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Sample records for aqueous carbon dioxide

  1. REACTION OF ACTIVATED CARBON WITH AQUEOUS CHLORINE AND CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to determine whether aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide react with activated carbon, or with compounds adsorbed on activated carbon, to produce compounds that would not form in the absence of activated carbon. The experimental conditions were...

  2. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct aqueous mineral carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration by an ex-situ, direct aqueous mineral carbonation process has been investigated over the past two years. This process was conceived to minimize the steps in the conversion of gaseous CO2 to a stable solid. This meant combining two separate reactions, mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation, into a single unit operation. It was recognized that the conditions favorable for one of these reactions could be detrimental to the other. However, the benefits for a combined aqueous process, in process efficiency and ultimately economics, justified the investigation. The process utilizes a slurry of water, dissolved CO2, and a magnesium silicate mineral, such as olivine [forsterite end member (Mg2SiO4)], or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. These minerals were selected as the reactants of choice for two reasons: (1) significant abundance in nature; and (2) high molar ratio of the alkaline earth oxides (CaO, MgO) within the minerals. Because it is the alkaline earth oxide that combines with CO2 to form the solid carbonate, those minerals with the highest ratio of these oxides are most favored. Optimum results have been achieved using heat pretreated serpentine feed material, sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride additions to the solution, and high partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2). Specific conditions include: 155?C; PCO2=185 atm; 15% solids. Under these conditions, 78% conversion of the silicate to the carbonate was achieved in 30 minutes. Future studies are intended to investigate various mineral pretreatment options, the carbonation solution characteristics, alternative reactants, scale-up to a continuous process, geochemical modeling, and process economics.

  3. Electroreduction of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions at metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Augustynski, J.; Jermann, B.; Kedzierzawski, P.

    1996-12-31

    The quantities of carbon stored in the form of atmospheric carbon dioxide, CO{sub 2} in the hydrosphere and carbonates in the terrestrial environment substantially exceed those of fossil fuels. In spite of this the industrial use of carbon dioxide as a source of chemical carbon is presently limited to preparation of urea and certain carboxylic acids as well as organic carbonates and polycarbonates. However, the situation is expected to change in the future, if effective catalytic systems allowing to activate carbon dioxide will become available. In this connection, the electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2}, requiring only an additional input of water and electrical energy, appears as an attractive possibility. For more than 100 years formic acid and formates of alkali metals were considered as the only significant products of the electroreduction of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions. The highest current efficiencies, exceeding 90 %, were obtained either with mercury or with amalgam electrodes. The only comprehensive study regarding kinetics of CO{sub 2} reduction in aqueous solution has been performed by Eyring et al. using a mercury cathode. This paper describes electrolysis studies.

  4. Solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, J.I.; Yoon, J.H.

    1998-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (AMPD) has been measured at (30, 40, and 60) C and the partial pressure of carbon dioxide ranging from (0.5 to 3065) kPa. The concentrations of the aqueous solutions were (10 and 30) mass % AMPD. The tendency of the solubility of carbon dioxide in 30 mass % AMPD aqueous solution at 40 C was found to be similar to that in 30 mass % N-methyldiethanolamine aqueous solution.

  5. Carbon dioxide sequestration by aqueous mineral carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.; O'Connor, William K.; Penner, Larry R.

    2003-01-01

    The dramatic increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since the Industrial Revolution has caused concerns about global warming. Fossil-fuel-fired power plants contribute approximately one third of the total human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide. Increased efficiency of these power plants will have a large impact on carbon dioxide emissions, but additional measures will be needed to slow or stop the projected increase in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. By accelerating the naturally occurring carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals it is possible to sequester carbon dioxide in the geologically stable mineral magnesite (MgCO3). The carbonation of two classes of magnesium silicate minerals, olivine (Mg2SiO4) and serpentine (Mg3Si2O5(OH)4), was investigated in an aqueous process. The slow natural geologic process that converts both of these minerals to magnesite can be accelerated by increasing the surface area, increasing the activity of carbon dioxide in the solution, introducing imperfections into the crystal lattice by high-energy attrition grinding, and in the case of serpentine, by thermally activating the mineral by removing the chemically bound water. The effect of temperature is complex because it affects both the solubility of carbon dioxide and the rate of mineral dissolution in opposing fashions. Thus an optimum temperature for carbonation of olivine is approximately 185 degrees C and 155 degrees C for serpentine. This paper will elucidate the interaction of these variables and use kinetic studies to propose a process for the sequestration of the carbon dioxide.

  6. Effect of a magnetic field on the dissolution kinetics of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglitskii, N.N.; Kolomiets, A.A.; Kul'skii, L.A.; Rubezhanskii, K.A.; Zhantalai, B.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper gives an account of an investigation into the effect of a magnetic field on the rate of dissolution of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions. The CO/sub 2/ pressure in the system was maintained by a Hoffer valve. The method used for studying the dissolution kinetics of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions is described. The specific rate of dissolution of carbon dioxide in solutions exposed to a magnetic field is lower than in solutions not so exposed. There is a tendency for the equilibrium solubility of CO/sub 2/ to increase in solutions exposed to a magnetic field.

  7. Vapor-liquid equilibrium of carbon dioxide in aqueous mixtures of monoethanolamine and methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Jou, F.Y.; Otto, F.D.; Mather, A.E. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    Aqueous solutions of alkanolamines are used to separate carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide from gas streams. Data for the distribution of carbon dioxide between the vapor and aqueous solutions of four mixtures of monoethanolamine (MEA) and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) have been obtained at 25, 40, 80 and 120 C over a range of pressures from 100 kPa to 20 MPa. Partial pressures of CO[sub 2] ranged from 0.001 to 19,930 kPa. Enthalpies of reaction of CO[sub 2] in the solutions have been calculated from the solubility data.

  8. Physical solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous alkanolamines via nitrous oxide analogy

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, G.J.; Weiland, R.H. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-10-01

    In the petrochemical and natural gas industry, the removal of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide from process gas streams is commonly achieved by reacting these impurities with aqueous alkanolamines. Van Krevelen coefficients for protonated monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), the carbamates of MEA and DEA, and the bicarbonate ion have been determined experimentally from measurements of the solubility of N[sub 2]O at 25 C and atmospheric pressure in aqueous solutions of these ions. Measured values different significantly from values recommended by others in the absence of experimental data. By analogy with N[sub 2]O, the solubility of carbon dioxide in the same solutions can be estimated.

  9. Research status on the sequestration of carbon dioxide by direct aqueous mineral carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Rush, Gilbert E.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2001-01-01

    Direct aqueous mineral carbonation has been investigated as a process to convert gaseous CO2 into a geologically stable, solid final form. The process utilizes a solution of distilled water, or sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), sodium chloride (NaCl), and water, mixed with a mineral reactant, such as olivine (Mg2SiO4) or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. Carbon dioxide is dissolved into this slurry, by diffusion through the surface and gas dispersion within the aqueous phase. The process includes dissolution of the mineral and precipitation of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) in a single unit operation. Mineral reactivity has been increased by pretreatment of the minerals. Thermal activation of serpentine can be achieved by heat pretreatment at 630 C. Carbonation of the thermally activated serpentine, using the bicarbonate-bearing solution, at T=155 C, PCO2=185 atm, and 15% solids, achieved 78% stoichiometric conversion of the silicate to the carbonate in 30 minutes. Recent studies have investigated mechanical activation as an alternative to thermal treatment. The addition of a high intensity attrition grinding step to the size reduction circuit successfully activated both serpentine and olivine. Over 80% stoichiometric conversion of the mechanically activated olivine was achieved in 60 minutes, using the bicarbonate solution at T=185 C, PCO2=150 atm, and 15% solids. Significant carbonation of the mechanically activated minerals, at up to 66% stoichiometric conversion, has also been achieved at ambient temperature (25 C) and PCO2 ={approx}10 atm.

  10. Carbon dioxide concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, C. F.; Huebscher, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Passed exhaled air through electrochemical cell containing alkali metal carbonate aqueous solution, and utilizes platinized electrodes causing reaction of oxygen at cathode with water in electrolyte, producing hydroxyl ions which react with carbon dioxide to form carbonate ions.

  11. Solubility of mixtures of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jou, Fang Yuan; Carroll, J.J.; Mather, A.E.; Otto, F.D. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of alkanolamines are commonly used to strip acid gases (H[sub 2]S and CO[sub 2]) from streams contaminated with these components. The two most widely used amines are monoethanolamine (MEA) and diethanolamine (DEA). The solubilities of mixtures of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in a 35 wt% (3.04 kmol/m[sup 3]) aqueous solution of N-methyldiethanolamine at 40 and 100C have been measured. Partial pressures of the acid gases ranged from 0.006 to 101 kPa at 40C and from 4 to 530 kPa at 100C.

  12. Experimental fractionation of stable carbon isotopes during degassing of carbon dioxide and precipitation of calcite from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, K.; Winde, V.; Escher, P.; von Geldern, R.; Böttcher, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    Processes in the carbonate system of surface waters are in particular sensitive to variations of boundary conditions as, for instance, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the aqueous solution. Examples range from streams, rivers, to coastal marine waters. The flux of carbon dioxide from continental flowing waters was recently included into calculations of the global carbon budget (Butman & Raymond, 2011, Nature Geo.). These solutions, are often supersaturated in carbon dioxide with respect to the atmosphere. The degassing of carbon dioxide is associated with a kinetically controlled fractionation of the stable carbon isotopes, which has to be considered in balancing water-air carbon dioxide fluxes. The degassing process additionally leads to the super-saturation of the aqueous solution with respect to calcium carbonate. Stable isotope fractionation is of particular value to identify and quantify processes at the water-gas phase interface and link these non-equilibrium processes to the formation mechanisms of calcite and the hydrodynamics of surface waters. Experiments were carried out with or without inert N2 gas flow to degas carbon dioxide from initially supersaturated solutions. Natural solutions used are from different stations of the Elbe estuary, the Jade Bay, the backbarrier tidal area of Spiekeroog Island, carbonate springs of Rügen Island, and the Baltic Sea coastline. Results are compared experiments using bottled mineral waters. By following the (physico) chemical changes in the solutions (pH, TA, Ca PHREEQC modeling) it was found, that two evolutionary stages can be differentiated. Reaction progress led to the preferential liberation of carbon dioxide containing the light carbon isotope, following a Rayleigh-type process. After an induction period, where only degassing of carbon dioxide took place, a second stage was observed where calcite began to form from the highly supersaturated solutions. In this stage the carbonate

  13. Solubility of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in aqueous alkanolamines

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, R.H. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Chakravarty, T. ); Mather, A.E. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    The Deshmukh-Mather thermodynamic model has been fitted to all available, public, phase-equilibrium data for CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2]S in aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine, diethanolamine, diglycolamine, and N-methyldiethanolamine. The fitting was done for both acid gases simultaneously, and the best numerical values of the most important interaction parameters for each amine were obtained. Although the method used for data regression did not provide a statistical measure of the goodness of fit, the regressed model forms a unified basis for evaluating the large amount of data collected over the past 50 years and it results in a rational approach to performing vapor-liquid equilibrium calculations in a computationally affordable, thermodynamically sound manner.

  14. Separation processes for recovering alloy steels from grinding sludge: Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction and aqueous cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, H.; Matthews, M.A.

    1999-04-01

    Two separation processes have been developed to remove contaminants (cutting oil with trace phosphorus additive) from high-speed steel grinding sludge. One process uses an aqueous surfactant washing technique, and the second process uses supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) extraction. Bench-scale aqueous washings have shown that the required phosphorus removal is easily obtained, but a sufficient oil removal is more difficult. The experimental results also indicate a strong dependence of the aqueous washing efficiency on the choice of a suitable surfactant. A mass transfer model is used to simulate a semi-continuous washing process. SCCO{sub 2} extraction at 80 C and 340 atm shows that approximately 80% of the oil can be removed from the sludge during a 60-minute process to produce a batch of recyclable steel, and that the phosphorus removal also reaches the required level. A linear desorption model is used to describe the irreversible desorption of oil from the solid phase into the CO{sub 2} phase, and the simulated results agree very well with the experimental data.

  15. Dissolved carbonic anhydrase for enhancing post-combustion carbon dioxide hydration in aqueous ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, James R.; Heck, Robert W.; Zwoster, Andy

    2011-04-01

    Aqueous ammonia solvents that capture CO2 as ionic complexes of carbonates with ammonium have recently been advanced as alternatives to amine-based solvents due to their lower energy requirements for thermal regeneration. In ammonia based solvents, the hydration of CO2 to form bicarbonate may become a rate-limiting step as the CO2 loading increases and the resulting pH level of the solvent decreases. Variants of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase can accelerate the reversible hydration of CO2 to yield bicarbonate by more than 10(6)-fold. The possible benefit of bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) addition to solutions of aqueous ammonia to enhance CO2 hydration was investigated in semi-batch reactions within continuously stirred tank reactors or in a bubble column gas-liquid contactor. Adding 154 mg/liter of BCA to 2 M aqueous ammonia provided a 34.1% overall increase in the rate of CO2 hydration (as indicated by the production of [H+]) as the pH declined from 9.6 to 8.6 during sparging with a 15% CO2, 85% N-2 gas at a flow rate of 3 lpm. The benefits of adding BCA to enhance CO2 hydration were only discernable below similar to pH 9. The implications of the apparent pH limitations on the utility of BCA are discussed in the context of absorber unit operation design. Possible embodiments of carbonic anhydrase as either an immobilized catalyst or as a dissolved, recirculating catalyst in potential plant scale aqueous ammonia systems are considered as well. (C) 2010 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Kinetic study of carbon dioxide reaction with tertiary amines in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, D.; Tondre, C.; Lappai, G.; Delpuech, J.J.

    1981-11-26

    Reaction kinetics of CO/sub 2/ with triethanolamine (TEA) and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) in aqueous solution have been studied by using a stopped-flow technique with pH detection. Rate constants are obtained from the comparison of experimental and theoretical curves giving the optical density as a function of time. At concentrations of CO/sub 2/ well below the saturation limit, the results are consistent with the hydration reactions of the CO/sub 2/ molecules either with neutral water molecules or with hydroxide ions, depending upon the pH, itself governed by the ionization equilibrium of the dissolved amine. Moreover, a specific (catalytic) reaction, first order with respect to both carbon dioxide and amine (rate constant, 2.85 M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ at 25/sup 0/C), has been shown to contribute significantly to the reaction rate in the case of the first amine (TEA) only.

  17. Stabilization of carbon dioxide (CO2) bubbles in micrometer-diameter aqueous droplets and the formation of hollow microparticles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tianyi; Fan, Rong; Delgadillo, Luis F; Wan, Jiandi

    2016-04-26

    We report an approach to stabilize carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubbles encapsulated in micrometer-diameter aqueous drops when water in the aqueous drops is evaporated. CO2-in-water-in-oil double emulsion drops are generated using microfluidic approaches and evaporation is conducted in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and/or graphene oxide (GO) particles dispersed in the aqueous phase of the double emulsion drops. We examine the roles of the bubble-to-drop size ratio, PVA and GO concentration in the stabilization of CO2 bubbles upon water evaporation and show that thin-shell particles with encapsulated CO2 bubbles can be obtained under optimized conditions. The developed approach offers a new strategy to study CO2 dissolution and stability on the microscale and the synthesis of novel gas-core microparticles. PMID:27025654

  18. Experimental studies of selective acid gas removal: Absorption of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide into aqueous methyldiethanolamine using packed columns

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, C.N.

