resonance and apsidal locking can act as two important mechanisms for stabilizing the system. In addition, we further investigate the secular dynamics of this system by comparing the numerical results with those given by Laplace-Lagrange secular theory.

  20. 76 FR 76711 - Overland Trail Transmission, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

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  1. High-Frame-Rate Echocardiography Using Coherent Compounding With Doppler-Based Motion-Compensation.

    PubMed

    Poree, Jonathan; Posada, Daniel; Hodzic, Amir; Tournoux, Francois; Cloutier, Guy; Garcia, Damien

    2016-07-01

    High-frame-rate ultrasonography based on coherent compounding of unfocused beams can potentially transform the assessment of cardiac function. As it requires successive waves to be combined coherently, this approach is sensitive to high-velocity tissue motion. We investigated coherent compounding of tilted diverging waves, emitted from a 2.5 MHz clinical phased array transducer. To cope with high myocardial velocities, a triangle transmit sequence of diverging waves is proposed, combined with tissue Doppler imaging to perform motion compensation (MoCo). The compound sequence with integrated MoCo was adjusted from simulations and was tested in vitro and in vivo. Realistic myocardial velocities were analyzed in an in vitro spinning disk with anechoic cysts. While a 8 dB decrease (no motion versus high motion) was observed without MoCo, the contrast-to-noise ratio of the cysts was preserved with the MoCo approach. With this method, we could provide high-quality in vivo B-mode cardiac images with tissue Doppler at 250 frames per second. Although the septum and the anterior mitral leaflet were poorly apparent without MoCo, they became well perceptible and well contrasted with MoCo. The septal and lateral mitral annulus velocities determined by tissue Doppler were concordant with those measured by pulsed-wave Doppler with a clinical scanner (r(2)=0.7,y=0.9 x+0.5,N=60) . To conclude, high-contrast echo cardiographic B-mode and tissue Doppler images can be obtained with diverging beams when motion compensation is integrated in the coherent compounding process. PMID:26863650

  2. Motion artifact cancellation and outlier rejection for clip-type ppg-based heart rate sensor.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Takunori; Hara, Shinsuke; Okuhata, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hajime; Kawabata, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate sensing can be used to not only understand exercise intensity but also detect life-critical condition during sports activities. To reduce stress during exercise and attach heart rate sensor easily, we developed a clip-type photoplethysmography (PPG)-based heart rate sensor. The sensor can be attached just by hanging it to the waist part of undershorts, and furthermore, it employs the motion artifact (MA) cancellation technique. However, due to its low contact pressure, sudden jumps and drops, which are called "outliers," are often observed in the sensed heart rate, so we also developed a simple outlier rejection technique. By an experiment using five male subjects (4 sets per subject), we confirmed the MA cancellation and outlier rejection capabilities. PMID:26736684

  3. Coding Efficiency of Fly Motion Processing Is Set by Firing Rate, Not Firing Precision

    PubMed Central

    Spavieri, Deusdedit Lineu; Eichner, Hubert; Borst, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    To comprehend the principles underlying sensory information processing, it is important to understand how the nervous system deals with various sources of perturbation. Here, we analyze how the representation of motion information in the fly's nervous system changes with temperature and luminance. Although these two environmental variables have a considerable impact on the fly's nervous system, they do not impede the fly to behave suitably over a wide range of conditions. We recorded responses from a motion-sensitive neuron, the H1-cell, to a time-varying stimulus at many different combinations of temperature and luminance. We found that the mean firing rate, but not firing precision, changes with temperature, while both were affected by mean luminance. Because we also found that information rate and coding efficiency are mainly set by the mean firing rate, our results suggest that, in the face of environmental perturbations, the coding efficiency is improved by an increase in the mean firing rate, rather than by an increased firing precision. PMID:20661305

  4. An experimental investigation of domain wall motion in polycrystalline Ni during high-rate compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipankar; Bah, Abubakarr; Carman, Gregory P.; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes experimental data on a polycrystalline nickel subjected to compressive loads induced in a split Hopkinson pressure bar test. A perpendicular bias magnetic field with respect to the loading direction is used to orient the domains and a pick-up coil measures the magnetic response of the sample during loading. Utilizing this experimental configuration, this study investigated the coupled effects of the magnetic and mechanical fields on domain wall motion in a polycrystalline magnetostrictive material (Ni) during the high-rate elastic loading. The experimental measurements reveal that the magnitude of the stress-induced magnetization change is dependent upon bias magnetic field.

  5. Frame rate of motion picture and its influence on speech perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazono, Kaoru

    1996-03-01

    The preservation of QoS for multimedia traffic through a data network is a difficult problem. We focus our attention on video frame rate and study its influence on speech perception. When sound and picture are discrepant (e.g., acoustic `ba' combined with visual `ga'), subjects perceive a different sound (such as `da'). This phenomenon is known as the McGurk effect. In this paper, the influence of degraded video frame rate on speech perception was studied. It was shown that when frame rate decreases, correct hearing is improved for discrepant stimuli and is degraded for congruent (voice and picture are the same) stimuli. Furthermore, we studied the case where lip closure was always captured by the synchronization of sampling time and lip position. In this case, frame rate has little effect on mishearing for congruent stimuli. For discrepant stimuli, mishearing is decreased with degraded frame rate. These results indicate that stiff motion of lips resulting from low frame rate cannot give enough labial information for speech perception. In addition, the effect of delaying the picture to correct for low frame rate was studied. The results, however, were not as definitive as expected because of compound effects related to the synchronization of sound and picture.

  6. Interfraction patient motion and implant displacement in prostate high dose rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C. D.; Kron, T.; Leahy, M.; Duchesne, G.; Williams, S.; Tai, K. H.; Haworth, A.; Herschtal, A.; Foroudi, F.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify movement of prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment, using an in-house developed motion sensor in order to determine a relationship between patient movement and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant displacement. Methods: An electronic motion sensor was developed based on a three axis accelerometer. HDR brachytherapy treatment for prostate is delivered at this institution in two fractions 24 h apart and 22 patients were monitored for movement over the interval between fractions. The motion sensors functioned as inclinometers, monitoring inclination of both thighs, and the inclination and roll of the abdomen. The implanted HDR brachytherapy catheter set was assessed for displacement relative to fiducial markers in the prostate. Angle measurements and angle differences over a 2 s time base were binned, and the standard deviations of the resulting frequency distributions used as a metric for patient motion in each monitored axis. These parameters were correlated to measured catheter displacement using regression modeling. Results: The mean implant displacement was 12.6 mm in the caudal direction. A mean of 19.95 h data was recorded for the patient cohort. Patients generally moved through a limited range of angles with a mean of the exception of two patients who spent in excess of 2 h lying on their side. When tested for a relationship between movement in any of the four monitored axes and the implant displacement, none was significant. Conclusions: It is not likely that patient movement influences HDR prostate implant displacement. There may be benefits to patient comfort if nursing protocols were relaxed to allow patients greater freedom to move while the implant is in situ.

  7. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    SciTech Connect

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%).

  8. Influence of Motion Picture Rating on Adolescent Response to Movie Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Tanski, Susanne; Stoolmiller, Mike

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between movie smoking exposure (MSE) and adolescent smoking according to rating category. METHODS: A total of 6522 US adolescents were enrolled in a longitudinal survey conducted at 8-month intervals; 5503 subjects were followed up at 8 months, 5019 subjects at 16 months, and 4575 subjects at 24 months. MSE was estimated from 532 recent box-office hits, blocked into 3 Motion Picture Association of America rating categories: G/PG, PG-13, and R. A survival model evaluated time to smoking onset. RESULTS: Median MSE in PG-13–rated movies was ∼3 times higher than median MSE from R-rated movies, but their relation with smoking was essentially the same, with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.49 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23–1.81) and 1.33 (95% CI: 1.23–1.81) for each additional 500 occurrences of MSE respectively. MSE from G/PG-rated movies was small and had no significant relationship with adolescent smoking. Attributable risk estimates showed that adolescent smoking would be reduced by 18% (95% CI: 14–21) if smoking in PG-13–rated movies was reduced to the fifth percentile. In comparison, making all parents maximally authoritative in their parenting would reduce adolescent smoking by 16% (95% CI: 12–19). CONCLUSIONS: The equivalent effect of PG-13-rated and R-rated MSE suggests it is the movie smoking that prompts adolescents to smoke, not other characteristics of R-rated movies or adolescents drawn to them. An R rating for movie smoking could substantially reduce adolescent smoking by eliminating smoking from PG-13 movies. PMID:22778305

  9. Analysis and Visualization of 3D Motion Data for UPDRS Rating of Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Piro, Neltje E; Piro, Lennart K; Kassubek, Jan; Blechschmidt-Trapp, Ronald A

    2016-01-01

    Remote monitoring of Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients with inertia sensors is a relevant method for a better assessment of symptoms. We present a new approach for symptom quantification based on motion data: the automatic Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) classification in combination with an animated 3D avatar giving the neurologist the impression of having the patient live in front of him. In this study we compared the UPDRS ratings of the pronation-supination task derived from: (a) an examination based on video recordings as a clinical reference; (b) an automatically classified UPDRS; and (c) a UPDRS rating from the assessment of the animated 3D avatar. Data were recorded using Magnetic, Angular Rate, Gravity (MARG) sensors with 15 subjects performing a pronation-supination movement of the hand. After preprocessing, the data were classified with a J48 classifier and animated as a 3D avatar. Video recording of the movements, as well as the 3D avatar, were examined by movement disorder specialists and rated by UPDRS. The mean agreement between the ratings based on video and (b) the automatically classified UPDRS is 0.48 and with (c) the 3D avatar it is 0.47. The 3D avatar is similarly suitable for assessing the UPDRS as video recordings for the examined task and will be further developed by the research team. PMID:27338400

  10. The effect of electrode surface roughness on the motional heating rate of electromagnetic trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kuan-Yu; Low, Guang Hao; Chuang, Isaac

    Electric field noise is a major source of motional heating in trapped ion quantum computation. While it is well known that this noise is influenced by trap electrode geometry in patch potential and surface adsorbate models, this has only been analyzed for smooth surfaces. We investigate the dependence of electric field noise on the roughness of surface electrodes by deriving a Green's function describing this roughness, and evaluating its effects on adsorbate-surface binding energies. At cryogenic temperature, surface roughness is found to exponentially enhance or suppress heating rate, depending on the density distribution of surface adsorbates. Our result suggests that heating rates can be tuned over orders of magnitude by careful engineering of electrode surface profiles.

  11. Perceptual switch rates with ambiguous structure-from-motion figures in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Krug, Kristine; Brunskill, Emma; Scarna, Antonina; Goodwin, Guy M; Parker, Andrew J

    2008-08-22

    Slowing of the rate at which a rivalrous percept switches from one configuration to another has been suggested as a potential trait marker for bipolar disorder. We measured perceptual alternations for a bistable, rotating, structure-from-motion cylinder in bipolar and control participants. In a control task, binocular depth rendered the direction of cylinder rotation unambiguous to monitor participants' performance and attention during the experimental task. A particular direction of rotation was perceptually stable, on average, for 33.5s in participants without psychiatric diagnosis. Euthymic, bipolar participants showed a slightly slower rate of switching between the two percepts (percept duration 42.3s). Under a parametric analysis of the best-fitting model for individual participants, this difference was statistically significant. However, the variability within groups was high, so this difference in average switch rates was not big enough to serve as a trait marker for bipolar disorder. We also found that low-level visual capacities, such as stereo threshold, influence perceptual switch rates. We suggest that there is no single brain location responsible for perceptual switching in all different ambiguous figures and that perceptual switching is generated by the actions of local cortical circuitry. PMID:18463054

  12. Molecular simulation of dislocation motion in magnesium alloys under high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Peng; Cammarata, Robert; Falk, Michael

    Dislocation motion of < a>dislocations on the basal and the prismatic planes under simple shear was studied using molecular simulations in Mg/Al and Mg/Y alloys. The critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) was calculated at temperature from 0K to 500K with solute concentrations from 0 to 7 at.%. The strain rates of 106-108 s-1 used in the simulation correspond to experimental strain rates of 101-105 s-1 based on Orowan's equation. Basal slip is dominated by the < a>edge dislocations. Solute hardening to the CRSS follows a power law, cn, where c is the solute concentration. The exponent n transitions from close to 2/3 at low temperature to close to 1 at high temperature. Temperature and strain rate effects on the CRSS are captured by Kocks model based on thermally activated events. Prismatic slip is controlled by the < a>screw dislocation that cross-slips between the basal and the prismatic planes, in a locking-unlocking pattern. Temperature affects the slip kinetics through the diffusion of the screw dislocation on the basal plane, which leads to vacancy and loop generation. Solute softening was observed for both Mg/Al and Mg/Y alloys. The softening on prismatic slip is due to the solute pinning effect on the basal plane, and Al is more effective in softening.

  13. 77 FR 13120 - American Midstream (Louisiana Intrastate) LLC ; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission American Midstream (Louisiana Intrastate) LLC ; Notice of Motion for... Intrastate) LLC (AMLI) filed a motion requesting an extension consistent with the Federal Energy Regulatory... desiring to participate in this proceeding must file a motion to intervene or to protest this filing...

  14. SU-E-T-244: Motion Control Challenges in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hyvarinen, M; Leventouri, T; Pella, S; Dumitru, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy dose distribution is highly localized and has a very sharp fall-off. Thus the one of the most important part of the treatment is the localization and immobilization of the applicator from the implantation to the setup verification to the treatment delivery. The smallest motions of the patient can induce a small rotation, tilt, or translational movement of the applicator that can convert into miss of a significant part of the tumor or to over irradiating a nearby critical organ.The purpose of this study is to revise most of the HDR types of treatments with their applicators and their localization challenges. Since every millimeter of misplacement counts the study will look into the necessity of increasing the immobilization for several types of applicators. Methods: The study took over 136 plans generated by the treatment planning system (TPS) looking into the applicator placement in regard to the organs at risk (OR) and simulated the three possible displacements at the hottest dose point on the critical organ for several accessories to evaluate the variation of the delivered dose at the point due to the displacement. Results: Many of the present immobilization devices produced for external radiotherapy can be used to improve the localization of HDR applicators during transportation of the patient and during treatment. Conclusion: This study data indicates that an improvement of the immobilization devices for HDR is absolutely necessary. Better applicator fixation devices are required too. Developing new immobilization devices for all the applicators is recommended.

  15. Physiological demands of women's rugby union: time-motion analysis and heart rate response.

    PubMed

    Virr, Jody Lynn; Game, Alex; Bell, Gordon John; Syrotuik, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physical demands of women's rugby union match play using time-motion analysis and heart rate (HR) response. Thirty-eight premier club level female rugby players, ages 18-34 years were videotaped and HRs monitored for a full match. Performances were coded into 12 different movement categories: 5 speeds of locomotion (standing, walking, jogging, striding, sprinting), 4 forms of intensive non-running exertion (ruck/maul/tackle, pack down, scrum, lift) and 3 discrete activities (kick, jump, open field tackle). The main results revealed that backs spend significantly more time sprinting and walking whereas forwards spend more time in intensive non-running exertion and jogging. Forwards also had a significantly higher total work frequency compared to the backs, but a higher total rest frequency compared to the backs. In terms of HR responses, forwards displayed higher mean HRs throughout the match and more time above 80% of their maximum HR than backs. In summary, women's rugby union is characterised by intermittent bursts of high-intensity activity, where forwards and backs have similar anaerobic energy demands, but different specific match demands. PMID:24168428

  16. 76 FR 36913 - Washington Gas Light Company; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Washington Gas Light Company; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline Take notice that on June 15, 2011, Washington Gas Light Company (Washington Gas) filed...

  17. 75 FR 56093 - Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, LP; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, LP; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline September 8, 2010. Take notice that on September 8, 2010, Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P. (Eagle Rock) filed a request...

  18. 77 FR 55469 - Kinder Morgan Border Pipeline LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Border Pipeline LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline Take notice that on August 30, 2012, Kinder Morgan Border Pipeline LLC (KM Border... Hinshaw pipelines to extend the cycle for such reviews from three to five years.\\1\\ Therefore, KM...

  19. Ride quality - An exploratory study and criteria development. [visual motion simulator measurement of response ratings of ride quality of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The Langley six degree of freedom visual motion simulator has been used to measure subjective response ratings of the ride quality of eight segments of flight, representative of a wide variation in comfort estimates. The results indicate that the use of simulators for this purpose appears promising. A preliminary approach for the development of criteria for ride quality ratings based on psychophysical precepts is included.

  20. A particle filter framework for the estimation of heart rate from ECG signals corrupted by motion artifacts.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Viswam; Akkaya, Ilge; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we describe a methodology to probabilistically estimate the R-peak locations of an electrocardiogram (ECG) signal using a particle filter. This is useful for heart rate estimation, which is an important metric for medical diagnostics. Some scenarios require constant in-home monitoring using a wearable device. This poses a particularly challenging environment for heart rate detection, due to the susceptibility of ECG signals to motion artifacts. In this work, we show how the particle filter can effectively track the true R-peak locations amidst the motion artifacts, given appropriate heart rate and R-peak observation models. A particle filter based framework has several advantages due to its freedom from strict assumptions on signal and noise models, as well as its ability to simultaneously track multiple possible heart rate hypotheses. Moreover, the proposed framework is not exclusive to ECG signals and could easily be leveraged for tracking other physiological parameters. We describe the implementation of the particle filter and validate our approach on real ECG data affected by motion artifacts from the MIT-BIH noise stress test database. The average heart rate estimation error is about 5 beats per minute for signal streams contaminated with noisy segments with SNR as low as -6 dB. PMID:26737796

  1. EFFECTS OF TURBULENCE, ECCENTRICITY DAMPING, AND MIGRATION RATE ON THE CAPTURE OF PLANETS INTO MEAN MOTION RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Jacob A.; Adams, Fred C.; Bloch, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    Pairs of migrating extrasolar planets often lock into mean motion resonance as they drift inward. This paper studies the convergent migration of giant planets (driven by a circumstellar disk) and determines the probability that they are captured into mean motion resonance. The probability that such planets enter resonance depends on the type of resonance, the migration rate, the eccentricity damping rate, and the amplitude of the turbulent fluctuations. This problem is studied both through direct integrations of the full three-body problem and via semi-analytic model equations. In general, the probability of resonance decreases with increasing migration rate, and with increasing levels of turbulence, but increases with eccentricity damping. Previous work has shown that the distributions of orbital elements (eccentricity and semimajor axis) for observed extrasolar planets can be reproduced by migration models with multiple planets. However, these results depend on resonance locking, and this study shows that entry into-and maintenance of-mean motion resonance depends sensitively on the migration rate, eccentricity damping, and turbulence.

  2. The effects of autogenic-feedback training on motion sickness severity and heart rate variability in astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toscano, William B.; Cowings, Patricia S.

    1994-01-01

    Space motion sickness (SMS) affects 50 percent of all people during early days of spaceflight. This study describes the results of two Shuttle flight experiments in which autogenic-feedback training (AFT), a physiological conditioning method, was tested as a treatment for this disorder. Of the six who were designated as flight subjects (two women and four men), three were given treatment and three served as controls (i.e., no AFT). Treatment subjects were given 6 hours of preflight AFT. Preflight results showed that AFT produced a significant increase in tolerance to rotating chair motion sickness tests. Further, this increased tolerance was associated with changes in specific physiological responses and reports of reduced malaise. Flight results showed that two of the three control subjects experienced repeated vomiting on the first mission day, while one subject experienced only moderate malaise. Of the three treatment subjects, one experienced mild discomfort, one moderate discomfort, and one severe motion sickness. Only the three control subjects took medication for symptom suppression. Measures of cardiac function reflective of vagal control were shown to be affected especially strongly on the first day of space flight. AFT given for control of heart rate, respiration, and other autonomic activity influenced both the vagal control measures and SMS. These data suggest that AFT may be an effective treatment for space motion sickness; however, this cannot be demonstrated conclusively with the small number of subjects described.

  3. Brownian motion in a rotating fluid: Diffusivity is a function of the rotation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryskin, Gregory

    1988-09-01

    The phenomenological relations between thermodynamic fluxes and forces are normally assumed to be invariant with respect to arbitrary motion of the frame of reference. We describe a breakdown of this invariance strong enough to be observable. It is shown that the diffusivity in a rotating fluid is anisotropic and also smaller in magnitude than in a fluid at rest in an inertial frame, giving rise to a diffusion analog of the Hall effect. For large Brownian particles (e.g., biological macromolecules) the diffusivity may decrease by 50% at the rotation speeds achievable in ultracentrifuges.

  4. 18 CFR 154.206 - Motion to place suspended rates into effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... rate, charge, classification, or service into effect at the end of the suspension period, the change... suspended rates into effect. 154.206 Section 154.206 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES...

  5. 18 CFR 154.206 - Motion to place suspended rates into effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... rate, charge, classification, or service into effect at the end of the suspension period, the change... suspended rates into effect. 154.206 Section 154.206 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES...

  6. Slip-rate measurements on the Karakorum Fault may imply secular variations in fault motion.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, M-L; Ryerson, F J; Tapponnier, P; Finkel, R C; Van Der Woerd, J; Haibing, Li; Qing, Liu

    2005-01-21

    Beryllium-10 surface exposure dating of offset moraines on one branch of the Karakorum Fault west of the Gar basin yields a long-term (140- to 20-thousand-year) right-lateral slip rate of approximately 10.7 +/- 0.7 millimeters per year. This rate is 10 times larger than that inferred from recent InSAR analyses ( approximately 1 +/- 3 millimeters per year) that span approximately 8 years and sample all branches of the fault. The difference in slip-rate determinations suggests that large rate fluctuations may exist over centennial or millennial time scales. Such fluctuations would be consistent with mechanical coupling between the seismogenic, brittle-creep, and ductile shear sections of faults that reach deep into the crust. PMID:15662010

  7. Analysis and Visualization of 3D Motion Data for UPDRS Rating of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piro, Neltje E.; Piro, Lennart K.; Kassubek, Jan; Blechschmidt-Trapp, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    Remote monitoring of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) patients with inertia sensors is a relevant method for a better assessment of symptoms. We present a new approach for symptom quantification based on motion data: the automatic Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) classification in combination with an animated 3D avatar giving the neurologist the impression of having the patient live in front of him. In this study we compared the UPDRS ratings of the pronation-supination task derived from: (a) an examination based on video recordings as a clinical reference; (b) an automatically classified UPDRS; and (c) a UPDRS rating from the assessment of the animated 3D avatar. Data were recorded using Magnetic, Angular Rate, Gravity (MARG) sensors with 15 subjects performing a pronation-supination movement of the hand. After preprocessing, the data were classified with a J48 classifier and animated as a 3D avatar. Video recording of the movements, as well as the 3D avatar, were examined by movement disorder specialists and rated by UPDRS. The mean agreement between the ratings based on video and (b) the automatically classified UPDRS is 0.48 and with (c) the 3D avatar it is 0.47. The 3D avatar is similarly suitable for assessing the UPDRS as video recordings for the examined task and will be further developed by the research team. PMID:27338400

  8. 76 FR 79170 - Southcross Mississippi Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Southcross Mississippi Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Motion for Extension of... proceeding must file a motion to intervene, or to protest this filing must file in accordance with Rules 211... notice of intervention or motion to intervene, as appropriate. Such notices, motions, or protests must...

  9. Heart rate, blood lactate concentration, and time-motion analysis of female basketball players during competition.

    PubMed

    Matthew, Dionne; Delextrat, Anne

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the physiological demands and movement patterns of female basketball players after changes in the rules of the game. Nine varsity players were studied during nine official games. Each game was videotaped to identify the frequencies of the main movements performed, heart rate was recorded continuously, and blood samples were collected to determine blood lactate concentration when the competition rules allowed. The main results showed that the players performed on average 652 +/- 128 movements per game, which corresponded to a change in activity every 2.82 s. Mean heart rate was 165 +/- 9 beats . min(-1) (89.1% of maximum heart rate) for total time and 170 +/- 8 beats . min(-1) (92.5% of maximum) for live time. Mean blood lactate concentration was 5.2 +/- 2.7 mmol . l(-1) (55.9% of maximum blood lactate concentration). In addition, heart rates were significantly higher in the first half than the second half of games. These results indicate: (1) a greater physiological load compared with previous studies on female players tested before the rules modification (Beam & Merrill, 1994; McArdle et al., 1971) and (2) lower movement frequencies compared with male players competing under modern rules (Ben Abdelkrim et al., 2007). These observations must be taken into account by coaches and conditioning specialists working with female players. PMID:19551549

  10. Estimating Brownian motion dispersal rate, longevity and population density from spatially explicit mark-recapture data on tropical butterflies.

    PubMed

    Tufto, Jarle; Lande, Russell; Ringsby, Thor-Harald; Engen, Steinar; Saether, Bernt-Erik; Walla, Thomas R; DeVries, Philip J

    2012-07-01

    1. We develop a Bayesian method for analysing mark-recapture data in continuous habitat using a model in which individuals movement paths are Brownian motions, life spans are exponentially distributed and capture events occur at given instants in time if individuals are within a certain attractive distance of the traps. 2. The joint posterior distribution of the dispersal rate, longevity, trap attraction distances and a number of latent variables representing the unobserved movement paths and time of death of all individuals is computed using Gibbs sampling. 3. An estimate of absolute local population density is obtained simply by dividing the Poisson counts of individuals captured at given points in time by the estimated total attraction area of all traps. Our approach for estimating population density in continuous habitat avoids the need to define an arbitrary effective trapping area that characterized previous mark-recapture methods in continuous habitat. 4. We applied our method to estimate spatial demography parameters in nine species of neotropical butterflies. Path analysis of interspecific variation in demographic parameters and mean wing length revealed a simple network of strong causation. Larger wing length increases dispersal rate, which in turn increases trap attraction distance. However, higher dispersal rate also decreases longevity, thus explaining the surprising observation of a negative correlation between wing length and longevity. PMID:22320218

  11. Effects of Three Recovery Protocols on Range of Motion, Heart Rate, Rating of Perceived Exertion, and Blood Lactate in Baseball Pitchers During a Simulated Game.

    PubMed

    Warren, Courtney D; Szymanski, David J; Landers, Merrill R

    2015-11-01

    Baseball pitching has been described as an anaerobic activity from a bioenergetics standpoint with short bouts of recovery. Depending on the physical conditioning and muscle fiber composition of the pitcher as well as the number of pitches thrown per inning and per game, there is the possibility of pitchers fatiguing during a game, which could lead to a decrease in pitching performance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 3 recovery protocols: passive recovery, active recovery (AR), and electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) on range of motion (ROM), heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and blood lactate concentration in baseball pitchers during a simulated game. Twenty-one Division I intercollegiate baseball pitchers (age = 20.4 ± 1.4 years; height = 185.9 ± 8.4 cm; weight = 86.5 ± 8.9 kg; percent body fat = 11.2 ± 2.6) volunteered to pitch 3 simulated 5-inning games, with a maximum of 70 fastballs thrown per game while wearing an HR monitor. Range of motion was measured pre, post, and 24 hours postpitching for shoulder internal and external rotation at 90° and elbow flexion and extension. Heart rate was recorded after each pitch and after every 30 seconds of the 6-minute recovery period. Rating of perceived exertion was recorded after the last pitch of each inning and after completing each 6-minute recovery period. Immediately after throwing the last pitch of each inning, postpitching blood lactate concentration (PPLa-) was measured. At the end of the 6-minute recovery period, before the next inning started, postrecovery blood lactate concentration (PRLa-) was measured. Pitchers were instructed to throw each pitch at or above 95% of their best-pitched fastball. This was enforced to ensure that each pitcher was throwing close to maximal effort for all 3 simulated games. All data presented represent group mean values. Results revealed that the method of recovery protocol did not significantly influence ROM (p > 0

  12. A multi-channel opto-electronic sensor to accurately monitor heart rate against motion artefact during exercise.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Abdullah; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Barrett, Laura; Esliger, Dale; Hayes, Matthew; Akbare, Shafique; Achart, Jérôme; Kuoch, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the use of a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor (OEPS) to effectively monitor critical physiological parameters whilst preventing motion artefact as increasingly demanded by personal healthcare. The aim of this work was to study how to capture the heart rate (HR) efficiently through a well-constructed OEPS and a 3-axis accelerometer with wireless communication. A protocol was designed to incorporate sitting, standing, walking, running and cycling. The datasets collected from these activities were processed to elaborate sport physiological effects. t-test, Bland-Altman Agreement (BAA), and correlation to evaluate the performance of the OEPS were used against Polar and Mio-Alpha HR monitors. No differences in the HR were found between OEPS, and either Polar or Mio-Alpha (both p > 0.05); a strong correlation was found between Polar and OEPS (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 0.85 bpm, the standard deviation (SD) 9.20 bpm, and the limits of agreement (LOA) from -17.18 bpm to +18.88 bpm. For the Mio-Alpha and OEPS, a strong correlation was found (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 1.63 bpm, SD 8.62 bpm, LOA from -15.27 bpm to +18.58 bpm. These results demonstrate the OEPS to be capable of carrying out real time and remote monitoring of heart rate. PMID:26473860

  13. A Multi-Channel Opto-Electronic Sensor to Accurately Monitor Heart Rate against Motion Artefact during Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Abdullah; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Barrett, Laura; Esliger, Dale; Hayes, Matthew; Akbare, Shafique; Achart, Jérôme; Kuoch, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the use of a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor (OEPS) to effectively monitor critical physiological parameters whilst preventing motion artefact as increasingly demanded by personal healthcare. The aim of this work was to study how to capture the heart rate (HR) efficiently through a well-constructed OEPS and a 3-axis accelerometer with wireless communication. A protocol was designed to incorporate sitting, standing, walking, running and cycling. The datasets collected from these activities were processed to elaborate sport physiological effects. t-test, Bland-Altman Agreement (BAA), and correlation to evaluate the performance of the OEPS were used against Polar and Mio-Alpha HR monitors. No differences in the HR were found between OEPS, and either Polar or Mio-Alpha (both p > 0.05); a strong correlation was found between Polar and OEPS (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 0.85 bpm, the standard deviation (SD) 9.20 bpm, and the limits of agreement (LOA) from −17.18 bpm to +18.88 bpm. For the Mio-Alpha and OEPS, a strong correlation was found (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 1.63 bpm, SD 8.62 bpm, LOA from −15.27 bpm to +18.58 bpm. These results demonstrate the OEPS to be capable of carrying out real time and remote monitoring of heart rate. PMID:26473860

  14. Development of the wake behind a circular cylinder impulsively started into rotatory and rectilinear motion: Intermediate rotation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Ming; Ou, Yuh-Roung; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    1991-01-01

    The temporal development of two-dimensional viscous incompressible flow generated by a circular cylinder started impulsively into steady rotatory and rectilinear motion is studied by integration of a velocity/vorticity formulation of the governing equations, using an explicit finite-difference/pseudo-spectral technique and an implementation of the Biot-Savart law. Results are presented for a Reynolds number of 200 (based on the cylinder diameter 2a and the magnitude U of the rectilinear velocity) for several values of the angular/rectilinear speed ratio alpha = (omega x a)/U (where omega is the angular speed) up to 3.25. Several aspects of the kinematics and dynamics of the flow not considered earlier are discussed. For higher values of alpha, the results indicate that for Re = 200, vortex shedding does indeed occur for alpha = 3.25. The shedding process is; however, very different from that which gives rise to the usual Karman vortex street for alpha = 0. In particular, consecutive vortices shed by the body can be shed from the same side and be of the same sense, in contrast to the nonrotating case, in which mirror-image vortices of opposite sense are shed alternately on opposite sides of the body. The implications of the results are discussed in relation to the possibility of suppressing vortex shedding by open or closed-loop control of the rotation rate.

  15. Material Parameter Determination of an L4-L5 Motion Segment Finite Element Model Under High Loading Rates.

    PubMed

    Pyles, C O; Zhang, J; Demetropoulos, C K; Bradfield, C A; Ott, K A; Armiger, R S; Merkle, A C

    2015-01-01

    Underbody blast (UBB) events impart vertical loads through a victim’s lumbar spine, resulting in fracture, paralysis, and disc rupture. Validated biofidelic lumbar models allow characterization of injury mechanisms and development of personal protective equipment. Previous studies have focused on lumbar mechanics under quasi-static loading. However, it is unclear how the role and response of individual spinal components of the lumbar spine change under dynamic loading. The present study leverages high-rate impacts of progressively dissected two-vertebra lumbar motion segments and Split-Hopkinson pressure bar tissue characterization to identify and validate material properties of a high-fidelity lumbar spine finite element model for UBB. The annulus fibrosus was modeled as a fiber-reinforced Mooney-Rivlin material, while ligaments were represented by nonlinear spring elements. Optimization and evaluation of material parameters was achieved by minimizing the root-mean-square (RMS) of compressive displacement and sagittal rotation for selected experimental conditions. Applying dynamic based material models and parameters resulted in a 0.42% difference between predicted and experiment axial compression during impact loading. This dynamically optimized lumbar model is suited for cross validation against whole-lumbar loading scenarios, and prediction of injury during UBB and other dynamic events. PMID:25996719

  16. Modulation of the reaction rate of regulating protein induces large morphological and motional change of amoebic cell.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Shin I; Sasai, Masaki

    2007-03-21

    Morphologies of moving amoebae are categorized into two types. One is the "neutrophil" type in which the long axis of cell roughly coincides with its moving direction. This type of cell extends a leading edge at the front and retracts a narrow tail at the rear, whose shape has been often drawn as a typical amoeba in textbooks. The other one is the "keratocyte" type with widespread lamellipodia along the front side arc. Short axis of cell in this type roughly coincides with its moving direction. In order to understand what kind of molecular feature causes conversion between two types of morphologies, and how two typical morphologies are maintained, a mathematical model of amoebic cells is developed. This model describes movement of cell and intracellular reactions of activator, inhibitor and actin filaments in a unified way. It is found that the producing rate of activator is a key factor of conversion between two types. This model also explains the observed data that the keratocyte type cells tend to rapidly move along a straight line. The neutrophil type cells move along a straight line when the moving velocity is small, but they show fluctuated motions deviating from a line when they move as fast as the keratocyte type cells. Efficient energy consumption in the neutrophil type cells is predicted. PMID:17113108

  17. Dynamic instability of dislocation motion at high-strain-rate deformation of crystals with high concentration of point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malashenko, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    The motion of an ensemble of edge dislocations has been studied under conditions of high-strainrate deformation of a crystal with a high concentration of point defects. The conditions of existence of the region of dynamic instability of dislocation motion have been found. It has been shown that the existence of the region and its boundaries is determined by the proportion of the point defect concentration and the dislocation density.

