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Sample records for aqueous foam flow

  1. Rheology of aqueous foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollet, Benjamin; Raufaste, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Aqueous foams are suspensions of bubbles inside aqueous phases. Their multiphasic composition leads to a complex rheological behavior that is useful in numerous applications, from oil recovery to food/cosmetic processing. Their structure is very similar to the one of emulsions, so that both materials share common mechanical properties. In particular, the presence of surfactants at the gas-liquid interfaces leads to peculiar interfacial and dissipative properties. Foam rheology has been an active research topics and is already reported in several reviews, most of them covering rheometry measurements at the scale of the foam, coupled with interpretations at the local scale of bubbles or interfaces. In this review, we start following this approach, then we try to cover the multiscale features of aqueous foam flows, emphasizing regimes where intermediate length scales need to be taken into account or regimes fast enough regarding internal time scales so that the flow goes beyond the quasi-static limit. xml:lang="fr"

  2. Liquid oil that flows in spaces of aqueous foam without defoaming.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Junko; Sakai, Takaya; Inomata, Yukio

    2014-08-01

    A very interesting phenomenon has been observed in which foam formed from an aqueous fatty acid potassium salt solution spontaneously absorbs liquid oil immediately upon contact without defoaming. Although this phenomenon initially appeared to be based on capillary action, it was clarified that the liquid oil that flows in foam film did not wet the air/water interface. In this study, it is discussed why aqueous foam can spontaneously soak up liquid oil without defoaming using equilibrium surface tension, dynamic oil/water interfacial tension, and image analysis techniques. The penetration of oil was attributed both to the dynamic decrease in the surface tension at the oil/water interface and to Laplace pressure, depending on the curvature of the plateau border. Therefore, the foam does not absorb the oil, but the oil spontaneously penetrates the foam. This interesting behavior can be expected to be applied to aqueous detergents for liquid oil removal. PMID:25019527

  3. Responsive aqueous foams.

    PubMed

    Fameau, Anne-Laure; Carl, Adrian; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; von Klitzing, Regine

    2015-01-12

    Remarkable properties have emerged recently for aqueous foams, including ultrastability and responsiveness. Responsive aqueous foams refer to foams for which the stability can be switched between stable and unstable states with a change in environment or with external stimuli. Responsive foams have been obtained from various foam stabilizers, such as surfactants, proteins, polymers, and particles, and with various stimuli. Different strategies have been developed to design this type of soft material. We briefly review the two main approaches used to obtain responsive foams. The first approach is based on the responsiveness of the interfacial layer surrounding the gas bubbles, which leads to responsive foams. The second approach is based on modifications that occur in the aqueous phase inside the foam liquid channels to tune the foam stability. We will highlight the most sophisticated approaches, which use light, temperature, and magnetic fields and lead to switchable foam stability. PMID:25384466

  4. Flow of an aqueous foam through a two-dimensional porous medium: a pore scale investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; Jones, S. A.; Dollet, B.; Cox, S.; Cantat, I.

    2012-12-01

    Flowing foams are used in many engineering and technical applications. A well-known application is oil recovery. Another one is the remediation of polluted soil: the foam is injected into the ground in order to mobilize chemical species present in the medium. Apart from potential interesting physico-chemical and biochemical properties, foams have peculiar flow properties that might be of benefit to the application. We address here this physical aspect of the topic. As a precursor to the study of foam flow through a complex porous material, we first study the behavior of an aqueous two-dimensional foam flowing through a medium consisting of two parallel channels with different widths, at fixed medium porosity, that is, at fixed total combined width of the two channels. The flow velocity, and hence flux, in each channel is measured by analyzing images of the flowing foam. It is then compared to a theoretical model, the basic assumption of which is that the pressure drop along a channel is identical for both channels. This pressure drop both consists of (i) a dynamic pressure drop, which is controlled by bubble-wall friction and depends on the foam velocity in the channel, and (ii) a capillary pressure drop over the bubble films that emerge at the channel outlet, the latter pressure drop being controlled by the radius of curvature of the bubble film. Based on this assumption, the dependence of the ratio of the foam velocities in the two channels is inferred as a function of the channel width ratio. It compares well to the measurements and shows that the flow behavior is highly dependent on the foam structure within the narrowest of the two channels, especially when a "bamboo" structure is obtained. Consequently, the flux in a channel is found to have a more complicated relation to the channel width than expected for the flow of a standard Newtonian fluid in the same geometry. We provide a comparison to this reference configuration. We then study the flow of the same

  5. The Melting of Aqueous Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durian, Douglas J.; Gopal, Anthony D.; Vera, Moin U.; Langer, Stephen A.

    1996-01-01

    Diffusing-wave spectroscopy measurements show that ordinarily solid aqueous foams flow by a series of stick-slip avalanche-like rearrangements of neighboring bubbles from one tight packing configuration to another. Contrary to a recent prediction, the distribution of avalanche sizes do not obey a power-law distribution characteristic of self-organized criticality. This can be understood from a simple model of foam mechanics based on bubble-bubble interactions.

  6. An experimental investigation of the hydrodynamic and heat-transfer behavior of aqueous foam in laminar tube flow

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, B.F.; Sobolik, K.B.

    1987-12-01

    The structure of both static and dynamic aqueous foam samples has been observed photographically. Velocity profiles for a pipe-flow configuration were measured using a hot-film anemometer and an indirect calibration method. Temperature profiles at the end of a 3-m-long test section were measured using a thermocouple probe on a traversing mechanism. A finite-control-volume model of the energy equation for the flowing foam and the surrounding pipe was developed and compared with experimental results.

  7. An experimental investigation of pressure drop of aqueous foam in laminar tube flow

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, B.F.; Sobolik, K.B.

    1987-04-01

    This report is the first of two detailing pressure-drop and heat-transfer measurements made at the Foam Flow Heat Transfer Loop. The work was motivated by a desire to extend the application of aqueous foam from petroleum drilling to geothermal drilling. Pressure-drop measurements are detailed in this report; a forthcoming report (SAND85-1922) will describe the heat-transfer measurements. The pressure change across a 2.4-m (8-ft) length of the 2.588-cm (1.019-in.) ID test section was measured for liquid volume fractions between 0.05 and 0.35 and average velocities between 0.12 and 0.80 m/s (0.4 and 2.6 ft/s). The resulting pressure-drop/flow-rate data were correlated to a theoretical model for a Bingham plastic. Simple expressions for the dynamic viscosity and the yield stress as a function of liquid volume fraction were estimated.

  8. The flow of an aqueous foam through a two-dimensional porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollet, B.; Jones, S. A.; Géraud, B.; Meheust, Y.; Cox, S. J.; Cantat, I.

    2013-12-01

    Flowing foams are used in many engineering and technical applications. A well-known application is oil recovery. Another one is the remediation of polluted soils: the foam is injected into the ground in order to mobilize chemical species present in the medium. Apart from potential interesting physico-chemical and biochemical properties, foams have peculiar flow properties that applications might benefit of. In particular, viscous dissipation arises mostly from the contact zones between the soap films and the walls, which results in peculiar friction laws allowing the foam to invade narrow pores more efficiently than Newtonian fluids would. We investigate the flow of a two-dimensional foam in three geometrical configurations. The flow velocity field and pressure field can both be reconstructed from the kinematics of the foam bubbles. We first consider a medium consisting of two parallel channels with different widths, at fixed medium porosity, that is, at fixed total combined width of the two channels. The flow behavior is highly dependent on the foam structure within the narrowest of the two channels [1]; consequently, the flux ratio between the two channels exhibits a non-monotonic dependence on the ratio of their widths. We then consider two parallel channels that are respectively convergent and divergent. The resulting flow kinematics imposes asymmetric bubble deformations in the two channels; these deformations strongly impact the foam/wall friction, and consequently the flux distribution between the two channels, causing flow irreversibility. We quantitatively predict the flux ratio as a function of the channel widths by modeling pressure drops of both viscous and capillary origins. This study reveals the crucial importance of boundary-induced bubble deformation on the mobility of a flowing foam. We then study how film-wall friction, capillary pressures and bubble deformation impact the flow of a foam in a two-dimensional porous medium consisting of randomly

  9. Absorption Optics of Aqueous Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini; Gittings, Alex; Durian, D. J.

    2002-11-01

    Aqueous foams are composed of gas bubbles packed together in a small volume of soapy water. The large number of gas-liquid interfaces in foams results in very strong scattering of light, which explains the opaque nature of conventional aqueous foams such as shaving foams and mousse. For dry foams, the interfaces can take the following three forms: the soap films where two bubbles meet, the triangular plateau borders where three soap films meet and the vertices where four plateau borders meet. Previous experiments have shown that most of the scattering occurs from the plateau borders 2,3 and the transport mean free path of light (l*), the bubble radius (R) and the liquid fraction of foam (epsilon) is related through the relation l*=R/(epsilon0.5). To understand the reflection and scattering of light at the gas-bubble interfaces, we study the absorption of photons in the liquid network as a function of the foam absorptivity. We do this to confirm if the time spent by the photons in the liquid phase is proportional to the liquid fraction of the foam. Our results indicate that for a specific range of liquid fractions (0.05 is less than e is less than 0.1), the photons seem to get trapped in the liquid network. This result is independent of the absorptivity of the foam and leads us to conclude that under appropriate conditions, an aqueous foam behaves very much like an optical fiber network. Aqueous foam is generated in the lab by the method of turbulent mixing of N2 gas with a jet of alpha-olefin-sulfonate (AOS) solution. The foam has been made absorbing by dissolving small quantities of rhodamine dye (R = 0.005 g/l, R = 0.01 g/l and R = 0.0124 g/l) in the AOS solution. The transmission of photons through the foams of liquid fractions 0.0297 is less than e is less than 0.35 has been studied using Diffuse Transmission Spectroscopy (DTS). For each liquid fraction, the transport mean free path l* (the length over which the photon travels before it gets completely

  10. Dynamics of Aqueous Foam Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akhatov, Iskander; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Holt, R. Glynn

    2001-01-01

    We develop a model for the nonlinear oscillations of spherical drops composed of aqueous foam. Beginning with a simple mixture law, and utilizing a mass-conserving bubble-in-cell scheme, we obtain a Rayleigh-Plesset-like equation for the dynamics of bubbles in a foam mixture. The dispersion relation for sound waves in a bubbly liquid is then coupled with a normal modes expansion to derive expressions for the frequencies of eigenmodal oscillations. These eigenmodal (breathing plus higher-order shape modes) frequencies are elicited as a function of the void fraction of the foam. A Mathieu-like equation is obtained for the dynamics of the higher-order shape modes and their parametric coupling to the breathing mode. The proposed model is used to explain recently obtained experimental data.

  11. Micromodel foam flow study

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, K.T.; Radke, C.J.

    1990-10-01

    Foams are often utilized as part of enhanced oil recovery techniques. This report presents the results of a micromodel foam flow study. Micromodels are valuable tools in uncovering capillary phenomena responsible for lamellae generation and coalescence during foam flow in porous media. Among the mechanisms observed are snap-off, weeping-flow breakup, and lamella division and leave behind. Coalescence mechanisms include dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage and gas diffusion. These phenomena are sensitive to the mode of injection, the local capillary environment, and the geometry of the pore structure. An important consideration in presenting a tractable model of foam flow behavior is the ability to identify the pore-level mechanisms having the greatest impact on foam texture. The predominant mechanisms will vary depending upon the application for foam as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) fluid. Both simultaneous gas and surfactant injection and surfactant alternating with gas injection (SAG) have been used to create foam for mobility control in EOR projects. The model developed is based on simultaneous gas and surfactant injection during steady-state conditions into a Berea sandstone core. The lamellae generation and coalescence mechanisms included in this model are snap-off, lamella division, and dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage. This simplified steady-state model serves as a foundation for developing more complete rate expressions and for extending the population balance to handle transient foam flow behavior. 70 refs., 30 figs.

  12. Aqueous foam toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Aqueous foams are aggregates of bubbles mechanically generated by passing air or other gases through a net, screen, or other porous medium that is wetted by an aqueous solution of surface-active foaming agents (surfactants). Aqueous foams are important in modem fire-fighting technology, as well as for military uses for area denial and riot or crowd control. An aqueous foam is currently being developed and evaluated by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a Less-Than-Lethal Weapon for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of the aqueous foam developed for the NIJ and to determine whether there are any significant adverse health effects associated with completely immersing individuals without protective equipment in the foam. The toxicity of the aqueous foam formulation developed for NIJ is determined by evaluating the toxicity of the individual components of the foam. The foam is made from a 2--5% solution of Steol CA-330 surfactant in water generated at expansion ratios ranging from 500:1 to 1000:1. SteoI CA-330 is a 35% ammonium laureth sulfate in water and is produced by Stepan Chemical Company and containing trace amounts (<0.1%) of 1,4-dioxane. The results of this study indicate that Steol CA-330 is a non-toxic, mildly irritating, surfactant that is used extensively in the cosmetics industry for hair care and bath products. Inhalation or dermal exposure to this material in aqueous foam is not expected to produce significant irritation or systemic toxicity to exposed individuals, even after prolonged exposure. The amount of 1,4-dioxane in the surfactant, and subsequently in the foam, is negligible and therefore, the toxicity associated with dioxane exposure is not significant. In general, immersion in similar aqueous foams has not resulted in acute, immediately life-threatening effects, or chronic, long-term, non-reversible effects following exposure.

  13. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  14. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  15. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  16. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  17. 46 CFR 108.474 - Aqueous film forming foam systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aqueous film forming foam systems. 108.474 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.474 Aqueous film forming foam systems. Aqueous film forming foam systems may be installed if approved by the Commandant....

  18. Blast mitigation capabilities of aqueous foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, William Franklin; Larsen, Marvin Elwood; Boughton, Bruce A.

    2006-02-01

    A series of tests involving detonation of high explosive blanketed by aqueous foam (conducted from 1982 to 1984) are described in primarily terms of recorded peak pressure, positive phase specific impulse, and time of arrival. The investigation showed that optimal blast mitigation occurs for foams with an expansion ratio of about 60:1. Simple analyses representing the foam as a shocked single phase mixture are presented and shown inadequate. The experimental data demonstrate that foam slows down and broadens the propagated pressure disturbance relative to a shock in air. Shaped charges and flyer plates were evaluated for operation in foam and appreciable degradation was observed for the flyer plates due to drag created by the foam.

  19. Novel aqueous foams for suppressing VOC emission.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Pankaj S; Mohanty, Kishore K

    2004-05-01

    Reducing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from crude oil/gasoline distribution and storage facilities is important in controlling environmental pollution and enhancing workplace safety. Stable aqueous foam formulations are developed to provide a mass transfer barrier to the emission of VOCs during loading of gasoline. Experiments are carried out in a bench-scale foam cell using liquid hexane as oil. The foam columns of 32 cm in height were able to suppress the plateau concentration of hexane vapors in the effluent by 87% under experimental conditions tested. Vapor suppression increased with foam height but was almost insensitive to liquid viscosity. These experiments are then upscaled from bench-scale to a vessel having an exposed surface area of roughly 2 orders of magnitude higher. Gasoline is used as oil in the upscaled experiments, and the concentrations of volatile hydrocarbons in the effluent are measured during oil loading. A 40-cm-thick foam column is found to reduce the emissions by 96% for foams prepared with deionized water and by 93.8% for foams prepared with 3.5 wt % NaCl brine for 10 h of oil loading. PMID:15180071

  20. Shear-induced Melting of an Aqueous Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, A. D.; Durian, D. J.

    1998-03-01

    Aqueous foam is a densely packed collection of gas bubbles in a liquid medium. For a foam to deform and flow, its bubbles must hop from one solid-like packing to another. Previous work on slowly sheared foams established that these bubble rearrangements are random, localized, and intermittent, even though the macroscopic shear profile appears affine.(A. D. Gopal and D. J. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2610 (1995).) Because a given rearrangement lasts for a finite time, an applied shear rate that is fast compared to this event duration should cause the intermittent hops to blend into continuous flow throughout the sample; i.e. the foam should melt. The nature of such bubble motion during shear can be probed by diffusing wave spectroscopy. With increasing shear rate, we observe a melting transition both in the microscopic DWS measurements and in novel macroscopic measurements of transient-stress relaxation. We discuss this shear-induced melting and the connections it reveals between bubble- and bulk-scale dynamics in aqueous foams.

  1. Capillary rise of oil in an aqueous foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piroird, Keyvan; Lorenceau, Élise

    2012-11-01

    Oil is usually known as an anti-foaming agent. Yet, it has been shown that oil droplets present in the foaming solution can have the opposite effect and stabilize a foam when unable to cross the air/water interface. In these previous studies, oil is first emulsified and then mixed with air to generate a foam. In this work, we report experiments where an aqueous foam is put in direct contact with a large oil drop. With the appropriate choice of oil and surfactants, oil spontaneously invades the liquid network of the foam without damaging it. We study the dynamics of penetration at the scale of a single Plateau border, that acts as a ``liquid capillary tube'' in which oil flows in an unbroken stream. At the end of the experiment, a long and stable cylinder of oil is formed in the Plateau border. This cylinder breaks up into droplets when, following a rearrangement, oil is transferred from the Plateau border to a soap film.

  2. Evaluation of aqueous-foam surfactants for geothermal drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, P.B.; Montoya, O.J.

    1983-07-01

    Aqueous foams are potentially useful drilling and cleanout fluids for geothermal applications. Successful use of foams requires surfactants (foaming agents) that can survive in the high-temperature geothermal environment. In this study, solutions of aqueous-foam-forming surfactants have been exposed to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) and 310/sup 0/C (590/sup 0/F) in various chemical environments to determine if they can survive and make foams after exposure. Comparison of foams before and after exposure and the change in solution pH were used to evaluate their performance. Controlled liquid-volume-fraction foams, made in a packed-bed foam generator, were used for all tests. These tests have shown that many commercially available surfactants can survive short high-temperature cycles in mild acids, mild bases, and salt solutions as evidenced by their ability to make foams after exposure to high temperatures.

  3. Analysis of shock-wave propagation in aqueous foams using shock tube experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, G.; Mariani, C.; Houas, L.; Chinnayya, A.; Hadjadj, A.; Del Prete, E.; Haas, J.-F.; Rambert, N.; Counilh, D.; Faure, S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports experimental results of planar shock waves interacting with aqueous foams in a horizontal conventional shock tube. Four incident shock wave Mach numbers are considered, ranging from 1.07 to 1.8, with two different foam columns of one meter thickness and expansion ratios of 30 and 80. High-speed flow visualizations are used along with pressure measurements to analyse the main physical mechanisms that govern shock wave mitigation in foams. During the shock/foam interaction, a precursor leading pressure jump was identified as the trace of the liquid film destruction stage in the foam fragmentation process. The corresponding pressure threshold is found to be invariant for a given foam. Regarding the mitigation effect, the results show that the speed of the shock is drastically reduced and that wetter is the foam, slower are the transmitted waves. The presence of the foam barrier attenuates the induced pressure impulse behind the transmitted shock, while the driest foam appears to be more effective, as it limits the pressure induced by the reflected shock off the foam front. Finally, it was found that the pressure histories in the two-phase gas-liquid mixture are different from those previously obtained within a cloud of droplets. The observed behavior is attributed to the process of foam fragmentation and to the modification of the flow topology past the shock. These physical phenomena occurring during the shock/foam interaction should be properly accounted for when elaborating new physical models.

  4. Aqueous foam surfactants for geothermal drilling fluids: 1. Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    Aqueous foam is a promising drilling fluid for geothermal wells because it will minimize damage to the producing formation and would eliminate the erosion problems of air drilling. Successful use of aqueous foam will require a high foaming surfactant which will: (1) be chemically stable in the harsh thermal and chemical environment, and (2) form stable foams at high temperatures and pressures. The procedures developed to generate and test aqueous foams and the effects of a 260/sup 0/C temperature cycle on aqueous surfactant solutions are presented. More than fifty selected surfactants were evaluated with representatives from the amphoteric, anionic, cationic, and nonionic classes included. Most surfactants were severely degraded by this temperature cycle; however, some showed excellent retention of their properties. The most promising surfactant types were the alkyl and alkyl aryl sulfonates and the ethoxylated nonionics.

  5. Couette flow of two-dimensional foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katgert, G.; Tighe, B. P.; Möbius, M. E.; van Hecke, M.

    2010-06-01

    We experimentally investigate flow of quasi-two-dimensional disordered foams in Couette geometries, both for foams squeezed below a top plate and for freely floating foams (bubble rafts). With the top plate, the flows are strongly localized and rate dependent. For the bubble rafts the flow profiles become essentially rate independent, the local and global rheology do not match, and in particular the foam flows in regions where the stress is below the global yield stress. We attribute this to nonlocal effects and show that the "fluidity" model recently introduced by Goyon et al. (Nature, 454 (2008) 84) captures the essential features of flow both with and without a top plate.

  6. Microgravity studies of aqueous wet foams.

    PubMed

    Langevin, D; Vignes-Adler, M

    2014-03-01

    Foams and foaming pose important questions and problems for both fundamental research and practical applications. Despite the fact that foams have been extensively studied, many aspects of foam physics and chemistry still remain unclear. Experiments on foams performed under microgravity can be extended far beyond their counterpart where gravity is fully present (i.e. most experiments on Earth). They allow, in particular, observation of the wet foams obtained during the foaming process; on Earth, foams at this stage evolve too quickly due to gravity drainage and cannot be studied. This paper reviews the existing studies of foams under microgravity, which include studies in parabolic flights, in sounding rockets and in the International Space Station. PMID:24652241

  7. Fluid Physics of Foam Evolution and Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aref, H.; Thoroddsen, S. T.; Sullivan, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    The grant supported theoretical, numerical and experimental work focused on the elucidation of the fluid physics of foam structure, evolution and flow. The experimental work concentrated on these subject areas: (a) Measurements of the speed of reconnections within a foam; (b) statistics of bubble rearrangements; and (c) three-dimensional reconstruction of the foam structure. On the numerical simulation and theory side our efforts concentrated on the subjects: (a) simulation techniques for 2D and 3D foams; (b) phase transition in a compressible foam; and (c) TCP structures.

  8. Aspiration tests in aqueous foam using a breathing simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-12-01

    Non-toxic aqueous foams are being developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) for use in crowd control, cell extractions, and group disturbances in the criminal justice prison systems. The potential for aspiration of aqueous foam during its use and the resulting adverse effects associated with complete immersion in aqueous foam is of major concern to the NIJ when examining the effectiveness and safety of using this technology as a Less-Than-Lethal weapon. This preliminary study was designed to evaluate the maximum quantity of foam that might be aspirated by an individual following total immersion in an SNL-developed aqueous foam. A.T.W. Reed Breathing simulator equipped with a 622 Silverman cam was used to simulate the aspiration of an ammonium laureth sulfate aqueous foam developed by SNL and generated at expansion ratios in the range of 500:1 to 1000:1. Although the natural instinct of an individual immersed in foam is to cover their nose and mouth with a hand or cloth, thus breaking the bubbles and decreasing the potential for aspiration, this study was performed to examine a worst case scenario where mouth breathing only was examined, and no attempt was made to block foam entry into the breathing port. Two breathing rates were examined: one that simulated a sedentary individual with a mean breathing rate of 6.27 breaths/minute, and one that simulated an agitated or heavily breathing individual with a mean breathing rate of 23.7 breaths/minute. The results of this study indicate that, if breathing in aqueous foam without movement, an air pocket forms around the nose and mouth within one minute of immersion.

  9. Materials Applications for Non-Lethal: Aqueous Foams

    SciTech Connect

    GOOLSBY,TOMMY D.; SCOTT,STEVEN H.

    1999-09-15

    High expansion aqueous foam is an aggregation of bubbles that has the appearance of soap suds and is used to isolate individuals both visually and acoustically. It was developed in the 1920's in England to fight coal mine fires and has been widely used since for fire fighting and dust suppression. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 1970's for nuclear safeguards and security applications. In the mid-1990s, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of high expansion aqueous foam for correctional applications. NIJ funded the project as part of its search for new and better less-than-lethal weapons for responding to violent and dangerous individuals, where other means of force could lead to serious injuries. The phase one objectives of the project were to select a low-to-no toxicity foam concentrate (foaming agent) with physical characteristics suited for use in a single cell or large prison disturbances, and to determine if the selected foam concentrate could serve as a carrier for Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) irritant. The phase two objectives were to conduct an extensive toxicology review of the selected foam concentrate and OC irritant, and to conduct respiration simulation experiments in the selected high expansion aqueous foam. The phase three objectives were to build a prototype individual cell aqueous foam system and to study the feasibility of aqueous foams for large prison facility disturbances. The phase four and five objectives were to use the prototype system to do large scale foam physical characteristics testing of the selected foam concentrate, and to have the prototype single cell system further evaluated by correctional representatives. Prison rather than street scenarios were evaluated as the first and most likely place for using the aqueous foam since prisons have recurrent incidents where officers and inmates might be

  10. Measurement of Aqueous Foam Rheology by Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, J. Gregory; Holt, R. Glynn; Rogers, Rich (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An experimental technique is demonstrated for acoustically levitating aqueous foam drops and exciting their spheroidal modes. This allows fundamental studies of foam-drop dynamics that provide an alternative means of estimating the viscoelastic properties of the foam. One unique advantage of the technique is the lack of interactions between the foam and container surfaces, which must be accounted for in other techniques. Results are presented in which a foam drop with gas volume fraction phi = 0.77 is levitated at 30 kHz and excited into its first quadrupole resonance at 63 +/- 3 Hz. By modeling the drop as an elastic sphere, the shear modulus of the foam was estimated at 75 +/- 3 Pa.

  11. Foam Flows in Analog Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; Géraud, B.; Jones, S. A.; Cantat, I.; Dollet, B.

    2015-12-01

    Foams have been used for decades as displacing fluids for EOR and aquifer remediation, and more recently as carriers of chemical amendments for the remediation of the vadose zone. Apart from various interesting physico-chemical and biochemical properties, foams are better injection fluids due to their low sensitivity to gravity and their peculiar rheology: for foams with bubbles on the order of at least the typical pore size, viscous dissipation arises mostly from the contact zones between the soap films and the walls. In most experimental studies no local information of the foam structure is possible, and only global quantities such as the effective viscosity can be measured. We investigate foam flow through a two-dimensional porous medium consisting of circular obstacles positioned randomly in a horizontal transparent Hele-Shaw cell. The local foam structure is recorded in situ, which provides a measure of the spatial distribution of bubble velocities and sizes at regular time intervals. The flow exhibits a rich phenomenology including preferential flow paths and local flow intermittency/non-stationarity despite the imposed permanent global flow rate. Moreover, the medium selects the bubble size distribution through lamella division-triggered bubble fragmentation. Varying the mean bubble size of the injected foam, its water content, and mean velocity, we characterize those processes systematically and show that the distributions of bubble sizes and velocities are to some extent correlated. We furthermore measure the evolution, along the flow direction, of the distribution of bubble sizes, and measure the efficiency of bubble fragmentation as a function of the control parameters. The bubble fragmentation can be modeled numerically and to some extent analytically, based on statistical measures inferred from the experimental data. This study sheds new light on the local rheology of foams in porous media and opens the way towards quantitative characterization of the

  12. Capillary imbibition of aqueous foams by miscible and nonmiscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensire, Rémy; Piroird, Keyvan; Lorenceau, Elise

    2015-11-01

    When put in contact with a large liquid drop, dry foams wick owing to surface-tension-driven flows until reaching equilibrium. This work is devoted to the dynamics of this imbibition process. We consider imbibition of both wetting or nonwetting liquid, by putting the dry foam into contact either with the foaming solution that constitutes the foam or with organic oils. Indeed, with the appropriate choice of surfactants, oil spontaneously invades the liquid network of the foam without damaging it. Our experiments show an early-time dynamics in t1 /2 followed by a late-time dynamics in t1 /4. These features, which differ from theoretical works predicting a t1 /3 dynamics, are rationalized considering the influence of the initial liquid fraction of the foam in the driving capillary force and the impact of gravity through the capillary-gravity equilibrium.

  13. Flowing Foam: T1 events and solid-liquid transitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennin, Michael

    2005-11-01

    Flowing aqueous foam is found in many applications ranging from oil recovery, to fire fighting, to spreading shaving cream. Aqueous foam consists of gas bubbles with liquid walls. One of the striking features of foam is that despite being composed entirely of fluids, its mechanical properties are either those of a solid (elastic response) or fluid (viscous flow), depending on the nature of the applied stress and strains. We study the transition between these two regimes using a model foam system: bubble rafts. Bubble rafts are a single layer of bubbles floating on the air-water surface. This allows us to track the motion of all the bubbles during flow. In this talk, we will present two main results. First, we will discuss the observation of the coexistence between a solid-like and fluid-like state during flow. Second, we will discuss the role played by nonlinear, topological rearrangements, known as T1 events, in determining the mechanical response of the system.

  14. Aqueous foams stabilized by temperature-sensitive hairy polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, S; Yusa, S; Nakamura, Y; Fujii, S

    2015-12-21

    Submicrometer-sized polystyrene (PS) particles carrying poly[2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDEA) hairs (PDEA-PS particles) were synthesized by free radical dispersion polymerization. The hydrophilicity-hydrophobicity balance of the PDEA could be tuned by varying the temperature at near neutral pH (a lower critical solution temperature of PDEA at pH 6.86, 41 °C) and therefore these sterically-stabilized particles acted as temperature-sensitive stabilizers for aqueous foams. At 25 °C, where the PDEA hairs were hydrated and PDEA-PS particles were colloidally stable in aqueous media, foams were formed which coalesced with time and the size of the bubble increased. At 40 and 45 °C, where the PDEA hairs were partially non-hydrated and PDEA-PS particles were close to flocculation or weakly flocculated, foams were formed and bubble coalescence and size increase speeds were slower than those observed at 25 °C. At and above 50 °C, where the PDEA hairs were non-hydrated and PDEA-PS particles were heavily flocculated in aqueous media, the more stable cream-like foams whose volume was almost the same for 1 week were formed. Scanning electron microscopy studies indicated that the particles mainly adsorbed at the air-water interface as monolayers at 25 °C and as multilayers at and above 40 °C. The foam stability and structure could be controlled by changing the temperature. PMID:26418034

  15. Quasi-steady model for predicting temperature of aqueous foams circulating in geothermal wellbores

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, B.F.; Ortega, A.

    1983-01-01

    A quasi-steady model has been developed for predicting the temperature profiles of aqueous foams circulating in geothermal wellbores. The model assumes steady one-dimensional incompressible flow in the wellbore; heat transfer by conduction from the geologic formation to the foam is one-dimensional radially and time-dependent. The vertical temperature distribution in the undisturbed geologic formation is assumed to be composed of two linear segments. For constant values of the convective heat-transfer coefficient, a closed-form analytical solution is obtained. It is demonstrated that the Prandtl number of aqueous foams is large (1000 to 5000); hence, a fully developed temperature profile may not exist for representative drilling applications. Existing convective heat-transfer-coefficient solutions are adapted to aqueous foams. The simplified quasi-steady model is successfully compared with a more-sophisticated finite-difference computer code. Sample temperature-profile calculations are presented for representative values of the primary parameters. For a 5000-ft wellbore with a bottom hole temperature of 375{sup 0}F, the maximum foam temperature can be as high as 300{sup 0}F.

  16. Aqueous Foam Stabilized by Tricationic Amphiphilic Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerschap, Seth; Marafino, John; McKenna, Kristin; Caran, Kevin; Feitosa, Klebert; Kevin Caran's Research Group Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The unique surface properties of amphiphilic molecules have made them widely used in applications where foaming, emulsifying or coating processes are needed. The development of novel architectures with multi-cephalic/tailed molecules have enhanced their anti-bacterial activity in connection with tail length and the nature of the head group. Here we report on the foamability of two triple head double, tail cationic surfactants (M-1,14,14, M-P, 14,14) and a triple head single tail cationic surfactant (M-1,1,14) and compare them with commercially available single headed, single tailed anionic and cationic surfactants (SDS,CTAB and DTAB). The results show that bubble rupture rate decrease with the length of the carbon chain irrespective of head structure. The growth rate of bubbles with short tailed surfactants (SDS) and longer, single tailed tricationic surfactants (M-1,1,14) was shown to be twice as high as those with longer tailed surfactants (CTAB, M-P,14,14, M-1,14,14). This fact was related to the size variation of bubbles, where the foams made with short tail surfactants exhibited higher polydispersivity than those with short tails. This suggests that foams with tricationic amphiphilics are closed linked to their tail length and generally insensitive to their head structure.

  17. Stabilized aqueous foam systems and concentrate and method for making them

    DOEpatents

    Rand, Peter B.

    1984-01-01

    This invention comprises a combination of a water soluble polymer of the polyacrylic acid type, a foam stabilizer of dodecyl alcohol, a surfactant, a solvent and water as a concentrate for use in producing stabilized aqueous foams. In another aspect, the invention comprises a solution of the concentrate with water. In still another aspect the invention includes a method of generating stabilized aqueous foams.

  18. Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery to Subsurface Using Shear Thinning Fluid and Aqueous Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Shen, Xin; Li, Xiqing

    2011-04-23

    A major issue with in situ subsurface remediation is the ability to achieve an even spatial distribution of remedial amendments to the contamination zones in an aquifer or vadose zone. Delivery of amendment to the aquifer using shear thinning fluid and to the vadose zone using aqueous foam has the potential to enhance the amendment distribution into desired locations and improve the remediation. 2-D saturated flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the enhanced sweeping, contaminant removal, and amendment persistence achieved by shear thinning fluid delivery. Bio-polymer xanthan gum solution was used as the shear thinning fluid. Unsaturated 1-D column and 2-D flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the mitigation of contaminant mobilization, amendment uniform distribution enhancement, and lateral delivery improvement by foam delivery. Surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate was used as the foaming agent. It was demonstrated that the shear thinning fluid injection enhanced the fluid sweeping over a heterogeneous system and increased the delivery of remedial amendment into low-permeability zones. The persistence of the amendment distributed into the low-perm zones by the shear thinning fluid was prolonged compared to that of amendment distributed by water injection. Foam delivery of amendment was shown to mitigate the mobilization of highly mobile contaminant from sediments under vadose zone conditions. Foam delivery also achieved more uniform amendment distribution in a heterogeneous unsaturated system, and demonstrated remarkable increasing in lateral distribution of the injected liquid compared to direct liquid injection.

  19. Bubble rearrangement dynamics and light transport in aqueous foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gittings, Alex St Clair

    The general scope of this work investigates two essential, yet surprisingly elusive, properties of aqueous foams. The first concerns how multiply scattered light is transported throughout the foam. The second concerns the dynamics of bubble rearrangement events for coarsening foams. The absorption of diffuse photons in aqueous foams is measured by adding a dye to the continuous liquid phase. For very wet and for dry foams, the absorption of the diffuse photons equals the absorption length of the liquid divided by the liquid volume fraction, indicating photons propagate by a random walk, sampling each phase in proportion to its volume. Foams of intermediate wetness, by contrast, absorb photons more strongly than expected, indicating photons have a higher probability for being transported in the network. This suggests novel transport effects such as photons that enter a border in a state that only allows internal reflection for the border length. We further investigate light transport in foams by considering a two-dimensional model foam with scattering described by geometric optics and the Fresnel equations. Here we develop theoretical results for bulk transport quantities, such as the scattering length, in terms of the basic microscopic structural elements of the foam. Results are compared with a computer simulation. Essential to this work is determining key quantities, such as the scattering length, for each phase separately. The transport quantity for the foam is then constructed from the phase dependant parts using probability weights. The probability weights represent the probability that a diffuse photon scatters at network and disperse incidence, and are determined simply in terms of the index of refraction for the liquid and gas. Study of bubble rearrangement dynamics for coarsening foams proceeds in two steps. First, simultaneous measurement of second and three-time temporal intensity correlations are performed to test the validity of Diffusing

  20. Point-source imbibition into dry aqueous foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensire, Rémy; Ault, Jesse T.; Lorenceau, Elise; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-02-01

    We use experiments, modeling and numerics to study the imbibition dynamics from a point source into a homogeneous dry aqueous foam. A distinctive feature of foams compared to solid porous material is that imbibition occurs in the liquid microchannels of the foam called Plateau borders, which have a volume varying in space and time. Dynamics is driven by the capillary pressure and resisted by the viscous and gravity forces in the liquid microchannels. Assuming a constant pressure in the imbibing liquid reservoir, we show that the imbibition front advances and flattens out in time due to gravity, the effect of which is quantified by introducing the Bond number B, which compares the gravitational effects to the capillary pressure using the mean bubble radius as the characteristic length. This evolution describes both miscible and immiscible imbibing liquids. For the latter, we introduce the idea of an effective interfacial tension γ\\textit{eff} to take the oil-water interfacial energy into account. The details of the imbibition process are confirmed by experiments and numerics using foams with tangentially immobile interfaces in the channel-dominated model.

  1. The flow of a foam in a two-dimensional porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Géraud, Baudouin; Jones, Siân. A.; Cantat, Isabelle; Dollet, Benjamin; Méheust, Yves

    2016-02-01

    Foams have been used for decades as displacing fluids for enhanced oil recovery and aquifer remediation, and more recently, for remediation of the vadose zone, in which case foams carry chemical amendments. Foams are better injection fluids than aqueous solutions due to their low sensitivity to gravity and because they are less sensitive to permeability heterogeneities, thus allowing a more uniform sweep. The latter aspect results from their peculiar rheology, whose understanding motivates the present study. We investigate foam flow through a two-dimensional porous medium consisting of circular obstacles positioned randomly in a horizontal transparent Hele-Shaw cell. The local foam structure is recorded in situ, which provides a measure of the spatial distribution of bubble velocities and sizes at regular time intervals. The flow exhibits a rich phenomenology including preferential flow paths and local flow nonstationarity (intermittency) despite the imposed permanent global flow rate. Moreover, the medium selects the bubble size distribution through lamella division-triggered bubble fragmentation. Varying the mean bubble size of the injected foam, its water content, and mean velocity, we characterize those processes systematically. In particular, we measure the spatial evolution of the distribution of bubble areas, and infer the efficiency of bubble fragmentation depending on the various control parameters. We furthermore show that the distributions of bubble sizes and velocities are correlated. This study sheds new light on the local rheology of foams in porous media and opens the way toward quantitative characterization of the relationship between medium geometry and foam flow properties. It also suggests that large-scale models of foam flows in the subsurface should account for the correlation between bubble sizes and velocities.

  2. Electrocatalytic hydrodechlorination of 4-chlorobiphenyl in aqueous solution using palladized nickel foam cathode.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Yu, Gang; Shuai, Danmeng

    2007-04-01

    The electrocatalytic hydrodechlorination of 4-chlorobiphenyl on palladized nickel foam with high porous structure in an aqueous solution containing MeOH, bromide of hexadecyltrimethylammonium (CTAB), sodium acetate, and acetic acid were investigated in a membrane-separated flow-through cell. The Pd/Ni foam electrode was prepared by electroless deposition method, on which the Pd particles dispersed finely over Ni foam surface indicated by SEM-EDX analysis. The effects of current density, organic cosolvent, initial concentration, temperature, and flow rate on the hydrodechlorination of 4-chlorobiphenyl were examined. Methanol was among the best cosolvents and was used in preferential concentration of 50 vol%. Moderate current density (e.g., 2.23 mA cm(-2)), relatively high initial concentration, temperature, and flow rate were beneficial to improve the hydrodechlorination of 4-chlorobiphenyl. The current efficiencies for the conversion of 1mM 4-MCB decreased with increasing current density and range from 37.2% at 0.74 mA cm(-2) to 14.1% at 5.21 mA cm(-2) after 20 min electrolysis cut. Under the optimized conditions, 1mM of 4-MCB could be removed rapidly with the rate of 94.6% after 2h electrolysis, which gave current efficiencies and energy consumptions in range of 8.1-24.6% and 1.7-5.2 kW h kg(-1), respectively. PMID:17141295

  3. Patterns, Instabilities, Colors, and Flows in Vertical Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilixiati, Subinuer; Wojcik, Ewelina; Zhang, Yiran; Pearsall, Collin; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Foams find use in many applications in daily life, industry and biology. Examples include beverages, firefighting foam, cosmetics, foams for oil recovery and foams formed by pollutants. Foams are collection of bubbles separated by thin liquid films that are stabilized against drainage by the presence of surfactant molecules. Drainage kinetics and stability of the foam are strongly influenced by surfactant type, addition of particles, proteins and polymers. In this study, we utilize the thin film interference colors as markers for identifying patterns, instabilities and flows within vertical foam films. We experimentally study the emergence of thickness fluctuations near the borders and within thinning films, and study how buoyancy, capillarity and gravity driven instabilities and flows, are affected by variation in bulk and interfacial physicochemical properties dependent on the choice of constituents.

  4. Transient foam flow in porous media with CAT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dianbin; Brigham, W.E.

    1992-03-01

    Transient behavior is likely to dominate over most of the duration of a foam injection field project. Due to the lack of date, little is presently known about transient foam flow behavior. Foam flow does not follow established models such as the Buckley-Leverett theory, and no general predictive model has been derived. Therefore, both experimental data and a foam flow theory are needed. In this work, foam was injected at a constant mass rate into one-dimensional sandpacks of 1-in diameter and 24-in or 48-in length that had initially been saturate with distilled water. The system was placed in a cat Scanner. Data, obtained at room temperature and low pressure at various times, include both the pressure and saturation distributions. Pressure profiles showed that the pressure gradient is much greater behind the foam front than ahead of it. Moreover, the pressure gradients keep changing as the foam advances in the sandpack. This behavior differs from Buckley-Leverett theory. The CT scan results demonstrated gas channeling near the front, but eventually the foam block all these channels and sweeps the entire cross section after many pore volumes of injection. Three series of experiments were run: (1) surfactant adsorption measurements; (2) gas displacements of surfactant-laden solutions and (3) foam displacements. The first two series of experiments were made to provide the necessary parameters required to match the foam displacements. To this end, it was necessary to smooth the saturation history data, using a Langmuir-type formula. A theory was proposed based on the principles of the fractional flow curve construction method. This foam theory treats the foam as composed of infinitesimal slugs of gas of varying viscosities. The foam front has the lowest viscosity and foam at the injection end has the highest.

  5. Sonochemical degradation of perfluorooctanesulfonate in aqueous film-forming foams.

    PubMed

    Vecitis, Chad D; Wang, Yajuan; Cheng, Jie; Park, Hyunwoong; Mader, Brian T; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous film-forming foams (AFFFs) are fire extinguishing agents developed by the Navy to quickly and effectively combat fires occurring close to explosive materials and are utilized today at car races, airports, oil refineries, and military locations. Fluorochemical (FC) surfactants represent 1-5% of the AFFF composition, which impart properties such as high spreadability, negligible fuel diffusion, and thermal stability to the foam. FC's are oxidatively recalcitrant, persistent in the environment, and have been detected in groundwater at AFFF training sites. Ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous FCs has been reported to degrade and subsequently mineralize the FC surfactants perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS). Here we present results of the sonochemical degradation of aqueous dilutions of FC-600, a mixture of hydrocarbon (HC) and fluorochemical components including cosolvents, anionic hydrocarbon surfactants, fluorinated amphiphilic surfactants, anionic fluorinated surfactants, and thickeners such as starch. The primary FC surfactant in FC-600, PFOS, was sonolytically degraded over a range of FC-600 aqueous dilutions, 65 ppb < [PFOS]i < 13100 ppb. Sonochemical PFOS-AFFF decomposition rates, RAFFF-PFOS, are similar to PFOS-Milli-Q rates, RMQ-PFOS, indicating that the AFFF matrix only had a minor effect on the sonochemical degradation rate, 0.5 < RAFFF-PFOS/RMQ-PFOS < 2.0, even though the total organic concentration was 50 times the PFOS concentration, [Org]tot/[PFOS] 50, consistent with the superior FC surfactant properties. Sonochemical sulfate production is quantitative, delta[SO42-]/delta[PFOS] > or = 1, indicating that bubble-water interfacial pyrolytic cleavage of the C-S bond in PFOS is the initial degradation step, in agreement with previous studies done in Milli-Q water. Sonochemical fluoride production is significantly below quantitative expectations, delta[F-]/delta[PFOS] 4 vs 17, suggesting that in the AFFF matrix, PFOS

  6. Bubble Avalanches in a Slowly Flowing Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durian, D. J.

    1996-03-01

    Foams consist of a dense random packing of gas bubbles in a smaller volume of liquid. As a form of matter, foams exhibit remarkable mechanical properties that arise from the bubble- packing structure in ways that are not well understood. For example they can support small static shear like a solid, but can also flow and deform arbitrarily like a liquid. Whereas the solid-like properties can be understood in terms of linear response, the liquid-like properties, as discussed here, cannot. Using novel diffusing-light spectroscopies, we have shown that large scale deformations, though macroscopically homogeneous, are accomplished by a series of microscopically inhomogeneous bubble-switching rearrangements from one tightly packed configuration to another(A.D. Gopal and D.J. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2610 (1995).). Such stick-slip dynamics is reminiscent of the propagation of earthquake faults or the flow of sand, but by contrast can be studied noninvasively at the microscopic scale. We compare our observations with MD simulations predicting that bubble rearrangements exhibit self-organized criticality(T. Okuzono and K. Kawasaki, Phys. Rev. E 51, 1246 (1995).), as well as with results from a simpler model(D. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 (1995).)^,(S.A. Langer, A.J. Liu, and D.J. Durian, unpublished.).

  7. Surface rheology and foaming properties of sodium oleate and C12(EO)6 aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Beneventi, Davide; Pugh, Robert J; Carré, Bruno; Gandini, Alessandro

    2003-12-01

    The dynamic surface tension (DST) and the surface viscoelastic modulus of sodium oleate aqueous solutions at different concentrations were measured using an image analysis tensiometer based on the oscillating bubble technique. The diffusion coefficient of oleate moieties was calculated from DST measurements and the surface viscoelastic modulus using the Langmuir-Szyszkowski and the diffusion-controlled adsorption models. The viscoelastic moduli obtained from model calculations were compared with the corresponding experimental values. The diffusion coefficient of C(12)(EO)(6) in water and the parameters of the Langmuir-Szyszkowski adsorption isotherm were taken from the literature and used to calculate the surface viscoelastic modulus of its aqueous solutions at different concentrations. The foaming properties of both C(12)(EO)(6) and sodium oleate solutions, viz., the foam conductance and the water volume fraction in the foam, were measured using a commercial Foamscan device. Foaming experiments with C(12)(EO)(6) and sodium oleate solutions were carried out either under static conditions; i.e., the foam conductance and the water volume fraction were measured as a function of time after the generation of a fixed volume of foam, or under dynamic conditions; i.e., the foam conductance and the water volume fraction were measured during foam formation. The variations in the foam permeability as a function of surfactant concentration were related to the viscoelastic properties of the air/water interface and to the presence of micelles in the foam films. With foams in which the water volume fraction was higher than 0.05, the foam electrical conduction could be described using a simple parallel resistor model and their conductance measurements were related to the foam water volume fraction. The results related to water drainage under static conditions were used to interpret water drainage under dynamic conditions. Preliminary conjectures on the influence of foam

  8. Flowing crystals: nonequilibrium structure of foam.

    PubMed

    Garstecki, Piotr; Whitesides, George M

    2006-07-14

    Bubbles pushed through a quasi-two-dimensional channel self-organize into a variety of periodic lattices. The structures of these lattices correspond to local minima of the interfacial energy. The "flowing crystals" are long-lived metastable states, a small subset of possible local minima of confined quasi-two-dimensional foams [P. Garstecki and G. M. Whitesides, Phys. Rev. E 73, 031603 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevE.73.031603]. Experimental results suggest that the choice of the structures that we observe is dictated by the dynamic stability of the cyclic processes of their formation. Thus, the dynamic system that we report provides a unique example of nonequilibrium self-organization that results in structures that correspond to local minima of the relevant energy functional. PMID:16907453

  9. Performance of Magnetorheological Fluids Flowing Through Metal Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. h.; Fu, Z. m.; Yao, X. y.; Li, F.

    2011-01-01

    If magnetorheological (MR) fluids are stored in porous materials, when excited by the external magnetic field, MR fluid will be drawn out and produce MR effect, which could be used to solve the following problems of the MR damper, such as the seal, volume and the cost of MR fluid damper. In this paper, the effect of structure of metal foams on the performance of MR fluid is investigated; the relationship between the penetrability and the porosity of the metal foams is measured, the change of MR fluid performance flowing though the metal foams is obtained. It shows that, after flowing through metal foams, the change of performance of MR fluid is about 2.5%. Compared to the sponge, the porous metal foams have the obvious advantages in high porosity and rigidity, which provide a convenient and low-cost way to design the MR damper.

  10. Aqueous foam as a less-than-lethal technology for prison applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goolsby, Tommy D.

    1997-01-01

    High expansion aqueous foam is an aggregation of bubbles that has the appearance of soap suds and is used to isolate individuals both visually and acoustically. It was developed in the 1920's in England to fight coal mine fires and has been widely used since for fire fighting and dust suppression. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 1970's for nuclear safeguards and security applications. In late 1994, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of high expansion aqueous foam for correctional applications. NIJ funded the project as part of its search for new and better less-than-lethal weapons for responding to violent and dangerous individuals, where other means of force could lead to serious injuries. The phase one objectives of the project were to select a low-to-no toxicity foam concentrate with physical characteristics suited for use in a single cell or large prison disturbances, and to determine if the selected foam concentrate could serve as a carrier for Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) irritant. The phase two objective were to conduct an extensive toxicology review of the selected foam concentrate and OC irritant, and to conduct respiration simulation experiments in the selected high expansion aqueous foam. The phase three objectives were to build a prototype individual cell aqueous foam system and to study the feasibility of aqueous foams for large prison facility disturbances. The phase four and five objectives were to use the prototype system to do large scale foam physical characteristics testing of the selected foam concentrate, and to have the prototype single cell system further evaluated by correctional representatives. Prison rather than street scenarios were evaluated as the first and most likely place for using the aqueous foam since prisons have recurrent incidents where officers and inmates might be seriously injured during

  11. Foam stability in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, N.; Caps, H.; Delon, G.; Saint-Jalmes, A.; Rio, E.; Saulnier, L.; Adler, M.; Biance, A. L.; Pitois, O.; Cohen Addad, S.; Hohler, R.; Weaire, D.; Hutzler, S.; Langevin, D.

    2011-12-01

    Within the context of the ESA FOAM project, we have studied the stability of aqueous and non-aqueous foams both on Earth and in microgravity. Foams are dispersions of gas into liquid or solid. On Earth, the lifetime of a foam is limited by the free drainage. By drainage, we are referring to the irreversible flow of liquid through the foam (leading to the accumulation of liquid at the foam bottom, and to a global liquid content decreases within the foam). When the liquid films become thinner, they eventually break, and the foam collapses. In microgravity, this process is no more present and foams containing large amounts of liquid can be studied for longer time. While the difference between foaming and not-foaming solutions is clear, the case of slightly-foaming solutions is more complicated. On Earth, such mixtures are observed to produce unstable froth for a couple of seconds. However, these latter solutions may produce foam in microgravity. We have studied both configurations for different solutions composed of common surfactant, proteins, anti-foaming agents or silicon oil. Surprising results have been obtained, emphasizing the role played by gravity on the foam stabilization process.

  12. A population balance model for transient and steady-state foam flow in Boise sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Kovscek, A.; Patzek, T.; Radke, C.

    1995-07-01

    An experimental and mechanistic-modeling study is reported for the transient flow of aqueous foam through 1.3-{mu}m{sup 2} (1.3-D) Boise sandstone at backpressures in excess of 5 MPa (700 psi) over a quality range from 0.80 to 0.99. Total superficial velocities range from as little as 0.42 to 2.20 m/day (1.4 ft/day to 7 ft/day). Sequential pressure taps and gamma-ray densitometry measure flow resistance and in-situ liquid saturations, respectively. We garner experimental pressure and saturation profiles in both the transient and steady states. Adoption of a mean-size foam-bubble conservation equation along with the traditional reservoir simulation equations allows mechanistic foam simulation. Since foam mobility depends heavily upon its texture, the bubble population balance is both useful and necessary as the role of foam texture must be incorporated into any model which seeks accurate prediction of flow properties. Our model employs capillary-pressure-dependent kinetic expressions for lamellae generation and coalescence and also a term for trapping of lamellae. Additionally, the effects of surfactant chemical transport are included. We find quantitative agreement between experimental and theoretical saturation and pressure profiles in both the transient and steady states.

  13. Thermal dispersion in vertical gas-liquid flows with foaming and non-foaming liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Pino, L.R.Z.; Saez, A.E.

    1995-05-01

    Heat transfer experiments have been performed in gas-liquid upwards flow in a vertical column with non-foaming (water) and foaming (kerosene) liquids. The main purpose of the experiments has been to characterized the degree of thermal mixing in the system. For the range of conditions employed, the nonfoaming liquid exhibits complete mixing a low liquid superficial velocities. An increased in liquid velocity leads to incomplete mixing. In the latter case, the thermal dispersion coefficient at low gas superficial velocities is larger than what correlations in the literature predict. For the foaming liquid, when foaming and bubbling regions coexist in the bubble column, each region behaves as a completely-mixed subsystem.