    1988-01-01

    The use of aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) for selective removal of hydrogen sulfide from acid gas streams has been studied in a 2 inch column packed with 1/4 inch ceramic Intalox saddles. The column was operated in a counter-current, steady state fashion. The feed gas composition varied between 1 and 5 mole % hydrogen sulfide and between 0 and 50 mole % carbon dioxide. In order to assist the development of packed column absorption models, the rate at which pure carbon dioxide absorbs into 2 M MDEA was measured as a function of pressure, liquid flow rate and packed bed length. The importance of end effects was carefully evaluated. In addition, draining and tracer methods were used to estimate the amount of static holdup present in the column. Using classical draining methods, as much as 50 % of the total holdup was found to be static. However, according to the step decrease in tracer method, less than 5 % of the total holdup was static. Since the step decrease in tracer method measures the amount of static holdup present in the bed under irrigated conditions, it seems likely that the draining method provides an unrealistic estimate of static holdup. Thus, although the notion of static holdup may be useful as a means of correlating mass transfer coefficients, the data indicate that very little static holdup exists in the column under irrigated conditions. Hence, in the absence of a mechanistically sound model, the choice of whether to use static holdup or dispersion as a means of accounting for deviations from plug flow in the liquid phase should be made on the basis of computational convenience.

  19. Measurements and properties of ice particles and carbon dioxide bubbles in aqueous mixture utilizing optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, Amadou O.

    Optical techniques are used to determine the size, shape and many other properties of particles ranging from the micro to a nano-level. These techniques have endless applications. This research is based on a project assigned by a "Vendor" that wants anonymity. The Leica optical microscope and the Dark Field Polarizing Metallurgical Microscope is used to determine the size and count of ice crystals (Vendors products) in multiple time frames. Since the ice temperature influences, its symmetry and the shape is subject to changes at room temperature (300 K) and the atmospheric pressure that is exerted on the ice crystals varies. The ice crystals are in a mixture of water, electrolytes and carbon dioxide with the optical spectroscopy (Qpod2) and Spectra suite, the optical density of the ice crystals is established from the absorbance and transmission measurements. The optical density in this case is also referred to as absorption; it is plotted with respect to a frequency (GHz), wavelength (nm) or Raman shift (1/cm) which shows the light colliding with the ice particles and CO2. Depending on the peaks positions, it is possible to profile the ice crystal sizes using a mean distribution plots. The region of absorbency wavelength expected for the ice is in the visible range; the water molecules in the (UV) Ultra-violet range and the CO2 in the (IR) infrared region. It is also possible to obtain the reflection and transmission output as a percentage change with the wavelengths ranging from 200 to 1100 nm. The refractive index of the ice can be correlated to the density based on the optical acoustic theorem, or Mie Scattering Theory. The viscosity of the ice crystals and the solutions from which the ice crystals are made of as well are recorded with the SV-10 viscometer. The baseline viscosity is used as reference and set lower than that of the ice crystals. The Zeta potential of the particles present in the mixture are approximated by first finding the viscosity of the

  20. Experimental Measurement and Thermodynamic Modeling of the Solubility of Carbon Dioxide in Aqueous Alkanolamine Solutions in the High Gas Loading Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleman, Humbul; Maulud, Abdulhalim Shah; Man, Zakaria

    2016-09-01

    The solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous alkanolamine solutions was investigated in the high gas loading region based on experimental measurements and thermodynamic modeling. An experimental phase equilibrium study was performed to evaluate the absorption of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of five representative alkanolamines, including monoethanolamine, diethanolamine, N-methyldiethanolamine, 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol and piperazine. The carbon dioxide loadings of these solutions were determined for a wide range of pressures (62.5 kPa to 4150 kPa), temperatures (303.15 K to 343.15 K) and alkanolamine concentrations (2 M to 4 M). The results were found to be largely consistent with those previously reported in the literature. Furthermore, a hybrid Kent-Eisenberg model was developed for the correlation of the experimental data points. This new model incorporated an equation of state/excess Gibbs energy model for determining the solubility of carbon dioxide in the high-pressure-high gas loading region. This approach also used a single correction parameter, which was a function of the alkanolamine concentration. The results of this model were in excellent agreement with our experimental results. Most notably, this model was consistent with other reported values from the literature.

  1. Solubility of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Huttenhuis, P.J.G.; Agrawal, N.J.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2009-04-15

    In this work, 72 new experimental solubility data points for H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} mixtures in aqueous N-methyldiethanol amine (MDEA) solutions at different methane partial pressures (up to 69 bara) are presented. They are correlated using an electrolyte equation of state (E-EOS) thermodynamic model. This model has already been used to estimate the CO{sub 2} solubility in aqueous MDEA (Huttenhuis et al. Fluid Phase Equilib. 2008, 264, 99-112) and the H{sub 2}S solubility in aqueous MDEA (Huttenhuis et al. Int. J. Oil, Gas Coal Technol. 2008, 1, 399-424). Here, the model is further extended to predict the behavior of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S when they are present simultaneously in aqueous MDEA. The application of an equation of state is a new development for this type of system, i.e., of acid-gas-amine systems. The molecular interactions are described by Schwarzentruber et al.'s modification of the Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state, with terms added to account for ionic interactions in the liquid phase. The model is used to describe acid-gas solubility data for the CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}S-MDEA-H{sub 2}O system reported in the open literature and experimental data reported here for the CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}S-MDEA-H{sub 2}O-CH{sub 4} system.

  2. The carbon dioxide cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, P.B.; Hansen, G.B.; Titus, T.N.

    2005-01-01

    The seasonal CO2 cycle on Mars refers to the exchange of carbon dioxide between dry ice in the seasonal polar caps and gaseous carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This review focuses on breakthroughs in understanding the process involving seasonal carbon dioxide phase changes that have occurred as a result of observations by Mars Global Surveyor. ?? 2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultradry Carbon Dioxide-in-Water Foams with Viscoelastic Aqueous Phases.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zheng; Worthen, Andrew J; Da, Chang; Qajar, Ali; Ketchum, Isaiah Robert; Alzobaidi, Shehab; Huh, Chun; Prodanović, Maša; Johnston, Keith P

    2016-01-12

    For foams with ultra low water contents, the capillary pressure is very large and induces rapid drainage that destabilizes the aqueous lamellae between the gas bubbles. However, we show that high-pressure CO2-in-water foams can be stabilized with a viscoelastic aqueous phase composed of entangled wormlike micelles, even for extremely high CO2 volume fractions ϕ of 0.95 to 0.98; the viscosity of these ultradry foams increased by up to 3-4-fold, reaching more than 100 cP relative to foams formed with conventional low viscosity aqueous phases. The foam morphology consisted of fine ∼20 μm polyhedral-shaped CO2 bubbles that were stable for hours. The wormlike micelles were formed by mixing anionic sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) with salt and a protonated cationic surfactant, as shown by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and large values of the zero-shear viscosity and the dynamic storage and loss moduli. With the highly viscous continuous aqueous phases, the foam lamella drainage rates were low, as corroborated by confocal microscopy. The preservation of viscous thick lamellae resulted in lower rates of Ostwald ripening relative to conventional foams as shown by high-pressure optical microscopy. The ability to stabilize viscous ultra high internal phase foams is expected to find utility in various practical applications, including nearly "waterless" fracturing fluids for recovery of oil and gas in shale, offering the possibility of a massive reduction in the amount of wastewater. PMID:26666311

  4. Simultaneous absorption of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide with carbonyl sulfide contamination in aqueous methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ghawas, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    The primary objectives of the research were to: (1) obtain experimental data for simultaneous gas absorption systems to help formulate and test theoretical models of multicomponent mass transfer, and (2) develop the theoretical models which predict mass transfer rates from chemical reaction kinetics, system hydrodynamics and boundary conditions. To fulfill these objectives two-phase contact devices were designed and constructed. These were, a solubility of equilibrium apparatus, a laminar liquid jet apparatus, and a wetted-sphere apparatus. These devices were used to measure fundamental physiochemical properties of gases in liquids. The properties measured were the solubilities and diffusivities of N{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and COS in aqueous MDEA. The reaction rate constants of the reactions between CO{sub 2} and MDEA and between COS and MDEA were also measured. In addition to these devices, a stirred tank absorber was used to obtain experimental data on multicomponent simultaneous absorption. A computer program was developed to solve the two-point boundary value problems generated by film theory. This research involved modeling and analyzing gas absorption systems with the chemical reactions taken as irreversible in one case and reversible in another. A parametric study of the case of reversible reactions revealed that for certain ranges of the parameter space the model predicted forced desorption. The program was tested against experimental data from two simultaneous absorption experiments. These were the simultaneous absorption of CO{sub 2}, COS, and N{sub 2} into aqueous MDEA and the simultaneous absorption of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, COS and N{sub 2} into aqueous MDEA. The program predictions of gas absorption rates were within 13% of the experimental values for the former experiment and within 9% for the latter.

  5. Carbon Dioxide Fountain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)…

  6. Carbon Dioxide and Climate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Peter G.

    1978-01-01

    The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing at a rate that could cause significant warming of the Earth's climate in the not too distant future. Oceanographers are studying the role of the ocean as a source of carbon dioxide and as a sink for the gas. (Author/BB)

  7. Antifouling foldable acrylic IOLs loaded with norfloxacin by aqueous soaking and by supercritical carbon dioxide technology.

    PubMed

    González-Chomón, Clara; Braga, Mara E M; de Sousa, Herminio C; Concheiro, Angel; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2012-10-01

    Cataracts treatment usually involves the extraction of the opaque crystalline lens and its replacement by an intraocular lens (IOL). A serious complication is the occurrence of endophthalmitis, a post-surgery infection mainly caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. IOLs having the ability to load and to release norfloxacin in a controlled way and at efficient therapeutic levels may help to overcome these issues. In this work, acrylic hydrogels combining 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 2-butoxyethyl methacrylate (BEM) at various ratios were prepared to attain biocompatible networks that can be foldable even in the dry state and thus insertable through minor ocular incision, and that load therapeutic amounts of norfloxacin. Acrylamide (AAm) and methacrylic acid (MAAc) were also incorporated as functional comonomers in small proportions. Water sorption, contact angle, protein adsorption, and optical properties of the networks were characterized. BEM notably decreased the T(g) of the networks, but also the loading by immersion in aqueous solution (presoaking). Then, a scCO(2)-based impregnation/deposition (SSI) method was implemented to improve the uptake of the drug. Loading capacities were discussed in terms of the comonomers composition and the employed method and operational conditions. The networks prepared with HEMA/BEM 20:80 vol/vol and processed with supercritical fluids combine adequate mechanical properties, biocompatibility and norfloxacin loading/release, and seem to be suitable for developing norfloxacin-eluting IOLs. PMID:22846620

  8. The influence of aliphatic amines, diamines, and amino acids on the polymorph of calcium carbonate precipitated by the introduction of carbon dioxide gas into calcium hydroxide aqueous suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuajiw, Wittaya; Takatori, Kazumasa; Igarashi, Teruki; Hara, Hiroki; Fukushima, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The influence of aliphatic organic additives including amines, diamines and amino acids, on the polymorph of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitated from a calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) suspensions and carbon dioxide gas (CO2) was studied by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The amorphous calcium carbonate, vaterite, aragonite and calcite were observed for the precipitated samples with organic additives. While the precipitation without organic additive, only the stable phase; calcite was obtained. The observed crystal phases were related with the alkyl chain length in the aliphatic part of additives. These results suggested that hydrophobic interactions due to the van der Waals force between organic additives and surface of inorganic precipitates could not be ignored. We concluded that covering or adsorbing of these organic additives on the precipitates surfaces retarded the successive dissolution/recrystallisation process in the aqueous systems. The results revealed that not only the polar interaction from the hydrophilic functional groups, as the former reports proposed, but also the van der Waals interactions from the hydrophobic alkyl groups played the important role in the phase transformation of CaCO3.

  9. Carbon dioxide removal process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Da Costa, Andre R.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2003-11-18

    A process and apparatus for separating carbon dioxide from gas, especially natural gas, that also contains C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons. The invention uses two or three membrane separation steps, optionally in conjunction with cooling/condensation under pressure, to yield a lighter, sweeter product natural gas stream, and/or a carbon dioxide stream of reinjection quality and/or a natural gas liquids (NGL) stream.

  10. Environmental carbon dioxide control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onischak, M.; Baker, B.; Gidaspow, D.

    1974-01-01

    A study of environmental carbon dioxide control for NASA EVA missions found solid potassium carbonate to be an effective regenerable absorbent in maintaining low carbon dioxide levels. The supported sorbent was capable of repeated regeneration below 150 C without appreciable degradation. Optimum structures in the form of thin pliable sheets of carbonate, inert support and binder were developed. Interpretation of a new solid-gas pore closing model helped predict the optimum sorbent and analysis of individual sorbent sheet performance in a thin rectangular channel sorber can predict packed bed performance.

  11. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dutta, Prabir K.; Lee, Inhee; Akbar, Sheikh A.

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  12. Solubilities of methane, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and a natural gas mixture in aqueous sodium bicarbonate solutions under high pressure and elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Zheng, D.Q.; Guo, T.M.

    1997-01-01

    The solubility of natural gas mixtures in formation water (brine) plays an important role in estimating the natural gas reserve, the formation/dissociation conditions of methane hydrates in situ, and the interfacial tension of the hydrocarbon-formation water system. However, solubility data at high pressure and elevated temperature conditions for aqueous electrolyte systems are rare. Recently, in the reservoirs found at the South China Sea areas, the main salt species in the formation water is sodium bicarbonate, and the solubility data of gases in aqueous sodium bicarbonate solutions under reservoir conditions have not previously been reported. An apparatus for measuring the solubility of gases in aqueous electrolyte solutions under high pressure and elevated temperature conditions is described. The solubility of methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and a natural gas mixture in aqueous sodium bicarbonate solutions were measured up to 58 MPa and 403 K. The modified Patel-Teja equation of state proposed by Zuo and Guo (1991) for aqueous electrolyte systems was applied to correlate the measured solubility data, and satisfactory results were obtained.

  13. Carbon dioxide recycling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether is seen to offer a substantial route to renewable and environmentally carbon neutral fuels. One of the authors has championed the “Methanol Economy" in articles and a book. By recycling ambient CO2, the authors argue ...

  14. Polymeric Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C-S.

    1999-11-02

    Synthesis of polymeric carbon dioxide has long been of interest to many chemists and materials scientists. Very recently we discovered the polymeric phase of carbon dioxide (called CO{sub 2}-V) at high pressures and temperatures. Our optical and x-ray results indicate that CO{sub 2}-V is optically non-linear, generating the second harmonic of Nd: YLF laser at 527 nm and is also likely superhard similar to cubic-boron nitride or diamond. CO{sub 2}-V is made of CO{sub 4} tetrahedra, analogous to SiO{sub 2} polymorphs, and is quenchable at ambient temperature at pressures above 1 GPa. In this paper, we describe the pressure-induced polymerization of carbon dioxide together with the stability, structure, and mechanical and optical properties of polymeric CO{sub 2}-V. We also present some implications of polymeric CO{sub 2} for high-pressure chemistry and new materials synthesis.

  15. Solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol and N-methyldiethanolamine and their mixtures in the temperature range of 313 to 353 K and pressures up to 2.7 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Silkenbaeumer, D.; Lichtenthaler, R.N.; Rumpf, B.