  18. The reliability of lumbar motion palpation using continuous analysis and confidence ratings: choosing a relevant index of agreement

    PubMed Central

    Cooperstein, Robert; Young, Morgan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Most studies show motion palpation unreliable. This study’s primary objective was assessing its reliability using a continuous measure methods, most-fixated level paradigm, stratified by examiners’ confidence; and the secondary objective was comparing various indices of examiner agreement. Methods: Thirty-four minimally symptomatic participants were palpated in side posture by two experienced examiners. Interexaminer differences in identifying the most-fixated level and degree of examiner confidence were recorded. Indices of agreement were: Intraclass correlation coefficient, Mean and Median Examiner Absolute Examiner Differences, Root-Mean-Square Error and Bland-Altman Limits of Agreement. Results: Three of four reliability indices (excluding intraclass correlation) suggested on average examiners agreed on the most fixated motion segment, and agreement increased with confidence. Statistical measures of data dispersion were low. The analyses of subgroups were “fragile” due to small sample size. Discussion: Although subject homogeneity lowered ICC levels, the other reliability measures were not similarly impacted. Continuous measures statistical analysis demonstrates examiner agreement in situations where discrete analysis with kappa may not. Conclusion: Continuous analysis for the lumbar most-fixated level is reliable. Future studies will need a larger sample size to properly analyze subgroups based on examiner confidence. PMID:27385834

  19. Motion estimation optimization in a MPEG-1-like video coding scheme for low-bit-rate applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, Miguel; Villegas, Paulo

    1994-05-01

    In this paper we present a work based on a coding algorithm for visual information that follows the International Standard ISO-IEC IS 11172, `Coding of Moving Pictures and Associated Audio for Digital Storage Media up to about 1.5 Mbit/s', widely known as MPEG1. The main intention in the definition of the MPEG 1 standard was to provide a large degree of flexibility to be used in many different applications. The interest of this paper is to adapt the MPEG 1 scheme for low bitrate operation and optimize it for special situations, as for example, a talking head with low movement, which is a usual situation in videotelephony application. An adapted and compatible MPEG 1 scheme, previously developed, able to operate at px8 Kbit/s will be used in this work. Looking for a low complexity scheme and taking into account that the most expensive (from the point of view of consumed computer time) step in the scheme is the motion estimation process (almost 80% of the total computer time is spent on the ME), an improvement of the motion estimation module based on the use of a new search pattern is presented in this paper.

  20. A Novel Time-Varying Spectral Filtering Algorithm for Reconstruction of Motion Artifact Corrupted Heart Rate Signals During Intense Physical Activities Using a Wearable Photoplethysmogram Sensor.

    PubMed

    Salehizadeh, Seyed M A; Dao, Duy; Bolkhovsky, Jeffrey; Cho, Chae; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of heart rates from photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals during intense physical activity is a very challenging problem. This is because strenuous and high intensity exercise can result in severe motion artifacts in PPG signals, making accurate heart rate (HR) estimation difficult. In this study we investigated a novel technique to accurately reconstruct motion-corrupted PPG signals and HR based on time-varying spectral analysis. The algorithm is called Spectral filter algorithm for Motion Artifacts and heart rate reconstruction (SpaMA). The idea is to calculate the power spectral density of both PPG and accelerometer signals for each time shift of a windowed data segment. By comparing time-varying spectra of PPG and accelerometer data, those frequency peaks resulting from motion artifacts can be distinguished from the PPG spectrum. The SpaMA approach was applied to three different datasets and four types of activities: (1) training datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 12 subjects while performing treadmill exercise from 1 km/h to 15 km/h; (2) test datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 11 subjects while performing forearm and upper arm exercise. (3) Chon Lab dataset including 10 min recordings from 10 subjects during treadmill exercise. The ECG signals from all three datasets provided the reference HRs which were used to determine the accuracy of our SpaMA algorithm. The performance of the SpaMA approach was calculated by computing the mean absolute error between the estimated HR from the PPG and the reference HR from the ECG. The average estimation errors using our method on the first, second and third datasets are 0.89, 1.93 and 1.38 beats/min respectively, while the overall error on all 33 subjects is 1.86 beats/min and the performance on only treadmill experiment datasets (22 subjects) is 1.11 beats/min. Moreover, it was found that dynamics of heart rate variability can be

  1. A Novel Time-Varying Spectral Filtering Algorithm for Reconstruction of Motion Artifact Corrupted Heart Rate Signals During Intense Physical Activities Using a Wearable Photoplethysmogram Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Salehizadeh, Seyed M. A.; Dao, Duy; Bolkhovsky, Jeffrey; Cho, Chae; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of heart rates from photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals during intense physical activity is a very challenging problem. This is because strenuous and high intensity exercise can result in severe motion artifacts in PPG signals, making accurate heart rate (HR) estimation difficult. In this study we investigated a novel technique to accurately reconstruct motion-corrupted PPG signals and HR based on time-varying spectral analysis. The algorithm is called Spectral filter algorithm for Motion Artifacts and heart rate reconstruction (SpaMA). The idea is to calculate the power spectral density of both PPG and accelerometer signals for each time shift of a windowed data segment. By comparing time-varying spectra of PPG and accelerometer data, those frequency peaks resulting from motion artifacts can be distinguished from the PPG spectrum. The SpaMA approach was applied to three different datasets and four types of activities: (1) training datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 12 subjects while performing treadmill exercise from 1 km/h to 15 km/h; (2) test datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 11 subjects while performing forearm and upper arm exercise. (3) Chon Lab dataset including 10 min recordings from 10 subjects during treadmill exercise. The ECG signals from all three datasets provided the reference HRs which were used to determine the accuracy of our SpaMA algorithm. The performance of the SpaMA approach was calculated by computing the mean absolute error between the estimated HR from the PPG and the reference HR from the ECG. The average estimation errors using our method on the first, second and third datasets are 0.89, 1.93 and 1.38 beats/min respectively, while the overall error on all 33 subjects is 1.86 beats/min and the performance on only treadmill experiment datasets (22 subjects) is 1.11 beats/min. Moreover, it was found that dynamics of heart rate variability can be

  2. Reaction Rate Constants of CH4(ads) ⇌ CH3(ads) + H(ads) on Ni(111): The Effect of Lattice Motion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenji; Zhao, Yi

    2015-12-31

    Methane dissociation on metal surfaces is of great commercial importance. The dissociation and recombination rate constants of CH4 on Ni(111) are calculated using the quantum instanton approach with the path integral Monte Carlo method. The Ni(111) lattice is treated rigidly, classically, and quantum mechanically to reveal the effects of lattice motion and quantum tunneling. For the dissociation of CH4, the rates have the smallest value on the rigid lattice, while they possess the largest value on the quantum lattice. For instance, at 300 K, the rates on the classical and quantum lattices are 5 and 12 times larger than that on the rigid lattice, respectively. The curve of the Arrhenius plot for the dissociation rates on the rigid lattice demonstrates that the quantum tunneling effect of the ruptured H atom is remarkable, while the nearly invariable dissociation rates at low temperatures on the quantum lattice confirm that the thermally assisted tunneling should be dominant at low temperatures. For the recombination of CH4, the quantum lattice still has rates that are much larger than that of the rigid lattice. For instance, the ratio of the recombination rates on the quantum and rigid lattices is 12 at 300 K. The quantum tunneling effect seems to play a minor role in the recombination rates on the rigid lattice; however, the thermally assisted tunneling is still very significant for the recombination process. PMID:26650500

  3. Electromechanical actuator with controllable motion, fast response rate, and high-frequency resonance based on graphene and polydiacetylene.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiajie; Huang, Lu; Li, Na; Huang, Yi; Wu, Yingpeng; Fang, Shaoli; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail; Ma, Yanfeng; Li, Feifei; Baughman, Ray; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-05-22

    Although widely investigated, novel electromechanical actuators with high overall actuation performance are still in urgent need for various practical and scientific applications, such as robots, prosthetic devices, sensor switches, and sonar projectors. In this work, combining the properties of unique environmental perturbations-actuated deformational isomerization of polydiacetylene (PDA) and the outstanding intrinsic features of graphene together for the first time, we design and fabricate an electromechanical bimorph actuator composed of a layer of PDA crystal and a layer of flexible graphene paper through a simple yet versatile solution approach. Under low applied direct current (dc), the graphene-PDA bimorph actuator with strong mechanical strength can generate large actuation motion (curvature is about 0.37 cm(-1) under a current density of 0.74 A/mm(2)) and produce high actuation stress (more than 160 MPa/g under an applied dc of only 0.29 A/mm(2)). When applying alternating current (ac), this actuator can display reversible swing behavior with long cycle life under high frequencies even up to 200 Hz; significantly, while the frequency and the value of applied ac and the state of the actuators reach an appropriate value, the graphene-PDA actuator can produce a strong resonance and the swing amplitude will jump to a peak value. Moreover, this stable graphene-PDA actuator also demonstrates rapidly and partially reversible electrochromatic phenomenon when applying an ac. Two mechanisms-the dominant one, electric-induced deformation, and a secondary one, thermal-induced expansion of PDA-are proposed to contribute to these interesting actuation performances of the graphene-PDA actuators. On the basis of these results, a mini-robot with controllable direction of motion based on the graphene-PDA actuator is designed to illustrate the great potential of our discoveries for practical use. Combining the unique actuation mechanism and many outstanding properties of

  4. Balance maintenance in high-speed motion of humanoid robot arm-based on the 6D constraints of momentum change rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-song; Xiong, Rong; Wu, Jun; Chu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Based on the 6D constraints of momentum change rate (CMCR), this paper puts forward a real-time and full balance maintenance method for the humanoid robot during high-speed movement of its 7-DOF arm. First, the total momentum formula for the robot's two arms is given and the momentum change rate is defined by the time derivative of the total momentum. The author also illustrates the idea of full balance maintenance and analyzes the physical meaning of 6D CMCR and its fundamental relation to full balance maintenance. Moreover, discretization and optimization solution of CMCR has been provided with the motion constraint of the auxiliary arm's joint, and the solving algorithm is optimized. The simulation results have shown the validity and generality of the proposed method on the full balance maintenance in the 6 DOFs of the robot body under 6D CMCR. This method ensures 6D dynamics balance performance and increases abundant ZMP stability margin. The resulting motion of the auxiliary arm has large abundance in joint space, and the angular velocity and the angular acceleration of these joints lie within the predefined limits. The proposed algorithm also has good real-time performance. PMID:24883404

  5. Effects of Lateral Heterogeneity and Power Law Rheology on Glacially Induced Surface Motion and Gravity Rate of Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, P.; Wang, H.; van der Wal, W.

    2006-12-01

    Modern geodetic measurements from GPS, satellite altimetry, tide-gauges, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and space-borne gravimetry (such as GRACE) have been used to monitor global change. Since these measurements contain contributions from glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) and other tectonic processes, they must be modeled and removed in order to observe current climate change. In the past, most GIA models assumed that the earth is laterally homogeneous and the rheology is linear. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of lateral heterogeneity and Power-Law rheology on GIA induced land uplift rate, horizontal velocities, relative sealevels, J-dot and the secular gravity rate of change in the southern part of Hudson Bay, which is detected by the GRACE mission. Here, GIA is modeled with a spherical, self-gravitating, compressible viscoelastic, laterally heterogeneous earth using the Finite-Element Method. The effect of gravitationally self-consistent sea levels in realistic oceans is also included. Lateral variations in mantle viscosities and lithospheric thickness are inferred from the seismic tomography model S20A using well known scaling relationships. Power-Law rheologies in the whole mantle or in combination with linear rheologies in the upper or lower mantle are also investigated. Both ICE-5G and ICE-4G deglaciation models are used to investigate their effect on the pattern of rebound. Preliminary results show that both lateral heterogeneity and power-law rheology have strong effects on the direction and magnitude of horizontal velocities. The effects of lateral heterogeneity and power-law rheology are also large enough to be detected in land uplift rate, relative sealevels, J-dot and gravity rate of change. Their implication on observing the effects of global warming will also be discussed.

  6. The thickness history of the northern sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet: an assessment of glacial isostatic adjustment models, sea-level measurements, and vertical land motion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, K. M.; James, T. S.; Henton, J. A.; Dyke, A.

    2014-12-01

    The fit of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) model predictions to 24 relative sea-level histories and an additional 18 present-day GPS-measured vertical land motion rates constrains the thickness and volume history of the central and northern Laurentide Ice Sheet. The predictions of the best-fit GIA model indicate respective peak ice thicknesses west and east of Hudson Bay of 3.4-3.6 km and approximately 4 km. These values represent, respectively, a large decrease, and a moderate increase, to the load thickness compared to ICE-5G. This result is generally consistent with other GIA studies focussing on space-geodetic constraints. The large reduction to the ice load west of Hudson Bay also reduces the vertical mantle response along the margins of the load centre, which improves the fit to relative sea-level data from the southern Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The fit of GIA model predictions to relative sea-level data from the Baffin Sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet indicate peak ice thicknesses there of 1.2-1.3 km, a modest reduction compared to ICE-5G. On Baffin Island, the modelled elastic crustal response of the Earth to present-day ice mass changes is large. Accounting for this effect improves the agreement between GPS measurements of vertical crustal motion and the GIA model predictions. However, work is needed to incorporate more detailed observations and modelling of present-day changes to glaciers and ice caps. Overall, the fit to the data is most strongly improved in the region west of Hudson Bay (the χ2 RSL misfit is reduced by a factor of ~4) although the entire revised reconstruction for the central and northern Laurentide Ice Sheet provides an improved fit to both the regional RSL data (the cumulative χ2 misfit is reduced by a factor of >2) and the GPS data (the RMS misfit is reduced by a factor of 9).

  7. The Effect of Recovery Duration on Vastus Lateralis Oxygenation, Heart Rate, Perceived Exertion and Time Motion Descriptors during Small Sided Football Games

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Scott; Kerhervé, Hugo; Lovell, Geoff P.; Gorman, Adam D.; Solomon, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Small sided games (SSG) of football are an effective and efficient format to simultaneously train the physiological, technical, and tactical components of football. The duration of the recovery period between bouts of SSG will affect the physiological response to subsequent bouts. It was hypothesised that decreasing the duration of recovery periods separating serial SSG bouts would increase physiological, and perceptual responses, and decrease high speed running, and distance during SSG bouts. Methods Twelve experienced footballers (mean ± SD; age 21 ± 3 yrs; VO2peak 64 ± 7 ml·min·kg−1; playing experience 15 ± 3 yrs) completed two SSG sessions. Each SSG consisted of 3 vs. 3 players and 6 bouts of 2 min duration, with bouts separated by either 30 s recovery (REC-30) or 120 s recovery (REC-120). Deoxygenated haemoglobin (HHb) in the vastus lateralis (VL) (using near infrared spectroscopy), heart rate (HR) and time motion descriptors (TMD) (speed and distance) were measured continuously during the SSG sessions and perceived exertion (RPE) was measured for each bout. Results During the recovery periods, in REC-30 compared to REC-120, there was a significant (p < 0.05) main effect of a higher HHb and HR. During the bouts, in REC-30 compared to REC-120, there were no significant differences in HHb, HR, RPE, or TMD, but within both REC-30 and REC-120 there were significant increases as a function of bout number in RPE. Conclusions Although a four-fold increase in recovery period allowed a significant increase in the recovery of HHb and HR, this did not increase the physiological, and perceptual responses, or time motion descriptors during the bouts. These results could have been due to the regulation of effort (pacing), in these experienced players performing an exercise task to which they were well adapted. PMID:26919064

  8. Real-time transmission of full-motion echocardiography over a high-speed data network: impact of data rate and network quality of service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, M. L.; Foltz, D.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Bobinsky, E.; Bailey, D.; Frantz, B.; Pleva, D.; Baldizzi, M.; Meyers, D. P.; Jones, K.; Spence, M. C.; Freeman, K.; Morehead, A.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    With high-resolution network transmission required for telemedicine, education, and guided-image acquisition, the impact of errors and transmission rates on image quality needs evaluation. METHODS: We transmitted clinical echocardiograms from 2 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research centers with the use of Motion Picture Expert Group-2 (MPEG-2) encoding and asynchronous transmission mode (ATM) network protocol over the NASA Research and Education Network. Data rates and network quality (cell losses [CLR], errors [CER], and delay variability [CVD]) were altered and image quality was judged. RESULTS: At speeds of 3 to 5 megabits per second (Mbps), digital images were superior to those on videotape; at 2 Mbps, images were equivalent. Increasing CLR caused occasional, brief pauses. Extreme CER and CDV increases still yielded high-quality images. CONCLUSIONS: Real-time echocardiographic acquisition, guidance, and transmission is feasible with the use of MPEG-2 and ATM with broadcast quality seen above 3 Mbps, even with severe network quality degradation. These techniques can be applied to telemedicine and used for planned echocardiography aboard the International Space Station.

  9. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  10. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall. PMID:26773791

  11. Brownian motion goes ballistic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2012-02-01

    It is the randomness that is considered the hallmark of Brownian motion, but already in Einstein's seminal 1905 paper on Brownian motion it is implied that this randomness must break down at short time scales when the inertia of the particle kicks in. As a result, the particle's trajectories should lose its randomness and become smooth. The characteristic time scale for this transition is given by the ratio of the particle's mass to its viscous drag coefficient. For a 1 μm glass particle in water and at room temperature, this timescale is on the order of 100 ns. Early calculations, however, neglected the inertia of the liquid surrounding the particle which induces a transition from random diffusive to non-diffusive Brownian motion already at much larger timescales. In this first non-diffusive regime, particles of the same size but with different densities still move at almost the same rate as a result of hydrodynamic correlations. To observe Brownian motion that is dominated by the inertia of the particle, i.e. ballistic motion, one has to observe the particle at significantly shorter time scales on the order of nanoseconds. Due to the lack of sufficiently fast and precise detectors, such experiments were so far not possible on individual particles. I will describe how we were able to observe the transition from hydrodynamically dominated Brownian motion to ballistic Brownian motion in a liquid. I will compare our data with current theories for Brownian motion on fast timescales that take into account the inertia of both the liquid and the particle. The newly gained ability to measure the fast Brownian motion of an individual particle paves the way for detailed studies of confined Brownian motion and Brownian motion in heterogeneous media. [4pt] [1] Einstein, A. "Uber die von der molekularkinetischen Theorie der W"arme geforderte Bewegung von in ruhenden Fl"ussigkeiten suspendierten Teilchen. Ann. Phys. 322, 549--560 (1905). [0pt] [2] Lukic, B., S. Jeney, C

  12. Circular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Isaac; Henry, Richard Conn

    2000-07-01

    An extraordinarily simple and transparent derivation of the formula for the acceleration that occurs in uniform circular motion is presented, and is advocated for use in high school and college freshman physics textbooks.

  13. Polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolenkiewicz, R.

    1973-01-01

    Tracking of the Beacon Explorer-C satellite by a precision laser system was used to measure the polar motion and solid earth tide. The tidal perturbation of satellite latitude is plotted as variation in maximum latitude in seconds of arc on earth's surface as a function of the date, and polar motion is shown by plotting the variation in latitude of the laser in seconds of arc along the earth's surface as a function of date

  14. iPhone 4s photoplethysmography: which light color yields the most accurate heart rate and normalized pulse volume using the iPhysioMeter Application in the presence of motion artifact?

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Kenta; Rolfe, Peter; Lee, Jihyoung; Yamakoshi, Takehiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in information and communication technologies has made it possible to measure heart rate (HR) and normalized pulse volume (NPV), which are important physiological indices, using only a smartphone. This has been achieved with reflection mode photoplethysmography (PPG), by using a smartphone's embedded flash as a light source and the camera as a light sensor. Despite its widespread use, the method of PPG is susceptible to motion artifacts as physical displacements influence photon propagation phenomena and, thereby, the effective optical path length. Further, it is known that the wavelength of light used for PPG influences the photon penetration depth and we therefore hypothesized that influences of motion artifact could be wavelength-dependant. To test this hypothesis, we made measurements in 12 healthy volunteers of HR and NPV derived from reflection mode plethysmograms recorded simultaneously at three different spectral regions (red, green and blue) at the same physical location with a smartphone. We then assessed the accuracy of the HR and NPV measurements under the influence of motion artifacts. The analyses revealed that the accuracy of HR was acceptably high with all three wavelengths (all rs > 0.996, fixed biases: -0.12 to 0.10 beats per minute, proportional biases: r =  -0.29 to 0.03), but that of NPV was the best with green light (r = 0.791, fixed biases: -0.01 arbitrary units, proportional bias: r = 0.11). Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio obtained with green and blue light PPG was higher than that of red light PPG. These findings suggest that green is the most suitable color for measuring HR and NPV from the reflection mode photoplethysmogram under motion artifact conditions. We conclude that the use of green light PPG could be of particular benefit in ambulatory monitoring where motion artifacts are a significant issue. PMID:24618594

  15. iPhone 4s Photoplethysmography: Which Light Color Yields the Most Accurate Heart Rate and Normalized Pulse Volume Using the iPhysioMeter Application in the Presence of Motion Artifact?

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Kenta; Rolfe, Peter; Lee, Jihyoung; Yamakoshi, Takehiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in information and communication technologies has made it possible to measure heart rate (HR) and normalized pulse volume (NPV), which are important physiological indices, using only a smartphone. This has been achieved with reflection mode photoplethysmography (PPG), by using a smartphone’s embedded flash as a light source and the camera as a light sensor. Despite its widespread use, the method of PPG is susceptible to motion artifacts as physical displacements influence photon propagation phenomena and, thereby, the effective optical path length. Further, it is known that the wavelength of light used for PPG influences the photon penetration depth and we therefore hypothesized that influences of motion artifact could be wavelength-dependant. To test this hypothesis, we made measurements in 12 healthy volunteers of HR and NPV derived from reflection mode plethysmograms recorded simultaneously at three different spectral regions (red, green and blue) at the same physical location with a smartphone. We then assessed the accuracy of the HR and NPV measurements under the influence of motion artifacts. The analyses revealed that the accuracy of HR was acceptably high with all three wavelengths (all rs > 0.996, fixed biases: −0.12 to 0.10 beats per minute, proportional biases: r = −0.29 to 0.03), but that of NPV was the best with green light (r = 0.791, fixed biases: −0.01 arbitrary units, proportional bias: r = 0.11). Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio obtained with green and blue light PPG was higher than that of red light PPG. These findings suggest that green is the most suitable color for measuring HR and NPV from the reflection mode photoplethysmogram under motion artifact conditions. We conclude that the use of green light PPG could be of particular benefit in ambulatory monitoring where motion artifacts are a significant issue. PMID:24618594

  16. 38 CFR 4.59 - Painful motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Painful motion. 4.59 Section 4.59 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.59 Painful motion. With any form of arthritis, painful motion is an important factor...

  17. Effects of rotation motions on strong-motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, H. C.; Wu, F. J.; Lin, C. J.; Huang, H. C.; Liu, C. C.

    2012-10-01

    Rotation motion and its effects on strong-motion data, in most cases, are much smaller than that of translational motion and have been ignored in most analyses of strong-motion data. However, recent observations from near-fault and/or extreme large ground motions suggest that these effects might be underestimated and quantitative analyses seem to be necessary for improving our understating of these effects. Rotation motion-related effects include centrifugal acceleration, the effects of gravity and effects of the rotation frame. Detailed analyses of these effects based on the observed data are unavailable in the literature. In this study, we develop a numerical algorithm for estimating the effects of rotational motion on the strong-motion data using a set of six-component ground motions and apply it to a set of rotation rate-strong motion velocity data. The data were recorded during a magnitude 6.9 earthquake. The peak value of the derived acceleration and rotation rate of this dataset are about 186 cm/s/s and 0.0026 rad/s. Numerical analyses of data gives time histories of these rotational motion-related effects. Our results show that all the rotation angles are less than 0.01°. The maximum centrifugal acceleration, effect from gravity and effect of the rotation frame are about 0.03 and 0.14 cm/s/s, respectively. Both these two effects are much smaller than the peak acceleration 186 cm/s/s. This result might have been expected because our data are not near-field and wave motions are expected to be nearly plane waves. However, it is worth noticing that the centrifugal acceleration is underestimated and a small rotational effect can cause large waveform difference in acceleration data. The waveform difference before and after the correction for rotational motion can reach 16 cm/s/s (about 10 %).

  18. Asteroid Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Mary V.; Moynihan, P. Daniel

    1996-12-01

    Equations are derived which describe the apparent motion of an asteroid traveling on an elliptical orbit in geocentric ecliptic coordinates. At opposition, the equations are identical to those derived by Bowellet al. (Bowell, E., B. Skiff, and L. Wasserman 1990. InAsteroids, Comets, Meteors III(C.-I. Lagerkvist, M. Rickman, B. A. Lindblad, and M. Lindgren, Eds.), pp. 19-24. Uppsala Universitet, Uppsala, Sweden). These equations can be an important component in the optimization of search strategies for specific asteroid populations based on their apparent motions relative to other populations when observed away from opposition.

  19. What's Motion Sickness?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What's Motion Sickness? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Motion Sickness? Print ... motion sickness might get even worse. continue Avoiding Motion Sickness To avoid motion sickness: Put your best ...

  20. Brownian Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenda, Bernard H.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the phenomenon of Brownian motion, which serves as a mathematical model for random processes. Topics addressed include kinetic theory, Einstein's theory, particle displacement, and others. Points out that observations of the random course of a particle suspended in fluid led to the first accurate measurement of atomic mass. (DH)

  1. Dislocation motion and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Chapman, Stephen Jonathan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The Peach-Koehler expression for the stress generated by a single (non-planar) curvilinear dislocation is evaluated to calculate the dislocation self stress. This is combined with a law of motion to give the self-induced motion of a general dislocation curve. A stability analysis of a rectilinear, uniformly translating dislocation is then performed. The dislocation is found to be susceptible to a helical instability, with the maximum growth rate occurring when the dislocation is almost, but not exactly, pure screw. The non-linear evolution of the instability is determined numerically, and implications for slip band formation and non-Schmid behavior in yielding are discussed.

  2. Chaos in navigation satellite orbits caused by the perturbed motion of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengren, Aaron J.; Alessi, Elisa Maria; Rossi, Alessandro; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.

    2015-06-01

    Numerical simulations carried out over the past decade suggest that the orbits of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems are unstable, resulting in an apparent chaotic growth of the eccentricity. Here, we show that the irregular and haphazard character of these orbits reflects a similar irregularity in the orbits of many celestial bodies in our Solar system. We find that secular resonances, involving linear combinations of the frequencies of nodal and apsidal precession and the rate of regression of lunar nodes, occur in profusion so that the phase space is threaded by a devious stochastic web. As in all cases in the Solar system, chaos ensues where resonances overlap. These results may be significant for the analysis of disposal strategies for the four constellations in this precarious region of space.

  3. Diurnal polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, P.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical theory is developed to describe diurnal polar motion in the earth which arises as a forced response due to lunisolar torques and tidal deformation. Doodson's expansion of the tide generating potential is used to represent the lunisolar torques. Both the magnitudes and the rates of change of perturbations in the earth's inertia tensor are included in the dynamical equations for the polar motion so as to account for rotational and tidal deformation. It is found that in a deformable earth with Love's number k = 0.29, the angular momentum vector departs by as much as 20 cm from the rotation axis rather than remaining within 1 or 2 cm as it would in a rigid earth. This 20 cm separation is significant in the interpretation of submeter polar motion observations because it necessitates an additional coordinate transformation in order to remove what would otherwise be a 20 cm error source in the conversion between inertial and terrestrial reference systems.

  4. Seismic Sources and Recurrence Rates as Adopted by USGS Staff for the Production of the 1982 and 1990 Probabilistic Ground Motion Maps for Alaska and the Conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Stanley L.; Perkins, David M.

    1995-01-01

    The construction of a probabilistic ground-motion hazard map for a region follows a sequence of analyses beginning with the selection of an earthquake catalog and ending with the mapping of calculated probabilistic ground-motion values (Hanson and others, 1992). An integral part of this process is the creation of sources used for the calculation of earthquake recurrence rates and ground motions. These sources consist of areas and lines that are representative of geologic or tectonic features and faults. After the design of the sources, it is necessary to arrange the coordinate points in a particular order compatible with the input format for the SEISRISK-III program (Bender and Perkins, 1987). Source zones are usually modeled as a point-rupture source. Where applicable, linear rupture sources are modeled with articulated lines, representing known faults, or a field of parallel lines, representing a generalized distribution of hypothetical faults. Based on the distribution of earthquakes throughout the individual source zones (or a collection of several sources), earthquake recurrence rates are computed for each of the sources, and a minimum and maximum magnitude is assigned. Over a period of time from 1978 to 1980 several conferences were held by the USGS to solicit information on regions of the United States for the purpose of creating source zones for computation of probabilistic ground motions (Thenhaus, 1983). As a result of these regional meetings and previous work in the Pacific Northwest, (Perkins and others, 1980), California continental shelf, (Thenhaus and others, 1980), and the Eastern outer continental shelf, (Perkins and others, 1979) a consensus set of source zones was agreed upon and subsequently used to produce a national ground motion hazard map for the United States (Algermissen and others, 1982). In this report and on the accompanying disk we provide a complete list of source areas and line sources as used for the 1982 and later 1990 seismic

  5. Space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Research on the etiology, prediction, treatment and prevention of space motion sickness, designed to minimize the impact of this syndrome which was experienced frequently and with severity by individuals on the Skylab missions, on Space Shuttle crews is reviewed. Theories of the cause of space motion sickness currently under investigation by NASA include sensory conflict, which argues that motion sickness symptoms result from a mismatch between the total pattern of information from the spatial senses and that stored from previous experiences, and fluid shift, based upon the redistribution of bodily fluids that occurs upon continued exposure to weightlessness. Attempts are underway to correlate space motion sickness susceptibility to different provocative environments, vestibular and nonvestibular responses, and the rate of acquisition and length of retention of sensory adaptation. Space motion sickness countermeasures under investigation include various drug combinations, of which the equal combination of promethazine and ephedrine has been found to be as effective as the scopolomine and dexedrine combination, and vestibular adaptation and biofeedback training and autogenic therapy.

  6. Muon motion in titanium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempton, J. R.; Petzinger, K. G.; Kossler, W. J.; Schone, H. E.; Hitti, B. S.; Stronach, C. E.; Adu, N.; Lankford, W. F.; Reilly, J. J.; Seymour, E. F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Motional narrowing of the transverse-field muon spin rotation signal was observed in gamma-TiH(x) for x = 1.83, 1.97, and 1.99. An analysis of the data for TiH1.99 near room temperature indicates that the mechanism responsible for the motion of the muon out of the octahedral site is thermally activated diffusion with an attempt frequency comparable to the optical vibrations of the lattice. Monte Carlo calculations to simulate the effect of muon and proton motion upon the muon field-correlation time were used to interpret the motional narrowing in TiH1.97 near 500 K. The interpretation is dependent upon whether the Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound (BPP) theory or an independent spin-pair relaxation model is used to obtain the vacancy jump rate from proton NMR T1 measurements. Use of BPP theory shows that the field-correction time can be obtained if the rate of motion of the muon with respect to the rate of the motion for the protons is decreased. An independent spin-pair relaxation model indicates that the field-correlation time can be obtained if the rate of motion for the nearest-neighbor protons is decreased.

  7. The periodic and chaotic regimes of motion in the exoplanet 2/1 mean-motion resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michtchenko, T. A.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Beaugé, C.