  14. Foam rheology: A model of viscous effects in shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Reinelt, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Foams consisting of gas bubbles dispersed in a continuous network of thin liquid films display a remarkable range of rheological characteristics that include a finite shear modulus, yield stress, non-Newtonian viscosity, and slip at the wall. Progress in developing micromechanical theories to describe foam rheology has depended upon two-dimensional models, which in most cases are assumed to have perfectly ordered structure. Princen accounted for surface tension and geometrical effects, and analyzed the nonlinear elastic response of a spatially periodic foam in simple shear. His analysis has been extended to account for more general deformations. Khan and Armstrong and Kraynik and Hansen have proposed ad hoc models for viscous effects in foam rheology. Their models capture numerous qualitative phenomena but incorporate relaxation mechanisms based upon overly simplified assumptions of liquid flow in the thin films. Mysels, Shinoda, and Frankel considered soap films with interfaces that are inextensible due to the presence of surfactants. They analyzed the primary flow that occurs when such films are slowly withdrawn from or recede into essentially static junction regions such as the Plateau borders in a foam. Adopting this mechanism, Schwartz and Princen considered small periodic deformations of a foam and calculated the energy dissipation due to viscous flow in the thin films. In the following, we also adopt the basic interfacial and viscous mechanisms introduced by Mysels et al. and analyze simple shearing deformations of finite amplitude. The configuration and effective stress of the foam are determined. Under these deformation conditions, the foam is a nonlinear viscoelastic material. Results for the uniform expansion of a foam are also presented. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Flow of foams in two-dimensional disordered porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollet, Benjamin; Geraud, Baudouin; Jones, Sian A.; Meheust, Yves; Cantat, Isabelle; Institut de Physique de Rennes Team; Geosciences Rennes Team

    2015-11-01

    Liquid foams are a yield stress fluid with elastic properties. When a foam flow is confined by solid walls, viscous dissipation arises from the contact zones between soap films and walls, giving very peculiar friction laws. In particular, foams potentially invade narrow pores much more efficiently than Newtonian fluids, which is of great importance for enhanced oil recovery. To quantify this effect, we study experimentally flows of foam in a model two-dimensional porous medium, consisting of an assembly of circular obstacles placed randomly in a Hele-Shaw cell, and use image analysis to quantify foam flow at the local scale. We show that bubbles split as they flow through the porous medium, by a mechanism of film pinching during contact with an obstacle, yielding two daughter bubbles per split bubble. We quantify the evolution of the bubble size distribution as a function of the distance along the porous medium, the splitting probability as a function of bubble size, and the probability distribution function of the daughter bubbles. We propose an evolution equation to model this splitting phenomenon and compare it successfully to the experiments, showing how at long distance, the porous medium itself dictates the size distribution of the foam.

  16. Graphene oxide/chitin nanofibril composite foams as column adsorbents for aqueous pollutants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongshi; Liu, Dagang; Zhu, Yi; Li, Zehui; Li, Zhenxuan; Tian, Huafeng; Liu, Haiqing

    2016-06-25

    A novel graphene oxide/chitin nanofibrils (GO-CNF) composite foam as a column adsorbent was prepared for aqueous contaminant disposal. The structures, morphologies and properties of composite foams supported by nanofibrils were characterized. As a special case, the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on GO-CNF was investigated regarding the static adsorption and column adsorption-desorption tests. Results from equilibrium adsorption isotherms indicated that the adsorption behavior was well-fitted to Langmuir model. The composite foams reinforced by CNF were dimensionally stable during the column adsorption process and could be reused after elution. The removal efficiency of MB was still nearly 90% after 3 cycles. Furthermore, other inorganic or organic pollutants adsorbed by composite foams were also explored. Therefore, this novel composite foam with remarkable properties such as dimensional stability, universal adsorbent for cationic pollutants, high adsorption capacity, and ease of regeneration was a desirable adsorbent in the future practical application of water pollutant treatment. PMID:27083813

  17. Ultradry Carbon Dioxide-in-Water Foams with Viscoelastic Aqueous Phases.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zheng; Worthen, Andrew J; Da, Chang; Qajar, Ali; Ketchum, Isaiah Robert; Alzobaidi, Shehab; Huh, Chun; Prodanović, Maša; Johnston, Keith P

    2016-01-12

    For foams with ultra low water contents, the capillary pressure is very large and induces rapid drainage that destabilizes the aqueous lamellae between the gas bubbles. However, we show that high-pressure CO2-in-water foams can be stabilized with a viscoelastic aqueous phase composed of entangled wormlike micelles, even for extremely high CO2 volume fractions ϕ of 0.95 to 0.98; the viscosity of these ultradry foams increased by up to 3-4-fold, reaching more than 100 cP relative to foams formed with conventional low viscosity aqueous phases. The foam morphology consisted of fine ∼20 μm polyhedral-shaped CO2 bubbles that were stable for hours. The wormlike micelles were formed by mixing anionic sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) with salt and a protonated cationic surfactant, as shown by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and large values of the zero-shear viscosity and the dynamic storage and loss moduli. With the highly viscous continuous aqueous phases, the foam lamella drainage rates were low, as corroborated by confocal microscopy. The preservation of viscous thick lamellae resulted in lower rates of Ostwald ripening relative to conventional foams as shown by high-pressure optical microscopy. The ability to stabilize viscous ultra high internal phase foams is expected to find utility in various practical applications, including nearly "waterless" fracturing fluids for recovery of oil and gas in shale, offering the possibility of a massive reduction in the amount of wastewater. PMID:26666311

  18. Sorption of Ponceau 4R anionic dye from aqueous solutions on aluminum oxide and polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirova, T. I.; Ramazanova, G. R.; Apyari, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    The sorption of Ponceau 4R (E-124) anionic dye on polyurethane foam based on ethers and γ-Al2O3 from aqueous solutions is studied. It is established that sorption is highest in the range of 0.5 M HCl, pH 2 on polyurethane foam and 0.2 M HCl, pH 6.5 on γ-Al2O3. Under optimum conditions, the degrees of recovery on polyurethane foam and γ-Al2O3 are 20-30 and 70-85%, respectively. A possible scheme of interactions between the dye and the surfaces of sorbents is proposed.

  19. A Porous Media Model for Blood Flow within Reticulated Foam

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    A porous media model is developed for non-Newtonian blood flow through reticulated foam at Reynolds numbers ranging from 10−8 to 10. This empirical model effectively divides the pressure gradient versus flow speed curve into three regimes, in which either the non-Newtonian viscous forces, the Newtonian viscous forces, or the inertial fluid forces are most prevalent. When compared to simulation data of blood flow through two reticulated foam geometries, the model adequately captures the pressure gradient within all three regimes, especially that within the Newtonian regime where blood transitions from a power-law to a constant viscosity fluid. PMID:24031095

  20. Flow and jamming of granular suspensions in foams.

    PubMed

    Haffner, B; Khidas, Y; Pitois, O

    2014-05-14

    The drainage of particulate foams is studied under conditions where the particles are not trapped individually by constrictions of the interstitial pore space. The drainage velocity decreases continuously as the particle volume fraction φ(p) increases. The suspensions jam--and therefore drainage stops--for values φ*(p) which reveal a strong effect of the particle size. In accounting for the particular geometry of the foam, we show that φ*(p) accounts for unusual confinement effects when the particles pack into the foam network. We model quantitatively the overall behavior of the suspension--from flow to jamming--by taking into account explicitly the divergence of its effective viscosity at φ*(p). Beyond the scope of drainage, the reported jamming transition is expected to have a deep significance for all aspects related to particulate foams, from aging to mechanical properties. PMID:24633178

  1. Pore level visualization of foam flow in a silicon micromodel. SUPRI TR 100

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, F.; Blunt, M.; Castanier, L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the behavior of foam in porous media at the pore level. Identical, heterogeneous silicon micromodels, two dimensionally etched to replicate flow in Berea Sandstone, were used. The models, already saturated with varying concentrations of surfactant and, at times, oil were invaded with air. Visual observations were made of these air displacement events in an effort to determine foam flow characteristics with varying surfactant concentrations, and differing surfactants in the presence of oil. These displacement events were recorded on video tape. These tapes are available at the Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute, Stanford, California. The observed air flow characteristics can be broadly classified into two: continuous and discontinuous. Continuous air flow was observed in two phase runs when the micromodel contained no aqueous surfactant solution. Air followed a tortuous path to the outlet, splitting and reconnecting around grains, isolating water located in dead-end or circumvented pores, all without breaking and forming bubbles. No foam was created. Discontinuous air flow occurred in runs containing surfactant - with smaller bubble sizes appearing with higher surfactant concentrations. Air moved through the medium by way of modified bubble train flow where bubbles travel through pore throats and tend to reside more statically in larger pore bodies until enough force is applied to move them along. The lamellae were stable, and breaking and reforming events by liquid drainage and corner flow were observed in higher surfactant concentrations. However, the classic snap-off process, as described by Roof (1973) was not seen at all.

  2. Removal of lead ions in aqueous solution by hydroxyapatite/polyurethane composite foams.

    PubMed

    Jang, Suk Hyun; Min, Byung Gil; Jeong, Young Gyu; Lyoo, Won Seok; Lee, Sang Cheol

    2008-04-15

    We have prepared hydroxyapatite/polyurehthane (HAp/PU) composite foams with two different HAp contents of 20 and 50 wt.% and investigated their removal capability of Pb2+ ions from aqueous solutions with various initial Pb2+ ion concentrations and pH values of 2-6. HAp/PU composite foams synthesized exhibited well-developed open pore structures which provide paths for the aqueous solution and adsorption sites for Pb2+ ions. With increasing the HAp content in the composites, the removal capability of Pb2+ ions by the composite foams increases owing to the higher adsorption capacity, whereas the removal rate is slower due to the less uniform dispersity of HAp in composite foams. The removal rate of Pb2+ ions is also slower with increasing the initial Pb2+ ion concentration in aqueous solutions. The removal mechanism of Pb2+ ion by the composites is varied, depending on the pH value of aqueous solution: the dissolution of HAp and precipitation of hydroypyromorphite is dominant at lower pH 2-3, the adsorption of Pb2+ ions on the HAp/PU composite surface and ion exchange reaction between Ca2+ of HAp and Pb2+ in aqueous solution is dominant at higher pH 5-6, and two removal mechanisms compete at pH 4. The equilibrium removal process of Pb2+ ions by the HAp/PU composite foam at pH 5 was described well with the Langmuir isotherm model, resulting in the maximum adsorption capacity of 150 mg/g for the composite foam with 50 wt.% HAp content. PMID:17850963

  3. Dispersion behavior and aqueous foams in mixtures of a vesicle-forming surfactant and edible nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Campbell, Shawn; Mashinchi, Saeed; Piatko, Michael P

    2015-03-17

    In an attempt to prepare ultrastable aqueous foams composed entirely of food-grade ingredients, we describe the foamability and foam stability of aqueous phases containing either calcium carbonate particles (CaCO3), sodium stearoyl lactylate surfactant (SSL), or their mixtures. Techniques including zeta potential measurements, adsorption isotherm determination, contact angles and optical and cryo-scanning electron microscopy are used to probe the interaction between particles and surfactant molecules. Aqueous dispersions of inherently hydrophilic cationic CaCO3 nanoparticles do not foam to any great extent. By contrast, aqueous dispersions of anionic SSL, which forms a lamellar phase/vesicles, foam progressively on increasing the concentration. Despite their foamability being low compared to that of micelle-forming surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate, they are much more stable to collapse with half-lives (of up to 40 days) of around 2 orders of magnitude higher above the respective aggregation concentrations. We believe that, in addition to surfactant lamellae around bubbles, the bilayers within vesicles contain surfactant chains in a solidlike state yielding indestructible aggregates that jam the aqueous films between bubbles, reducing the drainage rate and both bubble coalescence and gas-transfer between bubbles. In mixtures of particles and surfactant, the adsorption of SSL monomers occurs on particle surfaces, leading to an increase in their hydrophobicity, promoting particle adsorption to bubble surfaces. Ultrastable foams result with half-lives of around an order of magnitude higher again at low concentrations and foams which lose only around 30% of their volume within a year at high concentrations. In the latter case, we evidence a high surface density of discrete surfactant-coated particles at bubble surfaces, rendering them stable to coalescence and disproportionation. PMID:25734773

  4. Enhanced Amendment Delivery to Subsurface Using Shear Thinning Fluid and Aqueous Foam for Metal, Radionuclide, and NAPL Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Szecsody, J.; Li, X.; Oostrom, M.; Truex, M.

    2010-12-01

    In many contamination sites, removal of contaminants by any active remediation efforts is not practical due to the high cost and technological limitations. Alternatively, in situ remediation is expected to be the most important remediation strategy. Delivery of reactive amendment to the contamination zone is essential for the reactions between the contaminants and remedial amendments to proceed in situ. It is a challenge to effectively deliver remedial amendment to the subsurface contamination source areas in both aquifer and vadose zone. In aquifer, heterogeneity induces fluid bypassing the low-permeability zones, resulting in certain contaminated areas inaccessible to the remedial amendment delivered by water injection, thus inhibiting the success of remedial operations. In vadose zone in situ remediation, conventional solution injection and infiltration for amendment delivery have difficulties to achieve successful lateral spreading and uniform distribution of the reactive media. These approaches also tend to displace highly mobile metal and radionuclide contaminants such as hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and technetium (Tc-99), causing spreading of contaminations. Shear thinning fluid and aqueous foam can be applied to enhance the amendment delivery and improve in situ subsurface remediation efficiency under aquifer and vadose zone conditions, respectively. Column and 2-D flow cell experiments were conducted to demonstrate the enhanced delivery and improved remediation achieved by the application of shear thinning fluid and foam injection at the laboratory scale. Solutions of biopolymer xanthan gum were used as the shear thinning delivering fluids. Surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate (STEOL CS-330) was the foaming agent. The shear thinning fluid delivery (STFD) considerably improved the sweeping efficiency over a heterogeneous system and enhanced the non-aqueous liquid phase (NAPL) removal. The delivery of amendment into low-perm zones (LPZs) by STFD also

  5. Blood Flow through an Open-Celled Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason; Maitland, Duncan

    2011-11-01

    The Hazen-Dupuit-Darcy (HDD) equation is commonly used in engineering applications to model the pressure gradient of flow through a porous media. One major advantage of this equation is that it simplifies the complex geometric details of the porous media into two coefficients: the permeability, K, and form factor, C. However through this simplification, the flow details within the porous media are no longer accessible, making it difficult to study the phenomena that contribute to changes in K and C due to clotting of blood flow. To obtain a more detailed understanding of blood flow through a porous media, a direct assessment of the complex interstitial geometry and flow is required. In this study, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations for Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flow through an open-celled foam geometry obtained from a micro-CT scan. The nominal strut size of the foam sample is of O(10e-5) m and the corresponding Reynolds number based upon this length ranges up to O(10). Fitting the pressure gradient vs. Darcy velocity data with the HDD equation demonstrates that both viscous and inertial forces play an important role in the flow through the foam at these Reynolds numbers. Recirculation zones are observed to form in the wake of the pore struts, producing regions of flow characterized by both low shear rates and long fluid residence times, factors of which have been shown in previous studies to promote blood clotting.

  6. Fundamental investigation of foam flow in a liquid-filled Hele-Shaw cell.

    PubMed

    Osei-Bonsu, Kofi; Shokri, Nima; Grassia, Paul

    2016-01-15

    The relative immobility of foam in porous media suppresses the formation of fingers during oil displacement leading to a more stable displacement which is desired in various processes such as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) or soil remediation practices. Various parameters may influence the efficiency of foam-assisted oil displacement such as properties of oil, the permeability and heterogeneity of the porous medium and physical and chemical characteristics of foam. In the present work, we have conducted a comprehensive series of experiments using customised Hele-Shaw cells filled with either water or oil to describe the effects of foam quality, permeability of the cell as well as the injection rate on the apparent viscosity of foam which is required to investigate foam displacement. Our results reveal the significant impact of foam texture and bubble size on the foam apparent viscosity. Foams with smaller bubble sizes have a higher apparent viscosity. This statement only applies (strictly speaking) when the foam quality is constant. However, wet foams with smaller bubbles may have lower apparent viscosity compared to dry foams with larger bubbles. Furthermore, our results show the occurrence of more stable foam-water fronts as foam quality decreases. Besides, the complexity of oil displacement by foam as well as its destabilizing effects on foam displacement has been discussed. Our results extend the physical understanding of foam-assisted liquid displacement in Hele-Shaw cell which is a step towards understanding the foam flow behaviour in more complex systems such as porous media. PMID:26473278

  7. Dissipation in quasi-two-dimensional flowing foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raufaste, Christophe; Foulon, Amandine; Dollet, Benjamin

    2009-05-01

    The dissipation between two-dimensional (2D) monolayers of bubbles, the so-called quasi-2D foams, and a wall is investigated in two setups: a "liquid pool" system, where the foam is confined between a soap solution and a glass coverslip, and a Hele-Shaw cell, where the foam occupies the narrow gap between two plates. This experimental study reports dissipation measurements for mobile gas/liquid interfaces (free shear boundary condition) over a large range of parameters: in the liquid pool system, velocity and bubble area; in the Hele-Shaw cell, velocity and liquid fraction. The effect of the latter quantity is measured for the first time over more than three orders of magnitude. A full comparison between our results and other experimental studies is proposed and enables to rescale all measurements on a single master curve. It shows that for mobile gas/liquid interfaces, the existing models systematically underestimate the dissipation in flowing foams. This is quantified by a discrepancy factor ξ, ratio of the experimental dissipation measurements to the theoretical predictions, which scales as ξ =1.4(RP/√A )-0.5 with RP the Plateau border radius and A the bubble area, showing that the discrepancy is higher for dry foams.

  8. A Porous Media Model for Blood Flow within Reticulated Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason

    2013-11-01

    A porous media model is developed for non-Newtonian blood flow through reticulated foam at Reynolds numbers ranging from 10-8 to 10. This empirical model effectively divides the pressure gradient versus flow speed curve into three regimes, in which either the non-Newtonian viscous forces, the Newtonian viscous forces, or the inertial fluid forces are most prevalent. When compared to simulation data of blood flow through two reticulated foam geometries, the model adequately captures the pressure gradient within all three regimes, especially that within the Newtonian regime where blood transitions from a power-law to a constant viscosity fluid. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Grant R01EB000462 and partially performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornick, Marc

    Phenolic foam is a unique cellular material that can be utilized in either a fully open cell structure or a completely closed cell structure in a diversity of applications such as open cellular material for floral foam, soil propagation media and/or orthopedic use, and closed cell phenolic foam primarily for thermal insulation. Thus, phenolic foam is much more versatile than other competitive organic foams such as polystyrene and polyurethane with the latter materials being more heavily involved in thermal insulation. Foam processing can consider batch, semi-continuous, or continuous conditions, and the features and weaknesses of the appropriate processes are discussed along with continuous mix heads involving high and low pressure conditions.

  10. Particle-tracking velocimetry analysis of liquid drainage within individual Plateau borders in aqueous foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Matthew J.; Conroy, Michael W.; Ananth, Ramagopal; Fleming, James W.

    2012-11-01

    Foam drainage theory describes macro-scale liquid drainage for a body of foam based on the microscopic flow within individual Plateau borders and within the nodes which occur at the intersections of multiple Plateau borders. The present study measures micro-scale liquid velocities within individual Plateau borders using microparticle image velocimetry, and it measures macro-scale liquid drainage using a weighing scale. Measurements take place over the course of free drainage for foam which is initially wet with initial liquid fraction equal to 20% averaged over the height of the foam. Preliminary results show that the flow dynamics within individual Plateau borders evolve according to similar trends as the macro-scale volume of liquid drained. Foam drainage theory agrees with both measurements after an initial transition period, but during initial drainage the experimentally measured drainage rate exceeds that predicted by the theory. We discuss implications of the agreement between the micro-scale and macro-scale measurements as well as potential sources for the unexpectedly high drainage rate which occurs at the beginning of drainage. NRC Research Associate at NRL.

  11. pH- and temperature-responsive aqueous foams stabilized by hairy latex particles.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Syuji; Akiyama, Ko; Nakayama, Saori; Hamasaki, Sho; Yusa, Shin-ichi; Nakamura, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-21

    Polystyrene (PS) particles carrying pH- and temperature-responsive poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMA) hairs (PDMA-PS particles) were synthesized by dispersion polymerization. The diameter, diameter distribution, morphology, chemical composition and surface chemistry of the particles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), elemental microanalysis, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements. The hydrophilicity-hydrophobicity balance of the PDMA could be tuned by varying both pH and temperature and therefore these sterically stabilized particles acted as doubly stimuli-responsive stabilizers for aqueous foams by adsorption and desorption to/from the air-water interface. At and above pH 6.0, in which range the PDMA hairs were either non-protonated or partially protonated, particle-stabilized foams were formed at both 23 and 55 °C. The foam prepared at 55 °C was the more stable of the two, lasting for at least 24 h, whereas the 23 °C foam destabilized within 24 h. SEM studies indicated that the particles adsorbed at the air-water interface as monolayers at 23 °C and as multilayers at 55 °C. At and below pH 5, in which range the hairs were cationic, hydrophilic and water-soluble, no foam was formed irrespective of temperature. Rapid defoaming could be induced by lowering the solution pH at both temperatures, due to rapid in situ protonation of the PDMA hairs, prompting the PDMA-PS particles to desorb from the air-water interface. The foaming and defoaming cycles could be repeated at least five times. PMID:25426611

  12. Lead and copper removal from aqueous solutions using carbon foam derived from phenol resin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Jeon, Jun-Woo; Hwang, Min-Jin; Ahn, Kyu-Hong; Park, Chanhyuk; Choi, Jae-Woo; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2015-07-01

    Phenolic resin-based carbon foam was prepared as an adsorbent for removing heavy metals from aqueous solutions. The surface of the produced carbon foam had a well-developed open cell structure and the specific surface area according to the BET model was 458.59m(2)g(-1). Batch experiments showed that removal ratio increased in the order of copper (19.83%), zinc (34.35%), cadmium (59.82%), and lead (73.99%) in mixed solutions with the same initial concentration (50mgL(-1)). The results indicated that the Sips isotherm model was the most suitable for describing the experimental data of lead and copper. The maximum adsorption capacity of lead and copper determined to Sips model were 491mgg(-1) and 247mgg(-1). The obtained pore diffusion coefficients for lead and copper were found to be 1.02×10(-6) and 2.42×10(-7)m(2)s(-1), respectively. Post-sorption characteristics indicated that surface precipitation was the primary mechanism of lead and copper removal by the carbon foam, while the functional groups on the surface of the foam did not affect metal adsorption. PMID:25819762

  13. Responsive Aqueous Foams Stabilized by Silica Nanoparticles Hydrophobized in Situ with a Conventional Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue; Pei, Xiaomei; Jiang, Jianzhong; Cui, Zhenggang; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-12-01

    In the recent past, switchable surfactants and switchable/stimulus-responsive surface-active particles have been of great interest. Both can be transformed between surface-active and surface-inactive states via several triggers, making them recoverable and reusable afterward. However, the synthesis of these materials is complicated. In this paper we report a facile protocol to obtain responsive surface-active nanoparticles and their use in preparing responsive particle-stabilized foams. Hydrophilic silica nanoparticles are initially hydrophobized in situ with a trace amount of a conventional cationic surfactant in water, rendering them surface-active such that they stabilize aqueous foams. The latter can then be destabilized by adding equal moles of an anionic surfactant, and restabilized by adding another trace amount of the cationic surfactant followed by shaking. The stabilization-destabilization of the foams can be cycled many times at room temperature. The trigger is the stronger electrostatic interaction between the oppositely charged surfactants than that between the cationic surfactant and the negatively charged particles. The added anionic surfactant tends to form ion pairs with the cationic surfactant, leading to desorption of the latter from particle surfaces and dehydrophobization of the particles. Upon addition of another trace amount of cationic surfactant, the particles are rehydrophobized in situ and can then stabilize foams again. This principle makes it possible to obtain responsive surface-active particles using commercially available inorganic nanoparticles and conventional surfactants. PMID:26542227

  14. Removal of trace Cd2+ from aqueous solution by foam fractionation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Li, Ying; Zhang, Sen; Sun, Yange

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, aqueous foam was known as an efficient technique with high potential on being used to remove heavy metal ions from the polluted water, not only because of the low cost, simple operation, but also ascribed to the high removal efficiency of trace heavy metal ions and would not cause secondary pollution to the environment. In this paper, the removal of Cd(2+) from aqueous solution by aqueous foam stabilized by a kind of novel anionic-nonionic surfactant sodium trideceth-4 carboxylate (AEC) was investigated. The effect of conditions such as surfactant/metal ions molar ratio, surfactant concentration on the removal efficiency was studied. In large concentration range of surfactant, the removal rate was higher than 90%, and could reach up to 99.8% under the optimum conditions. The Zeta potential of gas bubbles in the AEC solutions was determined to verify the combination between the negative charged group heads of surfactant molecules and heavy metal ions, and isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) determination was utilized to demonstrate the interaction, which helped to understand the mechanisms more clearly. PMID:25603296

  15. Synchronized diffusive-wave spectroscopy: Principle and application to sound propagation in aqueous foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crassous, Jérôme; Chasle, Patrick; Pierre, Juliette; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Dollet, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    We present an experimental method to measure oscillatory strains in turbid material. The material is illuminated with a laser, and the speckle patterns are recorded. The analysis of the deformations of the optical path length shows that the speckle patterns are modulated at the strain frequency. By recording those patterns synchronously with the strain source, we are able to measure the amplitude and the phase of the strain. This method is tested in the specific case of an aqueous foam where an acoustic wave propagates. The effects of material internal dynamics and heterogeneous deformations are also discussed.

  16. Synchronized diffusive-wave spectroscopy: Principle and application to sound propagation in aqueous foams.

    PubMed

    Crassous, Jérôme; Chasle, Patrick; Pierre, Juliette; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Dollet, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    We present an experimental method to measure oscillatory strains in turbid material. The material is illuminated with a laser, and the speckle patterns are recorded. The analysis of the deformations of the optical path length shows that the speckle patterns are modulated at the strain frequency. By recording those patterns synchronously with the strain source, we are able to measure the amplitude and the phase of the strain. This method is tested in the specific case of an aqueous foam where an acoustic wave propagates. The effects of material internal dynamics and heterogeneous deformations are also discussed. PMID:27078418

  17. Effect of pH and interaction between egg white protein and hydroxypropymethylcellulose in bulk aqueous medium on foaming properties.

    PubMed

    Sadahira, Mitie S; Lopes, Fernanda C Rezende; Rodrigues, Maria I; Yamada, Aureo T; Cunha, Rosiane L; Netto, Flavia M

    2015-07-10

    Egg white protein (EW) is used as surface-active ingredient in aerated food and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) is a polysaccharide that behaves as a surfactant. This study aimed at investigating the effects of process parameters biopolymer concentration (2.0-5.0%, w/w), EW:HPMC ratio (2:1-18:1), pH (3.0-6.0), and the influence of biopolymers' behavior in aqueous solution at different pH on the foaming properties (overrun, drainage, and bubble growth rate). Process parameters had effect on foaming properties. The pH was the major factor influencing the type of EW/HPMC interaction and affected the foaming properties of biopolymer mixture. At pH 3.0, EW and HPMC showed thermodynamic compatibility leading to better foaming properties, higher foaming capacity, and stability than without HPMC addition whereas at pH 4.5 and 6.0, EW and HPMC are incompatible that causes lower stability concerning the disproportionation comparing to foam without HPMC. At pH between 3.0 and 4.5, HPMC improves foaming properties of aerated products. PMID:25857956

  18. Thermal Characterization of porous graphitic foam ? convection in impinging flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sultan, K; DeGroot, CT; Straatman, Anthony G; Gallego, Nidia C; Hangan, H

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study has been undertaken to explore the convective heat transfer enhancement that can be achieved in an impinging airflow arrangement by bonding layers of graphitic foam to a heated metal substrate. The effects of foam protrusion, foam thickness and foam properties were explored in this study. The results show that surfaces with a layer of foam protruding upward with open edges had the highest convective enhancement over that of the bare substrate under the same conditions. For the protruding cases, convective enhancements of 30-70% were observed for airflows ranging from 7-11 m/s, for foam thicknesses in the range 2-10 mm. The highest enhancements were observed for foam specimens with the most open, interconnected void structure.

  19. Study of displacement efficiency and flow behavior of foamed gel in non-homogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanling; Jin, Jiafeng; Bai, Baojun; Wei, Mingzhen

    2015-01-01

    Field trials have demonstrated that foamed gel is a very cost-effective technology for profile modification and water shut-off. However, the mechanisms of profile modification and flow behavior of foamed gel in non-homogeneous porous media are not yet well understood. In order to investigate these mechanisms and the interactions between foamed gel and oil in porous media, coreflooding and pore-scale visualization waterflooding experiments were performed in the laboratory. The results of the coreflooding experiment in non-homogeneous porous media showed that the displacement efficiency improved by approximately 30% after injecting a 0.3 pore volume of foamed gel, and was proportional to the pore volumes of the injected foamed gel. Additionally, the mid-high permeability zone can be selectively plugged by foamed gel, and then oil located in the low permeability zone will be displaced. The visualization images demonstrated that the amoeba effect and Jamin effect are the main mechanisms for enhancing oil recovery by foamed gel. Compared with conventional gel, a unique benefit of foamed gel is that it can pass through micropores by transforming into arbitrary shapes without rupturing, this phenomenon has been named the amoeba effect. Additionally, the stability of foam in the presence of crude oil also was investigated. Image and statistical analysis showed that these foams boast excellent oil resistance and elasticity, which allows them to work deep within formations. PMID:26030282

  20. Sonochemical degradation of perfluorinated chemicals in aqueous film-forming foams.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Freire, Lucia; Abad-Fernández, Nerea; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Hoppe-Jones, Christiane; Peng, Hui; Giesy, John P; Snyder, Shane; Keswani, Manish

    2016-11-01

    Aqueous film-forming foams (AFFFs) are complex mixtures containing 1-5% w/w fluorocarbons (FCs). Here, we have investigated degradation of two commercial AFFF formulations, 3M and Ansul, using sound field at 500kHz and 1MHz, with varying initial concentrations ranging from 200 to 930× dilution. The foams were readily degraded by 1MHz, with percentage of defluorination ranging from 11.1±1.4% (200× dilution of 3M) to 47.1±5.8% (500× dilution of Ansul). Removal of total organic carbon (TOC) ranged from 16.0±1.4% (200× dilution Ansul) to 39.0±7.2% (500× dilution Ansul). Degradation of AFFF was affected by sound frequency with rates of defluorination 10-fold greater when the frequency was 1MHz than when it was 500kHz. Mineralization of TOC was 1.5- to 3.0-fold greater under 1MHz than 500kHz. Rate of fluoride release was 60% greater for the greatest initial concentration of FC in Ansul compared to the least initial concentration. While the rate of mineralization of AFFF was directly proportional to the initial concentration of Ansul, that was not the case for 3M, where the rates of mineralization were approximately the same for all three initial concentrations. Results of the study demonstrate that sonolysis is a promising technology to effectively treat AFFFs. PMID:27295064

  1. Final bubble lengths for aqueous foam coarsened in a horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebag, V.; Roth, A. E.; Durian, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    We report on length statistics measured for bubbles in the equilibrium bamboo state, achieved by the coarsening of aqueous foam in long cylindrical tubes, such that the soap films are all flat and perpendicular to the axis of the tube. The average bubble length is found to be 0.88 times the tube diameter, independent of variation of the liquid filling fraction by a factor of nearly three. The actual distribution is well-approximated by a shifted Rayleigh form, with a minimum bubble size of 0.28 tube diameters. And, perhaps surprisingly, no correlations are found in the lengths of neighboring bubbles. The observed length distribution agrees with that of Fortes et al. for short bubbles, but not for long bubbles.

  2. An Experimental Investigation of Foam Flow in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Porous Media, SUPRI TR-112

    SciTech Connect

    Apaydin, Osman G.; Bertin, Henri; Castanier, Louis M.; Kovscek, Anthony R.

    1999-08-09

    Foam is used to reduce the high mobility of gas-drive fluids and improve the contact between oil and these injected fluids. We require a better understanding of the effect of surfactant concentration on foam flow in porous media. Besides this, the literature on foam flow and transport in heterogeneous systems is sparse although the field situation is primarily heterogeneous and multidimensional. In this study, foam flow experiments were conducted first in homogeneous sand packs to investigate the effect of surfactant concentration on foam flow and then a heterogeneous experimental setup was prepared to observe heterogeneity and multidimensional flow effects on foam propagation. The homogeneous core experiments were conducted in a cylindrical aluminum core holder that was packed with a uniform Ottawa sand. Sand permeability is about 7.0 Darcy. The experiments were interpreted in terms of evolution of in-situ water saturation as a function of time by the usage of CT scanner, cumulative water, and pressure drop across the core. At very low surfactant concentration, no significant benefit was observed. But when stable foam generation started sweep efficiency (water recovery), breakthrough time, and pressure drop increased as surfactant concentration increased.

  3. Foam flows in 2D porous media: intermittency and bubble fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; Géraud, B.; Jones, S. A.; Dollet, B.; Cantat, I.

    2014-12-01

    Flowing foams are used in many engineering and technical applications. A well-known application is oil recovery. Another one is the remediation of polluted soils: the foam is injected into the ground in order to mobilize chemical species present in the medium. Apart from potential interesting physico-chemical and biochemical properties, foams have peculiar flow properties that applications might benefit of. In particular, viscous dissipation arises mostly from the contact zones between the soap films and the walls, which results in peculiar friction laws allowing the foam to invade narrow pores more efficiently than Newtonian fluids would. In most experimental studies no local information of the foam structure is possible, and only global quantities such as the effective viscosity can be measured. Using two-dimensional transparent flow cells, we have previously shown that foam structural [1] and elastic [2] effects significantly impact the flow of foams in porous media. We now present an investigation of foam flow through a two-dimensional (2D) porous medium consisting of circular obstacles positioned randomly in a Hele-Shaw cell (see figure). The foam structure is recorded in time by a video camera and subsequently analyzed by image processing, which provides us with the velocity field and spatial distribution of bubble sizes. The flow exhibits a rich phenomenology, including flow irreversibility, preferential flow paths, local flow intermittency/non-stationarity (despite the imposed permanent global flow rate). Moreover, the medium impacts the nature of the flowing fluid by selecting the bubble size through bubble fragmentation. We investigate how preferential flow paths and intermittency depend on the imposed global flow rate and foam quality (the water content), and show that the spatial distribution of bubble sizes is to some extent correlated with the velocity field. We furthermore measure the evolution, along the flow direction, of the probability density

  4. Research on Gas-liquid Flow Rate Optimization in Foam Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, B. K.; Sun, D. G.; Jia, Z. G.; Huang, Z. Q.

    2010-03-01

    With the advantages of less gas consumption, higher carrying rocks ability, lower leakage and higher penetration rate, foam drilling is widely used today in petroleum industry. In the process of foam underbalanced drilling, the mixture of gas, liquid and cuttings flows upwards through the annular, so it is a typical gas-liquid-solid multi-phase flow. In order to protect the reservoir and avoid borehole wall collapsing during foam drilling, it is crucial to ensure that the bottom hole pressure is lower than the formation pressure and higher than the formation collapse pressure, and in the mean time, foam drilling fluid in the whole wellbore should be in the best foam quality stage in order to have sufficient capacity to carry cuttings. In this paper, main relations between bottom hole pressure and gas-liquid injecting rate are analyzed with the underbalanced multiphase flow models. And in order to obtain precise flow pattern and flow pressure, the whole well bore is spatial meshed and iterative method is used. So, a convenient safety window expressed by gas-liquid injecting rate is obtained instead of that by bottom hole pressure. Finally, a foam drilling example from a block in Yemen is presented; the drilling results show that this method is reliable and practical.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Effective Foam Viscosity in Unsaturated Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Zhong, Lirong; White, Mark D.; Szecsody, James E.

    2012-11-01

    Foam has the potential to effectively carry and distribute either aqueous or gaseous amendments to the deep vadose zone for contaminant remediation. However, the transport of foam in porous media is complicated because flow characteristics such as the effective viscosity are affected not only by foam properties but also by the sediment properties and flow conditions. We determined the average effective foam viscosity via a series of laboratory experiments and found that the effective foam viscosity increased with the liquid fraction in foam, the injection rate, and sediment permeability. These impacts are quantified with an empirical expression, which is further demonstrated with data from literature. The results show that the liquid fraction in foam and sediment permeability are two primary factors affecting effective foam viscosity. These results suggest that, when foam is used in deep vadose zone remediation, foam flow will not suffer from gravitational drainage and can distribute amendments uniformly in heterogeneous sediments.

  6. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen

    2004-06-14

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research will lay the groundwork for more applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media. Significant progress was made during this period on all three Tasks. Regarding Task 1, we continued comparisons of foam behavior in sandpacks with and without polymer and oil. As in our previous results, decane was moderately destabilizing to foam. Xanthan polymer did not stabilize foam in the presence of decane in this case. Rather, it appears to have destabilized foam, so that pressure gradient decreased in spite of the increase in aqueous-phase viscosity. Research on Task 2 included the first shake-down experiments with our new apparatus for gas-phase tracer tests for direct measurement of trapped-gas saturation with foam. In addition, we began to analyze CT images of gas-phase tracer in foam displacements, which offers an independent measure of trapped-gas fraction and insights into the roles of convection of tracer in flowing gas and diffusion into trapped gas. Research on Task 3 included foam generation experiments in heterogeneous sandpacks and beadpacks and modeling of discontinuous changes in state such as foam generation. The experiments found the same three regimes (coarse foam, strong foam, and intermediate regime) in heterogeneous sandpacks previously identified in homogeneous porous media. One implication is that there may be a minimum flow rate required for foam generation in even heterogeneous porous media. The dynamics in SAG foam processes in heterogeneous media are complex

  7. Identification of Novel Fluorochemicals in Aqueous Film-Forming Foams (AFFF) Used by the US Military

    PubMed Central

    Place, Benjamin J.; Field, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    Aqueous film-forming foams (AFFFs) are a vital tool to fight large hydrocarbon fires and can be used by public, commercial, and military firefighting organizations. In order to possess these superior firefighting capabilities, AFFFs contain fluorochemical surfactants, of which many of the chemical identities are listed as proprietary. Large-scale controlled (e.g. training activities) and uncontrolled releases of AFFF have resulted in contamination of groundwater. Information on the composition of AFFF formulations is needed to fully define the extent of groundwater contamination and the first step is to fully define the fluorochemical composition of AFFFs used by the US military. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) and high resolution quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF-MS) were combined to elucidate chemical formulas for the fluorochemicals in AFFF mixtures and, along with patent-based information, structures were assigned. Sample collection and analysis was focused on AFFFs that have been designated as certified for US military use. Ten different fluorochemical classes were identified in the seven military-certified AFFF formulations, and include anionic, cationic, and zwitterionic surfactants with perfluoroalkyl chain lengths ranging from 4-12. The environmental implications are discussed and research needs are identified. PMID:22681548

  8. Foaming volume and foam stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Sydney

    1947-01-01

    A method of measuring foaming volume is described and investigated to establish the critical factors in its operation. Data on foaming volumes and foam stabilities are given for a series of hydrocarbons and for a range of concentrations of aqueous ethylene-glycol solutions. It is shown that the amount of foam formed depends on the machinery of its production as well as on properties of the liquid, whereas the stability of the foam produced, within specified mechanical limitations, is primarily a function of the liquid.

  9. Hydrodynamics of foam flows for in situ bioremediation of DNAPL-contaminated subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Bouillard, J.X.; Enzien, M.; Peters, R.W.; Frank, J.; Botto, R.E.; Cody, G.

    1995-12-31

    In situ remediation technologies such as (1) pump-and-treat, (2) soil vacuum extraction, (3) soil flushing/washing, and (4) bioremediation are being promoted for cleanup of contaminated sites. However, these technologies are limited by flow channeling of chemical treatment agents. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the Gas Research Institute, and the Institute of Gas Technology are collaboratively investigating a new bioremediation technology using foams. The ability of a foam to block pores and limit flow bypassing makes it ideal for DNAPL remediation. The hydrodynamics of gas/liquid foam flows differ significantly from the hydrodynamics of single and multiphase nonfoaming flows. This is illustrated using a multiphase flow hydrodynamic computer model and a two-dimensional flow visualization cell. A state-of-the-art, nonintrusive, three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging technique was developed to visualize DNAPL mobilization in three dimensions. Mechanisms to be investigated are in situ DNAPL interactions with the foam, DNAPL emulsification, DNAPL scouring by the foam, and subsequent DNAPL mobilization/redeposition in the porous media.

  10. Simple shearing flow of dry soap foams with tetrahedrally close-packed structure

    SciTech Connect

    Reinelt, Douglas A.; Kraynik, Andrew M.

    2000-05-01

    The microrheology of dry soap foams subjected to quasistatic, simple shearing flow is analyzed. Two different monodisperse foams with tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) structure are examined: Weaire-Phelan (A15) and Friauf-Laves (C15). The elastic-plastic response is evaluated by using the Surface Evolver to calculate foam structures that minimize total surface area at each value of strain. The foam geometry and macroscopic stress are piecewise continuous functions of strain. The stress scales as T/V{sup 1/3}, where T is surface tension and V is cell volume. Each discontinuity corresponds to large changes in foam geometry and topology that restore equilibrium to unstable configurations that violate Plateau's laws. The instabilities occur when the length of an edge on a polyhedral foam cell vanishes. The length can tend to zero smoothly or abruptly with strain. The abrupt case occurs when a small increase in strain changes the energy profile in the neighborhood of a foam structure from a local minimum to a saddle point, which can lead to symmetry-breaking bifurcations. In general, the new structure associated with each stable solution branch results from an avalanche of local topology changes called T1 transitions. Each T1 cascade produces different cell neighbors, reduces surface energy, and provides an irreversible, film-level mechanism for plastic yield behavior. Stress-strain curves and average stresses are evaluated by examining foam orientations that admit strain-periodic behavior. For some orientations, the deformation cycle includes Kelvin cells instead of the original TCP structure; but the foam does not remain perfectly ordered. Bifurcations during subsequent T1 cascades lead to disorder and can even cause strain localization. (c) 2000 Society of Rheology.

  11. Sorption of Perfluorochemicals to Matrices Relevant to Sites Impacted by Aqueous Film-Forming Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulvado, J.; Higgins, C.

    2011-12-01

    Perfluorochemicals are a class of emerging contaminants consisting of fluorinated surfactants that are chemically and thermally stable and which contain a fluorocarbon tail that is both hydro- and oleophobic. Because of these unique properties, PFCs have a wide variety of uses including food paper packaging products, stain repellants, nonstick coatings, and aqueous film-forming foams (AFFF). At fire-training facilities, repeated application of AFFF is used to extinguish hydrocarbon fuel fires ignited for training purposes. The presence of perfluochemicals (PFCs) in groundwater as a result of repeated AFFF application at these facilities has been documented. Due to factors such as the recent push towards regulation of PFCs in drinking water, concerns have arisen about the fate of these compounds in the subsurface. Groundwater plumes containing PFC subclasses such as perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), perfluoroalkylsulfonates (PFAS), and fluorotelomer sulfonates (FtSs) in the μg/L to mg/L range have been detected. These plumes also may contain co-contaminants such as hydrocarbon fuel components and chlorinated solvents, some of which may exist as nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPL). This study examined the sorption of PFCs to soil and aquifer material across the concentration range applicable to AFFF-impacted sites (μg/L - mg/L) and looked at the impact of co-contaminants, including NAPL, on PFC sorption. PFC sorption was variable and indicated that similar to previous work on PFC sorption to sediment, subsurface PFC transport will depend on factors such as the sorbent organic carbon content, PFC subclass, solution chemistry, and PFC chain length.

  12. Experimental And Analytical Study Of Heat Transfer And Fluid Flow Through Aluminum Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancin, Simone; Zilio, Claudio; Rossetto, Luisa; Cavallini, Alberto

    2010-05-01

    This paper aims at investigating the air heat transfer and fluid flow through eight Aluminum open cell foam samples with different number of pores per linear inch (PPI ranging between 5 and 40), almost constant porosity (around 0.92-0.93) and different foam core heights (20 and 40 mm). The experimental heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop measurements have been collected in a test rig built at Dipartimento di Fisica Tecnica of the University of Padova. Three different heat fluxes have been imposed: 25.0, 32.5 and 40.0 kW m-2 and the air mass flow rate has been varied between 0.005 and 0.025 kg s-1, with air approach velocity between 2 and 5 m s-1. The effect of the foam height on the heat transfer has been experimentally analysed. Finally, the pressure drop measurements have been compared against an analytical model suggested in the open literature.

  13. Halloysite nanotube with fluorinated lumen: non-foaming nanocontainer for storage and controlled release of oxygen in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Giuseppe; Lazzara, Giuseppe; Milioto, Stefana; Palmisano, Giovanni; Parisi, Filippo

    2014-03-01

    Halloysite clay nanotubes were selectivity modified by adsorbing perfluoroalkylated anionic surfactants at the inner surface. The modified nanotubes formed kinetically stable dispersions due to the enhanced electrostatic repulsions exercised between the particles. We proved that the modified nanotubes can be used as non-foaming oxygen nanocontainers in aqueous media. The gas release from supersaturated dispersions can be controlled by external stimuli and system composition. In conclusion, we managed to put forward an easy strategy to develop smart materials from natural nanoclays, which can endow important applications like the storage and delivery of gas. PMID:24407660

  14. Foam Transport in Porous Media - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhong, Lirong

    2009-11-11

    transport of foam in porous media is complicated in that the number of lamellae present governs flow characteristics such as viscosity, relative permeability, fluid distribution, and interactions between fluids. Hence, foam is a non-Newtonian fluid. During transport, foam destruction and formation occur. The net result of the two processes determines the foam texture (i.e., bubble density). Some of the foam may be trapped during transport. According to the impacts of the aqueous and gas flow rates, foam flow generally has two regimes – weak and strong foam. There is also a minimum pressure gradient to initiate foam flow and a critical capillary for foam to be sustained. Similar to other fluids, the transport of foam is described by Darcy’s law with the exception that the foam viscosity is variable. Three major approaches to modeling foam transport in porous media are the empirical, semi-empirical, and mechanistic methods. Mechanistic approaches can be complete in principal but may be difficult to obtain reliable parameters, whereas empirical and semi-empirical approaches can be limited by the detail used to describe foam rheology and mobility. Mechanistic approaches include the bubble population-balance model, the network/percolation theory, the catastrophe theory, and the filtration theory. Among these methods, all were developed for modeling polyhedral foam with the exception that the method based on the filtration theory was for the ball foam (microfoam).

  15. Foam drainage in the presence of solid particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Nguyen, A V

    2016-03-28

    We conducted forced drainage experiments to study the liquid flow within the foams stabilized by a cationic surfactant (CTAB) in the presence of partially hydrophobic silica particles. The results show that the presence of solid particles, even when present in small amounts (0.0932 g L(-1) foam), can significantly decrease the foam permeability. The scaling behaviour (power law) between the drainage velocity and the imposed flow rate indicates that the presence of solid particles in the foams triggers a transition of the foam drainage regime from a node-dominated regime to a Plateau border-dominated regime. We applied two foam drainage equations for aqueous foams to simulate the experimental data and interpret the transition. The simulation results show that the presence of solid particles in the foams increases the rigidity of the interfaces and the viscous losses in the channels (the Plateau borders) of the foams, and decreases the foam permeability. We also generalize the theory for the effects of unattached hydrophilic particles on foam drainage by considering the effects of hydrophobicity and concentration of solid particles on the confinement of foam networks. This study explores liquid drainage in three-phase foams and is relevant to the field of hydrophobic particle separation by froth flotation, in which the wash water is commonly applied to the froth layer to improve the product grade. PMID:26877265

  16. Polyurethane foam loaded with sodium dodecylsulfate for the extraction of 'quat' pesticides from aqueous medium: Optimization of loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Vinhal, Jonas O; Lima, Claudio F; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2016-09-01

    The cationic herbicides paraquat, diquat and difenzoquat are largely used in different cultures worldwide. With this, there is an intrinsic risk of environmental contamination when these herbicides achieve natural waters. The goal of this work was to propose a novel and low-cost sorbent for the removal of the cited herbicides from aqueous medium. The proposed sorbent was prepared by loading polyurethane foam with sodium dodecylsulfate. The influence of several parameters (SDS concentration, HCl concentration and shaking time) on the loading process was investigated. The results obtained in this work demonstrated that all studied variables influenced the loading process, having significant effect on the extraction efficiency of the resulted PUF-SDS. At optimized conditions, the PUF was loaded by shaking 200mg of crushed foam with 200mL of a solution containing 5.0×10(-3)molL(-1) SDS and 0.25molL(-1) HCl, for 30min. The obtained PUF-SDS was efficient for removing the three herbicides from aqueous medium, achieving extraction percentages higher than 90%. The sorption process followed a pseudo second-order kinetics, which presented excellent predictive capacity of the amount of herbicide retained with time. PMID:27213562

  17. Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam Device

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Gjersing, E; Herberg, J L; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2008-10-29

    Interventional medical devices based on thermally responsive shape memory polymer (SMP) are under development to treat stroke victims. The goals of these catheter-delivered devices include re-establishing blood flow in occluded arteries and preventing aneurysm rupture. Because these devices alter the hemodynamics and dissipate thermal energy during the therapeutic procedure, a first step in the device development process is to investigate fluid velocity and temperature changes following device deployment. A laser-heated SMP foam device was deployed in a simplified in vitro vascular model. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques were used to assess the fluid dynamics and thermal changes associated with device deployment. Spatial maps of the steady-state fluid velocity and temperature change inside and outside the laser-heated SMP foam device were acquired. Though non-physiological conditions were used in this initial study, the utility of MRI in the development of a thermally-activated SMP foam device has been demonstrated.

  18. In Situ Observation of Plastic Foaming under Static Condition, Extensional Flow and Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Anson Sze Tat

    Traditional blowing agents (e.g., hydrochlorofluorocarbons) in plastic foaming processes has been phasing out due to environmental regulations. Plastic foaming industry is forced to employ greener alternatives (e.g., carbon dioxide, nitrogen), but their foaming processes are technologically challenging. Moreover, to improve the competitiveness of the foaming industry, it is imperative to develop a new generation of value-added plastic foams with cell structures that can be tailored to different applications. In this context, the objective of this thesis is to achieve a thorough understanding on cell nucleation and growth phenomena that determine cell structures in plastic foaming processes. The core research strategy is to develop innovative visualization systems to capture and study these phenomena. A system with accurate heating and cooling control has been developed to observe and study crystallization-induced foaming behaviors of polymers under static conditions. The cell nucleation and initial growth behavior of polymers blown with different blowing agents (nitrogen, argon and helium, and carbon dioxide-nitrogen mixtures) have also been investigated in great detail. Furthermore, two innovative systems have been developed to simulate the dynamic conditions in industrial foaming processes: one system captures a foaming process under an easily adjustable and uniform extensional strain in a high temperature and pressure environment, while the other achieves the same target, but with shear strain. Using these systems, the extensional and shear effects on bubble nucleation and initial growth processes has been investigated independently in an isolated manner, which has never been achieved previously. The effectiveness of cell nucleating agents has also been evaluated under dynamic conditions, which have led to the identification of new foaming mechanisms based on polymer-chain alignment and generation of microvoids under stress. Knowledge generated from these

  19. Aqueous semi-solid flow cell: demonstration and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z; Smith, KC; Dong, YJ; Baram, N; Fan, FY; Xie, J; Limthongkul, P; Carter, WC; Chiang, YM

    2013-01-01

    An aqueous Li-ion flow cell using suspension-based flow electrodes based on the LiTi2(PO4)(3)-LiFePO4 couple is demonstrated. Unlike conventional flow batteries, the semi-solid approach utilizes fluid electrodes that are electronically conductive. A model of simultaneous advection and electrochemical transport is developed and used to separate flow-induced losses from those due to underlying side reactions. The importance of plug flow to achieving high energy efficiency in flow batteries utilizing highly non-Newtonian flow electrodes is emphasized.

  20. USE OF SELECTED SORBENTS AND AN AQUEOUS FILM FORMING FOAM ON FLOATING HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research test program was initiated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to determine the effect sorbent materials and fire fighting foam have on containment, recovery and vapor suppression of floatable hazardous materials (HM) spilled on water. The test plan in...