    1998-08-01

    The solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions containing 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) was measured in the temperature range from 313 to 353 K at total pressures up to 2.7 MPa using an analytical method. A model taking into account chemical reactions in the liquid phase as well as physical interactions is used to correlate the new data. To test the predictive capability of the model, the solubility of carbon dioxide in an aqueous solution containing AMP and N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) was measured at 313 K. Experimental results are reported and compared to literature data and calculations.

  16. Carbon dioxide laser guidelines.

    PubMed

    Krupa Shankar, Ds; Chakravarthi, M; Shilpakar, Rachana

    2009-07-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser is a versatile tool that has applications in ablative lasing and caters to the needs of routine dermatological practice as well as the aesthetic, cosmetic and rejuvenation segments. This article details the basics of the laser physics as applicable to the CO(2) laser and offers guidelines for use in many of the above indications. PMID:20808594

  17. Carbon Dioxide Laser Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Krupa Shankar, DS; Chakravarthi, M; Shilpakar, Rachana

    2009-01-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is a versatile tool that has applications in ablative lasing and caters to the needs of routine dermatological practice as well as the aesthetic, cosmetic and rejuvenation segments. This article details the basics of the laser physics as applicable to the CO2 laser and offers guidelines for use in many of the above indications. PMID:20808594

  18. Bench Remarks: Carbon Dioxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Henry A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the properties of carbon dioxide in its solid "dry ice" stage. Suggests several demonstrations and experiments that use dry ice to illustrate Avogadro's Law, Boyle's Law, Kinetic-Molecular Theory, and the effects of dry ice in basic solution, in limewater, and in acetone. (TW)

  19. Thermodynamic and Experimental Study of the Energetic Cost Involved in the Capture of Carbon Dioxide by Aqueous Mixtures of Commonly Used Primary and Tertiary Amines.

    PubMed

    Arcis, Hugues; Coulier, Yohann; Coxam, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The capture of carbon dioxide with chemical solvents is one solution to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources and thus tackle climate change. Recent research has been focused on optimizing new kinds of advanced absorbents including aqueous amine blends, but critical downsides such as the large energetic cost involved with the industrial process remain. To address this issue, a better understanding of the energetic interactions existing in solution is necessary. In this paper, we report direct experimental measurements of the energy cost involved in the solvation of CO2 in two aqueous amine blends at different temperatures. The chemical solvents were designed as aqueous mixtures of commonly used primary and tertiary amines to study the influence of the different chemical properties inferred by the amine class. We have also applied a thermodynamic model to represent the energetic effects that take place in solution during CO2 dissolution in these mixtures, where all parameters were taken from previous studies focused on single amine absorbents. The noteworthy agreement observed with the reported experimental heats of absorption and with literature vapor liquid equilibrium properties confirmed the relevance of the underlying molecular mechanisms considered in our model, and suggest that this model would prove useful to investigate CO2 dissolution in other amine blends. PMID:26630087

  20. Carbon dioxide dangers demonstration model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina; Wessells, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a dangerous volcanic gas. When carbon dioxide seeps from the ground, it normally mixes with the air and dissipates rapidly. However, because carbon dioxide gas is heavier than air, it can collect in snowbanks, depressions, and poorly ventilated enclosures posing a potential danger to people and other living things. In this experiment we show how carbon dioxide gas displaces oxygen as it collects in low-lying areas. When carbon dioxide, created by mixing vinegar and baking soda, is added to a bowl with candles of different heights, the flames are extinguished as if by magic.

  1. Carbon dioxide adsorbent study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onischak, M.; Baker, B. S.

    1973-01-01

    A study was initiated on the feasibility of using the alkali metal carbonate - bi-carbonate solid-gas reaction to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere of an EVA life support system. The program successfully demonstrates that carbon dioxide concentrations could be maintained below 0.1 mole per cent using this chemistry. Further a practical method for distributing the carbonates in a coherent sheet form capable of repeated regeneration (50 cycles) at modest temperatures (423 K), without loss in activity was also demonstrated. Sufficiently high reaction rates were shown to be possible with the carbonate - bi-carbonate system such that EVA hardware could be readily designed. Experimental and design data were presented on the basis of which two practical units were designed. In addition to conventional thermally regenerative systems very compact units using ambient temperature cyclic vacuum regeneration may also be feasible. For a one man - 8 hour EVA unit regenerated thermally at the base ship a system volume of 14 liters is estimated.

  2. Development of rolling tin gas diffusion electrode for carbon dioxide electrochemical reduction to produce formate in aqueous electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinian; Dong, Heng; Yu, Hongbing

    2014-12-01

    Carbon dioxide electrochemical reduction to produce formate (CERPF) basing on gas diffusion electrode (GDE) is a promising carbon cycle technology. However, its performance is still restrained by formate accumulation and catalyst loss in the catalyst layer (CL). In this study, a novel rolling Sn-loading GDE (SGDE) without porous hydrophilic CL is developed. The electrochemical behavior of CERPF on the SGDE is investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical performance of the SGDE for CERPF is assessed by constant potential electrolysis. The results show that the CERPF process basing on the SGDE performs a double charge transfer and is dominated by the electron transfer rate. The highest partial current density for CERPF (17.43 ± 2.60 mA cm-2) and corresponding Faraday efficiency (78.60 ± 0.11%) are obtained under the applied potential of -1.8 V vs Ag/AgCl in 0.5 M KHCO3 solution. The produced formate is allowed to be released into the electrolyte easily and the catalyst holds steady during the CERPF process. Since its excellent electrochemical performance and low fabrication cost (ca. 30 m-2), bright prospect for SGDE application in CERPF can be convinced.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Landscape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    23 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a view of some of the widely-varied terrain of the martian south polar residual cap. The landforms here are composed mainly of frozen carbon dioxide. Each year since MGS arrived in 1997, the scarps that bound each butte and mesa, or line the edges of each pit, in the south polar region, have changed a little bit as carbon dioxide is sublimed away. The scarps retreat at a rate of about 3 meters (3 yards) per martian year. Most of the change occurs during each southern summer.

    Location near: 86.7oS, 9.8oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  4. CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.

    SciTech Connect

    FUJITA,E.

    2000-01-12

    Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

  5. Frozen Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    1 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a south polar residual cap landscape, formed in frozen carbon dioxide. There is no place on Earth that one can go to visit a landscape covering thousands of square kilometers with frozen carbon dioxide, so mesas, pits, and other landforms of the martian south polar region are as alien as they are beautiful. The scarps of the south polar region are known from thousands of other MGS MOC images to retreat at a rate of about 3 meters (3 yards) per martian year, indiating that slowly, over the course of the MGS mission, the amount of carbon dioxide in the martian atmosphere has probably been increasing.

    Location near: 86.9oS, 25.5oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  6. Carbon Dioxide Landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 March 2004 The martian south polar residual ice cap is mostly made of frozen carbon dioxide. There is no place on Earth that a person can go to see the landforms that would be produced by erosion and sublimation of hundreds or thousands of cubic kilometers of carbon dioxide. Thus, the south polar cap of Mars is as alien as alien can get. This image, acquired in February 2004 by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), shows how the cap appears in summer as carbon dioxide is subliming away, creating a wild pattern of pits, mesas, and buttes. Darker surfaces may be areas where the ice contains impurities, such as dust, or where the surface has been roughened by the removal of ice. This image is located near 86.3oS, 0.8oW. This picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the top/upper left.

  7. Heat capacity of aqueous monoethanolamine, diethanolamine, N-methyldiethanolamine, and N-methyldiethanolamine-based blends with carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, R.H.; Dingman, J.C.; Cronin, D.B.

    1997-09-01

    New data are reported on the heat capacity of CO{sub 2}-loaded, aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and aqueous MDEA-based blends with MEA and DEA. The work reported here was motivated by the need to quantify the effect of acid gas loading on the important physical properties of gas-sweetening solvents.

  8. Mineralization strategies for carbon dioxide sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, Larry R.; O'Connor, William K.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.

    2003-01-01

    Progress is reported in three primary research areas--each concerned with sequestering carbon dioxide into mineral matrices. Direct mineral carbonation was pioneered at Albany Research Center. The method treats the reactant, olivine or serpentine in aqueous media with carbon dioxide at high temperature and pressure to form stable mineral carbonates. Recent results are introduced for pretreatment by high-intensity grinding to improve carbonation efficiency. To prove feasibility of the carbonation process, a new reactor was designed and operated to progress from batch tests to continuous operation. The new reactor is a prototype high-temperature, high-pressure flow loop reactor that will furnish information on flow, energy consumption, and wear and corrosion resulting from slurry flow and the carbonation reaction. A promising alternative mineralization approach is also described. New data are presented for long-term exposure of carbon dioxide to Colombia River Basalt to determine the extent of conversion of carbon dioxide to permanent mineral carbonates. Batch autoclave tests were conducted using drill-core samples of basalt and reacted under conditions that simulate in situ injection into basalt-containing geological formations.

  9. Carbon dioxide and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

  10. Coral reefs and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    This commentary argues the conclusion from a previous article, which investigates diurnal changes in carbon dioxide partial pressure and community metabolism on coral reefs, that coral `reefs might serve as a sink, not a source, for atmospheric carbon dioxide.` Commentaries from two groups are given along with the response by the original authors, Kayanne et al. 27 refs.

  11. Carbon dioxide/dewpoint monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luczkowski, S.

    1977-01-01

    The portable Carbon Dioxide/Dewpoint Monitor was designed to permit measurements of carbon dioxide partial pressure and dewpoint and ambient gas temperature at any place within the Saturn Workshop. It required no vehicle interface other than storage. All components necessary for operation, including battery power source, were incorporated in the instrument.

  12. Photoreduction of carbon dioxide by aqueous ferrous ion: An alternative to the strongly reducing atmosphere for the chemical origin of life

    PubMed Central

    Borowska, Zofia; Mauzerall, David

    1988-01-01

    We have shown that ferrous ion at neutral pH photoreduces water to hydrogen with a high quantum yield on excitation with near-ultraviolet light. This simple system also efficiently reduces carbon dioxide (bicarbonate ions) to formaldehyde. Overall, these reactions offer a solution to a dilemma confronting the standard or Oparin-Urey model of the origin of life. If carbon dioxide was the main form of carbon on the primitive earth, the ferrous photoreaction would have provided the reduced carbon necessary to form amino acids and other biogenetic molecules. We believe this system may have been the progenitor to the biological photosynthetic systems. PMID:16593977

  13. Carbon Dioxide Landscape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    7 July 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a mid-summer view of the south polar residual cap at full MOC resolution, 1.5 m (5 ft) per pixel. During each of the three summers since the start of the MGS mapping mission in March 1999, the scarps that form mesas and pits in the 'Swiss cheese'-like south polar terrain have retreated an average of about 3 meters (1 yard). The material is frozen carbon dioxide; another 3 meters or so of each scarp is expected to be removed during the next summer, in late 2005. This image is located near 86.0oS, 350.8oW, and covers an area about 1.5 km (0.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the top/upper left.

  14. Forecasting carbon dioxide emissions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaobing; Du, Ding

    2015-09-01

    This study extends the literature on forecasting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by applying the reduced-form econometrics approach of Schmalensee et al. (1998) to a more recent sample period, the post-1997 period. Using the post-1997 period is motivated by the observation that the strengthening pace of global climate policy may have been accelerated since 1997. Based on our parameter estimates, we project 25% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050 according to an economic and population growth scenario that is more consistent with recent global trends. Our forecasts are conservative due to that we do not have sufficient data to fully take into account recent developments in the global economy. PMID:26081307

  15. Carbon dioxide: atmospheric overload

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing and may double within the next century. The result of this phenomenon, climatic alterations, will adversely affect crop production, water supplies, and global temperatures. Sources of CO2 include the combustion of fossil fuels, photosynthesis, and the decay of organic matter in soils. The most serious effect of possible climatic changes could occur along the boundaries of arid and semiarid regions. Shifts is precipitation patterns could accelerate the processes of desertification. An increase of 5..cap alpha..C in the average temperature of the top 1000 m of ocean water would raise sea level by 2 m. CO2 releases to the atmosphere can be reduced by controlling emissions from fossil fuel-fired facilities and by careful harvesting of forest regions. (3 photos, 5 references)

  16. Aqueous Mesocosm Techniques Enabling the Real-Time Measurement of the Chemical and Isotopic Kinetics of Dissolved Methane and Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric W; Kessler, John D; Shiller, Alan M; Joung, DongJoo; Colombo, Frank

    2016-03-15

    Previous studies of microbially mediated methane oxidation in oceanic environments have examined the many different factors that control the rates of oxidation. However, there is debate on what factor(s) are limiting in these types of environments. These factors include the availability of methane, O2, trace metals, nutrients, the density of cell population, and the influence that CO2 production may have on pH. To look at this process in its entirety, we developed an automated mesocosm incubation system with a Dissolved Gas Analysis System (DGAS) coupled to a myriad of analytical tools to monitor chemical changes during methane oxidation. Here, we present new high temporal resolution techniques for investigating dissolved methane and carbon dioxide concentrations and stable isotopic dynamics during aqueous mesocosm and pure culture incubations. These techniques enable us to analyze the gases dissolved in solution and are nondestructive to both the liquid media and the analyzed gases enabling the investigation of a mesocosm or pure culture experiment in a completely closed system, if so desired. PMID:26916091

  17. Solubility of single gases carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in aqueous solutions of N-methyldiethanolamine in the temperature range 313--413 K at pressures up to 5 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranov, G.; Smirnova, N.A.; Rumpf, B.; Maurer, G.

    1996-06-01

    Experimental results for the solubility of the single gases carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in aqueous solutions of 2,2{prime}-methyliminodiethanol (N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA)) at temperatures between 313 and 413 K and total pressures up to 5 MPa are reported. A model taking into account chemical reactions as well as physical interactions is used to correlate the new data. The correlation is also used to compare the new experimental data with literature data.

  18. Onsager heat of transport of carbon dioxide at the surface of aqueous ammonia: The remarkable effect of carbamate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packwood, Daniel M.; Phillips, Leon F.

    2010-11-01

    The Onsager heat of transport Q∗ has been measured for CO 2 at the surface of aqueous ammonia. The heat of transport incorporates the enthalpy of reaction of gaseous CO 2 with ammonia, adsorbed on the liquid surface, to form adsorbed ammonium carbamate, with the result that -Q∗ has the unusually large value of 180 kJ mol -1. Measurement of Q∗ for transfer of a reactive species through a surfactant monolayer is proposed as a new method of studying reactions at liquid and quasi-liquid surfaces.

  19. Reducing carbon dioxide to products

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

    2014-09-30

    A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

  20. Recuperative supercritical carbon dioxide cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Sprouse, Kenneth M; Subbaraman, Ganesan; O'Connor, George M; Johnson, Gregory A

    2014-11-18

    A power plant includes a closed loop, supercritical carbon dioxide system (CLS-CO.sub.2 system). The CLS-CO.sub.2 system includes a turbine-generator and a high temperature recuperator (HTR) that is arranged to receive expanded carbon dioxide from the turbine-generator. The HTR includes a plurality of heat exchangers that define respective heat exchange areas. At least two of the heat exchangers have different heat exchange areas.

  1. Measurement of diffusion coefficients important in modeling the absorption rate of carbon dioxide into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.L.; Adams, M.E.; Marshall, T.L.; Oscarson, J.L.; Wilding, W.V.; Anderson, D.J.