    We present the dynamical structure of the phase space of the planar plane- tary 2/1 mean-motion resonance (MMR). Inside the resonant domain, there exist two families of periodic orbits, one associated to the librational mo- tion of the critical angle (-family) and the other related to the circulatory motion of the angle between the pericentres (-family). The well-known apsidal corotation resonances (ACR) appear at the intersections of these families. A complex web of secondary resonances exists also for low ec- centricities, whose strengths and positions are dependent on the individual masses and spatial scale of the system. Depending on initial conditions, a resonant system is found in one of the two topologically different states, referred to as internal and external resonances. The internal resonance is characterized by symmetric ACR and its resonant angle is 2 2 - 1 - 1 , where i and i stand for the planetary mean longitudes and longitudes of pericentre, respectively. In contrast, the external resonance is characterized by asymmetric ACR and the resonant angle is 2 2 - 1 - 2 . We show that systems with more massive outer planets always envolve inside inter- nal resonances. The limit case is the well-known asteroidal resonances with Jupiter. At variance, systems with more massive inner planets may evolve in either internal or external resonances; the internal resonances are typical for low-to-moderate eccentricity configurations, whereas the external ones for high eccentricity configurations of the systems. In the limit case, anal- ogous to Kuiper belt objects in resonances with Neptune, the systems are always in the external resonances characterized by asymmetric equilibria.

  8. Objective Motion Cueing Criteria Investigation Based on Three Flight Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaal, Petrus M. T.; Schroeder, Jeffery A.; Chung, William W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper intends to help establish fidelity criteria to accompany the simulator motion system diagnostic test specified by the International Civil Aviation Organization. Twelve air- line transport pilots flew three tasks in the NASA Vertical Motion Simulator under four different motion conditions. The experiment used three different hexapod motion configurations, each with a different tradeoff between motion filter gain and break frequency, and one large motion configuration that utilized as much of the simulator's motion space as possible. The motion condition significantly affected: 1) pilot motion fidelity ratings, and sink rate and lateral deviation at touchdown for the approach and landing task, 2) pilot motion fidelity ratings, roll deviations, maximum pitch rate, and number of stick shaker activations in the stall task, and 3) heading deviation after an engine failure in the takeoff task. Significant differences in pilot-vehicle performance were used to define initial objective motion cueing criteria boundaries. These initial fidelity boundaries show promise but need refinement.

  9. 38 CFR 4.59 - Painful motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Painful motion. 4.59... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.59 Painful motion. With any form of arthritis, painful motion is an important factor of disability, the facial expression, wincing, etc., on pressure...

  10. 38 CFR 4.59 - Painful motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Painful motion. 4.59... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.59 Painful motion. With any form of arthritis, painful motion is an important factor of disability, the facial expression, wincing, etc., on pressure...

  11. 38 CFR 4.59 - Painful motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Painful motion. 4.59... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.59 Painful motion. With any form of arthritis, painful motion is an important factor of disability, the facial expression, wincing, etc., on pressure...

  12. 38 CFR 4.59 - Painful motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Painful motion. 4.59... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.59 Painful motion. With any form of arthritis, painful motion is an important factor of disability, the facial expression, wincing, etc., on pressure...

  13. Locomotor, Heart-Rate, and Metabolic Power Characteristics of Youth Women's Field Hockey: Female Athletes in Motion (FAiM) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vescovi, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the locomotor, heart-rate, and metabolic power characteristics of high-level youth female field hockey matches. Method: Players from the U21 and U17 Canadian women's national teams were monitored during a 4-match test series using Global Positioning System technology. Position (forward,…

  14. Decadal variations in geophysical processes and asymmetries in the solar motion about the Solar System's barycentre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenkov, Nikolay; Wilson, Ian; Khlystov, Anatoly

    2010-05-01

    Motion (SIM). Over the last 800 years, the Earth has experience exceptionally strong tidal forces in the years 1247, 1433, 1610, 1787 and 1974 (Keeling and Whorf, 1997). He shows that these exceptionally strong tidal forces closely correspond in time to the first peak in the asymmetry of the SIM that occurs just after a period low asymmetry. These first peaks in asymmetry in the SIM occur in the years 1251, 1432, 1611, 1791, and 1971, closely correspond the years of peak tidal force. Thus, there appear to be periodic alignments between the lunar apsides, syzygies and lunar nodes that occur at almost exactly the same times that the SIM becomes most asymmetric for the first time after a period of low asymmetry in the SIM. It means that precession and stretching of the Lunar orbit (i.e. the factors that control the long-term variation of the lunar tides that are experienced here on Earth) are almost perfectly synchronized with the SIM. If the Solar system just consisted of Jupiter and the Sun, the barycentre of the Solar System would move in an almost circular orbit located just above the surface of the Sun (i.e. about 1.08 solar radii), called the sub-Jupiter point. Hence, the actual motion of the barycentre about the centre of the Sun (or equivalently the Sun about the barycentre) can be considered as a combination of the smooth symmetrical motion produced by Jupiter, combined with an additional, often asymmetric motion, caused by the other three Jovan planets (principally, Saturn and Neptune). The distance of the centre-of-mass from the Sub-Jupiter point is an excellent indicator of the level of asymmetry of the Sun's orbital motion, at any given time. A.I.Khlystov et al., (1992,1995) showed that the Earth and the other planets move in ellipses with the Sun at one foci, while at the same time they (effectively) share in the motion of the Sun around barycenter of the solar system. From the above results two important conclusions follows: 1) The movement of each planet is

  15. Motion-Matching: A Challenge Game to Generate Motion Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, David; Adams, Betty; Brookes, David; Milner-Bolotin, Marina; Undreiu, Adriana

    2009-10-01

    Motion is a topic that is taught from elementary grades through to university at various levels of sophistication. It is an area that can be challenging for learning in a conceptually meaningful way, and formal kinematics instruction can sometimes seem dry and boring. Thus, the nature of students' initial introduction to motion is important in sparking their interest, shaping their perspective, and developing conceptual understanding of motion. The kinematic concepts we want students to acquire for basic motions are: position, time, speed, direction, velocity, velocity change, change rate, and acceleration, all with respect to a frame of reference. In this article we describe a challenge game used as an "opener" to motion, in which students themselves essentially generate these concepts, in everyday language, from a perceived need for them.

  16. Synchronous motion modulates animacy perception.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Visual motion serves as a cue for high-level percepts. The present study reports novel modulation of animacy perception through synchronous motion. A target dot moving along a random trajectory was presented. The trajectory was generated based on a variant of 1/f noise; hence, the dot could be perceived as animate. Participants were asked to rate the strength of perceived animacy and perceived intention from the target dot. Several task-irrelevant dots surrounding the target were also presented. Results indicated that perceived animacy and intention were drastically weakened when surrounding dots created synchronous motion with the target dot as compared to when surrounding dots did not create synchronous motion. A series of follow-up experiments replicated these results and revealed specific characteristics of this modulation. The present findings suggest synchronous visual motion serves as a strong modulator of animacy perception. PMID:26114680

  17. Enhanced motion coding in MC-EZBC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junhua; Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Yingkun

    2005-07-01

    Since hierarchical variable size block matching and bidirectional motion compensation are used in the motioncompensated embedded zero block coding (MC-EZBC), the motion information consists of motion vector quadtree map and motion vectors. In the conventional motion coding scheme, the quadtree structure is coded directly, the motion vector modes are coded with Huffman codes, and the motion vector differences are coded by an m-ary arithmetic coder with 0-order models. In this paper we propose a new motion coding scheme which uses an extension of the CABAC algorithm and new context modeling for quadtree structure coding and mode coding. In addition, we use a new scalable motion coding method which scales the motion vector quadtrees according to the rate-distortion slope of the tree nodes. Experimental results show that the new coding scheme increases the efficiency of the motion coding by more than 25%. The performance of the system is improved accordingly, especially in low bit rates. Moreover, with the scalable motion coding, the subjective and objective coding performance is further enhanced in low bit rate scenarios.

  18. Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  19. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Motion restraining device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, A. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A motion-restraining device for dissipating at a controlled rate the force of a moving body is discussed. The device is characterized by a drive shaft adapted to be driven in rotation by a moving body connected to a tape wound about a reel mounted on the drive shaft, and an elongated pitman link having one end pivotally connected to the crankshaft and the opposite end thereof connected with the mass through an energy dissipating linkage. A shuttle is disposed within a slot and guided by rectilinear motion between a pair of spaced impact surfaces. Reaction forces applied at impact of the shuttle with the impact surfaces include oppositely projected force components angularly related to the direction of the applied impact forces.

  1. Collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicsek, Tamás; Zafeiris, Anna

    2012-08-01

    We review the observations and the basic laws describing the essential aspects of collective motion - being one of the most common and spectacular manifestation of coordinated behavior. Our aim is to provide a balanced discussion of the various facets of this highly multidisciplinary field, including experiments, mathematical methods and models for simulations, so that readers with a variety of background could get both the basics and a broader, more detailed picture of the field. The observations we report on include systems consisting of units ranging from macromolecules through metallic rods and robots to groups of animals and people. Some emphasis is put on models that are simple and realistic enough to reproduce the numerous related observations and are useful for developing concepts for a better understanding of the complexity of systems consisting of many simultaneously moving entities. As such, these models allow the establishing of a few fundamental principles of flocking. In particular, it is demonstrated, that in spite of considerable differences, a number of deep analogies exist between equilibrium statistical physics systems and those made of self-propelled (in most cases living) units. In both cases only a few well defined macroscopic/collective states occur and the transitions between these states follow a similar scenario, involving discontinuity and algebraic divergences.

  2. Auditory motion affects visual biological motion processing.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A; van der Zwan, R; Billard, A; Petreska, B; Clarke, S; Blanke, O

    2007-02-01

    The processing of biological motion is a critical, everyday task performed with remarkable efficiency by human sensory systems. Interest in this ability has focused to a large extent on biological motion processing in the visual modality (see, for example, Cutting, J. E., Moore, C., & Morrison, R. (1988). Masking the motions of human gait. Perception and Psychophysics, 44(4), 339-347). In naturalistic settings, however, it is often the case that biological motion is defined by input to more than one sensory modality. For this reason, here in a series of experiments we investigate behavioural correlates of multisensory, in particular audiovisual, integration in the processing of biological motion cues. More specifically, using a new psychophysical paradigm we investigate the effect of suprathreshold auditory motion on perceptions of visually defined biological motion. Unlike data from previous studies investigating audiovisual integration in linear motion processing [Meyer, G. F. & Wuerger, S. M. (2001). Cross-modal integration of auditory and visual motion signals. Neuroreport, 12(11), 2557-2560; Wuerger, S. M., Hofbauer, M., & Meyer, G. F. (2003). The integration of auditory and motion signals at threshold. Perception and Psychophysics, 65(8), 1188-1196; Alais, D. & Burr, D. (2004). No direction-specific bimodal facilitation for audiovisual motion detection. Cognitive Brain Research, 19, 185-194], we report the existence of direction-selective effects: relative to control (stationary) auditory conditions, auditory motion in the same direction as the visually defined biological motion target increased its detectability, whereas auditory motion in the opposite direction had the inverse effect. Our data suggest these effects do not arise through general shifts in visuo-spatial attention, but instead are a consequence of motion-sensitive, direction-tuned integration mechanisms that are, if not unique to biological visual motion, at least not common to all types of

  3. Human comfort response to dominant random motions in longitudinal modes of aircraft motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of random vertical and longitudinal accelerations and pitching velocity passenger ride comfort responses were examined on the NASA Langley Visual Motion Simulator. Effects of power spectral density shape were studied for motions where the peak was between 0 and 2 Hz. The subjective rating data and the physical motion data obtained are presented without interpretation or detailed analysis. There existed motions in all other degrees of freedom as well as the particular pair of longitudinal airplane motions studied. These unwanted motions, caused by the characteristics of the simulator may have introduced some interactive effects on passenger responses.

  4. Decadal variations in geophysical processes and asymmetries in the solar motion about the Solar System's barycentre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenkov, Nikolay; Wilson, Ian; Khlystov, Anatoly

    2010-05-01

    Motion (SIM). Over the last 800 years, the Earth has experience exceptionally strong tidal forces in the years 1247, 1433, 1610, 1787 and 1974 (Keeling and Whorf, 1997). He shows that these exceptionally strong tidal forces closely correspond in time to the first peak in the asymmetry of the SIM that occurs just after a period low asymmetry. These first peaks in asymmetry in the SIM occur in the years 1251, 1432, 1611, 1791, and 1971, closely correspond the years of peak tidal force. Thus, there appear to be periodic alignments between the lunar apsides, syzygies and lunar nodes that occur at almost exactly the same times that the SIM becomes most asymmetric for the first time after a period of low asymmetry in the SIM. It means that precession and stretching of the Lunar orbit (i.e. the factors that control the long-term variation of the lunar tides that are experienced here on Earth) are almost perfectly synchronized with the SIM. If the Solar system just consisted of Jupiter and the Sun, the barycentre of the Solar System would move in an almost circular orbit located just above the surface of the Sun (i.e. about 1.08 solar radii), called the sub-Jupiter point. Hence, the actual motion of the barycentre about the centre of the Sun (or equivalently the Sun about the barycentre) can be considered as a combination of the smooth symmetrical motion produced by Jupiter, combined with an additional, often asymmetric motion, caused by the other three Jovan planets (principally, Saturn and Neptune). The distance of the centre-of-mass from the Sub-Jupiter point is an excellent indicator of the level of asymmetry of the Sun's orbital motion, at any given time. A.I.Khlystov et al., (1992,1995) showed that the Earth and the other planets move in ellipses with the Sun at one foci, while at the same time they (effectively) share in the motion of the Sun around barycenter of the solar system. From the above results two important conclusions follows: 1) The movement of each planet is

  5. Three-directional motion-compensation mask-based novel look-up table on graphics processing units for video-rate generation of digital holographic videos of three-dimensional scenes.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-Woo; Kim, Seung-Cheol; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2016-01-20

    A three-directional motion-compensation mask-based novel look-up table method is proposed and implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for video-rate generation of digital holographic videos of three-dimensional (3D) scenes. Since the proposed method is designed to be well matched with the software and memory structures of GPUs, the number of compute-unified-device-architecture kernel function calls can be significantly reduced. This results in a great increase of the computational speed of the proposed method, allowing video-rate generation of the computer-generated hologram (CGH) patterns of 3D scenes. Experimental results reveal that the proposed method can generate 39.8 frames of Fresnel CGH patterns with 1920×1080 pixels per second for the test 3D video scenario with 12,088 object points on dual GPU boards of NVIDIA GTX TITANs, and they confirm the feasibility of the proposed method in the practical application fields of electroholographic 3D displays. PMID:26835954

  6. Dynamics of the 3/1 planetary mean-motion resonance: an application to the HD60532 b-c planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, A. J.; Michtchenko, T. A.; Tadeu dos Santos, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we use a semi-analytical approach to analyze the global structure of the phase space of the planar planetary 3/1 mean-motion resonance. The case where the outer planet is more massive than its inner companion is considered. We show that the resonant dynamics can be described using two fundamental parameters, the total angular momentum and the spacing parameter. The topology of the Hamiltonian function describing the resonant behaviour is investigated on a large domain of the phase space without time-expensive numerical integrations of the equations of motion, and without any restriction on the magnitude of the planetary eccentricities. The families of the Apsidal Corotation Resonances (ACR) parameterized by the planetary mass ratio are obtained and their stability is analyzed. The main dynamical features in the domains around the ACR are also investigated in detail by means of spectral analysis techniques, which allow us to detect the regions of different regimes of motion of resonant systems. The construction of dynamical maps for various values of the total angular momentum shows the evolution of domains of stable motion with the eccentricities, identifying possible configurations suitable for exoplanetary systems.

  7. Limited range of motion

    MedlinePlus

    Limited range of motion is a term meaning that a joint or body part cannot move through its normal range of motion. ... Motion may be limited because of a problem within the joint, swelling of tissue around the joint, ...

  8. Self Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The studies conducted in this research project examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  9. Self-Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Motion sickness typically is considered a bothersome artifact of exposure to passive motion in vehicles of conveyance. This condition seldom has significant impact on the health of individuals because it is of brief duration, it usually can be prevented by simply avoiding the eliciting condition and, when the conditions that produce it are unavoidable, sickness dissipates with continued exposure. The studies conducted examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  10. Theoretical motions of hydrofoil systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlay, Frederick H

    1948-01-01

    Results are presented of an investigation that has been undertaken to develop theoretical methods of treating the motions of hydrofoil systems and to determine some of the important parameters. Variations of parameters include three distributions of area between the hydrofoils, two rates of change of downwash angle with angle of attack, three depths of immersion, two dihedral angles, two rates of change of lift with immersion, three longitudinal hydrofoil spacings, two radii of gyration in pitching, and various horizontal and vertical locations of the center of gravity. Graphs are presented to show locations of the center of gravity for stable motion, values of the stability roots, and motions following the sudden application of a vertical force or a pitching moment to the hydrofoil system for numerous sets of values of the parameters.

  11. Yaw Motion Cues in Helicopter Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Jeffrey A.; Johnson, Walter W.

    1996-01-01

    A piloted simulation that examined the effects of yaw motion cues on pilot-vehicle performance, pilot workload, and pilot motion perception was conducted on the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator. The vehicle model that was used represented an AH-64 helicopter. Three tasks were performed in which only combinations of vehicle yaw and vertical displacement were allowed. The commands issued to the motion platform were modified to present the following four motion configurations for a pilot located forward of the center of rotation: (1) only the linear translations, (2) only the angular rotation, (3) both the linear translations and the angular rotation, and (4) no motion. The objective data indicated that pilot-vehicle performance was reduced and the necessary control activity increased when linear motion was removed; however, the lack of angular rotation did not result in a measured degradation for almost all cases. Also, pilots provided subjective assessments of their compensation required, the motion fidelity, and their judgment of whether or not linear or rotational cockpit motion was present. Ratings of compensation and fidelity were affected only by linear acceleration, and the rotational motion had no significant impact. Also, when only linear motion was present, pilots typically reported the presence of rotation. Thus, linear acceleration cues, not yaw rotational cues, appear necessary to simulate hovering flight.

  12. Human comfort response to random motions with combined yawing and rolling motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of random yawing and rolling velocities on passenger ride comfort responses were examined on a visual motion simulator. The effects of power spectral density shape and frequency ranges of peak power from 0 to 2 Hz were studied. The subjective rating data and the physical motion data obtained are presented. No attempt at interpretation or detailed analysis of the data is made. There existed during this study motions in all other degrees of freedom as well as the yawing and rolling motions, because of the characteristics of the simulator. These unwanted motions may have introduced some interactive effects on passenger responses which should be considered in any analysis of the data.

  13. Human comfort response to random motions with a dominant pitching motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of random pitching velocities on passenger ride comfort response were examined on the NASA Langley Visual Motion Simulator. The effects of power spectral density shape and frequency ranges from 0 to 2 Hz were studied. The subjective rating data and the physical motion data obtained are presented. No attempt at interpretation or detailed analysis of the data is made. Motions in all degrees of freedom existed as well as the intended pitching motion, because of the characteristics of the simulator. These unwanted motions may have introduced some interactive effects on passenger responses which should be considered in any analysis of the data.

  14. Static imaging of motion: motion texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, Koichi

    1992-05-01

    This paper describes how motion segmentation can be achieved by analyzing of a single static image that is created from a series of picture frames. The key idea is motion imaging; in other words, motion is expressed in static images by integrating, frame after frame, the spatiotemporal fluctuations of the gradient gray level at each local area. This tends to create blurred or attached line images (images with lines that show the path of movement of an object through space) on moving objects. We call this 'motion texture'. We computed motion texture images based on the animation of a natural scene and on a number of computer synthesized animations containing groups of moving objects (random dots). Moreover, we applied two different texture analyses to the motion textured images for segmentation: a texture analysis based on the local homogeneity of gray level gradation in similarly textured regions and another based on the structural feature of gray level gradation in motion texture. Experiments showed that subjective visual impressions of segmentation were quite different for these animations. The texture segmentation described here successfully grouped moving objects coincident to subjective impressions. In our random dot animations, the density of the basic motion vectors extracted from each pair of successive frames was set at a constant to compensate for the dot grouping effect based on the vector density. The dot appearance period (lifetime) is varied across the animations. In a long lifetime random dot animation, region boundaries can be more clearly perceived than in a short one. The different impressions may be explained by analyzing the motion texture elements, but can not always be represented successfully using the motion vectors between two successive frames whose density is set at a constant between the animations with the different lifetime.

  15. Comparative orbital evolution of transient Uranian co-orbitals: exploring the role of ephemeral multibody mean motion resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2014-07-01

    Uranus has three known co-orbitals: 83982 Crantor (2002 GO9), 2010 EU65 and 2011 QF99. All of them were captured in their current resonant state relatively recently. Here, we perform a comparative analysis of the orbital evolution of these transient co-orbitals to understand better how they got captured in the first place and what makes them dynamically unstable. We also look for additional temporary Uranian co-orbital candidates among known objects. Our N-body simulations show that the long-term stability of 2011 QF99 is controlled by Jupiter and Neptune; it briefly enters the 1:7 mean motion resonance with Jupiter and the 2:1 with Neptune before becoming a Trojan and prior to leaving its tadpole orbit. During these ephemeral two-body mean motion resonance episodes, apsidal corotation resonances are also observed. For known co-orbitals, Saturn is the current source of the main destabilizing force but this is not enough to eject a minor body from the 1:1 commensurability with Uranus. These objects must enter mean motion resonances with Jupiter and Neptune in order to be captured or become passing Centaurs. Asteroid 2010 EU65, a probable visitor from the Oort cloud, may have been stable for several Myr due to its comparatively low eccentricity. Additionally, we propose 2002 VG131 as the first transient quasi-satellite candidate of Uranus. Asteroid 1999 HD12 may signal the edge of Uranus' co-orbital region. Transient Uranian co-orbitals are often submitted to complex multibody ephemeral mean motion resonances that trigger the switching between resonant co-orbital states, making them dynamically unstable. In addition, we show that the orbital properties and discovery circumstances of known objects can be used to outline a practical strategy by which additional Uranus' co-orbitals may be found.

  16. Essay on Gyroscopic Motions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tea, Peter L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Explains gyroscopic motions to college freshman or high school seniors who have learned about centripetal acceleration and the transformations of a couple. Contains several figures showing the direction of forces and motion. (YP)

  17. Guiding Center Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, H.J. de

    2004-03-15

    The motion of charged particles in slowly varying electromagnetic fields is analyzed. The strength of the magnetic field is such that the gyro-period and the gyro-radius of the particle motion around field lines are the shortest time and length scales of the system. The particle motion is described as the sum of a fast gyro-motion and a slow drift velocity.

  18. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  19. General autonomic components of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Suter, Steve; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Naifeh, Karen

    1986-01-01

    This report refers to a body of investigations directed toward the examination of autonomic nervous system responses to motion sickness. Heart rate, respiration rate, finger pulse volume, and basal skin resistance were measured on 127 men and women before, during, and after exposure to a nauseogenic rotating chair test. Significant changes in all autonomic responses were observed across the tests (p less than .05). Significant differences in autonomic responses among groups divided according to motion sickness susceptibility were also observed (p less than .05). Results suggest that the examination of autonomic responses as an objective indicator of motion sickness malaise is warranted and may contribute to the overall understanding of the syndrome.

  20. The Eclipsing Binary Di Herculis: One Mystery Solved, But Another Takes Its Place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Nicole; Guinan, E.; Maloney, F.

    2010-01-01

    The 8th-mag eclipsing binary DI Herculis has perplexed scientists for the past few decades due to its anomalously slow apsidal motion rate. DI Her consists of two main-sequence stars (B5V, B6V), with P(orb) = 10.55 days, and eccentricity(e= 0.489). Since the apsidal motion is dominated by General Relativity, the system is one of the few tests available for verifying the theory. Combining the expected classical (1.93°/100 yr) and relativistic (2.34°/100 yr) effects, the predicted apsidal motion rate is 4.27°/100 yr. Our recent determination of the apsidal motion yields 1.33°+/-0.25 /100 yr, based on eclipse timings from 1936-2008. Recently, Albrecht et al (2009, Nature 461) have apparently solved the apsidal motion anomaly of DI Her, finding that the axes of both stars are significantly inclined from the normal to the orbital plane. This was determined from the radial velocity curves and observing the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect during primary and secondary eclipses. Having significantly misaligned axes of rotation produces a perturbation that greatly reduces the classical apsidal motion effect, thus explaining the observed small apsidal motion rate. Even though this discovery apparently solves the problem, it raises new questions as to how the axes are so tilted. Additionally, tilted axes are expected to contribute to other orbital effects, such as changes in orbital inclination, which have not yet observed from the apparent constancy in eclipse depths over time. We have also searched for evidence of small periodic oscillations in the eclipse timings and found no evidence of a light travel time effect arising from a possible tertiary component. Further, we find evidence that the projected rotation axes of the stars may be precessing, since it appears that the value of V(rot)sini has increased over the past 30 years. This research was supported by NSF/RUI Grants AST05-07536/42.

  1. Discovering hierarchical motion structure.

    PubMed

    Gershman, Samuel J; Tenenbaum, Joshua B; Jäkel, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Scenes filled with moving objects are often hierarchically organized: the motion of a migrating goose is nested within the flight pattern of its flock, the motion of a car is nested within the traffic pattern of other cars on the road, the motion of body parts are nested in the motion of the body. Humans perceive hierarchical structure even in stimuli with two or three moving dots. An influential theory of hierarchical motion perception holds that the visual system performs a "vector analysis" of moving objects, decomposing them into common and relative motions. However, this theory does not specify how to resolve ambiguity when a scene admits more than one vector analysis. We describe a Bayesian theory of vector analysis and show that it can account for classic results from dot motion experiments, as well as new experimental data. Our theory takes a step towards understanding how moving scenes are parsed into objects. PMID:25818905

  2. 29 CFR 541.709 - Motion picture producing industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motion picture producing industry. 541.709 Section 541.709... SALES EMPLOYEES Definitions and Miscellaneous Provisions § 541.709 Motion picture producing industry... motion picture producing industry who is compensated at a base rate of at least $695 a week (exclusive...

  3. Managing space motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Jennings, R T

    1998-01-01

    Space motion sickness is a well-recognized problem for space flight and affects 73% of crewmembers on the first 2 or 3 days of their initial flight. Illness severity is variable, but over half of cases are categorized as moderate to severe. Management has included elimination of provocative activities and delay of critical performance-related procedures such as extra-vehicular activity (EVA) or Shuttle landing during the first three days of missions. Pharmacological treatment strategies have had variable results, but intramuscular promethazine has been the most effective to date with a 90% initial response rate and important reduction in residual symptoms the next flight day. Oral prophylactic treatment of crewmembers with difficulty on prior flights has had mixed results. In order to accommodate more aggressive pharmacologic management, crew medical officers receive additional training in parenteral administration of medications. Preflight medication testing is accomplished to reduce the risk of unexpected performance decrements or idiosyncratic reactions. When possible, treatment is offered in the presleep period to mask potential treatment-related drowsiness. Another phenomenon noted by crewmembers and physicians as flights have lengthened is readaptation difficulty or motion sickness on return to Earth. These problems have included nausea, vomiting, and difficulty with locomotion or coordination upon early exposure to gravity. Since landing and egress are principal concerns during this portion of the flight, these deficits are of operational concern. Postflight therapy has been directed at nausea and vomiting, and meclizine and promethazine are the principal agents used. There has been no official attempt at prophylactic treatment prior to entry. Since there is considerable individual variation in postflight deficit and since adaptation from prior flights seems to persist, it has been recommended that commanders with prior shuttle landing experience be named to

  4. Motion Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Integrated Sensors, Inc. (ISI), under NASA contract, developed a sensor system for controlling robot vehicles. This technology would enable a robot supply vehicle to automatically dock with Earth-orbiting satellites or the International Space Station. During the docking phase the ISI-developed sensor must sense the satellite's relative motion, then spin so the robot vehicle can adjust its motion to align with the satellite and slowly close until docking is completed. ISI used the sensing/tracking technology as the basis of its OPAD system, which simultaneously tracks an object's movement in six degrees of freedom. Applications include human limb motion analysis, assembly line position analysis and auto crash dummy motion analysis. The NASA technology is also the basis for Motion Analysis Workstation software, a package to simplify the video motion analysis process.

  5. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology in motion Nanotechnology in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-02-01

    , Toshio Ando from the University of Kanazawa provides an overview of developments that have allowed atomic force microscopy to move from rates of the order of one frame a minute to over a thousand frames per second in constant height mode, as reported by Mervyn Miles and colleagues at Bristol University and University College London [8]. Among the pioneers in the field, Ando's group demonstrated the ability to record the Brownian motion of myosin V molecules on mica with image capture rates of 100 x 100 pixels in 80 ms over a decade ago [9]. The developments unleash the potential of atomic force microscopy to observe the dynamics of biological and materials systems. If seeing is believing, the ability to present real motion pictures of the nanoworld cannot fail to capture the public imagination and stimulate burgeoning new avenues of scientific endeavour. Nearly 350 years on from the publication Micrographia, images in microscopy have moved from the page to the movies. References [1] Binnig G, Quate C F, and Gerber Ch 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930-3 [2] Ando T 2012 Nanotechnology 23 062001 [3] J G 1934 Nature 134 635-6 [4] Bharadwaj P, Anger P and Novotny L 2007 Nanotechnology 18 044017 [5] The Nobel Prize in Physics 1986 Nobelprize.org [6] Kim K K, Reina A, Shi Y, Park H, Li L-J, Lee Y H and Kong J 2010 Nanotechnology 21 285205 [7] Phillips D B, Grieve J A, Olof S N, Kocher S J, Bowman R, Padgett M J, Miles M J and Carberry D M 2011 Nanotechnology 22 285503 [8] Picco L M, Bozec L, Ulcinas A, Engledew D J, Antognozzi M, Horton M A and Miles M J 2007 Nanotechnology 18 044030 [9] Ando T, Kodera N, Takai E, Maruyama D, Saito K and Toda A 2001 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 98 12468

  6. The Personal Motion Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brian Vandellyn

    1993-01-01

    The Neutral Body Posture experienced in microgravity creates a biomechanical equilibrium by enabling the internal forces within the body to find their own balance. A patented reclining chair based on this posture provides a minimal stress environment for interfacing with computer systems for extended periods. When the chair is mounted on a 3 or 6 axis motion platform, a generic motion simulator for simulated digital environments is created. The Personal Motion Platform provides motional feedback to the occupant in synchronization with their movements inside the digital world which enhances the simulation experience. Existing HMD based simulation systems can be integrated to the turnkey system. Future developments are discussed.

  7. Human comfort response to random motions with a dominant vertical motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Subjective ride comfort response ratings were measured on the Langley Visual Motion Simulator with vertical acceleration inputs with various power spectra shapes and magnitudes. The data obtained are presented.

  8. General Automatic Components of Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suter, S.; Toscano, W. B.; Kamiya, J.; Naifeh, K.

    1985-01-01

    A body of investigations performed in support of experiments aboard the space shuttle, and designed to counteract the symptoms of Space Adaptation Syndrome, which resemble those of motion sickness on Earth is reviewed. For these supporting studies, the automatic manifestations of earth-based motion sickness was examined. Heart rate, respiration rate, finger pulse volume and basal skin resistance were measured on 127 men and women before, during and after exposure to nauseogenic rotating chair tests. Significant changes in all autonomic responses were observed across the tests. Significant differences in autonomic responses among groups divided according to motion sickness susceptibility were also observed. Results suggest that the examination of autonomic responses as an objective indicator of motion sickness malaise is warranted and may contribute to the overall understanding of the syndrome on Earth and in Space.

  9. Motion compensator for holographic motion picture camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    When reference beam strikes target it undergoes Doppler shift dependent upon target velocity. To compensate, object beam is first reflected from rotating cylinder that revolves in direction opposite to target but at same speed. When beam strikes target it is returned to original frequency and is in phase with reference beam. Alternatively this motion compensator may act on reference beam.

  10. Present-day plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minster, J. B.; Jordan, T. H.

    1977-01-01

    A data set comprising 110 spreading rates, 78 transform fault azimuths and 142 earthquake slip vectors was inverted to yield a new instantaneous plate motion model, designated RM2. The mean averaging interval for the relative motion data was reduced to less than 3 My. A detailed comparison of RM2 with angular velocity vectors which best fit the data along individual plate boundaries indicates that RM2 performs close to optimally in most regions, with several notable exceptions. On the other hand, a previous estimate (RM1) failed to satisfy an extensive set of new data collected in the South Atlantic Ocean. It is shown that RM1 incorrectly predicts the plate kinematics in the South Atlantic because the presently available data are inconsistent with the plate geometry assumed in deriving RM1. It is demonstrated that this inconsistency can be remedied by postulating the existence of internal deformation with the Indian plate, although alternate explanations are possible.

  11. Measuring mandibular motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Rositano, S.; Taylor, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mandibular motion along three axes is measured by three motion transducers on floating yoke that rests against mandible. System includes electronics to provide variety of outputs for data display and processing. Head frame is strapped to test subject's skull to provide fixed point of reference for transducers.

  12. Object motion analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of optical data processing (ODP) techniques for motion analysis in two-dimensional imagery was studied. The basic feasibility of this approach was demonstrated, but inconsistent performance of the photoplastic used for recording spatial filters prevented totally automatic operation. Promising solutions to the problems encountered are discussed, and it is concluded that ODP techniques could be quite useful for motion analysis.