  1. Bioremediation of aqueous pollutants using biomass embedded in hydrophilic foam. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.; Radway, J.C.; Santo Domingo, J.; Zingmark, R.G.; Whitaker, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    The major objective of this project was to examine the potential of a novel hydrophilic polyurethane foam as an immobilization medium for algal, bacteria, and other types of biomass, and to test the resulting foam/biomass aggregates for their use in cleaning up waters contaminated with heavy metals, radionuclides and toxic organic compounds. Initial investigations focused on the bioremoval of heavy metals from wastewaters at SRS using immobilized algal biomass. This effort met with limited success for reasons which included interference in the binding of biomass and target metals by various non-target constituents in the wastewater, lack of an appropriate wastewater at SRS for testing, and the unavailability of bioreactor systems capable of optimizing contact of target pollutants with sufficient biomass binding sites. Subsequent studies comparing algal, bacterial, fungal, and higher plant biomass demonstrated that other biomass sources were also ineffective for metal bioremoval under the test conditions. Radionuclide bioremoval using a Tc-99 source provided more promising results than the metal removal studies with the various types of biomass, and indicated that the alga Cyanidium was the best of the tested sources of biomass for this application. However, all of the biomass/foam aggregates tested were substantially inferior to a TEVA resin for removing Tc-99 in comparative testing. The authors also explored the use of hydrophilic polyurethane foam to embed Burkholderia cepacia, which is an efficient degrader of trichloroethylene (TCE), a contaminant of considerable concern at SRS and elsewhere. The embedded population proved to be incapable of growth on nutrient media, but retained respiratory activity. Lastly, the degradative capabilities of embedded G4 were examined. Phenol- or benzene-induced bacteria retained the ability to degrade TCE and benzene. The authors were successful in inducing enzyme activity after the organisms had already been embedded.

  2. Periodic explosions by positive feedback in a rising foam column

    PubMed Central

    Zener, Clarence; Noriega, Jaime

    1982-01-01

    An aqueous foam rising adiabatically in a column suffers a drop in temperature. Under appropriate conditions, such a column periodically explodes. We here trace this explosion to the tight thermal coupling between the foam and its enclosing glass column. When the surface surfactant concentration is unbuffered by micelles, a positive feedback exists between the flow of heat from the walls into the foam and the thermal conductivity of the foam itself. In our highly expanded foam, heat is conducted through the foam cells' interior primarily by the heat-pipe effect. Such an effect is retarded by a dense layer of surfactant molecules. Heat absorption causes cell expansion, which, in a foam unbuffered by micelles, causes a reduction in surface concentration of surfactant molecules and, hence, in an increase in thermal conductivity. This interpretation of our observed periodic explosions is in agreement with all of our observations. PMID:16593192

  3. Drag enhancement of aqueous electrolyte solutions in turbulent pipe flow.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Andrew P; Spedding, Peter L; Chen, John J J

    2010-04-22

    Detailed experimental results are presented for both laminar and turbulent flow of aqueous solutions in pipes of different diameters. Nonelectrolytes, such as sugar solutions followed the normal Moody pressure loss curves. Drag enhancement was demonstrated for turbulent flow of aqueous electrolyte solutions but not for laminar flow. The increased pressure drop for turbulent electrolyte flow was attributed to an electroviscous effect and a theory was developed to explain the drag enhancement. The increased pressure drop for the turbulent region of flow was shown to depend on the Debye length in the laminar sublayer on the pipe wall. Reasonable predictions of the increasing drag were obtained for both 1:1 and 2:1 electrolyte solutions. PMID:20337452

  4. Aqueous carrier waveguide in a flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, R.P. Jr.; Engh, G. van den; Northrup, M.A.

    1995-12-12

    The liquid of a flow cytometer itself acts as an optical waveguide, thus transmitting the light to an optical filter/detector combination. This alternative apparatus and method for detecting scattered light in a flow cytometer is provided by a device which views and detects the light trapped within the optical waveguide formed by the flow stream. A fiber optic or other light collecting device is positioned within the flow stream. This provides enormous advantages over the standard light collection technique which uses a microscope objective. The signal-to-noise ratio is greatly increased over that for right-angle-scattered light collected by a microscope objective, and the alignment requirements are simplified. 6 figs.

  5. Aqueous carrier waveguide in a flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; van den Engh, Gerrit; Northrup, M. Allen

    1995-01-01

    The liquid of a flow cytometer itself acts as an optical waveguide, thus transmitting the light to an optical filter/detector combination. This alternative apparatus and method for detecting scattered light in a flow cytometer is provided by a device which views and detects the light trapped within the optical waveguide formed by the flow stream. A fiber optic or other light collecting device is positioned within the flow stream. This provides enormous advantages over the standard light collection technique which uses a microscope objective. The signal-to-noise ratio is greatly increased over that for right-angle-scattered light collected by a microscope objective, and the alignment requirements are simplified.

  6. Evaluating the performance of the two-phase flow solver interFoam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Anumolu, Lakshman; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of the open source multiphase flow solver, interFoam, is evaluated in this work. The solver is based on a modified volume of fluid (VoF) approach, which incorporates an interfacial compression flux term to mitigate the effects of numerical smearing of the interface. It forms a part of the C + + libraries and utilities of OpenFOAM and is gaining popularity in the multiphase flow research community. However, to the best of our knowledge, the evaluation of this solver is confined to the validation tests of specific interest to the users of the code and the extent of its applicability to a wide range of multiphase flow situations remains to be explored. In this work, we have performed a thorough investigation of the solver performance using a variety of verification and validation test cases, which include (i) verification tests for pure advection (kinematics), (ii) dynamics in the high Weber number limit and (iii) dynamics of surface tension-dominated flows. With respect to (i), the kinematics tests show that the performance of interFoam is generally comparable with the recent algebraic VoF algorithms; however, it is noticeably worse than the geometric reconstruction schemes. For (ii), the simulations of inertia-dominated flows with large density ratios {\\sim }\\mathscr {O}(10^3) yielded excellent agreement with analytical and experimental results. In regime (iii), where surface tension is important, consistency of pressure-surface tension formulation and accuracy of curvature are important, as established by Francois et al (2006 J. Comput. Phys. 213 141-73). Several verification tests were performed along these lines and the main findings are: (a) the algorithm of interFoam ensures a consistent formulation of pressure and surface tension; (b) the curvatures computed by the solver converge to a value slightly (10%) different from the analytical value and a scope for improvement exists in this respect. To reduce the disruptive effects of spurious

  7. Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

    2009-02-01

    A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

  8. Analytical and Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer through Open-Cell Metal Foam Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Mehrdad

    In this thesis analytical and numerical investigations of fluid flow and heat transfer through open cell metal foam heat exchangers are presented. Primarily, different representative unit cell approximations, i.e, tetrakaidecahedron, dodecahedron and cubic are discussed. By applying the thermal resistance analogy, a novel formulation for evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of metal foams is proposed. The model improves previous models based on cubic or hexagonal cells. By using computer tomography images of a nickel foam sample a realistic 3D geometry is created and the foam's geometrical properties (i.e., porosity and surface area to volume ratio) and effective thermal conductivity are obtained. By using the experimentally found values of permeability, Forchheimer coefficient and solid-fluid interfacial convection coefficient, mathematical models for fluid flow and heat transfer in metal foams are developed. Two different assumptions: local thermal equilibrium (LTE) and local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE), are used. LTNE yields more accurate results. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of metal foam is made and validated against the experimental data for a square cross sectional nickel foam heat exchanger channel heated from the side walls while cooling air passes through the foam. The simulations are carried out for constant temperature or heat flux and different foam materials with pore densities of 10 and 40 pores per inch. The results show that the bonding of the foam to the walls has a considerable impact on the heat transfer rate. Convective heat transfer coefficients in terms of Nusselt number as functions of Reynolds number are also obtained. The design and CFD modeling of metal foam cross flow heat exchangers are also discussed. The results indicate both effectiveness and number of transfer units (NTU) for the metal foam heat exchangers are higher than those of a hollow channel; however, the effectiveness-NTU curves

  9. Comparison of Two-Phase Pipe Flow in OpenFOAM with a Mechanistic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuard, Adrian M.; Mahmud, Hisham B.; King, Andrew J.

    2016-03-01

    Two-phase pipe flow is a common occurrence in many industrial applications such as power generation and oil and gas transportation. Accurate prediction of liquid holdup and pressure drop is of vast importance to ensure effective design and operation of fluid transport systems. In this paper, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study of a two-phase flow of air and water is performed using OpenFOAM. The two-phase solver, interFoam is used to identify flow patterns and generate values of liquid holdup and pressure drop, which are compared to results obtained from a two-phase mechanistic model developed by Petalas and Aziz (2002). A total of 60 simulations have been performed at three separate pipe inclinations of 0°, +10° and -10° respectively. A three dimensional, 0.052m diameter pipe of 4m length is used with the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k - ɷ turbulence model to solve the turbulent mixtures of air and water. Results show that the flow pattern behaviour and numerical values of liquid holdup and pressure drop compare reasonably well to the mechanistic model.

  10. Organic non-aqueous cation-based redox flow batteries

    DOEpatents

    Jansen, Andrew N.; Vaughey, John T.; Chen, Zonghai; Zhang, Lu; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-03-29

    The present invention provides a non-aqueous redox flow battery comprising a negative electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid negative electrolyte, a positive electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid positive electrolyte, and a cation-permeable separator (e.g., a porous membrane, film, sheet, or panel) between the negative electrolyte from the positive electrolyte. During charging and discharging, the electrolytes are circulated over their respective electrodes. The electrolytes each comprise an electrolyte salt (e.g., a lithium or sodium salt), a transition-metal free redox reactant, and optionally an electrochemically stable organic solvent. Each redox reactant is selected from an organic compound comprising a conjugated unsaturated moiety, a boron cluster compound, and a combination thereof. The organic redox reactant of the positive electrolyte is selected to have a higher redox potential than the redox reactant of the negative electrolyte.

  11. Partitioning of perfluorooctanesulfonate and perfluorohexanesulfonate in the aquatic environment after an accidental release of aqueous film forming foam at Schiphol Amsterdam Airport.

    PubMed

    Kwadijk, Christiaan J A F; Kotterman, Michiel; Koelmans, Albert A

    2014-08-01

    In summer 2008, an accidental release of aqueous film forming foam (AFFF) took place at Schiphol Amsterdam Airport (The Netherlands). After the release, water, fish, and sediment samples were collected and analyzed for perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs). In situ perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) sediment-water distribution factor (KD ) values, bioaccumulation factor (BAF) values, and biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) values showed a remarkable agreement among reference and impacted sites, 10 wk after the incident as well as after 3 yr. PMID:24729487

  12. Plasmonic nanoshell synthesis in microfluidic composite foams.

    PubMed

    Duraiswamy, Suhanya; Khan, Saif A

    2010-09-01

    The availability of robust, scalable, and automated nanoparticle manufacturing processes is crucial for the viability of emerging nanotechnologies. Metallic nanoparticles of diverse shape and composition are commonly manufactured by solution-phase colloidal chemistry methods, where rapid reaction kinetics and physical processes such as mixing are inextricably coupled, and scale-up often poses insurmountable problems. Here we present the first continuous flow process to synthesize thin gold "nanoshells" and "nanoislands" on colloidal silica surfaces, which are nanoparticle motifs of considerable interest in plasmonics-based applications. We assemble an ordered, flowing composite foam lattice in a simple microfluidic device, where the lattice cells are alternately aqueous drops containing reagents for nanoparticle synthesis or gas bubbles. Microfluidic foam generation enables precisely controlled reagent dispensing and mixing, and the ordered foam structure facilitates compartmentalized nanoparticle growth. This is a general method for aqueous colloidal synthesis, enabling continuous, inherently digital, scalable, and automated production processes for plasmonic nanomaterials. PMID:20731386

  13. Removal of trace levels of aromatic amines from aqueous solution by foam flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Nyssen, G.A.; White, J.S. ); Bibring, P.; Wilson, D.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Aromatic amines, including 4-(t-butyl)pyridine, 4-(n-butyl)-aniline, benzylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl, 1- and 2-aminonaphthalene, and 2,6-xylidine were effectively removed from water by foam flotation with the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). With initial amine concentrations of 10 mg/L or less, residual amine concentrations of less than 0.1 mg/L were generally obtained after 10-30 min of flotation. The SDS concentration and flotation time are directly related to the amount of amine removed. Amine removal is most efficient at pH values low enough so that the amine is protonated (usually about 3), and at low ionic strength. Alcohols up to 10% by volume do not appreciably affect amine removal. The mechanism of removal is dominated by ion-ion attraction between the surfactant and the protonated amine; there is also apparently some contribution from ion-dipole attraction. Benzidine is not removed effectively; evidently it is insufficiently hydrophobic.

  14. Effects of Aqueous Film-Forming Foams (AFFFs) on Trichloroethene (TCE) Dechlorination by a Dehalococcoides mccartyi-Containing Microbial Community.

    PubMed

    Harding-Marjanovic, Katie C; Yi, Shan; Weathers, Tess S; Sharp, Jonathan O; Sedlak, David L; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    The application of aqueous film-forming foams (AFFFs) to extinguish chlorinated solvent-fueled fires has led to the co-contamination of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater and soil. Although reductive dechlorination of TCE by Dehalococcoides mccartyi is a frequently used remediation strategy, the effects of AFFF and PFASs on TCE dechlorination are not well-understood. Various AFFF formulations, PFASs, and ethylene glycols were amended to the growth medium of a D. mccartyi-containing enrichment culture to determine the impact on dechlorination, fermentation, and methanogenesis. The community was capable of fermenting organics (e.g., diethylene glycol butyl ether) in all AFFF formulations to hydrogen and acetate, but the product concentrations varied significantly according to formulation. TCE was dechlorinated in the presence of an AFFF formulation manufactured by 3M but was not dechlorinated in the presence of formulations from two other manufacturers. Experiments amended with AFFF-derived PFASs and perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) indicated that dechlorination could be inhibited by PFASs but that the inhibition depends on surfactant concentration and structure. This study revealed that the fermentable components of AFFF can stimulate TCE dechlorination, while some of the fluorinated compounds in certain AFFF formulations can inhibit dechlorination. PMID:26894610

  15. Small scale flow processes in aqueous heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Rashidi, M.; Dickenson, E.

    1996-04-01

    Small scale flow processes in aqueous heterogeneous porous systems have been studied experimentally via novel nonintrusive fluorescence imaging techniques. The techniques involve 3D visualization and quantification of flow fields within a refractive index-matched transparent porous column. The refractive index-matching yields a transparent porous medium, free from any scattering and refraction at the solid-liquid interfaces, as a result allowing direct optical probing at any point within the porous system. By illuminating the porous regions within the column with a planar sheet of laser beam, flow processes through the porous medium can be observed microscopically, and qualitative and quantitative in-pore transport information can be obtained at a good resolution and a good accuracy. A CCD camera is used to record the fluorescent images at every vertical plane location while sweeping back and forth across the column. These digitized flow images are then analyzed and accumulated over a 3D volume within the column. Series of flow experiments in aqueous, refractive index-matched, porous systems packed with natural mineral particles have been performed successfully in these laboratories.

  16. Complete dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenol in aqueous solution on palladium/polymeric pyrrole-cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide/foam-nickel composite electrode.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhirong; Wei, Xuefeng; Han, Yanbo; Tong, Shan; Hu, Xiang

    2013-01-15

    The electrochemically reductive dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) in aqueous solution on palladium/polymeric pyrrole-cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide/foam-nickel electrode (Pd/PPy-CTAB/foam-Ni electrode) was investigated in this paper. Pd/PPy-CTAB/foam-Ni electrode was prepared and characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) adsorption and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The influences of some experimental factors such as the dechlorination current, dechlorination time and the initial pH on the removal efficiency and the current efficiency of 2,4-DCP dechlorination on Pd/PPy-CTAB/foam-Ni electrode were studied. Complete removal of 2,4-DCP was achieved and the current efficiency of 47.4% could be obtained under the conditions of the initial pH of 2.2, the dechlorination current of 5 mA and the dechlorination time of 50 min when the initial 2,4-DCP concentration was 100 mg L(-1). The analysis of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) identified that the intermediate products were 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). The final products were mainly phenol. Its further reduction product cyclohexanone was also detected. The electrocatalytic dechlorination pathways of 2,4-DCP on Pd/PPy-CTAB/foam-Ni electrode were discussed. The stability of the electrode was favorable that it could keep dechlorination efficiency at 100% after having been reused 10 times. Results revealed that the stable prepared Pd/PPy-CTAB/foam-Ni electrode presented a good application prospect in dechlorination process with high effectiveness and low cost. PMID:23270952

  17. High areal capacitance three-dimensional Ni@Ni(OH)2 foams via in situ oxidizing Ni foams in mild aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qingfeng; Cui, Mangwei; Tao, Keyu; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang; Kang, Litao

    2016-03-01

    In this work, commercial Ni foams are directly oxidized into Ni@Ni(OH)2 foams in a mild NH4NO3 solution at 80 °C. When used as binder-free electrodes, these Ni@Ni(OH)2 electrodes demonstrate a high areal capacitance of 6.4 F/cm2 at a current density of 2.5 mA/cm2, or 1.62 F/cm2 at a high current density of 30 mA/cm2. Nevertheless, they show a poor cycling ability with 70.4% (or 42%) capacitance retention after 2000 (or 5000) cycles at 30 mA/cm2. This kind of electrodes has a promising application in low-cost, high-performance supercapacitor, if an effective strategy is found to improve their cycling ability.

  18. Additions to compact heat exchanger technology: Jet impingement cooling & flow & heat transfer in metal foam-fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstad, Andrew J.

    Compact heat exchangers have been designed following the same basic methodology for over fifty years. However, with the present emphasis on energy efficiency and light weight of prime movers there is increasing demand for completely new heat exchangers. Moreover, new materials and mesoscale fabrication technologies offer the possibility of significantly improving heat exchanger performance over conventional designs. This work involves fundamental flow and heat transfer experimentation to explore two new heat exchange systems: in Part I, large arrays of impinging jets with local extraction and in Part II, metal foams used as fins. Jet impingement cooling is widely used in applications ranging from paper manufacturing to the cooling of gas turbine blades because of the very high local heat transfer coefficients that are possible. While the use of single jet impingement results in non-uniform cooling, increased and more uniform mean heat transfer coefficients may be attained by dividing the total cooling flow among an array of smaller jets. Unfortunately, when the spent fluid from the array's central jets interact with the outer jets, the overall mean heat transfer coefficient is reduced. This problem can be alleviated by locally extracting the spent fluid before it is able to interact with the surrounding jets. An experimental investigation was carried out on a compact impingement array (Xn/Djet = 2.34) utilizing local extraction of the spent fluid (Aspent/Ajet = 2.23) from the jet exit plane. Spatially resolved measurements of the mean velocity field within the array were carried out at jet Reynolds numbers of 2300 and 5300 by magnetic resonance velocimetry, MRV. The geometry provided for a smooth transition from the jet to the target surface and out through the extraction holes without obvious flow recirculation. Mean Nusselt number measurements were also carried out for a Reynolds number range of 2000 to 10,000. The Nusselt number was found to increase with the

  19. Foam Microrheology

    SciTech Connect

    KRAYNIK,ANDREW M.; LOEWENBERG,MICHAEL; REINELT,DOUGLAS A.

    1999-09-01

    The microrheology of liquid foams is discussed for two different regimes: static equilibrium where the capillary number Ca is zero, and the viscous regime where viscosity and surface tension are important and Ca is finite. The Surface Evolver is used to calculate the equilibrium structure of wet Kelvin foams and dry soap froths with random structure, i.e., topological disorder. The distributions of polyhedra and faces are compared with the experimental data of Matzke. Simple shearing flow of a random foam under quasistatic conditions is also described. Viscous phenomena are explored in the context of uniform expansion of 2D and 3D foams at low Reynolds number. Boundary integral methods are used to calculate the influence of Ca on the evolution of foam microstructure, which includes bubble shape and the distribution of liquid between films, Plateau borders, and (in 3D) the nodes where Plateau borders meet. The micromechanical point of view guides the development of structure-property-processing relationships for foams.

  20. Discrete Particle Model for Porous Media Flow using OpenFOAM at Intel Xeon Phi Coprocessors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhi; Nandakumar, Krishnaswamy; Liu, Honggao; Tyagi, Mayank; Lupo, James A.; Thompson, Karten

    2015-11-01

    The discrete particle model (DPM) in OpenFOAM was used to study the turbulent solid particle suspension flows through the porous media of a natural dual-permeability rock. The 2D and 3D pore geometries of the porous media were generated by sphere packing with the radius ratio of 3. The porosity is about 38% same as the natural dual-permeability rock. In the 2D case, the mesh cells reach 5 million with 1 million solid particles and in the 3D case, the mesh cells are above 10 million with 5 million solid particles. The solid particles are distributed by Gaussian distribution from 20 μm to 180 μm with expectation as 100 μm. Through the numerical simulations, not only was the HPC studied using Intel Xeon Phi Coprocessors but also the flow behaviors of large scale solid suspension flows in porous media were studied. The authors would like to thank the support by IPCC@LSU-Intel Parallel Computing Center (LSU # Y1SY1-1) and the HPC resources at Louisiana State University (http://www.hpc.lsu.edu).

  1. Loop flow analysis of dissolved reactive phosphorus in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Li, Quanlong; Yuan, Dongxing

    2014-06-01

    The current flow based method for the determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) suffers interference from salinity (e.g. index refractive difference) and the incidentally formed bubbles, which can be a problem for optical detection. Here we reported a simple and robust loop flow analysis (LFA) method for accurate measurement of DRP in different aqueous samples. The chemistry is based on the classic phosphomolybdenum blue (PMB) reaction and the PMB formed in a novel cross-shaped flow cell was detected at 700 nm using a miniature spectrophotometer. The effects of reagents on the kinetic formation of PMB were evaluated. The detection limit was 32 nM with an optical pathlength of 1cm and the relative standard deviations for repetitive determinations of 1, 2 and 8 µM phosphate solutions were 1.8% (n=113, without any stoppage during repeating analysis for >7h), 1.0% (n=49) and 0.39% (n=9), respectively. The analysis time was 4 min sample(-1). The effects of salinity and interfering ions (silicate and arsenate) were evaluated and showed no interference under the proposed protocol for DRP analysis. Using the LFA method, different aqueous samples with a salinity range of 0-34 were analyzed and the results showed excellent agreement with the reference method (slope 0.9982±0.0063, R(2)=0.9987, n=34). Recoveries for spiked samples varied from 95.4% to 103.7%. The proposed method showed insignificant interference from salinity, silicate and arsenate, higher reproducibility, easier operation and was free of the bubble problem. PMID:24725885

  2. Residual aqueous ozone determination by gas diffusion flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Straka, M.R.; Gordon, G.; Pacey, G.E.

    1985-08-01

    A method for the determination of residual aqueous ozone utilizing the technique of gas diffusion flow injection analysis and the redox reagents potassium indigo trisulfonate and bis(terpyridine)iron(II) is described. The system uses a commercially available gas diffusion cell fitted with a microporous Teflon membrane to significantly reduce or eliminate potential interferences such as chlorine and oxidized forms of manganese. Detection limits of 0.03 mg/L ozone are possible with sensitivities and linear ranges comparable to the manual method. Selectivity is significantly improved and chlorine interference is reduced to 0.008 mg/L of apparent ozone for each part per million of chlorine present while oxidized manganese interference is completely eliminated. This method provides a sample throughput of 65 samples per hour. 30 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Laser driven supersonic flow over a compressible foam surface on the Nike lasera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Plewa, T.; Velikovich, A. L.; Gillespie, R. S.; Weaver, J. L.; Visco, A.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Ditmar, J. R.

    2010-05-01

    A laser driven millimeter-scale target was used to generate a supersonic shear layer in an attempt to create a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable interface in a high-energy-density (HED) plasma. The KH instability is a fundamental fluid instability that remains unexplored in HED plasmas, which are relevant to the inertial confinement fusion and astrophysical environments. In the experiment presented here the Nike laser [S. P. Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] was used to create and drive Al plasma over a rippled foam surface. In response to the supersonic Al flow (Mach=2.6±1.1) shocks should form in the Al flow near the perturbations. The experimental data were used to infer the existence and location of these shocks. In addition, the interface perturbations show growth that has possible contributions from both KH and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. Since compressible shear layers exhibit smaller growth, it is important to use the KH growth rate derived from the compressible dispersion relation.

  4. Simple shearing flow of dry soap foams with TCP structure[Tetrahedrally Close-Packed

    SciTech Connect

    REINELT,DOUGLAS A.; KRAYNIK,ANDREW M.

    2000-02-16

    The microrheology of dry soap foams subjected to large, quasistatic, simple shearing deformations is analyzed. Two different monodisperse foams with tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) structure are examined: Weaire-Phelan (A15) and Friauf-Laves (C15). The elastic-plastic response is evaluated by calculating foam structures that minimize total surface area at each value of strain. The minimal surfaces are computed with the Surface Evolver program developed by Brakke. The foam geometry and macroscopic stress are piecewise continuous functions of strain. The stress scales as T/V{sup 1/3} where T is surface tension and V is cell volume. Each discontinuity corresponds to large changes in foam geometry and topology that restore equilibrium to unstable configurations that violate Plateau's laws. The instabilities occur when the length of an edge on a polyhedral foam cell vanishes. The length can tend to zero smoothly or abruptly with strain. The abrupt case occurs when a small increase in strain changes the energy profile in the neighborhood of a foam structure from a local minimum to a saddle point, which can lead to symmetry-breaking bifurcations. In general, the new foam topology associated with each stable solution branch results from a cascade of local topology changes called T1 transitions. Each T1 cascade produces different cell neighbors, reduces surface energy, and provides an irreversible, film-level mechanism for plastic yield behavior. Stress-strain curves and average stresses are evaluated by examining foam orientations that admit strain-periodic behavior. For some orientations, the deformation cycle includes Kelvin cells instead of the original TCP structure; but the foam does not remain perfectly ordered. Bifurcations during subsequent T1 cascades lead to disorder and can even cause strain localization.

  5. Foam Micromechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Neilsen, M.K.; Reinelt, D.A.; Warren, W.E.

    1998-11-03

    Foam evokes many different images: waves breaking at the seashore, the head on a pint of Guinness, an elegant dessert, shaving, the comfortable cushion on which you may be seated... From the mundane to the high tech, foams, emulsions, and cellular solids encompass a broad range of materials and applications. Soap suds, mayonnaise, and foamed polymers provide practical motivation and only hint at the variety of materials at issue. Typical of mukiphase materiaIs, the rheoIogy or mechanical behavior of foams is more complicated than that of the constituent phases alone, which may be gas, liquid, or solid. For example, a soap froth exhibits a static shear modulus-a hallmark of an elastic solid-even though it is composed primarily of two Newtonian fluids (water and air), which have no shear modulus. This apparent paradox is easily resolved. Soap froth contains a small amount of surfactant that stabilizes the delicate network of thin liq- uid films against rupture. The soap-film network deforms in response to a macroscopic strain; this increases interracial area and the corresponding sur- face energy, and provides the strain energy of classical elasticity theory [1]. This physical mechanism is easily imagined but very challenging to quantify for a realistic three-dimensional soap froth in view of its complex geome- try. Foam micromechanics addresses the connection between constituent properties, cell-level structure, and macroscopic mechanical behavior. This article is a survey of micromechanics applied to gas-liquid foams, liquid-liquid emulsions, and cellular solids. We will focus on static response where the foam deformation is very slow and rate-dependent phenomena such as viscous flow can be neglected. This includes nonlinear elasticity when deformations are large but reversible. We will also discuss elastic- plastic behavior, which involves yield phenomena. Foam structures based on polyhedra packed to fill space provide a unify- ing geometrical theme. Because a two

  6. Effect of mesocelluar carbon foam electrode material on performance of vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sanghyun; An, Sunhyung; Jeong, Jooyoung; Lee, Jinwoo; Kwon, Yongchai

    2015-03-01

    Languid reaction rate of VO2+/VO2+ redox couple is a problem to solve for improving performance of vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). To facilitate the slow reaction materials including large pore sized mesocellular carbon foam (MSU-F-C and Pt/MSU-F-C) are used as new catalyst. Their catalytic activity and reaction reversibility are estimated and compared with other catalysts, while cycle tests of charge-discharge and polarization curve tests are implemented to evaluate energy efficiency (EE) and maximum power density (MPD). Their crystal structure, specific surface area and catalyst morphology are measured by XRD, BET and TEM. The new catalysts indicate high peak current ratio, small peak potential difference and high electron transfer rate constant, proving that their catalytic activity and reaction reversibility are superior. Regarding the charge-discharge and polarization curve tests, the VRFB single cells including new catalysts show high EE as well as low overpotential and internal resistance and high MPD. Such excellent results are due to mostly unique characteristics of MSU-F-C having large interconnected mesopores, high surface area and large contents of hydroxyl groups that serve as active sites for VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction and platinums (Pts) supporting the MSU-F-C. Indeed, employment of the catalysts including MSU-F-C leads to enhancement in performance of VRFB by facilitating the slow VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction.

  7. A metal-free organic-inorganic aqueous flow battery

    SciTech Connect

    Huskinson, B; Marshak, MP; Suh, C; Er, S; Gerhardt, MR; Galvin, CJ; Chen, XD; Aspuru-Guzik, A; Gordon, RG; Aziz, MJ

    2014-01-08

    As the fraction of electricity generation from intermittent renewable sources-such as solar or wind-grows, the ability to store large amounts of electrical energy is of increasing importance. Solid-electrode batteries maintain discharge at peak power for far too short a time to fully regulate wind or solar power output(1,2). In contrast, flow batteries can independently scale the power (electrode area) and energy (arbitrarily large storage volume) components of the system by maintaining all of the electro-active species in fluid form(3-5). Wide-scale utilization of flow batteries is, however, limited by the abundance and cost of these materials, particularly those using redox-active metals and precious-metal electrocatalysts(6,7). Here we describe a class of energy storage materials that exploits the favourable chemical and electro-chemical properties of a family of molecules known as quinones. The example we demonstrate is ametal-free flow battery based on the redox chemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonic acid (AQDS). AQDS undergoes extremely rapid and reversible two-electron two-proton reduction on a glassy carbon electrode in sulphuric acid. An aqueous flow battery with inexpensive carbon electrodes, combining the quinone/hydroquinone couple with the Br-2/Br- redox couple, yields a peak galvanic power density exceeding 0.6 W cm(-2) at 1.3 A cm(-2). Cycling of this quinone-bromide flow battery showed >99 per cent storage capacity retention per cycle. The organic anthraquinone species can be synthesized from inexpensive commodity chemicals(8). This organic approach permits tuning of important properties such as the reduction potential and solubility by adding functional groups: for example, we demonstrate that the addition of two hydroxy groups to AQDS increases the open circuit potential of the cell by 11% and we describe a pathway for further increases in cell voltage. The use of p-aromatic redox-active organic molecules instead of redox-active metals

  8. A metal-free organic-inorganic aqueous flow battery.

    PubMed

    Huskinson, Brian; Marshak, Michael P; Suh, Changwon; Er, Süleyman; Gerhardt, Michael R; Galvin, Cooper J; Chen, Xudong; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    As the fraction of electricity generation from intermittent renewable sources--such as solar or wind--grows, the ability to store large amounts of electrical energy is of increasing importance. Solid-electrode batteries maintain discharge at peak power for far too short a time to fully regulate wind or solar power output. In contrast, flow batteries can independently scale the power (electrode area) and energy (arbitrarily large storage volume) components of the system by maintaining all of the electro-active species in fluid form. Wide-scale utilization of flow batteries is, however, limited by the abundance and cost of these materials, particularly those using redox-active metals and precious-metal electrocatalysts. Here we describe a class of energy storage materials that exploits the favourable chemical and electrochemical properties of a family of molecules known as quinones. The example we demonstrate is a metal-free flow battery based on the redox chemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonic acid (AQDS). AQDS undergoes extremely rapid and reversible two-electron two-proton reduction on a glassy carbon electrode in sulphuric acid. An aqueous flow battery with inexpensive carbon electrodes, combining the quinone/hydroquinone couple with the Br2/Br(-) redox couple, yields a peak galvanic power density exceeding 0.6 W cm(-2) at 1.3 A cm(-2). Cycling of this quinone-bromide flow battery showed >99 per cent storage capacity retention per cycle. The organic anthraquinone species can be synthesized from inexpensive commodity chemicals. This organic approach permits tuning of important properties such as the reduction potential and solubility by adding functional groups: for example, we demonstrate that the addition of two hydroxy groups to AQDS increases the open circuit potential of the cell by 11% and we describe a pathway for further increases in cell voltage. The use of π-aromatic redox-active organic molecules instead of redox-active metals

  9. A metal-free organic-inorganic aqueous flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huskinson, Brian; Marshak, Michael P.; Suh, Changwon; Er, Süleyman; Gerhardt, Michael R.; Galvin, Cooper J.; Chen, Xudong; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Gordon, Roy G.; Aziz, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    As the fraction of electricity generation from intermittent renewable sources--such as solar or wind--grows, the ability to store large amounts of electrical energy is of increasing importance. Solid-electrode batteries maintain discharge at peak power for far too short a time to fully regulate wind or solar power output. In contrast, flow batteries can independently scale the power (electrode area) and energy (arbitrarily large storage volume) components of the system by maintaining all of the electro-active species in fluid form. Wide-scale utilization of flow batteries is, however, limited by the abundance and cost of these materials, particularly those using redox-active metals and precious-metal electrocatalysts. Here we describe a class of energy storage materials that exploits the favourable chemical and electrochemical properties of a family of molecules known as quinones. The example we demonstrate is a metal-free flow battery based on the redox chemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonic acid (AQDS). AQDS undergoes extremely rapid and reversible two-electron two-proton reduction on a glassy carbon electrode in sulphuric acid. An aqueous flow battery with inexpensive carbon electrodes, combining the quinone/hydroquinone couple with the Br2/Br- redox couple, yields a peak galvanic power density exceeding 0.6Wcm-2 at 1.3Acm-2. Cycling of this quinone-bromide flow battery showed >99 per cent storage capacity retention per cycle. The organic anthraquinone species can be synthesized from inexpensive commodity chemicals. This organic approach permits tuning of important properties such as the reduction potential and solubility by adding functional groups: for example, we demonstrate that the addition of two hydroxy groups to AQDS increases the open circuit potential of the cell by 11% and we describe a pathway for further increases in cell voltage. The use of π-aromatic redox-active organic molecules instead of redox-active metals represents a new and

  10. Foam process models.

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, Harry K.; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A.; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2008-09-01

    In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level foam processing computational model suitable for predicting the self-expansion of foam in complex geometries. The model is based on a finite element representation of the equations of motion, with the movement of the free surface represented using the level set method, and has been implemented in SIERRA/ARIA. An empirically based time- and temperature-dependent density model is used to encapsulate the complex physics of foam nucleation and growth in a numerically tractable model. The change in density with time is at the heart of the foam self-expansion as it creates the motion of the foam. This continuum-level model uses an homogenized description of foam, which does not include the gas explicitly. Results from the model are compared to temperature-instrumented flow visualization experiments giving the location of the foam front as a function of time for our EFAR model system.

  11. Verification, validation, and implementation of numerical methods and models for OpenFOAM 2.0 for incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Eric D.

    A comprehensive survey of available numerical methods and models was performed on the open source computational fluid dynamics solver OpenFOAM version 2.0 for incompressible turbulent bluff body flows. Numerical methods are illuminated using source code for side-by-side comparison. For validation, the accuracy of flow predictions over a sphere in the subcritical regime and delta wing with sharp leading edge is assessed. Solutions show mostly good agreement with experimental data and data obtained from commercial software. A demonstration of the numerical implementation of a dynamic hybrid RANS/LES framework is also presented, including results from test studies.

  12. Development of advanced foams in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Moreno, Francisco; Babcsan, Norbert; Banhart, John; Andersson, Martin; Pugh, Robert J.; Kronberg, Bengt; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Marze, Sébastien; Langevin, Dominique; Brunke, Oliver; Odenbach, Stefan; Cox, Simon; Hutzler, Stefan; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Weaire, Denis; Baumgärtner, Frank; Seeliger, Wolfgang; Argillier, Jean-François; Lange, Dieter

    2005-10-01

    Metallic and aqueous foams are challenging materials for both fundamental and applied research. They distinguish themselves from other materials by their very low density and, especially in the case of metallic foams, by high specific stiffness, good damping and high-energy absorption capability. They are therefore becoming increasingly popular for industrial applications. Driven by industry demand, efforts have been made in recent years to improve foam quality. Microgravity conditions are essential for further analysis and improvement of aqueous and metallic foams. Experimental devices for in situ and ex situ analysis were developed within this MAP project. Foam properties such as drainage, rupture events and foam density were analysed quantitatively, as well as the influence of external conditions like gas pressure and foaming gas. Hardness and wetting angles for different stabilising particles were compared; mica is proposed as a suitable candidate for aluminium foams. In the case of aqueous foams, surfactants and proteins are found to have a different microscopic origin of stabilisation. A monodisperse aqueous foam generator will be adapted for metallic foams. Foam stabilisation mechanisms and foam evolution simulations were performed. 2-D X-ray foam images were successfully simulated.

  13. Membrane treatment of Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) wastes for recovery of its active ingredients. Final report, Mar 79-Sep 80

    SciTech Connect

    Chian, E.S.K.; Wu, T.P.; Rowland, R.W.

    1980-10-01

    Ultrafiltration (UF) and Reverse Osmosis (RO) treatment of Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) solutions was investigated to determine the feasibility of employing membrane processes to separate and recover AFFF active ingredients for reuse. Studies were performed on both 6% AFFF in tap-water solutions and on actual wastewaters spiked with 3% or 6% AFFF. The AFFF materials used in this study consisted of Ansul, 3M FC-206, and 3M FC-780. Membrane employed for these studies included Abcor HFD, HFF, HFJ, and HFK tubular ultrafiltration (UF) membranes and a DuPont B-10 reverse osmosis (RO) module. Parameters monitored to represent AFFF ingredients were TOC, dissolved solids, surfactants, and % glycol. An attempt was also made to determine fluorocarbons as fluoride. Membrane fluxes were also determined. Results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of employing UF-RO processes to separate and recover the AFFF active ingredients for reuse. Approximately 75% recovery of the AFFF active ingredients as represented by the foam test was attained. An economic analysis of the membrane treatment processes indicates that it is extremely favorable in recovering the AFFF wastewater for reuse. Pilot-scale studies are, however, necessary to fully establish the process feasibilities and economics of the AFFF recovery system.

  14. SediFoam: A general-purpose, open-source CFD-DEM solver for particle-laden flow with emphasis on sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rui; Xiao, Heng

    2016-04-01

    With the growth of available computational resource, CFD-DEM (computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method) becomes an increasingly promising and feasible approach for the study of sediment transport. Several existing CFD-DEM solvers are applied in chemical engineering and mining industry. However, a robust CFD-DEM solver for the simulation of sediment transport is still desirable. In this work, the development of a three-dimensional, massively parallel, and open-source CFD-DEM solver SediFoam is detailed. This solver is built based on open-source solvers OpenFOAM and LAMMPS. OpenFOAM is a CFD toolbox that can perform three-dimensional fluid flow simulations on unstructured meshes; LAMMPS is a massively parallel DEM solver for molecular dynamics. Several validation tests of SediFoam are performed using cases of a wide range of complexities. The results obtained in the present simulations are consistent with those in the literature, which demonstrates the capability of SediFoam for sediment transport applications. In addition to the validation test, the parallel efficiency of SediFoam is studied to test the performance of the code for large-scale and complex simulations. The parallel efficiency tests show that the scalability of SediFoam is satisfactory in the simulations using up to O(107) particles.

  15. Foam Cushioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    One innovation developed by a contractor at Ames Research Center was an open cell polymeric foam material with unusual properties. Intended as padding for aircraft seats the material offered better impact protection against accidents, and also enhanced passenger comfort because it distributed body weight evenly over the entire contact area. Called a slow springback foam, it flows to match the contour of the body pressing against it, and returns to its original shape once the pressure is removed. It has many applications including aircraft cushions and padding, dental stools, and athletic equipment. Now it's used by Dynamic Systems, Inc. for medical applications such as wheel chairs for severely disabled people which allow them to sit for 3-8 hours where they used to be uncomfortable in 15-30 minutes.

  16. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOEpatents

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  17. Foam Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    William G. Simpson, a NASA/Marshall employee, invented and patented a foam mixing dispensing device. He is supplying his Simpson mixer to a number of foam applications where it is used to apply foam for insulation purposes.

  18. Modeling of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell with metal foam in the flow-field of the bipolar/end plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Atul; Reddy, R. G.

    A unified, three-dimensional, steady-state numerical mass-transfer single cell model for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was developed. The modeled fuel cell uses metal foam in the flow-field of the bipolar/end plates instead of the conventionally used rectangular channels. Transport equations formulated under the PEMFC conditions were solved using the commercial computational fluid dynamics software Fluent ® 6.0 with Gambit ® 2.0 as pre-processor. Simulations were performed for different permeability levels of the metal foam in the flow-field. Results showed a significant effect of permeability of the metal foam on the performance of the fuel cell. For example: at 10 -6 m 2 permeability of metal foam the value of average current density was 5943 A/m 2 while at 10 -11 m 2 permeability, the average current density was 8325 A/m 2. The average current density value for the multi-parallel flow-field channel design (channel width=0.0625 in., channel depth=0.0625 in. and land width=0.0625 in.), which corresponded to an equivalent permeability value of 4.4×10 -8 m 2 was 7019 A/m 2. This value for the porous configuration with same permeability and under similar conditions of temperature, pressure and reactants flow rate was slightly lower at 6794 A/m 2. The trend indicated that decreasing the permeability of the flow-field results in better performance from the cell. However, the permeability of the channel design can not be decreased below the value of around 10 -8 m 2, due to difficulty in machining thinner channels. Consequently, the use of metal foam flow-field is proposed in the bipolar/end plate. The developed model offers fuel cell developers a scope for improvement of the bipolar/end plates in the fuel cell, by switching over to the metal foam flow-field concept.

  19. Determining Aqueous Fullerene Particle Size Distributions by Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) without Surfactants

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the behavior of nanoparticles in environmental systems, methods must be developed to measure nanoparticle size. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation (AF4) is an aqueous compatible size separation technique which is able to separate particles from 1 nm to 10 µm in...

  20. Foams for barriers and nonlethal weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, Peter B.

    1997-01-01

    Our times demand better solutions to conflict resolution than simply shooting someone. Because of this, police and military interest in non-lethal concepts is high. Already in use are pepper sprays, bean-bag guns, flash-bang grenades, and rubber bullets. At Sandia we got a head start on non- lethal weapon concepts. Protection of nuclear materials required systems that went way beyond the traditional back vault. Dispensable deterrents were used to allow a graduated response to a threat. Sticky foams and stabilized aqueous foams were developed to provide access delay. Foams won out for security systems simply because you could get a large volume from a small container. For polymeric foams the expansion ratio is thirty to fifty to one. In aqueous foams expansion ratios of one thousand to ne are easily obtained. Recent development work on sticky foams has included a changeover to environmentally friendly solvents, foams with very low toxicity, and the development of non-flammable silicone resin based foams. High expansion aqueous foams are useful visual and aural obscurants. Our recent aqueous foam development has concentrated on using very low toxicity foaming agents combined with oleoresin capsicum irritant to provide a safe but highly irritating foam.

  1. Structure of Porous Starch Microcellular Foam Particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new starch product with various novel applications is a porous microcellular foam. The foam product is made by dehydrating a starch hydrogel in a solvent such as ethanol and then removing the solvent to form a foam product. The process involves heating an aqueous slurry of starch (8% w/...

  2. Foam flow and liquid films motion: role of the surfactants properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantat, Isabelle

    2011-11-01

    Liquid foams absorb energy in a much more efficient way than each of its constituents, taken separately. However, the local process at the origin of the energy dissipation is not entirely elucidated yet, and several models may apply, thus making worth local studies on simpler systems. We investigate the motion through a wet tube of transverse soap films, or lamellae, combining local thickness and velocity measurements in the wetting film. For foaming solution with a high dilatational surface modulus, we reveal a zone of several centimeters in length, the dynamic wetting film, which is significantly influenced by a moving lamella. The dependence of this influence length on lamella velocity and wetting film thickness provides an accurate discrimination among several possible surfactants models. In collaboration with B. Dollet.

  3. Liquid organic foams for formulation optimization : an assessment of foam linear viscoelasticity and its temporal dependence.

    SciTech Connect

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2010-03-01

    Liquid foams are viscoelastic liquids, exhibiting a fast relaxation attributed to local bubble motions and a slow response due to structural evolution of the intrinsically unstable system. In this work, these processes are examined in unique organic foams that differ from the typically investigated aqueous systems in two major ways: the organic foams (1) posses a much higher continuous phase viscosity and (2) exhibit a coarsening response that involves coalescence of cells. The transient and dynamic relaxation responses of the organic foams are evaluated and discussed in relation to the response of aqueous foams. The change in the foam response with increasing gas fraction, from that of a Newtonian liquid to one that is strongly viscoelastic, is also presented. In addition, the temporal dependencies of the linear viscoelastic response are assessed in the context of the foam structural evolution. These foams and characterization techniques provide a basis for testing stabilization mechanisms in epoxy-based foams for encapsulation applications.

  4. Shock Hugoniot measurements in foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petel, O. E.; Ouellet, S.; Frost, D. L.; Higgins, A. J.

    2014-05-01

    The present study outlines a new approach to collecting shock Hugoniot data in foams using photonic Doppler velocimetry to perform mid-plane measurements of the foam deformation. Plate impact experiments were carried out to investigate wave propagation in a closed-cell polymeric foam and an open-cell aluminum foam. Dual-wave structures were observed in both materials with the leading precursor wave determined to be an elastic wave. The discussion of the results focuses on the nature of foam compression under high-rate loading, particularly the difference between the strain history in a foam undergoing uniform stress compaction and uniaxial strain compression. These results are discussed in reference to the current interpretations of Taylor-Hopkinson bar experiments on similar metallic foams. The importance of gas-filtration driven flows in the wave dynamics of open-cell foams is discussed in relation to the nature of the precursor waves.

  5. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the OpenFOAM-based Flow Solver of the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA): Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Sang, L.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver such that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with somepreliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simply set of hills.

  6. Structure design of and experimental research on a two-stage laval foam breaker for foam fluid recycling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-song; Cao, Pin-lu; Yin, Kun

    2015-07-01

    Environmental, economical and efficient antifoaming technology is the basis for achievement of foam drilling fluid recycling. The present study designed a novel two-stage laval mechanical foam breaker that primarily uses vacuum generated by Coanda effect and Laval principle to break foam. Numerical simulation results showed that the value and distribution of negative pressure of two-stage laval foam breaker were larger than that of the normal foam breaker. Experimental results showed that foam-breaking efficiency of two-stage laval foam breaker was higher than that of normal foam breaker, when gas-to-liquid ratio and liquid flow rate changed. The foam-breaking efficiency of normal foam breaker decreased rapidly with increasing foam stability, whereas the two-stage laval foam breaker remained unchanged. Foam base fluid would be recycled using two-stage laval foam breaker, which would reduce the foam drilling cost sharply and waste disposals that adverse by affect the environment. PMID:26387358

  7. Biomonitoring of perfluorochemicals and toxicity to the downstream fish community of Etobicoke Creek following deployment of aqueous film-forming foam.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Ken D; Benskin, Jonathan P; Martin, Jonathan W; Ings, Jennifer S; Heinrichs, Jill Y; Dixon, D George; Servos, Mark R

    2010-06-10

    On August 2, 2005, Air France Flight 358 descended on Lester B. Pearson International Airport (Toronto, ON, Canada) during adverse weather conditions and overran the runway, leading to an onboard fire which destroyed the aircraft. Large quantities (48000L) of aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) were applied to the burning fuselage within meters of Etobicoke Creek. Local authorities could not confirm the identity of the AFFF formulation applied, but chemical analyses of fish livers collected 9 days post-AFFF application indicated that no perfluorinated acids (PFAs) were elevated at the site of application or downstream. This, and higher concentrations of a fluorotelomer sulfonate in fish liver collected downstream, suggests that an AFFF containing telomerized polyfluorinated material was likely used. However, as an urbanized stream within a heavily developed commercial, industrial, and residential watershed, background levels of perfluorinated compounds in Etobicoke Creek were considerable at all sites. Enlarged fish livers adjacent the AFFF-application site, commensurate with depressed peroxisomal beta-oxidation and hepatic oxidative stress, demonstrate some short-term impact of the AFFF on exposed fish within 9 days of its release. Most fish biochemical responses had recovered to normal values by 120 days, although there was some indication that AFFF-associated contamination shifted further downstream over this interval. This study suggests contemporary AFFFs exert relatively low toxicity on fish communities under realistic exposure scenarios. PMID:20206387

  8. Chemical enrichment and separation of uranyl ions in aqueous media using novel polyurethane foam chemically grafted with different basic dyestuff sorbents.

    PubMed

    El-Shahat, M F; Moawed, E A; Farag, A B

    2007-01-15

    The new type of the grafted polyurethane foam sorbents were prepared by coupling polyether polyol, toluene diisocyanate and basic dyestuff (Methylene blue, Rhodamine B and Brilliant green). The Me.B-PUF, Rh.B-PUF and Br.G-PUF were characterized using UV/vis, IR and TGA. The adsorption properties and chromatographic behaviour of these new adsorbents for preconcentration and separation of uranium(VI) ions at low concentrations from aqueous thiocyanate media were investigated by a batch process. The maximum sorption of U(VI) was in the pH ranges 1-4. The kinetics of sorption of the U(VI) by the Grafted-PUF were found to be fast with half life of sorption (t(1/2)) in 2.43min. The average sorption capacity of different sorbents 0.124meqg(-1) for uranyl ions, enrichment factors approximately 40 and the recovery 98-100% were achieved (R.S.D. approximately 0.73%). The basic dyestuff Grafted-PUF could be used many times without decreasing their capacities significantly. The value of the Gibbs free energy (DeltaG) for the sorbents is -7.3kJmol(-1), which reflects the spontaneous nature of sorption process. The sorption mechanism of the metal ion onto Grafted-PUF was also discussed. PMID:19071294

  9. Foam Experiment Hardware are Flown on Microgravity Rocket MAXUS 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockowandt, C.; Löth, K.; Jansson, O.; Holm, P.; Lundin, M.; Schneider, H.; Larsson, B.

    2002-01-01

    The Foam module was developed by Swedish Space Corporation and was used for performing foam experiments on the sounding rocket MAXUS 4 launched from Esrange 29 April 2001. The development and launch of the module has been financed by ESA. Four different foam experiments were performed, two aqueous foams by Doctor Michele Adler from LPMDI, University of Marne la Vallée, Paris and two non aqueous foams by Doctor Bengt Kronberg from YKI, Institute for Surface Chemistry, Stockholm. The foam was generated in four separate foam systems and monitored in microgravity with CCD cameras. The purpose of the experiment was to generate and study the foam in microgravity. Due to loss of gravity there is no drainage in the foam and the reactions in the foam can be studied without drainage. Four solutions with various stabilities were investigated. The aqueous solutions contained water, SDS (Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate) and dodecanol. The organic solutions contained ethylene glycol a cationic surfactant, cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and decanol. Carbon dioxide was used to generate the aqueous foam and nitrogen was used to generate the organic foam. The experiment system comprised four complete independent systems with injection unit, experiment chamber and gas system. The main part in the experiment system is the experiment chamber where the foam is generated and monitored. The chamber inner dimensions are 50x50x50 mm and it has front and back wall made of glass. The front window is used for monitoring the foam and the back window is used for back illumination. The front glass has etched crosses on the inside as reference points. In the bottom of the cell is a glass frit and at the top is a gas in/outlet. The foam was generated by injecting the experiment liquid in a glass frit in the bottom of the experiment chamber. Simultaneously gas was blown through the glass frit and a small amount of foam was generated. This procedure was performed at 10 bar. Then the pressure was

  10. Convective Instabilities in Liquid Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veretennikov, Igor; Glazier, James A.

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to better understand foam behavior both on the Earth and in microgravity conditions and to determine the relation between a foam's structure and wetness and its rheological properties. Our experiments focused on the effects of the bubble size distribution (BSD) on the foam behavior under gradual or stepwise in the liquid flow rate and on the onset of the convective instability. We were able to show experimentally, that the BSD affects foam rheology very strongly so any theory must take foam texture into account.

  11. Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang

    2014-12-01

    Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for different densities of foams under various temperatures and loading rates. Crush stress, tensile strength, and elastic modulus were obtained. A newly developed confined compression experiment provided data for investigating the foam flow direction. A biaxial tension experiment was also developed to explore the damage surface of a rigid polyurethane foam.

  12. Transport of a solid sphere in liquid foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louvet, Nicolas; Pitois, Olivier; Rouyer, Florence; Lorenceau, Elise

    2008-11-01

    In many foam applications, particles flow through the liquid network of aqueous foam made of channels and nodes. These channels named Plateau border are the junctions between three soap films and have fluid interfaces (non zero velocity). To understand the complex behaviour of this transport, we focus our experiments on a single particle flowing with the liquid through i) a single fluid channel and ii) aqueous foam. In each experiment we control the following parameters: - mobility of the fluid interfaces -- average liquid velocity - aspect ratio d/dlim, where d is the particle diameter and dlim the maximum diameter of the sphere that can pass through the channel. We measure the velocity of individual particles. Unexpectedly, for small d/dlim and mobile interfaces, the particle velocity is smaller than the average liquid velocity. To explain this result, we assume that counter flows take place in the soap films due to Marangoni flows and thus modify the boundary conditions of the liquid flow by having an upward velocity instead of a zero velocity in the corner. We are working on a model that reproduce experimental data assuming counter flow and real network geometry.