    1997-03-01

    Natural gas processors use amine treating processes to remove the acid gases H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} from gas streams. Absorption rates of gaseous CO{sub 2} into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solutions were measured in a quiescent, inverted-tube diffusiometer by monitoring the rate of pressure drop. The absorption rate was found to be insensitive to the diffusion coefficient of CO{sub 2} in solution but very sensitive to the diffusion rate of bicarbonate and protonated MDEA ions. Evidence also suggested that chemical reaction equilibrium is rapid relative to diffusion. A numerical model was developed on the basis of these observations. The model was used to regress diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate and protonated amine, which must be equivalent by electroneutrality arguments, from measured absorption rates. Complete modeling of the absorption process also required data for the diffusion coefficient of MDEA in water. These were measured using a Taylor dispersion apparatus. CO{sub 2} absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate and protonated MDEA were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in solutions containing 20, 35, and 50 mass % MDEA in water.

  2. Determination of the optimum conditions for boric acid extraction with carbon dioxide gas in aqueous media from colemanite containing arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Ata, O.N.; Colak, S.; Copur, M.; Celik, C.

    2000-02-01

    The Taguchi method was used to determine optimum conditions for the boric acid extraction from colemanite ore containing As in aqueous media saturated by CO{sub 2} gas. After the parameters were determined to be efficient on the extraction efficiency, the experimental series with two steps were carried out. The chosen experimental parameters for the first series of experiments and their ranges were as follows: (1) reaction temperature, 25--70 C; (2) solid-to-liquid ratio (by weight), 0.091 to 0.333; (3) gas flow rate (in mL/min), 66.70--711; (4) mean particle size, {minus}100 to {minus}10 mesh; (5) stirring speed, 200--600 rpm; (6) reaction time, 10--90 min. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: reaction temperature, 70 C; solid-to-liquid ratio, 0.091; gas flow rate, 711 (in mL/min); particle size, {minus}100 mesh; stirring speed, 500 rpm; reaction time, 90 min. Under these optimum conditions, the boric acid extraction efficiency from the colemanite containing As was approximately 54%. Chosen experimental parameters for the second series of experiments and their ranges were as follows: (1) reaction temperature, 60--80 C; (2) solid-to-liquid ratio (by weight), 0.1000 to 0.167; (3) gas pressure (in atm), 1.5; 2.7; (4) reaction time, 45--120 min. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: reaction temperature, 70 C; solid-to-liquid ratio, 0.1; gas pressure, 2.7 atm; reaction time, 120 min. Under these optimum conditions the boric acid extraction efficiency from the colemanite ore was approximately 75%. Under these optimum conditions, the boric acid extraction efficiency from calcined colemanite ore was approximately 99.55%.

  3. Extraction of furfural with carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Gamse, T.; Marr, R.; Froeschl, F.; Siebenhofer, M.

    1997-01-01

    A new approach to separate furfural from aqueous waste has been investigated. Recovery of furfural and acetic acid from aqueous effluents of a paper mill has successfully been applied on an industrial scale since 1981. The process is based on the extraction of furfural and acetic acid by the solvent trooctylphosphineoxide (TOPO). Common extraction of both substances may cause the formation of resin residues. Improvement was expected by selective extraction of furfural with chlorinated hydrocarbons, but ecological reasons stopped further development of this project. The current investigation is centered in the evaluation of extraction of furfural by supercritical carbon dioxide. The influence of temperature and pressure on the extraction properties has been worked out. The investigation has considered the multi-component system furfural-acetic acid-water-carbon dioxide. Solubility of furfural in liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide has been measured, and equilibrium data for the ternary system furfural-water-CO{sub 2} as well as for the quaternary system furfural-acetic acid-water-CO{sub 2} have been determined. A high-pressure extraction column has been used for evaluation of mass transfer rates.

  4. Magnesite disposal of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Butt, D.P.; Wendt, C.H.

    1997-08-01

    In this paper we report our progress on developing a method for carbon dioxide disposal whose purpose it is to maintain coal energy competitive even is environmental and political pressures will require a drastic reduction in carbon dioxide emissions. In contrast to most other methods, our approach is not aiming at a partial solution of the problem, or at buying time for phasing out fossil energy. Instead, its purpose is to obtain a complete and economic solution of the problem, and thus maintain access to the vast fossil energy reservoir. A successful development of this technology would guarantee energy availability for many centuries even if world economic growth the most optimistic estimates that have been put forward. Our approach differs from all others in that we are developing an industrial process which chemically binds the carbon dioxide in an exothermic reaction into a mineral carbonate that is thermodynamically stable and environmentally benign.

  5. Effect of carbon dioxide concentration on the bioleaching of a pyrite-arsenopyrite ore concentrate

    SciTech Connect

    Nagpal, S.; Dahlstrom, D. ); Oolman, T. )

    1993-02-20

    The effect of carbon dioxide concentration on the bacterial leaching of a pyrite-arsenopyrite ore concentrate was studied in continuous-flow reactors. Steady-state operation with two feed slurry densities, 6 wt% and 16wt% solids, were tested for the effect of carbon dioxide concentration. Bacterial growth rates were estimated via the measurement of carbon dioxide consumption rates. Aqueous-phase carbon dioxide concentrations in excess of 10 mg/L were found to be inhibitory to bacterial growth.

  6. Carbon Dioxide - Our Common "Enemy"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Macatangay, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Health effects of brief and prolonged exposure to carbon dioxide continue to be a concern for those of us who manage this pollutant in closed volumes, such as in spacecraft and submarines. In both examples, considerable resources are required to scrub the atmosphere to levels that are considered totally safe for maintenance of crew health and performance. Defining safe levels is not a simple task because of many confounding factors, including: lack of a robust database on human exposures, suspected significant variations in individual susceptibility, variations in the endpoints used to assess potentially adverse effects, the added effects of stress, and the fluid shifts associated with micro-gravity (astronauts only). In 2007 the National Research Council proposed revised Continuous Exposure Guidelines (CEGLs) and Emergency Exposure Guidelines (EEGLs) to the U.S. Navy. Similarly, in 2008 the NASA Toxicology Group, in cooperation with another subcommittee of the National Research Council, revised Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs). In addition, a 1000-day exposure limit was set for long-duration spaceflights to celestial bodies. Herein we examine the rationale for the levels proposed to the U.S. Navy and compare this rationale with the one used by NASA to set its limits. We include a critical review of previous studies on the effects of exposure to carbon dioxide and attempt to dissect out the challenges associated with setting fully-defensible limits. We also describe recent experiences with management of carbon dioxide aboard the International Space Station with 13 persons aboard. This includes the tandem operations of the Russian Vozduk and the U.S. Carbon Dioxide Removal System. A third removal system is present while the station is docked to the Shuttle spacecraft, so our experience includes the lithium hydroxide system aboard Shuttle for the removal of carbon dioxide. We discuss strategies for highly-efficient, regenerable removal of carbon

  7. Carbon Dioxide Absorption Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A carbon dioxide absorption heat pump cycle is disclosed using a high pressure stage and a super-critical cooling stage to provide a non-toxic system. Using carbon dioxide gas as the working fluid in the system, the present invention desorbs the CO2 from an absorbent and cools the gas in the super-critical state to deliver heat thereby. The cooled CO2 gas is then expanded thereby providing cooling and is returned to an absorber for further cycling. Strategic use of heat exchangers can increase the efficiency and performance of the system.

  8. Process for sequestering carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Maroto-Valer, M. Mercedes; Zhang, Yinzhi; Kuchta, Matthew E.; Andresen, John M.; Fauth, Dan J.

    2009-10-20

    A process for sequestering carbon dioxide, which includes reacting a silicate based material with an acid to form a suspension, and combining the suspension with carbon dioxide to create active carbonation of the silicate-based material, and thereafter producing a metal salt, silica and regenerating the acid in the liquid phase of the suspension.

  9. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide. 184.1240 Section 184.1240 Food and....1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Carbon dioxide (empirical formula CO2, CAS Reg. No. 124-38-9) occurs as a..., sublimes under atmospheric pressure at a temperature of −78.5 °C. Carbon dioxide is prepared as a...

  11. Carbon dioxide transport over complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Burns, Sean P.; Delany, A.C.; Oncley, S.P.; Turnipseed, A.; Stephens, B.; Guenther, A.; Anderson, D.E.; Monson, R.

    2004-01-01

    The nocturnal transport of carbon dioxide over complex terrain was investigated. The high carbon dioxide under very stable conditions flows to local low-ground. The regional drainage flow dominates the carbon dioxide transport at the 6 m above the ground and carbon dioxide was transported to the regional low ground. The results show that the local drainage flow was sensitive to turbulent mixing associated with local wind shear.

  12. Modelling Sublimation of Carbon Dioxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reports results in their efforts to model sublimation of carbon dioxide and the associated kinetics order and parameter estimation issues in their model. They have offered the reader two sets of data and several approaches to determine the rate of sublimation of a piece of solid dry ice. They presented several models…

  13. 21 CFR 582.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide. 582.1240 Section 582.1240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Product. Carbon dioxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide. 582.1240 Section 582.1240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Product. Carbon dioxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide. 582.1240 Section 582.1240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Product. Carbon dioxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide. 582.1240 Section 582.1240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Product. Carbon dioxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide. 582.1240 Section 582.1240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Product. Carbon dioxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  18. Photoassisted carbon dioxide reduction and formation of twoand three-carbon compounds. [prebiological photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halmann, M.; Aurian-Blajeni, B.; Bloch, S.

    1981-01-01

    The photoassisted reduction of aqueous carbon dioxide in the presence of naturally occurring minerals is investigated as a possible abiotic precursor of photosynthesis. Aqueous carbon dioxide saturated suspensions or surfaces of the minerals nontronite, bentonite, anatase, wolframite, molybdenite, minium, cinnabar and hematite were irradiated with high-pressure mercury lamps or sunlight. Chemical analyses reveal the production of formic acid, formaldehyde, methanol and methane, and the two and three-carbon compounds glyoxal (CHOCHO) and malonaldehyde (CH2(CHO)2). It is suggested that such photosynthetic reactions with visible light in the presence of semiconducting minerals may provide models for prebiological carbon and nitrogen fixation in both oxidized and reduced atmospheres.

  19. CARBON DIOXIDE AS A FEEDSTOCK.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,C.; FUJITA,E.

    2000-12-09

    This report is an overview on the subject of carbon dioxide as a starting material for organic syntheses of potential commercial interest and the utilization of carbon dioxide as a substrate for fuel production. It draws extensively on literature sources, particularly on the report of a 1999 Workshop on the subject of catalysis in carbon dioxide utilization, but with emphasis on systems of most interest to us. Atmospheric carbon dioxide is an abundant (750 billion tons in atmosphere), but dilute source of carbon (only 0.036 % by volume), so technologies for utilization at the production source are crucial for both sequestration and utilization. Sequestration--such as pumping CO{sub 2} into sea or the earth--is beyond the scope of this report, except where it overlaps utilization, for example in converting CO{sub 2} to polymers. But sequestration dominates current thinking on short term solutions to global warming, as should be clear from reports from this and other workshops. The 3500 million tons estimated to be added to the atmosphere annually at present can be compared to the 110 million tons used to produce chemicals, chiefly urea (75 million tons), salicylic acid, cyclic carbonates and polycarbonates. Increased utilization of CO{sub 2} as a starting material is, however, highly desirable, because it is an inexpensive, non-toxic starting material. There are ongoing efforts to replace phosgene as a starting material. Creation of new materials and markets for them will increase this utilization, producing an increasingly positive, albeit small impact on global CO{sub 2} levels. The other uses of interest are utilization as a solvent and for fuel production and these will be discussed in turn.

  20. Oxygen and carbon dioxide sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, Fan (Inventor); Pearton, Stephen John (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) capable of performing as a CO.sub.2 or O.sub.2 sensor is disclosed, hi one implementation, a polymer solar cell can be connected to the HEMT for use in an infrared detection system. In a second implementation, a selective recognition layer can be provided on a gate region of the HEMT. For carbon dioxide sensing, the selective recognition layer can be, in one example, PEI/starch. For oxygen sensing, the selective recognition layer can be, in one example, indium zinc oxide (IZO). In one application, the HEMTs can be used for the detection of carbon dioxide and oxygen in exhaled breath or blood.

  1. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  2. Method for carbon dioxide sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifeng; Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.

    2015-09-22

    A method for geo-sequestration of a carbon dioxide includes selection of a target water-laden geological formation with low-permeability interbeds, providing an injection well into the formation and injecting supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) into the injection well under conditions of temperature, pressure and density selected to cause the fluid to enter the formation and splinter and/or form immobilized ganglia within the formation. This process allows for the immobilization of the injected SC--CO.sub.2 for very long times. The dispersal of scCO2 into small ganglia is accomplished by alternating injection of SC--CO.sub.2 and water. The injection rate is required to be high enough to ensure the SC--CO.sub.2 at the advancing front to be broken into pieces and small enough for immobilization through viscous instability.

  3. Summer Ice and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukla, G.; Gavin, J.

    1981-10-01

    The extent of Antarctic pack ice in the summer, as charted from satellite imagery, decreased by 2.5 million square kilometers between 1973 and 1980. The U.S. Navy and Russian atlases and whaling and research ship reports from the 1930's indicate that summer ice conditions earlier in this century were heavier than the current average. Surface air temperatures along the seasonally shifting belt of melting snow between 55 degrees and 80 degrees N during spring and summer were higher in 1974 to 1978 than in 1934 to 1938. The observed departures in the two hemispheres qualitatively agree with the predicted impact of an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, since it is not known to what extent the changes in snow and ice cover and in temperature can be explained by the natural variability of the climate system or by other processes unrelated to carbon dioxide, a cause-and-effect relation cannot yet be established.

  4. Summer ice and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kukla, G.; Gavin, J.

    1981-10-30

    The extent of Antarctic pack ice in the summer, as charted from satellite imagery, decreased by 2.5 million square kilometers between 1973 and 1980. The U.S. Navy and Russian atlases and whaling and reseach ship reports from the 1930's indicate that summer ice conditions earlier in this century were heavier than the current average. Surface air temperatures along the seasonally shifting belt of melting snow between 55/sup o/ and 80/sup o/N during spring and summer were higher in 1974 to 1978 than in 1934 to 1938. The observed departures in the two hemispheres qualitatively agree with the predicted impact of an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, since it is not known to what extent the changes in snow and ice cover and in temperature can be explained by the natural variability of the climate system or by other processes unrelated to carbon dioxide, a cause-and-effect relation cannot yet be established.

  5. Counter-current carbon dioxide extraction of soy skim

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of carbon dioxide in a counter-current fractionation column was investigated as a means to remove residual fat from soy skim after enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction of soybeans. The stainless steel column was 1.2 meters long with an internal diameter of 1.75 cm and filled protruded stainles...

  6. Carbon dioxide review 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The buildup of CO/sub 2/ is a reality, monitored with increasing precision since 1957 and inferred for much earlier dates. A statistical section gives the monitored values to 1980, as well as a review of a long series of measurements made at Mauna Loa by the pioneers of such monitoring, Charles D. Keeling, Robert B. Bacastow, and Timothy P. Whorf. The book discusses internal transport processes in the ocean, of ocean-atmosphere interaction, of the magnitude of forest and soil carbon wastage, of the future course of fossil-fuel consumption. Yet something else emerges, too: if the CO/sub 2/ buildup continues; if the big general circulation models are right about its impact on climate, and if we have not miscalculated the potential role of the oceans, then we face a climatic change in the next century and a half like nothing the post-glacial world, and hence civilized humanity, has seen.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Removal via Passive Thermal Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Michael; Hanford, Anthony; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2011-01-01

    A paper describes a regenerable approach to separate carbon dioxide from other cabin gases by means of cooling until the carbon dioxide forms carbon dioxide ice on the walls of the physical device. Currently, NASA space vehicles remove carbon dioxide by reaction with lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or by adsorption to an amine, a zeolite, or other sorbent. Use of lithium hydroxide, though reliable and well-understood, requires significant mass for all but the shortest missions in the form of lithium hydroxide pellets, because the reaction of carbon dioxide with lithium hydroxide is essentially irreversible. This approach is regenerable, uses less power than other historical approaches, and it is almost entirely passive, so it is more economical to operate and potentially maintenance- free for long-duration missions. In carbon dioxide removal mode, this approach passes a bone-dry stream of crew cabin atmospheric gas through a metal channel in thermal contact with a radiator. The radiator is pointed to reject thermal loads only to space. Within the channel, the working stream is cooled to the sublimation temperature of carbon dioxide at the prevailing cabin pressure, leading to formation of carbon dioxide ice on the channel walls. After a prescribed time or accumulation of carbon dioxide ice, for regeneration of the device, the channel is closed off from the crew cabin and the carbon dioxide ice is sublimed and either vented to the environment or accumulated for recovery of oxygen in a fully regenerative life support system.