  13. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    Objects in motion attract children. The following activity helps children explore the motion of bodies riding in a vehicle and safely demonstrates the answer to their questions, "Why do I need a seatbelt?" Children will enjoy moving the cup around, even if all they "see" is a cup rather than understanding it represents a car. They will understand…

  14. Body Motion and Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Tierney, Cornelia; Wright, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed two children's use of a computer-based motion detector to make sense of symbolic expressions (Cartesian graphs). Found three themes: (1) tool perspectives, efforts to understand graphical responses to body motion; (2) fusion, emergent ways of talking and behaving that merge symbols and referents; and (3) graphical spaces, when changing…

  15. Teaching Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a novel approach to the teaching of projectile motion of sixth form level. Students are asked to use an analogue circuit to observe projectile motion and to graph the experimental results. Using knowledge of basic dynamics, students are asked to explain the shape of the curves theoretically. (Author/MA)

  16. Motion through Syntactic Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feist, Michele I.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of (Talmy, 1985), (Talmy, 1985) and (Talmy, 2000) typology sparked significant interest in linguistic relativity in the arena of motion language. Through careful analysis of the conflation patterns evident in the language of motion events, Talmy noted that one class of languages, V-languages, tends to encode path along with the…

  17. Aristotle, Motion, and Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jane

    Aristotle rejects a world vision of changing reality as neither useful nor beneficial to human life, and instead he reaffirms both change and eternal reality, fuses motion and rest, and ends up with "well-behaved" changes. This concept of motion is foundational to his world view, and from it emerges his theory of knowledge, philosophy of nature,…

  18. Making Sense of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    When watching a small child with a toy car, it is seen that interest in motion comes early. Children often suggest speed through sounds such as "RRRrrrRRRooooommMMMmmmm" as the toy car is made to speed up, slow down, or accelerate through a turn. Older children start to consider force and motion studies in more detail, and experiences in school…

  19. Naive Theories of Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Michael

    Everyday life provides individuals with countless opportunities for observing and interacting with objects in motion. Although everyone presumably has some sort of knowledge about motion, it is by no means clear what form(s) this knowledge may take. The research described in this paper determined what sorts of knowledge are in fact acquired…

  20. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  1. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  2. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  3. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  4. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  5. Visual-Motion Cueing in Altitude and Yaw Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Schroeder, Jeffery; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Research conducted using the Vertical Motion Simulator at the NASA Ames Research Center examined the contributions of platform motion and visual level-of-detail (LOD) cueing to tasks that required altitude and/or yaw control in a simulated AH-64 Apache helicopter. Within the altitude control tasks the LOD manipulation caused optical density to change across altitudes by a small, moderate, or large amount; while platform motion was either present or absent. The results from these tasks showed that both constant optical density and platform motion improved altitude awareness in an altitude repositioning task, while the presence of platform motion also led to improved performance in a vertical rate control task. The yaw control tasks had pilots'sit 4.5 ft in front of the center of rotation, thus subjecting them to both rotational and lateral motions during a yaw. The pilots were required to regulate their yaw, while the platform motion was manipulated in order to present all combinations of the resulting rotational and lateral motion components. Ratings of simulation fidelity and sensed platform motion showed that the pilots were relatively insensitive to the rotational component, but highly aware of the lateral component. Together these findings show that: 1) platform motion cues are important when speed regulation is required during altitude change; 2) platform motion contributes to the perception of movement amplitude; 3) lateral, but not rotational, motion cues are essential to the perception of vehicle yaw; and 4) LOD management yielding constant optical density across altitudes improves altitude awareness.

  6. Cortical motion deafness.

    PubMed

    Ducommun, Christine Y; Michel, Christoph M; Clarke, Stephanie; Adriani, Michela; Seeck, Margitta; Landis, Theodor; Blanke, Olaf

    2004-09-16

    The extent to which the auditory system, like the visual system, processes spatial stimulus characteristics such as location and motion in separate specialized neuronal modules or in one homogeneously distributed network is unresolved. Here we present a patient with a selective deficit for the perception and discrimination of auditory motion following resection of the right anterior temporal lobe and the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG). Analysis of stimulus identity and location within the auditory scene remained intact. In addition, intracranial auditory evoked potentials, recorded preoperatively, revealed motion-specific responses selectively over the resected right posterior STG, and electrical cortical stimulation of this region was experienced by the patient as incoming moving sounds. Collectively, these data present a patient with cortical motion deafness, providing evidence that cortical processing of auditory motion is performed in a specialized module within the posterior STG. PMID:15363389

  7. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  8. OCT Motion Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Martin F.; Hornegger, Joachim

    From the introduction of time domain OCT [1] up to recent swept source systems, motion continues to be an issue in OCT imaging. In contrast to normal photography, an OCT image does not represent a single point in time. Instead, conventional OCT devices sequentially acquire one-dimensional data over a period of several seconds, capturing one beam of light at a time and recording both the intensity and delay of reflections along its path through an object. In combination with unavoidable object motion which occurs in many imaging contexts, the problem of motion artifacts lies in the very nature of OCT imaging. Motion artifacts degrade image quality and make quantitative measurements less reliable. Therefore, it is desirable to come up with techniques to measure and/or correct object motion during OCT acquisition. In this chapter, we describe the effect of motion on OCT data sets and give an overview on the state of the art in the field of retinal OCT motion correction.

  9. Generalized compliant motion primitive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a general primitive for controlling a telerobot with a set of input parameters. The primitive includes a trajectory generator; a teleoperation sensor; a joint limit generator; a force setpoint generator; a dither function generator, which produces telerobot motion inputs in a common coordinate frame for simultaneous combination in sensor summers. Virtual return spring motion input is provided by a restoration spring subsystem. The novel features of this invention include use of a single general motion primitive at a remote site to permit the shared and supervisory control of the robot manipulator to perform tasks via a remotely transferred input parameter set.

  10. Motion Recognition and Modifying Motion Generation for Imitation Robot Based on Motion Knowledge Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuzawa, Yuki; Kato, Shohei; Kanoh, Masayoshi; Itoh, Hidenori

    A knowledge-based approach to imitation learning of motion generation for humanoid robots and an imitative motion generation system based on motion knowledge learning and modification are described. The system has three parts: recognizing, learning, and modifying parts. The first part recognizes an instructed motion distinguishing it from the motion knowledge database by the continuous hidden markov model. When the motion is recognized as being unfamiliar, the second part learns it using locally weighted regression and acquires a knowledge of the motion. When a robot recognizes the instructed motion as familiar or judges that its acquired knowledge is applicable to the motion generation, the third part imitates the instructed motion by modifying a learned motion. This paper reports some performance results: the motion imitation of several radio gymnastics motions.

  11. Extended rate equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.

    1981-01-30

    The equations of motion are discussed which describe time dependent population flows in an N-level system, reviewing the relationship between incoherent (rate) equations, coherent (Schrodinger) equations, and more general partially coherent (Bloch) equations. Approximations are discussed which replace the elaborate Bloch equations by simpler rate equations whose coefficients incorporate long-time consequences of coherence.

  12. Stroboscopic Goggles for Reduction of Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Somers, Jeffrey T.

    2005-01-01

    A device built around a pair of electronic shutters has been demonstrated to be effective as a prototype of stroboscopic goggles or eyeglasses for preventing or reducing motion sickness. The momentary opening of the shutters helps to suppress a phenomenon that is known in the art as retinal slip and is described more fully below. While a number of different environmental factors can induce motion sickness, a common factor associated with every known motion environment is sensory confusion or sensory mismatch. Motion sickness is a product of misinformation arriving at a central point in the nervous system from the senses from which one determines one s spatial orientation. When information from the eyes, ears, joints, and pressure receptors are all in agreement as to one s orientation, there is no motion sickness. When one or more sensory input(s) to the brain is not expected, or conflicts with what is anticipated, the end product is motion sickness. Normally, an observer s eye moves, compensating for the anticipated effect of motion, in such a manner that the image of an object moving relatively to an observer is held stationary on the retina. In almost every known environment that induces motion sickness, a change in the gain (in the signal-processing sense of gain ) of the vestibular system causes the motion of the eye to fail to hold images stationary on the retina, and the resulting motion of the images is termed retinal slip. The present concept of stroboscopic goggles or eyeglasses (see figure) is based on the proposition that prevention of retinal slip, and hence, the prevention of sensory mismatch, can be expected to reduce the tendency toward motion sickness. A device according to this concept helps to prevent retinal slip by providing snapshots of the visual environment through electronic shutters that are brief enough that each snapshot freezes the image on each retina. The exposure time for each snapshot is less than 5 ms. In the event that a higher

  13. Combined pitching and yawing motion of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranoff, A V; Hopf, L

    1931-01-01

    This report treats the following problems: The beginning of the investigated motions is always a setting of the lateral controls, i.e., the rudder or the ailerons. Now, the first interesting question is how the motion would proceed if these settings were kept unchanged for some time; and particularly, what upward motion would set in, how soon, and for how long, since therein lie the dangers of yawing. Two different motions ensue with a high rate of turn and a steep down slope of flight path in both but a marked difference in angle of attack and consequently different character in the resultant aerodynamic forces: one, the "corkscrew" dive at normal angle, and the other, the "spin" at high angle.

  14. Toying with Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a variety of activities that support the development of an understanding of Newton's laws of motion. Activities use toy cars, mobile roads, and a seat-of-nails. Includes a scoring rubric. (DDR)

  15. Projectile Motion Details.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnick, Jeffrey W.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an exercise that attempts to correct for the common discrepancies between theoretical and experimental predictions concerning projectile motion using a spring-loaded projectile ball launcher. Includes common correction factors for student use. (MVL)

  16. A Projectile Motion Bullseye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Explains a projectile motion experiment involving a bow and arrow. Procedures to measure "muzzle" velocity, bow elastic potential energy, range, flight time, wind resistance, and masses are considered. (DH)

  17. Dizziness and Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... special tests of eye motion after warm or cold water or air is used to stimulate the ... Get enough fluids Treat infections, including ear infections, colds, flu, sinus congestion, and other respiratory infections If ...

  18. Vision and Motion Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities on persistence of vision that involve students in a hands-on approach to the study of early methods of creating motion pictures. Students construct flip books, a Zoetrope, and an early movie machine. (DDR)

  19. Limited range of motion

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss of motion. Some of these disorders include: Cerebral palsy Congenital torticollis Muscular dystrophy Stroke or brain injury ... Rheumatology and musculoskeletal problems. In: Rakel RE, Rakel DP, eds. Textbook of Family Medicine . 8th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  20. Coupled transverse motion

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic field in an accelerator or a storage ring is usually so designed that the horizontal (x) and the vertical (y) motions of an ion are uncoupled. However, because of imperfections in construction and alignment, some small coupling is unavoidable. In this lecture, we discuss in a general way what is known about the behaviors of coupled motions in two degrees-of-freedom. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  1. The triple system AO Monocerotis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Kučáková, H.; Hynek, T.; Melcer, L. Å.

    2010-05-01

    The variable star AO Mon is a relatively bright but seldom investigated early-type eccentric eclipsing binary. Thirty new eclipses were measured as a part of our long-term observational project or derived from previous measurements. Based on a new solution of the current O-C diagram, we found for the first time a rapid apsidal advance superimposed with a light-time effect caused by a third unseen body in the system. Their short periods are 33.8 years and 3.6 years for the apsidal motion and the third-body circular orbit, respectively. The observed internal structure constant was derived to be log k2, obs = -2.23, which is close to the theoretically expected value. The relativistic as well as the third-body effects on the apsidal advance are negligible, as they are only about 3% of the total apsidal motion rate. Partly based on observations secured at the South African Astronomical Observatory, Sutherland, South Africa, in April 2004.

  2. PROMOTIONS: PROper MOTION Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleb Wherry, John; Sahai, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the development of a software tool (PROMOTIONS) to streamline the process of measuring proper motions of material in expanding nebulae. Our tool makes use of IDL's widget programming capabilities to design a unique GUI that is used to compare images of the objects from two epochs. The software allows us to first orient and register the images to a common frame of reference and pixel scale, using field stars in each of the images. We then cross-correlate specific morphological features in order to determine their proper motions, which consist of the proper motion of the nebula as a whole (PM-neb), and expansion motions of the features relative to the center. If the central star is not visible (quite common in bipolar nebulae with dense dusty waists), point-symmetric expansion is assumed and we use the average motion of high-quality symmetric pairs of features on opposite sides of the nebular center to compute PM-neb. This is then subtracted out to determine the individual movements of these and additional features relative to the nebular center. PROMOTIONS should find wide applicability in measuring proper motions in astrophysical objects such as the expanding outflows/jets commonly seen around young and dying stars. We present first results from using PROMOTIONS to successfully measure proper motions in several pre-planetary nebulae (transition objects between the red giant and planetary nebula phases), using images taken 7-10 years apart with the WFPC2 and ACS instruments on board HST. The authors are grateful to NASA's Undergradute Scholars Research Program (USRP) for supporting this research.

  3. Perceived health from biological motion predicts voting behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Robin S S; Arend, Isabel; Ward, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Body motion signals socially relevant traits like the sex, age, and even the genetic quality of actors and may therefore facilitate various social judgements. By examining ratings and voting decisions based solely on body motion of political candidates, we considered how the candidates' motion affected people's judgements and voting behaviour. In two experiments, participants viewed stick figure motion displays made from videos of politicians in public debate. Participants rated the motion displays for a variety of social traits and then indicated their vote preference. In both experiments, perceived physical health was the single best predictor of vote choice, and no two-factor model produced significant improvement. Notably, although attractiveness and leadership correlated with voting behaviour, neither provided additional explanatory power to a single-factor model of health alone. Our results demonstrate for the first time that motion can produce systematic vote preferences. PMID:20094942

  4. Experimental Harmonic Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, G. F. C.

    2014-05-01

    1. Elementary theory of harmonic motion; 2. Experimental work in harmonic motion; Experiment 1. Determination of g by a simple pendulum; Experiment 2. Harmonic motion of a body suspended by a spring; Experiment 3. Harmonic motion of a rigid body suspended by a torsion wire; Experiment 4. Study of a system with variable moment of inertia; Experiment 5. Dynamical determination of ratio of couple to twist for a torsion wire; Experiment 6. Comparison of the moments of inertia of two bodies; Experiment 7. Experiment with a pair of inertia bars; Experiment 8. Determination of the moment of inertia of a rigid pendulum; Experiment 9. Experiment on a pendulum with variable moment of inertia; Experiment 10. Determination of g by a rigid pendulum; Experiment 11. Pendulum on a yielding support; Experiment 12. Determination of the radius of curvature of a concave mirror by the oscillations of a sphere rolling in it; Experiment 13. Determination of g by the oscillations of a rod rolling on a cylinder; Experiment 14. Study of a vibrating system with two degrees of freedom; Note 1. On the vibration of a body suspended from a light spring; Note 2. Periodic time of a pendulum vibrating through a finite arc; Note 3. Periodic time for finite motion; Note 4. Periodic times of a pendulum with two degrees of freedom.

  5. Ultraslow scaled Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodrova, Anna S.; Chechkin, Aleksei V.; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    We define and study in detail utraslow scaled Brownian motion (USBM) characterized by a time dependent diffusion coefficient of the form D(t)≃ 1/t. For unconfined motion the mean squared displacement (MSD) of USBM exhibits an ultraslow, logarithmic growth as function of time, in contrast to the conventional scaled Brownian motion. In a harmonic potential the MSD of USBM does not saturate but asymptotically decays inverse-proportionally to time, reflecting the highly non-stationary character of the process. We show that the process is weakly non-ergodic in the sense that the time averaged MSD does not converge to the regular MSD even at long times, and for unconfined motion combines a linear lag time dependence with a logarithmic term. The weakly non-ergodic behaviour is quantified in terms of the ergodicity breaking parameter. The USBM process is also shown to be ageing: observables of the system depend on the time gap between initiation of the test particle and start of the measurement of its motion. Our analytical results are shown to agree excellently with extensive computer simulations.

  6. Motion Information Inferring Scheme for Multi-View Video Coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Han-Suh; Jeon, Yong-Joon; Jeon, Byeong-Moon

    This letter proposes a motion information inferring scheme for multi-view video coding motivated by the idea that the aspect of motion vector between the corresponding positions in the neighboring view pair is quite similar. The proposed method infers the motion information from the corresponding macroblock in the neighboring view after RD optimization with the existing prediction modes. This letter presents evaluation showing that the method significantly enhances the efficiency especially at high bit rates.

  7. The Particle--Motion Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses solutions to real-world linear particle-motion problems using graphing calculators to simulate the motion and traditional analytic methods of calculus. Applications include (1) changing circular or curvilinear motion into linear motion and (2) linear particle accelerators in physics. (MDH)

  8. An "Emergent Model" for Rate of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Sandra; Pierce, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    Does speed provide a "model for" rate of change in other contexts? Does JavaMathWorlds (JMW), animated simulation software, assist in the development of the "model for" rate of change? This project investigates the transference of understandings of rate gained in a motion context to a non-motion context. Students were 27 14-15 year old students at…

  9. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over timemore » can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.« less

  10. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  11. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  12. Motion detector and analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Unruh, W.P.

    1987-03-23

    Method and apparatus are provided for deriving positive and negative Doppler spectrum to enable analysis of objects in motion, and particularly, objects having rotary motion. First and second returned radar signals are mixed with internal signals to obtain an in-phase process signal and a quadrature process signal. A broad-band phase shifter shifts the quadrature signal through 90/degree/ relative to the in-phase signal over a predetermined frequency range. A pair of signals is output from the broad-band phase shifter which are then combined to provide a first side band signal which is functionally related to a negative Doppler shift spectrum. The distinct positive and negative Doppler spectra may then be analyzed for the motion characteristics of the object being examined.

  13. Spinor approach to gravitational motion and precession

    SciTech Connect

    Hestenes, D.

    1986-06-01

    The translational and rotational equations of motion for a small rigid body in a gravitational field are combined in a single spinor equation. Besides its computational advantages, this unifies the description of gravitational interaction in classical and quantum theory. Explicit expressions for gravitational precession rates are derived.

  14. Mechanics of amoeboid motion

    SciTech Connect

    Dembo, M.

    1986-01-01

    The reactive flow model is a putative description of amoeboid cytoplasm based on the formalism of multifield fluid mechanics. We show by direct numerical computations that the reactive flow model is able to account for various phenomena observed in dissociated cytoplasm and/or in vitro contractile networks. These phenomena include states of relaxation or mechanical equilibrium, as well as transitions between such states, by processes of expansion or contraction. Simulations also indicate the existence of states of chaotic or turbulent cytoplasmic streaming. Finally, simulations yield steady states of coherent motion similar to motions observed in cytoplasm dissociated from the giant amoeba, Chaos carolinensis.

  15. Analysis of swimming motions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallenstein, J.; Huston, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of swimming motion with specific attention given to the flutter kick, the breast-stroke kick, and the breast stroke. The analysis is completely theoretical. It employs a mathematical model of the human body consisting of frustrums of elliptical cones. Dynamical equations are written for this model including both viscous and inertia forces. These equations are then applied with approximated swimming strokes and solved numerically using a digital computer. The procedure is to specify the input of the swimming motion. The computer solution then provides the output displacement, velocity, and rotation or body roll of the swimmer.

  16. The Average of Rates and the Average Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Defines arithmetic, harmonic, and weighted harmonic means, and discusses their properties. Describes the application of these properties in problems involving fuel economy estimates and average rates of motion. Gives example problems and solutions. (CW)

  17. Coupling between corotation and Lindblad resonances in the presence of secular precession rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Moutamid, Maryame; Sicardy, Bruno; Renner, Stéfan

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of two satellites with masses and orbiting a massive central planet in a common plane, near a first order mean motion resonance ( m integer). We consider only the resonant terms of first order in eccentricity in the disturbing potential of the satellites, plus the secular terms causing the orbital apsidal precessions. We obtain a two-degrees-of-freedom system, associated with the two critical resonant angles and , where and are the mean longitude and longitude of periapsis of , respectively, and where the primed quantities apply to . We consider the special case where (restricted problem). The symmetry between the two angles and is then broken, leading to two different kinds of resonances, classically referred to as corotation eccentric resonance (CER) and Lindblad eccentric Resonance (LER), respectively. We write the four reduced equations of motion near the CER and LER, that form what we call the CoraLin model. This model depends upon only two dimensionless parameters that control the dynamics of the system: the distance between the CER and LER, and a forcing parameter that includes both the mass and the orbital eccentricity of the disturbing satellite. Three regimes are found: for the system is integrable, for of order unity, it exhibits prominent chaotic regions, while for large compared to 2, the behavior of the system is regular and can be qualitatively described using simple adiabatic invariant arguments. We apply this model to three recently discovered small Saturnian satellites dynamically linked to Mimas through first order mean motion resonances: Aegaeon, Methone and Anthe. Poincaré surfaces of section reveal the dynamical structure of each orbit, and their proximity to chaotic regions. This work may be useful to explore various scenarii of resonant capture for those satellites.

  18. Strong Motion Recording in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archuleta, R. J.; Fletcher, J. B.; Shakal, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The United States strong motion program began in 1932 when the Coast and Geodetic Survey (C&GS) installed eight strong motion accelerographs in California. During the March 1933 Long Beach earthquake, three of these produced the first strong motion records. With this success the C&GS expanded the number of accelerographs to 71 by 1964. With development of less expensive, mass-produced accelerographs the number of strong motion accelerographs expanded to ~575 by 1972. Responsibilities for operating the network and disseminating data were transferred to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in 1970 and then to the U.S. Geological Survey in 1973. In 1972 the California Legislature established the California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (CSMIP). CSMIP operates accelerographs at 812 ground stations, with multi-channel accelerographs in 228 buildings, 125 lifelines and 37 geotechnical arrays, in California. The USGS and the ANSS effort operate accelerographs at 1584 ground stations, 96 buildings, 14 bridges, 70 dams, and 15 multi-channel geotechnical arrays. The USC Los Angeles array has 78 ground stations; UCSB operates 5 geotechnical arrays; other government and private institutions also operate accelerographs. Almost all accelerographs are now digital with a sampling rate of 200 Hz. Most of the strong motion data can be downloaded from the Center for Engineering Strong Motion Data (http://strongmotioncenter.org). As accelerographs have become more sophisticated, the concept of what constitutes strong motion has blurred because small earthquakes (M ~3) are well recorded on accelerometers as well as seismometers. However, when accelerations are over ~10%g and velocities over ~1 cm/s, the accelerometers remain on scale, providing the unclipped data necessary to analyze the ground motion and its consequences. Strong motion data are essential to the development of ground motion prediction equations, understanding structural response, performance

  19. Choosing a Motion Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of three types of motion detectors: Doppler radar, infrared, and ultrasonic wave, and how they are used on school buses to prevent students from being killed by their own school bus. Other safety devices cited are bus crossing arms and a camera monitor system. (MLF)

  20. Planets in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2005-01-01

    All the planets in the solar system revolve around the Sun in the same direction, clockwise when viewed from above the North Pole. This is referred to as direct motion. From the perspective on the Earth's surface, the planets travel east across the sky in relation to the background of stars. The Sun also moves eastward daily, but this is an…

  1. A Harmonic Motion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, P.; Krakower, Zeev

    2010-01-01

    We present a unit comprising theory, simulation and experiment for a body oscillating on a vertical spring, in which the simultaneous use of a force probe and an ultrasonic range finder enables one to explore quantitatively and understand many aspects of simple and damped harmonic motions. (Contains 14 figures.)

  2. Solar Motion from Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treschman, Keith

    2009-01-01

    At noon throughout the year the Sun has a north-south and east-west motion around the meridian. Earliest/latest sunrises and sunsets do not occur at the solstices and the effect is more pronounced with decreasing latitude. This phenomenon is calculated for 25 Australian cities and the following observations are recorded: (1) The latest sunrise…

  3. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a…

  4. Marbles in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Helen; Meyers, Bernice; Schmidt, William

    1999-01-01

    Marbles were successfully used to help primary students develop concepts of motion. Marble-unit activities began with shaking and rattling inference bags and predicting by listening just how many marbles were in each bag. Students made qualitative and quantitative observations of the marbles, manipulated marbles with a partner, and observed…

  5. Projectile Motion Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucie, Pierre

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes projectile motion using symmetry and simple geometry. Deduces the direction of velocity at any point, range, time of flight, maximum height, safety parabola, and maximum range for a projectile launched upon a plane inclined at any angle with respect to the horizontal. (Author/GA)

  6. A world in motion

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A World in Motion is a physical science curriculum supplement for grades four, five, and six which responds to the need to promote and teach sound science and mathematics concepts. Using the A World in Motion kits, teachers work in partnership with practicing engineer or scientists volunteers to provide students with fun, exciting, and relevant hands-on science and math experiences. During the A World in Motion experience, students work together in {open_quotes}Engineering Design Teams{close_quotes} exploring physics concepts through a series of activities. Each student is assigned a role as either a facilities engineer, development engineer, test engineer, or project engineer and is given responsibilities paralleling those of engineers in industry. The program culminates in a {open_quotes}Design Review{close_quotes} where students can communicate their results, demonstrate their designs, and receive recognition for their efforts. They are given a chance to take on responsibility and build self-esteem. Since January 1991, over 12,000 volunteers engineers have been involved with the program, with a distribution of 20,000 A World in Motion kit throughout the U.S. and Canada.

  7. Theory of orthodontic motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepe, S.; Pepe, W. D.; Strauss, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A general theory of orthodontic motion is developed that can be applied to determine the forces necessary to induce a given tooth to move to the predetermined desirable position. It is assumed that the natural (nonorthodontic) forces may be represented by a periodic function and the orthodontic forces may be superimposed upon the natural forces. A simple expression is derived for the applied stress.

  8. Introducing Simple Harmonic Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    2002-01-01

    Explains the origin and significance of harmonic motion which is an important topic that has wide application in the world. Describes the phenomenon by using an auxiliary circle to help illustrate the key relationships between acceleration, displacement, time, velocity, and phase. (Contains 16 references.) (Author/YDS)

  9. Superluminal motion (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malykin, G. B.; Romanets, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    Prior to the development of Special Relativity, no restrictions were imposed on the velocity of the motion of particles and material bodies, as well as on energy transfer and signal propagation. At the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, it was shown that a charge that moves at a velocity faster than the speed of light in an optical medium, in particular, in vacuum, gives rise to impact radiation, which later was termed the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation. Shortly after the development of Special Relativity, some researchers considered the possibility of superluminal motion. In 1923, the Soviet physicist L.Ya. Strum suggested the existence of tachyons, which, however, have not been discovered yet. Superluminal motions can occur only for images, e.g., for so-called "light spots," which were considered in 1972 by V.L. Ginzburg and B.M. Bolotovskii. These spots can move with a superluminal phase velocity but are incapable of transferring energy and information. Nevertheless, these light spots may induce quite real generation of microwave radiation in closed waveguides and create the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation in vacuum. In this work, we consider various paradoxes, illusions, and artifacts associated with superluminal motion.

  10. Linear motion valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The linear motion valve is described. The valve spool employs magnetically permeable rings, spaced apart axially, which engage a sealing assembly having magnetically permeable pole pieces in magnetic relationship with a magnet. The gap between the ring and the pole pieces is sealed with a ferrofluid. Depletion of the ferrofluid is minimized.

  11. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-03-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a bicycle wheel.

  12. V1 neurons respond differently to object motion versus motion from eye movements

    PubMed Central

    Troncoso, Xoana G.; McCamy, Michael B.; Jazi, Ali Najafian; Cui, Jie; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Macknik, Stephen L.; Costela, Francisco M.; Martinez-Conde, Susana

    2015-01-01

    How does the visual system differentiate self-generated motion from motion in the external world? Humans can discern object motion from identical retinal image displacements induced by eye movements, but the brain mechanisms underlying this ability are unknown. Here we exploit the frequent production of microsaccades during ocular fixation in the primate to compare primary visual cortical responses to self-generated motion (real microsaccades) versus motion in the external world (object motion mimicking microsaccades). Real and simulated microsaccades were randomly interleaved in the same viewing condition, thereby producing equivalent oculomotor and behavioural engagement. Our results show that real microsaccades generate biphasic neural responses, consisting of a rapid increase in the firing rate followed by a slow and smaller-amplitude suppression that drops below baseline. Simulated microsaccades generate solely excitatory responses. These findings indicate that V1 neurons can respond differently to internally and externally generated motion, and expand V1's potential role in information processing and visual stability during eye movements. PMID:26370518

  13. Space station rotational equations of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheinfurth, M. H.; Carroll, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic equations of motion are developed which describe the rotational motion for a large space structure having rotating appendages. The presence of the appendages produce torque coupling terms which are dependent on the inertia properties of the appendages and the rotational rates for both the space structure and the appendages. These equations were formulated to incorporate into the Space Station Attitude Control and Stabilization Test Bed to accurately describe the influence rotating solar arrays and thermal radiators have on the dynamic behavior of the Space Station.

  14. Ship motion pattern directed VTOL letdown guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phatak, A. V.; Karmali, M. S.; Paulk, C. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    This paper examines ship motion pattern directed letdown guidance strategies for landing a VTOL aircraft onboard a small aviation ship under adverse environmental conditions. Off-line computer simulation of the shipboard landing task is utilized for assessing the relative merits of the proposed guidance schemes. A sum of seventy sinusoids representation is used to model the ship motion time histories. The touchdown performance of a nonimal constant-rate-of-descent (CROD) letdown strategy serves as a benchmark for ranking the performance of the alternative letdown schemes.

  15. Do Fish Perceive Illusory Motion?

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Simone; Agrillo, Christian; Dadda, Marco; Bisazza, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Motion illusion refers to a perception of motion that is absent or different in the physical stimulus. These illusions are a powerful non-invasive tool for understanding the neurobiology of vision because they tell us, indirectly, how we process motion. There is general agreement in ascribing motion illusion to higher-level processing in the visual cortex, but debate remains about the exact role of eye movements and cortical networks in triggering it. Surprisingly, there have been no studies investigating global illusory motion evoked by static patterns in animal species other than humans. Herein, we show that fish perceive one of the most studied motion illusions, the Rotating Snakes. Fish responded similarly to real and illusory motion. The demonstration that complex global illusory motion is not restricted to humans and can be found even in species that do not have a cortex paves the way to develop animal models to study the neurobiological bases of motion perception. PMID:25246001

  16. Motion dominance in binocular rivalry depends on extraretinal motions.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Ryohei; Motoyoshi, Isamu; Sato, Takao

    2016-01-01

    In binocular rivalry, moving stimulus is dominant over stationary stimulus. This is called motion dominance. The motion here is usually a motion defined on the retina (retinal motion). However, motion can be defined in several different coordinates. It can be defined with respect to objects in the background (object-based motion) or to observers' head or body (spatiotopic motion), as well as to the retinal coordinate. In this study, we examined the role of motions defined by these three coordinates. A dichoptic pair of gratings was presented to create a binocular rivalry, one of which was moving and the other stationary. A fixation point and a reference background were either moving with the grating or stationary, depending on the condition. Different combinations of the three types of motions were created by having the observer track the fixation point or the background when they are moving. It was found that the retinal motion does not necessarily yield motion dominance, and that the motion dominance is determined by the combination of motions defined by different coordinate systems. PMID:26943347

  17. Phytoplankton's motion in turbulent ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of turbulence on upward motion of phytoplankton. Interaction with the flow is described by the Pedley-Kessler model considering spherical microorganisms. We find a range of parameters when the upward drift is only weakly perturbed or when turbulence completely randomizes the drift direction. When the perturbation is small, the drift is either determined by the local vorticity or is Gaussian. We find a range of parameters where the phytoplankton interaction with the flow can be described consistently as diffusion of orientation in effective potential. By solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation we find exponential steady-state distribution of phytoplankton's propulsion orientation. We further identify the range of parameters where phytoplankton's drift velocity with respect to the flow is determined uniquely by its position. In this case, one can describe phytoplankton's motion by a smooth flow and phytoplankton concentrates on fractal. We find fractal dimensions and demonstrate that phytoplankton forms vertical stripes in space with a nonisotropic pair-correlation function of concentration increased in the vertical direction. The probability density function of the distance between two particles obeys power law with the negative exponent given by the ratio of integrals of the turbulent energy spectrum. We find the regime of strong clustering where the exponent is of order one so that turbulence increases the rate of collisions by a large factor. The predictions hold for Navier-Stokes turbulence and stand for testing.

  18. Phytoplankton's motion in turbulent ocean.

    PubMed

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of turbulence on upward motion of phytoplankton. Interaction with the flow is described by the Pedley-Kessler model considering spherical microorganisms. We find a range of parameters when the upward drift is only weakly perturbed or when turbulence completely randomizes the drift direction. When the perturbation is small, the drift is either determined by the local vorticity or is Gaussian. We find a range of parameters where the phytoplankton interaction with the flow can be described consistently as diffusion of orientation in effective potential. By solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation we find exponential steady-state distribution of phytoplankton's propulsion orientation. We further identify the range of parameters where phytoplankton's drift velocity with respect to the flow is determined uniquely by its position. In this case, one can describe phytoplankton's motion by a smooth flow and phytoplankton concentrates on fractal. We find fractal dimensions and demonstrate that phytoplankton forms vertical stripes in space with a nonisotropic pair-correlation function of concentration increased in the vertical direction. The probability density function of the distance between two particles obeys power law with the negative exponent given by the ratio of integrals of the turbulent energy spectrum. We find the regime of strong clustering where the exponent is of order one so that turbulence increases the rate of collisions by a large factor. The predictions hold for Navier-Stokes turbulence and stand for testing. PMID:26274279

  19. Block-classified motion compensation scheme for digital video

    SciTech Connect

    Zafar, S.; Zhang, Ya-Qin; Jabbari, B.