  13. Flow Boiling Heat Transfer to Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in Subcooled Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Kaji, Masao; Nishizumi, Takeharu; Ozaki, Shinji; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    To improve the thermal performance of high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater, heat transfer characteristics of flow boiling of lithium bromide aqueous solution in the subcooled region were experimentally investigated. Experiments were made for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution flowing in a rectangular channel (5 mm × 20 mm cross section) with one side wall heated. Boiling onset quality of lithium bromide aqueous solution is greater than that of water. The heat transfer coefficient of lithium bromide aqueous solution is about a half of that of water under the same experimental conditions of inlet velocity and heat flux. The experimental data of heat transfer coefficient for water are compared with the empirical correlation of Thom et al.11) and a fairly good agreement is obtained. The predictive calculations by the method of Sekoguchi et al.12) are compared with the data for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution. Agreement between them is good for water, while the results for lithium bromide aqueous solution are not satisfactory.

  14. Springback Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A decade ago, NASA's Ames Research Center developed a new foam material for protective padding of airplane seats. Now known as Temper Foam, the material has become one of the most widely-used spinoffs. Latest application is a line of Temper Foam cushioning produced by Edmont-Wilson, Coshocton, Ohio for office and medical furniture. The example pictured is the Classic Dental Stool, manufactured by Dentsply International, Inc., York, Pennsylvania, one of four models which use Edmont-Wilson Temper Foam. Temper Foam is an open-cell, flameresistant foam with unique qualities.

  15. Dry sand foam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Edgley, K.D.; Stromberg, J.L.

    1988-10-25

    A method of generating a foam containing particulate material for treating a subsurface earth formation penetrated by a well bore, the method comprising: (a) introducing a first stream of pressurized gas having dry particulate material entrained therein into a vessel, the particulate material flowing vertically downward into the vessel, at least in part due to the action of gravity; (b) introducing a second stream of liquid into the vessel; (c) varying the second stream into a self-impinging conical jet; (d) impinging the conical jet onto the first stream and thereby forming a foam containing particulate material; and (e) injecting such a foam into the well bore.

  16. Scalability of the parallel CFD simulations of flow past a fluttering airfoil in OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šidlof, Petr; Řidký, Václav

    2015-05-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of unsteady subsonic airflow past an elastically supported airfoil during onset of the flutter instability. Based on the geometry, boundary conditions and airfoil motion data identified from wind-tunnel measurements, a 3D CFD model has been set up in OpenFOAM. The model is based on incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modelled by the Menter's k-omega shear stress transport turbulence model. The computational mesh was generated in GridPro, a mesh generator capable of producing highly orthogonal structured C-type meshes. The mesh totals 3.1 million elements. Parallel scalability was measured on a small shared-memory SGI Altix UV 100 supercomputer.

  17. The Effect of Vasopressin on Ciliary Blood Flow and Aqueous Flow

    PubMed Central

    Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Strohmaier, Clemens; Trost, Andrea; Tockner, Birgit; Kiel, Jeffrey W.; Schroedl, Falk; Reitsamer, Herbert A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Previous experiments have shown that arginine-vasopressin (AVP) reduces intraocular pressure (IOP) dose-dependently. The present study investigated the relationships between IOP, ciliary blood flow (CilBF), and aqueous flow (AqF) responses to AVP in anesthetized rabbits. Methods. CilBF was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry and AqF by fluorophotometry. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and IOP were monitored continuously and simultaneously. Perfusion pressure (PP) was varied mechanically. Four experimental protocols were performed: the dose-response (n = 11) and the pressure-flow relationship (n = 8) for CilBF and the effects on CilBF, and AqF at low (0.08 ng/kg/min; n = 14) and high AVP infusion rates (1.33 ng/kg/min; n = 12). Results. AVP decreased CilBF and IOP dose-dependently. At the low AVP infusion rate, AqF was reduced by 21.48% ± 2.52% without changing CilBF significantly. The high AVP infusion rate caused a 24.49% ± 3.53% decrease of AqF and a significant reduction in CilBF (35.60% ± 3.58%). IOP was reduced by 9.56% ± 2.35% at low and by 41.02% ± 3.19% at high AVP infusion rates. Based on the Goldmann equation, the decrease of AqF at the low AVP infusion rate accounted for 77.1% of the IOP reduction, whereas at the high AVP infusion rate, decreased AqF accounted for 28.4% of the IOP decline. Conclusions. The results indicate that AVP can modulate IOP by different dose-dependent physiological mechanisms. The shifts of the CilBF-AqF relationship suggest that the reduction of AqF by the low AVP infusion rate is mainly provoked by inhibiting secretory processes in the ciliary epithelium. In contrast, at the high AVP infusion rate, the AqF reduction is caused by either reduced CilBF or more likely by a combined effect of reduced CilBF and secretory inhibition. PMID:24327617

  18. Foam Optics and Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durian, Douglas J.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    The Foam Optics and Mechanics (FOAM) project will exploit the microgravity environment to more accurately measure the rheological and optical characteristics of wet aqueous foams. Using both rheology and laser light scattering diagnostics, the goal is to quantify the unusual elastic character of foams in terms of their underlying microscopic structure and dynamics. Of particular interest is determining how the elastic character vanishes, i.e., how the foam 'melts' into a simple viscous liquid, as a function of both increasing liquid content and increasing shear strain rate. The unusual elastic character of foams will be quantified macroscopically by measurement of the shear stress as a function of shear strain rate and of time following a step strain. Such data will be analyzed in terms of a yield stress, shear moduli, and dynamical time scales. Microscopic information about bubble packing and rearrangement dynamics, from which the macroscopic non-Newtonian properties ultimately arise, will be obtained non-invasively by multiple-light scattering: diffuse transmission spectroscopy (DTS) and diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS). Quantitative trends with materials parameters, most importantly average bubble size and liquid content, will be sought in order to elucidate the fundamental connection between the microscopic structure and dynamics and the macroscopic rheology.

  19. Time scales for drainage and imbibition in gellified foams: application to decontamination processes.

    PubMed

    Deleurence, Rémi; Saison, Tamar; Lequeux, François; Monteux, Cécile

    2015-09-21

    We probe the drainage and imbibition dynamics of foams in which the continuous aqueous phase is a transient gel-like network. To produce these foams, we provide a new method - a PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) solution is first foamed and then a cross-linker, Borax, is added, which binds reversibly to the PVA chains. The resulting foams are ultra-stable-over a month. We find that the typical time for gravitational drainage of the continuous phase can be slowed down from hours to several weeks by tuning the Borax concentration. We show that the Borax concentration controls both the bulk viscosity of the continuous phase and the surface viscosity of the air-water interfaces. From these results we suggest that the PVA molecules adsorbed at the bubble interfaces are highly cross-linked by the Borax molecules. We find that the capillary rise of a dyed liquid into these foams is orders of magnitude faster than the drainage flow, meaning that these foams can quickly absorb liquids. These results show that these foams could be used to clean or decontaminate surfaces covered with liquid wastes. Indeed we show that the PVA-Borax foam can easily be spread on a surface, absorb a liquid without destabilizing and be dried afterward to recover the waste. PMID:26246375

  20. Pathways to low-cost electrochemical energy storage: a comparison of aqueous and nonaqueous flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Robert M.; Gallagher, Kevin G.; Kowalski, Jeffrey A.; Ha, Seungbum; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2014-11-01

    Energy storage is increasingly seen as a valuable asset for electricity grids composed of high fractions of intermittent sources, such as wind power or, in developing economies, unreliable generation and transmission services. However, the potential of batteries to meet the stringent cost and durability requirements for grid applications is largely unquantified. We investigate electrochemical systems capable of economically storing energy for hours and present an analysis of the relationships among technological performance characteristics, component cost factors, and system price for established and conceptual aqueous and nonaqueous batteries. We identified potential advantages of nonaqueous flow batteries over those based on aqueous electrolytes; however, new challenging constraints burden the nonaqueous approach, including the solubility of the active material in the electrolyte. Requirements in harmony with economically effective energy storage are derived for aqueous and nonaqueous systems. The attributes of flow batteries are compared to those of aqueous and nonaqueous enclosed and hybrid (semi-flow) batteries. Flow batteries are a promising technology for reaching these challenging energy storage targets owing to their independent power and energy scaling, reliance on facile and reversible reactants, and potentially simpler manufacture as compared to established enclosed batteries such as lead–acid or lithium-ion.

  1. Historical usage of aqueous film forming foam: a case study of the widespread distribution of perfluoroalkyl acids from a military airport to groundwater, lakes, soils and fish.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, Marko; Woldegiorgis, Andreas; Norström, Karin; Bibi, Momina; Lindberg, Maria; Österås, Ann-Helen

    2015-06-01

    Historical usage of aqueous film forming foams (AFFFs) at military airports is a potential source of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) to the nearby environment. In this study, the distribution of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in soil, groundwater, surface water, tap water well, and fish muscle was investigated at a closed down military airfield (F18) and its surroundings in Stockholm, Sweden. The presence of PFOS at AFFF training sites was inventoried. One major finding of the study is that a former airfield, abandoned since 1994, may still be a point source of PFAAs to nearby recipients. PFOS and PFOA were ubiquitous in the soil samples at former AFFF training sites with concentrations ranging from 2.18 to 8520ngg(-1) dry weight and <0.12-287ngg(-1) dry weight respectively. The sum of PFAAs in the groundwater and surface waters ranged from 738 to 51000ngL(-1) and

  2. Flow-Electrode Capacitive Deionization Using an Aqueous Electrolyte with a High Salt Concentration.

    PubMed

    Yang, SeungCheol; Choi, Jiyeon; Yeo, Jeong-Gu; Jeon, Sung-Il; Park, Hong-Ran; Kim, Dong Kook

    2016-06-01

    Flow-electrode capacitive deionization (FCDI) is novel capacitive deionization (CDI) technology that exhibits continuous deionization and a high desalting efficiency. A flow-electrode with high capacitance and low resistance is required for achieving an efficient FCDI system with low energy consumption. For developing high-performance flow-electrode, studies should be conducted considering porous materials, conductive additives, and electrolytes constituting the flow-electrode. Here, we evaluated the desalting performances of flow-electrodes with spherical activated carbon and aqueous electrolytes containing various concentrations of NaCl in the FCDI unit cell for confirming the effect of salt concentration on the electrolyte of a flow-electrode on desalting efficiency. We verified the necessity of a moderate amount of salt in the flow-electrode for compensating for the reduction in the performance of the flow-electrode, attributed to the resistance of water used as the electrolyte. Simultaneously, we confirmed the potential use of salt water with a high salt concentration, such as seawater, as an aqueous electrolyte for the flow-electrode. PMID:27162028

  3. The effects of sleep on circulating catecholamines and aqueous flow in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Maus, T L; McLaren, J W; Shepard, J W; Brubaker, R F

    1996-04-01

    We measured the rate of aqueous flow and analysed its relation to the time of day, the state of wakefulness and the urinary excretion of catecholamines. Two groups of subjects were studied. One group comprised 20 normal subjects who were studied over two 22-hr periods. During one period, the subjects were permitted to sleep during their customary hours of sleep; during the other, they were not permitted to sleep, but remained active for all 22 hr. The other group comprised ten subjects with obstructive sleep apnea who were studied over a 22-hr period and slept during their customary hours of sleep but without the aid of any respiratory device. Aqueous flow was measured with fluorophotometry. Motion of the wrist was monitored by a seismograph (wrist Actigraph) and served as a surrogate of activity and wakefulness. Urinary catecholamine excretion was measured during different periods of the wake/sleep cycle. Both groups exhibited the normal nocturnal suppression of flow (59% lower compared to morning in the normal group; 56% lower compared to morning in the apneic group). During sleep deprivation, the rate of flow at night in normal subjects was 30% lower than during the morning (P < 0.001) and 60% higher than during sleep (P < 0.001). Lid closure during sleep deprivation had no effect on the results. Aqueous flow correlated with a 'catecholamine index', derived from the combined excretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine. Flow also correlated with an 'activity index', and 'sleep efficiency', indices derived from motion of the wrist. We conclude that the day-night difference of aqueous humor flow as measured by clearance of fluorescein from the human eye is driven partly by a factor that has a circadian rhythm and partly by a factor that depends on the activity of the subject. We hypothesize that these factors are the catecholamines, epinephrine and norepinephrine. PMID:8795453

  4. An Ambient Temperature Molten Sodium-Vanadium Battery with Aqueous Flowing Catholyte.

    PubMed

    Liu, Caihong; Shamie, Jack S; Shaw, Leon L; Sprenkle, Vincent L

    2016-01-20

    In this study, we have investigated the key factors dictating the cyclic performance of a new type of hybrid sodium-based flow batteries (HNFBs) that can operate at room temperature with high cell voltages (>3 V), multiple electron transfer redox reactions per active ion, and decoupled design of power and energy. HNFBs are composed of a molten Na-Cs alloy anode, flowing aqueous catholyte, and a Na-β″-Al2O3 solid electrolyte as the separator. The surface functionalization of graphite felt electrodes for the flowing aqueous catholyte has been studied for its effectiveness in enhancing V(2+)/V(3+), V(3+)/V(4+), and V(4+)/V(5+) redox couples. The V(4+)/V(5+) redox reaction has been further investigated at different cell operation temperatures for its cyclic stability and how the properties of the solid electrolyte membrane play a role in cycling. These fundamental understandings provide guidelines for improving the cyclic performance and stability of HNFBs with aqueous catholytes. We show that the HNFB with aqueous V-ion catholyte can reach high storage capacity (∼70% of the theoretical capacity) with good Coulombic efficiency (90% ± 1% in 2-30 cycles) and cyclic performance (>99% capacity retention for 30 cycles). It demonstrates, for the first time, the potential of high capacity HNFBs with aqueous catholytes, good capacity retention and long cycling life. This is also the first demonstration that Na-β″-Al2O3 solid electrolyte can be used with aqueous electrolyte at near room temperature for more than 30 cycles. PMID:26720551

  5. Analysis on Experimental Investigation and Mathematical Modeling of Incompressible Flow Through Ceramic Foam Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarnejad, Shahin; Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar; Kennedy, Mark William; Aune, Ragnhild Elizabeth; Jönsson, Pӓr Göran

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents experimental results of pressure drop measurements on 30, 50, and 80 pores per inch (PPI) commercial alumina ceramic foam filters (CFF) and compares the obtained pressure drop profiles to numerically modeled values. In addition, it is aimed at investigating the adequacy of the mathematical correlations used in the analytical and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. It is shown that the widely used correlations for predicting pressure drop in porous media continuously under-predict the experimentally obtained pressure drop profiles. For analytical predictions, the negative deviations from the experimentally obtained pressure drop using the unmodified Ergun and Dietrich equations could be as high as 95 and 74 pct, respectively. For the CFD predictions, the deviation to experimental results is in the range of 84.3 to 88.5 pct depending on filter PPI. Better results can be achieved by applying the Forchheimer second-order drag term instead of the Brinkman-Forchheimer drag term. Thus, the final deviation of the CFD model estimates lie in the range of 0.3 to 5.5 pct compared to the measured values.

  6. Analysis on Experimental Investigation and Mathematical Modeling of Incompressible Flow Through Ceramic Foam Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarnejad, Shahin; Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar; Kennedy, Mark William; Aune, Ragnhild Elizabeth; Jönsson, Pӓr Göran

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents experimental results of pressure drop measurements on 30, 50, and 80 pores per inch (PPI) commercial alumina ceramic foam filters (CFF) and compares the obtained pressure drop profiles to numerically modeled values. In addition, it is aimed at investigating the adequacy of the mathematical correlations used in the analytical and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. It is shown that the widely used correlations for predicting pressure drop in porous media continuously under-predict the experimentally obtained pressure drop profiles. For analytical predictions, the negative deviations from the experimentally obtained pressure drop using the unmodified Ergun and Dietrich equations could be as high as 95 and 74 pct, respectively. For the CFD predictions, the deviation to experimental results is in the range of 84.3 to 88.5 pct depending on filter PPI. Better results can be achieved by applying the Forchheimer second-order drag term instead of the Brinkman-Forchheimer drag term. Thus, the final deviation of the CFD model estimates lie in the range of 0.3 to 5.5 pct compared to the measured values.

  7. Dynamics of poroelastic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forterre, Yoel; Sobac, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    Soft poroelastic structures are widespread in biological tissues such as cartilaginous joints in bones, blood-filled placentae or plant organs. Here we investigate the dynamics of open elastic foams immersed in viscous fluids, as model soft poroelastic materials. The experiment consists in slowly compacting blocs of polyurethane solid foam embedded in silicon oil-tanks and studying their relaxation to equilibrium when the confining stress is suddenly released. Measurements of the local fluid pressure and foam velocity field are compared with a simple two-phase flow approach. For small initial compactions, the results show quantitative agreement with the classical diffusion theory of soil consolidation (Terzaghi, Biot). On the other hand, for large initial compactions, the dynamics exhibits long relaxation times and decompaction fronts, which are mainly controlled by the highly non-linear mechanical response of the foam. The analogy between this process and the evaporation of a polymer melt close to the glass transition will be briefly discussed.

  8. Pathways to low-cost electrochemical energy storage: a comparison of aqueous and nonaqueous flow batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Darling, Robert M.; Gallagher, Kevin G.; Kowalski, Jeffrey A.; Ha, Seungbum; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2014-11-01

    Energy storage is increasingly seen as a valuable asset for electricity grids composed of high fractions of intermittent sources, such as wind power or, in developing economies, unreliable generation and transmission services. However, the potential of batteries to meet the stringent cost and durability requirements for grid applications is largely unquantified. We investigate electrochemical systems capable of economically storing energy for hours and present an analysis of the relationships among technological performance characteristics, component cost factors, and system price for established and conceptual aqueous and nonaqueous batteries. We identified potential advantages of nonaqueous flow batteries over those based on aqueousmore » electrolytes; however, new challenging constraints burden the nonaqueous approach, including the solubility of the active material in the electrolyte. Requirements in harmony with economically effective energy storage are derived for aqueous and nonaqueous systems. The attributes of flow batteries are compared to those of aqueous and nonaqueous enclosed and hybrid (semi-flow) batteries. Flow batteries are a promising technology for reaching these challenging energy storage targets owing to their independent power and energy scaling, reliance on facile and reversible reactants, and potentially simpler manufacture as compared to established enclosed batteries such as lead–acid or lithium-ion.« less

  9. Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

  10. Specific surface area model for foam permeability.

    PubMed

    Pitois, O; Lorenceau, E; Louvet, N; Rouyer, F

    2009-01-01

    Liquid foams were recognized early to be porous materials, as liquid flowed between the gas bubbles. Drainage theories have been established, and foam permeability has been modeled from the microscopic description of the equivalent pores geometry, emphasizing similarities with their solid counterparts. But to what extent can the theoretical work devoted to the permeability of solid porous materials be useful to liquid foams? In this article, the applicability of the Carman-Kozeny model on foam is investigated. We performed measurements of the permeability of foams with nonmobile surfactants, and we show that, in introducing an equivalent specific surface area for the foam, the model accurately describes the experimental data over two orders of magnitude for the foam liquid fraction, without any additional parameters. Finally, it is shown that this model includes the previous permeability models derived for foams in the dry foams limit. PMID:19032030

  11. Flow Boiling Heat Transfer to Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in Subcooled Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Masao; Furukawa, Masahiro; Nishizumi, Takeharu; Ozaki, Shinji; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    A theoretical prediction model of the boiling heat transfer coefficient in the subcooled region for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution flowing in a rectangular channel is proposed. In the present heat transfer model, a heat flux is assumed to consist of both the forced convective and the boiling effect components. The forced convective component is evaluated from the empirical correlation of convective heat transfer coefficient for single-phase flow considering the effect of increase of liquid velocity due to net vapor generation. Empirical correlations for determining the heat flux due to the boiling effect and the quality at the onset point of net vapor generation are obtained from the data presented in the first report1). Agreement between the present theoretical prediction and the experimental data is satisfactorily good both for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution.

  12. Development of Defoamers for Confinenment Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D M; Mitchell, A R

    2005-08-10

    Aqueous foam concentrate (AFC) 380 foam was developed by Sandia National Laboratory as a blast mitigation foam for unexploded ordnance (UXO) and its ''engineered foam structure'' is reported to be able to ''envelop chemical or biological aerosols'' [1]. It is similar to commercial fire-fighting foams, consisting mostly of water with small amounts of two alcohols, an ether and surfactant. It also contains xanthan gum, probably, to strengthen the foam film and delay drainage. The concentrate is normally diluted in a 6:94 ratio with water for foaming applications. The diluted solution is normally foamed with air to an expansion factor of about 100 (density 0.01 g/cc), which is called ''dry'' foam. Higher density foam (0.18 > {rho} > 0.03 g/cc) was discovered which had quite different characteristics from ''dry'' foam and was called ''wet'' foam. Some characterization of these foams has also been carried out, but the major effort described in this document is the evaluation, at the small and medium scale, of chemical, mechanical and thermal approaches to defoaming AFC 380 foam. Several chemical approaches to defoaming were evaluated including oxidation and precipitation of the xanthan, use of commercial oil-emulsion or suspension defoamers, pH modification, and cation exchange with the surfactant. Of these the commercial defoamers were most effective. Two mechanical approaches to defoaming were evaluated: pressure and foam rupture with very fine particles. Pressure and vacuum techniques were considered too difficult for field applications but high surface area silica particles worked very well on dry foam. Finally simple thermal techniques were evaluated. An order-disorder transition occurs in xanthan solutions at about 60 C, which may be responsible for the effectiveness of hot air as a defoamer. During defoaming of 55 gallons of foam with hot air, after about 70% of the AFC 380 foam had been defoamed, the effectiveness of hot air was dramatically reduced

  13. Zero-valent iron removal rates of aqueous Cr(VI) measured under flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2004-06-30

    The rates of Cr(VI) removal from the aqueous phase by zero-valent iron Fe(0) was measured under flow conditions. The intent of this work was to generate removal rate coefficients that would be applicable to the Reactive Well Technology, a gournwater remediation technology that replaces the sand in a filter pack of a conventioanl well with a reactive material, such as Fe(0).

  14. Foam-Driven Fractures of an Elastic Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ching-Yao; Smiddy, Sam; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We report an experimental study of foam-driven fractures in an elastic matrix. When a pressurized foam is constantly injected into a gelatin matrix with a constant flow rate, the foam generates a disc-like fracture which is commonly observed in liquid-driven fractures. Compare to liquid-driven fractures, foam-driven fractures grow faster with time. We investigate how the rheological behaviour of foams affects the fracture characteristics by varying the air volume fraction of the foam, the types and concentration of surfactants in the foam. Foam-fracturing reduces the environmental costs of hydraulic fracturing, which inspires this laboratory study.

  15. Foams in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, S.S.

    1986-07-01

    In 1978 a literature search on selective blocking of fluid flow in porous media was done by Professor S.S. Marsden and two of his graduate students, Tom Elson and Kern Huppy. This was presented as SUPRI Report No. TR-3 entitled ''Literature Preview of the Selected Blockage of Fluids in Thermal Recovery Projects.'' Since then a lot of research on foam in porous media has been done on the SUPRI project and a great deal of new information has appeared in the literature. Therefore we believed that a new, up-to-date search should be done on foam alone, one which would be helpful to our students and perhaps of interest to others. This is a chronological survey showing the development of foam flow, blockage and use in porous media, starting with laboratory studies and eventually getting into field tests and demonstrations. It is arbitrarily divided into five-year time periods. 81 refs.

  16. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Copolyimide foams derived from a diester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, an aromatic diamine, and a heterocyclic diamine. A molar concentration of the heterocyclic diamine approaching but not exceeding 0.42 is employed. This results in a flexible foam with a homogeneous cellular structure and a reduced compression set loss.

  17. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Copolymide foams derived from a diester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, an aromatic diamine, and a heterocyclic diamine. A molar concentration of the heterocyclic diamine approaching but not exceeding 0.42 is employed. This results in a flexible foam with a homogeneous cellular structure and a reduced compression set loss.

  18. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Copolyimide foams derived from a diester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, an aromatic diamine, and a heterocyclic diamine. A molar concentration of the heterocyclic diamine approaching but not exceeding 0.42 is employed. This results in a flexible foam with a homogeneous cellular structure and a reduced compression set loss.

  19. Composite foams

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Jr., Joel M.; Nyitray, Alice M.; Wilkerson, Mark H.

    1990-01-01

    Composite foams are provided comprising a first rigid, microcellular, open-celled organic polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 1 micron to about 30 microns, said first foam containing a second polymer having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 or a second polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 0.01 microns to about 1.0 micron within the open cells of said first foam.

  20. Composite foams

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Jr., Joel M.; Nyitray, Alice M.; Wilkerson, Mark H.

    1991-01-01

    Composite foams are provided comprising a first rigid, microcellular, open-celled organic polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 1 micron to about 30 microns, said first foam containing a second polymer having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 or a second polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 0.01 microns to about 1.0 micron within the open cells of said first foam.

  1. Wall slip of foams close to the jamming transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Addad, S.; Le Merrer, M.; Lespiat, R.; Hohler, R.

    2014-11-01

    Aqueous foams are dense packings of gas bubbles in a surfactant solution. They exhibit unique rheological properties. When they flow along a solid smooth wall, they slip and experience viscous drag. This feature is crucial in many applications involving flow through microfluidic channels, pipes or spreading on surfaces. We focus on foams in the vicinity of the jamming transition where the bubbles are quasi spherical with small contact films at the wall and thick liquid channels between bubbles. What are the mechanisms of friction at play at the scale of the films, the channels and the bubbles that are at the origin of the macroscopic friction law? To address this question, we measure the velocity of a bubble monolayer or a wet 3D foam as it creeps along an immersed inclined plane, as a function of the inclination angle, bubble size and confinement. Two regimes of friction are evidenced: In addition to a previously reported non-linear Bretherton-like drag, we present the first direct evidence for a linear Stokes-like drag. We show that the key parameter governing the transition between the regimes is set by the Bond number for the monolayer or the confinement pressure for the foam. Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, sylvie.cohen-addad@insp.upmc.fr.

  2. Characterization of Ti6Al7Nb alloy foams surface treated in aqueous NaOH and CaCl2 solutions.

    PubMed

    Bütev, Ezgi; Esen, Ziya; Bor, Şakir

    2016-07-01

    Ti6Al7Nb alloy foams having 53-73% porosity were manufactured via evaporation of magnesium space holders. A bioactive 1µm thick sodium hydrogel titanate layer, NaxH2-xTiyO2y+1, formed after 5M NaOH treatment, was converted to crystalline sodium titanate, Na2TiyO2y+1, as a result of post-heat treatment. On the other hand, subsequent CaCl2 treatment of NaOH treated specimens induced calcium titanate formation. However, heat treatment of NaOH-CaCl2 treated specimens led to the loss of calcium and disappearance of the titanate phase. All of the aforementioned surface treatments reduced yield strengths due to the oxidation of the cell walls of the foams, while elastic moduli remained mostly unchanged. Accordingly, equiaxed dimples seen on the fracture surfaces of as-manufactured foams turned into relatively flat and featureless fracture surfaces after surface treatments. On the other hand, Ca- and Na-rich coating preserved their mechanical stabilities and did not spall during fracture. The relation between mechanical properties of foams and macro-porosity fraction were found to obey a power law. The foams with 63 and 73% porosity met the desired biocompatibility requirements with fully open pore structures and elastic moduli similar to that of bone. In vitro tests conducted in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that NaOH-heat treated surfaces exhibit the highest bioactivity and allow the formation of Ca-P rich phases having Ca/P ratio of 1.3 to form within 5 days. Although Ca-P rich phases formed only after 15 days on NaOH-CaCl2 treated specimens, the Ca/P ratio was closer to that of apatite found in bone. PMID:26807769

  3. Ceramic foam substrates for automotive catalyst applications: fluid mechanic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis; Tsinoglou, Dimitrios N.; Seyfert, Jacqueline; Bach, Christian; Vogt, Ulrich; Gorbar, Michal

    2009-08-01

    Several properties of ceramic foams render them promising substrates for various industrial processes. For automotive applications, the foam properties that need to be further studied include the substrate impact on the exhaust gas flow, in terms of pressure drop and flow uniformity. In this paper, pressure drop measurements are performed with different honeycomb and ceramic foam substrates, and pressure drop correlations are discussed. The flow uniformity upstream and downstream of the substrates is evaluated using particle image velocimetry. The results show that ceramic foam substrates induce higher pressure drop, while increasing the uniformity of the flow. In contrast to honeycomb monoliths, the flow uniformity downstream of ceramic foams does not decrease with increasing flow velocity. The higher flow uniformity of ceramic foams is not only caused by their higher pressure drop, but also by flow homogenization that occurs inside the ceramic foam structure, as a result of the momentum exchange perpendicular to the main flow direction.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of electrokinetic flow of an aqueous electrolyte solution in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-06-01

    Electrokinetic flows of an aqueous NaCl solution in nanochannels with negatively charged surfaces are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The four transport coefficients that characterize the response to weak electric and pressure fields, namely, the coefficients for the electrical current in response to the electric field (Mjj) and the pressure field (Mjm), and those for the mass flow in response to the same fields (Mmj and Mmm), are obtained in the linear regime using a Green-Kubo approach. Nonequilibrium simulations with explicit external fields are also carried out, and the current and mass flows are directly obtained. The two methods exhibit good agreement even for large external field strengths, and Onsager's reciprocal relation (Mjm = Mmj) is numerically confirmed in both approaches. The influence of the surface charge density on the flow is also considered. The values of the transport coefficients are found to be smaller for larger surface charge density, because the counter-ions strongly bound near the channel surface interfere with the charge and mass flows. A reversal of the streaming current and of the reciprocal electro-osmotic flow, with a change of sign of Mmj due to the excess co-ions, takes places for very high surface charge density.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of electrokinetic flow of an aqueous electrolyte solution in nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-06-01

    Electrokinetic flows of an aqueous NaCl solution in nanochannels with negatively charged surfaces are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The four transport coefficients that characterize the response to weak electric and pressure fields, namely, the coefficients for the electrical current in response to the electric field (M(jj)) and the pressure field (M(jm)), and those for the mass flow in response to the same fields (M(mj) and M(mm)), are obtained in the linear regime using a Green-Kubo approach. Nonequilibrium simulations with explicit external fields are also carried out, and the current and mass flows are directly obtained. The two methods exhibit good agreement even for large external field strengths, and Onsager's reciprocal relation (M(jm) = M(mj)) is numerically confirmed in both approaches. The influence of the surface charge density on the flow is also considered. The values of the transport coefficients are found to be smaller for larger surface charge density, because the counter-ions strongly bound near the channel surface interfere with the charge and mass flows. A reversal of the streaming current and of the reciprocal electro-osmotic flow, with a change of sign of M(mj) due to the excess co-ions, takes places for very high surface charge density. PMID:24908029

  6. Ferrocene and cobaltocene derivatives for non-aqueous redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byunghyun; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ketack

    2015-01-01

    Ferrocene and cobaltocene and their derivatives are studied as new redox materials for redox flow cells. Their high reaction rates and moderate solubility are attractive properties for their use as active materials. The cyclability experiments are carried out in a static cell; the results showed that these materials exhibit stable capacity retention and predictable discharge potentials, which agree with the potential values from the cyclic voltammograms. The diffusion coefficients of these materials are 2 to 7 times higher than those of other non-aqueous materials such as vanadium acetylacetonate, iron tris(2,2'-bipyridine) complexes, and an organic benzene derivative. PMID:25428116

  7. Forming foam structures with carbon foam substrates

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Coronado, Paul R.; Baumann, Theodore F.

    2012-11-06

    The invention provides foams of desired cell sizes formed from metal or ceramic materials that coat the surfaces of carbon foams which are subsequently removed. For example, metal is located over a sol-gel foam monolith. The metal is melted to produce a metal/sol-gel composition. The sol-gel foam monolith is removed, leaving a metal foam.

  8. Foam patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhry, Anil R; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M; Neece, Faurice D; Singh, Nipendra P; Westendorf, Travis

    2013-11-26

    A method of creating a foam pattern comprises mixing a polyol component and an isocyanate component to form a liquid mixture. The method further comprises placing a temporary core having a shape corresponding to a desired internal feature in a cavity of a mold and inserting the mixture into the cavity of the mold so that the mixture surrounds a portion of the temporary core. The method optionally further comprises using supporting pins made of foam to support the core in the mold cavity, with such pins becoming integral part of the pattern material simplifying subsequent processing. The method further comprises waiting for a predetermined time sufficient for a reaction from the mixture to form a foam pattern structure corresponding to the cavity of the mold, wherein the foam pattern structure encloses a portion of the temporary core and removing the temporary core from the pattern independent of chemical leaching.

  9. Macro-mechanical modelling of blast wave mitigation in foams. Part I: review of available experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britan, A.; Shapiro, H.; Liverts, M.; Ben-Dor, G.; Chinnayya, A.; Hadjadj, A.

    2013-02-01

    Multiphase flows, which involve compressible or incompressible fluids with linear or nonlinear dynamics, are found in all areas of technology at all length scales and flow regimes. In this contribution, we discuss application of aqueous-foam barriers against blast wave impact. The first experiments demonstrating this behaviour were conducted in the early 1980s in free-field tests. Based on structural requirements, various foams with different blast energy contents were tested with the aim of characterizing the time history of the blast pressure reduction. A number of consistent methodologies for calculating this pressure reduction in foam are based on the effective gas flow model. For estimating the uncertainties of these methodologies, we briefly demonstrate their comparison with existing experimental data. Thereafter, we present various modifications of modelling approaches and their comparison with new results of blast wave experiments.

  10. Allometry and Scaling of the Intraocular Pressure and Aqueous Humour Flow Rate in Vertebrate Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Zouache, Moussa A.; Eames, Ian; Samsudin, Amir

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, intraocular pressure (IOP) is required to maintain the eye into a shape allowing it to function as an optical instrument. It is sustained by the balance between the production of aqueous humour by the ciliary body and the resistance to its outflow from the eye. Dysregulation of the IOP is often pathological to vision. High IOP may lead to glaucoma, which is in man the second most prevalent cause of blindness. Here, we examine the importance of the IOP and rate of formation of aqueous humour in the development of vertebrate eyes by performing allometric and scaling analyses of the forces acting on the eye during head movement and the energy demands of the cornea, and testing the predictions of the models against a list of measurements in vertebrates collated through a systematic review. We show that the IOP has a weak dependence on body mass, and that in order to maintain the focal length of the eye, it needs to be an order of magnitude greater than the pressure drop across the eye resulting from gravity or head movement. This constitutes an evolutionary constraint that is common to all vertebrates. In animals with cornea-based optics, this constraint also represents a condition to maintain visual acuity. Estimated IOPs were found to increase with the evolution of terrestrial animals. The rate of formation of aqueous humour was found to be adjusted to the metabolic requirements of the cornea, scaling as Vac0.67, where Vac is the volume of the anterior chamber. The present work highlights an interdependence between IOP and aqueous flow rate crucial to ocular function that must be considered to understand the evolution of the dioptric apparatus. It should also be taken into consideration in the prevention and treatment of glaucoma. PMID:26990431

  11. Allometry and Scaling of the Intraocular Pressure and Aqueous Humour Flow Rate in Vertebrate Eyes.

    PubMed

    Zouache, Moussa A; Eames, Ian; Samsudin, Amir

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, intraocular pressure (IOP) is required to maintain the eye into a shape allowing it to function as an optical instrument. It is sustained by the balance between the production of aqueous humour by the ciliary body and the resistance to its outflow from the eye. Dysregulation of the IOP is often pathological to vision. High IOP may lead to glaucoma, which is in man the second most prevalent cause of blindness. Here, we examine the importance of the IOP and rate of formation of aqueous humour in the development of vertebrate eyes by performing allometric and scaling analyses of the forces acting on the eye during head movement and the energy demands of the cornea, and testing the predictions of the models against a list of measurements in vertebrates collated through a systematic review. We show that the IOP has a weak dependence on body mass, and that in order to maintain the focal length of the eye, it needs to be an order of magnitude greater than the pressure drop across the eye resulting from gravity or head movement. This constitutes an evolutionary constraint that is common to all vertebrates. In animals with cornea-based optics, this constraint also represents a condition to maintain visual acuity. Estimated IOPs were found to increase with the evolution of terrestrial animals. The rate of formation of aqueous humour was found to be adjusted to the metabolic requirements of the cornea, scaling as [Formula: see text], where Vac is the volume of the anterior chamber. The present work highlights an interdependence between IOP and aqueous flow rate crucial to ocular function that must be considered to understand the evolution of the dioptric apparatus. It should also be taken into consideration in the prevention and treatment of glaucoma. PMID:26990431

  12. Domain Growth Kinetics in Stratifying Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Typical foam films consist of two surfactant-laden surfaces that are μ 5 nm - 10 micron apart. Sandwiched between these interfacial layers is a fluid that drains primarily under the influence of viscous and interfacial forces, including disjoining pressure. Interestingly, for certain low molecular weight surfactants, a layered ordering of micelles inside the foam films (thickness <100 nm) leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification. We experimentally elucidate the influence of these different driving forces, and confinement on drainage kinetics of horizontal stratifying foam films. Thinner, darker domains spontaneously grow within foam films. Quantitative characterization of domain growth visualized in a using Scheludko-type thin film cell and a theoretical model based on lubrication analysis, provide critical insights into hydrodynamics of thin foam films, and the strength and nature of surface forces, including supramolecular oscillatory structural forces.

  13. Description and performance of a novel aqueous all-copper redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Laura; Lloyd, David; Magdalena, Eva; Palma, Jesús; Kontturi, Kyösti

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present a novel aqueous redox flow battery chemistry based on copper chloro complexes. The energy density (20 Wh L-1) achieved is comparable to traditional vanadium redox flow batteries. This is due to the high solubility of copper (3 M), which offsets the relatively low cell potential (0.6 V). The electrolyte is cheap, simple to prepare and easy to recycle since no additives or catalysts are used. The stack used is based on plain graphite electrode materials and a low-cost microporous separator. The system can be operated at 60 °C eliminating the need for a heat exchanger and delivers an energy efficiency of 93, 86 and 74% at 5, 10 and 20 mA cm-2 respectively.

  14. Flow Instability of Soft Gels from Pluronic F108 Aqueous Solution Under Steady Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hanjin; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Ryu, Chang Yeol

    2012-02-01

    Nonionic surfactants of Pluronic tri-block copolymers have received special interest during the past decades because of the temperature dependent self-assembly characteristics that would lead to the formation of hydrogels upon heating. Here, we investigate the gelation behavior of Pluronic F108, (PEO)132-(PPO)50-(PEO)132, aqueous solution with an aim to elucidate how the shear affects the thermo-reversible transitions between micellar liquids and hydrogels. Specifically, we have studied the rheological characteristics of soft gels as an intermediate state between liquid to hard gels. From steady shear experiments, we found that there exists a shear rate window, where the flow instability of soft gels is observed. On the contrary, non-Newtonian behaviors following power-law are still observed at the shear rates above and below the shear rate window showing the flow instability. Small angle x-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering experiments had been performed to reveal how the temperature dependent rheological behavior correlates with the structural changes in the micellar aqueous solutions of F108.

  15. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-24

    Large-scale energy storage systems are crucial for substantial deployment of renewable energy sources. Energy storage systems with high energy density, high safety, and low cost and environmental friendliness are desired. To overcome the major limitations of the current aqueous redox flow battery systems, namely lower energy density (~25 Wh L-1) and presence of strong acids and/or other hazardous, a high energy density aqueous zinc/polyiodide flow battery (ZIB) is designed with near neutral ZnI2 solutions as catholytes. The energy density of ZIB could reach 322 Wh L-1 at the solubility limit of ZnI2 in water (~7 M). We demonstrate charge and discharge energy densities of 245.9 Wh/L and 166.7 Wh L-1 with ZnI2 electrolyte at 5.0 M, respectively. The addition of ethanol (EtOH) in ZnI2 electrolyte can effectively mitigate the growth of zinc dendrite at the anode and improve the stability of catholytes with wider temperature window (-20 to 50°C), which enable ZIB system to be a promising alternative as a high-energy and high- safety stationary energy storage system.

  16. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-24

    Large-scale energy storage systems are crucial for substantial deployment of renewable energy sources. Energy storage systems with high energy density, high safety, and low cost and environmental friendliness are desired. To overcome the major limitations of the current aqueous redox flow battery systems, namely lower energy density (~25 Wh L-1) and presence of strong acids and/or other hazardous, a high energy density aqueous zinc/polyiodide flow battery (ZIB) is designed with near neutral ZnI2 solutions as catholytes. The energy density of ZIB could reach 322 Wh L-1 at the solubility limit of ZnI2 in water (~7 M). We demonstrate charge andmore » discharge energy densities of 245.9 Wh/L and 166.7 Wh L-1 with ZnI2 electrolyte at 5.0 M, respectively. The addition of ethanol (EtOH) in ZnI2 electrolyte can effectively mitigate the growth of zinc dendrite at the anode and improve the stability of catholytes with wider temperature window (-20 to 50°C), which enable ZIB system to be a promising alternative as a high-energy and high- safety stationary energy storage system.« less

  17. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-24

    Large-scale energy storage systems are crucial for substantial deployment of renewable energy sources. Energy storage systems with high energy density, high safety, and low cost and environmental friendliness are desired. To overcome the major limitations of the current aqueous redox flow battery systems, namely lower energy density (~25 Wh L-1) and presence of strong acids and/or other hazardous, a high energy density aqueous zinc/polyiodide flow battery (ZIB) is designed with near neutral ZnI2 solutions as catholytes. The energy density of ZIB could reach 322 Wh L-1 at the solubility limit of ZnI2 in water (~7 M). We demonstrate charge and discharge energy densities of 245.9 Wh/L and 166.7 Wh L-1 with ZnI2 electrolyte at 5.0 M, respectively. The addition of ethanol (EtOH) in ZnI2 electrolyte can effectively mitigate the growth of zinc dendrite at the anode and improve the stability of catholytes with wider temperature window (-20 to 50°C), which enable ZIB system to be a promising alternative as a high-energy and high- safety stationary energy storage system.

  18. Drainage in a rising foam.

    PubMed

    Yazhgur, Pavel; Rio, Emmanuelle; Rouyer, Florence; Pigeonneau, Franck; Salonen, Anniina

    2016-01-21

    Rising foams created by continuously blowing gas into a surfactant solution are widely used in many technical processes, such as flotation. The prediction of the liquid fraction profile in such flowing foams is of particular importance since this parameter controls the stability and the rheology of the final product. Using drift flux analysis and recently developed semi-empirical expressions for foam permeability and osmotic pressure, we build a model predicting the liquid fraction profile as a function of height. The theoretical profiles are very different if the interfaces are considered as mobile or rigid, but all of our experimental profiles are described by the model with mobile interfaces. Even the systems with dodecanol are well known to behave as rigid in forced drainage experiments. This is because in rising foams the liquid fraction profile is fixed by the flux at the bottom of the foam. Here the foam is wet with higher permeability and the interfaces are not in equilibrium. These results demonstrate once again that it is not only the surfactant system that controls the mobility of the interface, but also the hydrodynamic problem under consideration. For example liquid flow through the foam during generation or in forced drainage is intrinsically different. PMID:26554500

  19. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Redox flow batteries are receiving wide attention for electrochemical energy storage due to their unique architecture and advantages, but progress has so far been limited by their low energy density (~25 Wh l(-1)). Here we report a high-energy density aqueous zinc-polyiodide flow battery. Using the highly soluble iodide/triiodide redox couple, a discharge energy density of 167 Wh l(-1) is demonstrated with a near-neutral 5.0 M ZnI2 electrolyte. Nuclear magnetic resonance study and density functional theory-based simulation along with flow test data indicate that the addition of an alcohol (ethanol) induces ligand formation between oxygen on the hydroxyl group and the zinc ions, which expands the stable electrolyte temperature window to from -20 to 50 °C, while ameliorating the zinc dendrite. With the high-energy density and its benign nature free from strong acids and corrosive components, zinc-polyiodide flow battery is a promising candidate for various energy storage applications. PMID:25709083

  20. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Redox flow batteries are receiving wide attention for electrochemical energy storage due to their unique architecture and advantages, but progress has so far been limited by their low energy density (~25 Wh l−1). Here we report a high-energy density aqueous zinc-polyiodide flow battery. Using the highly soluble iodide/triiodide redox couple, a discharge energy density of 167 Wh l−1 is demonstrated with a near-neutral 5.0 M ZnI2 electrolyte. Nuclear magnetic resonance study and density functional theory-based simulation along with flow test data indicate that the addition of an alcohol (ethanol) induces ligand formation between oxygen on the hydroxyl group and the zinc ions, which expands the stable electrolyte temperature window to from −20 to 50 °C, while ameliorating the zinc dendrite. With the high-energy density and its benign nature free from strong acids and corrosive components, zinc-polyiodide flow battery is a promising candidate for various energy storage applications. PMID:25709083

  1. Temper Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Fabricated by Expanded Rubber & Plastics Corporation, Temper Foam provides better impact protection for airplane passengers and enhances passenger comfort on long flights because it distributes body weight and pressure evenly over the entire contact area. Called a "memory foam" it matches the contour of the body pressing against it and returns to its original shape once the pressure is removed. As a shock absorber, a three-inch foam pad has the ability to absorb the impact of a 10-foot fall by an adult. Applications include seat cushioning for transportation vehicles, padding for furniture and a variety of athletic equipment medical applications including wheelchair padding, artificial limb socket lining, finger splint and hand padding for burn patients, special mattresses for the bedridden and dental stools. Production and sales rights are owned by Temper Foam, Inc. Material is manufactured under license by the Dewey and Almy Division of Grace Chemical Corporation. Distributors of the product are Kees Goebel Medical Specialties, Inc. and Alimed, Inc. They sell Temper Foam in bulk to the fabricators who trim it to shapes required by their customers.

  2. Metal-doped organic foam

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, James A.

    1982-01-01

    Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for producing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers.

  3. Study on Durability and Stability of an Aqueous Electrolyte Solution for Zinc Bromide Hybrid Flow Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyeon; Jeon, Joonhyeon

    2015-01-01

    Zinc-bromine flow battery using aqueous electrolyte has advantages of cost effective and high energy density, but there still remains a problem improving stability and durability of electrolyte materials during long-time cell operation. This paper focuses on providing a homogeneous aqueous solution for durability and stability of zinc bromide electrolyte. For performance experiments of conventional and proposed electrolyte solutions, detailed cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements (at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 in the range of -1.5 V~1.5 V) are carried out for 40 cycles and five kinds of electrolytes containing which has one of additives, such as (conventionally) zinc chloride, potassium chloride, (newly) lithium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate and zeolite-Y are compared with the 2.0 M ZnBr2 electrolyte, respectively. Experimental results show that using the proposed three additives provides higher anodic and cathodic peak current density of electrolytes than using other two conventional additives, and can lead to improved chemical reversibility of zinc bromide electrolyte. Especially, the solution of which the zeolite-Y added, shows enhanced electrochemical stability of zinc bromide electrolyte. Consequently, proposed electrolytes have a significant advantage in comparison with conventional electrolytes on higher stability and durability.

  4. MWCNTs based high sensitive lateral flow strip biosensor for rapid determination of aqueous mercury ions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Li; Teng, Jun; Zhu, Mengya; Zheng, Lei; Zhong, Youhao; Liu, Guodong; Xue, Feng; Chen, Wei

    2016-11-15

    Here, we describe a disposable multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) labeled nucleic acid lateral flow strip biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of aqueous mercury ions (Hg(2+)). Unlike the conventional colloidal gold nanoparticle based strip biosensors, the carboxylated MWCNTs were selected as the labeling substrate because of its high specific surface area for immobilization of recognition probes, improved stability and enhanced detection sensitivity of the strip biosensor. Combining the sandwich-type of T-Hg(2+)-T recognition mechanism with the optical properties of MWCNTs on lateral flow strip, optical black bands were observed on the lateral flow strips. Parameters (such as membrane category, the MWCNTs concentration, the amount of MWCNT-DNA probe, and the volume of the test probe) that govern the sensitivity and reproducibility of the sensor were optimized. The response of the optimized biosensor was highly linear over the range of 0.05-1ppb target Hg(2+), and the detection threshold was estimated at 0.05 ppb within a 15-min assay time. The sensitivity was 10-fold higher than the conventional colloidal gold based strip biosensor. More importantly, the stability of the sensor was also greatly improved with the usage of MWCNTs as the labeling. PMID:27183284

  5. Aqueous Lithium-Iodine Solar Flow Battery for the Simultaneous Conversion and Storage of Solar Energy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mingzhe; McCulloch, William D; Beauchamp, Damian R; Huang, Zhongjie; Ren, Xiaodi; Wu, Yiying

    2015-07-01

    Integrating both photoelectric-conversion and energy-storage functions into one device allows for the more efficient solar energy usage. Here we demonstrate the concept of an aqueous lithium-iodine (Li-I) solar flow battery (SFB) by incorporation of a built-in dye-sensitized TiO2 photoelectrode in a Li-I redox flow battery via linkage of an I3(-)/I(-) based catholyte, for the simultaneous conversion and storage of solar energy. During the photoassisted charging process, I(-) ions are photoelectrochemically oxidized to I3(-), harvesting solar energy and storing it as chemical energy. The Li-I SFB can be charged at a voltage of 2.90 V under 1 sun AM 1.5 illumination, which is lower than its discharging voltage of 3.30 V. The charging voltage reduction translates to energy savings of close to 20% compared to conventional Li-I batteries. This concept also serves as a guiding design that can be extended to other metal-redox flow battery systems. PMID:26102317

  6. ZERO-VALENT IRON REMOVAL RATES OF AQUEOUS Cr(VI) MEASURED UNDER FLOW CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2004-06-01

    The rates of Cr(VI) removal from the aqueous phase by zero-valent iron, Fe(0), was measured under flow conditions. The intent of this work was to generate removal rate coefficients that would be applicable to the Reactive Well Technology, a groundwater remediation technology that replaces the sand in a filter pack of a conventional well with a reactive material, such as Fe(0). Dissolved Cr(VI) concentration, dissolved O2 concentration, and Eh data indicated that Cr(VI) removal from the aqueous phase was mass-transfer limited. All pseudo-first-order regression fits to the data were significant (P≤0.05), however, they did not capture many of the salient aspects of the data, including that the removal rate often decreased as contact time increased. As such, application of these rate coefficients to predict long-term Cr(VI) removal were compromised. The rate coefficients measured under flow conditions were comparable to those measured previously under batch conditions with significantly greater solution:solid ratios. Between the range of 20 and 100 wt-% Fe(0) in the column, there was little measurable change in the reaction kinetics. Thus, it may be possible to include sand into the reactive filter packs in the event it is necessary to increase filter pack porosity or to decrease the accumulation of secondary reaction products that may lead to filter pack plugging. Background water chemistry (0.2 M NaHCO3, distilled water, and a carbonate-dominated groundwater) had only marginal, if any, effects on reaction rate coefficients. The reaction rates measured in this study indicated that an Fe(0) filter pack could be used to lower Cr(VI) concentrations by several orders of magnitude in a once-through mode of operation of the Reactive Well Technology.

  7. Polyimide Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Juan M. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A fully imidized, solvent-free polyimide foam having excellent mechanical, acoustic, thermal, and flame resistant properties is produced. A first solution is provided, which includes one or more aromatic dianhydrides or derivatives of aromatic dianhydrides, and may include one or more aromatic diamines, dissolved in one or more polar solvents, along with an effective amount of one or more blowing agents. This first solution may also advantageously include effective amounts respectively of one or mores catalysts, one or more surfactants, and one or more fire retardants. A second solution is also provided which includes one or more isocyanates. The first and second solutions are rapidly and thoroughly mixed to produce an admixture, which is allowed to foam-in an open container, or in a closed mold-under ambient conditions to completion produce a foamed product. This foamed product is then cured by high frequency electromagnetic radiation, thermal energy, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, the process is adapted for spraying or extrusion.

  8. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Juan M. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A fully imidized, solvent-free polyimide foam having excellent mechanical, acoustic, thermal, and flame resistant properties is produced. A first solution is provided, which includes one or more aromatic dianhydrides or derivatives of aromatic dianhydrides, and may include one or more aromatic diamines, dissolved in one or more polar solvents, along with an effective amount of one or more blowing agents. This first solution may also advantageously include effective amounts respectively of one or mores catalysts, one or more surfactants, and one or more fire retardants. A second solution is also provided which includes one or more isocyanates. The first and second solutions are rapidly and thoroughly mixed to produce an admixture, which is allowed to foam?in an open container, or in a closed mold?under ambient conditions to completion produce a foamed product. This foamed product is then cured by high frequency electromagnetic radiation, thermal energy, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, the process is adapted for spraying or extrusion.