  8. Synthesis of fluoropolymers in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Z.; Combes, J.R.; Elsbernd, C.S.; DeSimone, J.M.

    1993-12-31

    The authors` research is focus on the synthesis of fluopolymers is supercritical carbon dioxide. The authors reported earlier the successful homogenous free radical polymerization of a series of highly fluorinated acrylic type monomers in supercritical carbon dioxide. Now it is found that a highly fluorinated styrenic polymer also exhibits very high solubility in carbon dioxide. The fluorinated styrenic polymer was synthesized in supercritical carbon dioxide using homogenous free radical polymerization and was characterized by {sup 1}HNMR, FTIR etc. Some semicrystalline fluoropolymers were also synthesized in supercritical carbon but the polymerization were heterogenous under the condition used. Various conventional nonfluorinated monomers were copolymerized with the fluorinated monomers and the copolymerizations were homogenous at very high nonfluorinated monomer feed ratio. The incorporation of nonfluorinated units onto the fluoropolymer chains increases their solubility greatly in organic solvents. The polymers synthesized in carbon dioxide will be furtherly characterized and the authors will continue the efforts on synthesizing polymers using carbon dioxide as polymerization medium.

  9. Management practices affects soil carbon dioxide emission and carbon storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural practices contribute about 25% of total anthropogenic carbon dioxide emission, a greenhouse gas responsible for global warming. Soil can act both as sink or source of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide fixed in plant biomass through photosynthesis can be stored in soil as organi...

  10. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2000-01-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. Other participants in this Program include the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Arizona State University, Science Applications International Corporation, and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite end member (Mg2SiO4)], or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce magnesite (MgCO3). The CO2 is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3), which dissociates to H+ and HCO3 -. The H+ reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg2+ cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO2 pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185?C and a partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction

  11. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, W.K.; Dahlin, D.C.; Nilsen, D.N.; Walters, R.P.; Turner, P.C.

    2000-07-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite and member (mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4})], or serpentine [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to produce magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The CO{sub 2} is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), which dissociates to H{sup +} and HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The H{sup +} reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg{sup 2+} cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO{sub 2} pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185 C and a partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P{sub CO{sub 2}}) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction conditions, have achieved roughly 83% conversion of heat treated serpentine

  12. Solubility of Carbon Dioxide in Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Pat; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an activity measuring the amount of dissolved carbon dioxide in carbonated water at different temperatures. The amount of carbon dioxide is measured by the amount of dilute ammonia solution needed to produce a pH indicator color change. (PR)

  13. 21 CFR 184.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide. 184.1240 Section 184.1240 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Carbon dioxide (empirical formula CO2, CAS Reg. No.... The solid form, dry ice, sublimes under atmospheric pressure at a temperature of −78.5 °C....

  14. 21 CFR 184.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Carbon dioxide. 184.1240 Section 184.1240 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Carbon dioxide (empirical formula CO2, CAS Reg. No.... The solid form, dry ice, sublimes under atmospheric pressure at a temperature of −78.5 °C....

  15. 21 CFR 184.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide. 184.1240 Section 184.1240 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Carbon dioxide (empirical formula CO2, CAS Reg. No.... The solid form, dry ice, sublimes under atmospheric pressure at a temperature of −78.5 °C....

  16. 21 CFR 184.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide. 184.1240 Section 184.1240 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Carbon dioxide (empirical formula CO2, CAS Reg. No.... The solid form, dry ice, sublimes under atmospheric pressure at a temperature of −78.5 °C....

  17. Precipitation of neptunium dioxide from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, K E

    1999-12-01

    Tens of thousands of metric tons of highly radioactive, nuclear waste have been generated in the US. Currently, there is no treatment or disposal facility for these wastes. Of the radioactive elements in high-level nuclear waste, neptunium (Np) is of particular concern because it has a long half-life and may potentially be very mobile in groundwaters associated with a proposed underground disposal site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Aqueous Np concentrations observed in previous, short-term solubility experiments led to calculated potential doses exceeding proposed long-term regulatory limits. However, thermodynamic data for Np at 25 C showed that these observed aqueous Np concentrations were supersaturated with respect to crystalline NpO{sub 2}. It was hypothesized that NpO{sub 2} is the thermodynamically stable solid phase in aqueous solution, but it is slow to form in an aqueous solution of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} on the time scale of previous experiments. The precipitation of NpO{sub 2} would provide significantly lower aqueous Np concentrations leading to calculated doses below proposed regulatory limits. To test this hypothesis, solubility experiments were performed at elevated temperature to accelerate any slow precipitation kinetics. Ionic NpO{sub 2}{sup +} (aq) was introduced into very dilute aqueous solutions of NaCl with initial pH values ranging from 6 to 10. The reaction vessels were placed in an oven and allowed to react at 200 C until steady-state aqueous Np concentrations were observed. In all cases, aqueous Np concentrations decreased significantly from the initial value of 10{sup {minus}4} M. The solids that formed were analyzed by x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The solids were determined to be high-purity crystals of NpO{sub 2}. This is the first time that crystalline NpO{sub 2} has been observed to precipitate from NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq) in near-neutral aqueous solutions. The results obtained

  18. Carbon dioxide disposal in solid form

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Butt, D.P.; Sharp, D.H.; Wendt, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    Coal reserves can provide for the world`s energy needs for centuries. However, coal`s long term use may be severely curtailed if the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is not eliminated. We present a safe and permanent method of carbon dioxide disposal that is based on combining carbon dioxide chemically with abundant raw materials to form stable carbonate minerals. We discuss the availability of raw materials and potential process designs. We consider our initial rough cost estimate of about 3{cents}/kWh encouraging. The availability of a carbon dioxide fixation technology would serve as insurance in case global warming, or the perception of global warming, causes severe restrictions on carbon dioxide emissions. If the increased energy demand of a growing world population is to be satisfied from coal, the implementation of such a technology would quite likely be unavoidable.

  19. Silanediol-catalyzed carbon dioxide fixation.

    PubMed

    Hardman-Baldwin, Andrea M; Mattson, Anita E

    2014-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is an abundant and renewable C1 source. However, mild transformations with carbon dioxide at atmospheric pressure are difficult to accomplish. Silanediols have been discovered to operate as effective hydrogen-bond donor organocatalysts for the atom-efficient conversion of epoxides to cyclic carbonates under environmentally friendly conditions. The reaction system is tolerant of a variety of epoxides and the desired cyclic carbonates are isolated in excellent yields. PMID:25328125

  20. Carbon Dioxide for pH Control

    SciTech Connect

    Wagonner, R.C.

    2001-08-16

    Cardox, the major supplier of carbon dioxide, has developed a diffuser to introduce carbon dioxide into a water volume as small bubbles to minimize reagent loss to the atmosphere. This unit is integral to several configurations suggested for treatment to control alkalinity in water streams.

  1. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin David C.; O'Connor William K.; Penner Larry R.

    2003-11-01

    Concerns about global warming caused by the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the earth’s atmosphere have resulted in the need for research to reduce or eliminate emissions of these gases. Carbonation of magnesium and calcium silicate minerals is one possible method to achieve this reduction. It is possible to carry out these reactions either in situ (storage underground and subsequent reaction with the host rock to trap CO2 as carbonate minerals) or ex situ (above ground in a more traditional chemical processing plant). Research at the Department of Energy’s Albany Research Center has explored both of these routes. This paper will explore parameters that affect the direct carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals serpentine (Mg3Si2O5(OH)4) and olivine (Mg2SiO4) to produce magnesite (MgCO3), as well as the calcium silicate mineral, wollastonite (CaSiO3), to form calcite (CaCO3). The Columbia River Basalt Group is a multi-layered basaltic lava plateau that has favorable mineralogy and structure for storage of CO2. Up to 25% combined concentration of Ca, Fe2+, and Mg cations could react to form carbonates and thus sequester large quantities of CO2. Core samples from the Columbia River Basalt Group were reacted in an autoclave for up to 2000 hours at temperatures and pressures to simulate in situ conditions. Changes in core porosity, secondary minerals, and solution chemistry were measured.

  2. Encapsulated liquid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Vericella, John J; Baker, Sarah E; Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Duoss, Eric B; Hardin, James O; Lewicki, James; Glogowski, Elizabeth; Floyd, William C; Valdez, Carlos A; Smith, William L; Satcher, Joe H; Bourcier, William L; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Lewis, Jennifer A; Aines, Roger D

    2015-01-01

    Drawbacks of current carbon dioxide capture methods include corrosivity, evaporative losses and fouling. Separating the capture solvent from infrastructure and effluent gases via microencapsulation provides possible solutions to these issues. Here we report carbon capture materials that may enable low-cost and energy-efficient capture of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymer microcapsules composed of liquid carbonate cores and highly permeable silicone shells are produced by microfluidic assembly. This motif couples the capacity and selectivity of liquid sorbents with high surface area to facilitate rapid and controlled carbon dioxide uptake and release over repeated cycles. While mass transport across the capsule shell is slightly lower relative to neat liquid sorbents, the surface area enhancement gained via encapsulation provides an order-of-magnitude increase in carbon dioxide absorption rates for a given sorbent mass. The microcapsules are stable under typical industrial operating conditions and may be used in supported packing and fluidized beds for large-scale carbon capture. PMID:25652243

  3. Encapsulated liquid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vericella, John J.; Baker, Sarah E.; Stolaroff, Joshuah K.; Duoss, Eric B.; Hardin, James O.; Lewicki, James; Glogowski, Elizabeth; Floyd, William C.; Valdez, Carlos A.; Smith, William L.; Satcher, Joe H.; Bourcier, William L.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Lewis, Jennifer A.; Aines, Roger D.

    2015-02-01

    Drawbacks of current carbon dioxide capture methods include corrosivity, evaporative losses and fouling. Separating the capture solvent from infrastructure and effluent gases via microencapsulation provides possible solutions to these issues. Here we report carbon capture materials that may enable low-cost and energy-efficient capture of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymer microcapsules composed of liquid carbonate cores and highly permeable silicone shells are produced by microfluidic assembly. This motif couples the capacity and selectivity of liquid sorbents with high surface area to facilitate rapid and controlled carbon dioxide uptake and release over repeated cycles. While mass transport across the capsule shell is slightly lower relative to neat liquid sorbents, the surface area enhancement gained via encapsulation provides an order-of-magnitude increase in carbon dioxide absorption rates for a given sorbent mass. The microcapsules are stable under typical industrial operating conditions and may be used in supported packing and fluidized beds for large-scale carbon capture.

  4. Electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Masel, Richard I; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2015-04-21

    Electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide conversion include at least one catalytically active element with a particle size above 0.6 nm. The electrocatalysts can also include a Helper Catalyst. The catalysts can be used to increase the rate, modify the selectivity or lower the overpotential of electrochemical conversion of CO.sub.2. Chemical processes and devices using the catalysts also include processes to produce CO, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, (COOH).sub.2, or (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and a specific device, namely, a CO.sub.2 sensor.

  5. Carbon dioxide cleaning pilot project

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, L.; Blackman, T.E.

    1994-01-21

    In 1989, radioactive-contaminated metal at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) was cleaned using a solvent paint stripper (Methylene chloride). One-third of the radioactive material was able to be recycled; two-thirds went to the scrap pile as low-level mixed waste. In addition, waste solvent solutions also required disposal. Not only was this an inefficient process, it was later prohibited by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 40 CFR 268. A better way of doing business was needed. In the search for a solution to this situation, it was decided to study the advantages of using a new technology - pelletized carbon dioxide cleaning. A proof of principle demonstration occurred in December 1990 to test whether such a system could clean radioactive-contaminated metal. The proof of principle demonstration was expanded in June 1992 with a pilot project. The purpose of the pilot project was three fold: (1) to clean metal so that it can satisfy free release criteria for residual radioactive contamination at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP); (2) to compare two different carbon dioxide cleaning systems; and (3) to determine the cost-effectiveness of decontamination process in a production situation and compare the cost of shipping the metal off site for waste disposal. The pilot project was completed in August 1993. The results of the pilot project were: (1) 90% of those items which were decontaminated, successfully met the free release criteria , (2) the Alpheus Model 250 was selected to be used on plantsite and (3) the break even cost of decontaminating the metal vs shipping the contaminated material offsite for disposal was a cleaning rate of 90 pounds per hour, which was easily achieved.

  6. Numerically Simulating Carbonate Mineralization of Basalt with Injection of Carbon Dioxide into Deep Saline Formations

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bacon, Diana H.

    2006-07-08

    The principal mechanisms for the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep saline formations include geological structural trapping, hydrological entrapment of nonwetting fluids, aqueous phase dissolution and ionization, and geochemical sorption and mineralization. In sedimentary saline formations the dominant mechanisms are structural and dissolution trapping, with moderate to weak contributions from hydrological and geochemical trapping; where, hydrological trapping occurs during the imbibition of aqueous solution into pore spaces occupied by gaseous carbon dioxide, and geochemical trapping is controlled by generally slow reaction kinetics. In addition to being globally abundant and vast, deep basaltic lava formations offer mineralization kinetics that make geochemical trapping a dominate mechanism for trapping carbon dioxide in these formations. For several decades the United States Department of Energy has been investigating Columbia River basalt in the Pacific Northwest as part of its environmental programs and options for natural gas storage. Recently this nonpotable and extensively characterized basalt formation is being reconsidered as a potential reservoir for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. The reservoir has an estimated storage capacity of 100 giga tonnes of carbon dioxide and comprises layered basalt flows with sublayering that generally alternates between low permeability massive and high permeability breccia. Chemical analysis of the formation shows 10 wt% Fe, primarily in the +2 valence. The mineralization reaction that makes basalt formations attractive for carbon dioxide sequestration is that of calcium, magnesium, and iron silicates reacting with dissolved carbon dioxide, producing carbonate minerals and amorphous quartz. Preliminary estimates of the kinetics of the silicate-to-carbonate reactions have been determined experimentally and this research is continuing to determine effects of temperature, pressure, rock composition and

  7. Colored polymer microparticles through carbon dioxide-assisted dyeing

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, M.Z.; Birnbaum, E.R.; McCleskey, T.M.

    2000-05-30

    A new procedure is described for dyeing polymer beads using liquid carbon dioxide as a plasticizer to facilitate transport of dye into the particle phase. Aqueous latexes consisting of monodisperse polystyrene particles with surface-grafted poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) were dyed with Sudan Red 7B using CO{sub 2} at 25 C and 310 bar. Adding CO{sub 2} to the headspace above the latex resulted in some dyeing of the polymer, but better results were obtained by forming an emulsion of CO{sub 2} in the aqueous latex phase. Emulsions were formed with both a fluorinated and a hydrocarbon-based surfactant. It was found that the carbon dioxide emulsion greatly enhances the transfer of dye into the polystyrene without altering the size or morphology of the particles.