    1996-03-01

    A novel scheme for block-based motion compensation is introduced in which a block is classified according to the energy that is directly related to the motion activity it represents. This classification allows more flexibility in controlling the bit rate arid the signal-to-noise ratio and results in a reduction in motion search complexity. The method introduced is not dependent on the particular type of motion search algorithm implemented and can thus be used with any method assuming that the underlying matching criteria used is minimum absolute difference. It has been shown that the method is superior to a simple motion compensation algorithm where all blocks are motion compensated regardless of the energy resulting after the displaced difference.

  20. Relative motion of near orbiting satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eades, J. B., Jr.; Drewry, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The relative motion of two particles on adjacent orbits about the same primary has been investigated under the condition that both motions have the same period. The geometrical properties of the relative displacement and velocity traces, on representative planes, are studied. A complete state of the motion is given; and, the range and range-rate variations, over one or more orbits, are described. It has been found that cusps appear on some of the traces provided that a proper relationship exists between the eccentricity and inclination. (Here, one particle moves on a circular path while the second moves on an ellipse). The conditions for which cusps appear are given, and typical traces are shown.

  1. Secular motion around synchronously orbiting planetary satellites.

    PubMed

    Lara, Martin; San-Juan, Juan F; Ferrer, Sebastián

    2005-12-01

    We investigate the secular motion of a spacecraft around the natural satellite of a planet. The satellite rotates synchronously with its mean motion around the planet. Our model takes into account the gravitational potential of the satellite up to the second order, and the third-body perturbation in Hill's approximation. Close to the satellite, the ratio of rotation rate of the satellite to mean motion of the orbiter is small. When considering this ratio as a small parameter, the Coriolis effect is a first-order perturbation, while the third-body tidal attraction, the ellipticity effect, and the oblateness perturbation remain at higher orders. Then, we apply perturbation theory and find that a third-order approach is enough to show the influence of the satellite's ellipticity in the pericenter dynamics. Finally, we discuss the averaged system in the three-dimensional parametric space, and provide a global description of the flow. PMID:16396586

  2. Site-specific volumetric analysis of lung tumour motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu, Huanmei; Sandison, George A.; Langer, Mark; Shirato, Hiroki

    2010-06-01

    The treatment of lung cancer with radiation therapy is hindered by respiratory motion. Real-time adjustments to compensate for this motion are hampered by mechanical system latencies and imaging-rate restrictions. To better understand tumour motion behaviour for adaptive image-guided radiation therapy of lung cancer, the volume of a tumour's motion space was investigated. Motion data were collected by tracking an implanted fiducial using fluoroscopy at 30 Hz during treatment sessions. A total of 637 treatment fractions from 31 tumours were used in this study. For each fraction, data points collected from three consecutive breathing cycles were used to identify instantaneous tumour location. A convex hull was created over these data points, defining the tumour motion envelope. The study sought a correlation between the tumour location in the lung and the convex hull's volume and shape. It was found that tumours located in the upper apex had smaller motion envelopes (<50 mm3), whereas tumours located near the chest wall or diaphragm had larger envelopes (>70 mm3). Tumours attached to fixed anatomical structures had small motion spaces. Three general shapes described the tumour motion envelopes: 50% of motion envelopes enclosed largely 1D oscillation, 38% enclosed an ellipsoid path, 6% enclosed an arced path and 6% were of hybrid shape. This location-space correlation suggests it may be useful in developing a predictive model, but more work needs to be done to verify it.

  3. Computational Motion Phantoms and Statistical Models of Respiratory Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Klinder, Tobias; Lorenz, Cristian

    Breathing motion is not a robust and 100 % reproducible process, and inter- and intra-fractional motion variations form an important problem in radiotherapy of the thorax and upper abdomen. A widespread consensus nowadays exists that it would be useful to use prior knowledge about respiratory organ motion and its variability to improve radiotherapy planning and treatment delivery. This chapter discusses two different approaches to model the variability of respiratory motion. In the first part, we review computational motion phantoms, i.e. computerized anatomical and physiological models. Computational phantoms are excellent tools to simulate and investigate the effects of organ motion in radiation therapy and to gain insight into methods for motion management. The second part of this chapter discusses statistical modeling techniques to describe the breathing motion and its variability in a population of 4D images. Population-based models can be generated from repeatedly acquired 4D images of the same patient (intra-patient models) and from 4D images of different patients (inter-patient models). The generation of those models is explained and possible applications of those models for motion prediction in radiotherapy are exemplified. Computational models of respiratory motion and motion variability have numerous applications in radiation therapy, e.g. to understand motion effects in simulation studies, to develop and evaluate treatment strategies or to introduce prior knowledge into the patient-specific treatment planning.

  4. Liquid Motion Experiment Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato David J.; Dalton, Penni J.; Dodge, Franklin T.; Green, Steve

    1998-01-01

    The Liquid Motion Experiment (LME), designed to study the effects of liquid motion in rotating tanks, was flown on STS 84. LME was essentially a spin table that created a realistic nutation motion of scale-model tanks containing liquid. TWo spherical and two cylindrical transparent tanks were tested simultaneously, and three sets of such tanks were employed to vary liquid viscosity, fill level, and propellant management device (PMD) design. All the tanks were approximately 4.5 inches diameter. The primary test measurements were the radial and tangential torques exerted on the tanks by the liquid. Resonant frequencies and damping of the liquid oscillations were determined by sine sweep tests. For a given tank shape, the resonant frequency depended on fill level. For the cylindrical tanks, the resonances had somewhat different frequencies for the tangential axis (0.55 to 0.75 times spin rate) and the radial axis (0.73 to 0.78 times spin rate), and the tangential axis resonance agreed more closely with available analytical models. For the spherical tanks, the resonant frequencies were between 0.74 to 0.77 times the spin rate and were the same for the tangential and radial axes. The damping coefficients varied from about I% to 3% of critical, depending on tank shape, fill level, and liquid viscosity. 'Me viscous energy dissipation rates of the liquid oscillations were determined from sine dwell tests. The LME energy dissipation rates varied from 0.3 to 0.5 times the estimates obtained from scaling previous ground tests and spacecraft flight data. The PNDs sometimes enhanced the resonances and energy dissipation rates and sometimes decreased them, which points out the need to understand better the effects of PMD on liquid motion as a function of PMD and tank design.

  5. Speed tuning of motion segmentation and discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, G. S.; Mestre, D. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1999-01-01

    Motion transparency requires that the visual system distinguish different motion vectors and selectively integrate similar motion vectors over space into the perception of multiple surfaces moving through or over each other. Using large-field (7 degrees x 7 degrees) displays containing two populations of random-dots moving in the same (horizontal) direction but at different speeds, we examined speed-based segmentation by measuring the speed difference above which observers can perceive two moving surfaces. We systematically investigated this 'speed-segmentation' threshold as a function of speed and stimulus duration, and found that it increases sharply for speeds above approximately 8 degrees/s. In addition, speed-segmentation thresholds decrease with stimulus duration out to approximately 200 ms. In contrast, under matched conditions, speed-discrimination thresholds stay low at least out to 16 degrees/s and decrease with increasing stimulus duration at a faster rate than for speed segmentation. Thus, motion segmentation and motion discrimination exhibit different speed selectivity and different temporal integration characteristics. Results are discussed in terms of the speed preferences of different neuronal populations within the primate visual cortex.

  6. Motion compensation on synthetic aperture sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, R.; Acheroy, M.; Dupont, Y.

    2006-09-01

    High resolution sonars are required to detect and classify mines on the sea-bed. Synthetic aperture sonar increases the sonar cross range resolution by several orders of magnitudes while maintaining or increasing the area search rate. The resolution is however strongly dependent on the precision with which the motion errors of the platform can be estimated. The term micro-navigation is used to describe this very special requirement for sub-wavelength relative positioning of the platform. Therefore algorithms were designed to estimate those motion errors and to correct for them during the (ω, k)-reconstruction phase. To validate the quality of the motion estimation algorithms a single transmitter/multiple receiver simulator was build, allowing to generate multiple point targets with or without surge and/or sway and/or yaw motion errors. The surge motion estimation is shown on real data, which were taken during a sea trial in November of 2003 with the low frequency (12 kHz) side scan sonar (LFSS) moving on a rail positioned on the sea-bed near Marciana Marina on the Elba Island, Italy.

  7. Theory of coorbital motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopliv, Alexander Stephen

    The gravitational interaction of two small coorbital satellites in nearly identical orbits about a large central mass is investigated. This involves the study of the general three-body problem as well as the restricted three-body problem. Since the eccentricity is small, dynamical models are developed by expanding the equations of motion in rotating polar coordinates about a circular orbit. For numerical investigation, a combination of Hill's variables and equinoctial variables is used to find series solutions expanded in time. From these series solutions, highly accurate averaged equations are determined. To study the stability of the motion, periodic orbits are generated and the linearized stability is found from the eigenvalues of the state transition matrix.

  8. Visible Motion Blur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor); Ahumada, Albert J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of measuring motion blur is disclosed comprising obtaining a moving edge temporal profile r(sub 1)(k) of an image of a high-contrast moving edge, calculating the masked local contrast m(sub1)(k) for r(sub 1)(k) and the masked local contrast m(sub 2)(k) for an ideal step edge waveform r(sub 2)(k) with the same amplitude as r(sub 1)(k), and calculating the measure or motion blur Psi as a difference function, The masked local contrasts are calculated using a set of convolution kernels scaled to simulate the performance of the human visual system, and Psi is measured in units of just-noticeable differences.

  9. Ionic motion in crystalline cryolite.

    PubMed

    Foy, Lindsay; Madden, Paul A

    2006-08-10

    The character of the ion dynamics in crystalline cryolite, Na(3)AlF(6), a model double perovskite-structured mineral, has been examined in computer simulations using a polarizable ionic potential obtained by force-fitting to ab initio electronic structure calculations. NMR studies, and conductivity measurements, have indicated a high degree of mobility, in both Na(+) ion diffusion and reorientation of the AlF(6) octahedral units. The simulations reproduce the low-temperature (tilted) crystal structure and the existence of a transition to a cubic structure at elevated temperatures, in agreement with diffraction measurements, though the calculated transition temperature is too low. The reorientational dynamics of the AlF(6) octahedra is shown to consist of a hopping motion between the various tilted positions of the low-temperature form, even above the transition temperature. The rate of reorientation estimated by extrapolation to the temperature régime of the NMR measurements is consistent with the experimental data. In addition, we report a novel cooperative "tilt-swapping" motion of the differently tilted sublattices, just below the transition temperature. The perfect crystals show no Na(+) diffusion, in apparent disagreement with observation. We argue, following previous analyses of the cryolite phase diagram, that the diffusion observed in the experimental studies is a consequence of defects that are intrinsic to the thermodynamically stable form of cryolite. By introducing defects into the simulation cell, we obtain diffusion rates that are consistent with the NMR and conductivity measurements. Finally, we demonstrate a link between diffusion of the Na(+) ions and the reorientation of AlF(6) units, though the correlation between the two is not very strong. PMID:16884249

  10. Relativistic Motion in Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. H.

    1986-02-01

    This is a summary of an article which will appear in "Highlights of Modern Astrophysics" (Cohen, 1985). The majority of strong core-dominated radio sources show superluminal motion and rapid variations in flux density. Some of them also have X-rays which are weaker than the amount predicted by the inverse-Compton effect. All these characteristics can be explained by rela tivistic motion. The superluminal motion and the unusual rapidity of the variations are kinematic effects. The radiating source nearly keeps up with its own radiation, with a consequent reduction in time scales. The weak X-rays are an artifact introduced when the inverse-Compton cal culation is based on the spectrum measured in the terrestrial coordinate system. When allowance is made for motion towards the observer,the measurements give a lower limit to the Doppler factor of the moving source. The common model uses a narrow jet pointed at angle θ to the line of sight, and carrying luminous blobs moving at Lorentz factor y. This model can explain all the above effects, and also the common core-jet radio morphology. Application of the model gives values of y between 5 and 10, and values of θ less than 200. The Doppler effect boosts t e flux density of those jets which are pointed nearly at us. The strong sources we see must therefore form a small subset of a large population of sources most of which are misdi rected and weak. It is likely that the parent population consists of the "classical double" quasars. Nearly all of the superluminal sources have low surface brightness halos, which could be the outer double radio lobes seen end-on.

  11. Human comfort response to random motions with a dominant transverse motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Subjective ride comfort response ratings were measured on the Langley Visual Motion Simulator with transverse acceleration inputs with various power spectra shapes and magnitudes. The results show only little influence of spectra shape on comfort response. The effects of magnitude on comfort response indicate the applicability of psychophysical precepts for comfort modeling.

  12. Human confort response to random motions with a dominant rolling motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Subjective ride comfort response ratings were measured on a visual motion simulator with rolling velocity inputs with various power spectra shapes and magnitudes. The results show only little influence of spectra shape on comfort response. The effects of magnitude on comfort response indicate the applicability of psychophysical precepts for comfort modeling.

  13. The vertical motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosein, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Today's flight simulators, such as NASA's multimillion dollar Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS), recreate an authentic aircraft environment, and reproduce the sensations of flight by mechanically generating true physical events. In addition to their application as a training tool for pilots, simulators have become essential in the design, construction, and testing of new aircraft. Simulators allow engineers to study an aircraft's flight performance and characteristics without the cost or risk of an actual test flight. Because of their practicality, simulators will become more and more important in the development and design of new, safer aircraft.

  14. Motion analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.

    1985-01-01

    Human motion analysis is the task of converting actual human movements into computer readable data. Such movement information may be obtained though active or passive sensing methods. Active methods include physical measuring devices such as goniometers on joints of the body, force plates, and manually operated sensors such as a Cybex dynamometer. Passive sensing de-couples the position measuring device from actual human contact. Passive sensors include Selspot scanning systems (since there is no mechanical connection between the subject's attached LEDs and the infrared sensing cameras), sonic (spark-based) three-dimensional digitizers, Polhemus six-dimensional tracking systems, and image processing systems based on multiple views and photogrammetric calculations.

  15. Space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderploeg, J. M.; Stewart, D. F.; Davis, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Space motion sickness clinical characteristics, time course, prediction of susceptibility, and effectiveness of countermeasures were evaluated. Although there is wide individual variability, there appear to be typical patterns of symptom development. The duration of symptoms ranges from several hours to four days with the majority of individuals being symptom free by the end of third day. The etiology of this malady remains uncertain but evidence points to reinterpretation of otolith inputs as being a key factor in the response of the neurovestibular system. Prediction of susceptibility and severity remains unsatisfactory. Countermeasures tried include medications, preflight adaptation, and autogenic feedback training. No countermeasure is entirely successful in eliminating or alleviating symptoms.

  16. Rolling and slipping motion of Euler's disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caps, H.; Dorbolo, S.; Ponte, S.; Croisier, H.; Vandewalle, N.

    2004-05-01

    We present an experimental study of the motion of a circular disk spun onto a table. With the help of a high speed video system, the temporal evolution of (i) the inclination angle α , (ii) the angular velocity ω , and (iii) the precession rate Ω are studied. The influence of the mass of the disk as well as the friction between the disk and the supporting surface are considered. Both inclination angle and angular velocity are observed to decrease according to a power law. We also show that the precession rate diverges as the motion stops. Measurements are performed very near the collapse as well as on long range times. Times to collapse have been also measured. Results are compared with previous theoretical and experimental works. The major source of energy dissipation is found to be the slipping of the disk on the plane.

  17. Salient motion features for video quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Ćulibrk, Dubravko; Mirković, Milan; Zlokolica, Vladimir; Pokrić, Maja; Crnojević, Vladimir; Kukolj, Dragan

    2011-04-01

    Design of algorithms that are able to estimate video quality as perceived by human observers is of interest for a number of applications. Depending on the video content, the artifacts introduced by the coding process can be more or less pronounced and diversely affect the quality of videos, as estimated by humans. While it is well understood that motion affects both human attention and coding quality, this relationship has only recently started gaining attention among the research community, when video quality assessment (VQA) is concerned. In this paper, the effect of calculating several objective measure features, related to video coding artifacts, separately for salient motion and other regions of the frames of the sequence is examined. In addition, we propose a new scheme for quality assessment of coded video streams, which takes into account salient motion. Standardized procedure has been used to calculate the Mean Opinion Score (MOS), based on experiments conducted with a group of non-expert observers viewing standard definition (SD) sequences. MOS measurements were taken for nine different SD sequences, coded using MPEG-2 at five different bit-rates. Eighteen different published approaches related to measuring the amount of coding artifacts objectively on a single-frame basis were implemented. Additional features describing the intensity of salient motion in the frames, as well as the intensity of coding artifacts in the salient motion regions were proposed. Automatic feature selection was performed to determine the subset of features most correlated to video quality. The results show that salient-motion-related features enhance prediction and indicate that the presence of blocking effect artifacts and blurring in the salient regions and variance and intensity of temporal changes in non-salient regions influence the perceived video quality. PMID:20876020

  18. Investigating the Highest Proper Motion Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jao, Wei-Chun; Henry, Todd; Subasavage, John; Bean, Jacob

    2002-02-01

    There currently are 601 stars (502 systems) with proper motion faster than 1 arcsec/year (hereafter, MOTION stars). Among these MOTION stars, there are 186 systems (37%) without complete VRI photometric information on a standard system. We propose to obtain VRI band photometry from both CTIO and KPNO in order to characterize these stars. 75% of MOTION stars are estimated to lie within 25 pc of the Sun. These results will allow us to understand the colors, temperatures and luminosities for these fast moving objects and provide a complete picture of this definitive sample. The complete characterization of this sample comprises the thesis project of PI Jao. By obtaining VRI photometry for the MOTION stars , we will be able to identify new nearby star candidates for our second generation parallax project, CTIOPI2, planned as part of the new small telescope consortium at CTIO. The frames taken can be used to evaluate appropriate setup frames for future astrometry series. We also expect to discover new companions in the photometry frames. These companions can be identified by (1) confirming common proper motion using DSS frames and/or (2) initiating deep photometric searches by combining the VRI data with JHK photometry of nearby sources in 2MASS. Both types of new companions will contribute to our growing database that is being used to investigate the stellar multiplicity rate. Finally, the VRI photometry will allow us to identify the less common subdwarfs, white dwarfs or close binaries, many of which will be added to the lists of new nearby stars that will be the targets for future space missions such as SIM and TPF.

  19. Atypical Integration of Motion Signals in Autism Spectrum Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Caroline E.; Martin, Alex; Baker, Chris I.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Vision in Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC) is characterized by enhanced perception of local elements, but impaired perception of global percepts. Deficits in coherent motion perception seem to support this characterization, but the roots and robustness of such deficits remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the dynamics of the perceptual decision-making network known to support coherent motion perception. In a series of forced-choice coherent motion perception tests, we parametrically varied a single stimulus dimension, viewing duration, to test whether the rate at which evidence is accumulated towards a global decision is atypical in ASC. 40 adult participants (20 ASC) performed a classic motion discrimination task, manually indicating the global direction of motion in a random-dot kinematogram across a range of coherence levels (2–75%) and stimulus-viewing durations (200–1500 ms). We report a deficit in global motion perception at short viewing durations in ASC. Critically, however, we found that increasing the amount of time over which motion signals could be integrated reduced the magnitude of the deficit, such that at the longest duration there was no difference between the ASC and control groups. Further, the deficit in motion integration at the shortest duration was significantly associated with the severity of autistic symptoms in our clinical population, and was independent from measures of intelligence. These results point to atypical integration of motion signals during the construction of a global percept in ASC. Based on the neural correlates of decision-making in global motion perception our findings suggest the global motion deficit observed in ASC could reflect a slower or more variable response from the primary motion area of the brain or longer accumulation of evidence towards a decision-bound in parietal areas. PMID:23185249

  20. Waves in Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGourty, L.; Rideout, K.

    2005-12-01

    "Waves in Motion" This teaching unit was created by Leslie McGourty and Ken Rideout under the Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program at MIT Haystack Observatory during the summer of 2005. The RET program is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. The goals of this teaching unit are to deepen students' understanding about waves, wave motion, and the electromagnetic spectrum as a whole. Specifically students will comprehend the role radio waves play in our daily lives and in the investigation of the universe. The lessons can be used in a high school physics, earth science or astronomy curriculum. The unit consists of a series of interlocking lectures, activities, and investigations that can be used as stand alone units to supplement a teacher's existing curriculum, as an independent investigation for a student, or as a long exploration into radio astronomy with a theme of waves in space: how and where they carry their information. Special emphasis is given to the Relativity theories in honor of the "World Year of Physics" to celebrate Einstein's 1905 contributions. The lessons are currently being implemented at the high school level, the preliminary results of which will be presented. At the end of the academic year, the units will be evaluated and updated, reflecting student input and peer review after which they will be posted on the internet for teachers to use in their classrooms.

  1. Stochastic blind motion deblurring.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lei; Gregson, James; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Blind motion deblurring from a single image is a highly under-constrained problem with many degenerate solutions. A good approximation of the intrinsic image can, therefore, only be obtained with the help of prior information in the form of (often nonconvex) regularization terms for both the intrinsic image and the kernel. While the best choice of image priors is still a topic of ongoing investigation, this research is made more complicated by the fact that historically each new prior requires the development of a custom optimization method. In this paper, we develop a stochastic optimization method for blind deconvolution. Since this stochastic solver does not require the explicit computation of the gradient of the objective function and uses only efficient local evaluation of the objective, new priors can be implemented and tested very quickly. We demonstrate that this framework, in combination with different image priors produces results with Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) values that match or exceed the results obtained by much more complex state-of-the-art blind motion deblurring algorithms. PMID:25974941

  2. Tiling Motion Patches.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyunglyul; Kim, Manmyung; Hwang, Youngseok; Lee, Jehee

    2013-05-01

    Simulating multiple character interaction is challenging because character actions must be carefully coordinated to align their spatial locations and synchronized with each other. We present an algorithm to create a dense crowd of virtual characters interacting with each other. The interaction may involve physical contacts, such as hand shaking, hugging, and carrying a heavy object collaboratively. We address the problem by collecting deformable motion patches, each of which describes an episode of multiple interacting characters, and tiling them spatially and temporally. The tiling of motion patches generates a seamless simulation of virtual characters interacting with each other in a non-trivial manner. Our tiling algorithm uses a combination of stochastic sampling and deterministic search to address the discrete and continuous aspects of the tiling problem. Our tiling algorithm made it possible to automatically generate highly-complex animation of multiple interacting characters. We achieved the level of complexity far beyond the current state-of-the-art animation techniques could generate, in terms of the diversity of human behaviors and the spatial/temporal density of interpersonal interactions. PMID:23669532

  3. Tiling motion patches.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyunglyul; Kim, Manmyung; Hwang, Youngseok; Lee, Jehee

    2013-11-01

    Simulating multiple character interaction is challenging because character actions must be carefully coordinated to align their spatial locations and synchronized with each other. We present an algorithm to create a dense crowd of virtual characters interacting with each other. The interaction may involve physical contacts, such as hand shaking, hugging, and carrying a heavy object collaboratively. We address the problem by collecting deformable motion patches, each of which describes an episode of multiple interacting characters, and tiling them spatially and temporally. The tiling of motion patches generates a seamless simulation of virtual characters interacting with each other in a nontrivial manner. Our tiling algorithm uses a combination of stochastic sampling and deterministic search to address the discrete and continuous aspects of the tiling problem. Our tiling algorithm made it possible to automatically generate highly complex animation of multiple interacting characters. We achieve the level of interaction complexity far beyond the current state of the art that animation techniques could generate, in terms of the diversity of human behaviors and the spatial/temporal density of interpersonal interactions. PMID:24029911

  4. Integrated Reproduction of Human Motion Components by Motion Copying System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunashima, Noboru; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Currently, the development of leading-edge technology for recording and loading human motion on the basis of haptic information is required in the field of manufacturing and human support. Human movement is an assembly of motion components. Since human movements should be supported by a robot in real time, it is necessary to integrate the morion components, which were saved earlier. Once such motion integration is realized, future technology for use in daily human life is developed. This paper proposes the integrated reproduction of the decomposed components of human motion by using a motion copying system. This system is the key technology for the realization of the acquisition, saving and reproduction of the real-world haptic information. By the proposed method, it is possible not only to achieve expert skill acquisition, skill transfer to robots, and power assist for each motion component but also to open up new areas of applications.

  5. What you thought you knew about motion sickness isn't necessarily so

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, P. S.; Malmstrom, F. V.

    1984-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms, stimuli, and drug therapy are discussed. Autogenic feedback training (AFT) methods of preventing motion sickness are explained. Research with AFT indicates that participants who had AFT could withstand longer periods of Coriolis acceleration, participants with high or low susceptibility to motion sickness could control their symptoms with AFT, AFT for Coriolis acceleration is transferable to other motion sickness stimuli, and most people can learn AFT, though with varying rates of learning.

  6. Vection and induced visual motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Ian P.

    1991-12-01

    When exposed to a large moving visual display, a person experiences illusory self motion (vection). Specialized devices were used to investigate the relation between illusory visual motion of stationary objects and illusory self motion induced by motion of a visual scene. In a first set of experiments, two distinct components of induced visual motion were measured: exocentric induced motion which causes a stationary object to appear to move with the self, and egocentric induced motion which causes an object to seem to move relative to the self. Another set of experiments was designed to reveal the extent to which vection depends on the presence of stationary objects in the field of view and to explore what types of relative motion between the moving display and the stationary objects most strongly induce vection. It was observed that when all stationary objects were removed, vection had a long latency and was very weak when it occurred. A third set of experiments was designed to reveal the extent to which illusory body tilt induced by viewing a tilted or rotating scene depends on the motion of a visual stimulus and on the geometrical features of the stimulus. The results reveal the relative contributions of visual polarity and visual motion to illusory body tilt and the extent to which visual stimuli can override conflicting stimuli arising from the otolith organs.

  7. 24 CFR 26.16 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Motions. 26.16 Section 26.16... PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.16 Motions. (a) Motions. Requests for... a motion. All motions from the commencement of the action until the issuance of a decision shall...

  8. 24 CFR 26.16 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Motions. 26.16 Section 26.16... PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.16 Motions. (a) Motions. Requests for... a motion. All motions from the commencement of the action until the issuance of a decision shall...

  9. 24 CFR 26.16 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Motions. 26.16 Section 26.16... PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.16 Motions. (a) Motions. Requests for... a motion. All motions from the commencement of the action until the issuance of a decision shall...

  10. 24 CFR 26.16 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 26.16 Section 26.16... PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.16 Motions. (a) Motions. Requests for... a motion. All motions from the commencement of the action until the issuance of a decision shall...

  11. 24 CFR 26.16 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Motions. 26.16 Section 26.16... PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.16 Motions. (a) Motions. Requests for... a motion. All motions from the commencement of the action until the issuance of a decision shall...

  12. Deterministic Brownian Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefan, Gyorgy

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to contribute to the ambitious program of the foundation of developing statistical physics using chaos. We build a deterministic model of Brownian motion and provide a microscopic derivation of the Fokker-Planck equation. Since the Brownian motion of a particle is the result of the competing processes of diffusion and dissipation, we create a model where both diffusion and dissipation originate from the same deterministic mechanism--the deterministic interaction of that particle with its environment. We show that standard diffusion which is the basis of the Fokker-Planck equation rests on the Central Limit Theorem, and, consequently, on the possibility of deriving it from a deterministic process with a quickly decaying correlation function. The sensitive dependence on initial conditions, one of the defining properties of chaos insures this rapid decay. We carefully address the problem of deriving dissipation from the interaction of a particle with a fully deterministic nonlinear bath, that we term the booster. We show that the solution of this problem essentially rests on the linear response of a booster to an external perturbation. This raises a long-standing problem concerned with Kubo's Linear Response Theory and the strong criticism against it by van Kampen. Kubo's theory is based on a perturbation treatment of the Liouville equation, which, in turn, is expected to be totally equivalent to a first-order perturbation treatment of single trajectories. Since the boosters are chaotic, and chaos is essential to generate diffusion, the single trajectories are highly unstable and do not respond linearly to weak external perturbation. We adopt chaotic maps as boosters of a Brownian particle, and therefore address the problem of the response of a chaotic booster to an external perturbation. We notice that a fully chaotic map is characterized by an invariant measure which is a continuous function of the control parameters of the map

  13. Tvashtar in Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This five-frame sequence of New Horizons images captures the giant plume from Io's Tvashtar volcano. Snapped by the probe's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter earlier this year, this first-ever 'movie' of an Io plume clearly shows motion in the cloud of volcanic debris, which extends 330 kilometers (200 miles) above the moon's surface. Only the upper part of the plume is visible from this vantage point -- the plume's source is 130 kilometers (80 miles) below the edge of Io's disk, on the far side of the moon.

    The appearance and motion of the plume is remarkably similar to an ornamental fountain on Earth, replicated on a gigantic scale. The knots and filaments that allow us to track the plume's motion are still mysterious, but this movie is likely to help scientists understand their origin, as well as provide unique information on the plume dynamics.

    Io's hyperactive nature is emphasized by the fact that two other volcanic plumes are also visible off the edge of Io's disk: Masubi at the 7 o'clock position, and a very faint plume, possibly from the volcano Zal, at the 10 o'clock position. Jupiter illuminates the night side of Io, and the most prominent feature visible on the disk is the dark horseshoe shape of the volcano Loki, likely an enormous lava lake. Boosaule Mons, which at 18 kilometers (11 miles) is the highest mountain on Io and one of the highest mountains in the solar system, pokes above the edge of the disk on the right side.

    The five images were obtained over an 8-minute span, with two minutes between frames, from 23:50 to 23:58 Universal Time on March 1, 2007. Io was 3.8 million kilometers (2.4 million miles) from New Horizons; the image is centered at Io coordinates 0 degrees north, 342 degrees west.

    The pictures were part of a sequence designed to look at Jupiter's rings, but planners included Io in the sequence because the moon was passing behind Jupiter's rings at the time.

  14. Effect of vertical motion on current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kallio, Nicholas A.

    1966-01-01

    The effect of vertical motion on the performance of current meters at various stream velocities was evaluated to determine whether accurate discharge measurements can be made from a bobbing boat. Three types of current meters--Ott, Price, and vane types--were tested under conditions simulating a bobbing boat. A known frequency and amplitude of vertical motion were imparted to the current meter, and the related effect on the measured stream velocity was determined. One test of the Price meter was made under actual conditions, using a boat and standard measuring gear. The results of the test under actual conditions verified those obtained by simulating the vertical movements of a boat. The tests show that for stream velocities below 2.5 feet per second the accuracy of all three meters is significantly affected when the meters are subjected to certain conditions of vertical motion that can occur during actual field operations. Both the rate of vertical motion and the frequency of vertical oscillation affect the registration of the meter. The results of these tests, presented in the form of graphs and tables, can be used as a guide to determine whether wind and stream flow are within an acceptable range for a reliable discharge measurement from a boat.

  15. Strong motion duration and earthquake magnitude relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, M.W.; Short, S.A.; Kennedy, R.P.

    1992-06-01

    Earthquake duration is the total time of ground shaking from the arrival of seismic waves until the return to ambient conditions. Much of this time is at relatively low shaking levels which have little effect on seismic structural response and on earthquake damage potential. As a result, a parameter termed ``strong motion duration`` has been defined by a number of investigators to be used for the purpose of evaluating seismic response and assessing the potential for structural damage due to earthquakes. This report presents methods for determining strong motion duration and a time history envelope function appropriate for various evaluation purposes, for earthquake magnitude and distance, and for site soil properties. There are numerous definitions of strong motion duration. For most of these definitions, empirical studies have been completed which relate duration to earthquake magnitude and distance and to site soil properties. Each of these definitions recognizes that only the portion of an earthquake record which has sufficiently high acceleration amplitude, energy content, or some other parameters significantly affects seismic response. Studies have been performed which indicate that the portion of an earthquake record in which the power (average rate of energy input) is maximum correlates most closely with potential damage to stiff nuclear power plant structures. Hence, this report will concentrate on energy based strong motion duration definitions.

  16. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis. PMID:27261363

  17. Perturbed motion at small eccentricities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanov, N. V.

    2015-09-01

    In the study of the motion of planets and moons, it is often necessary to have a simple approximate analytical motion model, which takes into account major perturbations and preserves almost the same accuracy at long time intervals. A precessing ellipse model is used for this purpose. In this paper, it is shown that for small eccentricities this model of the perturbed orbit does not correspond to body motion characteristics. There is perturbed circular motion with a constant zero mean anomaly. The corresponding solution satisfies the Lagrange equations with respect to Keplerian orbital elements. There are two families of solutions with libration and circulation changes in the mean anomaly close to this particular solution. The paper shows how the eccentricity and mean anomaly change in these solutions. Simple analytical models of the motion of the four closest moons of Jupiter consistent with available ephemerides are proposed, which in turn are obtained by the numerical integration of motion equations and are refined by observations.

  18. Simulation System Fidelity Assessment at the Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, Steven D.; Reardon, Scott E.; Tobias, Eric L.; Aponso, Bimal L.