  9. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Juan M. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A fully imidized, solvent-free polyimide foam having excellent mechanical, acoustic, thermal, and flame resistant properties is produced. A first solution is provided, which includes one or more aromatic dianhydrides or derivatives of aromatic dianhydrides, and may include one or more aromatic diamines, dissolved in one or more polar solvents, along with an effective amount of one or more blowing agents. This first solution may also advantageously include effective amounts respectively of one or mores catalysts, one or more surfactants, and one or more fire retardants. A second solution is also provided which includes one or more isocyanates. The first and second solutions are rapidly and thoroughly mixed to produce an admixture, which is allowed to foam--in an open container, or in a closed mold--under ambient conditions to completion produce a foamed product. This foamed product is then cured by high frequency electromagnetic radiation, thermal energy, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, the process is adapted for spraying or extrusion.

  10. Removal Rates of Aqueous Cr(VI) by Zero-Valent Iron Measured Under Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2002-05-10

    Studies were undertaken to measure the rate of Cr(VI) removal from the aqueous phase by zero-valent iron, Fe(0), under flow conditions. The intent of this work was to generate removal rate coefficients that would be applicable to the Reactive Well Technology, a groundwater remediation technology that replaces the sand in a filter pack of a conventional well with a reactive material, such as Fe(0). The pseudo-first-order rate coefficients measured under flow conditions were comparable to those previously measured under batch conditions that had significantly greater ratios of solution volume to Fe(0) surface area. Between the range of 20 and 100 weight percent Fe(0), there was little measurable change in the reaction kinetics. Thus, it may be possible to include sand into the reactive filter packs in the event it is necessary to increase filter pack porosity or to decrease the accumulation of secondary reaction products that may lead to filter pack plugging. Background water chemistry had only marginal effects on reaction rate coefficients. The reaction rates measured in this study indicated that an Fe(0) filter pack could be used to lower Cr(VI) concentrations by several orders of magnitude in a once-through mode of operation of the Reactive Well Technology.

  11. A continuous flow microfluidic calorimeter: 3-D numerical modeling with aqueous reactants

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Mehmet A.; Kowalski, Gregory J.; Fiering, Jason; Larson, Dale

    2015-01-01

    A computational analysis of the reacting flow field, species diffusion and heat transfer processes with thermal boundary layer effects in a microchannel reactor with a coflow configuration was performed. Two parallel adjacent streams of aqueous reactants flow along a wide, shallow, enclosed channel in contact with a substrate, which is affixed to a temperature controlled plate. The Fluent computational fluid dynamics package solved the Navier–Stokes, mass transport and energy equations. The energy model, including the enthalpy of reaction as a nonuniform heat source, was validated by calculating the energy balance at several control volumes in the microchannel. Analysis reveals that the temperature is nearly uniform across the channel thickness, in the direction normal to the substrate surface; hence, measurements made by sensors at or near the surface are representative of the average temperature. Additionally, modeling the channel with a glass substrate and a silicone cover shows that heat transfer is predominantly due to the glass substrate. Finally, using the numerical results, we suggest that a microcalorimeter could be based on this configuration, and that temperature sensors such as optical nanohole array sensors could have sufficient spatial resolution to determine enthalpy of reaction. PMID:25937678

  12. A chemiluminescence-based continuous flow aqueous ozone analyzer using photoactivated chromotropic acid.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Toshio; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2005-05-15

    Ozone has become the oxidant of choice for water disinfection, especially in large water treatment facilities. This paper describes a fast and sensitive method for the determination of ozone content by reaction with photoactivated chromotropic acid (CA, 4,5-dihydroxynaphthalene-2,7-disulfonic acid), which results in intense chemiluminescence (CL). Freshly ozonated water from a recirculating ozonizer/reservoir is injected into a carrier stream of deionized water in the flow-injection mode. This flow mixes with a stream of photoactivated CA solution in a spiral cell placed directly on top of an inexpensive miniature (8mm diameter active area) photomultiplier tube (PMT). Alkaline CA is photoactivated by passing it through a FEP-Teflon((R)) coil (residence time approximately 50s) wrapped around a 1W UV lamp emitting at 254nm; without photoactivation, the signal is approximately 70-fold lower. The S/N=3 limit of detection for aqueous ozone is 3mugl(-1) and good response slope is obtained up to an ozone concentration of 1.4mgl(-1), the highest that could be made in this study. The response obeyed a quadratic equation with r(2)=0.9984. No interference from permanganate ion is observed. The proposed system was applied to the monitoring of ozonation status of a playa lake water that exhibited significant ozone demand. PMID:18970059

  13. Determination of total iron in food samples after flow injection preconcentration on polyurethane foam functionalized with N,N-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Azeem, S M; Bader, N R; Kuss, H M; El-Shahat, M F

    2013-06-01

    A highly selective flow injection sorption system was developed for the fast determination of total iron in food samples. Iron (III) was reduced to iron (II) by ascorbic acid and preconcentrated on a mini-column packed with polyurethane foam (PUF) functionalized with N,N-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine (SPDA). The retained Fe (II) was eluted with hydrochloric acid and subsequently reacted to 2,4,6-tri(2'-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPTZ) then measured at 593 nm. The procedure has resulted preconcentration factor 36, sample frequency 20 h(-1) and detection limit 18 μg L(-1). The precision (RSD) was found to be 5.7% and 3.1% at concentration levels 0.1 and 5.0 μg mL(-1) iron (II), respectively. Finally, the method was successfully applied to determination of total iron in reference material and food samples. PMID:23411293

  14. Method of foaming a liquid metal

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Albert K.; Johnson, Carl E.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small quantity of barium to liquid metal NaK or sodium has been found to promote foam formation and improve bubble retention in the liquid metal. A stable liquid metal foam will provide a more homogeneous liquid metal flow through the channel of a two-phase liquid metal MHD power generator to improve operating efficiency.

  15. Co-doped titanium oxide foam and water disinfection device

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jian-Ku; Wu, Pinggui; Xie, Rong-Cai

    2016-01-26

    A quaternary oxide foam, comprises an open-cell foam containing (a) a dopant metal, (b) a dopant nonmetal, (c) titanium, and (d) oxygen. The foam has the advantages of a high surface area and a low back pressure during dynamic flow applications. The inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) was demonstrated in a simple photoreactor.

  16. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  17. FOAM: NOVEL DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY FOR REMEDIATION OF VADOSE ZONE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Zhong, Lirong; Wu, Yuxin; Foote, Martin; Zhang, Z. F.; Hubbard, Susan

    2011-07-05

    Deep vadose zone environments can be a primary source and pathway for contaminant migration to groundwater. These environments present unique characterization and remediation challenges that necessitate scrutiny and research. The thickness, depth, and intricacies of the deep vadose zone, combined with a lack of understanding of the key subsurface processes (e.g., biogeochemical and hydrologic) affecting contaminant migration, make it difficult to create validated conceptual and predictive models of subsurface flow dynamics and contaminant behavior across multiple scales. These factors also make it difficult to design and deploy sustainable remedial approaches and monitor long-term contaminant behavior after remedial actions. Functionally, the methods for addressing contamination must remove and/or reduce transport of contaminants. This problem is particularly challenging in the arid western United States where the vadose zone is hundreds of feet thick, rendering transitional excavation methods exceedingly costly and ineffective. Delivery of remedial amendments is one of the most challenging and critical aspects for all remedy-based approaches. The conventional approach for delivery is through injection of aqueous remedial solutions. However, heterogeneous deep vadose zone environments present hydrologic and geochemical challenges which limit the effectiveness. Because the flow of solution infiltration is dominantly controlled by gravity and suction, injected liquid preferentially percolates through highly permeable pathways, by-passing low-permeability zones which frequently contain the majority of contamination. Moreover, the wetting front can readily mobilize and enhance contaminant transport to the underlying aquifer prior to stabilization. Development of innovative, in-situ technologies may be the only way to meet remedial action objectives and long-term stewardship goals. Surfactants can be used to lower the liquid surface tension and create stabile foams

  18. Occurrence of select perfluoroalkyl substances at U.S. Air Force aqueous film-forming foam release sites other than fire-training areas: Field-validation of critical fate and transport properties.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R Hunter; Long, G Cornell; Porter, Ronald C; Anderson, Janet K

    2016-05-01

    The use of aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) to extinguish hydrocarbon-based fires is recognized as a significant source of environmental poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs). Although the occurrence of select PFASs in soil and groundwater at former fire-training areas (FTAs) at military installations operable since 1970 has been consistently confirmed, studies reporting the occurrence of PFASs at other AFFF-impacted sites (e.g. emergency response locations, AFFF lagoons, hangar-related AFFF storage tanks and pipelines, and fire station testing and maintenance areas) are largely missing from the literature. Further, studies have mostly focused on a single site (i.e., FTAs at military installations) and, thus, lack a comparison of sites with diverse AFFF release history. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to evaluate select PFAS occurrence at non-FTA sites on active U.S. Air Force installations with historic AFFF use of varying magnitude. Concentrations of fifteen perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA), an important PFOS precursor, were measured from several hundred samples among multiple media (i.e., surface soil, subsurface soil, sediment, surface water, and groundwater) collected from forty AFFF-impacted sites across ten installations between March and September 2014, representing one of the most comprehensive datasets on environmental PFAS occurrence to date. Differences in detection frequencies and observed concentrations due to AFFF release volume are presented along with rigorous data analyses that quantitatively demonstrate phase-dependent (i.e., solid-phase vs aqueous-phase) differences in the chemical signature as a function of carbon chain-length and in situ PFOS (and to a slightly lesser extent PFHxS) formation, presumably due to precursor biotransformation. PMID:26786021

  19. 2D Numerical Investigation of the Laminar and Turbulent Flow Over Different Airfoils Using OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, H.; Medjroubi, W.; Stoevesandt, B.; Peinke, J.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work is to assess the prediction capabilities of the turbulence models and the transition model kkl-ω available in OpenFOAM and to achieve a database of airfoil aerodynamical characteristics. The airfoils chosen for the simulations are FX 79-W- 15A and NACA 63-430, which are widely used in wind turbines. The numerically obtained lift and drag coefficients are compared with available experimental results. A quantitative and qualitative study is conducted to determine the influence of meshing strategies, computational time step together with interpolation and temporal schemes. Two Reynolds Averaged Navier- Stokes models (RANS models) are used, which are the k-ω SST model by Menter and the kkl-ω model (which involves transition modeling) by Walters and Davor.

  20. Continuously Infusing Hyperpolarized 129Xe into Flowing Aqueous Solutions Using Hydrophobic Gas Exchange Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Zackary I.; Möller, Harald E.; Hedlund, Laurence W.; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2009-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe yields high signal intensities in magnetic resonance (MR) and, through its large chemical shift range of ∼300 ppm, provides detailed information about the local chemical environment. To exploit these properties in aqueous solutions and living tissues requires the development of methods for efficiently dissolving HP 129Xe over an extended time period. To this end, we have used commercially available gas exchange modules to continuously infuse concentrated HP 129Xe into flowing liquids, including rat whole blood, for periods as long as one hour, and have demonstrated the feasibility of dissolved-phase MR imaging with sub-millimeter resolution within minutes. These modules, which exchange gases using hydrophobic microporous polymer membranes, are compatible with a variety of liquids and are suitable for infusing HP 129Xe into the bloodstream in vivo. Additionally, we have developed a detailed mathematical model of the infused HP 129Xe signal dynamics that should be useful in designing improved infusion systems that yield even higher dissolved HP 129Xe signal intensities. PMID:19702286

  1. Monosegmented flow analysis exploiting aqueous two-phase systems for the determination of cobalt.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Guilherme Dias; de Lemos, Leandro Rodrigues; da Silva, Luis Henrique Mendes; da Silva, Maria C Hespanhol

    2012-01-01

    An environmentally safe procedure has been developed for the extraction, separation and determination of metal ions using a monosegmented flow analysis technique that exploits an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS-MSFA). The ATPS-MSFA method was applied for the determination of cobalt, based on the reaction between Co(II) and KSCN, which produces a metallic complex that spontaneously partitions to the top phase of the ATPS composed of poly(ethylene oxide), ammonium sulfate and water. The linear range was 5.00 to 500 μmol kg(-1) (R = 0.9998; n = 13) with a coefficient of variation equal to 1.14% (n = 7). The method yielded a limit of detection and a limit of quantification of 2.17 and 7.24 μmol kg(-1), respectively. The ATPS-MSFA method was applied to the determination of cobalt in a nickel-cadmium battery sample and the results were validity with flame atomic absorption spectrometry using addition standard. PMID:23232244

  2. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen

    2003-03-31

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research will lay the groundwork for more applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media. The most significant progress during this period was made on Tasks 2 and 3. Research on Task 2 focused on experiments on gas trapping during liquid injection. A novel apparatus, similar to that in Kibodeaux and Rossen (1997), monitors average water saturation in a core moment-by-moment by weighing the core. Our experiments find that water saturation increases more during liquid injection than previously conjectured--in other words, less gas is trapped by liquid injection than previously thought. A number of unexpected trends in behavior were observed. It appears that these can be reconciled to previous theory of gas trapping by foam (Cheng et al., 2001) given that the experimental conditions were different from previous experiments. Results will be described in detail in the PhD dissertation of Qiang Xu, expected to be completed in early 2003. Regarding Task 3, recent laboratory research in a wide range of porous media shows that creating foam in steady flow in homogeneous media requires exceeding a minimum pressure gradient (Gauglitz et al., 2002). Data fit trends predicted by a theory in which foam generation depends on attaining sufficient {del}p to mobilize liquid lenses present before foam generation. Data show three regimes: a coarse-foam regime at low {del}p, strong foam at high {del}p, and, in between, a transient regime alternating between weaker and stronger foam. We for the first

  3. Quantum Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-10-24

    The laws of quantum mechanics and relativity are quite perplexing however it is when the two theories are merged that things get really confusing. This combined theory predicts that empty space isn’t empty at all – it’s a seething and bubbling cauldron of matter and antimatter particles springing into existence before disappearing back into nothingness. Scientists call this complicated state of affairs “quantum foam.” In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln discusses this mind-bending idea and sketches some of the experiments that have convinced scientists that this crazy prediction is actually true.

  4. Foam sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Alder, Glen; Lees, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Foam sclerotherapy is a minimally invasive treatment for lower limb varicose veins. Current evidence indicates that its efficacy may not be as high as surgery or endovenous ablation. The minimally invasive nature of the treatment however means that it has a wide application, and it can be particularly useful in patients who are not suitable for other types of treatment. NICE guidelines recommend its use as a second line after endovenous ablation. Complication rates are low and most of these are of little clinical consequence. PMID:26556698

  5. Foam-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2015-06-02

    Foam-based adsorbents and a related method of manufacture are provided. The foam-based adsorbents include polymer foam with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the foam-based adsorbents includes irradiating polymer foam, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Foam-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  6. Vacuum applications of metal foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Several vacuum applications of copper foams in the density range 2-5% and pore sizes of 0.5-0.7 mm are discussed, such as a foreline hydrocarbon trap in a mechanical vacuum pump, a molecular-flow resistor, a diffuser, and a water injector. Other suggested applications include the use of foam copper in the form of an externally heated plug to remove traces of oxygen from inert gases bled into a vacuum system through a stainless steel line and the use of the porous surface for minimizing release of secondary electrons from electrodes in the path of charged particle beams.

  7. Drainage and Stratification Kinetics of Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-03-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Foam lifetime, drainage kinetics and stability are strongly influenced by surfactant type (ionic vs non-ionic), and added proteins, particles or polymers modify typical responses. The rate at which fluid drains out from a foam film, i.e. drainage kinetics, is determined in the last stages primarily by molecular interactions and capillarity. Interestingly, for certain low molecular weight surfactants, colloids and polyelectrolyte-surfactant mixtures, a layered ordering of molecules, micelles or particles inside the foam films leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification. Though stratification is observed in many confined systems including foam films containing particles or polyelectrolytes, films containing globular proteins seem not to show this behavior. Using a Scheludko-type cell, we experimentally study the drainage and stratification kinetics of horizontal foam films formed by protein-surfactant mixtures, and carefully determine how the presence of proteins influences the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of foam films.

  8. [Foam sclerotherapy].

    PubMed

    Partsch, Bernhard

    2011-03-01

    Leg ulcers are often caused by varicose veins, with only little or no tendency to spontaneous healing. Compression therapy is the main treatment for this ailment, but even with optimal compression by short stretch bandages healing rates are rarely better than 70 - 80 % after 6 months. Experience shows, that healing times can be shortened significantly by elimination of superficial venous refluxes. For different reasons varicose vein surgery is rarely performed in patients with open leg ulcers. The increased age of ulcer patients with frequent comorbidities or the fear of an increased intraoperative risk of infection are reasons to avoid an operative elimination of refluxes. Foam sclerotherapy is a simple alternative to an operation, which can be performed irrespective of the existence of a venous leg ulcer. PMID:21360462

  9. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen

    2003-03-31

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research will lay the groundwork for more applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media. Significant progress was made during this period on all three Tasks. Regarding Task 1, we studied the behavior of foam made without polymer, with low-molecular-weight and high-molecular-weight polyacrylamide, and with xanthan polymer in sandpacks. Results consistently showed that polymer does not stabilize foam in porous media per se. Rather, it destabilizes foam to some extent, but may increase the viscosity of water sufficiently to increase the resistance to flow in spite of the lower intrinsic stability of the foam. This is consistent with the hypothesis the motivated our study. Results also showed that polymer shifts behavior from the high-quality foam-flow regime toward the low-quality regime, consistent with our initial hypothesis. Other aspects of the experimental results were puzzling and are discussed in the text of this report. Research on Task 2 included building an apparatus for gas-phase tracer tests for direct measurement of trapped-gas saturation with foam. We also investigated the nature of the low-quality foam regime, which is thought to be controlled by gas trapping and mobilization. In both the studies of polymers and foam and separate studies of CO{sub 2} foam, we observed behavior that seems to be related to the low-quality regime, but shows unexpected trends: specifically, a decrease in pressure gradient with increasing liquid injection rate, at fixed gas injection rate

  10. Surfactant micelles containing solubilized oil decrease foam film thickness stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongju; Nikolov, Alex; Wasan, Darsh

    2014-02-01

    Many practical applications involving three-phase foams (aqueous foams containing oil) commonly employ surfactants at several times their critical micelle concentration (CMC); in these applications, the oil can exist in two forms: (1) oil drops or macroemulsions and (2) oil solubilized within the micelles. We have recently observed that in the case of aqueous foams stabilized with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and n-dodecane as an oil, the oil drops did not alter the foam stability but the solubilized oil (swollen micelles) greatly influenced the foam's stability. In order to explain the effect of oil solubilized in the surfactant micelles on foam stability, we studied the stability of a single foam film containing swollen micelles of SDS using reflected light microinterferometry. The film thinning occurs in stepwise manner (stratification). In addition, we obtained data for the film-meniscus contact angle versus film thickness (corresponding to the different number of micellar layers) and used it to calculate the film structural energy isotherm. The results of this study showed that the structural energy stabilization barrier decreased in the presence of swollen micelles in the film, thereby decreasing the foam stability. These results provide a better understanding of the role of oil solubilized by the micelles in affecting foam stability. PMID:24267325

  11. Exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances through the consumption of fish from lakes affected by aqueous film-forming foam emissions - A combined epidemiological and exposure modeling approach. The SAMINOR 2 Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Solrunn; Vestergren, Robin; Herzke, Dorte; Melhus, Marita; Evenset, Anita; Hanssen, Linda; Brustad, Magritt; Sandanger, Torkjel M

    2016-09-01

    Releases of aqueous film-forming foams (AFFFs) from airport firefighting activities have been identified as important local point sources of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in nearby waterways. PFASs can be taken up by fish, and in turn by the humans that consume them. Despite the global extent of AFFF emissions, few studies exist on related impacts on humans. We aimed to investigate the associations between the consumption of fish from AFFF-affected waters and serum PFAS concentrations in humans using a combination of statistical tools, empirical data, and toxicokinetic modeling. Participants of the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Study were the basis for this study sample, which comprised 74 persons. Fifty-nine participants who reported consuming fish from AFFF-affected waters and 15 nonconsumers completed a questionnaire and gave serum samples. Participants were classified based on their consumption of trout and char: high (n=16), moderate (n=16), low (n=27), and nonconsumers (n=15); and serum samples were tested for the presence of 15 PFASs. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) was found in all participants, with the highest concentrations detected in the high consumption group (geometric means, 28ng/mL) compared to the low consumption group and nonconsumers (10 and 11ng/mL, respectively). In an analysis of variance contrast model, a significant, positive increasing trend was seen for fish consumption and PFOS, perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA). Toxicokinetic modeling allowed us to predict the median increases in serum concentrations of PFOS, PFHxS, and PFNA among high consumers within a factor of 2.2. The combination of statistical evaluation and toxicokinetic modeling clearly demonstrated a positive relationship between consumption of fish from AFFF-affected waters and serum PFAS concentrations. Further studies on dietary exposure to other PFASs present in AFFF and its consequences on human health are warranted. PMID

  12. Microstructural effects in foam fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Peter; Davis, Stephen; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-11-01

    We examine the fracture of a quasi two-dimensional aqueous foam under an applied driving pressure, using a network modelling approach developed for metallic foams by Stewart & Davis (J. Rheol., vol. 56, 2012, p. 543). In agreement with experiments, we observe two distinct mechanisms of failure analogous to those observed in a crystalline solid: a slow ductile mode when the driving pressure is applied slowly, where the void propagates as bubbles interchange neighbours through the T1 process, and a rapid brittle mode for faster application of pressures, where the void advances by successive rupture of liquid films driven by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The simulations allow detailed insight into the mechanics of the fracturing medium and the role of its microstructure. In particular, we examine the stress distribution around the crack tip and investigate how brittle fracture localizes into a single line of breakages. We also confirm that pre-existing microstructural defects can alter the course of fracture.

  13. Coalescence In Draining Foams Made of Very Small Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Briceño-Ahumada, Zenaida; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Langevin, Dominique

    2016-03-25

    We studied the stability of foams containing small bubbles (radius ≲ 50  μm). The foams are made from aqueous surfactant solutions containing various amounts of glycerol. The foams start breaking at their top, when the liquid volume fraction has decreased sufficiently during liquid drainage. Unlike in foams with larger bubbles, the liquid fraction at which the foam destabilizes is surprisingly high. In order to interpret this observation we propose that film rupture occurs during reorganization events (T1) induced by bubble coarsening, which is particularly rapid in the case of small bubbles. New films are therefore formed rapidly and if their thickness is too small, they cannot be sufficiently covered by surfactant and they break. Using literature data for the duration of T1 events and the thickness of the new films, we show that this mechanism is consistent with the behavior of the foams studied. PMID:27058106

  14. Coalescence In Draining Foams Made of Very Small Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño-Ahumada, Zenaida; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Langevin, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    We studied the stability of foams containing small bubbles (radius ≲ 50 μ m ). The foams are made from aqueous surfactant solutions containing various amounts of glycerol. The foams start breaking at their top, when the liquid volume fraction has decreased sufficiently during liquid drainage. Unlike in foams with larger bubbles, the liquid fraction at which the foam destabilizes is surprisingly high. In order to interpret this observation we propose that film rupture occurs during reorganization events (T 1 ) induced by bubble coarsening, which is particularly rapid in the case of small bubbles. New films are therefore formed rapidly and if their thickness is too small, they cannot be sufficiently covered by surfactant and they break. Using literature data for the duration of T 1 events and the thickness of the new films, we show that this mechanism is consistent with the behavior of the foams studied.

  15. Pitch based foam with particulate

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2001-01-01

    A thermally conductive, pitch based foam composite having a particulate content. The particulate alters the mechanical characteristics of the foam without severely degrading the foam thermal conductivity. The composite is formed by mixing the particulate with pitch prior to foaming.

  16. Foam granulation: new developments in pharmaceutical solid oral dosage forms using twin screw extrusion machinery.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M R; Weatherley, S; Pukadyil, R N; Sheskey, P J

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates foam granulation in a twin screw extruder as a new continuous wet granulation technique for pharmaceutical powder drug formulations. Foamed aqueous binder has a reportedly lower soak-to-spread ratio than drop or spray liquid addition in batch granulation. This work demonstrates a twin screw extruder configuration for foam granulation and subsequently compares the new approach against liquid injection in the granulation of α-lactose monohydrate with a methylcellulose binder. Trials were conducted at high powder output rates (20-40 kg/h) and high screw speeds (220-320 RPM) with two screw configurations. Process stability improved with the new technique allowing granulation with less binder. The extruded mass maintained a low exit temperature, being insensitive to operating conditions unlike the liquid injection approach, where temperatures rose significantly as flow rate increased. The particle size distribution by foam granulation reflected a more uniformly wetted mass with larger granule growth noted even for conditions where dry powder exited by liquid injection. Other factors were found similar between the two binder delivery methods such as consumed mechanical energy, as well as fracture strength and compressibility of produced granules. PMID:22085462

  17. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation of Aqueous C60 Nanoparticles with Size Determination by Dynamic Light Scattering and Quantification by Liquid Chromatography Atmospheric Pressure Photo-Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    A size separation method was developed for aqueous C60 fullerene aggregates (aqu/C60) using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a dynamic light scattering detector in flow through mode. Surfactants, which are commonly used in AF4, were avoided as they may al...

  18. Foam imbibition in a Hele-Shaw cell via laminated microfluidic ``T-junction'' device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Dina; Ward, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    In this talk we analyze experimental results of a novel microfluidic ``T-junction'' device, made from laminated plastic, that is used to produce foam in porous media. The fluids, both Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids and air, are driven using constant-static pressure fluid pumping. For the T-junction geometry studied there are novel observations with this type of pumping: 1) at low pressure ratios there is an increase in the liquid and total flow rates and 2) at higher pressure ratios there is a decrease in the liquid flow rate. To understand this phenomenon we visualize the drop production process near the T-junction. Furthermore, flow rates for the liquid and total volume are estimated by imbibing the foam into a Hele-Shaw cell. Foam is produced by using a mixture containing aqueous polyacrylamide of concentrations ranging from 0.01-0.10% by weight and several solution also containing a sodium-lauryl-sulfate (SLS) surfactant at concentrations ranging 0.01-0.1% by weight.

  19. Pipelining particulate solid material as stable foam slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.L.

    1980-04-29

    A method of transporting particulate solid material through a pipeline in the form of a stable foam slurry is described. A pumpable slurry is formed of the particulate solid material in a stable foam carrier medium and the slurry is flowed through the pipeline to a receiving point. A method of transporting particulate solid materials through a pipeline is described wherein a pumpable slurry is formed of the particulate solid material. The particulate material is present in the stable foam in an amount of at least 20% by volume based on the total volume of the stable foam slurry. The particulate solid material may be coal particles, other forms of particulate carbonaceous material, such as coke, lignite and pitch, ores, and still other particulate material which is insoluble in the stable foam. The foam may be formed from a liquid, usually water, gas, and a foam stabilizing agent, such as a soap or a surfactant. 4 claims.

  20. Fire retardant polyisocyanurate foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Parker, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Fire retardant properties of low density polymer foam are increased. Foam has pendant nitrile groups which form thermally-stable heterocyclic structures at temperature below degradation temperature of urethane linkages.

  1. Polyurethane-Foam Maskant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodemeijer, R.

    1985-01-01

    Brown wax previously used to mask hardware replaced with polyurethane foam in electroplating and electroforming operations. Foam easier to apply and remove than wax and does not contaminate electrolytes.

  2. Macro-mechanical modeling of blast-wave mitigation in foams. Part II: reliability of pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britan, A.; Liverts, M.; Shapiro, H.; Ben-Dor, G.

    2013-02-01

    A phenomenological study of the process occurring when a plane shock wave reflected off an aqueous foam column filling the test section of a vertical shock tube has been undertaken. The experiments were conducted with initial shock wave Mach numbers in the range 1.25le {M}_s le 1.7 and foam column heights in the range 100-450 mm. Miniature piezotrone circuit electronic pressure transducers were used to record the pressure histories upstream and alongside the foam column. The aim of these experiments was to find a simple way to eliminate a spatial averaging as an artifact of the pressure history recorded by the side-on transducer. For this purpose, we discuss first the common behaviors of the pressure traces in extended time scales. These observations evidently quantify the low frequency variations of the pressure field within the different flow domains of the shock tube. Thereafter, we focus on the fronts of the pressure signals, which, in turn, characterize the high-frequency response of the foam column to the shock wave impact. Since the front shape and the amplitude of the pressure signal most likely play a significant role in the foam destruction, phase changes and/or other physical factors, such as high capacity, viscosity, etc., the common practice of the data processing is revised and discussed in detail. Generally, side-on pressure measurements must be used with great caution when performed in wet aqueous foams, because the low sound speed is especially prone to this effect. Since the spatial averaged recorded pressure signals do not reproduce well the real behaviors of the pressure rise, the recorded shape of the shock wave front in the foam appears much thicker. It is also found that when a thin liquid film wet the sensing membrane, the transducer sensitivity was changed. As a result, the pressure recorded in the foam could exceed the real amplitude of the post-shock wave flow. A simple procedure, which allows correcting this imperfection, is discussed in

  3. Aqueous Iron-Sulfide Clusters in Variably Saturated Soil Systems: Implications for Iron Cycling and Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. T.; Hansen, D. J.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2008-12-01

    Iron and sulfur cycling is an important control on contaminant fate and transport, the availability of micronutrients and the physics of water flow. This study explores the effects of soil structure (i.e. layers, lenses, macropores, or fractures) on linked biogeochemical and hydrological processes involving Fe and S cycling in the vadose zone using packed soil columns. Three laboratory soil columns were constructed: a homogenized medium-grained sand, homogenized organic-rich loam, and a sand-over-loam layered column. Both upward and downward infiltration of water was evaluated during experiments to simulate rising water table and rainfall events respectively. Water samples extracted by lysimeter were analyzed for reduced species (including total sulfide, Fe(II), and FeSaq) voltammetrically using a mercury drop electrode. In addition to other reduced species, aqueous FeS clusters (FeSaq) were observed in two of the columns, with the greatest concentrations of FeSaq occurring in close proximity to the soil interface in the layered column. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of aqueous FeS clusters in partially saturated sediments. The aqueous nature of FeSaq allows it to be transported instead of precipitating and suggests that current conceptual models of iron-sulfur cycling may need to be adapted to account for an aqueous phase. The presence of iron-rich soil aggregates near the soil interface may indicate that FeS clusters played a critical role in the formation of soil aggregates that subsequently caused up to an order of magnitude decrease in hydraulic conductivity.

  4. Viscoelastic foam cushion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubokawa, C. C.; Yost, C.

    1977-01-01

    Foam is viscous and elastic with unusual and useful temperature, humidity, and compression responses. Applied weight and pressure distributed equally along entire interface with foam eliminates any pressure points. Flexible urethane foam is ideal for orthopedic and prosthetic devices, sports equipment, furniture, and crash protection.

  5. Metallized polymeric foam material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, B. A.; Bilow, N.

    1974-01-01

    Open-celled polyurethane foams can be coated uniformly with thin film of metal by vapor deposition of aluminum or by sensitization of foam followed by electroless deposition of nickel or copper. Foam can be further processed to increase thickness of metal overcoat to impart rigidity or to provide inert surface with only modest increase in weight.

  6. Direct Solar Charging of an Organic-Inorganic, Stable, and Aqueous Alkaline Redox Flow Battery with a Hematite Photoanode.

    PubMed

    Wedege, Kristina; Azevedo, João; Khataee, Amirreza; Bentien, Anders; Mendes, Adélio

    2016-06-13

    The intermittent nature of the sunlight and its increasing contribution to electricity generation is fostering the energy storage research. Direct solar charging of an auspicious type of redox flow battery could make solar energy directly and efficiently dispatchable. The first solar aqueous alkaline redox flow battery using low cost and environmentally safe materials is demonstrated. The electrolytes consist of the redox couples ferrocyanide and anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonate in sodium hydroxide solution, yielding a standard cell potential of 0.74 V. Photovoltage enhancement strategies are demonstrated for the ferrocyanide-hematite junction by employing an annealing treatment and growing a layer of a conductive polyaniline polymer on the electrode surface, which decreases electron-hole recombination. PMID:27151516

  7. Earth-like aqueous debris-flow activity on Mars at high orbital obliquity in the last million years.

    PubMed

    de Haas, T; Hauber, E; Conway, S J; van Steijn, H; Johnsson, A; Kleinhans, M G

    2015-01-01

    Liquid water is currently extremely rare on Mars, but was more abundant during periods of high obliquity in the last few millions of years. This is testified by the widespread occurrence of mid-latitude gullies: small catchment-fan systems. However, there are no direct estimates of the amount and frequency of liquid water generation during these periods. Here we determine debris-flow size, frequency and associated water volumes in Istok crater, and show that debris flows occurred at Earth-like frequencies during high-obliquity periods in the last million years on Mars. Results further imply that local accumulations of snow/ice within gullies were much more voluminous than currently predicted; melting must have yielded centimetres of liquid water in catchments; and recent aqueous activity in some mid-latitude craters was much more frequent than previously anticipated. PMID:26102485

  8. Earth-like aqueous debris-flow activity on Mars at high orbital obliquity in the last Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haas, Tjalling; Hauber, Ernst; Conway, Susan; van Steijn, Henk; Johnsson, Andreas; Kleinhans, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    Mars is currently very cold and dry and its thin atmosphere makes liquid water at its surface exceptionally rare. However, climatic conditions differed during periods of high orbital obliquity in the last few millions of years, and liquid water was probably more abundant, as testified by the widespread occurrence of mid-latitude gullies: small catchment-fan system (Fig. 1). There are no direct estimates of the amount and frequency of liquid water generation during these periods. We determined debris-flow size, frequency and associated water volumes in Istok crater, and show that debris flows occurred at Earth-like frequencies during high-obliquity periods in the last million years. This implies that (1) local accumulations of snow/ice within catchments were much more voluminous than generally predicted; (2) melting must have yielded centimeters of liquid water in catchments; and (3) recent aqueous activity in some mid-latitude craters was much more frequent than previously anticipated.

  9. Earth-like aqueous debris-flow activity on Mars at high orbital obliquity in the last million years

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, T.; Hauber, E.; Conway, S. J.; van Steijn, H.; Johnsson, A.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid water is currently extremely rare on Mars, but was more abundant during periods of high obliquity in the last few millions of years. This is testified by the widespread occurrence of mid-latitude gullies: small catchment-fan systems. However, there are no direct estimates of the amount and frequency of liquid water generation during these periods. Here we determine debris-flow size, frequency and associated water volumes in Istok crater, and show that debris flows occurred at Earth-like frequencies during high-obliquity periods in the last million years on Mars. Results further imply that local accumulations of snow/ice within gullies were much more voluminous than currently predicted; melting must have yielded centimetres of liquid water in catchments; and recent aqueous activity in some mid-latitude craters was much more frequent than previously anticipated. PMID:26102485

  10. Silica Foams for Fire Prevention and Firefighting.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander V; Kuprin, D S; Abduragimov, I M; Kuprin, G N; Serebriyakov, Evgeniy; Vinogradov, Vladimir V

    2016-01-13

    We report the new development of fire-extinguishing agents employing the latest technology of fighting and preventing fires. The in situ technology of fighting fires and explosions involves using large-scale ultrafast-gelated foams, which possess new properties and unique characteristics, in particular, exceptional thermal stability, mechanical durability, and full biocompatibility. We provide a detailed description of the physicochemical processes of silica foam formation at the molecular level and functional comparison with current fire-extinguishing and fire-fighting agents. The new method allows to produce controllable gelation silica hybrid foams in the range from 2 to 30 s up to 100 Pa·s viscosity. Chemical structure and hierarchical morphology obtained by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images develop thermal insulation capabilities of the foams, reaching a specific heat value of more than 2.5 kJ/(kg·°C). The produced foam consists of organized silica nanoparticles as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis with a narrow particle size distribution of ∼10-20 nm. As a result of fire-extinguishing tests, it is shown that the extinguishing efficiency exhibited by silica-based sol-gel foams is almost 50 times higher than that for ordinary water and 15 times better than that for state-of-the-art firefighting agent aqueous film forming foam. The biodegradation index determined by the time of the induction period was only 3 d, while even for conventional foaming agents this index is several times higher. PMID:26492207

  11. Covalent binding of a nerve agent hydrolyzing enzyme within polyurethane foams.

    PubMed

    Lejeune, K E; Russell, A J

    1996-08-20

    A phosphotriesterase preparation, extracted from Escherichia coli DH5alpha cells, was immobilized within a polyurethane foam matrix during polymer synthesis. The enzyme-foam interaction was shown to be covalent and analysis of the hydrolysis of paraoxon in aqueous solution demonstrated that more than 50% of the initial enzyme specific activity was retained after immobilization in the foam. Factors affecting the rate of paraoxon degradation include foam hydrophobicity, the degree of mixing applied to initiate polymerization, and foam pretreatment prior to use in substrate hydrolysis. The storage stability of the foam is significant, with phosphotriesterase-foam activity profiles exhibiting a three month half-life. Foams are currently being developed for biocatalytic air filtering, in which gaseous substrates will be simultaneously adsorbed and degraded by the immobilized enzyme system. (c) 1996 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18629797

  12. Multiscale modelling of evolving foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saye, R. I.; Sethian, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a set of multi-scale interlinked algorithms to model the dynamics of evolving foams. These algorithms couple the key effects of macroscopic bubble rearrangement, thin film drainage, and membrane rupture. For each of the mechanisms, we construct consistent and accurate algorithms, and couple them together to work across the wide range of space and time scales that occur in foam dynamics. These algorithms include second order finite difference projection methods for computing incompressible fluid flow on the macroscale, second order finite element methods to solve thin film drainage equations in the lamellae and Plateau borders, multiphase Voronoi Implicit Interface Methods to track interconnected membrane boundaries and capture topological changes, and Lagrangian particle methods for conservative liquid redistribution during rearrangement and rupture. We derive a full set of numerical approximations that are coupled via interface jump conditions and flux boundary conditions, and show convergence for the individual mechanisms. We demonstrate our approach by computing a variety of foam dynamics, including coupled evolution of three-dimensional bubble clusters attached to an anchored membrane and collapse of a foam cluster.

  13. Amorphous metallic foam: Synthesis and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veazey, Chris

    2007-12-01

    Bulk metallic glass alloys were processed into foam by several synthesis routes. These methods utilize the thermodynamic stability and thermoplastic formability of the supercooled liquid state to produce low-density homogeneous foams. The cellular structure is shown to evolve by growth of randomly distributed spherical bubbles towards polyhedral-like cells separated by microscopic intracellular membranes exhibiting random orientations and aspect ratios. The ability of amorphous metals to develop such random cellular morphologies is attributed primarily to the high ductility exhibited by their softened state, which enables large superplastic membrane elongations during foaming. Upon loading, moderate porosity foams are known to deform plastically by recurring non-linear yielding transitions followed by non-catastrophic collapse events. The ability of these foams to yield non-catastrophically is a result of the plastic deformability of amorphous metals in sub-millimeter dimensions. Nonlinear yielding is found to be accommodated by clusters involving 4--6 cells, which yield by intracellular membrane buckling and ultimately collapse plastically to produce a localized plastic collapse band. By comparison, high-porosity foams deform plastically by multiple recurring non-catastrophic collapse events without undergoing macroscopic failure. The numerous minor collapse events are associated with localized ligament collapse, and the few major collapse events are associated with the cooperative collapse of several adjacent ligaments and the formation of a collapse band. On average, the serrated flow responses between major events appear to be self-similar and resemble the recurring nonlinear yielding responses exhibited by moderate porosity foams.

  14. Structural graphitic carbon foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, K.M.; Anderson, H.J.

    1998-12-31

    Graphitic carbon foams are a unique material form with very high structural and thermal properties at a light weight. A process has been developed to produce microcellular, open-celled graphitic foams. The process includes heating a mesophase pitch preform above the pitch melting temperature in a pressurized reactor. At the appropriate time, the pressure is released, the gas nucleates bubbles, and these bubbles grow forming the pitch into the foam structure. The resultant foamed pitch is then stabilized in an oxygen environment. At this point a rigid structure exists with some mechanical integrity. The foam is then carbonized to 800 C followed by a graphitization to 2700 C. The shear action from the growing bubbles aligns the graphitic planes along the foam struts to provide the ideal structure for good mechanical properties. Some of these properties have been characterized for some of the foam materials. It is known that variations of the blowing temperature, blowing pressure and saturation time result in foams of variously sized with mostly open pores; however, the mechanism of bubble nucleation is not known. Therefore foams were blown with various gases to begin to determine the nucleation method. These gases are comprised of a variety of molecular weights as well as a range of various solubility levels. By examining the resultant structures of the foam, differences were noted to develop an explanation of the foaming mechanism.

  15. Non-aqueous carbon black suspensions for lithium-based redox flow batteries: rheology and simultaneous rheo-electrical behavior.

    PubMed

    Youssry, Mohamed; Madec, Lénaïc; Soudan, Patrick; Cerbelaud, Manuella; Guyomard, Dominique; Lestriez, Bernard

    2013-09-14

    We report on the rheological and electrical properties of non-aqueous carbon black (CB) suspensions at equilibrium and under steady shear flow. The smaller the primary particle size of carbon black is, the higher the magnitude of rheological parameters and the conductivity are. The electrical percolation threshold ranges seem to coincide with the strong gel rather than the weak gel rheological threshold ones. The simultaneous measurements of electrical properties under shear flow reveal the well-known breaking-and-reforming mechanism that characterises such complex fluids. The small shear rate breaks up the network into smaller agglomerates, which in turn transform into anisometric eroded ones at very high shear rates, recovering the network conductivity. The type of carbon black, its concentration range and the flow rate range are now precisely identified for optimizing the performance of a redox flow battery. A preliminary electrochemical study for a composite anolyte (CB/Li4Ti5O12) at different charge-discharge rates and thicknesses is shown. PMID:23892887

  16. Magnetic self-assembly of microparticle clusters in an aqueous two-phase microfluidic cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Niki; Jones, Steven G.; Moon, Byeong-Ui; Tsai, Scott S. H.

    2015-11-01

    We present a technique that self-assembles paramagnetic microparticles on the interface of aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) fluids in a microfluidic cross-flow. A co-flow of the ATPS is formed in the microfluidic cross channel as the flows of a dilute dextran (DEX) phase, along with a flow-focused particle suspension, converges with a dilute polyethylene glycol (PEG) phase. The microparticles arrive at the liquid-liquid interface and self-assemble into particle clusters due to forces on the particles from an applied external magnetic field gradient, and the interfacial tension of the ATPS. The microparticles form clusters at the interface, and once the cluster size grows to a critical value, the cluster passes through the interface. We control the size of the self-assembled clusters, as they pass through the interface, by varying the strength of the applied magnetic field gradient and the ATPS interfacial tension. We observe rich assembly dynamics, from the formation of Pickering emulsions to clusters that are completely encapsulated inside DEX phase droplets. We anticipate that this microparticle self-assembly method may have important biotechnological applications that require the controlled assembly of cells into clusters.

  17. Tests point the way for high-temp foams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    Tests at Sandia National Laboratories have identified organic surfactants that show promise of producing aqueous foam drilling fluids that will withstand the elevated temperatures encountered in drilling geothermal wells. Aqueous foams--a mixture of surfactant, water and gas, commonly air--are used in oil and gas drilling where temperatures do not exceed 200 F, but are not suitable for geothermal drilling where temperatures of 500/sup 0/F and pressures of 500 psi are encountered. The foams are of interest in geothermal drilling because of their high viscosity. They can be pumped at lower rates and thus produce less erosion of equipment than does the high- pressure air now used to cool drill bits and lift borehole cuttings to the surface. The low density of the foams-- about the consistency of shaving cream--could reduce lost circulation that occurs when drilling fluids invade the reservoir formation.

  18. Automated determination of nitrate plus nitrite in aqueous samples with flow injection analysis using vanadium (III) chloride as reductant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Lin, Kunning; Chen, Nengwang; Yuan, Dongxing; Ma, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Determination of nitrate in aqueous samples is an important analytical objective for environmental monitoring and assessment. Here we report the first automatic flow injection analysis (FIA) of nitrate (plus nitrite) using VCl3 as reductant instead of the well-known but toxic cadmium column for reducing nitrate to nitrite. The reduced nitrate plus the nitrite originally present in the sample react with the Griess reagent (sulfanilamide and N-1-naphthylethylenediamine dihydrochloride) under acidic condition. The resulting pink azo dye can be detected at 540 nm. The Griess reagent and VCl3 are used as a single mixed reagent solution to simplify the system. The various parameters of the FIA procedure including reagent composition, temperature, volume of the injection loop, and flow rate were carefully investigated and optimized via univariate experimental design. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range and detection limit of this method are 0-100 µM (R(2)=0.9995) and 0.1 µM, respectively. The targeted analytical range can be easily extended to higher concentrations by selecting alternative detection wavelengths or increasing flow rate. The FIA system provides a sample throughput of 20 h(-1), which is much higher than that of previously reported manual methods based on the same chemistry. National reference solutions and different kinds of aqueous samples were analyzed with our method as well as the cadmium column reduction method. The results from our method agree well with both the certified value and the results from the cadmium column reduction method (no significant difference with P=0.95). The spiked recovery varies from 89% to 108% for samples with different matrices, showing insignificant matrix interference in this method. PMID:26695325

  19. Linear and non-linear wall friction of wet foams.

    PubMed

    Le Merrer, Marie; Lespiat, Rémi; Höhler, Reinhard; Cohen-Addad, Sylvie

    2015-01-14

    We study the wall slip of aqueous foams with a high liquid content. We use a set-up where, driven by buoyancy, a foam creeps along an inclined smooth solid wall which is immersed in the foaming solution. This configuration allows the force driving the bubble motion and the bubble confinement in the vicinity of the wall to be tuned independently. First, we consider bubble monolayers with small Bond number Bo < 1 and measure the relation between the friction force F and the bubble velocity V. For bubbles which are so small that they are almost spherical, the friction law F ∝ V is Stokes-like. The analysis shows that the minimal thickness of the lubricating contact between the bubble and the wall is governed by DLVO long-range forces. Our results are the first evidence of this predicted linear friction regime for creeping bubbles. Due to buoyancy, large bubbles flatten against the wall. In this case, dissipation arises because of viscous flow in the dynamic meniscus between the contact film and the spherical part of the bubble. It leads to a non-linear Bretherton-like friction law F ∝ V(2/3), as expected for slipping bubbles with mobile liquid-gas interfaces. The Stokes-like friction dominates for capillary numbers Ca larger than the crossover value Ca* ∼ Bo(3/2). The overall friction force can be expressed as the sum of these two contributions. On this basis, we then study 3D foams close to the jamming transition with osmotic pressures Π small compared to the capillary pressure Pc. We measure the wall shear stress τ as a function of the capillary number, and we evidence two friction regimes that are consistent with those found for the monolayer. Similarly to this latter case, the total shear stress can be expressed as the sum of the Stokes-like friction term τ ∝ Ca and the Bretherton-like one τ ∝ Ca(2/3). However, for a 3D foam, the crossover at a capillary number Ca** between both regimes is governed by the ratio of the osmotic pressure to the

  20. Foam Generation in Homogeneous Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Friedman, F.; Kam, S. I.; Rossen, W. R.

    2002-10-01

    In steady gas-liquid flow in homogeneous porous media with surfactant present, there is often observed a critical injection velocity or pressure gradient ?grad p min? at which ?weak? or ?coarse? foam is abruptly converted into ?strong foam,? with reduction of one to two orders of magnitude in total mobility: i.e., ?foam generation.? Earlier research on foam generation is extended here with extensive data for a variety of porous media, permeabilities, gases (N2 and C02), surfactants, and temperatures. For bead and sandpacks, ?grad p min? scales like (1/k), where k is permeability, over 2 1/2 orders of magnitude in k; for consolidated media the relation is more complex. For dense C02 foam, ?grad p min? exists but can be less than 1 psi/ft. If pressure drop, rather than flow rates, is fixed, one observes and unstable regime between stable ?strong? and ?coarse? foam regimes; in the unstable regime ?grad p? is nonuniform in space or variable in time.

  1. Fundamentals of foam transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Kovscek, A.R.; Radke, C.J.

    1993-10-01

    Foam in porous media is a fascinating fluid both because of its unique microstructure and because its dramatic influence on the flow of gas and liquid. A wealth of information is now compiled in the literature describing foam generation, destruction, and transport mechanisms. Yet there are conflicting views of these mechanisms and on the macroscopic results they produce. By critically reviewing how surfactant formulation and porous media topology conspire to control foam texture and flow resistance, we attempt to unify the disparate viewpoints. Evolution of texture during foam displacement is quantified by a population balance on bubble concentration, which is designed specifically for convenient incorporation into a standard reservoir simulator. Theories for the dominant bubble generation and coalescence mechanisms provide physically based rate expressions for the proposed population balance. Stone-type relative permeability functions along with the texture-sensitive and shear-thinning nature of confined foam complete the model. Quite good agreement is found between theory and new experiments for transient foam displacement in linear cores.

  2. Foam and gel methods for the decontamination of metallic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, Luis; Kaminski, Michael Donald

    2007-01-23

    Decontamination of nuclear facilities is necessary to reduce the radiation field during normal operations and decommissioning of complex equipment. In this invention, we discuss gel and foam based diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) chemical solutions that are unique in that these solutions can be applied at room temperature; provide protection to the base metal for continued applications of the equipment; and reduce the final waste form production to one step. The HEDPA gels and foams are formulated with benign chemicals, including various solvents, such as ionic liquids and reducing and complexing agents such as hydroxamic acids, and formaldehyde sulfoxylate. Gel and foam based HEDPA processes allow for decontamination of difficult to reach surfaces that are unmanageable with traditional aqueous process methods. Also, the gel and foam components are optimized to maximize the dissolution rate and assist in the chemical transformation of the gel and foam to a stable waste form.

  3. The effects of disinfectant foam on microbial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Prem K; Chorny, Roberto C

    2005-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of common aqueous biocides and disinfectant foams derived from them on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Biofilms were grown on stainless steel coupons under standardised conditions in a reactor supplemented with low concentrations of organic matter to simulate conditions prevalent in industrial systems. Five-day-old biofilms formed under ambient conditions with continuous agitation demonstrated a low coefficient of variation (5.809%) amongst viable biofilm bacteria from independent trials. Scanning electron microscopy revealed biofilms on coupons with viable biofilm bacteria observed by confocal microscopy. An aqueous solution of a common foaming agent amine oxide (AO) produced negligible effects on bacterial viability in biofilms (p>0.05). However, significant biofilm inactivation was noted with aqueous solutions of common biocides (peracetic acid, sodium hypochlorite, sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) with or without AO (p<0.05). Aereation of a mixture of AO with each of these common biocides resulted in significant reductions in the viability of biofilm bacteria (p<0.05). In contrast, limited effects were noted by foam devoid of biocides. A relationship between microbial inactivation and the concentration of biocide in foam (ranging from 0.1-0.5%) and exposure period were noted (p<0.05). Although, lower numbers of viable biofilm bacteria were recovered after treatment with the disinfectant foam than by the cognate aqueous biocide, significant differences between these treatments were not evident (p>0.05). In summary, the studies revealed significant biofilm inactivation by biocidal foam prepared with common biocides. Validation of foam disinfectants in controlled trials at manufacturing sites may facilitate developments for clean in place applications. Advantages of foam disinfectants include reductions in the volumes of biocides for industrial disinfection and in their disposal after use. PMID:16167393

  4. Rheological properties and the mechanism of a viscous flow of aqueous pectin solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netesova, G. A.; Kotov, V. V.; Bodyakina, I. M.; Lukin, A. L.

    2012-09-01

    The rheological properties and mechanisms of a viscous flow of diluted apple pectin solutions are investigated. It is found that the rise in solution viscosity upon an increase in concentration and a drop in temperature is, along with the corresponding degree to which the interaction between pectin molecules and solvent is reduced, associated with the processes of structuring. The entropy of a viscous flow of pectin solutions is found to be positive: it grows with a rise in concentration is virtually temperature independent. It is established that the entropy factor makes the main contribution to the free energy value of a viscous flow.

  5. Intraocular Pressure and the Mechanisms Involved in Resistance of the Aqueous Humor Flow in the Trabecular Meshwork Outflow Pathways.

    PubMed

    Tamm, Ernst R; Braunger, Barbara M; Fuchshofer, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP), the critical risk factor for glaucoma, is generated and maintained by the aqueous humor circulation system. Aqueous humor is secreted from the epithelial layers of the ciliary body and exits the eye through the trabecular meshwork or the uveoscleral outflow pathways. IOP builds up in response to a resistance to aqueous humor flow in the trabecular outflow pathways. The trabecular outflow resistance is localized in the inner wall region, which comprises the juxtacanalicular connective tissue (JCT) and the inner wall endothelium of Schlemm's canal (SC). Outflow resistance in this region is lowered through the relaxation of contractile myofibroblast-like cells in trabecular meshwork and the adjacent scleral spur, or the contraction of the ciliary muscle. In primary open-angle glaucoma, the most frequent form of glaucoma, outflow resistance of the inner wall region is typically higher than normal. There is evidence that the increase in resistance is related to characteristic biological changes in the resident cells of the JCT, which more and more acquire the structural and functional characteristics of contractile myofibroblasts. The changes involve an augmentation of their actin cytoskeleton and of their surrounding fibrillary extracellular matrix, which connects to JCT cells via integrins. This scenario leads to an overall stiffening of the inner wall region, and is modulated by transforming growth factor-β/connective tissue growth factor signaling. Essentially comparable changes appear to occur in SC endothelial cells. Stiffening of JCT and SC cells is very likely a critical causative factor for the increase in trabecular outflow resistance in POAG. PMID:26310162

  6. An Aqueous Redox Flow Battery Based on Neutral Alkali Metal Ferri/ferrocyanide and Polysulfide Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xia, Gordon; Kirby, Brent W.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-13

    Aiming to explore low-cost redox flow battery systems, a novel iron-polysulfide (Fe/S) flow battery has been demonstrated in a laboratory cell. This system employs alkali metal ferri/ferrocyanide and alkali metal polysulfides as the redox electrolytes. When proper electrodes, such as pretreated graphite felts, are used, 78% energy efficiency and 99% columbic efficiency are achieved. The remarkable advantages of this system over current state-of-the-art redox flow batteries include: 1) less corrosive and relatively environmentally benign redox solutions used; 2) excellent energy and utilization efficiencies; 3) low cost for redox electrolytes and cell components. These attributes can lead to significantly reduced capital cost and make the Fe/S flow battery system a promising low-cost energy storage technology. The major drawbacks of the present cell design are relatively low power density and possible sulfur species crossover. Further work is underway to address these concerns.