  8. Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Pennline, Henry W.; Hoffman, James S.

    2002-05-14

    A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

  9. Carbon dioxide conversion over carbon-based nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Chai, Siang-Piao; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    The utilization of carbon dioxide for the production of valuable chemicals via catalysts is one of the efficient ways to mitigate the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is known that the carbon dioxide conversion and product yields are still low even if the reaction is operated at high pressure and temperature. The carbon dioxide utilization and conversion provides many challenges in exploring new concepts and opportunities for development of unique catalysts for the purpose of activating the carbon dioxide molecules. In this paper, the role of carbon-based nanocatalysts in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from carbon dioxide and methanol are reviewed. The current catalytic results obtained with different carbon-based nanocatalysts systems are presented and how these materials contribute to the carbon dioxide conversion is explained. In addition, different strategies and preparation methods of nanometallic catalysts on various carbon supports are described to optimize the dispersion of metal nanoparticles and catalytic activity. PMID:23901504

  10. 46 CFR 196.37-8 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 196.37-8 Section 196.37-8... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-8 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or any space...

  11. 46 CFR 95.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 95.15-20 Section 95.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a... of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the...

  12. 46 CFR 76.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 76.15-20 Section 76.15-20... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a) Except as... than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the space protected. If...

  13. 46 CFR 169.732 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 169.732 Section 169.732 Shipping... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.732 Carbon dioxide alarm. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED.”...

  14. 46 CFR 78.47-11 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 78.47-11 Section 78.47-11... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-11 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or any space into...

  15. 46 CFR 97.37-11 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 97.37-11 Section 97.37-11... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-11 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or...

  16. 46 CFR 78.47-11 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 78.47-11 Section 78.47-11... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-11 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or any space into...

  17. 46 CFR 76.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 76.15-20 Section 76.15-20... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a) Except as... than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the space protected. If...

  18. 46 CFR 193.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 193.15-20 Section 193.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-20 Carbon dioxide...-5(d), consisting of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have cylinders located...

  19. 46 CFR 97.37-11 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 97.37-11 Section 97.37-11... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-11 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or...

  20. 46 CFR 131.817 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 131.817 Section 131.817... Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.817 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or...

  1. 46 CFR 193.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 193.15-20 Section 193.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-20 Carbon dioxide...-5(d), consisting of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have cylinders located...

  2. 49 CFR 173.217 - Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). 173.217 Section... Class 7 § 173.217 Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). (a) Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice), when offered for... permit the release of carbon dioxide gas to prevent a buildup of pressure that could rupture...

  3. 46 CFR 97.37-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 97.37-9 Section 97.37-9 Shipping... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE...

  4. 46 CFR 97.37-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 97.37-9 Section 97.37-9 Shipping... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE...

  5. 46 CFR 108.627 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 108.627 Section 108.627 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.627 Carbon dioxide alarm. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be identified by marking: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED” next...

  6. 46 CFR 108.627 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 108.627 Section 108.627 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.627 Carbon dioxide alarm. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be identified by marking: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED” next...

  7. 46 CFR 95.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 95.15-20 Section 95.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a... of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the...

  8. 46 CFR 95.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 95.15-20 Section 95.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a... of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the...

  9. 46 CFR 95.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 95.15-20 Section 95.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a... of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the...

  10. 49 CFR 173.217 - Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). 173.217 Section... Class 7 § 173.217 Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). (a) Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice), when offered for... permit the release of carbon dioxide gas to prevent a buildup of pressure that could rupture...

  11. 46 CFR 108.626 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 108.626 Section 108.626... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.626 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or...

  12. 49 CFR 173.217 - Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). 173.217 Section... Class 7 § 173.217 Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). (a) Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice), when offered for... permit the release of carbon dioxide gas to prevent a buildup of pressure that could rupture...

  13. 46 CFR 108.626 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 108.626 Section 108.626... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.626 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or...

  14. 46 CFR 76.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 76.15-20 Section 76.15-20... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a) Except as... than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the space protected. If...

  15. 46 CFR 131.817 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 131.817 Section 131.817... Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.817 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or...

  16. 49 CFR 173.217 - Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). 173.217 Section... Class 7 § 173.217 Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). (a) Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice), when offered for... permit the release of carbon dioxide gas to prevent a buildup of pressure that could rupture...

  17. 46 CFR 76.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 76.15-20 Section 76.15-20... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a) Except as... than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the space protected. If...

  18. 46 CFR 78.47-11 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 78.47-11 Section 78.47-11... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-11 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or any space into...

  19. 46 CFR 196.37-8 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 196.37-8 Section 196.37-8... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-8 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or any space...

  20. 46 CFR 193.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 193.15-20 Section 193.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a...), consisting of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have cylinders located within the...

  1. 49 CFR 173.217 - Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). 173.217 Section... Class 7 § 173.217 Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). (a) Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice), when offered for... permit the release of carbon dioxide gas to prevent a buildup of pressure that could rupture...

  2. 46 CFR 97.37-11 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 97.37-11 Section 97.37-11... OPERATIONS Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-11 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or...

  3. 46 CFR 196.37-8 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 196.37-8 Section 196.37-8... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-8 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or any space...

  4. 46 CFR 108.626 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 108.626 Section 108.626... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.626 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or...

  5. 46 CFR 196.37-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 196.37-9 Section 196.37-9 Shipping... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE...

  6. 46 CFR 95.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 95.15-20 Section 95.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a... of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the...

  7. 46 CFR 196.37-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 196.37-9 Section 196.37-9 Shipping... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE...

  8. 46 CFR 131.817 - Carbon dioxide warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide warning signs. 131.817 Section 131.817... Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.817 Carbon dioxide warning signs. Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or...

  9. 46 CFR 78.47-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 78.47-9 Section 78.47-9 Shipping... and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED.” (b)...

  10. 46 CFR 78.47-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 78.47-9 Section 78.47-9 Shipping... and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED.” (b)...

  11. 46 CFR 76.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 76.15-20 Section 76.15-20... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a) Except as... than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the space protected. If...

  12. 46 CFR 193.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 193.15-20 Section 193.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-20 Carbon dioxide...-5(d), consisting of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have cylinders located...

  13. 46 CFR 169.732 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 169.732 Section 169.732 Shipping... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.732 Carbon dioxide alarm. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED.”...

  14. 46 CFR 193.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 193.15-20 Section 193.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a...), consisting of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have cylinders located within the...

  15. Carbon dioxide-soluble polymers and swellable polymers for carbon dioxide applications

    DOEpatents

    DeSimone, Joseph M.; Birnbaum, Eva; Carbonell, Ruben G.; Crette, Stephanie; McClain, James B.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Powell, Kimberly R.; Romack, Timothy J.; Tumas, William

    2004-06-08

    A method for carrying out a catalysis reaction in carbon dioxide comprising contacting a fluid mixture with a catalyst bound to a polymer, the fluid mixture comprising at least one reactant and carbon dioxide, wherein the reactant interacts with the catalyst to form a reaction product. A composition of matter comprises carbon dioxide and a polymer and a reactant present in the carbon dioxide. The polymer has bound thereto a catalyst at a plurality of chains along the length of the polymer, and wherein the reactant interacts with the catalyst to form a reaction product.

  16. Diffusion-based process for carbon dioxide uptake and isoprene emission in gaseous/aqueous two-phase photobioreactors by photosynthetic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Fiona K; Melis, Anastasios

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthesis for the generation of fuels and chemicals from cyanobacteria and microalgae offers the promise of a single host organism acting both as photocatalyst and processor, performing sunlight absorption and utilization, as well as CO(2) assimilation and conversion into product. However, there is a need to develop methods for generating, sequestering, and trapping such bio-products in an efficient and cost-effective manner that is suitable for industrial scale-up and exploitation. A sealed gaseous/aqueous two-phase photobioreactor was designed and applied for the photosynthetic generation of volatile isoprene (C(5)H(8)) hydrocarbons, which operates on the principle of spontaneous diffusion of CO(2) from the gaseous headspace into the microalgal or cyanobacterial-containing aqueous phase, followed by photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation and isoprene production by the transgenic microorganisms. Volatile isoprene hydrocarbons were emitted from the aqueous phase and were sequestered into the gaseous headspace. Periodic replacement (flushing) of the isoprene (C(5)H(8)) and oxygen (O(2)) content of the gaseous headspace with CO(2) allowed for the simultaneous harvesting of the photoproducts and replenishment of the CO(2) supply in the gaseous headspace. Reduction in practice of the gaseous/aqueous two-phase photobioreactor is offered in this work with a fed-batch and a semi-continuous culturing system using Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 heterologously expressing the Pueraria montana (kudzu) isoprene synthase (IspS) gene. Constitutive isoprene production was observed over 192 h of experimentation, coupled with cyanobacterial biomass accumulation. The diffusion-based process in gaseous/aqueous two-phase photobioreactors has the potential to be applied to other high-value photosynthetically derived volatile molecules, emanating from a variety of photosynthetic microorganisms. PMID:21830206

  17. Carbon dioxide capturing technologies: a review focusing on metal organic framework materials (MOFs).

    PubMed

    Sabouni, Rana; Kazemian, Hossein; Rohani, Sohrab

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a relevant literature has been reviewed focusing on the carbon dioxide capture technologies in general, such as amine-based absorption as conventional carbon dioxide capturing technology, aqueous ammonia-based absorption, membranes, and adsorption material (e.g., zeolites, and activated carbons). In more details, metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as new emerging technologies for carbon dioxide adsorption are discussed. The MOFs section is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of MOFs including material characteristics and synthesis, structural features, CO2 adsorption capacity, heat of adsorption and selectivity of CO2. PMID:24338107

  18. Turning carbon dioxide into fuel.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Z; Xiao, T; Kuznetsov, V L; Edwards, P P

    2010-07-28

    Our present dependence on fossil fuels means that, as our demand for energy inevitably increases, so do emissions of greenhouse gases, most notably carbon dioxide (CO2). To avoid the obvious consequences on climate change, the concentration of such greenhouse gases in the atmosphere must be stabilized. But, as populations grow and economies develop, future demands now ensure that energy will be one of the defining issues of this century. This unique set of (coupled) challenges also means that science and engineering have a unique opportunity-and a burgeoning challenge-to apply their understanding to provide sustainable energy solutions. Integrated carbon capture and subsequent sequestration is generally advanced as the most promising option to tackle greenhouse gases in the short to medium term. Here, we provide a brief overview of an alternative mid- to long-term option, namely, the capture and conversion of CO2, to produce sustainable, synthetic hydrocarbon or carbonaceous fuels, most notably for transportation purposes. Basically, the approach centres on the concept of the large-scale re-use of CO2 released by human activity to produce synthetic fuels, and how this challenging approach could assume an important role in tackling the issue of global CO2 emissions. We highlight three possible strategies involving CO2 conversion by physico-chemical approaches: sustainable (or renewable) synthetic methanol, syngas production derived from flue gases from coal-, gas- or oil-fired electric power stations, and photochemical production of synthetic fuels. The use of CO2 to synthesize commodity chemicals is covered elsewhere (Arakawa et al. 2001 Chem. Rev. 101, 953-996); this review is focused on the possibilities for the conversion of CO2 to fuels. Although these three prototypical areas differ in their ultimate applications, the underpinning thermodynamic considerations centre on the conversion-and hence the utilization-of CO2. Here, we hope to illustrate that advances

  19. Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Sodium Bicarbonate/Carbonate Buffer in an Open Aqueous Carbon Dioxide System and Corollary Electrochemical/Chemical Reactions Relative to System pH Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegman, Thomas W.; Wilson, Mark E.; Glasscock, Brad; Holt, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) experienced a number of chemical changes driven by system absorption of CO2 which altered the coolant’s pH. The natural effects of the decrease in pH from approximately 9.2 to less than 8.4 had immediate consequences on system corrosion rates and corrosion product interactions with specified coolant constituents. The alkalinity of the system was increased through the development and implementation of a carbonate/bicarbonate buffer that would increase coolant pH to 9.0 – 10.0 and maintain pH above 9.0 in the presence of ISS cabin concentrations of CO2 up to twenty times higher than ground concentrations. This paper defines how a carbonate/bicarbonate buffer works in an open carbon dioxide system and summarizes the analyses performed on the buffer for safe and effective application in the on-orbit system. The importance of the relationship between the cabin environment and the IATCS is demonstrated as the dominant factor in understanding the system chemistry and pH trends before and after addition of the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer. The paper also documents the corollary electrochemical and chemical reactions the system has experienced and the rationale for remediation of these effects with the addition of the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer.

  20. Experimental study of pattern formation during carbon dioxide mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuszter, Gabor; Brau, Fabian; de Wit, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Injection of supercritical carbon dioxide in deep porous aquifers, where mineral carbonation takes place via chemical reactions, is one of the possible long-term storage of this greenhouse gas. This mineralization process is investigated experimentally under controlled conditions in a confined horizontal Hele-Shaw geometry where an aqueous solution of sodium carbonate is injected radially into a solution of calcium chloride. Precipitation of calcium carbonate in various finger, flower or tube-like patterns is observed in the mixing zone between the two solutions. These precipitation structures and their growth dynamics are studied quantitatively as a function of the parameters of the problem, which are the injection rate and the reactant concentrations. In particular, we show the existence of critical concentrations of reactants above which the amount of the calcium carbonate precipitate produced drops significantly.

  1. Method for Extracting and Sequestering Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, Gregory H.; Caldeira, Kenneth G.

    2005-05-10

    A method and apparatus to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said method and apparatus hydrates CO2, and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO2 from a gaseous environment.

  2. Method for extracting and sequestering carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory H.; Caldeira, Kenneth G.

    2005-05-10

    A method and apparatus to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said method and apparatus hydrates CO.sub.2, and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO.sub.2 from a gaseous environment.

  3. Apparatus for extracting and sequestering carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory H.; Caldeira, Kenneth G.

    2010-02-02

    An apparatus and method associated therewith to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said apparatus hydrates CO.sub.2 and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO.sub.2 from a gaseous environment.