    2013-01-01

    Fidelity is a word that is often used but rarely understood when talking about groundbased simulation. Assessing the cueing fidelity of a ground based flight simulator requires a comparison to actual flight data either directly or indirectly. Two experiments were conducted at the Vertical Motion Simulator using the GenHel UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter math model that was directly compared to flight data. Prior to the experiment the simulator s motion and visual system frequency responses were measured, the aircraft math model was adjusted to account for the simulator motion system delays, and the motion system gains and washouts were tuned for the individual tasks. The tuned motion system fidelity was then assessed against the modified Sinacori criteria. The first experiments showed similar handling qualities ratings (HQRs) to actual flight for a bob-up and sidestep maneuvers. The second experiment showed equivalent HQRs between flight and simulation for the ADS33 slalom maneuver for the two pilot participants. The ADS33 vertical maneuver HQRs were mixed with one pilot rating the flight and simulation the same while the second pilot rated the simulation worse. In addition to recording HQRs on the second experiment, an experimental Simulation Fidelity Rating (SFR) scale developed by the University of Liverpool was tested for applicability to engineering simulators. A discussion of the SFR scale for use on the Vertical Motion Simulator is included in this paper.

  19. A true polar wander model for Neoproterozoic plate motions

    SciTech Connect

    Ripperdan, R.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Recent paleogeographic reconstructions for the interval 750--500 Ma (Neoproterozoic to Late Cambrian) require rapid rates of plate motion and/or rotation around an equatorial Euler pole to accommodate reconstructions for the Early Paleozoic. Motions of this magnitude appear to be very uncommon during the Phanerozoic. A model for plate motions based on the hypothesis that discrete intervals of rapid true polar wander (RTPW) occurred during the Neoproterozoic can account for the paleogeographic changes with minimum amounts of plate motion. The model uses the paleogeographic reconstructions of Hoffman (1991). The following constraints were applied during derivation of the model: (1) relative motions between major continental units were restricted to be combinations of great circle or small circle translations with Euler poles of rotation = spin axis; (2) maximum rates of relative translational plate motion were 0.2 m/yr. Based on these constraints, two separate sets of synthetic plate motion trajectories were determined. The sequence of events in both can be summarized as: (1) A rapid true polar wander event of ca 90[degree] rafting a supercontinent to the spin axis; (2) breakup of the polar supercontinent into two fragments, one with the Congo, West Africa, Amazonia, and Baltica cratons, the other with the Laurentia, East Gondwana, and Kalahari cratons; (3) great circle motion of the blocks towards the equator; (4) small circle motion leading to amalgamation of Gondwana and separation of Laurentia and Baltica. In alternative 1, rifting initiates between East Antarctica and Laurentia and one episode of RTPW is required. Alternative 2 requires two episodes of RTPW; and that rifting occurred first along the eastern margin and later along the western margin of Laurentia. Synthetic plate motion trajectories are compared to existing paleomagnetic and geological data, and implications of the model for paleoclimatic changes during the Neoproterozoic are discussed.

  20. Confining collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis; Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Savoie, Charles; Das, Debasish; Chepizhko, Oleskar; Peruani, Fernando; Saintillan, David

    2014-11-01

    It is well established that geometrical confinement have a significant impact on the structure and the flow properties of complex fluids. Prominent examples include the formation of topological defects in liquid crystals, and the flow instabilities of viscoelastic fluids in curved geometries. In striking contrast very little is known about the macroscopic behavior of confined active fluids. In this talk we show how to motorize plastic colloidal beads and turn them into self-propelled particles. Using microfluidic geometries we demonstrate how confinement impacts their collective motion. Combining quantitative experiments, analytical theory and numerical simulations we show how a population of motile bodies interacting via alignement and repulsive interactions self-organizes into a single heterogeneous macroscopic vortex that lives on the verge of a phase separation.

  1. Multivariate respiratory motion prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürichen, R.; Wissel, T.; Ernst, F.; Schlaefer, A.; Schweikard, A.

    2014-10-01

    In extracranial robotic radiotherapy, tumour motion is compensated by tracking external and internal surrogates. To compensate system specific time delays, time series prediction of the external optical surrogates is used. We investigate whether the prediction accuracy can be increased by expanding the current clinical setup by an accelerometer, a strain belt and a flow sensor. Four previously published prediction algorithms are adapted to multivariate inputs—normalized least mean squares (nLMS), wavelet-based least mean squares (wLMS), support vector regression (SVR) and relevance vector machines (RVM)—and evaluated for three different prediction horizons. The measurement involves 18 subjects and consists of two phases, focusing on long term trends (M1) and breathing artefacts (M2). To select the most relevant and least redundant sensors, a sequential forward selection (SFS) method is proposed. Using a multivariate setting, the results show that the clinically used nLMS algorithm is susceptible to large outliers. In the case of irregular breathing (M2), the mean root mean square error (RMSE) of a univariate nLMS algorithm is 0.66 mm and can be decreased to 0.46 mm by a multivariate RVM model (best algorithm on average). To investigate the full potential of this approach, the optimal sensor combination was also estimated on the complete test set. The results indicate that a further decrease in RMSE is possible for RVM (to 0.42 mm). This motivates further research about sensor selection methods. Besides the optical surrogates, the sensors most frequently selected by the algorithms are the accelerometer and the strain belt. These sensors could be easily integrated in the current clinical setup and would allow a more precise motion compensation.

  2. ANALYSIS OF AIRCRAFT MOTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed by Ames Research Center, in cooperation with the National Transportation Safety Board, as a technique for deriving time histories of an aircraft's motion from Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar records. This technique uses the radar range and azimuth data, along with the downlinked altitude data, to derive an expanded set of data which includes airspeed, lift, attitude angles (pitch, roll, and heading), etc. This technique should prove useful as a source of data in the investigation of commercial airline accidents and in the analysis of accidents involving aircraft which do not have onboard data recorders (e.g., military, short-haul, and general aviation). The technique used to determine the aircraft motions involves smoothing of raw radar data. These smoothed results, in combination with other available information (wind profiles and aircraft performance data), are used to derive the expanded set of data. This program uses a cubic least-square fit to smooth the raw data. This moving-arc procedure provides a smoothed time history of the aircraft position, the inertial velocities, and accelerations. Using known winds, these inertial data are transformed to aircraft stability axes to provide true airspeed, thrust-drag, lift, and roll angle. Further derivation, based on aircraft dependent performance data, can determine the aircraft angle of attack, pitch, and heading angle. Results of experimental tests indicate that values derived from ATC radar records using this technique agree favorably with airborne measurements. This program is written in FORTRAN IV to be executed in the batch mode, and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of 64k (octal) of 60 bit words.

  3. A rigid motion correction method for helical computed tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-H.; Nuyts, J.; Kyme, A.; Kuncic, Z.; Fulton, R.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a method to compensate for six degree-of-freedom rigid motion in helical CT of the head. The method is demonstrated in simulations and in helical scans performed on a 16-slice CT scanner. Scans of a Hoffman brain phantom were acquired while an optical motion tracking system recorded the motion of the bed and the phantom. Motion correction was performed by restoring projection consistency using data from the motion tracking system, and reconstructing with an iterative fully 3D algorithm. Motion correction accuracy was evaluated by comparing reconstructed images with a stationary reference scan. We also investigated the effects on accuracy of tracker sampling rate, measurement jitter, interpolation of tracker measurements, and the synchronization of motion data and CT projections. After optimization of these aspects, motion corrected images corresponded remarkably closely to images of the stationary phantom with correlation and similarity coefficients both above 0.9. We performed a simulation study using volunteer head motion and found similarly that our method is capable of compensating effectively for realistic human head movements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first practical demonstration of generalized rigid motion correction in helical CT. Its clinical value, which we have yet to explore, may be significant. For example it could reduce the necessity for repeat scans and resource-intensive anesthetic and sedation procedures in patient groups prone to motion, such as young children. It is not only applicable to dedicated CT imaging, but also to hybrid PET/CT and SPECT/CT, where it could also ensure an accurate CT image for lesion localization and attenuation correction of the functional image data.

  4. The use of vestibular models for design and evaluation of flight simulator motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussolari, Steven R.; Young, Laurence R.; Lee, Alfred T.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative models for the dynamics of the human vestibular system are applied to the design and evaluation of flight simulator platform motion. An optimal simulator motion control algorithm is generated to minimize the vector difference between perceived spatial orientation estimated in flight and in simulation. The motion controller has been implemented on the Vertical Motion Simulator at NASA Ames Research Center and evaluated experimentally through measurement of pilot performance and subjective rating during VTOL aircraft simulation. In general, pilot performance in a longitudinal tracking task (formation flight) did not appear to be sensitive to variations in platform motion condition as long as motion was present. However, pilot assessment of motion fidelity by means of a rating scale designed for this purpose, were sensitive to motion controller design. Platform motion generated with the optimal motion controller was found to be generally equivalent to that generated by conventional linear crossfeed washout. The vestibular models are used to evaluate the motion fidelity of transport category aircraft (Boeing 727) simulation in a pilot performance and simulator acceptability study at the Man-Vehicle Systems Research Facility at NASA Ames Research Center. Eighteen airline pilots, currently flying B-727, were given a series of flight scenarios in the simulator under various conditions of simulator motion. The scenarios were chosen to reflect the flight maneuvers that these pilots might expect to be given during a routine pilot proficiency check. Pilot performance and subjective rating of simulator fidelity was relatively insensitive to the motion condition, despite large differences in the amplitude of motion provided. This lack of sensitivity may be explained by means of the vestibular models, which predict little difference in the modeled motion sensations of the pilots when different motion conditions are imposed.

  5. Motion-Matching: A Challenge Game to Generate Motion Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, David; Adams, Betty; Brookes, David; Milner-Bolotin, Marina; Undreiu, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    Motion is a topic that is taught from elementary grades through to university at various levels of sophistication. It is an area that can be challenging for learning in a conceptually meaningful way, and formal kinematics instruction can sometimes seem dry and boring. Thus, the nature of students' initial introduction to motion is important in…

  6. Motion parallax links visual motion areas and scene regions.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Andreas; Bartels, Andreas

    2016-01-15

    When we move, the retinal velocities of objects in our surrounding differ according to their relative distances and give rise to a powerful three-dimensional visual cue referred to as motion parallax. Motion parallax allows us to infer our surrounding's 3D structure as well as self-motion based on 2D retinal information. However, the neural substrates mediating the link between visual motion and scene processing are largely unexplored. We used fMRI in human observers to study motion parallax by means of an ecologically relevant yet highly controlled stimulus that mimicked the observer's lateral motion past a depth-layered scene. We found parallax selective responses in parietal regions IPS3 and IPS4, and in a region lateral to scene selective occipital place area (OPA). The traditionally defined scene responsive regions OPA, the para-hippocampal place area (PPA) and the retrosplenial cortex (RSC) did not respond to parallax. During parallax processing, the occipital parallax selective region entertained highly specific functional connectivity with IPS3 and with scene selective PPA. These results establish a network linking dorsal motion and ventral scene processing regions specifically during parallax processing, which may underlie the brain's ability to derive 3D scene information from motion parallax. PMID:26515906

  7. Ground Motion Prediction Equations Empowered by Stress Drop Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, H.; Oth, A.

    2015-12-01

    Significant variation of stress drop is a crucial issue for ground motion prediction equations and probabilistic seismic hazard assessment, since only a few ground motion prediction equations take into account stress drop. In addition to average and sigma studies of stress drop and ground motion prediction equations (e.g., Cotton et al., 2013; Baltay and Hanks, 2014), we explore 1-to-1 relationship for each earthquake between stress drop and between-event residual of a ground motion prediction equation. We used the stress drop dataset of Oth (2013) for Japanese crustal earthquakes ranging 0.1 to 100 MPa and K-NET/KiK-net ground motion dataset against for several ground motion prediction equations with volcanic front treatment. Between-event residuals for ground accelerations and velocities are generally coincident with stress drop, as investigated by seismic intensity measures of Oth et al. (2015). Moreover, we found faster attenuation of ground acceleration and velocities for large stress drop events for the similar fault distance range and focal depth. It may suggest an alternative parameterization of stress drop to control attenuation distance rate for ground motion prediction equations. We also investigate 1-to-1 relationship and sigma for regional/national-scale stress drop variation and current national-scale ground motion equations.

  8. Motion of individual ribosomes along mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Koen

    2004-11-01

    Ribosomes move along messenger RNA to translate a sequence of ribonucleotides into a corresponding sequence of amino acids that make up a protein. Efficient motion of ribosomes along the mRNA requires hydrolysis of GTP, converting chemical energy into mechanical work, like better known molecular motors such as kinesin. However, motion is just one of the many tasks of the ribosome, whereas for kinesin, motion itself is the main goal. In keeping with these functional differences, the ribosome is also much larger consisting of more than 50 proteins and with half of its mass made up of ribosomal RNA. Such structural complexity enables indirect ways of coupling GTP hydrolysis to directed motion. In order to elucidate the mechanochemical coupling in ribosomes we have developed a single-molecule assay based on using optical tweezers to record the motion of individual ribosomes along mRNA. Translation rates of 2-4 codons/s have been observed. However, when increasing the force opposing motion, we observe backward slippage of ribosomes along homopolymeric poly(U) messages. Currently, it is not clear if the motor operates in reverse or if backward motion has become completely uncoupled from GTP hydrolysis. Interestingly, force-induced backward motion is of biological relevance because of its possible role in -1 frameshifting, a mechanism used by viruses to regulate gene expression at the level of translation.

  9. Neurons compute internal models of the physical laws of motion.

    PubMed

    Angelaki, Dora E; Shaikh, Aasef G; Green, Andrea M; Dickman, J David

    2004-07-29

    A critical step in self-motion perception and spatial awareness is the integration of motion cues from multiple sensory organs that individually do not provide an accurate representation of the physical world. One of the best-studied sensory ambiguities is found in visual processing, and arises because of the inherent uncertainty in detecting the motion direction of an untextured contour moving within a small aperture. A similar sensory ambiguity arises in identifying the actual motion associated with linear accelerations sensed by the otolith organs in the inner ear. These internal linear accelerometers respond identically during translational motion (for example, running forward) and gravitational accelerations experienced as we reorient the head relative to gravity (that is, head tilt). Using new stimulus combinations, we identify here cerebellar and brainstem motion-sensitive neurons that compute a solution to the inertial motion detection problem. We show that the firing rates of these populations of neurons reflect the computations necessary to construct an internal model representation of the physical equations of motion. PMID:15282606

  10. A Motion-Compensating Image-Compression Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Carol

    1994-01-01

    Chrominance used (in addition to luminance) in estimating motion. Variable-rate digital coding scheme for compression of color-video-image data designed to deliver pictures of good quality at moderate compressed-data rate of 1 to 2 bits per pixel, or of fair quality at rate less than 1 bit per pixel. Scheme, in principle, implemented by use of commercially available application-specific integrated circuits. Incorporates elements of some prior coding schemes, including motion compensation (MC) and discrete cosine transform (DCT).

  11. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology in motion Nanotechnology in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-02-01

    Microscopes provide tools of inimitable value for probing the building blocks of the world around us. The identity of the inventor of the first microscope remains under debate, but a name unequivocally linked with early developments in microscopy is Robert Hooke. His Micrographia published in 1665, was the first ever bestseller in science and brought topics in microscopy to the broader public eye with pages of detailed micrographs, most famously the fly's eye and plant cells. Since the first microscopes in the late 16th century, ingenious alternatives to the original optical microscopes have been developed to create images of the world at ever smaller dimensions. Innovations include scanning probe techniques such as the atomic force microscope [1]. As Toshio Ando describes in a review in this issue [2], these devices have also entered a new era in the past decade with the development of high-speed atomic force microscopy. Now, we can not only see the nanoscale components that make up the world around us, but we can watch them at work. One of the first innovations in optical microscopy was the use of dyes. This principle first came into practice with the use of ultraviolet light to reveal previously indistinguishable features. As explained by a researcher in the early 1930s, 'It is obvious that if the dyes used for selective staining in ordinary microscopical work are supplemented by substances which cause a particular detail of the structure to fluoresce with a specific colour in ultraviolet light, then many strings will be added to the bow of the practical microscopist' [3]. More recently, emphasis on the role of plasmons—collective oscillations of electrons in nanoscale metal structures—has received considerable research attention. Plasmons enhance the local electromagnetic field and can lead to increased fluorescence rates from nearby fluorophores depending on the efficiency of the counteracting process, non-radiative transfer [4]. The 1930s also saw the

  12. Pendulum Motion in Main Parachute Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.; Machin, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    The coupled dynamics of a cluster of parachutes to a payload are notoriously difficult to predict. Often the payload is designed to be insensitive to the range of attitude and rates that might occur, but spacecraft generally do not have the mass and volume budgeted for this robust of a design. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Orion Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) implements a cluster of three mains for landing. During testing of the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) design, it was discovered that with a cluster of two mains (a fault tolerance required for human rating) the capsule coupled to the parachute cluster could get into a limit cycle pendulum motion which would exceed the spacecraft landing capability. This pendulum phenomenon could not be predicted with the existing models and simulations. A three phased effort has been undertaken to understand the consequence of the pendulum motion observed, and explore potential design changes that would mitigate this phenomenon. This paper will review the early analysis that was performed of the pendulum motion observed during EDU testing, summarize the analysis ongoing to understand the root cause of the pendulum phenomenon, and discuss the modeling and testing that is being pursued to identify design changes that would mitigate the risk.

  13. Plate motions and deformations from geologic and geodetic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    A satellite laser ranging experiment conducted by NASA since 1972 has measured the relative motion between the North America and Pacific plates in California. Based on these measurements, the 896-km distance between San Diego and Quincy, California, is shortening at 62 + or - 9 mm/yr. This geodetic estimate is consistent with the rate of motion between the two plates, calculated from geological data to be 53 + or - 3 mm/yr averaged over the past few million years.

  14. Plate motions: Simpler than they look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambridge, M.; Iaffaldano, G.; Bodin, T.

    2012-12-01

    Plate motions shape Earth's surface through time. These kinematics are of paramount importance to make inferences on sea-level change, mantle/lithosphere interactions and dynamic topography among others. Over the last few decades much effort has gone into plate motion reconstructions at finer temporal resolution from ocean-floor finite-rotations. However, measurements feature substantial noise arising mainly from the challenge of identifying precisely magnetic lineations of the ocean-floor, as well as from uncertainties in geomagnetic reversal timescales. It is therefore standard practise to smooth reconstructions typically by averaging over 2 to 5 Myr-long intervals. But this comes at the price of i) downgrading the native resolution of costly measurements and ii) having to choose one among many smoothing methods that do not yield a unique result. At the native resolution of reconstructions, however, the scenario arising is puzzling, as plate motions vary erratically and significantly over short periods of less than 1 Myr. This equally undermines our ability to make geodynamic inferences, because the rates at which forces need to be built upon plates to explain these kinematics far exceed the most optimistic estimates based, for instance, on the temporal evolution of lithospheric slabs into Earth's mantle. Here we focus on the longest and most temporally-resolved records of ocean-floor spreading ever produced, across mid-oceanic ridges in the Atlantic, Indian and South Pacific Oceans. We show that the largest kinematic changes across these ridges relate to data-noise, and are of apparent nature. We overcome this limitation employing a trans-dimensional hierarchical Bayesian framework, which drastically reduces noise without loss of temporal resolution. Changes in the temporal trends of plate motions occur on timescales no shorter than a few million years, yielding simpler kinematic patterns and more plausible dynamics. This has important implications for the

  15. The tactile motion aftereffect suggests an intensive code for speed in neurons sensitive to both speed and direction of motion.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, S; Birznieks, I; Vickery, R M; Holcombe, A O; Seizova-Cajic, T

    2016-03-01

    Neurophysiological studies in primates have found that direction-sensitive neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) generally increase their response rate with increasing speed of object motion across the skin and show little evidence of speed tuning. We employed psychophysics to determine whether human perception of motion direction could be explained by features of such neurons and whether evidence can be found for a speed-tuned process. After adaptation to motion across the skin, a subsequently presented dynamic test stimulus yields an impression of motion in the opposite direction. We measured the strength of this tactile motion aftereffect (tMAE) induced with different combinations of adapting and test speeds. Distal-to-proximal or proximal-to-distal adapting motion was applied to participants' index fingers using a tactile array, after which participants reported the perceived direction of a bidirectional test stimulus. An intensive code for speed, like that observed in SI neurons, predicts greater adaptation (and a stronger tMAE) the faster the adapting speed, regardless of the test speed. In contrast, speed tuning of direction-sensitive neurons predicts the greatest tMAE when the adapting and test stimuli have matching speeds. We found that the strength of the tMAE increased monotonically with adapting speed, regardless of the test speed, showing no evidence of speed tuning. Our data are consistent with neurophysiological findings that suggest an intensive code for speed along the motion processing pathways comprising neurons sensitive both to speed and direction of motion. PMID:26823511

  16. Topographic Structure from Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, M. A.; Dietrich, J. T.; Courville, B. C.; Jensen, J.; Carbonneau, P.

    2011-12-01

    The production of high-resolution topographic datasets is of increasing concern and application throughout the geomorphic sciences, and river science is no exception. Consequently, a wide range of topographic measurement methods have evolved. Despite the range of available methods, the production of high resolution, high quality digital elevation models (DEMs) generally requires a significant investment in personnel time, hardware and/or software. However, image-based methods such as digital photogrammetry have steadily been decreasing in costs. Initially developed for the purpose of rapid, inexpensive and easy three dimensional surveys of buildings or small objects, the "structure from motion" photogrammetric approach (SfM) is a purely image based method which could deliver a step-change if transferred to river remote sensing, and requires very little training and is extremely inexpensive. Using the online SfM program Microsoft Photosynth, we have created high-resolution digital elevation models (DEM) of rivers from ordinary photographs produced from a multi-step workflow that takes advantage of free and open source software. This process reconstructs real world scenes from SfM algorithms based on the derived positions of the photographs in three-dimensional space. One of the products of the SfM process is a three-dimensional point cloud of features present in the input photographs. This point cloud can be georeferenced from a small number of ground control points collected via GPS in the field. The georeferenced point cloud can then be used to create a variety of digital elevation model products. Among several study sites, we examine the applicability of SfM in the Pedernales River in Texas (USA), where several hundred images taken from a hand-held helikite are used to produce DEMs of the fluvial topographic environment. This test shows that SfM and low-altitude platforms can produce point clouds with point densities considerably better than airborne LiDAR, with

  17. Investigation of nonlinear motion simulator washout schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedel, S. A.; Hofmann, L. G.

    1978-01-01

    An overview is presented of some of the promising washout schemes which have been devised. The four schemes presented fall into two basic configurations; crossfeed and crossproduct. Various nonlinear modifications further differentiate the four schemes. One nonlinear scheme is discussed in detail. This washout scheme takes advantage of subliminal motions to speed up simulator cab centering. It exploits so-called perceptual indifference thresholds to center the simulator cab at a faster rate whenever the input to the simulator is below the perceptual indifference level. The effect is to reduce the angular and translational simulation motion by comparison with that for the linear washout case. Finally, the conclusions and implications for further research in the area of nonlinear washout filters are presented.

  18. Extreme fluctuations of active Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Kleinbeck, Kevin; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    In active Brownian motion, an internal propulsion mechanism interacts with translational and rotational thermal noise and other internal fluctuations to produce directed motion. We derive the distribution of its extreme fluctuations and identify its universal properties using large deviation theory. The limits of slow and fast internal dynamics give rise to a kink-like and parabolic behavior of the corresponding rate functions, respectively. For dipolar Janus particles in two- and three-dimensions interacting with a field, we predict a novel symmetry akin to, but different from, the one related to entropy production. Measurements of these extreme fluctuations could thus be used to infer properties of the underlying, often hidden, network of states.

  19. Dynamic transitions in dislocation motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatov, Vasily; Cai, Wei; Marian, Jaime

    2003-03-01

    In a series of Molecular Dynamics simulations, we observe that, depending on stress, temperature and line length, screw dislocations in BCC iron move in three strikingly different regimes. Under low stress, the dislocations move smoothly via formation and migration of atomic-sized kinks; although widely believed, such motion mechanism has never been directly observed in full dynamic detail. Then, at a higher stress, dislocation motion suddenly becomes rough: the line becomes rugged and its motion becomes jerky producing in its wake a large amount of debris in the form of lattice vacancies and interstitial clusters. Remarkably, this bizarre behavior is not caused by any external factors, such as dislocation interaction with other crystal defects: the roughening transition is intrinsic to the dislocation itself. Under increasing stress the line raggedness and the amount of debris its motion produces continue to increase until, at some point, another dynamic transition takes place. The dislocation is now seen to cease at once its turbulent motion through the lattice and to initiate a thin plate of sheared crystal, a twin. The twin plate picks up where the dislocation just left off - it extends very fast in the same direction as dislocation motion and increases, gradually, in thickness. Notably, no more debris is produced during the twinning motion. The origin of these dynamic transitions, the underlying atomistic mechanisms of dislocation motion in all three regimes and their implication for strength of shocked materials are discussed.

  20. Motion sickness on tilting trains

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Bernard; Dai, Mingjia; Ogorodnikov, Dmitri; Laurens, Jean; Raphan, Theodore; Müller, Philippe; Athanasios, Alexiou; Edmaier, Jürgen; Grossenbacher, Thomas; Stadtmüller, Klaus; Brugger, Ueli; Hauser, Gerald; Straumann, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    Trains that tilt on curves can go faster, but passengers complain of motion sickness. We studied the control signals and tilts to determine why this occurs and how to maintain speed while eliminating motion sickness. Accelerometers and gyros monitored train and passenger yaw and roll, and a survey evaluated motion sickness. The experimental train had 3 control configurations: an untilted mode, a reactive mode that detected curves from sensors on the front wheel set, and a predictive mode that determined curves from the train's position on the tracks. No motion sickness was induced in the untilted mode, but the train ran 21% slower than when it tilted 8° in either the reactive or predictive modes (113 vs. 137 km/h). Roll velocities rose and fell faster in the predictive than the reactive mode when entering and leaving turns (0.4 vs. 0.8 s for a 4°/s roll tilt, P<0.001). Concurrently, motion sickness was greater (P<0.001) in the reactive mode. We conclude that the slower rise in roll velocity during yaw rotations on entering and leaving curves had induced the motion sickness. Adequate synchronization of roll tilt with yaw velocity on curves will reduce motion sickness and improve passenger comfort on tilting trains.—Cohen, B., Dai, M., Ogorodnikov, D., Laurens, J., Raphan, T., Müller, P., Athanasios, A., Edmaier, J., Grossenbacher, T., Stadtmüller, K., Brugger, U., Hauser, G., Straumann, D. Motion sickness on tilting trains. PMID:21788449

  1. Statistical description of tectonic motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Duncan Carr

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes investigations regarding tectonic motions. The topics discussed include statistics of crustal deformation, Earth rotation studies, using multitaper spectrum analysis techniques applied to both space-geodetic data and conventional astrometric estimates of the Earth's polar motion, and the development, design, and installation of high-stability geodetic monuments for use with the global positioning system.

  2. An open architecture motion controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossol, Lothar

    1994-01-01

    Nomad, an open architecture motion controller, is described. It is formed by a combination of TMOS, C-WORKS, and other utilities. Nomad software runs in a UNIX environment and provides for sensor-controlled robotic motions, with user replaceable kinematics. It can also be tailored for highly specialized applications. Open controllers such as Nomad should have a major impact on the robotics industry.

  3. The Influence of Motion Cues on Driver-Vehicle Performance in a Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repa, B. S.; Leucht, P. M.; Wierwille, W. W.

    1981-01-01

    Four different motion base configurations were studied on driving simulator. Differently responding vehicles were simulated on each motion configurations and the effects of the vehicle characteristics on driver vehicle system performance, driver control activity, and driver opinion ratings of vehicle performance during driving are compared for different motion configurations. Data show that: (1)) the effects of changes in vehicle characteristics on the different objective and subjective measures of driver vehicle performance are not disguised by the lack of physical motion; (2) fixed base simulator can be used to draw inferences despite the lack of motion; (3) the presence of motion tends to reduce path keeping errors and driver control activity; (4) roll and yaw motions are recommended because of their marked influence on driver vehicle performance (5) the importance of motion increases as the driving maneuvers become more extreme.

  4. The Equations of Oceanic Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Modeling and prediction of oceanographic phenomena and climate is based on the integration of dynamic equations. The Equations of Oceanic Motions derives and systematically classifies the most common dynamic equations used in physical oceanography, from large scale thermohaline circulations to those governing small scale motions and turbulence. After establishing the basic dynamical equations that describe all oceanic motions, M|ller then derives approximate equations, emphasizing the assumptions made and physical processes eliminated. He distinguishes between geometric, thermodynamic and dynamic approximations and between the acoustic, gravity, vortical and temperature-salinity modes of motion. Basic concepts and formulae of equilibrium thermodynamics, vector and tensor calculus, curvilinear coordinate systems, and the kinematics of fluid motion and wave propagation are covered in appendices. Providing the basic theoretical background for graduate students and researchers of physical oceanography and climate science, this book will serve as both a comprehensive text and an essential reference.

  5. Forces in rotary motion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilsch, Markus K.; Elliott, Gregory K.

    2008-09-01

    In many coating chambers substrates are moved by simple or planetary rotary motion systems. Isaac Newton already taught that an object in uniform motion tends to stay in uniform motion unless acted upon by a net external force. To move a substrate on a rotary trajectory, centripetal and gravitational forces must act upon the substrate. The substrate must be somehow confined. Confinement options range from firm attachment to a fixture to loose placement in a pocket. Depending on the rotary motion pattern, a loosely held substrate may slide once against a confinement boundary and then stay, or may constantly slide around. 'Rattling around' may be undesirable as it could lead to edge destruction, debris formation, precession of the substrate, and other adverse effects. Firm attachment is advantageous in most cases, but often adds process complexity. We examine the forces present on substrates in typical rotary motion systems and discuss the implications of different confinement methods.

  6. Retinal Adaptation to Object Motion

    PubMed Central

    Ölveczky, Bence P.; Baccus, Stephen A.; Meister, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Summary Due to fixational eye movements, the image on the retina is always in motion, even when one views a stationary scene. When an object moves within the scene, the corresponding patch of retina experiences a different motion trajectory than the surrounding region. Certain retinal ganglion cells respond selectively to this condition, when the motion in the cell’s receptive field center is different from that in the surround. Here we show that this response is strongest at the very onset of differential motion, followed by gradual adaptation with a time course of several seconds. Different subregions of a ganglion cell’s receptive field can adapt independently. The circuitry responsible for differential motion adaptation lies in the inner retina. Several candidate mechanisms were tested, and the adaptation most likely results from synaptic depression at the synapse from bipolar to ganglion cell. Similar circuit mechanisms may act more generally to emphasize novel features of a visual stimulus. PMID:18031685

  7. The Perception of Auditory Motion

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Johahn

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of efficient and relatively inexpensive virtual auditory display technology has provided new research platforms to explore the perception of auditory motion. At the same time, deployment of these technologies in command and control as well as in entertainment roles is generating an increasing need to better understand the complex processes underlying auditory motion perception. This is a particularly challenging processing feat because it involves the rapid deconvolution of the relative change in the locations of sound sources produced by rotational and translations of the head in space (self-motion) to enable the perception of actual source motion. The fact that we perceive our auditory world to be stable despite almost continual movement of the head demonstrates the efficiency and effectiveness of this process. This review examines the acoustical basis of auditory motion perception and a wide range of psychophysical, electrophysiological, and cortical imaging studies that have probed the limits and possible mechanisms underlying this perception. PMID:27094029

  8. The Perception of Auditory Motion.

    PubMed

    Carlile, Simon; Leung, Johahn

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of efficient and relatively inexpensive virtual auditory display technology has provided new research platforms to explore the perception of auditory motion. At the same time, deployment of these technologies in command and control as well as in entertainment roles is generating an increasing need to better understand the complex processes underlying auditory motion perception. This is a particularly challenging processing feat because it involves the rapid deconvolution of the relative change in the locations of sound sources produced by rotational and translations of the head in space (self-motion) to enable the perception of actual source motion. The fact that we perceive our auditory world to be stable despite almost continual movement of the head demonstrates the efficiency and effectiveness of this process. This review examines the acoustical basis of auditory motion perception and a wide range of psychophysical, electrophysiological, and cortical imaging studies that have probed the limits and possible mechanisms underlying this perception. PMID:27094029

  9. Target-acquisition performance in undersampled infrared imagers: static imagery to motion video.

    PubMed

    Krapels, Keith; Driggers, Ronald G; Teaney, Brian

    2005-11-20

    In this research we show that the target-acquisition performance of an undersampled imager improves with sensor or target motion. We provide an experiment designed to evaluate the improvement in observer performance as a function of target motion rate in the video. We created the target motion by mounting a thermal imager on a precision two-axis gimbal and varying the sensor motion rate from 0.25 to 1 instantaneous field of view per frame. A midwave thermal imager was used to permit short integration times and remove the effects of motion blur. It is shown that the human visual system performs a superresolution reconstruction that mitigates some aliasing and provides a higher (than static imagery) effective resolution. This process appears to be relatively independent of motion velocity. The results suggest that the benefits of superresolution reconstruction techniques as applied to imaging systems with motion may be limited. PMID:16318174

  10. A model for the pilot's use of motion cues in roll-axis tracking tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Junker, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Simulated target-following and disturbance-regulation tasks were explored with subjects using visual-only and combined visual and motion cues. The effects of motion cues on task performance and pilot response behavior were appreciably different for the two task configurations and were consistent with data reported in earlier studies for similar task configurations. The optimal-control model for pilot/vehicle systems provided a task-independent framework for accounting for the pilot's use of motion cues. Specifically, the availability of motion cues was modeled by augmenting the set of perceptual variables to include position, rate, acceleration, and accleration-rate of the motion simulator, and results were consistent with the hypothesis of attention-sharing between visual and motion variables. This straightforward informational model allowed accurate model predictions of the effects of motion cues on a variety of response measures for both the target-following and disturbance-regulation tasks.