  7. Practical thermodynamic quantities for aqueous vanadium- and iron-based flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Hudak, Nicholas S.

    2013-12-31

    A simple method for experimentally determining thermodynamic quantities for flow battery cell reactions is presented. Equilibrium cell potentials, temperature derivatives of cell potential (dE/dT), Gibbs free energies, and entropies are reported here for all-vanadium, iron–vanadium, and iron–chromium flow cells with state-of-the-art solution compositions. Proof is given that formal potentials and formal temperature coefficients can be used with modified forms of the Nernst Equation to quantify the thermodynamics of flow cell reactions as a function of state-of-charge. Such empirical quantities can be used in thermo-electrochemical models of flow batteries at the cell or system level. In most cases, the thermodynamic quantities measured here are significantly different from standard values reported and used previously in the literature. The data reported here are also useful in the selection of operating temperatures for flow battery systems. Because higher temperatures correspond to lower equilibrium cell potentials for the battery chemistries studied here, it can be beneficial to charge a cell at higher temperature and discharge at lower temperature. As a result, proof-of-concept of improved voltage efficiency with the use of such non-isothermal cycling is given for the all-vanadium redox flow battery, and the effect is shown to be more pronounced at lower current densities.

  8. Practical thermodynamic quantities for aqueous vanadium- and iron-based flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudak, Nicholas S.

    2014-12-01

    A simple method for experimentally determining thermodynamic quantities for flow battery cell reactions is presented. Equilibrium cell potentials, temperature derivatives of cell potential (dE/dT), Gibbs free energies, and entropies are reported here for all-vanadium, iron-vanadium, and iron-chromium flow cells with state-of-the-art solution compositions. Proof is given that formal potentials and formal temperature coefficients can be used with modified forms of the Nernst Equation to quantify the thermodynamics of flow cell reactions as a function of state-of-charge. Such empirical quantities can be used in thermo-electrochemical models of flow batteries at the cell or system level. In most cases, the thermodynamic quantities measured here are significantly different from standard values reported and used previously in the literature. The data reported here are also useful in the selection of operating temperatures for flow battery systems. Because higher temperatures correspond to lower equilibrium cell potentials for the battery chemistries studied here, it can be beneficial to charge a cell at higher temperature and discharge at lower temperature. Proof-of-concept of improved voltage efficiency with the use of such non-isothermal cycling is given for the all-vanadium redox flow battery, and the effect is shown to be more pronounced at lower current densities.

  9. Practical thermodynamic quantities for aqueous vanadium- and iron-based flow batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hudak, Nicholas S.

    2013-12-31

    A simple method for experimentally determining thermodynamic quantities for flow battery cell reactions is presented. Equilibrium cell potentials, temperature derivatives of cell potential (dE/dT), Gibbs free energies, and entropies are reported here for all-vanadium, iron–vanadium, and iron–chromium flow cells with state-of-the-art solution compositions. Proof is given that formal potentials and formal temperature coefficients can be used with modified forms of the Nernst Equation to quantify the thermodynamics of flow cell reactions as a function of state-of-charge. Such empirical quantities can be used in thermo-electrochemical models of flow batteries at the cell or system level. In most cases, the thermodynamic quantitiesmore » measured here are significantly different from standard values reported and used previously in the literature. The data reported here are also useful in the selection of operating temperatures for flow battery systems. Because higher temperatures correspond to lower equilibrium cell potentials for the battery chemistries studied here, it can be beneficial to charge a cell at higher temperature and discharge at lower temperature. As a result, proof-of-concept of improved voltage efficiency with the use of such non-isothermal cycling is given for the all-vanadium redox flow battery, and the effect is shown to be more pronounced at lower current densities.« less

  10. The impact of pH on side reactions for aqueous redox flow batteries based on nitroxyl radical compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orita, A.; Verde, M. G.; Sakai, M.; Meng, Y. S.

    2016-07-01

    Electrochemical and UV-VIS measurements demonstrate that the pH value of a 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-pipperidinyloxyl (TEMPOL) electrolyte significantly impacts its redox reversibility. The diffusion coefficient and kinetic rate constant of TEMPOL in neutral aqueous solution are determined and shown to be comparable to those of vanadium ions used for industrially utilized redox flow batteries (RFBs). RFBs that incorporate a TEMPOL catholyte and Zn-based anolyte have an average voltage of 1.46 V and an energy efficiency of 80.4% during the initial cycle, when subject to a constant current of 10 mA cm-2. We demonstrate several factors that significantly influence the concentration and capacity retention of TEMPOL upon cycling; namely, pH and atmospheric gases dissolved in electrolyte. We expand upon the known reactions of TEMPOL in aqueous electrolyte and propose several concepts to improve its electrochemical performance in a RFB. Controlling these factors will be the key to enable the successful implementation of this relatively inexpensive and environmentally friendly battery.

  11. Convective heat transfer for fluids passing through aluminum foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyga, Roman; Troniewski, Leon

    2015-03-01

    This paper analyses the experimental findings within heat transfer when heating up air, water and oil streams which are passed through a duct with internal structural packing elements in the form of metal foams. Three types of aluminum foams with different cell sizes, porosity specifications and thermal conductivities were used in the study. The test data were collected and they made it possible to establish the effect of the foam geometry, properties of fluids and flow hydrodynamic conditions on the convective heat transfer process from the heating surface to the fluid flowing by (wetting) that surface. The foam was found to be involved in heat transfer to a limited extent only. Heat is predominantly transferred directly from the duct wall to a fluid, and intensity of convective heat transfer is controlled by the wall effects. The influence of foam structural parameters, like cell size and/or porosity, becomes more clearly apparent under laminar flow conditions.

  12. Performance and cost characteristics of multi-electron transfer, common ion exchange non-aqueous redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laramie, Sydney M.; Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Breault, Tanya M.; Brushett, Fikile R.; Thompson, Levi T.

    2016-09-01

    Non-aqueous redox flow batteries (NAqRFBs) have recently received considerable attention as promising high energy density, low cost grid-level energy storage technologies. Despite these attractive features, NAqRFBs are still at an early stage of development and innovative design techniques are necessary to improve performance and decrease costs. In this work, we investigate multi-electron transfer, common ion exchange NAqRFBs. Common ion systems decrease the supporting electrolyte requirement, which subsequently improves active material solubility and decreases electrolyte cost. Voltammetric and electrolytic techniques are used to study the electrochemical performance and chemical compatibility of model redox active materials, iron (II) tris(2,2‧-bipyridine) tetrafluoroborate (Fe(bpy)3(BF4)2) and ferrocenylmethyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium tetrafluoroborate (Fc1N112-BF4). These results help disentangle complex cycling behavior observed in flow cell experiments. Further, a simple techno-economic model demonstrates the cost benefits of employing common ion exchange NAqRFBs, afforded by decreasing the salt and solvent contributions to total chemical cost. This study highlights two new concepts, common ion exchange and multi-electron transfer, for NAqRFBs through a demonstration flow cell employing model active species. In addition, the compatibility analysis developed for asymmetric chemistries can apply to other promising species, including organics, metal coordination complexes (MCCs) and mixed MCC/organic systems, enabling the design of low cost NAqRFBs.

  13. Electrophoretically induced aqueous flow through single-wall carbon nanotube membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ji; Gerstandt, Karen; Zhang, Hongbo; Liu, Jie; Hinds, Bruce. J.

    2013-01-01

    Electrophoresis, the motion of charged species through liquids and pores under an external electric field, has been principle source of chemical pumping for numerous micro- and nano-fluidic devices platforms. Recent studies of ion current through single or few carbon nanotube channels range from near bulk mobility to 2-7 orders of magnitude of enhancement but cannot directly measure ion flux. Membranes, with large number of nanotube pores, allow independent confirmation of ion current and flux. Here we report that the aqueous electrophoretic mobility of ions within the graphitic cores of carbon nanotube membranes, with a uniform pore size of 0.9 ± 0.2 nm, is enhanced ∼3 times that of bulk mobilities. The induced electroosmotic velocities are 4 orders of magnitude faster than those measured in conventional porous materials. We also show that a nanotube membrane can function as a rectifying diode due to ionic steric effects within tightly controlled nanotube diameter. PMID:22245860

  14. Accumulation of zirconium phosphate by a Serratia sp.: a benign system for the removal of radionuclides from aqueous flows.

    PubMed

    Mennan, Claire; Paterson-Beedle, Marion; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2010-10-01

    Metal phosphate deposited enzymatically on Serratia sp. has been used successfully for the removal of radionuclides from aqueous flows. Previous studies using biogenic hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP) on Serratia sp. biofilm showed removal of 100% of (90)Sr, (137)Cs, and (60)Co via their intercalation into biogenic HUP crystals. Zirconium phosphates (ZrP) offer a potential non-toxic and non-radioactive alternative to HUP for water decontamination. A method was developed for biomanufacturing ZrP. Biogenic ZrP removed ca. 100% of Sr(2+) and Co(2+) (0.5 mM) from solutions to a molar ratio at saturation of ca. 1:0.6 for both Zr:Sr and Zr:Co. The potential for drinking water decontamination via bio-ZrP is discussed with respect to bio-HUP and also other commercially available materials. PMID:20495949

  15. Study and characterization of positive electrolytes for application in the aqueous all-copper redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Laura; Lloyd, David; Magdalena, Eva; Palma, Jesús; Anderson, Marc; Kontturi, Kyösti

    2015-03-01

    In recent studies, the employment of the aqueous solution system comprised of Cu(II)-Cu(I)-Cl system was addressed for massive energy storage in Redox Flow Batteries (RFBs) [5,6], providing important practical advantages compared to the widespread all-vanadium or Zn/Br systems [5]. The substitution of vanadium electrolytes by copper-chloride electrolytes allows the simplification of the process and notably reduces the cost, allowing for a better commercialization of RFBs. Here, a complete physico-chemical characterization of positive copper electrolytes and their electrochemical performance using different supporting electrolytes, HCl and CaCl2, is presented. Once the physical properties and the electrochemical performance of each one of the supporting electrolytes were determined, the final composition of supporting electrolyte for this Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox couple could be optimized by mixing different sources of chloride, regarding its practical application in the all-copper RFB.

  16. Rheological Properties of Liquid and Particle Stabilized Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özarmut, A. Ö.; Steeb, H.

    2015-04-01

    In Earth-Pressure-Balance (EPB) tunnelling the excavated ground is used as face support medium to prevent surface settlements. In general, the excavated ground (e.g. for cohesionless soils) does not exhibit suitable conditions to support the tunnelling face. This technical challenge can be solved by adding conditioning agents that are mainly foams. In order to physically understand the rheological properties of the (added) liquid foam and the foam-soil (foam-particle) mixture and to comprehend its influence on the soil, advanced rheological investigations are necessary. Therefore, rheological experiments such as flow curve tests have been performed to determine the effective yield stress. Since the morphology, i.e. the microstructure of the foam accounts for effective rheological properties, size, shape and distribution of the cells of the foam and particle-laden foam were characterized in detail applying imaging techniques. In order to perform the above mentioned experiments, polymer- stabilised shaving foam seems to be a good replacement of tunnelling foam and suitable for laboratory tests due to its time stability, characteristic length scales of the microstructure and accessibility. Glass beads (of different diameter and volume fractions, i.e. specific surface areas) are used to investigate the effective material behaviour of foam-particle mixtures. The experimental results are compared with yield stress models of modified Herschel-Bulkley- Papanastasiou type.

  17. Foam as a Delivery Vehicle in Vadose Zone Remediation: Transport; Amendment Distribution; and Tc-99 Immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Szecsody, J.; Wellman, D. M.; Zhang, Z. F.; Mattigod, S.; Pierce, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    Foam is a promising low water content advection technology for the distribution of remedial amendments to the deep vadose zone for metals and radionuclides remediation. Foam flow in the vadose zone can be directed by manipulating the pressure field, therefore the foam delivery technology allows more even distribution of remedial amendments under vadose zone conditions than water-based delivery. With minimal water content in foam flow, foam delivery minimizes the potential for contaminant mobilization and spreading. Laboratory scale experiments were conducted to investigate the physical aspects of foam transport in sediments under vadose zone conditions, to study the (poly)phosphate amendment foam-delivery; and to evaluate technetium-99 immobilization by foam-delivered calcium polysulfide. Foam quality (percentage of gas volume in total foam volume) between 95% and 99% was tested to study its influence on foam injection pressure. It was observed that the injection pressure increased inversely as a function of foam quality. The effect of sediment permeability on foam injection pressure was evaluated in sediments with a range of permeabilities. Results suggested that when the foam injection rate was low, the injection pressure increased with sediment permeability; but when the foam injection rate was high, the injection pressure versus permeability relationship was reversed. Foam bubbles rupture at the foam-flow-front in the unsaturated sediments. The front of the gas injected with foam traveled significantly faster (~ 8 times) than the foam front observed in the sediment. The liquid carried by foam was left behind the foam front. In addition a water accumulation front developed in sediment ahead of the foam-flow-front, i.e. sediment not swept by foam flow, as native pore water was displaced by the foam front. The water content in this liquid accumulation front increased with the increasing of initial water content in the sediment. However, the water content in the

  18. Orbital foamed material extruder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    This invention is a process for producing foamed material in space comprising the steps of: rotating the material to simulate the force of gravity; heating the rotating material until it is molten; extruding the rotating, molten material; injecting gas into the extruded, rotating, molten material to produce molten foamed material; allowing the molten foamed material to cool to below melting temperature to produce the foamed material. The surface of the extruded foam may be heated to above melting temperature and allowed to cool to below melting temperature. The extruded foam may also be cut to predetermined length. The starting material may be metal or glass. Heating may be accomplished by electrical heating elements or by solar heating.

  19. Structure of random foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinelt, Douglas A.; van Swol, Frank B.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2004-06-01

    The Surface Evolver was used to compute the equilibrium microstructure of dry soap foams with random structure and a wide range of cell-size distributions. Topological and geometric properties of foams and individual cells were evaluated. The theory for isotropic Plateau polyhedra describes the dependence of cell geometric properties on their volume and number of faces. The surface area of all cells is about 10% greater than a sphere of equal volume; this leads to a simple but accurate theory for the surface free energy density of foam. A novel parameter based on the surface-volume mean bubble radius R32 is used to characterize foam polydispersity. The foam energy, total cell edge length, and average number of faces per cell all decrease with increasing polydispersity. Pentagonal faces are the most common in monodisperse foam but quadrilaterals take over in highly polydisperse structures.

  20. Monolithic Ceramic Foams for Ultrafast Photocatalytic Inactivation of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pinggui; Xie, Rongcai; Imlay, Kari; Shang, Jian Ku

    2011-01-01

    Palladium-modified nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (TiON/PdO) foams were synthesized by a sol-gel process on a polyurethane foam template. The TiON/PdO foam was tested for microbial killing using Escherichia coli cells as a target. Under visible-light illumination, the TiON/PdO foam displayed a strong antimicrobial effect on the bacteria cells in water. The antimicrobial effect was found to be dependent on the palladium content and the calcination temperature. In a flow-through dynamic photoreactor, the new photocatalyst efficiently inactivated E. coli within a short contact time (< 1 min), the shortest ever reported for photocatalytic killing of bacteria. The strong antimicrobial functions of the TiON/PdO foam were related to the charge trapping by PdO and to the high contact efficiency of the foam structure. PMID:21423830

  1. The science of foaming.

    PubMed

    Drenckhan, Wiebke; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    The generation of liquid foams is at the heart of numerous natural, technical or scientific processes. Even though the subject of foam generation has a long-standing history, many recent progresses have been made in an attempt to elucidate the fundamental processes at play. We review the subject by providing an overview of the relevant key mechanisms of bubble generation within a coherent hydrodynamic context; and we discuss different foaming techniques which exploit these mechanisms. PMID:26056064

  2. Repairing Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, J.; Buras, D.

    1986-01-01

    Large holes in polyurethane foam insulation repaired reliably by simple method. Little skill needed to apply method, used for overhead repairs as well as for those in other orientations. Plug positioned in hole to be filled and held in place with mounting fixture. Fresh liquid foam injected through plug to bond it in place. As foam cures and expands, it displaces plug outward. Protrusion later removed.

  3. Thermosetting Fluoropolymer Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sheng Yen

    1987-01-01

    New process makes fluoropolymer foams with controllable amounts of inert-gas fillings in foam cells. Thermosetting fluoropolymers do not require foaming additives leaving undesirable residues and do not have to be molded and sintered at temperatures of about 240 to 400 degree C. Consequently, better for use with electronic or other parts sensitive to high temperatures or residues. Uses include coatings, electrical insulation, and structural parts.

  4. High performance polymeric foams

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiulo, M.; Sorrentino, L.; Iannace, S.

    2008-08-28

    The aim of this work was to investigate the foamability of high-performance polymers (polyethersulfone, polyphenylsulfone, polyetherimide and polyethylenenaphtalate). Two different methods have been used to prepare the foam samples: high temperature expansion and two-stage batch process. The effects of processing parameters (saturation time and pressure, foaming temperature) on the densities and microcellular structures of these foams were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Optimization of HIPE Foams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Smith, M.E.; Sebring, R.J.; Nobile, A. Jr.

    2004-03-15

    High Internal Phase Emulsion (HIPE) polystyrene foams have been made at LANL for the past decade. It is a robust system that offers flexibility in tailoring density and the incorporation of halogens and metals. As target designs become more complex the demands placed on the foams are more stringent. Parts are machined from 30 mg/cm{sup 3} foams to thicknesses of 50 {mu}m. At three percent of full density these foams are to withstand extraction with ethanol to remove the wax utilized as a machining aid and not allow shrinkage or warpage. In order to accomplish this the formulation of the HIPE foam had to be modified. Recently some new processing issues have arisen. At low densities voids have become a problem. To determine a formulation that reduces void content and allows minimum shrinkage, experimental design was utilized. We also developed image analysis techniques that allow us to quantify the amount of voids in the system. These techniques also allow us to evaluate the surface finish of the foam. In order to machine these low density foams to the tolerance required with an optimum surface finish the foams are backfilled with Brij 78, an alcohol soluble wax. After the part is machined, the Brij is leached out. Recent batches of Brij have exhibited high shrinkage, which in turn affects the surface finish of the foam.

  6. Shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Loredana

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymer (SMP) foam research are reviewed. The SMPs belong to a new class of smart polymers which can have interesting applications in microelectromechanical systems, actuators and biomedical devices. They can respond to specific external stimulus changing their configuration and then remember the original shape. In the form of foams, the shape memory behaviour can be enhanced because they generally have higher compressibility. Considering also the low weight, and recovery force, the SMP foams are expected to have great potential applications primarily in aerospace. This review highlights the recent progress in characterization, evaluation, and proposed applications of SMP foams mainly for aerospace applications.

  7. FLUOROMETRIC FLOW INJECTION DETERMINATION OF AQUEOUS PEROXIDES AT NANOMOLAR LEVEL USING MEMBRANE REACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A flow injection system based on the p-hydroxphenylacetate-peroxide-peroxidase reaction allows the simultaneous determination of H2O2 and CH3HO2 at 50 samples/h with an LOD of 0.1 microgram/L (3 nM) H2O2. A pressurized porous PTFE membrane reactor introduces the enzyme and the pH...

  8. Aggregation behavior of fullerenes in aqueous solutions: a capillary electrophoresis and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation study.

    PubMed

    Astefanei, Alina; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Kok, Wim Th; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the electrophoretic behavior of hydrophobic fullerenes [buckminsterfullerene (C60), C70, and N-methyl-fulleropyrrolidine (C60-pyrr)] and water-soluble fullerenes [fullerol (C60(OH)24); polyhydroxy small gap fullerene, hydrated (C120(OH)30); C60 pyrrolidine tris acid (C60-pyrr tris acid); and (1,2-methanofullerene C60)-61-carboxylic acid (C60CHCOOH)] in micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) was evaluated. The aggregation behavior of the water-soluble compounds in MECC at different buffer and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentrations and pH values of the background electrolyte (BGE) was studied by monitoring the changes observed in the electrophoretic pattern of the peaks. Broad and distorted peaks that can be attributed to fullerene aggregation were obtained in MECC which became narrower and more symmetric by working at low buffer and SDS concentrations (below the critical micelle concentration, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) conditions). For the characterization of the suspected aggregates formed (size and shape), asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used. The results showed that the increase in the buffer concentration promoted the aggregation of the particles, while the presence of SDS micelles revealed multiple peaks corresponding to particles of different aggregation degrees. Furthermore, MECC has been applied for the first time for the analysis of C60 in two different cosmetic products (i.e., anti-aging serum and facial mask). PMID:26314484

  9. Fluid flow compartmentalization in the Sicilian fold and thrust belt: Implications for the regional aqueous fluid flow and oil migration history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewever, B.; Swennen, R.; Breesch, L.

    2013-04-01

    The fluid flow history in the frontal part of the Sicilian fold and thrust belt (FTB) has been reconstructed using an integrated structural, petrographic, geochemical and microthermometric approach. The study focused on comparing fluid flow during progressive deformation along major thrust horizons and in pelagic sediments occurring in the associated thrust sheets (foot- and hanging wall). A fluid flow model is constructed for the frontal part of the Sicilian FTB. Syn-deformational quartz and calcite have been precipitated along décollement horizons in the Iudica-Scalpello study area. The microthermometric analysis of fluid inclusions in the quartz and calcite indicated migration of low saline high temperature aqueous fluids (- 1.5 < Tm < - 0.2 °C and 80 < Th < 200 °C) and hydrocarbons along the main thrusts. Geochemical and petrographic analysis showed the presence of high manganese (2500-25,000 ppm) and iron (300-7000 ppm) contents in certain calcite phases, suggesting that the migrating fluids originate from clay dewatering and clay-water interactions. The fluid flow history in the thrust sheets can be subdivided into two stages. Calcite of types 1 and 2 has identical light orange cathodoluminescence as the surrounding mudstone. Furthermore, its isotope signature (2 < δ13C < 3‰ and - 6 < δ18O < - 2‰) and minor element content are also in line with closed, host rock buffered fluid flow during the initial stages of the fluid flow history. Type 3 calcite is volumetrically by far the most important calcite phase. It occurs in (hydro-)fractures that are limited to the hanging wall of major thrusts and within major strike-slip faults that are interpreted as transfer faults as a result of thrust development. The presence of associated fluorite suggests more open fluid flow conditions during the final stages of the fluid flow history. Fluorite is characterized by low salinity fluid inclusions (- 2.6 < Tm < - 1.6 °C) with Th between 80 and 140 °C. Type 3

  10. Experimental techniques for studying the structure of foams and froths.

    PubMed

    Pugh, R J

    2005-06-30

    Several techniques are described in this review to study the structure and the stability of froths and foams. Image analysis proved useful for detecting structure changes in 2-D foams and has enabled the drainage process and the gradients in bubble size distribution to be determined. However, studies on 3-D foams require more complex techniques such as Multiple-Light Scattering Methods, Microphones and Optical Tomography. Under dynamic foaming conditions, the Foam Scan Column enables the water content of foams to be determined by conductivity analysis. It is clear that the same factors, which play a role in foam stability (film thickness, elasticity, etc.) also have a decisive influence on the stability of isolated froth or foam films. Therefore, the experimental thin film balance (developed by the Bulgarian Researchers) to study thinning of microfilms formed by a concave liquid drop suspended in a short vertical capillary tube has proved useful. Direct measurement of the thickness of the aqueous microfilm is determined by a micro-reflectance method and can give fundamental information on drainage and thin film stability. It is also important to consider the influence of the mineral particles on the stability of the froth and it have been shown that particles of well defined size and hydrophobicity can be introduced into the thin film enabling stabilization/destabilization mechanisms to be proposed. It has also been shown that the dynamic and static stability can be increased by a reduction in particle size and an increase in particle concentration. PMID:15913531

  11. Foams stabilized with solid particles carrying stimuli-responsive polymer hairs.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, S; Hamasaki, S; Ueno, K; Mochizuki, M; Yusa, S; Nakamura, Y; Fujii, S

    2016-05-25

    Submicrometer-sized polystyrene (PS) particles carrying stimuli-responsive poly[2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDEA) hairs with degrees of polymerization of 30, 60 and 90 were synthesized by dispersion polymerization and used as a particulate foam stabilizer. The effects of the composition of these PDEA-PS particles and foam formation conditions on foamability, foam stability and foam microstructures were extensively investigated. The hairy particles were found to work as an effective stabilizer of aqueous foams in basic media, in which the PDEA hairs are not protonated and thus the particle surfaces exhibit suitable wettability at the air-water interface. In contrast, little to no foam or unstable foams were formed in acidic aqueous media, in which the hairs are protonated and are therefore water soluble. Particles carrying longer hairs resulted in greater foamability and more highly stabilized foams that were capable of persisting for more than one month. Foams were found to form in a narrower pH range when using PS particles with longer hairs, due to both entropic and image charge effects. Data obtained from the touch mixer mixing method showed that both foamability and foam stability increased with increases in the concentration of polymer particles up to 10 wt%, because higher concentrations allowed greater air-water interfacial areas to be stabilized. Conversely, only minimal foam was obtained at and above 15 wt% because of the high viscosity of the resulting aqueous particle dispersion. Trials using the homogenizer mixing method showed that foam with a cream-like texture could be formed even at 40 wt% particle concentration as a result of the improved mixing efficiency. Defoamation could be induced by exposing the foams to HCl vapor. Exposure to acidic vapor led to in situ protonation of the 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate residues, rendering the PDEA hairs hydrophilic and water soluble, and desorption of the PDEA-PS particles from the air

  12. Spin foam models as energetic causal sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortês, Marina; Smolin, Lee

    2016-04-01

    Energetic causal sets are causal sets endowed by a flow of energy-momentum between causally related events. These incorporate a novel mechanism for the emergence of space-time from causal relations [M. Cortês and L. Smolin, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084007 (2014); Phys. Rev. D 90, 044035 (2014)]. Here we construct a spin foam model which is also an energetic causal set model. This model is closely related to the model introduced in parallel by Wolfgang Wieland in [Classical Quantum Gravity 32, 015016 (2015)]. What makes a spin foam model also an energetic causal set is Wieland's identification of new degrees of freedom analogous to momenta, conserved at events (or four-simplices), whose norms are not mass, but the volume of tetrahedra. This realizes the torsion constraints, which are missing in previous spin foam models, and are needed to relate the connection dynamics to those of the metric, as in general relativity. This identification makes it possible to apply the new mechanism for the emergence of space-time to a spin foam model. Our formulation also makes use of Markopoulou's causal formulation of spin foams [arXiv:gr-qc/9704013]. These are generated by evolving spin networks with dual Pachner moves. This endows the spin foam history with causal structure given by a partial ordering of the events which are dual to four-simplices.

  13. Design and development of polyphenylene oxide foam as a reusable internal insulation for LH2 tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Material specification and fabrication process procedures for foam production are presented. The properties of mechanical strength, modulus of elasticity, density and thermal conductivity were measured and related to foam quality. Properties unique to the foam such as a gas layer insulation, density gradient parallel to the fiber direction, and gas flow conductance in both directions were correlated with foam quality. Inspection and quality control tests procedures are outlined and photographs of test equipment and test specimens are shown.

  14. Metal-Organic Frameworks as Highly Active Electrocatalysts for High-Energy Density, Aqueous Zinc-Polyiodide Redox Flow Batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Liu, Jian; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Wei; Reed, David; Liu, Jun; McGrail, Pete; Sprenkle, Vincent

    2016-07-13

    The new aqueous zinc-polyiodide redox flow battery (RFB) system with highly soluble active materials as well as ambipolar and bifunctional designs demonstrated significantly enhanced energy density, which shows great potential to reduce RFB cost. However, the poor kinetic reversibility and electrochemical activity of the redox reaction of I3(-)/I(-) couples on graphite felts (GFs) electrode can result in low energy efficiency. Two nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), MIL-125-NH2 and UiO-66-CH3, that have high surface areas when introduced to GF surfaces accelerated the I3(-)/I(-) redox reaction. The flow cell with MOF-modified GFs serving as a positive electrode showed higher energy efficiency than the pristine GFs; increases of about 6.4% and 2.7% occurred at the current density of 30 mA/cm(2) for MIL-125-NH2 and UiO-66-CH3, respectively. Moreover, UiO-66-CH3 is more promising due to its excellent chemical stability in the weakly acidic electrolyte. This letter highlights a way for MOFs to be used in the field of RFBs. PMID:27267589

  15. Hyphenation of sequential- and flow injection analysis with FTIR-spectroscopy for chemical analysis in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendl, B.; Schindler, R.; Kellner, R.

    1998-06-01

    A survey of the principles of sequential (SIA)-and flow injection analysis (FIA) systems with FTIR spectroscopic detection is presented to introduce these hyphenations as powerful techniques for performing chemical analysis in aqueous solution. The strength of FIA/SIA-FTIR systems lies in the possibility to perform highly reproducible and automated sample manipulations such as sample clean-up and/or chemical reactions prior to spectrum acquisition. It is shown that the hyphenation of FIA/SIA systems with an FTIR spectrometer enhances the problem solving capabilities of the FTIR spectrometer as also parameters which can not be measured directly (e.g. enzyme activities) can be determined. On the other hand application of FTIR spectroscopic detection in FIA or SIA is also of advantage as it allows to shorten conventional analysis procedures (e.g. sucrose or phosphate analysis) or to establish and apply a multivariate calibration model for simultaneous determinations (e.g. glucose, fructose and sucrose analysis). In addition to these examples two recent instrumental developments in miniaturized FIA/SIA-FTIR systems, a μ-Flow through cell based on IR fiber optics and a micromachined SI-enzyme reactor are presented in this paper.

  16. Experimental Evidence of the Effect of Evaporation-Condensation on Thermal Marangoni Flows in Aqueous Fatty Alcohol Solutions.

    PubMed

    Azouni; Pétré

    1998-10-01

    The static surface tension (final sigmae) of aqueous solutions of a fatty alcohol versus temperature exhibits a minimum. Thus, a temperature gradient which is created at the free surface of such a solution at temperatures higher than that of the minimum (final sigmae) should induce a surface flow from the cold area to the hot one. This was indeed observed even at temperatures much lower than that of the minimum. A possible explanation is the evaporation of alcohol at the hot area where the surface tension increases, and its condensation on the cold area where the surface tension decreases, the alcohol being tranported by the gas phase. The thickness of the gas phase over the liquid could play a role in the observed flows. A device was built in which the thickness of the gas phase could be adjusted. Experiments performed with a 6.2 x 10(-3) m solution of n-heptanol indicate a lowering of the surface velocity where the thickness of the gas phase is reduced. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9761660

  17. High Temperature Structural Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Baillif, Faye F.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The Aerospace Industry is experiencing growing demand for high performance polymer foam. The X-33 program needs structural foam insulation capable of retaining its strength over a wide range of environmental conditions. The High Speed Research Program has a need for low density core splice and potting materials. This paper reviews the state of the art in foam materials and describes experimental work to fabricate low density, high shear strength foam which can withstand temperatures from -220 C to 220 C. Commercially available polymer foams exhibit a wide range of physical properties. Some with densities as low as 0.066 g/cc are capable of co-curing at temperatures as high as 182 C. Rohacell foams can be resin transfer molded at temperatures up to 180 C. They have moduli of elasticity of 0.19 MPa, tensile strengths of 3.7 Mpa and compressive strengths of 3.6 MPa. The Rohacell foams cannot withstand liquid hydrogen temperatures, however Imi-Tech markets Solimide (trademark) foams which withstand temperatures from -250 C to 200 C, but they do not have the required structural integrity. The research activity at NASA Langley Research Center focuses on using chemical blowing agents to produce polyimide thermoplastic foams capable of meeting the above performance requirements. The combination of blowing agents that decompose at the minimum melt viscosity temperature together with plasticizers to lower the viscosity has been used to produce foams by both extrusion and oven heating. The foams produced exhibit good environmental stability while maintaining structural properties.

  18. Virtual Treatment of Basilar Aneurysms Using Shape Memory Polymer Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J. M.; Hartman, J.; Rodriguez, J. N.; Maitland, D. J.

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations are performed on patient-specific basilar aneurysms that are treated with shape memory polymer (SMP) foam. In order to assess the post-treatment hemodynamics, two modeling approaches are employed. In the first, the foam geometry is obtained from a micro-CT scan and the pulsatile blood flow within the foam is simulated for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosity models. In the second, the foam is represented as a porous media continuum, which has permeability properties that are determined by computing the pressure gradient through the foam geometry over a range of flow speeds comparable to those of in vivo conditions. Virtual angiography and additional post-processing demonstrate that the SMP foam significantly reduces the blood flow speed within the treated aneurysms, while eliminating the high-frequency velocity fluctuations that are present prior to treatment. A prediction of the initial locations of thrombus formation throughout the SMP foam is obtained by means of a low fidelity thrombosis model that is based upon the residence time and shear rate of blood. The two modeling approaches capture similar qualitative trends for the initial locations of thrombus within the SMP foam.

  19. Virtual Treatment of Basilar Aneurysms Using Shape Memory Polymer Foam

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, J.M.; Hartman, J.; Rodriguez, J.N.; Maitland, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed on patient-specific basilar aneurysms that are treated with shape memory polymer (SMP) foam. In order to assess the post-treatment hemodynamics, two modeling approaches are employed. In the first, the foam geometry is obtained from a micro-CT scan and the pulsatile blood flow within the foam is simulated for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosity models. In the second, the foam is represented as a porous media continuum, which has permeability properties that are determined by computing the pressure gradient through the foam geometry over a range of flow speeds comparable to those of in vivo conditions. Virtual angiography and additional post-processing demonstrate that the SMP foam significantly reduces the blood flow speed within the treated aneurysms, while eliminating the high-frequency velocity fluctuations that are present within the pre-treatment aneurysms. An estimation of the initial locations of thrombus formation throughout the SMP foam is obtained by means of a low fidelity thrombosis model that is based upon the residence time and shear rate of blood. The Newtonian viscosity model and the porous media model capture similar qualitative trends, though both yield a smaller volume of thrombus within the SMP foam. PMID:23329002

  20. Development of an acoustic levitation technique to obtain foam material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li

    2003-10-01

    Aqueous foam is an impermanent form of matter in which a kind of gas, often air, is dispersed as an agglomeration of bubbles that are separated from each other by films of liquid. Foams are of tremendous economical importance in industry. Foam material properties are sensitive functions of the void fraction. A ``wet foam'' is a bubbly liquid that cannot support shearing motion; inside the wet foam the individual bubbles are free to move around. A ``transitional'' or ``critical foam'' is composed of bubbles whose dynamics are strongly interacting and whose surfaces may be in mechanical contact with each other. Finally, a ``dry foam'' is composed of bubbles who have a fixed position in a lattice for low to moderate straining rates. An acoustic levitation technique is developed which provides a noncontact means of estimating the properties of the foam by acoustically levitating aqueous foam drops and exciting their spheroidal modes oscillation. Assuming linear oscillation of foam drops, experimental data for frequency and damping show good agreement with a bubble dynamics-based theoretical model. Thesis advisor: R. Glynn Holt Copies of this thesis may be obtained by contacting the advisor, Glynn Holt, Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, 110 Cummington St., Boston, MA 02215. E-mail address: rgholt@bu.edu

  1. Glucose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in a biphasic system over solid acid foams.

    PubMed

    Ordomsky, Vitaly V; van der Schaaf, John; Schouten, Jaap C; Nijhuis, T Alexander

    2013-09-01

    A solid acid foam-structured catalyst based on a binderless zirconium phosphate (ZrPO) coating on aluminum foam was prepared. The catalyst layer was obtained by performing a multiple washcoating procedure of ZrPO slurry on the anodized aluminum foam. The effect of the pretreatment of ZrPO, the concentration of the slurry, and the amount of coating on the properties of the foam was studied. The catalytic properties of the prepared foams have been evaluated in the dehydration of glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in a biphasic reactor. The catalytic behavior of ZrPO foam-based catalysts was studied in a rotating foam reactor and compared with that of bulk ZrPO. The effect of a silylation procedure on the selectivity of the process was shown over bulk and foam catalysts. This treatment resulted in a higher selectivity due to the deactivation of unselective Lewis acid sites. Addition of methylisobutylketone leads to extraction of HMF from the aqueous phase and stabilization of the selectivity to HMF over bulk ZrPO. A more intensive contact of the foam with the aqueous and organic phases leads to an increase in the selectivity and resistance to deactivation of the foam in comparison with a bulk catalyst. PMID:23616489

  2. Continuous flow room temperature reductive aqueous homo-coupling of aryl halides using supported Pd catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Feiz, Afsaneh; Bazgir, Ayoob; Balu, Alina M.; Luque, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    A convenient and environmentally friendly protocol for the preparation of biaryls at room temperature under continuous flow conditions is reported. A simple reductive homo-coupling Ullmann-type reaction was performed in an H-Cube mini using commercially available supported Pd catalysts under mild reaction conditions, with quantitative conversion to target products. Commercial Pd catalysts were found to be highly stable under the investigated reaction conditions, with a minimum Pd leaching into solution after several reaction runs (ca. 20 h on stream). PMID:27600989

  3. Continuous flow room temperature reductive aqueous homo-coupling of aryl halides using supported Pd catalysts.

    PubMed

    Feiz, Afsaneh; Bazgir, Ayoob; Balu, Alina M; Luque, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    A convenient and environmentally friendly protocol for the preparation of biaryls at room temperature under continuous flow conditions is reported. A simple reductive homo-coupling Ullmann-type reaction was performed in an H-Cube mini using commercially available supported Pd catalysts under mild reaction conditions, with quantitative conversion to target products. Commercial Pd catalysts were found to be highly stable under the investigated reaction conditions, with a minimum Pd leaching into solution after several reaction runs (ca. 20 h on stream). PMID:27600989

  4. Trace determination of aqueous sulfite, sulfide, and methanethiol by fluorometric flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, P.K.; Yang, H.C.

    1986-11-01

    Preservation of sulfite, sulfide, and methanethiol in buffered formaldehyde and oxaldihydroxamic acid stabilizers has been studied. Flow injection analysis procedures that involve T mixing or membrane-based reagent introduction have been developed for the fast (24 samples/h) analysis of these anions based upon the reaction with N-acridinylmaleimide in a water-N,N-dimethylformamide medium to form a fluorescent product. Detection limits are 0.04, 0.60, and 0.80 ..mu..M, respectively, for the three sulfur species; differential analysis is possible.

  5. Evaluating foam heterogeneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, D. W.; Lee, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    New analytical tool is available to calculate the degree of foam heterogeneity based on the measurement of gas diffusivity values. Diffusion characteristics of plastic foam are described by a system of differential equations based on conventional diffusion theory. This approach saves research and computation time in studying mass or heat diffusion problems.

  6. Chronicles of foam films.

    PubMed

    Gochev, G; Platikanov, D; Miller, R

    2016-07-01

    The history of the scientific research on foam films, traditionally known as soap films, dates back to as early as the late 17th century when Boyle and Hooke paid special attention to the colours of soap bubbles. Their inspiration was transferred to Newton, who began systematic study of the science of foam films. Over the next centuries, a number of scientists dealt with the open questions of the drainage, stability and thickness of foam films. The significant contributions of Plateau and Gibbs in the middle/late 19th century are particularly recognized. After the "colours" method of Newton, Reinold and Rücker as well as Johhonnot developed optical methods for measuring the thickness of the thinner "non-colour" films (first order black) that are still in use today. At the beginning of the 20th century, various aspects of the foam film science were elucidated by the works of Dewar and Perrin and later by Mysels. Undoubtedly, the introduction of the disjoining pressure by Derjaguin and the manifestation of the DLVO theory in describing the film stability are considered as milestones in the theoretical development of foam films. The study of foam films gained momentum with the introduction of the microscopic foam film methodology by Scheludko and Exerowa, which is widely used today. This historical perspective serves as a guide through the chronological development of knowledge on foam films achieved over several centuries. PMID:26361708

  7. Flow and morphological conditions associated with the directional solidification of aqueous ammonium chloride. Annual performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Magirl, C.S.; Incropera, F.P.

    1993-01-01

    Using 27% aq. NH{sub 4}Cl solutions as transparent analog, shadowgraphy and dye injection were used to observe flow and morphology in unidirectional solidification (UDS) from below. Dendritic crystals that form at the cold surface reject lighter, solute-deficient fluid, and instability is shown by finger-type double-diffusive convection. As the mushy two-phase region grows, perturbations at the liquidus interface cause localized remelting and downward development of channels. Solsutal plumes emanate from the channels, and in time, double-diffusive convection layers also form in the melt. When the solution is chilled at the sides as well as at the bottom, conditions are influenced by detachment and settling of crystals from the sidewall and by plumes from slanted channels. When a slow, oscillatory rocking motion is imposed on UDS, the freckle-type segregates in the final cast is suppressed. Within the melt, plumes and double-diffusive convection are eliminated. Inertially induced convection mixes the melt and produces a dense slurry. Although channels are eliminated from the bottom mushy region, overall heat transfer and macrosegregation in the cavity are unaffected by the slow rocking. Numerical simulations qualitatively predict trends in the field variables and provide insights on interdendritic flows and macrosegregation (freckle-, A-type segregates), although its quantitative predictions are hampered by simplifying assumptions.

  8. Flow and morphological conditions associated with the directional solidification of aqueous ammonium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Magirl, C.S.; Incropera, F.P.

    1993-01-01

    Using 27% aq. NH[sub 4]Cl solutions as transparent analog, shadowgraphy and dye injection were used to observe flow and morphology in unidirectional solidification (UDS) from below. Dendritic crystals that form at the cold surface reject lighter, solute-deficient fluid, and instability is shown by finger-type double-diffusive convection. As the mushy two-phase region grows, perturbations at the liquidus interface cause localized remelting and downward development of channels. Solsutal plumes emanate from the channels, and in time, double-diffusive convection layers also form in the melt. When the solution is chilled at the sides as well as at the bottom, conditions are influenced by detachment and settling of crystals from the sidewall and by plumes from slanted channels. When a slow, oscillatory rocking motion is imposed on UDS, the freckle-type segregates in the final cast is suppressed. Within the melt, plumes and double-diffusive convection are eliminated. Inertially induced convection mixes the melt and produces a dense slurry. Although channels are eliminated from the bottom mushy region, overall heat transfer and macrosegregation in the cavity are unaffected by the slow rocking. Numerical simulations qualitatively predict trends in the field variables and provide insights on interdendritic flows and macrosegregation (freckle-, A-type segregates), although its quantitative predictions are hampered by simplifying assumptions.

  9. Foamed Bulk Metallic Glass (Foam) Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This soldering iron has an evacuated copper capsule at the tip that contains a pellet of Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Prior to flight, researchers sealed a pellet of bulk metallic glass mixed with microscopic gas-generating particles into the copper ampoule under vacuum. Once heated in space, such as in this photograph, the particles generated gas and the BMG becomes a viscous liquid. The released gas made the sample foam within the capsule where each microscopic particle formed a gas-filled pore within the foam. The inset image shows the oxidation of the sample after several minutes of applying heat. Although hidden within the brass sleeve, the sample retained the foam shape when cooled, because the viscosity increased during cooling until it was solid.

  10. Influence of Flexibility and Dimensions of Nanocelluloses on the Flow Properties of Their Aqueous Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Reina; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Hondo, Hiromasa; Isogai, Akira

    2015-07-13

    We report that the intrinsic viscosity [η] of nanocellulose dispersions can be solely expressed as a function of the aspect ratio p of the nanocellulose. Both short rod-like nanocrystalline and long spaghetti-like nanofibrillated celluloses were prepared as dispersions in water. The influence of the flexibility and dimensions of the nanocelluloses on the flow properties of their dispersions was investigated by experimental and theoretical approaches using seven nanocellulose samples with different widths (2.6-14.4 nm) and aspect ratios (23-376). As the aspect ratio of a nanocellulose increases, it becomes more flexible, and its dispersion has higher viscosity. Irrespective of the flexibility and dimensions of these nanocelluloses, the relationship between [η] and p was ρ[η] = 0.15 × p(1.9), where ρ is the density of the nanocellulose. PMID:26010082

  11. Toughening of phenolic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hongbin

    2003-06-01

    Phenolic foam has excellent FST performance with relatively low cost, and thus is an attractive material for many applications. However, it is extremely brittle and fragile, precluding it from load-bearing applications. In order to make it tougher and more viable for structural purposes, an effective approach has been proposed and investigated in this study. Composite phenolic foam with short fiber reinforcements resulted in significant improvement in mechanical performance while retaining FST properties comparable to conventional phenolic foam. For example, composite phenolic foam with aramid fibers exhibited a seven-fold increase in peel resistance together with a five-fold reduction in friability. In shear tests, aramid composite foam endured prolonged loading to high levels of strain, indicating the potential for use in structural applications. On the other hand, glass fiber-reinforced phenolic foam produced substantial improvement in the stiffness and strength relative to the unreinforced counterpart. In particular, the Young's modulus of the glass fiber composite foam was increased by as much as 100% relative to the plain phenolic foam in the foam rise direction. In addition, different mechanical behavior was observed for aramid and glass fiber-reinforced foams. In an attempt to understand the mechanical behavior of composite foam, a novel NDT technique, micro-CT, was used to acquire information on fiber length distribution (FLD) and fiber orientation distribution (FOD). Results from micro-CT measurements were compared with theoretical distribution models, achieving various degrees of agreement. Despite some limitations of current micro-CT technology, the realistic observation and measurement of cellular morphology and fiber distribution within composite foams portend future advances in modeling of reinforced polymer foam. To explain the discrepancy observed in shear stiffness between traditional shear test results and those by the short sandwich beam test, a

  12. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, Thomas E.; Spieker, David A.

    1985-03-19

    A rigid, polyurethane foam comprises about 2-10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  13. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

    1983-12-08

    A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  14. Simple and rapid hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol with aqueous formic acid in catalytic flow reactors

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Shin-ichiro; Suzuki, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Summary The inner surface of a metallic tube (i.d. 0.5 mm) was coated with a palladium (Pd)-based thin metallic layer by flow electroless plating. Simultaneous plating of Pd and silver (Ag) from their electroless-plating solution produced a mixed distributed bimetallic layer. Preferential acid leaching of Ag from the Pd–Ag layer produced a porous Pd surface. Hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol was examined in the presence of formic acid simply by passing the reaction solution through the catalytic tubular reactors. p-Aminophenol was the sole product of hydrogenation. No side reaction occurred. Reaction conversion with respect to p-nitrophenol was dependent on the catalyst layer type, the temperature, pH, amount of formic acid, and the residence time. A porous and oxidized Pd (PdO) surface gave the best reaction conversion among the catalytic reactors examined. p-Nitrophenol was converted quantitatively to p-aminophenol within 15 s of residence time in the porous PdO reactor at 40 °C. Evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2) was observed during the reaction, although hydrogen (H2) was not found in the gas phase. Dehydrogenation of formic acid did not occur to any practical degree in the absence of p-nitrophenol. Consequently, the nitro group was reduced via hydrogen transfer from formic acid to p-nitrophenol and not by hydrogen generated by dehydrogenation of formic acid. PMID:23843908

  15. Simple and rapid hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol with aqueous formic acid in catalytic flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Javaid, Rahat; Kawasaki, Shin-Ichiro; Suzuki, Akira; Suzuki, Toshishige M

    2013-01-01

    The inner surface of a metallic tube (i.d. 0.5 mm) was coated with a palladium (Pd)-based thin metallic layer by flow electroless plating. Simultaneous plating of Pd and silver (Ag) from their electroless-plating solution produced a mixed distributed bimetallic layer. Preferential acid leaching of Ag from the Pd-Ag layer produced a porous Pd surface. Hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol was examined in the presence of formic acid simply by passing the reaction solution through the catalytic tubular reactors. p-Aminophenol was the sole product of hydrogenation. No side reaction occurred. Reaction conversion with respect to p-nitrophenol was dependent on the catalyst layer type, the temperature, pH, amount of formic acid, and the residence time. A porous and oxidized Pd (PdO) surface gave the best reaction conversion among the catalytic reactors examined. p-Nitrophenol was converted quantitatively to p-aminophenol within 15 s of residence time in the porous PdO reactor at 40 °C. Evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2) was observed during the reaction, although hydrogen (H2) was not found in the gas phase. Dehydrogenation of formic acid did not occur to any practical degree in the absence of p-nitrophenol. Consequently, the nitro group was reduced via hydrogen transfer from formic acid to p-nitrophenol and not by hydrogen generated by dehydrogenation of formic acid. PMID:23843908

  16. Quasi-one-dimensional foam drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, P.; Cilliers, J. J.; Neethling, S. J.; Ventura-Medina, E.

    Foam drainage is considered in a froth flotation cell. Air flow through the foam is described by a simple two-dimensional deceleration flow, modelling the foam spilling over a weir. Foam microstructure is given in terms of the number of channels (Plateau borders) per unit area, which scales as the inverse square of bubble size. The Plateau border number density decreases with height in the foam, and also decreases horizontally as the weir is approached. Foam drainage equations, applicable in the dry foam limit, are described. These can be used to determine the average cross-sectional area of a Plateau border, denoted A, as a function of position in the foam. Quasi-one-dimensional solutions are available in which A only varies vertically, in spite of the two-dimensional nature of the air flow and Plateau border number density fields. For such situations the liquid drainage relative to the air flow is purely vertical. The parametric behaviour of the system is investigated with respect to a number of dimensionless parameters: K (the strength of capillary suction relative to gravity), α (the deceleration of the air flow), and n and h (respectively, the horizontal and vertical variations of the Plateau border number density). The parameter K is small, implying the existence of boundary layer solutions: capillary suction is negligible except in thin layers near the bottom boundary. The boundary layer thickness (when converted back to dimensional variables) is independent of the height of the foam. The deceleration parameter α affects the Plateau border area on the top boundary: weaker decelerations give larger Plateau border areas at the surface. For weak decelerations, there is rapid convergence of the boundary layer solutions at the bottom onto ones with negligible capillary suction higher up. For strong decelerations, two branches of solutions for A are possible in the K=0 limit: one is smooth, and the other has a distinct kink. The full system, with small but non

  17. Foam For Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Like nature's honeycomb, foam is a structure of many-sided cells, apparently solid but actually only three percent material and 97 percent air. Foam is made by a heat-producing chemical reaction which expands a plastic material in a manner somewhat akin to the heat-induced rising of a loaf of bread. The resulting structure of interconnected cells is flexible yet strong and extremely versatile in applicati6n. Foam can, for example, be a sound absorber in one form, while in another it allows sound to pass through it. It can be a very soft powder puff material and at the same time a highly abrasive scrubber. A sampling of foam uses includes stereo speaker grilles, applying postage meter ink, filtering lawnmower carburetor air; deadening noise in trucks and tractors, applying cosmetics, releasing fabric softener and antistatic agents in home clothes dryers, painting, filtering factory heating and ventilating systems, shining shoes, polishing cars, sponge-mopping floors, acting as pre-operative surgical scrubbers-the list is virtually limitless. The process by which foam is made produces "windows," thin plastic membranes connecting the cell walls. Windowed foam is used in many applications but for certain others-filtering, for example-it is desirable to have a completely open network. Scott Paper Company's Foam Division, Chester, Pennsylvania, improved a patented method of "removing the windows," to create an open structure that affords special utility in filtering applications. NASA technology contributed to Scott's improvement.