  4. SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS

    SciTech Connect

    K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; L.R. Radovic

    2003-03-10

    The authors' long-term goal is to develop accurate prediction methods for describing the adsorption behavior of gas mixtures on solid adsorbents over complete ranges of temperature, pressure and adsorbent types. The originally-stated, major objectives of the current project are to (1) measure the adsorption behavior of pure CO{sub 2}, methane, nitrogen, and their binary and ternary mixtures on several selected coals having different properties at temperatures and pressures applicable to the particular coals being studied, (2) generalize the adsorption results in terms of appropriate properties of the coals to facilitate estimation of adsorption behavior for coals other than those studied experimentally, (3) delineate the sensitivity of the competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2}, methane and nitrogen to the specific characteristics of the coal on which they are adsorbed; establish the major differences (if any) in the nature of this competitive adsorption on different coals, and (4) test and/or develop theoretically-based mathematical models to represent accurately the adsorption behavior of mixtures of the type for which measurements are made. As this project has developed, an important additional objective has been added to the above original list. Namely, we have been encouraged to interact with industry and/or governmental agencies to utilize our expertise to advance the state of the art in coalbed adsorption science and technology. As a result of this additional objective, we have participated with the Department of Energy and industry in the measurement and analysis of adsorption behavior as part of two distinct investigations. These include (a) Advanced Resources International (ARI) DOE Project DE-FC26-00NT40924, ''Adsorption of Pure Methane, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide and Their Mixtures on Wet Tiffany Coal'', and (b) the DOE-NETL Project, ''Round Robin: CO{sub 2} Adsorption on Selected Coals''. These activities, contributing directly to the DOE projects

  5. SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS

    SciTech Connect

    K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; J.E. Fitzgerald; Z. Pan; M. Sudibandriyo

    2003-04-30

    The authors' long-term goal is to develop accurate prediction methods for describing the adsorption behavior of gas mixtures on solid adsorbents over complete ranges of temperature, pressure, and adsorbent types. The originally-stated, major objectives of the current project are to: (1) measure the adsorption behavior of pure CO{sub 2}, methane, nitrogen, and their binary and ternary mixtures on several selected coals having different properties at temperatures and pressures applicable to the particular coals being studied, (2) generalize the adsorption results in terms of appropriate properties of the coals to facilitate estimation of adsorption behavior for coals other than those studied experimentally, (3) delineate the sensitivity of the competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2}, methane, and nitrogen to the specific characteristics of the coal on which they are adsorbed; establish the major differences (if any) in the nature of this competitive adsorption on different coals, and (4) test and/or develop theoretically-based mathematical models to represent accurately the adsorption behavior of mixtures of the type for which measurements are made. As this project developed, an important additional objective was added to the above original list. Namely, we were encouraged to interact with industry and/or governmental agencies to utilize our expertise to advance the state of the art in coalbed adsorption science and technology. As a result of this additional objective, we participated with the Department of Energy and industry in the measurement and analysis of adsorption behavior as part of two distinct investigations. These include (a) Advanced Resources International (ARI) DOE Project DE-FC26-00NT40924, ''Adsorption of Pure Methane, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide and Their Mixtures on Wet Tiffany Coal'', and (b) the DOE-NETL Project, ''Round Robin: CO{sub 2} Adsorption on Selected Coals''. These activities, contributing directly to the DOE projects listed above, also

  6. Kinetics of the reaction between carbon dioxide and tertiary amines

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, J.E.; Donnellan, J.P. )

    1990-02-16

    The reaction between carbon dioxide and amines is of great technical importance and has been the subject of many investigations. The authors have shown that the reaction for secondary amines in anhydrous ethanol and in aqueous solution is exclusively second-order in amine and that the zwitterion intermediate postulated by Danckwerts is probably of negligible significance in the mechanism. The reaction with tertiary amines has also been studied, but the data are less controversial. In order to complete their studies of the reactions of carbon dioxide with amines, using their conductimetric stopped-flow apparatus, they have studied this reaction for MDEA (methyldiethanolamine, IUPAC name N-methyl-2,2{prime}-iminodiethanol) and TEA (triethanolamine, IUPAC name 2,2{prime},2{double prime}-nitrilotris(ethanol)).

  7. Polymers for metal extractions in carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    DeSimone, Joseph M.; Tumas, William; Powell, Kimberly R.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Romack, Timothy J.; McClain, James B.; Birnbaum, Eva R.

    2001-01-01

    A composition useful for the extraction of metals and metalloids comprises (a) carbon dioxide fluid (preferably liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide); and (b) a polymer in the carbon dioxide, the polymer having bound thereto a ligand that binds the metal or metalloid; with the ligand bound to the polymer at a plurality of locations along the chain length thereof (i.e., a plurality of ligands are bound at a plurality of locations along the chain length of the polymer). The polymer is preferably a copolymer, and the polymer is preferably a fluoropolymer such as a fluoroacrylate polymer. The extraction method comprises the steps of contacting a first composition containing a metal or metalloid to be extracted with a second composition, the second composition being as described above; and then extracting the metal or metalloid from the first composition into the second composition.

  8. [Pharmaceutical applications of supercritical carbon dioxide].

    PubMed

    Delattre, L

    2007-01-01

    The supercritical state of a fluid is intermediate between that of gases and liquids. Supercritical fluids exhibit some solvent power which is tunable in function of pressure and temperature. In the pharmaceutical field, supercritical carbon dioxide is by far the most commonly used fluid; of course, the first applications of supercritical fluids were the replacement of organic solvents in extraction processes; other applications appeared during the last twenty years: supercritical fluids are also used as eluents in chromatography, as solvents in organic synthesis or for the processing of solid dosage forms by drug micronization, by the production of nanospheres, of solid dispersions, of porous polymeric matrices containing different active substances. Supercritical carbon dioxide has been proposed for encapsulating both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drug substances into liposomes as well as for including different active substances into cyclodextrins. There are also future prospects for the use of pressurized carbon dioxide as a sterilizing agent. PMID:17299352

  9. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  10. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  11. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  12. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  13. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  14. Carbon dioxide hydrate and floods on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ground ice on Mars probably consists largely of carbon dioxide hydrate. This hydrate dissociates upon release of pressure at temperatures between 0 and 10 C. The heat capacity of the ground would be sufficient to produce up to 4% (by volume) of water at a rate equal to that at which it can be drained away. Catastrophic dissociation of carbon dioxide hydrate during some past epoch when the near-surface temperature was in this range would have produced chaotic terrain and flood channels.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Extraction from Air: Is It An Option?

    SciTech Connect

    Klaus Lackner; Hans-Joachim Ziock; Patrick Grimes

    1999-02-01

    Controlling the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere without limiting access to fossil energy resources is only possible if carbon dioxide is collected and disposed of away from the atmosphere. While it may be cost-advantageous to collect the carbon dioxide at concentrated sources without ever letting it enter the atmosphere, this approach is not available for the many diffuse sources of carbon dioxide. Similarly, for many older plants a retrofit to collect the carbon dioxide is either impossible or prohibitively expensive. For these cases we investigate the possibility of collecting the carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere. We conclude that there are no fundamental obstacles to this approach and that it deserves further investigation. Carbon dioxide extraction directly from atmosphere would allow carbon management without the need for a completely changed infrastructure. In addition it eliminates the need for a complex carbon dioxide transportation infrastructure, thus at least in part offsetting the higher cost of the extraction from air.

  16. Global deforestation: contribution to atmospheric carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Woodwell, G.M.; Hobbie, J.E.; Houghton, R.A.; Melillo, J.M.; Moore, B.; Peterson, B.J.; Shaver, G.R.

    1983-12-09

    A study of effects of terrestrial biota on the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere suggests that the global net release of carbon due to forest clearing between 1960 and 1980 was between 135 X 10/sup 15/ and 228 X 10/sup 15/ grams. Between 1.8 X 10/sup 15/ and 4.7 X 10/sup 15/ grams of carbon were released in 1980, of which nearly 80 percent was due to deforestation, principally in the tropics. The annual release of carbon from the biota and soils exceeded the release from fossil fuels until about 1960. Because the biotic release has been and remains much larger than is commonly assumed, the airborne fraction, usually considered to be about 50 percent of the releases from fossil fuels, was probably between 22 and 43 percent of the total carbon released in 1980. The increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is thought by some to be increasing the storage of carbon in the earth's remaining forests sufficiently to offset the release from deforestation. The interpretation of the evidence presented here suggests no such effect; deforestation appears to be the dominant biotic effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide. If deforestation increases in proportion to population, the biotic release of carbon will reach 9 X 10/sup 15/ grams per year before forests are exhausted early in the next century. The possibilities for limiting the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere through reduction in use of fossil fuels and through management of forests may be greater than is commonly assumed.

  17. Global deforestation: contribution to atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Woodwell, G M; Hobbie, J E; Houghton, R A; Melillo, J M; Moore, B; Peterson, B J; Shaver, G R

    1983-12-01

    A study of effects of terrestrial biota on the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere suggests that the global net release of carbon due to forest clearing between 1860 and 1980 was between 135 x 10(15) and 228 x 10(15) grams. Between 1.8 x 10(15) and 4.7 x 10(15) grams of carbon were released in 1980, of which nearly 80 percent was due to deforestation, principally in the tropics. The annual release of carbon from the biota and soils exceeded the release from fossil fuels until about 1960. Because the biotic release has been and remains much larger than is commonly assumed, the airborne fraction, usually considered to be about 50 percent of the release from fossil fuels, was probably between 22 and 43 percent of the total carbon released in 1980. The increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is thought by some to be increasing the storage of carbon in the earth's remaining forests sufficiently to offset the release from deforestation. The interpretation of the evidence presented here suggests no such effect; deforestation appears to be the dominant biotic effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide. If deforestation increases in proportion to population, the biotic release of carbon will reach 9 x 10(15) grams per year before forests are exhausted early in the next century. The possibilities for limiting the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere through reduction in use of fossil fuels and through management of forests may be greater than is commonly assumed. PMID:17747369

  18. Diffusion coefficients significant in modeling the absorption rate of carbon dioxide into aqueous blends of N-methyldiethanolamine and diethanolamine and of hydrogen sulfide into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.E.; Marshall, T.L.; Rowley, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    Absorption rates of gaseous CO{sub 2} into aqueous blends of N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and diethanolamine (DEA) and of gaseous H{sub 2}S into aqueous MDEA were measured in a quiescent, inverted-tube diffusiometer by monitoring the rate of pressure drop. A numerical model for absorption, diffusion, and reaction of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S in blends of MDEA, DEA, and water was developed. The model was used to regress diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and MDEAH{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for the case of CO{sub 2} absorption and of bisulfide ion for the case of H{sub 2}S absorption from measured absorption rates. CO{sub 2} absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and MDEAH{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in aqueous solutions containing 50 mass % total amine at DEA:MDEA mole ratios of 1:20, 1:4, 1L3, and 2:3. H{sub 2}S absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bisulfide ion were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in aqueous solutions containing 20, 35, and 50 mass % MDEA.

  19. International Space Station Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.

    2000-01-01

    Performance testing of the International Space Station Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly flight hardware in the United States Laboratory during 1999 is described. The CDRA exceeded carbon dioxide performance specifications and operated flawlessly. Data from this test is presented.

  20. Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

  1. Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

  2. Gas diffusion cell removes carbon dioxide from occupied airtight enclosures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Small, lightweight permeable cell package separates and removes carbon dioxide from respiratory gas mixtures. The cell is regenerative while chemically inert in the presence of carbon dioxide so that only adsorption takes place.

  3. Intrinsic formation of nanocrystalline neptunium dioxide under neutral aqueous conditions relevant to deep geological repositories.

    PubMed

    Husar, Richard; Hübner, René; Hennig, Christoph; Martin, Philippe M; Chollet, Mélanie; Weiss, Stephan; Stumpf, Thorsten; Zänker, Harald; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi

    2015-01-25

    The dilution of aqueous neptunium carbonate complexes induces the intrinsic formation of nanocrystalline neptunium dioxide (NpO2) particles, which are characterised by UV/Vis and X-ray absorption spectroscopies and transmission electron microscopy. This new route of nanocrystalline NpO2 formation could be a potential scenario for the environmental transport of radionuclides from the waste repository (i.e. under near-field alkaline conditions) to the geological environment (i.e. under far-field neutral conditions). PMID:25479067

  4. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide and methane at an immobilized cobalt protoporphyrin

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jing; Kortlever, Ruud; Kas, Recep; Birdja, Yuvraj Y.; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Kwon, Youngkook; Ledezma-Yanez, Isis; Schouten, Klaas Jan P.; Mul, Guido; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide and water into useful products is a major challenge in facilitating a closed carbon cycle. Here we report a cobalt protoporphyrin immobilized on a pyrolytic graphite electrode that reduces carbon dioxide in an aqueous acidic solution at relatively low overpotential (0.5 V), with an efficiency and selectivity comparable to the best porphyrin-based electrocatalyst in the literature. While carbon monoxide is the main reduction product, we also observe methane as by-product. The results of our detailed pH-dependent studies are explained consistently by a mechanism in which carbon dioxide is activated by the cobalt protoporphyrin through the stabilization of a radical intermediate, which acts as Brønsted base. The basic character of this intermediate explains how the carbon dioxide reduction circumvents a concerted proton–electron transfer mechanism, in contrast to hydrogen evolution. Our results and their mechanistic interpretations suggest strategies for designing improved catalysts. PMID:26324108

  5. Discussion of Refrigeration Cycle Using Carbon Dioxide as Refrigerant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Amin; Sun, Miming; Li, Jie; Yin, Gang; Cheng, Keyong; Zhen, Bing; Sun, Ying

    Nowadays, the problem of the environment goes worse, it urges people to research and study new energy-saving and environment-friendly refrigerants, such as carbon dioxide, at present, people do research on carbon dioxide at home and abroad. This paper introduces the property of carbon dioxide as a refrigerant, sums up and analyses carbon dioxide refrigeration cycles, and points out the development and research direction in the future.

  6. Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increase in carbon dioxide concentration in the earth's atmosphere and its potential effect on atmospheric temperature is a major concern. Changes in global environment will have major effects for natural and agricultural ecosystems. Plants have been directly affected by rising atmospheric CO2...

  7. Entrapment of carbon dioxide with chitosan-based core-shell particles containing changeable cores.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanrui; Fu, Yinghao; Lin, Xia; Xiao, Congming

    2016-08-01

    Water-soluble chitosan-based core-shell particles that contained changeable cores were successfully applied to anchor carbon dioxide. The entrapment capacity of the particles for carbon dioxide (EC) depended on the cores. It was found that EC of the particles contained aqueous cores was higher than that of the beads with water-soluble chitosan gel cores, which was confirmed with thermogravimetric analysis. In addition, calcium ions and sodium hydroxide were introduced within the particles to examine their effect on the entrapment. EC of the particles was enhanced with sodium hydroxide when the cores were WSC gel. The incorporation of calcium ions was helpful for stabilizing carbon dioxide through the formation of calcium carbonate, which was verified with Fourier transform infrared spectra and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectrometry. This phenomenon meant the role of calcium ions for fixating carbon dioxide was significant. PMID:27174910

  8. Catalyst cartridge for carbon dioxide reduction unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A catalyst cartridge, for use in a carbon dioxide reducing apparatus in a life support system for space vehicles, is described. The catalyst cartridge includes an inner perforated metal wall, an outer perforated wall space outwardly from the inner wall, a base plate closing one end of the cartridge, and a cover plate closing the other end of the cartridge. The cover plate has a central aperture through which a supply line with a heater feeds a gaseous reaction mixture comprising hydrogen and carbon dioxide at a temperature from about 1000 to about 1400 F. The outer surfaces of the internal wall and the inner surfaces of the outer wall are lined with a ceramic fiber batting material of sufficient thickness to prevent carbon formed in the reaction from passing through it. The portion of the surfaces of the base and cover plates defined within the inner and outer walls are also lined with ceramic batting. The heated reaction mixture passes outwardly through the inner perforated wall and ceramic batting and over the catalyst. The solid carbon product formes is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The solid carbon product formed is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The water vapor and unreacted carbon dioxide and any intermediate products pass through the perforations of the outer wall.

  9. 46 CFR 108.431 - Carbon dioxide systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide systems: General. 108.431 Section 108.431... AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.431 Carbon dioxide systems: General. (a) Sections 108.431 through 108.457 apply to high pressure...

  10. 40 CFR 86.124-78 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.124-78 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. Prior to its introduction into service and monthly thereafter the NDIR carbon dioxide analyzer shall be calibrated:...

  11. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From the Virgin Islands § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  12. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From the Virgin Islands § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  13. 9 CFR 313.5 - Chemical; carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Chemical; carbon dioxide. 313.5... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.5 Chemical; carbon dioxide. The slaughtering of sheep, calves and swine with the use of carbon dioxide gas and the handling in...