  11. Ageing single file motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, R.; Sanders, L.; Lomholt, M. A.; Lizana, L.; Fogelmark, K.; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2014-12-01

    The mean squared displacement of a tracer particle in a single file of identical particles with excluded volume interactions shows the famed Harris scaling ≃ K1/2t1/2 as function of time. Here we study what happens to this law when each particle of the single file interacts with the environment such that it is transiently immobilised for times τ with a power-law distribution ψ(τ) ≃ (τ★)α, and different ranges of the exponent α are considered. We find a dramatic slow-down of the motion of a tracer particle from Harris' law to an ultraslow, logarithmic time evolution ≃ K0 log 1/2(t) when 0 < α < 1. In the intermediate case 1 < α < 2, we observe a power-law form for the mean squared displacement, with a modified scaling exponent as compared to Harris' law. Once α is larger than two, the Brownian single file behaviour and thus Harris' law are restored. We also point out that this process is weakly non-ergodic in the sense that the time and ensemble averaged mean squared displacements are disparate.

  12. Vision System Measures Motions of Robot and External Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talukder, Ashit; Matthies, Larry

    2008-01-01

    A prototype of an advanced robotic vision system both (1) measures its own motion with respect to a stationary background and (2) detects other moving objects and estimates their motions, all by use of visual cues. Like some prior robotic and other optoelectronic vision systems, this system is based partly on concepts of optical flow and visual odometry. Whereas prior optoelectronic visual-odometry systems have been limited to frame rates of no more than 1 Hz, a visual-odometry subsystem that is part of this system operates at a frame rate of 60 to 200 Hz, given optical-flow estimates. The overall system operates at an effective frame rate of 12 Hz. Moreover, unlike prior machine-vision systems for detecting motions of external objects, this system need not remain stationary: it can detect such motions while it is moving (even vibrating). The system includes a stereoscopic pair of cameras mounted on a moving robot. The outputs of the cameras are digitized, then processed to extract positions and velocities. The initial image-data-processing functions of this system are the same as those of some prior systems: Stereoscopy is used to compute three-dimensional (3D) positions for all pixels in the camera images. For each pixel of each image, optical flow between successive image frames is used to compute the two-dimensional (2D) apparent relative translational motion of the point transverse to the line of sight of the camera. The challenge in designing this system was to provide for utilization of the 3D information from stereoscopy in conjunction with the 2D information from optical flow to distinguish between motion of the camera pair and motions of external objects, compute the motion of the camera pair in all six degrees of translational and rotational freedom, and robustly estimate the motions of external objects, all in real time. To meet this challenge, the system is designed to perform the following image-data-processing functions: The visual-odometry subsystem

  13. Anisotropic collective motion contributes to nuclear spin relaxation in crystalline proteins.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Józef R; Sein, Julien; Blackledge, Martin; Emsley, Lyndon

    2010-02-01

    A model for calculating the influence of anisotropic collective motions on NMR relaxation rates in crystalline proteins is presented. We show that small-amplitude (<10 degrees ) fluctuations may lead to substantial contributions to the (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rates and propose that the effect of domain motions should be included in solid-state NMR analyses of protein dynamics. PMID:19916496

  14. Weather Balloon Ascent Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The physics of a weather balloon is analyzed. The surprising aspect of the motion of these balloons is that they ascend to great altitudes (typically 35 km) at a more or less constant rate. Such behavior is not surprising near the ground—say for a helium-filled party balloon rising from street level to the top of the Empire State building—but it is unexpected for a balloon that rises to altitudes where the air is rarefied. We show from elementary physical laws why the ascent rate is approximately constant.

  15. Assessment of Psychophysiological Responses During Motion Sickness Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoud, Cynthia S.; Toscano, William B.; Cowings, Patricia; Freidman, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate a methodology designed to accurately trace the temporal progression of motion sickness and space motion sickness symptoms. With this method, subjects continuously monitor their own motion sickness symptoms during exposure to a provocative stimulus as symptoms occur, in contrast to previous methods during which subjects report symptoms verbally at discrete time intervals. This method not only is comparable to previous methods in the type of symptoms that subjects report, but subjects report symptoms more frequently. Frequent reporting of motion sickness symptoms allows researchers to detail the waxing and waning of motion sickness symptoms for each individual. Previous research has shown that physiological responses to motion sickness stimuli are characterized by unique individual differences in response patterns. By improving our assessment of motion sickness symptoms with continuous monitoring of symptoms, the relationship between specific physiological responses and sickness levels can be more accurately determined for each individual. Results from this study show significant positive relationships between skin conductance levels and symptom levels for ten individuals; a significant positive relationship between temperature and symptom levels for 5 of 10 individuals; and both positive and negative relationships between respiration, heart rate, blood volume pulse and symptom levels. Continuous monitoring of motion sickness symptoms can be used to more accurately assess motion sickness to aid in the evaluation of countermeasures. In addition, recognition of the onset of symptoms that are strongly related to specific physiological responses could be used as cues to initiate procedures (e.g., Autogenic Feedback Training) to prevent the development of severe motion sickness symptoms.

  16. Motion sickness potentiates core cooling during immersion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mekjavic, Igor B; Tipton, Michael J; Gennser, Mikael; Eiken, Ola

    2001-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that motion sickness affects thermoregulatory responses to cooling in humans. Ten healthy male volunteers underwent three separate head-out immersions in 28 °C water after different preparatory procedures. In the ‘control’ procedure immersion was preceded by a rest period. In the ‘motion sickness’ procedure immersion was preceded by provocation of motion sickness in a human centrifuge. This comprised rapid and repeated alterations of the gravitational (G-) stress in the head-to-foot direction, plus a standardized regimen of head movements at increased G-stress. In the ‘G-control’ procedure, the subjects were exposed to similar G-stress, but without the motion sickness provocation. During immersion mean skin temperature, rectal temperature, the difference in temperature between the forearm and 3rd digit of the right hand (ΔTforearm-fingertip), oxygen uptake and heart rate were recorded. Subjects provided ratings of temperature perception, thermal comfort and level of motion sickness discomfort at regular intervals. No differences were observed in any of the variables between control and G-control procedures. In the motion sickness procedure, the ΔTforearm-fingertip response was significantly attenuated, indicating a blunted vasoconstrictor response, and rectal temperature decreased at a faster rate. No other differences were observed. Motion sickness attenuates the vasoconstrictor response to skin and core cooling, thereby enhancing heat loss and the magnitude of the fall in deep body temperature. Motion sickness may predispose individuals to hypothermia, and have significant implications for survival time in maritime accidents. PMID:11533150

  17. 24 CFR 180.430 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Motions. 180.430 Section 180.430....430 Motions. (a) Motions. Any application for an order or other request shall be made by a motion... relief requested and the basis therefor. Motions made during an appearance before the ALJ shall be...

  18. 40 CFR 305.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motions. 305.23 Section 305.23... Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing, shall: be in... motions shall be served as provided by § 305.5(b)(2)(i). (b) Response to motions. A party's response...

  19. 22 CFR 224.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Motions. 224.28 Section 224.28 Foreign....28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall... ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or...

  20. 45 CFR 672.9 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Motions. 672.9 Section 672.9 Public Welfare... PROCEDURES § 672.9 Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing... memorandum relied upon. (b) Response to motions. A party must file a response to any written motion...

  1. 40 CFR 164.60 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motions. 164.60 Section 164.60... (Other Than Expedited Hearings) Motions § 164.60 Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made..., and shall be filed with the hearing clerk and served on all parties. (b) Response to motions....

  2. 40 CFR 164.60 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motions. 164.60 Section 164.60... (Other Than Expedited Hearings) Motions § 164.60 Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made..., and shall be filed with the hearing clerk and served on all parties. (b) Response to motions....

  3. 7 CFR 1.327 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Motions. 1.327 Section 1.327 Agriculture Office of the... Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.327 Motions. (a) Motions shall state the relief sought, the... parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or at the hearing, all motions...

  4. 29 CFR 102.65 - Motions; interventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motions; interventions. 102.65 Section 102.65 Labor... Act § 102.65 Motions; interventions. (a) All motions, including motions for intervention pursuant to... on the record and shall briefly state the order or relief sought and the grounds for such motion....

  5. 5 CFR 185.130 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Motions. 185.130 Section 185.130... § 185.130 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference...

  6. 7 CFR 1.327 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Motions. 1.327 Section 1.327 Agriculture Office of the... Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.327 Motions. (a) Motions shall state the relief sought, the... parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or at the hearing, all motions...

  7. 20 CFR 498.213 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Motions. 498.213 Section 498.213 Employees... § 498.213 Motions. (a) An application to the ALJ for an order or ruling will be by motion. Motions will... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference...

  8. 45 CFR 672.9 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Motions. 672.9 Section 672.9 Public Welfare... PROCEDURES § 672.9 Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing... memorandum relied upon. (b) Response to motions. A party must file a response to any written motion...

  9. 5 CFR 185.130 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Motions. 185.130 Section 185.130... § 185.130 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference...

  10. 22 CFR 1422.10 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Motions. 1422.10 Section 1422.10 Foreign... § 1422.10 Motions. (a) General. (1) A motion shall state briefly the order or relief sought and the grounds for the motion: Provided, however, That a motion to intervene will not be entertained by...

  11. 12 CFR 1081.212 - Dispositive motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dispositive motions. 1081.212 Section 1081.212... Initiation of Proceedings and Prehearing Rules § 1081.212 Dispositive motions. (a) Dispositive motions. This section governs the filing of motions to dismiss and motions for summary disposition. The filing of...

  12. 22 CFR 224.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Motions. 224.28 Section 224.28 Foreign....28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall... ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or...

  13. 43 CFR 35.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Motions. 35.28 Section 35.28 Public Lands... STATEMENTS § 35.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a pre-hearing...

  14. 22 CFR 224.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Motions. 224.28 Section 224.28 Foreign....28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall... ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or...

  15. 40 CFR 305.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motions. 305.23 Section 305.23... Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing, shall: be in... motions shall be served as provided by § 305.5(b)(2)(i). (b) Response to motions. A party's response...

  16. 40 CFR 164.60 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motions. 164.60 Section 164.60... (Other Than Expedited Hearings) Motions § 164.60 Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made..., and shall be filed with the hearing clerk and served on all parties. (b) Response to motions....

  17. 40 CFR 305.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motions. 305.23 Section 305.23... Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing, shall: be in... motions shall be served as provided by § 305.5(b)(2)(i). (b) Response to motions. A party's response...

  18. 22 CFR 1422.10 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 1422.10 Section 1422.10 Foreign... § 1422.10 Motions. (a) General. (1) A motion shall state briefly the order or relief sought and the grounds for the motion: Provided, however, That a motion to intervene will not be entertained by...

  19. 43 CFR 35.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Motions. 35.28 Section 35.28 Public Lands... STATEMENTS § 35.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a pre-hearing...

  20. 29 CFR 1603.208 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motions. 1603.208 Section 1603.208 Labor Regulations... GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Hearings § 1603.208 Motions. (a) All motions shall state the specific relief requested. All motions shall be in writing, except that a motion may be made orally during...

  1. 29 CFR 1603.208 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motions. 1603.208 Section 1603.208 Labor Regulations... GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Hearings § 1603.208 Motions. (a) All motions shall state the specific relief requested. All motions shall be in writing, except that a motion may be made orally during...

  2. 45 CFR 81.56 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Motions. 81.56 Section 81.56 Public Welfare... 80 OF THIS TITLE Proceedings Prior to Hearing § 81.56 Motions. Motions and petitions shall state the... as a formal motion. Motions, answers, and replies shall be addressed to the presiding officer, if...

  3. 24 CFR 180.430 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Motions. 180.430 Section 180.430....430 Motions. (a) Motions. Any application for an order or other request shall be made by a motion... relief requested and the basis therefor. Motions made during an appearance before the ALJ shall be...

  4. 20 CFR 498.213 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Motions. 498.213 Section 498.213 Employees... § 498.213 Motions. (a) An application to the ALJ for an order or ruling will be by motion. Motions will... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference...

  5. 22 CFR 1422.10 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Motions. 1422.10 Section 1422.10 Foreign... § 1422.10 Motions. (a) General. (1) A motion shall state briefly the order or relief sought and the grounds for the motion: Provided, however, That a motion to intervene will not be entertained by...

  6. 40 CFR 164.60 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions. 164.60 Section 164.60... (Other Than Expedited Hearings) Motions § 164.60 Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made..., and shall be filed with the hearing clerk and served on all parties. (b) Response to motions....

  7. 24 CFR 180.430 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Motions. 180.430 Section 180.430....430 Motions. (a) Motions. Any application for an order or other request shall be made by a motion... relief requested and the basis therefor. Motions made during an appearance before the ALJ shall be...

  8. 22 CFR 1422.10 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Motions. 1422.10 Section 1422.10 Foreign... § 1422.10 Motions. (a) General. (1) A motion shall state briefly the order or relief sought and the grounds for the motion: Provided, however, That a motion to intervene will not be entertained by...

  9. 45 CFR 81.56 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Motions. 81.56 Section 81.56 Public Welfare... 80 OF THIS TITLE Proceedings Prior to Hearing § 81.56 Motions. Motions and petitions shall state the... as a formal motion. Motions, answers, and replies shall be addressed to the presiding officer, if...

  10. 45 CFR 672.9 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motions. 672.9 Section 672.9 Public Welfare... PROCEDURES § 672.9 Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing... memorandum relied upon. (b) Response to motions. A party must file a response to any written motion...

  11. 45 CFR 81.56 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motions. 81.56 Section 81.56 Public Welfare... 80 OF THIS TITLE Proceedings Prior to Hearing § 81.56 Motions. Motions and petitions shall state the... as a formal motion. Motions, answers, and replies shall be addressed to the presiding officer, if...

  12. 20 CFR 498.213 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Motions. 498.213 Section 498.213 Employees... § 498.213 Motions. (a) An application to the ALJ for an order or ruling will be by motion. Motions will... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference...

  13. 5 CFR 185.130 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motions. 185.130 Section 185.130... § 185.130 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference...

  14. 22 CFR 1423.22 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Motions. 1423.22 Section 1423.22 Foreign... PROCEEDINGS § 1423.22 Motions. (a) Filing of Motions. (1) Motions made prior to a hearing and any response... issuance of a complaint by the Regional Director any motion to postpone the hearing should be filed...

  15. 22 CFR 224.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 224.28 Section 224.28 Foreign....28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall... ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or...

  16. 22 CFR 1423.22 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Motions. 1423.22 Section 1423.22 Foreign... PROCEEDINGS § 1423.22 Motions. (a) Filing of Motions. (1) Motions made prior to a hearing and any response... issuance of a complaint by the Regional Director any motion to postpone the hearing should be filed...

  17. 5 CFR 185.130 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Motions. 185.130 Section 185.130... § 185.130 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference...

  18. 43 CFR 35.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Motions. 35.28 Section 35.28 Public Lands... STATEMENTS § 35.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a pre-hearing...

  19. 22 CFR 1423.22 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Motions. 1423.22 Section 1423.22 Foreign... PROCEEDINGS § 1423.22 Motions. (a) Filing of Motions. (1) Motions made prior to a hearing and any response... issuance of a complaint by the Regional Director any motion to postpone the hearing should be filed...

  20. 20 CFR 498.213 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 498.213 Section 498.213 Employees... § 498.213 Motions. (a) An application to the ALJ for an order or ruling will be by motion. Motions will... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference...

  1. 22 CFR 1423.22 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Motions. 1423.22 Section 1423.22 Foreign... PROCEEDINGS § 1423.22 Motions. (a) Filing of Motions. (1) Motions made prior to a hearing and any response... issuance of a complaint by the Regional Director any motion to postpone the hearing should be filed...

  2. 7 CFR 1.327 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Motions. 1.327 Section 1.327 Agriculture Office of the... Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.327 Motions. (a) Motions shall state the relief sought, the... parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or at the hearing, all motions...

  3. 24 CFR 180.430 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 180.430 Section 180.430....430 Motions. (a) Motions. Any application for an order or other request shall be made by a motion... relief requested and the basis therefor. Motions made during an appearance before the ALJ shall be...

  4. 22 CFR 1422.10 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Motions. 1422.10 Section 1422.10 Foreign... § 1422.10 Motions. (a) General. (1) A motion shall state briefly the order or relief sought and the grounds for the motion: Provided, however, That a motion to intervene will not be entertained by...

  5. 29 CFR 1603.208 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motions. 1603.208 Section 1603.208 Labor Regulations... GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Hearings § 1603.208 Motions. (a) All motions shall state the specific relief requested. All motions shall be in writing, except that a motion may be made orally during...

  6. 22 CFR 1423.22 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 1423.22 Section 1423.22 Foreign... PROCEEDINGS § 1423.22 Motions. (a) Filing of Motions. (1) Motions made prior to a hearing and any response... issuance of a complaint by the Regional Director any motion to postpone the hearing should be filed...

  7. 40 CFR 164.60 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motions. 164.60 Section 164.60... (Other Than Expedited Hearings) Motions § 164.60 Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made..., and shall be filed with the hearing clerk and served on all parties. (b) Response to motions....

  8. 22 CFR 224.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Motions. 224.28 Section 224.28 Foreign....28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall... ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or...

  9. 24 CFR 180.430 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Motions. 180.430 Section 180.430....430 Motions. (a) Motions. Any application for an order or other request shall be made by a motion... relief requested and the basis therefor. Motions made during an appearance before the ALJ shall be...

  10. 5 CFR 185.130 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Motions. 185.130 Section 185.130... § 185.130 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference...

  11. 7 CFR 1.327 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motions. 1.327 Section 1.327 Agriculture Office of the... Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.327 Motions. (a) Motions shall state the relief sought, the... parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or at the hearing, all motions...

  12. 22 CFR 521.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 521.28 Section 521.28 Foreign... Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the... served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or at the...

  13. 20 CFR 498.213 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Motions. 498.213 Section 498.213 Employees... § 498.213 Motions. (a) An application to the ALJ for an order or ruling will be by motion. Motions will... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference...

  14. 45 CFR 672.9 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Motions. 672.9 Section 672.9 Public Welfare... PROCEDURES § 672.9 Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing... memorandum relied upon. (b) Response to motions. A party must file a response to any written motion...

  15. 40 CFR 305.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motions. 305.23 Section 305.23... Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing, shall: be in... motions shall be served as provided by § 305.5(b)(2)(i). (b) Response to motions. A party's response...

  16. 45 CFR 81.56 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Motions. 81.56 Section 81.56 Public Welfare... 80 OF THIS TITLE Proceedings Prior to Hearing § 81.56 Motions. Motions and petitions shall state the... as a formal motion. Motions, answers, and replies shall be addressed to the presiding officer, if...

  17. 45 CFR 81.56 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Motions. 81.56 Section 81.56 Public Welfare... 80 OF THIS TITLE Proceedings Prior to Hearing § 81.56 Motions. Motions and petitions shall state the... as a formal motion. Motions, answers, and replies shall be addressed to the presiding officer, if...

  18. 29 CFR 1603.208 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motions. 1603.208 Section 1603.208 Labor Regulations... GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Hearings § 1603.208 Motions. (a) All motions shall state the specific relief requested. All motions shall be in writing, except that a motion may be made orally during...

  19. 45 CFR 672.9 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Motions. 672.9 Section 672.9 Public Welfare... PROCEDURES § 672.9 Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing... memorandum relied upon. (b) Response to motions. A party must file a response to any written motion...

  20. 43 CFR 35.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Motions. 35.28 Section 35.28 Public Lands... STATEMENTS § 35.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a pre-hearing...

  1. 7 CFR 1.327 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Motions. 1.327 Section 1.327 Agriculture Office of the... Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.327 Motions. (a) Motions shall state the relief sought, the... parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or at the hearing, all motions...

  2. 43 CFR 35.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motions. 35.28 Section 35.28 Public Lands... STATEMENTS § 35.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a pre-hearing...

  3. 40 CFR 305.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions. 305.23 Section 305.23... Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing, shall: be in... motions shall be served as provided by § 305.5(b)(2)(i). (b) Response to motions. A party's response...

  4. 29 CFR 1603.208 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions. 1603.208 Section 1603.208 Labor Regulations... GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Hearings § 1603.208 Motions. (a) All motions shall state the specific relief requested. All motions shall be in writing, except that a motion may be made orally during...

  5. Mab's orbital motion explained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K.; de Pater, I.; Showalter, M. R.

    2015-07-01

    We explored the hypothesis that Mab's anomalous orbital motion, as deduced from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data (Showalter, M.R., Lissauer, J.J. [2006]. Science (New York, NY) 311, 973-977), is the result of gravitational interactions with a putative suite of large bodies in the μ-ring. We conducted simulations to compute the gravitational effect of Mab (a recently discovered Uranian moon) on a cloud of test particles. Subsequently, by employing the data extracted from the test particle simulations, we executed random walk simulations to compute the back-reaction of nearby perturbers on Mab. By generating simulated observation metrics, we compared our results to the data retrieved from the HST. Our results indicate that the longitude residual change noted in the HST data (Δλr,Mab ≈ 1 deg) is well matched by our simulations. The eccentricity variations (ΔeMab ≈10-3) are however typically two orders of magnitude too small. We present a variety of reasons that could account for this discrepancy. The nominal scenario that we investigated assumes a perturber ring mass (mring) of 1 mMab (Mab's mass) and a perturber ring number density (ρn,ring) of 10 perturbers per 3 RHill,Mab (Mab's Hill radius). This effectively translates to a few tens of perturbers with radii of approximately 2-3 km, depending on the albedo assumed. The results obtained also include an interesting litmus test: variations of Mab's inclination on the order of the eccentricity changes should be observable. Our work provides clues for further investigation into the tantalizing prospect that the Mab/μ-ring system is undergoing re-accretion after a recent catastrophic disruption.

  6. A database of macromolecular motions.

    PubMed Central

    Gerstein, M; Krebs, W

    1998-01-01

    We describe a database of macromolecular motions meant to be of general use to the structural community. The database, which is accessible on the World Wide Web with an entry point at http://bioinfo.mbb.yale.edu/MolMovDB , attempts to systematize all instances of protein and nucleic acid movement for which there is at least some structural information. At present it contains >120 motions, most of which are of proteins. Protein motions are further classified hierarchically into a limited number of categories, first on the basis of size (distinguishing between fragment, domain and subunit motions) and then on the basis of packing. Our packing classification divides motions into various categories (shear, hinge, other) depending on whether or not they involve sliding over a continuously maintained and tightly packed interface. In addition, the database provides some indication about the evidence behind each motion (i.e. the type of experimental information or whether the motion is inferred based on structural similarity) and attempts to describe many aspects of a motion in terms of a standardized nomenclature (e.g. the maximum rotation, the residue selection of a fixed core, etc.). Currently, we use a standard relational design to implement the database. However, the complexity and heterogeneity of the information kept in the database makes it an ideal application for an object-relational approach, and we are moving it in this direction. Specifically, in terms of storing complex information, the database contains plausible representations for motion pathways, derived from restrained 3D interpolation between known endpoint conformations. These pathways can be viewed in a variety of movie formats, and the database is associated with a server that can automatically generate these movies from submitted coordinates. PMID:9722650

  7. Neural mechanisms of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, G. H.; Daunton, N. G.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility that there might be a neuro-homoral cerebrospinal fluid link in motion sickness was directly tested by blocking the flow of CSF from the third into the fourth ventricle in cats. Evidence obtained thus far is consistent with the hypothesis. Cats with demonstrably sound plugs did not vomit in response to an accelerative motion sickness stimulus, whereas cats with imperfect 'leaky' plugs vomited with little or no delay in latency. Althoough there are several putative candidates, the identification of a humoral motion sickness substance is a matter of conjecture.

  8. 111 years of Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xin; Kim, Changho; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-08-14

    We consider the Brownian motion of a particle and present a tutorial review over the last 111 years since Einstein's paper in 1905. We describe Einstein's model, Langevin's model and the hydrodynamic models, with increasing sophistication on the hydrodynamic interactions between the particle and the fluid. In recent years, the effects of interfaces on the nearby Brownian motion have been the focus of several investigations. We summarize various results and discuss some of the controversies associated with new findings about the changes in Brownian motion induced by the interface. PMID:27396746

  9. Visual motion integration for perception and pursuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, L. S.; Beutter, B. R.; Lorenceau, J.

    2000-01-01

    To examine the relationship between visual motion processing for perception and pursuit, we measured the pursuit eye-movement and perceptual responses to the same complex-motion stimuli. We show that humans can both perceive and pursue the motion of line-figure objects, even when partial occlusion makes the resulting image motion vastly different from the underlying object motion. Our results show that both perception and pursuit can perform largely accurate motion integration, i.e. the selective combination of local motion signals across the visual field to derive global object motion. Furthermore, because we manipulated perceived motion while keeping image motion identical, the observed parallel changes in perception and pursuit show that the motion signals driving steady-state pursuit and perception are linked. These findings disprove current pursuit models whose control strategy is to minimize retinal image motion, and suggest a new framework for the interplay between visual cortex and cerebellum in visuomotor control.

  10. Proper Motion Of Emerging Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lirong

    2009-05-01

    Observational and modeling results indicate that typically the leading magnetic field of bipolar active regions is often spatially more compact, while more dispersed and fragmented in following polarity. Tian & Alexander (2009, ApJ, 695) studied 15 emerging active regions and find that magnetic helicity flux injected into the corona by the leading polarity is generally several times larger than that injected by the following polarity. They argue that the asymmetry of the magnetic helicity should be responsible for the asymmetry of the magnetic morphology. This argument is supported by two resent model results that magnetic flux tubes with higher degree of twist (and therefor greater magnetic tension) have higher rates of emergence (Murray & Hood 2008, A&A, 479; Cheung et al. 2008, ApJ, 687). These results are consistent because the proper motion (related to the emergence) of the leading polarity was found to be faster than that of the following polarity (van Driel-Gesztelyi & Petrovay 1990, Solar Phys., 126). In this paper, we will reinvestigate the proper motion of leading and following polarities of the emerging active regions, and study possible relationship between the proper motion and magnetic helicity.

  11. Coupled bunch motion in large size rings

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, P.L.; Ruth, R.D.; Thompson, K.A.

    1991-05-01

    The growth of the quasi-steady-state motion of the coupled bunch oscillations in storage rings has been studied by means of a normal mode analysis to determine the beam stability. In this type of analysis, the initial amplitude displacements of the bunches are first written as a sum of the normal modes of the multiple bunch system, and then the stability of each mode is determined. If the amplitude of all modes decay then the amplitude of all of the individual bunches must eventually decay, and the motion is considered stable. However, if the beat frequency between the different modes is sufficiently high, compared to the decay rate of the modes, it is possible for the amplitude of some of the bunches to grow temporarily before eventually decaying. Thus, even if all normal modes are eventually damped it is possible during the transient phase for the amplitude of several individual bunch oscillations to grow and become lost. Mathematical complications also arise from a modal analysis when there is a gap in the bunch train and the wake fields from the last bunch in the train decays before arrival of the first bunch; for this case the coupled bunch motion more nearly represents that of beam breakup phenomena observed in linacs. 2 figs.

  12. DAVID: A new video motion sensor for outdoor perimeter applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    To be effective, a perimeter intrusion detection system must comprise both sensor and rapid assessment components. The use of closed circuit television (CCTV) to provide the rapid assessment capability, makes possible the use of video motion detection (VMD) processing as a system sensor component. Despite it's conceptual appeal, video motion detection has not been widely used in outdoor perimeter systems because of an inability to discriminate between genuine intrusions and numerous environmental effects such as cloud shadows, wind motion, reflections, precipitation, etc. The result has been an unacceptably high false alarm rate and operator work-load. DAVID (Digital Automatic Video Intrusion Detector) utilizes new digital signal processing techniques to achieve a dramatic improvement in discrimination performance thereby making video motion detection practical for outdoor applications. This paper begins with a discussion of the key considerations in implementing an outdoor video intrusion detection system, followed by a description of the DAVID design in light of these considerations.

  13. Flight Simulator Platform Motion and Air Transport Pilot Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Alfred T.; Bussolari, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of flight simulator platform motion on pilot training and performance was examined In two studies utilizing a B-727-200 aircraft simulator. The simulator, located at Ames Research Center, Is certified by the FAA for upgrade and transition training in air carrier operations. Subjective ratings and objective performance of experienced B-727 pilots did not reveal any reliable effects of wide variations In platform motion de- sign. Motion platform variations did, however, affect the acquisition of control skill by pilots with no prior heavy aircraft flying experience. The effect was limited to pitch attitude control inputs during the early phase of landing training. Implications for the definition of platform motion requirements in air transport pilot training are discussed.

  14. Hurricane Balls: A rigid-body-motion project for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David P.; Mertens, David; Pearson, Brett J.

    2015-11-01

    We discuss a project on rigid-body motion that is appropriate for students in an upper-division course in classical mechanics. We analyze the motion of Hurricane Balls, two spheres that are welded (or glued) together so they act as a single object that can be spun like a top. The steady-state motion consists of purely rotational motion about the center of mass, such that only one ball is in contact with the table as it rolls without slipping. We give a qualitative explanation for why one ball rises into the air, and we theoretically analyze the system using multiple approaches. We also perform a high-speed video analysis to obtain experimental data on how the orientation depends on the spin rate, and find agreement within a few percent of the theory.

  15. Engineering uses of physics-based ground motion simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Jack W.; Luco, Nicolas; Abrahamson, Norman A.; Graves, Robert W.; Maechling, Phillip J.; Olsen, Kim B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes validation methodologies focused on enabling ground motion simulations to be used with confidence in engineering applications such as seismic hazard analysis and dynmaic analysis of structural and geotechnical systems. Numberical simullation of ground motion from large erthquakes, utilizing physics-based models of earthquake rupture and wave propagation, is an area of active research in the earth science community. Refinement and validatoin of these models require collaboration between earthquake scientists and engineering users, and testing/rating methodolgies for simulated ground motions to be used with confidence in engineering applications. This paper provides an introduction to this field and an overview of current research activities being coordinated by the Souther California Earthquake Center (SCEC). These activities are related both to advancing the science and computational infrastructure needed to produce ground motion simulations, as well as to engineering validation procedures. Current research areas and anticipated future achievements are also discussed.

  16. Human action recognition by extracting motion trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuwen; Yang, Shangpeng

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel human action recognition framework named Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based Hybrid Event Probability Sequence (HEPS), which can recognize unlabeled actions from videos. First, motion trajectories are effectively extracted using the centers of moving objects. Secondly, the HEPS is constructed using the trajectories and represents different human actions. Finally, the improved Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) with inertia weight is introduced to recognize human actions using HMM. The proposed methods are evaluated on UCF Human Action Dataset and achieve 76.67% accurate rate. The comparative experiments results demonstrate that the HMM got superior results with HEPS and PSO.

  17. Facial motion parameter estimation and error criteria in model-based image coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunhai; Yu, Lu; Yao, Qingdong

    2000-04-01

    Model-based image coding has been given extensive attention due to its high subject image quality and low bit-rates. But the estimation of object motion parameter is still a difficult problem, and there is not a proper error criteria for the quality assessment that are consistent with visual properties. This paper presents an algorithm of the facial motion parameter estimation based on feature point correspondence and gives the motion parameter error criteria. The facial motion model comprises of three parts. The first part is the global 3-D rigid motion of the head, the second part is non-rigid translation motion in jaw area, and the third part consists of local non-rigid expression motion in eyes and mouth areas. The feature points are automatically selected by a function of edges, brightness and end-node outside the blocks of eyes and mouth. The numbers of feature point are adjusted adaptively. The jaw translation motion is tracked by the changes of the feature point position of jaw. The areas of non-rigid expression motion can be rebuilt by using block-pasting method. The estimation approach of motion parameter error based on the quality of reconstructed image is suggested, and area error function and the error function of contour transition-turn rate are used to be quality criteria. The criteria reflect the image geometric distortion caused by the error of estimated motion parameters properly.

  18. Organized motion in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A review of organized motion in turbulent flow indicates that the transport properties of most shear flows are dominated by large-scale vortex nonrandom motions. The mean velocity profile of a turbulent boundary layer consists of a viscous sublayer, buffer layer, and a logarithmic outer layer; an empirical formula of Coles (1956) applies to various pressure gradients. The boundary layer coherent structure was isolated by the correlation methods of Townsend (1956) and flow visualization by direct observations of complex unsteady turbulent motions. The near-wall studies of Willmart and Wooldridge (1962) used the space-time correlation for pressure fluctuations at the wall under a thick turbulent boundary layer; finally, organized motion in free shear flows and transition-control of mixing demonstrated that the Reynolds number invariance of turbulence shows wide scatter.