  18. Unusually stable liquid foams.

    PubMed

    Rio, Emmanuelle; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Salonen, Anniina; Langevin, Dominique

    2014-03-01

    Obtaining stable liquid foams is an important issue in view of their numerous applications. In some of these, the liquid foam in itself is of interest, in others, the liquid foam acts as a precursor for the generation of solid foam. In this short review, we will make a survey of the existing results in the area. This will include foams stabilised by surfactants, proteins and particles. The origin of the stability is related to the slowing down of coarsening, drainage or coalescence, and eventually to their arrest. The three effects are frequently coupled and in many cases, they act simultaneously and enhance one another. Drainage can be arrested if the liquid of the foam either gels or solidifies. Coalescence is slowed down by gelified foam films, and it can be arrested if the films become very thick and/or rigid. These mechanisms are thus qualitatively easy to identify, but they are less easy to model in order to obtain quantitative predictions. The slowing down of coarsening requests either very thick or small films, and its arrest was observed in cases where the surface compression modulus was large. The detail of the mechanisms at play remains unclear. PMID:24342735

  19. Interfacial Stabilization of Fiber-Laden Foams with Carboxymethylated Lignin toward Strong Nonwoven Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Xiang, Wenchao; Järvinen, Marjo; Lappalainen, Timo; Salminen, Kristian; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-08-01

    Wet foams were produced via agitation and compressed air bubbling of aqueous solutions of carboxymethylated lignin (CML). Bubble size and distribution were assessed in situ via optical microscopy. Foamability, bubble collapse rate, and foam stability (half-life time) were analyzed as a function of CML concentration, temperature, pH, and air content. Dynamic changes of the CML liquid foam were monitored by light transmission and backscattering. Cellulosic fibers of different aspect ratios (long pine fibers and short birch fibers) were suspended under agitation by the liquid foams (0.6% CML in the aqueous phase) with an air (bubble) content as high as 75% in volume. Remarkably, the half-life time of fiber-laden CML foams was 10-fold higher than that of the corresponding fiber-free liquid foam. Such lignin-based foams were demonstrated, after dewatering, as a precursor for the synthesis of nonwoven, layered structures. The resulting fiber networks (paper), obtained here for the first time with lignin-based foams, were characterized for pore size distribution, lignin retention, morphology, and physical-mechanical properties (network formation quality, density, air permeability, surface roughness, and tensile and internal bond strengths). The results were compared against structures obtained from foams stabilized with an anionic surfactant (SDS) as well as those from foam-free, water-based web-laying. Remarkably, compared to SDS, the foam-formed materials produced with CML displayed better bonding and tensile strengths. Overall, CML-based foams were found to be suitable carriers of cellulosic fibers and have opened the possibility for integrating fully biobased systems in foam-forming. This is an emerging option to increase the effective solids content in the system without compromising the quality of formed nonwoven materials while achieving reductions in water and energy consumption. PMID:27398988

  20. Experiments for foam model development and validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Mahoney, James F.; Russick, Edward Mark; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Kraynik, Andrew Michael; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Gorby, Allen D.

    2008-09-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to allow observation of the foaming process and the collection of temperature, rise rate, and microstructural data. Microfocus video is used in conjunction with particle image velocimetry (PIV) to elucidate the boundary condition at the wall. Rheology, reaction kinetics and density measurements complement the flow visualization. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to examine the cured foams to determine density gradients. These data provide input to a continuum level finite element model of the blowing process.

  1. Domain growth kinetics in stratifying foam films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-11-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Typical foam films consist of two surfactant-laden surfaces that are ~ 5 nm - 10 micron apart. Sandwiched between these interfacial layers is a fluid that drains primarily under the influence of viscous and interfacial forces, including disjoining pressure. Interestingly, a layered ordering of micelles inside the foam films (thickness <100 nm) leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification, which results in a thickness-dependent variation in reflected light intensity, visualized as progressively darker shades of gray. Thinner, darker domains spontaneously grow within foam films. We show that the domain expansion dynamics exhibit two distinct growth regimes with characteristic scaling laws. Though several studies have focused on the expansion dynamics of isolated domains that exhibit a diffusion-like scaling, the change in expansion kinetics observed after domains contact with the Plateau border has not been reported and analyzed before.

  2. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, James H.; Clough, Roger L.; Curro, John G.; Quintana, Carlos A.; Russick, Edward M.; Shaw, Montgomery T.

    1987-01-01

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the resultant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Means for subjecting such a solvent to one-dimensional cooling are also provided. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 .mu.m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  3. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Clough, R.L.; Curro, J.G.; Quintana, C.A.; Russick, E.M.; Shaw, M.T.

    1985-10-02

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the reusltant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 ..mu..m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  4. The foaming of lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.; Walton, W.

    1976-01-01

    Foaming is of great practical and theoretical significance for volcanic processes on the earth, the moon, and perhaps the meteorite parent bodies. The theory of foams agrees with steelmaking experience to indicate that their presence depends on the existence of solutes in the lavas which reduce the surface tension, and are not saturated. These solutes concentrate at the surface, and are called surfactants. The surfactant responsible for the formation of volcanic ash was not identified; it appears to be related to the oxygen partial pressure above the lava. This fact may explain why lunar and meteoritic melts are not observed to foam. Experimental studies are needed to clarify the process.

  5. Foam encapsulated targets

    DOEpatents

    Nuckolls, John H.; Thiessen, Albert R.; Dahlbacka, Glen H.

    1983-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

  6. Foamed energy cell

    SciTech Connect

    Brotz, G.R.

    1990-02-13

    This patent describes an electric current generating cell. It comprises: a container; an open-cellular foamed material held within the container; a coating on the interior of the cells of the foam of a semiconductor or other type photoelectric junction material; a first pole electrode interconnected to the coating, the pole extending out of the container; a fluid or gaseous activating material entered into the open cells in the foam adapted to interact therewith for the production of an electric current; and a second pole electrode in the container in contact with the activating material, the pole extending out of the container.

  7. Transport of CO2 foam stabilized with engineered nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigiobbe, V.; Worthen, A. J.; Aroonsri, A.; Huh, C.; Bryant, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Foam injection into the subsurface is performed to improve gas control mobility for residual oil extraction in, e.g., enhanced oil recovery and contaminated site remediation. Foam improves the gas mobility control as the gas viscosity is increased through its dispersion into a liquid phase. Finer the bubbles the lower the gas apparent viscosity (or foam viscosity) and the better is the sweep efficiency of the residual oil. A chemical surfactant adsorbed at the gas-liquid interface is generally used to maintain an optimal foam texture (number of bubbles for unit volume) however it can be desorbed making the foam coarser. Here, we present an experimental and modeling study on the effect of nanoparticles on foam stability. Nanoparticles are adsorbed onto the bubble interface irreversibly and therefore they are expected to keep the desired texture of the foam for the entire time of its application. In this study, we use silica nanoparticles in conjunction with a surfactant to study the transport behavior of a CO2 foam in a porous medium. Experiments were performed using a glass-bead pack and Boise sandstone with foam quality (fg) 0.1-0.9 until steady-state. Foam flow was described by a mechanistic population balance model coupled with the fractional flow equation and constitutive equations for foam generation and destruction based on lamella division and bubble coalescence mechanisms, respectively. In order to minimize the uncertainty, model parameters were estimated by combining experimental data of pressure gradient during steady-state and transient. Experiments and theory agree very well and the overall results show a significant increase in foam texture and stability when nanoparticles and surfactant are added to a foam flow in a low permeability porous medium. Data from tests with various nanoparticle concentrations (cn) show that gas apparent viscosity changes with fg and cn. But its optimal value does not vary with cn and it is already attained at fg equal to 0

  8. Mixing insert for foam dispensing apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, W. G. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A device for mixing foam ingredients is described. The device comprises an arrangement of lands situated about a cylindrical elongated shaft-like member with each land having a slot. The slots of alternate lands are positioned 180 deg from each other so that as the ingredients flow through the mixing chamber they flow from adjacent one side of the housing to the other dividing as such passes around the shaft-like member.

  9. Electroless plating of Ni thin films using foam of electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuhashi, Takahiro; Yamada, Yoshiyasu; Ichihara, Shoji; Takai, Akihiro; Usui, Hiroaki

    2016-02-01

    Electroless plating of Ni thin films was achieved in foam of electroplating solution in place of electroplating liquid. Commercial hypophosphite-based solution for Ni electroless plating was added with a surfactant of sulfuric acid monododecyl ester sodium salt (SDS) and bubbled with nitrogen gas to produce airy foam. Ni thin films were deposited by immersing iron substrates in the foam. Although stationary foam was inconvenient for electrodeposition by itself, film growth was enhanced by generating a flow of foam using substrate rotation and by adding SDS to a concentration of 0.1 to 0.3 wt %. No defects attributed to pinholes were observed on the film surface. This method was effective in reducing the net amount of plating solution necessary for film deposition.

  10. Experimental Evaluation of Equivalent-Fluid Models for Melamine Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Albert R.; Schiller, Noah H.

    2016-01-01

    Melamine foam is a soft porous material commonly used in noise control applications. Many models exist to represent porous materials at various levels of fidelity. This work focuses on rigid frame equivalent fluid models, which represent the foam as a fluid with a complex speed of sound and density. There are several empirical models available to determine these frequency dependent parameters based on an estimate of the material flow resistivity. Alternatively, these properties can be experimentally educed using an impedance tube setup. Since vibroacoustic models are generally sensitive to these properties, this paper assesses the accuracy of several empirical models relative to impedance tube measurements collected with melamine foam samples. Diffuse field sound absorption measurements collected using large test articles in a laboratory are also compared with absorption predictions determined using model-based and measured foam properties. Melamine foam slabs of various thicknesses are considered.

  11. Graphite Foam Heat Exchangers for Thermal Management

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, J.W.

    2004-06-07

    better than the standard heat sinks. Next, work with evaporative cooling techniques, such as heat pipes, demonstrated some unique behavior with the foam that is not seen with standard wick materials. This was that as the thickness of the foam increased, the performance got better, where with standard wick materials, as the thickness increases, the performance decreases. This is yet to be completely explained. Last, the designs from the thermal model were used to fabricate a series of cold plates with the graphite foam and compare them to similar designs using high performance folded fin aluminum sinks (considered standard in the industry). It was shown that by corrugating the foam parallel to fluid flow, the pressure drop can be reduced significantly while maintaining the same heat transfer as that in the folded fin heat sink. In fact, the results show that the graphite foam heat sink can utilized 5% the pumping power as that required with the folded fin aluminum heat sink, yet remove the same amount of heat.

  12. Maximum in the damping of shape oscillations of foam drops near the critical void fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai; Liu, Li; McDaniel, Gregory J.; Holt, Glynn R.

    2001-05-01

    Small spheroidal samples of aqueous foam (``foam drops'') of varying gas volume fraction are acoustically levitated in an ultrasonic field. The normalized natural frequency and damping ratio are determined by treating a foam drop as a damped linear oscillator and measuring shape mode frequency response. The observed natural frequencies are compared to a wet foam model without any fitting parameters. Good agreement is found for gas volume fractions ranging from 0.01 to 0.87. The observed damping ratio of a foam drop exhibits a maximum for gas volume fractions 0.5 to 0.7. The data are inverted to infer the shear elastic modulus and its dependence on gas volume fraction for dry foams. [Work supported by NASA.

  13. Ocean foam generation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Bechis, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to determine the physical and microwave properties of ocean foam. Special foam generators were designed and fabricated, using porous glass sheets, known as glass frits, as the principal element. The glass frit was sealed into a water-tight vertical box, a few centimeters from the bottom. Compressed air, applied to the lower chamber, created ocean foam from sea water lying on the frit. Foam heights of 30 cm were readily achieved, with relatively low air pressures. Special photographic techniques and analytical procedures were employed to determine foam bubble size distributions. In addition, the percentage water content of ocean foam was determined with the aid of a particulate sampling procedure. A glass frit foam generator, with pore diameters in the range 70 - 100 micrometers, produced foam with bubble distributions very similar to those found on the surface of natural ocean foam patches.

  14. Responsive foams for nanoparticle delivery.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christina; Xiao, Edward; Sinko, Patrick J; Szekely, Zoltan; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-09-01

    We have developed responsive foam systems for nanoparticle delivery. The foams are easy to make, stable at room temperature, and can be engineered to break in response to temperature or moisture. Temperature-responsive foams are based on the phase transition of long chain alcohols and could be produced using medical grade nitrous oxide as a propellant. These temperature-sensitive foams could be used for polyacrylic acid (PAA)-based nanoparticle delivery. We also discuss moisture-responsive foams made with soap pump dispensers. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoparticles or PMMA latex nanoparticles were loaded into Tween 20 foams and the particle size was not affected by the foam formulation or foam break. Using biocompatible detergents, we anticipate this will be a versatile and simple approach to producing foams for nanoparticle delivery with many potential pharmaceutical and personal care applications. PMID:26091943

  15. Rigid molecular foams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Mitchell, M.A.; Aspen, P.G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Organic analogues to inorganic zeolites would be a significant step forward in engineered porous materials and would provide advantages in range, selectivity, tailorability, and processing. Rigid molecular foams or {open_quotes}organic zeolites{close_quotes} would not be crystalline materials and could be tailored over a broader range of pore sizes and volumes. A novel process for preparing hypercrosslinked polymeric foams has been developed via a Friedel-Crafts polycondensation reaction. A series of rigid hypercrosslinked foams have been prepared using simple rigid polyaromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, biphenyl, m-terphenyl, diphenylmethane, and polystyrene, with dichloroxylene (DCX) as the pore size. After drying the foams are robust and rigid. Densities of the resulting foams can range from 0.15 g/cc to 0.75 g/cc. Nitrogen adsorption studies have shown that by judiciously selecting monomers and the crosslinking agent along with the level of crosslinking and the cure time of the resulting gel, the pore size, pore size distribution, and the total surface area of the foam can be tailored. Surface areas range from 160 to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g with pore sizes ranging from 6 {angstrom} to 2,000 {angstrom}.

  16. Ultralight metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Nash, Philip; Shi, Chunsheng; Wang, Zejun

    2015-09-01

    Ultralight (<10 mg/cm3) cellular materials are desirable for thermal insulation; battery electrodes; catalyst supports; and acoustic, vibration, or shock energy damping. However, most of these ultralight materials, especially ultralight metal foams, are fabricated using either expensive materials or complicated procedures, which greatly limit their large-scale production and practical applications. Here we report a simple and versatile method to obtain ultralight monolithic metal foams. These materials are fabricated with a low-cost polymeric template and the method is based on the traditional silver mirror reaction and electroless plating. We have produced ultralight monolithic metal foams, such as silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper via this method. The resultant ultralight monolithic metal foams have remarkably low densities down to 7.4 mg/cm3 or 99.9% porosity. The metal foams have a long flat stress-train curve in compression tests and the densification strain ɛD of the Ni/Ag foam with a porosity of 99.8% can reach 82%. The plateau stress σpl was measured and found to be in agreement with the value predicted by the cellular solids theory.

  17. Ultralight metal foams.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Nash, Philip; Shi, Chunsheng; Wang, Zejun

    2015-01-01

    Ultralight (<10 mg/cm3) cellular materials are desirable for thermal insulation; battery electrodes; catalyst supports; and acoustic, vibration, or shock energy damping. However, most of these ultralight materials, especially ultralight metal foams, are fabricated using either expensive materials or complicated procedures, which greatly limit their large-scale production and practical applications. Here we report a simple and versatile method to obtain ultralight monolithic metal foams. These materials are fabricated with a low-cost polymeric template and the method is based on the traditional silver mirror reaction and electroless plating. We have produced ultralight monolithic metal foams, such as silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper via this method. The resultant ultralight monolithic metal foams have remarkably low densities down to 7.4 mg/cm3 or 99.9% porosity. The metal foams have a long flat stress-train curve in compression tests and the densification strain εD of the Ni/Ag foam with a porosity of 99.8% can reach 82%. The plateau stress σpl was measured and found to be in agreement with the value predicted by the cellular solids theory. PMID:26349002

  18. Aromatic Polyimide Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A mechanically undensified aromatic polyimide foam is made from an aromatic polyimide precursor solid residuum and has the following combination of properties: a density according to ASTM D-3574A of about 0.5 pounds/cu.ft to about 20 pounds/cu.ft; a compression strength according to ASTM D-3574C of about 1.5 psi to about 1500 psi; and a limiting oxygen index according to ASTM D-2863 of about 35% oxygen to about 75% oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The aromatic polyimide foam has no appreciable solid inorganic contaminants which are residues of inorganic blowing agents. The aromatic polyimide which constitutes the aromatic polyimide foam has a glass transition temperature (Tg) by differential scanning calorimetry of about 235 C to about 400 C; and a thermal stability of 0 to about 1% weight loss at 204 C as determined by thermogravinietric analysis (TGA). The aromatic polyimide foam has utility as foam insulation and as structural foam, for example, for aeronautical, aerospace and maritime applications.

  19. Ultralight metal foams

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bin; He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Nash, Philip; Shi, Chunsheng; Wang, Zejun

    2015-01-01

    Ultralight (<10 mg/cm3) cellular materials are desirable for thermal insulation; battery electrodes; catalyst supports; and acoustic, vibration, or shock energy damping. However, most of these ultralight materials, especially ultralight metal foams, are fabricated using either expensive materials or complicated procedures, which greatly limit their large-scale production and practical applications. Here we report a simple and versatile method to obtain ultralight monolithic metal foams. These materials are fabricated with a low-cost polymeric template and the method is based on the traditional silver mirror reaction and electroless plating. We have produced ultralight monolithic metal foams, such as silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper via this method. The resultant ultralight monolithic metal foams have remarkably low densities down to 7.4 mg/cm3 or 99.9% porosity. The metal foams have a long flat stress-train curve in compression tests and the densification strain εD of the Ni/Ag foam with a porosity of 99.8% can reach 82%. The plateau stress σpl was measured and found to be in agreement with the value predicted by the cellular solids theory. PMID:26349002

  20. A Simple Approach to Characterize Gas-Aqueous Liquid Two-phase Flow Configuration Based on Discrete Solid-Liquid Contact Electrification

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dongwhi; Lee, Donghyeon; Sung Kim, Dong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we first suggest a simple approach to characterize configuration of gas-aqueous liquid two–phase flow based on discrete solid-liquid contact electrification, which is a newly defined concept as a sequential process of solid-liquid contact and successive detachment of the contact liquid from the solid surface. This approach exhibits several advantages such as simple operation, precise measurement, and cost-effectiveness. By using electric potential that is spontaneously generated by discrete solid–liquid contact electrification, the configurations of the gas-aqueous liquid two-phase flow such as size of a gas slug and flow rate are precisely characterized. According to the experimental and numerical analyses on parameters that affect electric potential, gas slugs have been verified to behave similarly to point electric charges when the measuring point of the electric potential is far enough from the gas slug. In addition, the configuration of the gas-aqueous liquid two-phase microfluidic system with multiple gas slugs is also characterized by using the presented approach. For a proof-of-concept demonstration of using the proposed approach in a self-triggered sensor, a gas slug detector with a counter system is developed to show its practicality and applicability. PMID:26462437

  1. An aqueous, polymer-based redox-flow battery using non-corrosive, safe, and low-cost materials.

    PubMed

    Janoschka, Tobias; Martin, Norbert; Martin, Udo; Friebe, Christian; Morgenstern, Sabine; Hiller, Hannes; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2015-11-01

    For renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, and hydroelectric to be effectively used in the grid of the future, flexible and scalable energy-storage solutions are necessary to mitigate output fluctuations. Redox-flow batteries (RFBs) were first built in the 1940s and are considered a promising large-scale energy-storage technology. A limited number of redox-active materials--mainly metal salts, corrosive halogens, and low-molar-mass organic compounds--have been investigated as active materials, and only a few membrane materials, such as Nafion, have been considered for RFBs. However, for systems that are intended for both domestic and large-scale use, safety and cost must be taken into account as well as energy density and capacity, particularly regarding long-term access to metal resources, which places limits on the lithium-ion-based and vanadium-based RFB development. Here we describe an affordable, safe, and scalable battery system, which uses organic polymers as the charge-storage material in combination with inexpensive dialysis membranes, which separate the anode and the cathode by the retention of the non-metallic, active (macro-molecular) species, and an aqueous sodium chloride solution as the electrolyte. This water- and polymer-based RFB has an energy density of 10 watt hours per litre, current densities of up to 100 milliamperes per square centimetre, and stable long-term cycling capability. The polymer-based RFB we present uses an environmentally benign sodium chloride solution and cheap, commercially available filter membranes instead of highly corrosive acid electrolytes and expensive membrane materials. PMID:26503039

  2. Enhancing the lateral-flow immunoassay for viral detection using an aqueous two-phase micellar system.

    PubMed

    Mashayekhi, Foad; Chiu, Ricky Y T; Le, Alexander M; Chao, Felix C; Wu, Benjamin M; Kamei, Daniel T

    2010-12-01

    Availability of a rapid, accurate, and reliable point-of-care (POC) device for detection of infectious agents and pandemic pathogens, such as swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus, is crucial for effective patient management and outbreak prevention. Due to its ease of use, rapid processing, and minimal power and laboratory equipment requirements, the lateral-flow (immuno)assay (LFA) has gained much attention in recent years as a possible solution. However, since the sensitivity of LFA has been shown to be inferior to that of the gold standards of pathogen detection, namely cell culture and real-time PCR, LFA remains an ineffective POC assay for preventing pandemic outbreaks. A practical solution for increasing the sensitivity of LFA is to concentrate the target agent in a solution prior to the detection step. In this study, an aqueous two-phase micellar system comprised of the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 was investigated for concentrating a model virus, namely bacteriophage M13 (M13), prior to LFA. The volume ratio of the two coexisting micellar phases was manipulated to concentrate M13 in the top, micelle-poor phase. The concentration step effectively improved the M13 detection limit of the assay by tenfold from 5 × 10(8) plaque forming units (pfu)/mL to 5 × 10(7) pfu/mL. In the future, the volume ratio can be further manipulated to yield a greater concentration of a target virus and further decrease the detection limits of the LFA. PMID:20865404

  3. An aqueous, polymer-based redox-flow battery using non-corrosive, safe, and low-cost materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janoschka, Tobias; Martin, Norbert; Martin, Udo; Friebe, Christian; Morgenstern, Sabine; Hiller, Hannes; Hager, Martin D.; Schubert, Ulrich S.

    2015-11-01

    For renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, and hydroelectric to be effectively used in the grid of the future, flexible and scalable energy-storage solutions are necessary to mitigate output fluctuations. Redox-flow batteries (RFBs) were first built in the 1940s and are considered a promising large-scale energy-storage technology. A limited number of redox-active materials--mainly metal salts, corrosive halogens, and low-molar-mass organic compounds--have been investigated as active materials, and only a few membrane materials, such as Nafion, have been considered for RFBs. However, for systems that are intended for both domestic and large-scale use, safety and cost must be taken into account as well as energy density and capacity, particularly regarding long-term access to metal resources, which places limits on the lithium-ion-based and vanadium-based RFB development. Here we describe an affordable, safe, and scalable battery system, which uses organic polymers as the charge-storage material in combination with inexpensive dialysis membranes, which separate the anode and the cathode by the retention of the non-metallic, active (macro-molecular) species, and an aqueous sodium chloride solution as the electrolyte. This water- and polymer-based RFB has an energy density of 10 watt hours per litre, current densities of up to 100 milliamperes per square centimetre, and stable long-term cycling capability. The polymer-based RFB we present uses an environmentally benign sodium chloride solution and cheap, commercially available filter membranes instead of highly corrosive acid electrolytes and expensive membrane materials.

  4. Ambient cure polyimide foams. [thermal resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.; Hamermesh, C. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame and temperature resistant polyimide foams are prepared by the reaction of an aromatic dianhydride, (pyromellitic dianhydride) with an aromatic polyisocyanate, (polymethylene polyphenylisocyanate), in the presence of an inorganic acid and furfuryl alcohol. Usable acids include dilute sulfuric acid, dilute nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, polyphosphoric acid, and phosphoric acid, with the latter being preferred. The dianhydride and the isocyanate in about equimolar proportions constitute about 50% of the reaction mixture, the rest being made up with the acid and the alcohol in a ratio of about 1:10. An exothermic reaction between the acid and the alcohol provides the heat necessary for the other components to polymerize without recourse to external heat sources. The mixture can be sprayed on any surface to form polymeric foam in locations where the application of heat is not practical or possible, for instance, between walls or on mine tunnel surfaces.

  5. Interactions in lipid stabilised foam films.

    PubMed

    Toca-Herrera, José Luis; Krasteva, Nadejda; Müller, Hans-Joachim; Krastev, Rumen

    2014-05-01

    The interaction between lipid bilayers in water has been intensively studied over the last decades. Osmotic stress was applied to evaluate the forces between two approaching lipid bilayers in aqueous solution. The force-distance relation between lipid mono- or bilayers deposited on mica sheets using a surface force apparatus (SFA) was also measured. Lipid stabilised foam films offer another possibility to study the interactions between lipid monolayers. These films can be prepared comparatively easy with very good reproducibility. Foam films consist usually of two adsorbed surfactant monolayers separated by a layer of the aqueous solution from which the film is created. Their thickness can be conveniently measured using microinterferometric techniques. Studies with foam films deliver valuable information on the interactions between lipid membranes and especially their stability and permeability. Presenting inverse black lipid membrane (BLM) foam films supply information about the properties of the lipid self-organisation in bilayers. The present paper summarises results on microscopic lipid stabilised foam films by measuring their thickness and contact angle. Most of the presented results concern foam films prepared from dispersions of the zwitterionic lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (DMPC) and some of its mixtures with the anionic lipid -- 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DMPG). The strength of the long range and short range forces between the lipid layers is discussed. The van der Waals attractive force is calculated. The electrostatic repulsive force is estimated from experiments at different electrolyte concentrations (NaCl, CaCl₂) or by modification of the electrostatic double layer surface potential by incorporating charged lipids in the lipid monolayers. The short range interactions are studied and modified by using small carbohydrates (fructose and sucrose), ethanol (EtOH) or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Some

  6. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Charles B.

    1985-01-01

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 .ANG.. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  7. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, C.B.

    1984-05-18

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 A. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  8. Hyperbranched exopolysaccharide-enhanced foam properties of sodium fatty alcohol polyoxyethylene ether sulfate.

    PubMed

    Deng, Quanhua; Li, Haiping; Sun, Haoyang; Sun, Yange; Li, Ying

    2016-05-01

    The foam properties, such as the foamability, foam stability, drainage, coalescence and bulk rheology, of aqueous solutions containing an eco-friendly exopolysaccharide (EPS) secreted by a deep-sea mesophilic bacterium, Wangia profunda SM-A87, and an anionic surfactant, sodium fatty alcohol polyoxyethylene ether sulfate (AES), were studied. Both the foamability and foam stability of the EPS/AES solutions are considerably higher than those of single AES solutions, even at very low AES concentrations, although pure EPS solutions cannot foam. The improved foamability and foam stability arise from the formation of the EPS/AES complex via hydrogen bonds at the interfaces. The synergism between the EPS and AES decreases the surface tension, increases the interfacial elasticity and water-carrying capacity, and suppresses the coalescence and collapse of the foams. The EPS/AES foams are more salt-resistant than the AES foams. This work provides not only a new eco-friendly foam with great potential for use in enhanced oil recovery and health-care products but also useful guidance for designing other environmentally friendly foam systems that exhibit high performance. PMID:26852104

  9. Flow of Aqueous Humor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grant Terms & Conditions Patent & Intellectual Property Policy For Current Awardees FAQs Our Funding Philosophy News Science News Publications Newsletters Multimedia Press Releases Media Coverage Media Kit Events Contact Main menu Disease Toolkit Disease Toolkit Which ...

  10. Acoustic Radiation from Smart Foam for Various Foam Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivakumar, Nishkala

    2011-10-01

    Smart foam is an emerging active-passive noise control technology with many applications. Smart foam consists of passive foam with an embedded curved piezoelectric (PZT) film. We experimented with three geometries of varying film curvatures and a constant cross-sectional area of 58 cm^2, constructed using melamine foam covered with 28 μm thick polyvinylidene fluoride (piezoelectric) films with Cu-Ni surface electrodes. An AC voltage provided by a signal generator and amplifier drives the smart foam. An omnidirectional microphone mounted at a distance 100mm from the foam surface measured the sound level (dB) and harmonic distortion generated by the smart foam. Experiments were repeated for voltages, 40V-140V, and frequencies, 300Hz-2000Hz. The result show that the sound level generated by the smart foams has a characteristic frequency response common to all geometries and a peak sound level between 900 to 1,100 Hz.

  11. Foam computer model helps in analysis of underbalanced drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.; Medley, G.H. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    A new mechanistic model attempts to overcome many of the problems associated with existing foam flow analyses. The model calculates varying Fanning friction factors, rather than assumed constant factors, along the flow path. Foam generated by mixing gas and liquid for underbalanced drilling has unique rheological characteristics, making it very difficult to accurately predict the pressure profile. A user-friendly personal-computer program was developed to solve the mechanical energy balance equation for compressible foam flow. The program takes into account influxes of gas, liquid, and oil from formations. The pressure profile, foam quality, density, and cuttings transport are predicted by the model. A sensitivity analysis window allows the user to quickly optimize the hydraulics program by selecting the best combination of injection pressure, back pressure, and gas/liquid injection rates. This new model handles inclined and horizontal well bores and provides handy engineering and design tools for underbalanced drilling, well bore cleanout, and other foam operations. The paper describes rheological models, foam flow equations, equations of state, mechanical energy equations, pressure drop across nozzles, influx modeling, program operation, comparison to other models, to lab data, and to field data, and results.

  12. A swirl generator case study for OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, O.; Bosioc, A. I.; Nilsson, H.; Muntean, S.; Susan-Resiga, R. F.

    2010-08-01

    This work presents numerical results, using OpenFOAM, of the flow in the swirl flow generator test rig developed at Politehnica University of Timisoara, Romania. The work shows results computed by solving the unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations. The unsteady method couples the rotating and stationary parts using a sliding grid interface based on a GGI formulation. Turbulence is modeled using the standard k-epsilon model, and block structured wall function ICEM-Hexa meshes are used. The numerical results are validated against experimental LDV results, and against designed velocity profiles. The investigation shows that OpenFOAM gives results that are comparable to the experimental and designed profiles. This case study was presented at the 5th OpenFOAM Workshop, held in Gothenburg, Sweden, as a tutorial on how to treat turbomachinery applications in OpenFOAM.

  13. Method of making metal-doped organic foam products

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, James A.

    1981-01-01

    Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for roducing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers.

  14. Simple surface foam application enhances bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil in cold conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Jongshin; Kim, Jaisoo

    2015-04-01

    Landfarming of oil-contaminated soil is ineffective at low temperatures, because the number and activity of micro-organisms declines. This study presents a simple and versatile technique for bioremediation of diesel-contaminated soil, which involves spraying foam on the soil surface without additional works such as tilling, or supply of water and air. Surfactant foam containing psychrophilic oil-degrading microbes and nutrients was sprayed twice daily over diesel-contaminated soil at 6 °C. Removal efficiencies in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) at 30 days were 46.3% for landfarming and 73.7% for foam-spraying. The first-order kinetic biodegradation rates for landfarming and foam-spraying were calculated as 0.019 d(-1) and 0.044 d(-1), respectively. Foam acted as an insulating medium, keeping the soil 2 °C warmer than ambient air. Sprayed foam was slowly converted to aqueous solution within 10-12h and infiltrated the soil, providing microbes, nutrients, water, and air for bioaugmentation. Furthermore, surfactant present in the aqueous solution accelerated the dissolution of oil from the soil, resulting in readily biodegradable aqueous form. Significant reductions in hydrocarbon concentration were simultaneously observed in both semi-volatile and non-volatile fractions. As the initial soil TPH concentration increased, the TPH removal rate of the foam-spraying method also increased. PMID:25577318

  15. Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (AF4) of Aqueous C60 Aggregates with Dynamic Light Scattering Size and LC-MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current methods for the size determination of nanomaterials in aqueous suspension include dynamic or static light scattering and electron or atomic force microscopy techniques. Light scattering techniques are limited by poor resolution and the scattering intensity dependence on p...

  16. Foam Insulation for Cryogenic Flowlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonju, T. R.; Carbone, R. L.; Oves, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Welded stainless-steel vacuum jackets on cryogenic ducts replaced by plastic foam-insulation jackets that weigh 12 percent less. Foam insulation has 85 percent of insulating ability of stainless-steel jacketing enclosing vacuum of 10 microns of mercury. Foam insulation easier to install than vacuum jacket. Moreover, foam less sensitive to damage and requires minimal maintenance. Resists vibration and expected to have service life of at least 10 years.

  17. Low density metal hydride foams

    DOEpatents

    Maienschein, Jon L.; Barry, Patrick E.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

  18. Static and oscillatory response measurements of acoustically levitated foam drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Holt, R. Glynn

    2002-11-01

    Small samples of aqueous foam of varying gas volume fraction are acoustically levitated in an ultrasonic field. The drops are subjected to both static and time-varying pressures. Normal mode frequencies and inferred rheological properties (yield stress, shear modulus) for foams as a function of gas volume fraction will be presented. We compare the experimental results to recent theoretical descriptions of such modal oscillations [McDaniel and Holt, Phys. Rev. E 61, 2204 (2000); McDaniel, Akhatov, and Holt, Phys Fluids 14, 1886 (2002)]. [Work supported by NASA.

  19. Foam drilling and workover in high temperature wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pye, D.S.; Fischer, P.W.

    1980-05-06

    A method is described for conducting foam drilling and workover operations in a borehole penetrating a subterranean reservoir, particularly a high-temperature reservoir such as a geothermal reservoir. The method employs an aqueous foaming solution of 0.08 to 1.0% by weight of an amphoteric betaine, 0.02 to 0.4% by weight of a salt of a linear aliphatic or alkyl aryl hydrocarbon sulfonate and, optionally, from 0.03 to 3.5% by weight unneutralized ammonia. 19 claims.

  20. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, J.D.

    1991-11-19

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 [mu]m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process. 8 figures.

  1. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  2. Foaming in stout beers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. T.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-10-01

    We review the differences between bubble formation in champagne and other carbonated drinks, and stout beers which contain a mixture of dissolved nitrogen and carbon dioxide. The presence of dissolved nitrogen in stout beers gives them several properties of interest to connoisseurs and physicists. These remarkable properties come at a price: stout beers do not foam spontaneously and special technology, such as the widgets used in cans, is needed to promote foaming. Nevertheless, the same mechanism, nucleation by gas pockets trapped in cellulose fibers, responsible for foaming in carbonated drinks is active in stout beers, but at an impractically slow rate. This gentle rate of bubble nucleation makes stout beers an excellent model system for investigating the nucleation of gas bubbles. The equipment needed is modest, putting such experiments within reach of undergraduate laboratories. We also consider the suggestion that a widget could be constructed by coating the inside of a beer can with cellulose fibers.

  3. Ambient curing fire resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamermesh, C. L.; Hogenson, P. A.; Tung, C. Y.; Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of development of an ambient curing foam is described. The thermal stability and flame spread index of the foams were found to be comparable to those of the high-temperature cured polyimide foams by Monsanto two-foot tunnel test and NASA T-3 Fire test. Adaptation of the material to spray in place applications is described

  4. Spin Foam and Regge Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gionti, S. J. Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Recent results in Local Regge Calculus are confronted with Spin Foam Formalism. Introducing Barrett-Crane Quantization in Local Regge Calculus makes it possible to associate a unique Spin jh with an hinge h, fulfilling one of the requirements of Spin Foam definition. It is shown that inter-twiner terms of Spin Foam can follow from the closure constraint in Local Regge Calculus.

  5. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Jen

    Long fibers are generally preferred for reinforcing foams for performance reasons. However, uniform dispersion is difficult to achieve because they must be mixed with liquid resin prior to foam expansion. New approaches aiming to overcome such problem have been developed at USC's Composites Center. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams with long fibers (over 6 mm in length) manufactured at USC's Composites Center have achieved promising mechanical properties and demonstrated lower density relative to conventional composite foams. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were synthesized from thermosetting polymeric microspheres (amino and phenolic microspheres), as well as thermoplastic PVC heat expandable microspheres (HEMs). Carbon and/or aramid fibers were used to reinforce the syntactic foams. Basic mechanical properties, including shear, tensile, and compression, were measured in syntactic foams and fiber-reinforced syntactic foams. Microstructure and crack propagation behavior were investigated by scanning electron microscope and light microscopy. Failure mechanisms and reinforcing mechanisms of fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were also analyzed. As expected, additions of fiber reinforcements to foams enhanced both tensile and shear properties. However, only limited enhancement in compression properties was observed, and fiber reinforcement was of limited benefit in this regard. Therefore, a hybrid foam design was explored and evaluated in an attempt to enhance compression properties. HEMs were blended with glass microspheres to produce hybrid foams, and hybrid foams were subsequently reinforced with continuous aramid fibers to produce fiber-reinforced hybrid foams. Mechanical properties of these foams were evaluated. Findings indicated that the production of hybrid foams was an effective way to enhance the compressive properties of syntactic foams, while the addition of fiber reinforcements enhanced the shear and tensile performance of syntactic foams. Another approach

  6. Influence of filler selection on twin screw foam granulation.

    PubMed

    Rocca, K E; Weatherley, S; Sheskey, P J; Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    The influence of filler selection in wet granulation was studied for the novel case where the binder is delivered as an unstable, semi-rigid aqueous foam to an extrusion process. The work primarily examined the impact of differing concentrations of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH® 101) in a formulation with spray-dried α-lactose monohydrate (Flowlac® 100) in regards to wetting and granule nucleation for this relatively new technique known as continuous foam granulation. Foam stability was varied within the work to change its drainage and coarsening behavior atop these powder excipients, by use of different foamable binding agents (METHOCEL™ F4 PLV and METHOCEL™ Premium VLV) as well as by adjusting the foam quality. A static bed penetration test was first used to study the foam behavior in wetting these powders without the processing constraints of an extruder which limit possible liquid-to-solids ratios as well as introduce shear which may complicate interpretation of the mechanism. The test found that the penetration time to saturate these powders decreased as their water absorption capacity increased which in turn decreased the size of the formed nuclei. Differences in the stability of the foamed binder had minimal influence on these attributes of wetting despite its high spread-to-soak behavior. The size of granules produced by extrusion similarly demonstrated sensitivity to the increasing water absorption capacity of the filler and little dependency on foam properties. The different liquid-to-solids ratios required to granulate these different formulations inside the extruder highlighted an evolving concept of powder lubricity for continuous foam granulation. PMID:24111830

  7. Long lasting decontamination foam

    DOEpatents

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  8. Composite foam structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E. (Inventor); Brockmeyer, Jerry (Inventor); Tuffias, Robert H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A composite rigid foam structure that has a skin or coating on at least one of its surfaces. The skin is formed in situ by thermal spray techniques. The skin is bonded substantially throughout the surface of the porous substrate to the peripheries of the pores. The skin on the average does not penetrate the surface of the substrate by more than the depth of about 2 to 5 pores. Thus, thermal spraying the skin onto the rigid foam produces a composite that is tightly and uniformly bonded together without unduly increasing the weight of the composite structure. Both thermal conductivity and bonding are excellent.

  9. Space Time Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garattini, Remo

    In the context of a model of space-time foam, made by N wormholes we discuss the possibility of having a foam formed by different configurations. An equivalence between Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-Anti-de Sitter wormholes in terms of Casimir energy is shown. An argument to discriminate which configuration could represent a foamy vacuum coming from Schwarzschild black hole transition frequencies is used. The case of a positive cosmological constant is also discussed. Finally, a discussion involving charged wormholes leads to the conclusion that they cannot be used to represent a ground state of the foamy type.

  10. Wall slip of bubbles in foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saugey, A.; Drenckhan, W.; Weaire, D.

    2006-05-01

    We present a computational analysis of the flow of liquid foam along a smooth wall, as encountered in the transport of foams in vessels and pipes. We concentrate on the slip of the bubbles at the wall and present some novel finite element calculations of this motion for the case of fully mobile gas/liquid interfaces. Our two-dimensional simulations provide for the first time the bubble shapes and entire flow field, giving detailed insight into the distribution of stresses and dissipation in the system. In particular, we investigate the relationship between the drag force and the slip velocity of the bubble, which for small slip velocities obeys power laws, as predicted by previous semianalytical treatments.

  11. Controlling Flows Of Two Ingredients For Spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Huel H.

    1995-01-01

    Closed-loop servo control subsystem incorporated, as modification, into system controlling flows of two ingredients mixed and sprayed to form thermally insulating foams on large tanks. Provides steady flows at specified rates. Foams produced smoother and of higher quality. Continued use of system results in substantial reduction in cost stemming from close control of application of foam and consequent reduced use of material.

  12. Foam flotation as a separation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currin, B. L.

    1986-01-01

    The basic principles of foam separation techniques are discussed. A review of the research concerning bubble-particle interaction and its role in the kinetics of the flotation process is given. Most of the research in this area deals with the use of theoretical models to predict the effects of bubble and particle sizes, of liquid flow, and of various forces on the aperture and retention of particles by bubbles. A discussion of fluid mechanical aspects of particle flotation is given.

  13. Steam foam studies in the presence of residual oil

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.A.; Demiral, B.; Castanier, L.M.

    1992-05-01

    The lack of understanding regarding foam flow in porous media necessitates further research. This paper reports on going work at Stanford University aimed at increasing our understanding in the particular area of steam foams. The behavior of steam foam is investigated with a one dimensional (6 ft. {times} 2.15 in.) sandpack under residual oil conditions of approximately 12 percent. The strength of the in-situ generated foam, indicated by pressure drops, is significantly affected by injection procedure, slug size, and steam quality. The surfactant concentration effect is minor in the range studied. In the presence of residual oil the simultaneous injection of steam and surfactant fails to generate foam in the model even though the same procedure generates a strong foam in the absence of oil. Nevertheless when surfactant is injected as a slug ahead of the steam using a surfactant alternating (SAG) procedure, foam is generated. The suggested reason for the success of SAG is the increased phase mixing that results from steam continually having to reestablish a path through a slug of surfactant solution.

  14. Macro and micro-scale modeling of polyurethane foaming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Piesche, M.

    2014-05-01

    Mold filling processes of refrigerators, car dashboards or steering wheels are some of the many application areas of polyurethane foams. The design of these processes still mainly relies on empirical approaches. Therefore, we first developed a modeling approach describing mold filling processes in complex geometries. Hence, it is possible to study macroscopic foam flow and to identify voids. The final properties of polyurethane foams may vary significantly depending on the location within a product. Additionally, the local foam structure influences foam properties like thermal conductivity or impact strength significantly. It is neither possible nor would it be efficient to model complex geometries completely on bubble scale. For this reason, we developed a modeling approach describing the bubble growth and the evolution of the foam structure for a limited number of bubbles in a representative volume. Finally, we coupled our two simulation approaches by introducing tracer particles into our mold filling simulations. Through this coupling, a basis for studying the evolution of the local foam structure in complex geometries is provided.

  15. pH stability and comparative evaluation of ranaspumin-2 foam for application in biochemical reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyo-Jick; Ebersbacher, Charles F.; Quan, Fu-Shi; Montemagno, Carlo D.

    2013-02-01

    Aqueous channels of foam represent a simplified, natural bioreactor on the micro-/nano-scale. Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility and potential application of foams in replicating cellular process in vitro, but no research has been performed to establish a basis for designing stable and biocompatible foam formulations. Our research has been directed specifically to the evaluation of ranaspumin-2 (RSN-2), a frog foam nest protein. The strong surfactant activity of RSN-2 enabled us to produce foams using low protein concentration (1 mg ml-1) over a wide pH range (pH ≥ 3). Importantly, the RSN-2 formulation exhibited the best foam stability at a near neutral pH condition, which shows a potential for application to various biosynthesis applications. Model cellular systems such as liposomes and inactivated A/PR/8/34 influenza virus maintained their physicochemical stability and full hemagglutination activity, indicating biocompatibility of RSN-2 with both cellular membranes and proteins both in bulk solution and in foam. Moreover, the addition of RSN-2 did not exert any deteriorative effects on bacterial cell growth kinetics. In contrast, Tween 20, Triton X-100, and BSA did not show satisfactory performance in terms of foamability, foam stability, physicochemcial stability, and biochemical stability. Although our study has been limited to representative formulations composed of only surfactant molecules, a number of unique advantages make RSN-2 a promising candidate for in vitro foam biosynthesis.

  16. Tapered plug foam spray apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Peter B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A two-component foam spray gun is readily disassembled for cleaning. It includes a body (1) with reactant (12, 14) and purge gas (16) inlet ports. A moldable valve packing (32) inside the body has a tapered conical interior surface (142), and apertures which match the reactant ports. A valve/tip (40) has a conical outer surface (48) which mates with the valve packing (32). The valve/tip (40) is held in place by a moldable packing washer (34), held at non-constant pressure by a screw (36, 38). The interior of the valve/tip (40) houses a removable mixing chamber (50). The mixing chamber (50) has direct flow orifices (60) and an auxiliary flow path (58, 60) which ameliorate pressure surges. The spray gun can be disassembled for cleaning without disturbing the seal, by removing the valve/tip (40) to the rear, thereby breaking it free of the conical packing. Rotation of the valve/tip (40) relative to the body (1) shuts off the reactant flow, and starts the purge gas flow.

  17. Determination of Mercury in Aqueous and Geologic Materials by Continuous Flow-Cold Vapor-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (CVAFS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    New methods for the determination of total mercury in geologic materials and dissolved mercury in aqueous samples have been developed that will replace the methods currently (2006) in use. The new methods eliminate the use of sodium dichromate (Na2Cr2O7 ?2H2O) as an oxidizer and preservative and significantly lower the detection limit for geologic and aqueous samples. The new methods also update instrumentation from the traditional use of cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry to cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. At the same time, the new digestion procedures for geologic materials use the same size test tubes, and the same aluminum heating block and hot plate as required by the current methods. New procedures for collecting and processing of aqueous samples use the same procedures that are currently (2006) in use except that the samples are now preserved with concentrated hydrochloric acid/bromine monochloride instead of sodium dichromate/nitric acid. Both the 'old' and new methods have the same analyst productivity rates. These similarities should permit easy migration to the new methods. Analysis of geologic and aqueous reference standards using the new methods show that these procedures provide mercury recoveries that are as good as or better than the previously used methods.

  18. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  19. Anion exchange membrane prepared from simultaneous polymerization and quaternization of 4-vinyl pyridine for non-aqueous vanadium redox flow battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Sandip; Shin, Sung-Hee; Sung, Ki-Won; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2014-06-01

    A simple, single step and environmentally friendly process is developed for the synthesis of anion exchange membrane (AEM) by simultaneous polymerization and quaternization, unlike the conventional membrane synthesis which consists of separate polymerization and quaternization step. The membrane synthesis is carried out by dissolving polyvinyl chloride (PVC) in cyclohexanone along with 4-vinyl pyridine (4VP) and 1,4-dibromobutane (DBB) in the presence of thermal initiator benzoyl peroxide, followed by film casting to get thin and flexible AEMs. The membrane properties such as ion exchange capacity, ionic conductivity and swelling behaviour are tuned by varying the degree of crosslinking. These AEMs exhibit low vanadium permeability, while retaining good dimensional and chemical stability in an electrolyte solution, making them appropriate candidates for non-aqueous vanadium acetylacetonate redox flow battery (VRFB) applications. The optimized membrane displays ion exchange capacity and ionic conductivity of 2.0 mequiv g-1 and 0.105 mS cm-1, respectively, whereas the efficiency of 91.7%, 95.7% and 87.7% for coulombic, voltage and energy parameter in non-aqueous VRFB, respectively. This study reveals that the non-aqueous VRFB performance is greatly influenced by membrane properties; therefore the optimal control over the membrane properties is advantageous for the improved performance.

  20. A construction of novel iron-foam-based calcium phosphate/chitosan coating biodegradable scaffold material.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhaohui; Zhang, Liming; Chen, Chao; Liu, Yibo; Wu, Changjun; Dai, Changsong

    2013-04-01

    Slow corrosion rate and poor bioactivity restrict iron-based implants in biomedical application. In this study, we design a new iron-foam-based calcium phosphate/chitosan coating biodegradable composites offering a priority mechanical and bioactive property for bone tissue engineering through electrophoretic deposition (EPD) followed by a conversion process into a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). Tensile test results showed that the mechanical property of iron foam could be regulated through altering the construction of polyurethane foam. The priority coatings were deposited from 40% nano hydroxyapatite (nHA)/ethanol suspension mixed with 60% nHA/chitosan-acetic acid aqueous solution. In vitro immersion test showed that oxidation-iron foam as the matrix decreased the amount of iron implanted and had not influence on the bioactivity of this implant, obviously. So, this method could also be a promising method for the preparation of a new calcium phosphate/chitosan coating on foam construction. PMID:23827538

  1. Size Determination of Aqueous C60 by Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) and in-Line Dynamic Light Scattering

    EPA Science Inventory

    To date, studies on the environmental behaviour of aggregated aqueous fullerene nanomaterials have used the entire size distribution of fullerene aggregates and do not distinguish between different aggregate size classes. This is a direct result of the lack of analytical methods ...

  2. Graphene hydrogels deposited in nickel foams for high-rate electrochemical capacitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Sheng, Kaixuan; Luo, Peihui; Li, Chun; Shi, Gaoquan

    2012-08-28

    Graphene hydrogel/nickel foam composite electrodes for high-rate electrochemical capacitors are produced by reduction of an aqueous dispersion of graphene oxide in a nickel foam (upper half of figure). The micropores of the hydrogel are exposed to the electrolyte so that ions can enter and form electrochemical double-layers. The nickel framework shortens the distances of charge transfer. Therefore, the electrochemical capacitor exhibits highrate performance (see plots). PMID:22786775

  3. Foam drainage on a sloping weir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, P.; Neethling, S. J.; Cilliers, J. J.

    2002-08-01

    Foam drainage is considered in a froth flotation tank with a sloping weir. The drainage is shown to be gravity dominated in most of the foam, except for thin boundary layers at the base of the froth, and along the sloping weir. The mathematical reason for the boundary layers is that capillary suction is a much weaker effect than gravity, but cannot be ignored altogether, because it represents a singular perturbation. The relative weakness of capillary suction with respect to gravity is represented by a key dimensionless parameter, denoted K, which satisfies Kll 1. The volumetric flow at any point along the weir boundary layer is the accumulation of all liquid that has rained onto the weir above the point in question: typically, this flow is linear in distance measured downward from the weir lip. All liquid raining onto the weir is ultimately returned to the pulp phase as a high-speed jet. The jet velocity scales with the frac{2}{3} power of distance from the weir lip, and is O(K^{-2/3}) times larger than the typical velocity in the gravity-dominated flow in the bulk of the flotation tank. The liquid volume fraction in the jet is likewise O(K^{-2/3}) larger than that in the bulk. Across the jet, the foam exhibits a known profile of liquid fraction vs. distance from the weir: this is known as the equilibrium profile. The foam requires a distance equivalent to O(K^{4/3}) weir lengths to dry out significantly from the wetness value on the weir, but a larger O(K) distance to fall back to a wetness comparable with that in the bulk of the froth.

  4. Foam drainage on a sloping weir.

    PubMed

    Grassia, P; Neethling, S J; Cilliers, J J

    2002-08-01

    Foam drainage is considered in a froth flotation tank with a sloping weir. The drainage is shown to be gravity dominated in most of the foam, except for thin boundary layers at the base of the froth, and along the sloping weir. The mathematical reason for the boundary layers is that capillary suction is a much weaker effect than gravity, but cannot be ignored altogether, because it represents a singular perturbation. The relative weakness of capillary suction with respect to gravity is represented by a key dimensionless parameter, denoted K, which satisfies K<1. The volumetric flow at any point along the weir boundary layer is the accumulation of all liquid that has rained onto the weir above the point in question: typically, this flow is linear in distance measured downward from the weir lip. All liquid raining onto the weir is ultimately returned to the pulp phase as a high-speed jet. The jet velocity scales with the (2/3) power of distance from the weir lip, and is O(K(-2/3)) times larger than the typical velocity in the gravity-dominated flow in the bulk of the flotation tank. The liquid volume fraction in the jet is likewise O(K(-2/3)) larger than that in the bulk. Across the jet, the foam exhibits a known profile of liquid fraction vs. distance from the weir: this is known as the equilibrium profile. The foam requires a distance equivalent to O(K(4/3)) weir lengths to dry out significantly from the wetness value on the weir, but a larger O(K) distance to fall back to a wetness comparable with that in the bulk of the froth. PMID:15015124

  5. Intertwined nanocarbon and manganese oxide hybrid foam for high-energy supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Guo, Shirui; Bozhilov, Krassimir N; Yan, Dong; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2013-11-11

    Rapid charging and discharging supercapacitors are promising alternative energy storage systems for applications such as portable electronics and electric vehicles. Integration of pseudocapacitive metal oxides with single-structured materials has received a lot of attention recently due to their superior electrochemical performance. In order to realize high energy-density supercapacitors, a simple and scalable method is developed to fabricate a graphene/MWNT/MnO2 nanowire (GMM) hybrid nanostructured foam, via a two-step process. The 3D few-layer graphene/MWNT (GM) architecture is grown on foamed metal foils (nickel foam) via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition. Hydrothermally synthesized α-MnO2 nanowires are conformally coated onto the GM foam by a simple bath deposition. The as-prepared hierarchical GMM foam yields a monographical graphene foam conformally covered with an intertwined, densely packed CNT/MnO2 nanowire nanocomposite network. Symmetrical electrochemical capacitors (ECs) based on GMM foam electrodes show an extended operational voltage window of 1.6 V in aqueous electrolyte. A superior energy density of 391.7 Wh kg(-1) is obtained for the supercapacitor based on the GMM foam, which is much higher than ECs based on GM foam only (39.72 Wh kg(-1) ). A high specific capacitance (1108.79 F g(-1) ) and power density (799.84 kW kg(-1) ) are also achieved. Moreover, the great capacitance retention (97.94%) after 13 000 charge-discharge cycles and high current handability demonstrate the high stability of the electrodes of the supercapacitor. These excellent performances enable the innovative 3D hierarchical GMM foam to serve as EC electrodes, resulting in energy-storage devices with high stability and power density in neutral aqueous electrolyte. PMID:23650047

  6. Increasing the energy density of the non-aqueous vanadium redox flow battery with the acetonitrile-1,3-dioxolane-dimethyl sulfoxide solvent mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, T.; Fischer, P.; Tübke, J.; Pinkwart, K.; Elsner, P.