  14. 46 CFR 108.431 - Carbon dioxide systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide systems: General. 108.431 Section 108.431... AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.431 Carbon dioxide systems: General. (a) Sections 108.431 through 108.457 apply to high pressure...

  15. 40 CFR 86.124-78 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.124-78 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. Prior to its introduction into service and monthly thereafter the NDIR carbon dioxide analyzer shall be calibrated:...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  20. 9 CFR 313.5 - Chemical; carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chemical; carbon dioxide. 313.5... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.5 Chemical; carbon dioxide. The slaughtering of sheep, calves and swine with the use of carbon dioxide gas and the handling in...

  1. 27 CFR 24.319 - Carbon dioxide record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide record. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Records and Reports § 24.319 Carbon dioxide record. A proprietor who uses carbon dioxide in still wine shall maintain a record of the laboratory tests conducted...

  2. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From the Virgin Islands § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  3. 49 CFR 179.102-1 - Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-1... Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid. (a) Tank cars used to transport carbon dioxide, refrigerated...

  4. 27 CFR 24.319 - Carbon dioxide record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide record. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Records and Reports § 24.319 Carbon dioxide record. A proprietor who uses carbon dioxide in still wine shall maintain a record of the laboratory tests conducted...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  6. 40 CFR 86.124-78 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.124-78 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. Prior to its introduction into service and monthly thereafter the NDIR carbon dioxide analyzer shall be calibrated:...

  7. 9 CFR 313.5 - Chemical; carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Chemical; carbon dioxide. 313.5... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.5 Chemical; carbon dioxide. The slaughtering of sheep, calves and swine with the use of carbon dioxide gas and the handling in...

  8. 46 CFR 108.431 - Carbon dioxide systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon dioxide systems: General. 108.431 Section 108.431... AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.431 Carbon dioxide systems: General. (a) Sections 108.431 through 108.457 apply to high pressure...

  9. 49 CFR 179.102-1 - Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-1... Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid. (a) Tank cars used to transport carbon dioxide, refrigerated...

  10. 46 CFR 169.565 - Fixed carbon dioxide system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed carbon dioxide system. 169.565 Section 169.565... Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Firefighting Equipment § 169.565 Fixed carbon dioxide system. (a) The number of pounds of carbon dioxide required for each space protected must be equal to the gross volume...

  11. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From Puerto Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of wine;...

  12. 27 CFR 24.319 - Carbon dioxide record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide record. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.319 Carbon dioxide record. A proprietor who uses carbon dioxide in still wine shall maintain a record of the laboratory tests conducted...

  13. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From the Virgin Islands § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  15. 27 CFR 24.319 - Carbon dioxide record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide record. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.319 Carbon dioxide record. A proprietor who uses carbon dioxide in still wine shall maintain a record of the laboratory tests conducted...

  16. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From Puerto Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of wine;...

  17. 40 CFR 86.124-78 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.124-78 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. Prior to its introduction into service and monthly thereafter the NDIR carbon dioxide analyzer shall be calibrated:...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  19. 46 CFR 169.565 - Fixed carbon dioxide system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed carbon dioxide system. 169.565 Section 169.565... Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Firefighting Equipment § 169.565 Fixed carbon dioxide system. (a) The number of pounds of carbon dioxide required for each space protected must be equal to the gross volume...

  20. 49 CFR 179.102-1 - Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-1... Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid. (a) Tank cars used to transport carbon dioxide, refrigerated...

  1. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From Puerto Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of wine;...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  4. 40 CFR 86.124-78 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.124-78 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. Prior to its introduction into service and monthly thereafter the NDIR carbon dioxide analyzer shall be calibrated:...

  5. 46 CFR 108.431 - Carbon dioxide systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide systems: General. 108.431 Section 108.431... AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.431 Carbon dioxide systems: General. (a) Sections 108.431 through 108.457 apply to high pressure...

  6. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From the Virgin Islands § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  7. 49 CFR 179.102-1 - Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-1... Carbon dioxide, refrigerated liquid. (a) Tank cars used to transport carbon dioxide, refrigerated...

  8. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From Puerto Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of wine;...

  9. 46 CFR 169.565 - Fixed carbon dioxide system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed carbon dioxide system. 169.565 Section 169.565... Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Firefighting Equipment § 169.565 Fixed carbon dioxide system. (a) The number of pounds of carbon dioxide required for each space protected must be equal to the gross volume...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  11. 9 CFR 313.5 - Chemical; carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Chemical; carbon dioxide. 313.5... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.5 Chemical; carbon dioxide. The slaughtering of sheep, calves and swine with the use of carbon dioxide gas and the handling in...

  12. 9 CFR 313.5 - Chemical; carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Chemical; carbon dioxide. 313.5... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.5 Chemical; carbon dioxide. The slaughtering of sheep, calves and swine with the use of carbon dioxide gas and the handling in...

  13. 27 CFR 24.319 - Carbon dioxide record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide record. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.319 Carbon dioxide record. A proprietor who uses carbon dioxide in still wine shall maintain a record of the laboratory tests conducted...

  14. 46 CFR 108.431 - Carbon dioxide systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide systems: General. 108.431 Section 108.431... AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.431 Carbon dioxide systems: General. (a) Sections 108.431 through 108.457 apply to high pressure...

  15. 46 CFR 169.565 - Fixed carbon dioxide system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed carbon dioxide system. 169.565 Section 169.565... Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Firefighting Equipment § 169.565 Fixed carbon dioxide system. (a) The number of pounds of carbon dioxide required for each space protected must be equal to the gross volume...

  16. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From Puerto Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of wine;...

  17. 46 CFR 169.565 - Fixed carbon dioxide system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed carbon dioxide system. 169.565 Section 169.565... Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Firefighting Equipment § 169.565 Fixed carbon dioxide system. (a) The number of pounds of carbon dioxide required for each space protected must be equal to the gross volume...

  18. Ocean uptake of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Tsung-Hung ); Takahashi, Taro . Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)

    1993-01-01

    Factors controlling the capacity of the ocean for taking up anthropogenic C0[sup 2] include carbon chemistry, distribution of alkalinity, pCO[sup 2] and total concentration of dissolved C0[sup 2], sea-air pCO[sup 2] difference, gas exchange rate across the sea-air interface, biological carbon pump, ocean water circulation and mixing, and dissolution of carbonate in deep sea sediments. A general review of these processes is given and models of ocean-atmosphere system based on our understanding of these regulating processes axe used to estimate the magnitude of C0[sup 2] uptake by the ocean. We conclude that the ocean can absorb up to 35% of the fossil fuel emission. Direct measurements show that 55% Of C0[sup 2] from fossil fuel burning remains in the atmosphere. The remaining 10% is not accounted for by atmospheric increases and ocean uptake. In addition, it is estimated that an amount equivalent to 30% of recent annual fossil fuel emissions is released into the atmosphere as a result of deforestation and farming. To balance global carbon budget, a sizable carbon sink besides the ocean is needed. Storage of carbon in terrestrial biosphere as a result of C0[sup 2] fertilization is a potential candidate for such missing carbon sinks.

  19. Ocean uptake of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Tsung-Hung; Takahashi, Taro

    1993-06-01

    Factors controlling the capacity of the ocean for taking up anthropogenic C0{sup 2} include carbon chemistry, distribution of alkalinity, pCO{sup 2} and total concentration of dissolved C0{sup 2}, sea-air pCO{sup 2} difference, gas exchange rate across the sea-air interface, biological carbon pump, ocean water circulation and mixing, and dissolution of carbonate in deep sea sediments. A general review of these processes is given and models of ocean-atmosphere system based on our understanding of these regulating processes axe used to estimate the magnitude of C0{sup 2} uptake by the ocean. We conclude that the ocean can absorb up to 35% of the fossil fuel emission. Direct measurements show that 55% Of C0{sup 2} from fossil fuel burning remains in the atmosphere. The remaining 10% is not accounted for by atmospheric increases and ocean uptake. In addition, it is estimated that an amount equivalent to 30% of recent annual fossil fuel emissions is released into the atmosphere as a result of deforestation and farming. To balance global carbon budget, a sizable carbon sink besides the ocean is needed. Storage of carbon in terrestrial biosphere as a result of C0{sup 2} fertilization is a potential candidate for such missing carbon sinks.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A CO2 SEQUESTRATION MODULE BY INTEGRATING MINERAL ACTIVATION AND AQUEOUS CARBONATION

    SciTech Connect

    George Alexander; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Parvana Aksoy; Harold Schobert

    2006-03-25

    Mineral carbonation provides a potential option for the long-term storage of carbon dioxide. Serpentine has been chosen as the feedstock mineral, due to its abundance and availability. However, the relatively low reactivity of serpentine has warranted research into physical and chemical treatments that have been shown to greatly increase its reactivity. The use of sulfuric acid as an accelerating medium for the removal of magnesium from serpentine has recently been investigated. In addition to the challenges presented by the dissolution of serpentine, another challenge is the subsequent carbonation of the magnesium ions. A stable hydration sphere for the magnesium ion reduces the carbonation kinetics by obstructing the formation of the carbonation products. Accordingly, this research has evaluated the solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solution, the interaction between the dissociation products of carbon dioxide, and the carbonation potential of the magnesium ion.

  1. Kinetics of Aqueous Leaching and Carbonization of Steelmaking Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekakh, S. N.; Rawlins, C. H.; Robertson, D. G. C.; Richards, V. L.; Peaslee, K. D.

    2008-02-01

    Sequestration of carbon dioxide by steelmaking slag was studied in an atmospheric three-phase system containing industrial slag particles, water, and CO2 gas. Batch-type reactors were used to measure the rate of aqueous alkaline leaching and slag particle carbonization independently. Four sizes of slag particles were tested for the Ca leaching rate in deionized water at a constant 7.5 pH in an argon atmosphere and for carbonate conversion with CO2 bubbled through an aqueous suspension. Conversion data (fraction of Ca leached or converted to carbonate) were evaluated to determine the rate-limiting step based on the shrinking core model. For Ca leaching, the chemical reaction is the controlling mechanism during the initial period of time, which then switches to diffusion through the developed porous layer as the rate-limiting step. Carbonate conversion proceeded much slower than leaching conversion and was found to be limited by diffusion through the product calcium carbonate layer. The calculated value of diffusivity was found to be 5 × 10-9 cm2/s, which decreased by an order of magnitude with increasing carbonization conversion as a result of changing density of the product layer. The experimental data fit the shrinking core model well after correction for the particle specific surface area.

  2. 40 CFR 86.316-79 - Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide... Test Procedures § 86.316-79 Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications. (a) Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide measurements are to be made with nondispersive infrared (NDIR) an analyzers....

  3. 40 CFR 86.316-79 - Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide... Test Procedures § 86.316-79 Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications. (a) Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide measurements are to be made with nondispersive infrared (NDIR) an analyzers....

  4. 40 CFR 86.316-79 - Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide... Test Procedures § 86.316-79 Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications. (a) Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide measurements are to be made with nondispersive infrared (NDIR) an analyzers....

  5. 40 CFR 86.316-79 - Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide... Test Procedures § 86.316-79 Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide analyzer specifications. (a) Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide measurements are to be made with nondispersive infrared (NDIR) an analyzers....

  6. Hidden carbon dioxide on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, M. R.

    1985-12-01

    A recent proposal that much of the outgassed CO2 on Mars is tied up in the planet's crust in the form of carbonate mineral is discussed. According to this hypothesis, carbonate formation on Mars continued after open bodies of liquid water became unstable. A consequence of the hypothesis is that, in the absence of a recycling mechanism for CO2, the surface pressure on Mars will monotonically decrease until it reaches the minimum atmospheric overburden pressure required for liquid water to form. The theory explains Mars' low surface pressure, and also implies that the climate of Mars has evolved linearly over geologic time, rather than cyclically.

  7. Hidden carbon dioxide on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    A recent proposal that much of the outgassed CO2 on Mars is tied up in the planet's crust in the form of carbonate mineral is discussed. According to this hypothesis, carbonate formation on Mars continued after open bodies of liquid water became unstable. A consequence of the hypothesis is that, in the absence of a recycling mechanism for CO2, the surface pressure on Mars will monotonically decrease until it reaches the minimum atmospheric overburden pressure required for liquid water to form. The theory explains Mars' low surface pressure, and also implies that the climate of Mars has evolved linearly over geologic time, rather than cyclically.

  8. Water-wetting surfaces as hydrate promoters during transport of carbon dioxide with impurities.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Jensen, Bjørnar; Kvamme, Bjørn; Sjøblom, Sara

    2015-05-21

    Water condensing as liquid drops within the fluid bulk has traditionally been the only scenario accepted in the industrial analysis of hydrate risks. We have applied a combination of absolute thermodynamics and molecular dynamics modeling to analyze the five primary routes of hydrate formation in a rusty pipeline carrying dense carbon dioxide with methane, hydrogen sulfide, argon, and nitrogen as additional impurities. We have revised the risk analysis of all possible routes in accordance with the combination of the first and the second laws of thermodynamics to determine the highest permissible content of water. It was found that at concentrations lower than five percent, hydrogen sulfide will only support the formation of carbon dioxide-dominated hydrate from adsorbed water and hydrate formers from carbon dioxide phase rather than formation in the aqueous phase. Our results indicate that hydrogen sulfide leaving carbon dioxide for the aqueous phase will be able to create an additional hydrate phase in the aqueous region adjacent to the first adsorbed water layer. The growth of hydrate from different phases will decrease the induction time by substantially reducing the kinetically limiting mass transport across the hydrate films. Hydrate formation via adsorption of water on rusty walls will play the decisive role in hydrate formation risk, with the initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide being the critical factor. We concluded that the safest way to eliminate hydrate risks is to ensure that the water content of carbon dioxide is low enough to prevent water dropout via the adsorption mechanism. PMID:25903085

  9. Asymmetric catalytic transformations in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Shaoguang; Tumas, W.; Gross, M.F.; Burk, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Supercritical carbon dioxide can be a useful environmentally benign solvent for a wide range of catalytic reactions. We have been exploring the utility of supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction medium for catalytic asymmetric transformations. We will present results on the asymmetric hydrogenation of prochiral olefins, ketones, and unsaturated acids by Rh and Ru catalysts containing chiral phosphine ligands using hydrogen or hydrogen transfer agents. We have found that asymmetric catalytic hydrogenation reactions of enamide esters work as well or better in CO{sub 2} than in conventional solvents. We have been able to effect high conversions and ee`s using hydrogen transfer systems such as HCOOH/NEt{sub 3}, We will discuss temperature, pressure and solvent density effects on selectivity and reactivity. Kinetic studies will also be presented in order to understand the enhanced enantioselectivity that we observed in SC CO{sub 2}.

  10. Climate impact of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J; Johnson, D; Lacis, A; Lebedeff, S; Lee, P; Rind, D; Russell, G

    1981-08-28

    The global temperature rose by 0.2 degrees C between the middle 1960's and 1980, yielding a warming of 0.4 degrees C in the past century. This temperature increase is consistent with the calculated greenhouse effect due to measured increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Variations of volcanic aerosols and possibly solar luminosity appear to be primary causes of observed fluctuations about the mean trend of increasing temperature. It is shown that the anthropogenic carbon dioxide warming should emerge from the noise level of natural climate variability by the end of the century, and there is a high probability of warming in the 1980's. Potential effects on climate in the 21st century include the creation of drought-prone regions in North America and central Asia as part of a shifting of climatic zones, erosion of the West Antarctic ice sheet with a consequent worldwide rise in sea level, and opening of the fabled Northwest Passage. PMID:17789014