  19. Introducing Motion in a Circle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    2001-01-01

    Motion in a circle troubled Newton and his contemporaries and troubles students today. Presents a clear presentation of certain aspects, particularly centripetal acceleration and centrifugal force. (Author/MM)

  20. Bayesian estimation of turbulent motion.

    PubMed

    Héas, Patrick; Herzet, Cédric; Mémin, Etienne; Heitz, Dominique; Mininni, Pablo D

    2013-06-01

    Based on physical laws describing the multiscale structure of turbulent flows, this paper proposes a regularizer for fluid motion estimation from an image sequence. Regularization is achieved by imposing some scale invariance property between histograms of motion increments computed at different scales. By reformulating this problem from a Bayesian perspective, an algorithm is proposed to jointly estimate motion, regularization hyperparameters, and to select the most likely physical prior among a set of models. Hyperparameter and model inference are conducted by posterior maximization, obtained by marginalizing out non--Gaussian motion variables. The Bayesian estimator is assessed on several image sequences depicting synthetic and real turbulent fluid flows. Results obtained with the proposed approach exceed the state-of-the-art results in fluid flow estimation. PMID:23599051

  1. Vortex soliton motion and steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christou, Jason; Tikhonenko, Vladimir; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Luther-Davies, Barry

    1996-10-01

    Experimental demonstration of the steering of an optical vortex soliton by the superposition of a weak coherent background field is presented. A model to account for vortex motion is derived, and its validity is verified experimentally and numerically.

  2. Projectile Motion in Special Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naddy, Cory J.; Dudley, Scott C.; Haaland, Ryan K.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the motion that occurs when a particle with an initial velocity to the right is acted upon by a constant downward force. Considers what happens when the speed of the particle approaches the speed of light in particular. (WRM)

  3. Is Diaphragm Motion a Good Surrogate for Liver Tumor Motion?

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Cai, Jing; Wang, Hongjun; Chang, Zheng; Czito, Brian G.; Bashir, Mustafa R.; Palta, Manisha; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between liver tumor motion and diaphragm motion. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (10 of 14) or liver metastases (4 of 14) undergoing radiation therapy were included in this study. All patients underwent single-slice cine–magnetic resonance imaging simulations across the center of the tumor in 3 orthogonal planes. Tumor and diaphragm motion trajectories in the superior–inferior (SI), anterior–posterior (AP), and medial–lateral (ML) directions were obtained using an in-house-developed normalized cross-correlation–based tracking technique. Agreement between the tumor and diaphragm motion was assessed by calculating phase difference percentage, intraclass correlation coefficient, and Bland-Altman analysis (Diff). The distance between the tumor and tracked diaphragm area was analyzed to understand its impact on the correlation between the 2 motions. Results: Of all patients, the mean (±standard deviation) phase difference percentage values were 7.1% ± 1.1%, 4.5% ± 0.5%, and 17.5% ± 4.5% in the SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.98 ± 0.02, 0.97 ± 0.02, and 0.08 ± 0.06 in the SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean Diff values were 2.8 ± 1.4 mm, 2.4 ± 1.1 mm, and 2.2 ± 0.5 mm in the SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. Tumor and diaphragm motions had high concordance when the distance between the tumor and tracked diaphragm area was small. Conclusions: This study showed that liver tumor motion had good correlation with diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions, indicating diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions could potentially be used as a reliable surrogate for liver tumor motion.

  4. Investigation of glassy state molecular motions in thermoset polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jianwei

    This dissertation presents the investigation of the glassy state molecular motions in isomeric thermoset epoxies by means of solid-state deuterium (2H) NMR spectroscopy technique. The network structure of crosslinked epoxies was altered through monomer isomerism; specifically, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) was cured with isomeric amine curatives, i.e., the meta-substituted diaminodiphenylsulfone (33DDS) and para-substituted diaminodiphenylsulfone (44DDS). The use of structural isomerism provided a path way for altering macroscopic material properties while maintaining identical chemical composition within the crosslinked networks. The effects of structural isomerism on the glassy state molecular motions were studied using solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy, which offers unrivaled power to monitor site-specific molecular motions. Three distinctive molecular groups on each isomeric network, i.e., the phenylene rings in the bisphenol A structure (BPA), the phenylene rings in the diaminodiphenylsulfone structure (DDS), and the hydroxypropoyl ether group (HPE) have been selectively deuterated for a comprehensive study of the structure-dynamics- property relationships in thermoset epoxies. Quadrupolar echo experiments and line shape simulations were employed as the main research approach to gain both qualitative and quantitative motional information of the epoxy networks in the glassy state. Quantitative information on the geometry and rate of the molecular motions allows the elucidation of the relationship between molecular motions and macro physical properties and the role of these motions in the mechanical relaxation. Specifically, it is revealed that both the BPA and HPE moieties in the isomeric networks have almost identical behaviors in the deep glassy state, which indicates that the molecular motions in the glassy state are localized, and the correlation length of the motions does not exceed the length of the DGEBA repeat unit. BPA ring motions contribute

  5. Thermocapillary Motion in an Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pukhnachov, Vladislav V.; Voinov, Oleg V.

    1996-01-01

    The phenomenological model for the motion of an emulsion or a gas-liquid mixture exposed to thermocapillary forces and micro-acceleration is formulated. The analytical and numerical investigation of one-dimensional flows for these media is fulfilled, the structure of discontinuous motion is studied. The stability conditions of a space-uniform state and of the interface between an emulsion and a pure liquid are obtained.

  6. Brownian motion from Boltzmann's equation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1971-01-01

    Two apparently disparate lines of inquiry in kinetic theory are shown to be equivalent: (1) Brownian motion as treated by the (stochastic) Langevin equation and Fokker-Planck equation; and (2) Boltzmann's equation. The method is to derive the kinetic equation for Brownian motion from the Boltzmann equation for a two-component neutral gas by a simultaneous expansion in the density and mass ratios.

  7. Magnetic Control of Atomic Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Tom; Bannerman, Travis; Chavez, Isaac; Clark, Rob; Libson, Adam; Raizen, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Using a sequence of pulsed electromagnetic coils, known as the atomic coilgun, we slowed supersonic beams of atomic neon and molecular oxygen. We report our progress toward adapting the atomic coilgun for magnetically trapping hydrogen isotopes. This work has motivated us to investigate other methods for magnetic control of atomic motion. We describe these techniques, and present calculations suggesting their utility in controlling atomic motion. We then outline our plans for using these methods in certain applications.

  8. Descriptor for spatial distribution of motion activity for compressed video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divakaran, Ajay; Sun, Huifang

    1999-12-01

    In this paper we present a new descriptor for spatial distribution of motion activity in video sequences. We use the magnitude of the motion vectors as a measure of the intensity of motion cavity in a macro-block. We construct a matrix Cmv consisting of the magnitudes of the motion vector for each macro-block of a given P frame. We compute the average magnitude of the motion vector per macro-block Cavg, and then use Cavg as a threshold on the matrix C by setting the elements of C that are less than Cavg to zero. We classify the runs of zeros into three categories based on length, and count the number of runs of each category in the matrix C. Our activity descriptor for a frame thus consists of four parameters viz. the average magnitude of the motion vectors and the numbers of runs of short, medium and long length. Since the feature extraction is in the compressed domain and simple, it is extremely fast. We have tested it on the MPEG-7 test content set, which consists of approximately 14 hours of MPEG-1 encoded video content of different kinds. We find that our descriptor enables fast and accurate indexing of video. It is robust to noise and changes in encoding parameters such as frame size, frame rate, encoding bit rate, encoding format etc. It is a low-level non-semantic descriptor that gives semantic matches within the same program, and is thus very suitable for applications such as video program browsing. We also find that indirect and computationally simpler measures of the magnitude of the motion vectors such as bits taken to encode the motion vectors, though less effective, also can be used in our run-length framework.

  9. Collective Motion of Spherical Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rabani, Amit; Ariel, Gil; Be'er, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    A large variety of motile bacterial species exhibit collective motions while inhabiting liquids or colonizing surfaces. These collective motions are often characterized by coherent dynamic clusters, where hundreds of cells move in correlated whirls and jets. Previously, all species that were known to form such motion had a rod-shaped structure, which enhances the order through steric and hydrodynamic interactions. Here we show that the spherical motile bacteria Serratia marcescens exhibit robust collective dynamics and correlated coherent motion while grown in suspensions. As cells migrate to the upper surface of a drop, they form a monolayer, and move collectively in whirls and jets. At all concentrations, the distribution of the bacterial speed was approximately Rayleigh with an average that depends on concentration in a non-monotonic way. Other dynamical parameters such as vorticity and correlation functions are also analyzed and compared to rod-shaped bacteria from the same strain. Our results demonstrate that self-propelled spherical objects do form complex ordered collective motion. This opens a door for a new perspective on the role of cell aspect ratio and alignment of cells with regards to collective motion in nature. PMID:24376741

  10. Slow motion increases perceived intent.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Eugene M; Burns, Zachary C; Converse, Benjamin A

    2016-08-16

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor's intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in "slow motion." Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception. PMID:27482091

  11. Dynamical evolution of motion perception.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Ryota; Sheth, Bhavin R; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2007-03-01

    Motion is defined as a sequence of positional changes over time. However, in perception, spatial position and motion dynamically interact with each other. This reciprocal interaction suggests that the perception of a moving object itself may dynamically evolve following the onset of motion. Here, we show evidence that the percept of a moving object systematically changes over time. In experiments, we introduced a transient gap in the motion sequence or a brief change in some feature (e.g., color or shape) of an otherwise smoothly moving target stimulus. Observers were highly sensitive to the gap or transient change if it occurred soon after motion onset (< or =200 ms), but significantly less so if it occurred later (> or = 300 ms). Our findings suggest that the moving stimulus is initially perceived as a time series of discrete potentially isolatable frames; later failures to perceive change suggests that over time, the stimulus begins to be perceived as a single, indivisible gestalt integrated over space as well as time, which could well be the signature of an emergent stable motion percept. PMID:17316736

  12. Slow motion increases perceived intent

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Eugene M.; Burns, Zachary C.; Converse, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor’s intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in “slow motion.” Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception. PMID:27482091

  13. 77 FR 15748 - Atmos Energy Corporation/Atmos Energy-Kentucky/Mid-States Division; Notice of Motion for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline Take notice that on March 9, 2012, Atmos Energy Corporation filed on behalf of Atmos Energy--Kentucky/Mid-States Division (Atmos) a motion requesting an... a motion to intervene or to protest this filing must file in accordance with Rules 211 and 214...

  14. Example-Based Automatic Music-Driven Conventional Dance Motion Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songhua; Fan, Rukun; Geng, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel method for synthesizing dance motions that follow the emotions and contents of a piece of music. Our method employs a learning-based approach to model the music to motion mapping relationship embodied in example dance motions along with those motions' accompanying background music. A key step in our method is to train a music to motion matching quality rating function through learning the music to motion mapping relationship exhibited in synchronized music and dance motion data, which were captured from professional human dance performance. To generate an optimal sequence of dance motion segments to match with a piece of music, we introduce a constraint-based dynamic programming procedure. This procedure considers both music to motion matching quality and visual smoothness of a resultant dance motion sequence. We also introduce a two-way evaluation strategy, coupled with a GPU-based implementation, through which we can execute the dynamic programming process in parallel, resulting in significant speedup. To evaluate the effectiveness of our method, we quantitatively compare the dance motions synthesized by our method with motion synthesis results by several peer methods using the motions captured from professional human dancers' performance as the gold standard. We also conducted several medium-scale user studies to explore how perceptually our dance motion synthesis method can outperform existing methods in synthesizing dance motions to match with a piece of music. These user studies produced very positive results on our music-driven dance motion synthesis experiments for several Asian dance genres, confirming the advantages of our method.

  15. Martian Landscapes in Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, Sarah; McEwen, Alfred; Kirk, Randolph; Howington-Kraus, Elpitha; Chojnacki, Matthew; Runyon, Kirby; Cremonese, Gabriele; Re, Cristina

    2014-05-01

    RISE orthorectified image sequences makes it possible to conduct accurate change detection studies of active processes on Mars. Some examples of studies of active landscapes on Mars using HiRISE DTMs and orthoimage sequences include: dune and ripple motion (Bridges et al., 2012, Nature), recurring slope lineae (RSL) (McEwen et al., 2011, Science; McEwen et al., 2013, Nature Geoscience), gully activity (Dundas et al., 2012, Icarus), and polar processes (Hansen et al., 2011, Science; Portyankina et al. 2013, Icarus,). These studies encompass images from multiple Mars years and seasons. Sequences of orthoimages make it possible to generate animated gifs or movies to visualize temporal changes (http://www.uahirise.org/sim/). They can also be brought into geospatial software to quantitatively map and record changes. The ability to monitor the surface of Mars at high spatial resolution with frequent repeat images has opened up our insight into seasonal and interannual changes, further increasing our understanding of Mars as an active planet.

  16. Illusory motion reversals and feature tracking analyses of movement.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Derek H; Pearce, Samuel L; Marinovic, Welber

    2014-06-01

    Illusory motion reversals (IMRs) can happen when looking at a repetitive pattern of motion, such as a spinning wheel. To date these have been attributed to either a form of motion aftereffect seen while viewing a moving stimulus or to the visual system taking discrete perceptual snapshots of continuous input. Here we present evidence that we argue is inconsistent with both proposals. First, we show that IMRs are driven by the adaptation of nondirectional temporal frequency tuned cells, which is inconsistent with the motion aftereffect account. Then we establish that the optimal frequency for inducing IMRs differs for color and luminance defined movement. These data are problematic for any account based on a constant rate of discrete perceptual sampling. Instead, we suggest IMRs result from a perceptual rivalry involving discrepant signals from a feature tracking analysis of movement and motion-energy based analyses. We do not assume that feature tracking relies on a discrete sampling of input at a fixed rate, but rather that feature tracking can (mis)match features at any rate less than a stimulus driven maximal resolution. Consistent with this proposal, we show that the critical frequency for inducing IMRs is dictated by the duty cycle of salient features within a moving pattern, rather than by the temporal frequency of luminance changes. PMID:24635200

  17. Adaptive motion artifact reducing algorithm for wrist photoplethysmography application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jingwei; Wang, Guijin; Shi, Chenbo

    2016-04-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) technology is widely used in wearable heart pulse rate monitoring. It might reveal the potential risks of heart condition and cardiopulmonary function by detecting the cardiac rhythms in physical exercise. However the quality of wrist photoelectric signal is very sensitive to motion artifact since the thicker tissues and the fewer amount of capillaries. Therefore, motion artifact is the major factor that impede the heart rate measurement in the high intensity exercising. One accelerometer and three channels of light with different wavelengths are used in this research to analyze the coupled form of motion artifact. A novel approach is proposed to separate the pulse signal from motion artifact by exploiting their mixing ratio in different optical paths. There are four major steps of our method: preprocessing, motion artifact estimation, adaptive filtering and heart rate calculation. Five healthy young men are participated in the experiment. The speeder in the treadmill is configured as 12km/h, and all subjects would run for 3-10 minutes by swinging the arms naturally. The final result is compared with chest strap. The average of mean square error (MSE) is less than 3 beats per minute (BPM/min). Proposed method performed well in intense physical exercise and shows the great robustness to individuals with different running style and posture.

  18. Effect of motion cues during complex curved approach and landing tasks: A piloted simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1987-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted to examine the effect of motion cues using a high fidelity simulation of commercial aircraft during the performance of complex approach and landing tasks in the Microwave Landing System (MLS) signal environment. The data from these tests indicate that in a high complexity MLS approach task with moderate turbulence and wind, the pilot uses motion cues to improve path tracking performance. No significant differences in tracking accuracy were noted for the low and medium complexity tasks, regardless of the presence of motion cues. Higher control input rates were measured for all tasks when motion was used. Pilot eye scan, as measured by instrument dwell time, was faster when motion cues were used regardless of the complexity of the approach tasks. Pilot comments indicated a preference for motion. With motion cues, pilots appeared to work harder in all levels of task complexity and to improve tracking performance in the most complex approach task.

  19. Motion Aftereffects Transfer between Touch and Vision

    PubMed Central

    Konkle, Talia; Wang, Qi; Hayward, Vincent; Moore, Christopher I.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Current views on multisensory motion integration assume separate substrates where visual motion perceptually dominates tactile motion [1, 2]. However, recent neuroimaging findings demonstrate strong activation of visual motion processing areas by tactile stimuli [3–6], implying a potentially bidirectional relationship. To test the relationship between visual and tactile motion processing, we examined the transfer of motion aftereffects. In the well-known visual motion aftereffect, adapting to visual motion in one direction causes a subsequently presented stationary stimulus to be perceived as moving in the opposite direction [7, 8]. The existence of motion aftereffects in the tactile domain was debated [9–11], though robust tactile motion aftereffects have recently been demonstrated [12, 13]. By using a motion adaptation paradigm, we found that repeated exposure to visual motion in a given direction produced a tactile motion aftereffect, the illusion of motion in the opponent direction across the finger pad. We also observed that repeated exposure to tactile motion induces a visual motion aftereffect, biasing the perceived direction of counterphase gratings. These crossmodal aftereffects, operating both from vision to touch and from touch to vision, present strong behavioral evidence that the processing of visual and tactile motion rely on shared representations that dynamically impact modality-specific perception. PMID:19361996

  20. Pose and motion from contact

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.B.; Erdmann, M.

    1999-05-01

    In the absence of vision, grasping an object often relies on tactile feedback from the fingertips. As the finger pushes the object, the fingertip can feel the contact point move. If the object is known in advance, from this motion the finger may infer the location of the contact point on the object, and thereby, the object pose. This paper primarily investigates the problem of determining the pose (orientation and position) and motion (velocity and angular velocity) of a planar object with known geometry from such contact motion generated by pushing. A dynamic analysis of pushing yields a nonlinear system that relates through contact the object pose and motion to the finger motion. The contact motion on the fingertip thus encodes certain information about the object pose. Nonlinear observability theory is employed to show that such information is sufficient for the finger to observe not only the pose, but also the motion of the object. Therefore, a sensing strategy can be realized as an observer of the nonlinear dynamic system. Two observers are subsequently introduced. The first observer, based on the work of Gautheir, Hammouri, and Othman (1992), has its gain determined by the solution of a Lyapunov-like equation; it can be activated at any time instant during a push. The second observer, based on Newton`s method, solves for the initial (motionless) object pose from three intermediate contact points during a push. Under the Coulomb-friction model, the paper deals with support friction in the plane and/or contact friction between the finger and the object. Extensive simulations have been done to demonstrate the feasibility of the two observers. Preliminary experiments (with an Adept robot) have also been conducted. A contact sensor has been implemented using strain gauges.

  1. Quantitative assessment of human motion using video motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probe, John D.

    1990-01-01

    In the study of the dynamics and kinematics of the human body, a wide variety of technologies was developed. Photogrammetric techniques are well documented and are known to provide reliable positional data from recorded images. Often these techniques are used in conjunction with cinematography and videography for analysis of planar motion, and to a lesser degree three-dimensional motion. Cinematography has been the most widely used medium for movement analysis. Excessive operating costs and the lag time required for film development coupled with recent advances in video technology have allowed video based motion analysis systems to emerge as a cost effective method of collecting and analyzing human movement. The Anthropometric and Biomechanics Lab at Johnson Space Center utilizes the video based Ariel Performance Analysis System to develop data on shirt-sleeved and space-suited human performance in order to plan efficient on orbit intravehicular and extravehicular activities. The system is described.

  2. Elements of an improved model of debris‐flow motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    A new depth‐averaged model of debris‐flow motion describes simultaneous evolution of flow velocity and depth, solid and fluid volume fractions, and pore‐fluid pressure. Non‐hydrostatic pore‐fluid pressure is produced by dilatancy, a state‐dependent property that links the depth‐averaged shear rate and volumetric strain rate of the granular phase. Pore‐pressure changes caused by shearing allow the model to exhibit rate‐dependent flow resistance, despite the fact that the basal shear traction involves only rate‐independent Coulomb friction. An analytical solution of simplified model equations shows that the onset of downslope motion can be accelerated or retarded by pore‐pressure change, contingent on whether dilatancy is positive or negative. A different analytical solution shows that such effects will likely be muted if downslope motion continues long enough, because dilatancy then evolves toward zero, and volume fractions and pore pressure concurrently evolve toward steady states.

  3. Wadaiko performance enhances synchronized motion of mentally disabled persons.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Eriko; Sakuma, Haruo

    2013-02-01

    People with mental disabilities tend to lack communication skills and have difficulty with interpersonal relationships. Interpersonal communication skills were examined in two people with Down Syndrome with regard to playing wadaiko (Japanese drum). Motion analysis compared single play and two-person play in which one participant was more skillful than the other. The effect of wadaiko play was quantified using two different methodologies: motion delay and hit-timing analysis and visual analog-scale (VAS) ratings before and after play. The motion analysis indicated that the study participants became mutually synchronized in playing wadaiko, and that a participant played more accurately when he played with a senior member. VAS ratings indicated that participants felt more positive after practicing wadaiko than before and self-confidence improved. Synchronized gestures of wadaiko performance may be an effective therapy for people with limited communication skills. PMID:23829145

  4. Empirical comparison of a linear and a nonlinear washout for motion simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, R. V.; Martin, D. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The subjective opinions gathered from seven pilots in the process of comparing a linear and a nonlinear washout for motion simulators reveal an important advance in motion cue presentation. The advance is not in the increased cue provided by the nonlinear filter over a linear filter for the same amount of motion base travel, but rather in the elimination of false rotational rate cues presented by linear filters.

  5. 29 CFR 102.65 - Motions; interventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Act § 102.65 Motions; interventions. (a) All motions, including motions for intervention pursuant to... any proceeding shall make a motion for intervention, stating the grounds upon which such person claims... be, may by order permit intervention in person or by counsel or other representative to such...

  6. 29 CFR 102.65 - Motions; interventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Act § 102.65 Motions; interventions. (a) All motions, including motions for intervention pursuant to... any proceeding shall make a motion for intervention, stating the grounds upon which such person claims... be, may by order permit intervention in person or by counsel or other representative to such...

  7. 29 CFR 102.65 - Motions; interventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Act § 102.65 Motions; interventions. (a) All motions, including motions for intervention pursuant to... any proceeding shall make a motion for intervention, stating the grounds upon which such person claims... be, may by order permit intervention in person or by counsel or other representative to such...

  8. 29 CFR 102.65 - Motions; interventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Act § 102.65 Motions; interventions. (a) All motions, including motions for intervention pursuant to... any proceeding shall make a motion for intervention, stating the grounds upon which such person claims... be, may by order permit intervention in person or by counsel or other representative to such...

  9. Project Physics Reader 1, Concepts of Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    As a supplement to Project Physics Unit 1, 21 articles are presented in this reader. Concepts of motion are discussed under headings: motion, motion in words, representation of movement, introducing vectors, Galileo's discussion of projectile motion, Newton's laws of dynamics, the dynamics of a golf club, report on Tait's lecture on force, and bad…

  10. 29 CFR 22.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Motions. 22.28 Section 22.28 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 22.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought, the authority...

  11. 12 CFR 509.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motions. 509.23 Section 509.23 Banks and... ADJUDICATORY PROCEEDINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 509.23 Motions. (a) In writing. (1) Except... written motion. (2) All written motions must state with particularity the relief sought and must...

  12. 31 CFR 16.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motions. 16.28 Section 16.28 Money... FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 16.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought, the authority relied upon, and the...

  13. 21 CFR 17.32 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Motions. 17.32 Section 17.32 Food and Drugs FOOD... HEARINGS § 17.32 Motions. (a) Any application to the presiding officer for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought, the authority relied upon, and the facts alleged,...

  14. 49 CFR 386.34 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Motions. 386.34 Section 386.34 Transportation... and Hearings § 386.34 Motions. (a) General. An application for an order or ruling not otherwise covered by these rules shall be by motion. All motions filed prior to the calling of the matter for...

  15. 5 CFR 1201.55 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motions. 1201.55 Section 1201.55... Procedures for Appellate Cases Hearings § 1201.55 Motions. (a) Form. All motions, except those made during a prehearing conference or a hearing, must be in writing. All motions must include a statement of the...

  16. 14 CFR 13.49 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Motions. 13.49 Section 13.49 Aeronautics... AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Rules of Practice for FAA Hearings § 13.49 Motions. (a) Motion to dismiss... motion to dismiss for failure of the allegations in the notice of proposed action to state a violation...

  17. 16 CFR 1025.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Motions. 1025.23 Section 1025.23 Commercial... Prehearing Procedures, Motions, Interlocutory Appeals, Summary Judgments, Settlements § 1025.23 Motions. (a... motions, whether oral or written, except those filed under § 1025.42(e), shall be addressed to...

  18. 5 CFR 2422.19 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Motions. 2422.19 Section 2422.19... FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY REPRESENTATION PROCEEDINGS § 2422.19 Motions. (a) Purpose of a motion..., an order, or relief must do so by filing or raising a motion stating the order or relief sought...

  19. 12 CFR 747.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Motions. 747.23 Section 747.23 Banks and... Procedure § 747.23 Motions. (a) In writing. (1) Except as otherwise provided herein, an application or request for an order or ruling must be made by written motion. (2) All written motions must state...

  20. 41 CFR 50-203.4 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motions. 50-203.4...-Healey Public Contracts Act § 50-203.4 Motions. (a) All motions except those made at the hearing shall be... shall be included in the record. Such motions shall state briefly the order or relief applied for...

  1. 49 CFR 209.17 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Motions. 209.17 Section 209.17 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES General § 209.17 Motions. Motions shall be in writing... that oral motions may be made during the course of any hearing or appearance before the...

  2. 10 CFR 820.39 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Motions. 820.39 Section 820.39 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Enforcement Process § 820.39 Motions. (a) General. All motions in..., certificate, other evidence, or legal memorandum relied upon. (b) Answer to motions. Except as...

  3. 28 CFR 71.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motions. 71.28 Section 71.28 Judicial... REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 Implementation for Actions Initiated by the Department of Justice § 71.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the...

  4. 49 CFR 821.14 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Motions. 821.14 Section 821.14 Transportation..., and Appeals From Law Judges Initial Decisions and Appealable Orders § 821.14 Motions. (a) General. Any... shall be by motion. Prior to the assignment of the proceeding to a law judge, all motions shall...

  5. 22 CFR 35.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 35.28 Section 35.28 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CLAIMS AND STOLEN PROPERTY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 35.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought,...

  6. 49 CFR 386.34 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Motions. 386.34 Section 386.34 Transportation... and Hearings § 386.34 Motions. (a) General. An application for an order or ruling not otherwise covered by these rules shall be by motion. All motions filed prior to the calling of the matter for...

  7. 17 CFR 12.205 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Motions. 12.205 Section 12.205... Applicable to Summary Decisional Proceedings § 12.205 Motions. (a) In general. Motions for relief not otherwise specifically provided for in subpart D of these rules, other than discovery-related motions...

  8. 46 CFR 502.69 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Motions. 502.69 Section 502.69 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME...; Motions; Replies § 502.69 Motions. (a) In any adjudication, an application or request for an order or ruling not otherwise specifically provided for in this part must be by motion. After the assignment of...

  9. 10 CFR 13.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Motions. 13.28 Section 13.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought, the authority relied upon, and...

  10. 6 CFR 13.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Motions. 13.28 Section 13.28 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling will be by motion. Motions will state the...

  11. 10 CFR 1013.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Motions. 1013.28 Section 1013.28 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES § 1013.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought,...

  12. 31 CFR 16.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motions. 16.28 Section 16.28 Money... FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 16.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought, the authority relied upon, and the...

  13. 10 CFR 13.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Motions. 13.28 Section 13.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought, the authority relied upon, and...

  14. 45 CFR 79.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motions. 79.28 Section 79.28 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 79.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state...

  15. 19 CFR 210.15 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Motions. 210.15 Section 210.15 Customs Duties... ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Motions § 210.15 Motions. (a) Presentation and disposition. (1) During the period... administrative law judge, all motions shall be addressed to the chief administrative law judge. During the...

  16. 41 CFR 50-203.4 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Motions. 50-203.4 Section...-Healey Public Contracts Act § 50-203.4 Motions. (a) All motions except those made at the hearing shall be... shall be included in the record. Such motions shall state briefly the order or relief applied for...

  17. 19 CFR 210.15 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Motions. 210.15 Section 210.15 Customs Duties... ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Motions § 210.15 Motions. (a) Presentation and disposition. (1) During the period... administrative law judge, all motions shall be addressed to the chief administrative law judge. During the...

  18. 17 CFR 9.5 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Motions. 9.5 Section 9.5... DISCIPLINARY, ACCESS DENIAL OR OTHER ADVERSE ACTIONS General Provisions § 9.5 Motions. (a) In general. An... written motion, filed with the Proceedings Clerk. The motion must state the relief sought and the...

  19. 10 CFR 13.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motions. 13.28 Section 13.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought, the authority relied upon, and...

  20. 49 CFR 386.34 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Motions. 386.34 Section 386.34 Transportation... and Hearings § 386.34 Motions. (a) General. An application for an order or ruling not otherwise covered by these rules shall be by motion. All motions filed prior to the calling of the matter for...

  1. 12 CFR 747.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motions. 747.23 Section 747.23 Banks and... Procedure § 747.23 Motions. (a) In writing. (1) Except as otherwise provided herein, an application or request for an order or ruling must be made by written motion. (2) All written motions must state...

  2. 22 CFR 521.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Motions. 521.28 Section 521.28 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 521.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the...

  3. 46 CFR 201.79 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Motions. 201.79 Section 201.79 Shipping MARITIME... Formal Proceedings, Notice, Pleadings, Replies (Rule 7) § 201.79 Motions. All motions and requests for... after the hearing, such motions shall be in writing. If made at the hearing, they may be stated...

  4. 43 CFR 4.821 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Motions. 4.821 Section 4.821 Public Lands... Interior-Effectuation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Procedures § 4.821 Motions. Motions and... served on all parties. Within 8 days after a written motion or petition is served, any party may file...

  5. 16 CFR 3.22 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motions. 3.22 Section 3.22 Commercial... ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Prehearing Procedures; Motions; Interlocutory Appeals; Summary Decisions § 3.22 Motions. (a) Presentation and disposition. Motions filed under § 3.26 or § 4.17 shall be directly...

  6. 14 CFR 13.49 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Motions. 13.49 Section 13.49 Aeronautics... AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Rules of Practice for FAA Hearings § 13.49 Motions. (a) Motion to dismiss... motion to dismiss for failure of the allegations in the notice of proposed action to state a violation...

  7. 6 CFR 13.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motions. 13.28 Section 13.28 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling will be by motion. Motions will state the...

  8. 28 CFR 71.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions. 71.28 Section 71.28 Judicial... REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 Implementation for Actions Initiated by the Department of Justice § 71.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the...

  9. 38 CFR 42.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions. 42.28 Section 42... IMPLEMENTING THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 42.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought, the authority relied upon,...

  10. 39 CFR 3001.21 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motions. 3001.21 Section 3001.21 Postal Service... § 3001.21 Motions. (a) Scope and contents. An application for an order or ruling not otherwise specifically provided for in this part shall be by motion. Motions shall set forth with particularity...

  11. 12 CFR 308.527 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Motions. 308.527 Section 308.527 Banks and... PROCEDURE Program Fraud Civil Remedies and Procedures § 308.527 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling must be by motion. Motions must state the relief sought, the authority relied...

  12. 10 CFR 1013.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Motions. 1013.28 Section 1013.28 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES § 1013.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought,...

  13. 39 CFR 3001.21 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions. 3001.21 Section 3001.21 Postal Service... § 3001.21 Motions. (a) Scope and contents. An application for an order or ruling not otherwise specifically provided for in this part shall be by motion. Motions shall set forth with particularity...

  14. 22 CFR 35.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Motions. 35.28 Section 35.28 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CLAIMS AND STOLEN PROPERTY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 35.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought,...

  15. 12 CFR 109.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Motions. 109.23 Section 109.23 Banks and... ADJUDICATORY PROCEEDINGS Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure § 109.23 Motions. (a) In writing. (1) Except... written motion. (2) All written motions must state with particularity the relief sought and must...

  16. 10 CFR 1013.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motions. 1013.28 Section 1013.28 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES AND PROCEDURES § 1013.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought,...

  17. 13 CFR 134.211 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Motions. 134.211 Section 134.211... OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Rules of Practice § 134.211 Motions. (a) Contents. All motions must state the relief being requested, as well as the grounds and any authority for that relief. A motion must...

  18. 29 CFR 2700.10 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions. 2700.10 Section 2700.10 Labor Regulations Relating... Provisions § 2700.10 Motions. (a) An application for an order shall be by motion which, unless made during a...) Written motions shall be set forth in a document separate from other pleadings. (c) Prior to filing...

  19. 22 CFR 35.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Motions. 35.28 Section 35.28 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CLAIMS AND STOLEN PROPERTY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 35.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought,...

  20. 14 CFR 13.218 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motions. 13.218 Section 13.218 Aeronautics... AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Rules of Practice in FAA Civil Penalty Actions § 13.218 Motions. (a... motion. A party shall comply with the requirements of this section when filing a motion with...