    2014-11-01

    Different solvent mixtures were investigated for non-aqueous vanadium acetylacetonate (V(acac)3) redox flow batteries with tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate as the supporting electrolyte. The aim of this study was to increase the energy density of the non-aqueous redox flow battery. A mixture of acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide and 1-3-dioxolane nearly doubles the solubility of the active species. The proposed electrolyte system was characterized by Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and charge-discharge set-up. Spectroscopic methods were applied to understand the interactions between the solvents used and their impact on the solubility. The potential difference between oxidation and reduction of V(acac)3 measured by cyclic voltammetry was about 2.2 V. Impedance spectroscopy showed an electrolyte resistance of about 2400 Ω cm2. Experiments in a charge-discharge test cell achieved coulombic and energy efficiencies of ∼95% and ∼27% respectively. The highest discharge power density was 0.25 mW cm-2.

  7. Advanced foam computer model helps in the design and analysis of underbalanced drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.; Medley, G.H. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    Foam generated by mixing gas and liquid for underbalanced drilling has unique rheological characteristics, making it very difficult to accurately predict the pressure profile. A new mechanistic model attempts to overcome many of the problems associated with existing foam flow analyses. Varying Fanning friction factors, rather than assumed constants, are calculated along the flow path. A user-friendly PC computer program was developed to numerically solve the mechanical energy balance equation for compressible foam flow, taking into account influxes of gas, liquid, and oil from formations. The pressure profile, foam quality, density, and cuttings transport are predicted by the model. A Sensitivity Analysis Window allows the user to quickly optimize the hydraulics program by selecting the best combination of injection pressure, back pressure, and gas/liquid injection rates. This new model handles inclined and horizontal wellbores, and provides handy engineering and design tools for underbalanced drilling, wellbore clean-out, and other foam operations.

  8. A non-foaming proteosurfactant engineered from Ranaspumin-2.

    PubMed

    Frey, Shelli L; Todd, Jacob; Wurtzler, Elizabeth; Strelez, Carly R; Wendell, David

    2015-09-01

    Advances in biological surfactant proteins have already yielded a diverse range of benefits from dramatically improved survival rates for premature births to artificial photosynthesis. Presented here is the design, development, and analysis of a novel biosurfactant protein we call Surfactant Resisting Foam formatioN (SRFN). Starting with the Tungara frog's foam forming protein Ranaspumin-2, we have engineered a new surfactant protein with a destabilized hinge region to alter the kinetics and equilibrium of the protein structural transition from aqueous globular form to an extended surfactant structure at the air/water interface. SRFN is capable of approximately the same total surface tension reduction, but with the unique property of forming quickly collapsible foams. The difference in foam formation is attributed to the destabilizing glycine substitutions engineered into the hinge region. Surfactants used specifically to increase wettability, such as those used in agricultural applications would benefit from this new proteosurfactant since foamed liquid has greater wind resistance and decreased dispersal. Indeed, given growing concern of organsilicone surfactant effects on declining bee populations, biological surfactant proteins have several unique advantages over more common amphiphiles in that they can be renewably sourced, are environmentally friendly, degrade readily into non-toxic byproducts, and reduce surface tension without deleterious effects on cell membranes. PMID:26117804

  9. Design of metallic foams as insulation in thermal protection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huadong

    Metallic foams are novel materials that can be used as thermal insulation in many applications. The low volume fraction of solid, the small cell size and the low conductivity of enclosed gases limit the heat flow in foams. Varying the density, geometry and or material composition from point to point within the foam, one can produce functionally graded foams that may insulate more efficiently. The goal of this research is to investigate the use of functionally graded metal foam in thermal protection systems (TPS) for reusable launch vehicles. First, the effective thermal conductivity of the foam is derived based on a simple cubic unit cell model. Then two problems under steady state of heat transfer have been considered. The first one is the optimization of functionally graded foam insulation for minimum heat transmitted to the structure and the second is minimizing the mass of the functionally graded foam insulation for a given aerodynamic heating. In both cases optimality conditions are derived in closed-form, and numerical methods are used to solve the resulting differential equations to determine the optimal grading of the foam. In order to simplify the analysis the insulation was approximated by finite layers of uniform foams when studying the transient heat transfer case. The maximum structure temperature was minimized by varying the solidity profile for a given total thickness and mass. The principles that govern the design of TPS for transient conditions were identified. To take advantage of the load bearing ability of metallic foams, an integrated sandwich TPS/structure with metallic foam core is proposed. Such an integrated TPS will insulate the vehicle interior from aerodynamic heating as well as carry the primary vehicle loads. Thermal-structural analysis of integrated sandwich TPS panel subjected to transient heat conduction is developed to evaluate their performances. The integrated TPS design is compared with a conventional fibrous Safill TPS design

  10. Generalized entering coefficients: A criterion for foam stability against oil in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, V.; Fagan, M.E.; Radke, C.J.

    1993-09-01

    The unique mobility-control properties of foam in porous media make it an attractive choice as an injection fluid for enhanced oil recovery. Unfortunately, in many cases oil has a major destabilizing effect on foam. Therefore, it is important to understand how oil destabilizes foam and what surfactant properties lead to increased stability against oil. To explain the stability of foam in porous media in the presence of oil, we generalize the ideas of spreading and entering behavior using Frumkin-Deryaguin wetting theory. This formulation overcomes the inherent deficiencies in the classical spreading and entering coefficients used to explain foam stability against oil. We find that oil-tolerant foam can be produced by making the oil surface ``water wet``. To test our theoretical ideas, we measure foam-flow resistance through 45--70 {mu}m glass beadpacks, surface and interfacial tensions, and disjoining pressure isotherms for foam and pseudoemulsion films for a variety of surfactant/oil systems. Most notably, we measure pseudoemulsion-film disjoining pressure isotherms for the first time and directly establish that pseudoemulsion film stability controls the stability of the foam in the systems we tested. Moreover, we demonstrate the correspondence between stable pseudoemulsion films, negative entering behavior, and oil-tolerant foams.

  11. Pore-level mechanics of foam generation and coalescence in the presence of oil.

    PubMed

    Almajid, Muhammad M; Kovscek, Anthony R

    2016-07-01

    The stability of foam in porous media is extremely important for realizing the advantages of foamed gas on gas mobility reduction. Foam texture (i.e., bubbles per volume of gas) achieved is dictated by foam generation and coalescence processes occurring at the pore-level. For foam injection to be widely applied during gas injection projects, we need to understand these pore-scale events that lead to foam stability/instability so that they are modeled accurately. Foam flow has been studied for decades, but most efforts focused on studying foam generation and coalescence in the absence of oil. Here, the extensive existing literature is reviewed and analyzed to identify open questions. Then, we use etched-silicon micromodels to observe foam generation and coalescence processes at the pore-level. Special emphasis is placed on foam coalescence in the presence of oil. For the first time, lamella pinch-off as described by Myers and Radke [40] is observed in porous media and documented. Additionally, a new mechanism coined "hindered generation" is found. Hindered generation refers to the role oil plays in preventing the successful formation of a lamella following snap-off near a pore throat. PMID:26548502

  12. Foam injection molding of thermoplastic elastomers: Blowing agents, foaming process and characterization of structural foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, S.; Spoerrer, A.; Altstaedt, V.

    2014-05-01

    Polymer foams play an important role caused by the steadily increasing demand to light weight design. In case of soft polymers, like thermoplastic elastomers (TPE), the haptic feeling of the surface is affected by the inner foam structure. Foam injection molding of TPEs leads to so called structural foam, consisting of two compact skin layers and a cellular core. The properties of soft structural foams like soft-touch, elastic and plastic behavior are affected by the resulting foam structure, e.g. thickness of the compact skins and the foam core or density. This inner structure can considerably be influenced by different processing parameters and the chosen blowing agent. This paper is focused on the selection and characterization of suitable blowing agents for foam injection molding of a TPE-blend. The aim was a high density reduction and a decent inner structure. Therefore DSC and TGA measurements were performed on different blowing agents to find out which one is appropriate for the used TPE. Moreover a new analyzing method for the description of processing characteristics by temperature dependent expansion measurements was developed. After choosing suitable blowing agents structural foams were molded with different types of blowing agents and combinations and with the breathing mold technology in order to get lower densities. The foam structure was analyzed to show the influence of the different blowing agents and combinations. Finally compression tests were performed to estimate the influence of the used blowing agent and the density reduction on the compression modulus.

  13. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular from which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  14. Metal Foam Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares the ballistic performance of metallic foam sandwich structures with honeycomb structures. Honeycomb sandwich structures, consisting of metallic or composite facesheets and honeycomb cores, are often used in spacecraft construction due to their light-weight and structural stiffness. Honeycomb panels, however, are considered rather poor candidates for protection from micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) particles because the honeycomb channels the debris cloud from MMOD impacts on outer facesheet causing a concentrated load on the second facesheet. Sandwich structures with light-weight, open-cell metallic cores and metal or composite facesheets provide improved MMOD protection because channeling does not occur and because the core is more effective at disrupting hypervelocity impacts then honeycomb. This paper describes hypervelocity impact tests on metallic foam sandwich structures (aluminum and titanium) with metallic facesheets, compare them to equivalent mass and thickness honeycomb panels, based on the results of hypervelocity impact tests.

  15. Development of nonflammable cellulosic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttinger, M.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a moldable cellulosic foam for use in Skylab instrument storage cushions is considered. Requirements include density of 10 lb cu ft or less, minimal friability with normal handling, and nonflammability in an atmosphere of 70 percent oxygen and 30 percent nitrogen at 6.2 psia. A study of halogenated foam components was made, including more highly chlorinated binders, halogen-containing additives, and halogenation of the cellulose. The immediate objective was to reduce the density of the foam through reduction in inorganic phosphate without sacrificing flame-retarding properties of the foams. The use of frothing techniques was investigated, with particular emphasis on a urea-formaldehyde foam. Halogen-containing flame retardants were deemphasized in favor of inorganic salts and the preparation of phosphate and sulphate esters of cellulose. Utilization of foam products for civilian applications was also considered.

  16. Shock Hugoniot Measurements in Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petel, Oren; Ouellet, Simon; Frost, David; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    Foams are found in a variety of protective equipment, including those used in applications involving high-speed impact and blast waves. Despite their exposure to shock wave loadings, there is a considerable lack of shock Hugoniot data for these materials. Typical characterizations of foams have involved the use of split-Hopkinson pressure bars or quasi-static compression machines to determine the stress-strain relationship in the foams. As such, the elastic-plastic response of foam at intermediate pressure ranges continues to be a source of confusion. In the present study, Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is used to measure the shock Hugoniot of a foam for a comparison to its quasi-static compression curves. The deviation of these two curves will be discussed and compared to common plasticity models used to describe dynamic foam behaviour in the literature.

  17. Foam and gel decontamination techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McGlynn, J.F.; Rankin, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    The Savannah River Site is investigating decontamination technology to improve current decontamination techniques, and thereby reduce radiation exposure to plant personnel, reduce uptake of radioactive material, and improve safety during decontamination and decommissioning activities. When decontamination chemicals are applied as foam and gels, the contact time and cleaning ability of the chemical increases. Foam and gel applicators apply foam or gel that adheres to the surface being decontaminated for periods ranging from fifteen minutes (foam) to infinite contact (gel). This equipment was started up in a cold environment. The desired foam and gel consistency was achieved, operators were trained in its proper maintenance and operation, and the foam and gel were applied to walls, ceilings, and hard to reach surfaces. 17 figs.

  18. Pourable Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James A.; Butler, John M.; Chartoff, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes search for polyisocyanurate/polyurethane foam insulation with superior characteristics. Discusses chemistry of current formulations. Tests of formulations, of individual ingredients and or alternative new formulations described. Search revealed commercially available formulations exhibiting increased thermal stability at temperatures up to 600 degree C, pours readily before curing, presents good appearance after curing, and remains securely bonded to aluminum at cryogenic temperatures. Total of 42 different formulations investigated, 10 found to meet requirements.

  19. Dust control at longwalls with water infusion and foam. Technical progress report through November 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Foam spray equipment and materials for dust suppression on longwall double drum shearer faces have been procured. This equipment includes metering pumps, foam generators and mounting brackets, foam solutions, flow meters, real time and gravimetric sampling equipment, hoses and valve banks. Initial tests have been conducted in the laboratory with three types of generators and five types of foam solutions. Based on these tests, Senior Conflow's cluster spray and Onyx Chemical Company's millifoam solution have been selected. For pumping foam solution to the shearer, Jon Bean's 2 hp, 120 VAC single-phase ceramic lined piston pump has been selected. For field tests, equipment has been installed underground in Dobbin mine in Upper Freeport seam on Eickhoff EDW 300 double drum shearer. Foamspray tests have been conducted. Real time and gravimetric dust samples have been collected. Real time sampling results indicate a dust level reduction of up to 37 percent with foam spray compared to the base case of water sprays.

  20. Foam, a promising vehicle to deliver nanoparticles for vadose zone remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xin; Zhao, Lin; Ding, Yuanzhao; Liu, Bo; Zeng, Hui; Zhong, Lirong; Li, Xiqing

    2011-02-23

    Foam delivery of remedial amendments for in-situ immobilization of deep vadose zone contaminants can overcome the intrinsic problems associated with solution-based delivery, such as preferential flow and contaminant mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of using foam to deliver nanoparticles in unsaturated porous media was investigated. Carboxyl-modified polystyrene latex microspheres were used as surrogates for nanoparticles of remediation purposes. Foams generated from the solutions of six commonly available surfactants all had excellent abilities to carry the microspheres. The presence of the microspheres did not reduce the stabilities of the foams. When microsphere-laden foam was injected through the unsaturated columns, the fractions of microspheres exiting the column were much higher than that when the microsphere water suspensions were injected through the columns. The enhanced microsphere transport implies that foam delivery could significantly increase the radius of influence of injected nanoparticles of remediation purposes. Reduced tension at air-water interfaces by the surfactant and increased driving forces imparted on the microspheres at the interfaces by the flowing foam bubbles may have both contributed to the enhanced transport. Preliminary tests also demonstrated that foam can carry significant fractions of zero valent iron nanoparticles at concentrations relevant to field remediation conditions (up to 5.3 g L-1). As such, this study demonstrates that surfactant foam is potentially a promising vehicle to deliver nanoparticles for vadose zone remediation.

  1. Complications of foam sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cavezzi, A; Parsi, K

    2012-03-01

    Foam sclerotherapy may result in drug and/or gas-related complications of a generalized or localized nature. Significant complications include anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions (very rare), deep vein thrombosis (1-3%), stroke (0.01%), superficial venous thrombosis (4.4%), tissue necrosis (variable frequency), oedema (0.5%) and nerve damage (0.2%). Cosmetic complications include telangiectatic matting (15-24%) and pigmentation (10-30%). Patent foramen ovale and other cardio-pulmonary right-to-left shunts seem to play a role in the systemic gas-related complications. In conclusion, foam sclerotherapy is characterized by an overall high degree of safety, though special attention should be given to the embolic and thrombotic complications. Good technique, adequate imaging, general precautions and compliance with post-treatment instructions may help avoid some of the adverse events and an appropriate early intervention may minimize possible sequelae. Higher volumes of sclerosant foam have been attributed to local and distant thrombotic complications and should be avoided. PMID:22312067

  2. Polyimide Foams Offer Superior Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, Erik Weiser and his colleagues in the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch were working with a new substance for fabricating composites for use in supersonic aircraft. The team, however, was experiencing some frustration. Every time they tried to create a solid composite from the polyimide (an advanced polymer) material, it bubbled and foamed. It seemed like the team had reached a dead end in their research - until they had another idea. "We said, This isn t going to work for composites, but maybe we could make a foam out of it," Weiser says. "That was kind of our eureka moment, to see if we could go in a whole other direction. And it worked." Weiser and his colleagues invented a new kind of polyimide foam insulation they named TEEK. The innovation displayed a host of advantages over existing insulation options. Compared to other commercial foams, Weiser explains, polyimide foams perform well across a broad range of temperatures, noting that the NASA TEEK foams provide effective structural insulation up to 600 F and down to cryogenic temperatures. The foam does not burn or off-gas toxic fumes, and even at -423 F - the temperature of liquid hydrogen - the material stays flexible. The inventors could produce the TEEK foam at a range of densities, from 0.5 pounds per cubic foot up to 20 pounds per cubic foot, making the foam ideal for a range of applications, including as insulation for reusable launch vehicles and for cryogenic tanks and lines. They also developed a unique, friable balloon format for manufacturing the foam, producing it as hollow microspheres that allowed the foam to be molded and then cured into any desired shape - perfect for insulating pipes of different sizes and configurations. The team s originally unplanned invention won an "R&D 100" award, and a later form of the foam, called LaRC FPF-44 (Spinoff 2009), was named "NASA Invention of the Year" in 2007.

  3. Cryogenic foam insulation: Abstracted publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A group of documents were chosen and abstracted which contain information on the properties of foam materials and on the use of foams as thermal insulation at cryogenic temperatures. The properties include thermal properties, mechanical properties, and compatibility properties with oxygen and other cryogenic fluids. Uses of foams include applications as thermal insulation for spacecraft propellant tanks, and for liquefied natural gas storage tanks and pipelines.

  4. Materials for foam type insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, W. E.

    1971-01-01

    An internal foam fabrication is one of the concepts being considered for cryogenic insulation on the hydrogen tanks of the shuttle vehicle. The three-dimensional polyurethane used on the S-4 B tanks failed to meet the higher temperature requirements of the shuttle vehicle, however, and other foams under consideration include polyisocyanurates, polyphenylene oxides, polyimides, and polybenzimidazoles. Improved adhesive systems for attaching the foams to the interior tank wall are under study.

  5. EPR-Spin Trapping and Flow Cytometric Studies of Free Radicals Generated Using Cold Atmospheric Argon Plasma and X-Ray Irradiation in Aqueous Solutions and Intracellular Milieu.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Zhao, Qing-Li; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spin trapping and flow cytometry were used to identify free radicals generated using argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) in aqueous solutions and intracellularly in comparison with those generated by X-irradiation. Ar-CAP was generated using a high-voltage power supply unit with low-frequency excitation. The characteristics of Ar-CAP were estimated by vacuum UV absorption and emission spectra measurements. Hydroxyl (·OH) radicals and hydrogen (H) atoms in aqueous solutions were identified with the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (M4PO), and phenyl N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). The occurrence of Ar-CAP-induced pyrolysis was evaluated using the spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS) in aqueous solutions of DNA constituents, sodium acetate, and L-alanine. Human lymphoma U937 cells were used to study intracellular oxidative stress using five fluorescent probes with different affinities to a number of reactive species. The analysis and quantification of EPR spectra revealed the formation of enormous amounts of ·OH radicals using Ar-CAP compared with that by X-irradiation. Very small amounts of H atoms were detected whereas nitric oxide was not found. The formation of ·OH radicals depended on the type of rare gas used and the yield correlated inversely with ionization energy in the order of krypton > argon = neon > helium. No pyrolysis radicals were detected in aqueous solutions exposed to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, ·OH, H2O2, which is the recombination product of ·OH, and OCl- were the most likely formed reactive oxygen species after exposure to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, there was no practical evidence for the formation of NO whereas very small amounts of superoxides were formed. Despite the superiority of Ar-CAP in forming ·OH radicals, the exposure to X-rays proved more lethal. The mechanism of free radical formation in aqueous solutions and an

  6. EPR-Spin Trapping and Flow Cytometric Studies of Free Radicals Generated Using Cold Atmospheric Argon Plasma and X-Ray Irradiation in Aqueous Solutions and Intracellular Milieu

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Zhao, Qing-Li; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spin trapping and flow cytometry were used to identify free radicals generated using argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) in aqueous solutions and intracellularly in comparison with those generated by X-irradiation. Ar-CAP was generated using a high-voltage power supply unit with low-frequency excitation. The characteristics of Ar-CAP were estimated by vacuum UV absorption and emission spectra measurements. Hydroxyl (·OH) radicals and hydrogen (H) atoms in aqueous solutions were identified with the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (M4PO), and phenyl N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). The occurrence of Ar-CAP-induced pyrolysis was evaluated using the spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS) in aqueous solutions of DNA constituents, sodium acetate, and L-alanine. Human lymphoma U937 cells were used to study intracellular oxidative stress using five fluorescent probes with different affinities to a number of reactive species. The analysis and quantification of EPR spectra revealed the formation of enormous amounts of ·OH radicals using Ar-CAP compared with that by X-irradiation. Very small amounts of H atoms were detected whereas nitric oxide was not found. The formation of ·OH radicals depended on the type of rare gas used and the yield correlated inversely with ionization energy in the order of krypton > argon = neon > helium. No pyrolysis radicals were detected in aqueous solutions exposed to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, ·OH, H2O2, which is the recombination product of ·OH, and OCl- were the most likely formed reactive oxygen species after exposure to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, there was no practical evidence for the formation of NO whereas very small amounts of superoxides were formed. Despite the superiority of Ar-CAP in forming ·OH radicals, the exposure to X-rays proved more lethal. The mechanism of free radical formation in aqueous solutions and an

  7. Fiber reinforced hybrid phenolic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Amit

    Hybrid composites in recent times have been developed by using more than one type of fiber reinforcement to bestow synergistic properties of the chosen filler and matrix and also facilitating the design of materials with specific properties matched to end use. However, the studies for hybrid foams have been very limited because of problems related to fiber dispersion in matrix, non uniform mixing due to presence of more than one filler and partially cured foams. An effective approach to synthesize hybrid phenolic foam has been proposed and investigated here. Hybrid composite phenolic foams were reinforced with chopped glass and aramid fibers in varied proportions. On assessing mechanical properties in compression and shear several interesting facts surfaced but overall hybrid phenolic foams exhibited a more graceful failure, greater resistance to cracking and were significantly stiffer and stronger than foams with only glass and aramid fibers. The optimum fiber ratio for the reinforced hybrid phenolic foam system was found to be 1:1 ratio of glass to aramid fibers. Also, the properties of hybrid foam were found to deviate from rule of mixture (ROM) and thus the existing theories of fiber reinforcement fell short in explaining their complex behavior. In an attempt to describe and predict mechanical behavior of hybrid foams a statistical design tool using analysis of variance technique was employed. The utilization of a statistical model for predicting foam properties was found to be an appropriate tool that affords a global perspective of the influence of process variables such as fiber weight fraction, fiber length etc. on foam properties (elastic modulus and strength). Similar approach could be extended to study other fiber composite foam systems such as polyurethane, epoxy etc. and doing so will reduce the number of experimental iterations needed to optimize foam properties and identify critical process variables. Diffusivity, accelerated aging and flammability

  8. An Experimental Study of Cyclic Foam Oscillation: Unveiling the Time-Scale of Foam Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    A defined periodicity in eruptive activity has been reported for different volcanoes. Lava lakes, for example are often characterized by periodic short-time scale fluctuations of the surface which has been termed "gas piston activity" (Swanson et al., 1971), as well as long-term periodical overturns. The latter have been also reported in extra-terrestrial volcanoes (e.g. Loki, Rathbun et al., 2002). This cyclic nature of volcanic eruptive activity, together with its characteristic time-scale, carries fundamental information on the degassing dynamics, and is thus more than worthy of further investigation. To this end, we have performed decompression experiments using Argon-saturated silicon oil, with viscosities of 10 to 1000 Pa s, as analogue for volatile-bearing mafic to intermediate magmas. The analogue samples were held to saturate in Argon in a shock tube for 72 hours, and then decompressed. In response to decompression, bubbles were nucleated and a foam layer developed at the top of the sample. Vigorous oscillations and periodical disruptions at the surface of the foam were observed, followed by foam restoration via bubble addition from below. This regime of periodical foam collapse and renewal was investigated through a monochromatic light-sensitive video camera. Also, in order to reconstruct the elastic energy due to the excitation mechanisms related to the foam collapse, 7 high-dynamic piezoelectric sensors (LDT Series, Measurement Specialties, Inc.) were distributed along of the shock tube. By tracking the flow front height trough time, joined with the observation of the micro-seismic signatures related to the foam disruption and growth, we were able to assess the time scale of foam collapse under dynamics conditions, and compare it to previous models (e.g. Proussevitch et al., 1993) and published data on natural cyclic phenomena in open conduit volcanoes. The laboratory investigation of bubbles coalescence and foam collapse in analogue materials

  9. Foaming and cell flotation in suspended plant cell cultures and the effect of chemical antifoams.

    PubMed

    Wongsamuth, R; Doran, P M

    1994-08-01

    Foam development and stability in Atropa belladonna suspensions were investigated as a function of culture conditions. Foaming was due mainly to properties of the cell-free broth and was correlated with protein content; effects due to presence of cells increased towards the end of batch culture. Highest foam levels were measured 11 days after inoculation. Air flow rate was of major importance in determining foam volume; foam volume and stability were also strongly dependent on pH. Foam flotation of plant cells was very effective. After 30 min foaming, ca. 55% of cells were found in the foam; this increased to ca. 75% after 90 min. Polypropylene glycol 1025 and 2025, Pluronic PE 6100, and Antifoam-C emulsion were tested as chemical antifoams. Polypropylene glycol 1025 and Antifoam C at concentrations up to 600 ppm had no adverse effect on growth in shake flasks; Pluronic PE 6100 has an inhibitory effect at all levels tested. Concentrations of polypropylene glycol 2025 and Pluronic PE 6100 as low as 20 ppm reduced foam volumes by a factor of ca. 10. Addition of antifoam reduced k(L)a values in bubble-column and stirred-tank bioreactors. After operation of a stirred reactor for 2 days using Antifoam C for foam control, cell production was limited by oxygen due to the effect of antifoam on mass transfer. Theoretical analysis showed that maximum cell concentrations and biomass levels decline with increasing reactors working volume due to greater consumption of antifoam to prevent foam overflow. The results indicate that when chemical foam control is used in plant cell cultures, head-space volume and tolerable foam levels must be considered to optimize biomass production. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18618782

  10. Strong, Water-Durable, and Wet-Resilient Cellulose Nanofibril-Stabilized Foams from Oven Drying.

    PubMed

    Cervin, Nicholas Tchang; Johansson, Erik; Larsson, Per A; Wågberg, Lars

    2016-05-11

    Porous materials from cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) have been prepared using Pickering foams from aqueous dispersions. Stable wet foams were first produced using surface-modified CNFs as stabilizing particles. To better maintain the homogeneous pore structure of the foam after drying, the foams were dried in an oven on a liquid-filled porous ceramic frit. The cell structure was studied by scanning electron microscopy and liquid porosimetry, the mechanical properties were studied by compression testing, and the liquid absorption capacity was determined both with liquid porosimetry and by soaking in water. By controlling the charge density of the CNFs, it was possible to prepare dry foams with different densities, the lowest density being 6 kg m(-3), that is, a porosity of 99.6%. For a foam with a density of 200 kg m(-3), the compressive Young's modulus was 50 MPa and the energy absorption to 70% strain was 2.3 MJ m(-3). The use of chemically modified CNFs made it possible to prepare cross-linked foams with water-durable and wet-resilient properties. These foams absorbed liquid up to 34 times their own weight and were able to release this liquid under compression and to reabsorb the same amount when the pressure was released. PMID:27070532

  11. Surfactant foam technology for in situ removal of heavy chlorinated compounds-DNAPLs.

    PubMed

    Maire, Julien; Coyer, Amandine; Fatin-Rouge, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    The use of surfactant foam for the remediation of a saturated soil contaminated with a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) was investigated at bench-scale. Despite the presence of the DNAPL, high foam stability was obtained for a mixture of cocamidopropyl betaïne and dodecylsulfate at 0.05%. Foams were assessed in different injection conditions and were compared to commonly used remediation methods. Strong foams improved significantly the DNAPL recovery yield, which amounted up to 98%, owing to the propagation of a flat foam front, with low dissolution (<0.5 g l(-1)) and surfactant consumption (<10 g kg(-1) DNAPL recovered). The effects of important parameters (gas to liquid ratio, injection velocity, gas nature) and methods for foam production on pressure gradient (∇P), remediation efficiency and surfactant consumption were investigated. Even for low injection velocities (4×10(-4) ms(-1)), capillary numbers were high enough (∼8×10(-3)) to push the DNAPL efficiently. DNAPL lowered ∇P for foam propagation because of its destabilising effect. The use of CO2 as gas reduced the ∇Ps for foam propagation by 35%. ∇P were also decreased by 25% for gas to liquid ratios lower than 75%, whereas, DNAPL removal remained high. This technology should lower spreading risks and treatment costs. PMID:26291781

  12. Surfactant foam/bioaugmentation technology for in situ treatment of TCE-DNAPLs.

    SciTech Connect

    Rothmel, R. K.; Peters, R. W.; St. Martin, E.; Deflaun, M. F.; Energy Systems; Envirogen, Inc.

    1998-06-01

    Chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE) are prevalent aquifer contaminants. Depending on the degree of contamination, their physical properties may cause them to occur as dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) making them difficult to remediate by pump-and-treat methods. Successful in situ bioremediation requires mobilization and dispersion of DNAPLs in order to reduce sediment concentrations to levels nontoxic to degradative bacteria. A bench-scale study was conducted to evaluate a novel remediation technology that utilized surfactant foam for mobilizing and dispersing TCE-DNAPLs combined with a bioaugmentation technology to remediate TCE in situ. Results using the anionic surfactant Steol CS-330 showed that foam injected into TCE-DNAPL-contaminated sand columns enhanced mobilization of TCE-DNAPLs. Mobilization was maximized when the foam was injected in a pulsed operation. Injection of foam followed by artificial groundwater (AGW) and then by foam again resulted in flushing 75% of the initial TCE-DNAPL through an 8-in. column (884 cm3 of sand). The residual TCE was dispersed within the column at concentration levels compatible with biodegradation (<500 {micro}g/g). Adding the TCE-degrading bacterial strain ENV 435 simultaneously with the second pulse of foam resulted in 95-99% degradation of the residual TCE. This level of remediation was achieved with a total of 3 pore volumes (foam/AGW/foam + bacteria) and an aqueous column retention time of 1 h.

  13. Nickel foam-supported polyaniline cathode prepared with electrophoresis for improvement of rechargeable Zn battery performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yang; Zhu, Derong; Si, Shihui; Li, Degeng; Wu, Sen

    2015-06-01

    Porous nickel foam is used as a substrate for the development of rechargeable zinc//polyaniline battery, and the cathode electrophoresis of PANI microparticles in non-aqueous solution is applied to the fabrication of Ni foam supported PANI electrode, in which the corrosion of the nickel foam substrate is prohibited. The Ni foam supported PANI cathode with high loading is prepared by PANI electrophoretic deposition, and followed by PANI slurry casting under vacuum filtration. The electrochemical charge storage performance for PANI material is significantly improved by using nickel foam substrate via the electrophoretic interlayer. The specific capacity of the nickel foam-PANI electrode with the electrophoretic layer is higher than the composite electrode without the electrophoretic layer, and the specific capacity of PANI supported by Ni foam reaches up to 183.28 mAh g-1 at the working current of 2.5 mA cm-2. The present electrophoresis deposition method plays the facile procedure for the immobilization of PANI microparticles onto the surface of non-platinum metals, and it becomes feasible to the use of the Ni foam supported PANI composite cathode for the Zn/PANI battery in weak acidic electrolyte.

  14. Foam-assisted delivery of nanoscale zero valent iron in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuanzhao; Liu, Bo; Shen, Xin; Zhong, Lirong; Li, Xiqing

    2013-09-01

    Foam is potentially a promising vehicle to deliver nanoparticles for vadose zone remediation as foam can overcome the intrinsic problems associated with solution-based delivery, such as preferential flow and contaminant mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of using foam to deliver nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) in unsaturated porous media was investigated. Foams generated using surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) showed excellent ability to carry nZVI. SLES and nZVI concentrations in the foaming solutions did not affect the percentages of nZVI concentrations in foams relative to nZVI concentrations in the solutions. When foams carrying nZVI were injected through the unsaturated columns, the fractions of nZVI exiting the column were much higher than those when nZVI was injected in liquid. The enhanced nZVI transport implies that foam delivery could significantly increase the radius of influence of injected nZVI. The type and concentrations of surfactants and the influent nZVI concentrations did not noticeably affect nZVI transport during foam delivery. In contrast, nZVI retention increased considerably as the grain size of porous media decreased. Oxidation of foam-delivered nZVI due to oxygen diffusion into unsaturated porous media was visually examined using a flow cell. It was demonstrated that if foams are injected to cover a deep vadose zone layer, oxidation would only cause a small fraction of foam-delivered nZVI to be oxidized before it reacts with contaminants.

  15. Investigation of capillary free-flow electrophoresis for separation of Co, Cr, and As species in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ketterer, M.E.; Kozerski, G.E.; Ritacco, R.; Painuly, P.

    1997-01-01

    Application of a prototype capillary free-flow electrophoresis (CFFE) device for separation of different solution species of Co, Cr, and As is explored. A unique free-flow electrophoresis (FFE) design is employed, which makes use of internal capillary cooling tubes to minimize thermal convection due to Joule heating.

  16. Development of Polyimide Foam for Aircraft Sidewall Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, Richard; Cano, Roberto J.; Howerton, Brian M.; Bolton, J. Stuart; Kim, Nicholas N.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the use of polyimide foam as a lining in double panel applications is considered. It is being investigated here as a replacement for aircraft grade glass fiber and has a number of attractive functional attributes, not the least of which is its high fire resistance. The test configuration studied here consisted of two 1mm (0.04 in.) thick, flat aluminum panels separated by 12.7 cm (5.0 in.) with a 7.6 cm (3.0 in.) thick layer of foam centered in that space. Random incidence transmission loss measurements were conducted on this buildup, and conventional poro-elastic models were used to predict the performance of the lining material. Results from two densities of foam are considered. The Biot parameters of the foam were determined by a combination of direct measurement (for density, flow resistivity and Young s modulus) and inverse characterization procedures (for porosity, tortuosity, viscous and thermal characteristic length, Poisson s ratio and loss factor). The inverse characterization procedure involved matching normal incidence standing wave tube measurements of absorption coefficient and transmission loss of the isolated foam with finite element predictions. When the foam parameters determined in this way were used to predict the performance of the complete double panel system, reasonable agreement was obtained between the measured transmission loss and predictions made using a commercial statistical energy analysis code.

  17. THIRD-GENERATION FOAM BLOWING AGENTS FOR FOAM INSULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of third-generation blowing agents for foam insulation. (NOTE: the search for third-generation foam blowing agents has led to the realization that, as the number of potential substitutes increases, new concerns, such as their potential to act a...

  18. Continuous Aqueous Tritium Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.

    1995-03-29

    Continuous monitoring for tritium in the aqueous effluents of selected Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities is performed using a custom designed system that includes an automated water purification system and a flow-through radiation detection system optimized for tritium. Beads of plastic scintillators coupled with coincidence electronics provide adequate sensitivity (=25kBz/L) for tritium break-through detection int he aqueous discharge stream from these facilities. The tritium effluent water monitors (TEWMs) at SRS provide early warning (within 30 minutes) of an unanticipated release of tritium, supplement the routine sampling surveillances, and mitigate the impact of aqueous plant discharges of tritium releases to the environment.

  19. Continuous aqueous tritium monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.

    1995-10-01

    Continuous monitoring for tritium in the aqueous effluents of selected Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities is performed using a unique system that includes an automated water purification system and a flow-through radiation detection system optimized for tritium. Beads of plastic scintillator coupled with coincidence electronics provide adequate sensitivity (approx.25kBq/L) for tritium breakthrough detection in the aqueous discharge stream from these facilities. The tritium effluent water monitors (TEWMs) at SRS provide early warning (within 30 minutes) of an unanticipated release of tritium, supplement the routine sampling surveillances, and mitigate the impact of aqueous plant discharges of tritium to the environment. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Immobilized catalase on CoFoam hydrophilic polyurethane composite.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Palligarnai T; Como, Karin

    2006-02-01

    Catalase from bovine liver was covalently immobilized on hydrophilic polyurethane composite (CoFoam). The activity of the enzyme was assayed in the decomposition of H2O2 at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. The effects of water-to-prepolymer ratio, the addition of a crosslinking agent, and the utilization of a spacer on enzyme activity were examined. The results of immobilization of the enzyme in a large-scale unit are reported. The advantage of the CoFoam composite lies in the low drop in pressure in a packed-bed reactor at fairly large flow rates. For example, at flow rates of 10-12 L/min, the drop in pressure is typically 3 kPa. Enzymes immobilized on CoFoam represent a novel use as catalysts in packed-bed reactors owing to the low drop in pressure. PMID:16484719

  1. Effect of osteoblastic culture conditions on the structure of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foam scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, A. S.; Zhu, G.; Morris, G. E.; Meszlenyi, R. K.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) foams are an osteoconductive support that holds promise for the development of bone tissue in vitro and implantation into orthopedic defects. Because it is desirable that foams maintain their shape and size, we examined a variety of foams cultured in vitro with osteoblastic cells. Foams were prepared with different porosities and pore sizes by the method of solvent casting/porogen leaching using 80, 85, and 90 wt% NaCl sieved with particle sizes of 150-300 and 300-500 microm and characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Foams seeded with cells were found to have volumes after 7 days in static culture that decreased with increasing porosity: the least porous exhibited no change in volume while the most porous foams decreased by 39 +/- 10%. In addition, a correlation was observed between decreasing foam volume after 7 days in culture and decreasing internal surface area of the foams prior to seeding. Furthermore, foams prepared with the 300-500 microm porogen had lower porosities, greater mean wall thicknesses between adjacent pores, and larger volumes after 7 days in culture than those prepared with the smaller porogen. Two culture conditions for maintaining cells, static and agitated (in a rotary vessel), were found to have similar influences on foam size, cell density, and osteoblastic function for 7 and 14 days in culture. Finally, we examined unseeded foams in aqueous solutions of pH 3.0, 5.0, and 7.4 and found no significant decrease in foam size with degradation. This study demonstrates that adherent osteoblastic cells may collapse very porous PLGA foams prepared by solvent casting/particulate leaching: a potentially undesirable property for repair of orthopedic defects.

  2. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  3. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  4. Starch-Lignin Baked Foams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch-kraft lignin foams were prepared by a baking process. Replacing up to 20% of the starch with lignin has no effect on foam density or overall morphology. At 10% replacement, lignin marginally increases water resistance and modulus of elasticity but decreases strain at maximum stress. At 20% re...

  5. Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Charles; Derzon, Dora K.; Nelson, Jill S.; Rand, Peter B.

    1995-01-01

    Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications.

  6. Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Derzon, D.K.; Nelson, J.S.; Rand, P.B.

    1995-07-11

    Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications. 1 fig.

  7. Rearrangements in 2-Dimensional Foam Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiemann, Dylan; Tewari, Shubha; Liu, Andrea; Knobler, Charles; Durian, Douglas; Dennin, Michael; Langer, Stephen

    1998-03-01

    Foam is a collection of densely-packed polydisperse gas bubbles in liquid. Upon shear, the total interaction energy between bubbles fluctuates: it builds up and then is released via intermittent rearrangements of the bubbles. There is presently no effective experimental method for measuring these energy releases. However, it is possible to observe the relaxation of sheared foam through the analysis of topological rearrangements, or neighbor-switching events (T1 events) footnote A.D. Gopal and D.J. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 2610 (1995) footnote M. Dennin and C.M. Knobler, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 2485 (1997) We have used a simple two-dimensional model of foam proposed by Durian footnote D.J. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 4780 (1995) to study rearrangements under steady-state shear flow. The aim is to study the connection between T1 events, which are typically measured experimentally, and the distribution of energy releases, which is typically measured from simulations. We find that T1 events tend to correspond to the largest energy releases. We present results as a function of strain rate and area fraction of bubbles.

  8. Oil-foam interactions in a micromodel

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, N.S.; Castanier, L.M.

    1997-11-01

    This report presents results of a pore-level visualization study of foam stability in the presence of oil. Many laboratory investigations have been carried out in the absence of oil, but comparatively few have been carried out in the presence of oil. For a field application, where the residual oil saturation may vary from as low as 0 to as high as 40% depending on the recovery method applied, any effect of the oil on foam stability becomes a crucial matter. Sandstone patterns were used in this study. The micromodels used are two-dimensional replicas of the flow path of Berea sandstone etched on to a silicon wafer to a prescribed depth, adapting fabrication techniques from the computer chip industry. After flooding the models up to connate water and residual oil saturations, surfactant flood followed by gas injection to generate foam was done. Visual observations were made using a high resolution microscope and pictures were recorded on videotape before being processed as they appear in this report.

  9. Use of flow calorimetry for determining enthalpies of absorption and the solubility of CO{sub 2} in aqueous monoethanolamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mathonat, C.; Majer, V.; Grolier, J.P.E.

    1998-10-01

    A flow mixing unit adapted to a Setaram C-80 calorimeter was used for measuring enthalpies of absorption of carbon dioxide in a 30 wt% aqueous solution of monoethanolamine (MEA) at three temperatures (313.15, 353.15, and 393.15 K) and three pressures (2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 MPa). Determinations were performed both in the region where the gas is fully absorbed in the solvent and also in the region of concentrations above the saturation. Experimental data served to obtain the integral enthalpies of absorption and for indirect determination of solubility limits. Where comparison was possible, the presented results derived from calorimetric determinations were in reasonable agreement with those obtained from phase equilibria measurements.

  10. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  11. Flame Resistant Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Solimide manufactured by Imi-Tech Corporation, is a lightweight fire resistant material produced under a manufacturing process that allows it to be uniformly foamed. Can be produced in a variety of densities and structural configurations and remains resilient under exposure to temperatures ranging from minus 300 to plus 500 degrees Fahrenheit. Is resistant to open flame and generates virtually no smoke or toxic by-products. Used in aircraft for its superior damping characteristics, lighter weight and fire barrier properties, it's also applicable to ships and surface transportation systems such as transit cars, trains, buses and automobiles.

  12. Closed cell metal foam method

    DOEpatents

    Patten, James W.

    1978-01-01

    Foamed metals and metal alloys which have a closed cellular structure are prepared by heating a metal body containing entrapped inert gas uniformly distributed throughout to a temperature above the melting point of the metal and maintaining the body at this temperature a period of time sufficient to permit the entrapped gas to expand, forming individual cells within the molten metal, thus expanding and foaming the molten metal. After cell formation has reached the desired amount, the foamed molten metal body is cooled to below the melting temperature of the metal. The void area or density of the foamed metal is controlled by predetermining the amount of inert gas entrapped in the metal body and by the period of time the metal body is maintained in the molten state. This method is useful for preparing foamed metals and metal alloys from any metal or other material of which a body containing entrapped inert gas can be prepared.

  13. Structure of random bidisperse foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinelt, Douglas A.; van Swol, Frank B.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2005-02-01

    The Surface Evolver was used to compute the equilibrium microstructure of random soap foams with bidisperse cell-size distributions and to evaluate topological and geometric properties of the foams and individual cells. The simulations agree with the experimental data of Matzke and Nestler for the probability {rho}(F) of finding cells with F faces and its dependence on the fraction of large cells. The simulations also agree with the theory for isotropic Plateau polyhedra (IPP), which describes the F-dependence of cell geometric properties, such as surface area, edge length, and mean curvature (diffusive growth rate); this is consistent with results for polydisperse foams. Cell surface areas are about 10% greater than spheres of equal volume, which leads to a simple but accurate relation for the surface free energy density of foams. The Aboav-Weaire law is not valid for bidisperse foams.

  14. Final Report: Use of Graphite Foam as a Thermal Performance Enhancement of Heavy Hybrid Propulsion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, James William; Conklin, Jim

    2011-06-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's graphite foam has the potential to be used as a heat exchanger for the Army's Future Combat System Manned Ground Vehicle and thus has the potential to improve its thermal performance. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program FLOW3D was used to develop a new CFD model for the graphite foam to be used in the development of a proper heat exchanger. The program was calibrated by first measuring the properties of the solid foams and determining the parameters to be used in the CFD model. Then the model was used to predict within 5% error the performance of finned foam heat sinks. In addition, the f factors and j factors commonly used to predict pressure drop and heat transfer were calculated for both the solid and finned structures. There was some evidence that corrugating the foams would yield higher j/f ratios than state of the art heat exchangers, confirming previously measured data. Because the results show that the CFD model was validated, it is recommended that the funding for Phases 2 through 5 be approved for the design of both the finned heat exchanger using tubes and round fin structures and the solid foam design using corrugated foams. It was found that the new CFD model using FLOW3D can predict both solid foam heat transfer and finned foam heat transfer with the validated model parameters. In addition, it was found that the finned foam structures exhibited j/f ratios that indicate that significant heat transfer is occurring within the fin structures due to aerodynamically induced flow, which is not present in solid aluminum fin structures. It is possible that the foam surfaces can act as turbulators that increase heat transfer without affecting pressure drop, like the vortex generators seen in state of the art heat exchangers. These numbers indicate that the foam can be engineered into an excellent heat exchanger. It was also found that corrugating the solid foams would increase the j/f ratio dramatically, allowing the

  15. Foam structure :from soap froth to solid foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2003-01-01

    The properties of solid foams depend on their structure, which usually evolves in the fluid state as gas bubbles expand to form polyhedral cells. The characteristic feature of foam structure-randomly packed cells of different sizes and shapes-is examined in this article by considering soap froth. This material can be modeled as a network of minimal surfaces that divide space into polyhedral cells. The cell-level geometry of random soap froth is calculated with Brakke's Surface Evolver software. The distribution of cell volumes ranges from monodisperse to highly polydisperse. Topological and geometric properties, such as surface area and edge length, of the entire foam and individual cells, are discussed. The shape of struts in solid foams is related to Plateau borders in liquid foams and calculated for different volume fractions of material. The models of soap froth are used as templates to produce finite element models of open-cell foams. Three-dimensional images of open-cell foams obtained with x-ray microtomography allow virtual reconstruction of skeletal structures that compare well with the Surface Evolver simulations of soap-froth geometry.

  16. Addressing Student Misconceptions Concerning Electron Flow in Aqueous Solutions with Instruction Including Computer Animations and Conceptual Change Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the effects of both computer animations of microscopic chemical processes occurring in a galvanic cell and conceptual-change instruction based on chemical demonstrations on students' conceptions of current flow in electrolyte solutions. Finds that conceptual change instruction was effective at dispelling student misconceptions but…

  17. Mineralogy and morphology of geologic units at Libya Montes, Mars: Ancient aqueously derived outcrops, mafic flows, fluvial features, and impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Tirsch, Daniela; Tornabene, Livio L.; Jaumann, Ralf; McEwen, Alfred S.; McGuire, Patrick C.; Ody, Anouck; Poulet, Francois; Clark, Roger N.; Parente, Mario; McKeown, Nancy K.; Mustard, John F.; Murchie, Scott L.; Voigt, Joana; Aydin, Zeynep; Bamberg, Marlene; Petau, Andreas; Michael, Gregory; Seelos, Frank P.; Hash, Christopher D.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Neukum, Gerhard

    2013-03-01

    There is ample evidence of both ancient and long-lasting fluvial activity and chemical alteration in the Libya Montes region south of Isidis Basin. The region hosts Noachian to Amazonian aged surface rocks with extensive outcrops of olivine- and pyroxene-bearing material. Libya Montes also features surface outcrops and/or deposits hosting Fe/Mg-smectite, Fe/Mg-smectite mixed with carbonate and/or other Fe/Mg-rich phyllosilicates, and Al-smectite. These units likely formed through chemical alteration connected with hydrothermal activity resulting from the formation of the Isidis Basin and/or the pervasive fluvial activity throughout this region. The morphology and stratigraphy of the aqueous and mafic minerals are described using High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment and High Resolution Stereo Camera derived digital terrain models. Analyses of the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars spectra show variations in the chemistry of the Fe/Mg-smectite from nontronite-like exposures with spectral features near 2.29 and 2.4 µm more consistent with Fe3+2OH groups in the mineral structure, and saponite-like outcrops with spectral features near 2.31 and 2.38 µm characteristic of Mg2+3OH groups. These Fe/Mg-smectite bearing materials also have bands near 1.9 µm due to H2O and near 2.5 µm that could be due to the smectite, other phyllosilicates, and carbonates. All regions exhibiting carbonate features near 3.4-3.5 µm also have features consistent with the presence of olivine and Fe/Mg-smectite, indicating that the carbonate signatures occur in rocks likely containing a mixture of these minerals. The Al-smectite-bearing rocks have bands near 1.41, 1.91, and 2.19 µm that are more consistent with beidellite than other Al-phyllosilicates, indicating a higher-temperature or diagenetically processed origin for this material. Our interpretation of the geologic history of this region is that ancient Noachian basaltic crustal materials experienced extensive

  18. The compressive behaviour and constitutive equation of polyimide foam in wide strain rate and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Akifumi; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Horikawa, Keitaro; Tanigaki, Kenichi

    2015-09-01

    These days, polymer foams, such as polyurethane foam and polystyrene foam, are used in various situations as a thermal insulator or shock absorber. In general, however, their strength is insufficient in high temperature environments because of their low glass transition temperature. Polyimide is a polymer which has a higher glass transition temperature and high strength. Its mechanical properties do not vary greatly, even in low temperature environments. Therefore, polyimide foam is expected to be used in the aerospace industry. Thus, the constitutive equation of polyimide foam that can be applied across a wide range of strain rates and ambient temperature is very useful. In this study, a series of compression tests at various strain rates, from 10-3 to 103 s-1 were carried out in order to examine the effect of strain rate on the compressive properties of polyimide foam. The flow stress of polyimide foam increased rapidly at dynamic strain rates. The effect of ambient temperature on the properties of polyimide foam was also investigated at temperature from - 190 °C to 270°∘C. The flow stress decreased with increasing temperature.

  19. Correlation between porous texture and cell seeding efficiency of gas foaming and microfluidic foaming scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Marco; Colosi, Cristina; Mozetic, Pamela; Jaroszewicz, Jakub; Tosato, Alessia; Rainer, Alberto; Trombetta, Marcella; Święszkowski, Wojciech; Dentini, Mariella; Barbetta, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    In the design of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications, morphological parameters such as pore size, shape, and interconnectivity, as well as transport properties, should always be tailored in view of their clinical application. In this work, we demonstrate that a regular and ordered porous texture is fundamental to achieve an even cell distribution within the scaffold under perfusion seeding. To prove our hypothesis, two sets of alginate scaffolds were fabricated using two different technological approaches of the same method: gas-in-liquid foam templating. In the first one, foam was obtained by insufflating argon in a solution of alginate and a surfactant under stirring. In the second one, foam was generated inside a flow-focusing microfluidic device under highly controlled and reproducible conditions. As a result, in the former case the derived scaffold (GF) was characterized by polydispersed pores and interconnects, while in the latter (μFL), the porous structure was highly regular both with respect to the spatial arrangement of pores and interconnects and their monodispersity. Cell seeding within perfusion bioreactors of the two scaffolds revealed that cell population inside μFL scaffolds was quantitatively higher than in GF. Furthermore, seeding efficiency data for μFL samples were characterized by a lower standard deviation, indicating higher reproducibility among replicates. Finally, these results were validated by simulation of local flow velocity (CFD) inside the scaffolds proving that μFL was around one order of magnitude more permeable than GF. PMID:26952471

  20. Carbon foams from different coals

    SciTech Connect

    Montserrat Calvo; Roberto Garcia; Sabino R. Moinelo

    2008-09-15

    Carbon foams were obtained from several bituminous coals with different plasticity and volatile matter content by a two-stage thermal process. The first stage, a controlled carbonization treatment under pressure at 450-500 {sup o}C, is responsible for the final textural properties of the foam. In the second stage, the carbonization product was baked at 1100{sup o}C. The foams produced display a macroporous texture with fluidity, volatile matter content, and maceral composition of the precursor coals, having an influence on the apparent density and the pore size of the resultant porous products. Coals with low fluidity, volatile matter content, and liptinite content give rise to foams with lower pore size and lower apparent density. In the case of high fluidity coals, their foams display an increase of flexural strength with the increasing relative density. In general, the carbon foams obtained in this study display good electrical properties (electrical resistivity comparable to that of commercial foams). 27 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Injectable Foams for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Edna M.; Page, Jonathan M.; Harmata, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The design of injectable biomaterials has attracted considerable attention in recent years. Many injectable biomaterials, such as hydrogels and calcium phosphate cements, have nanoscale pores that limit the rate of cellular migration and proliferation. While introduction of macroporosity has been suggested to increase cellular infiltration and tissue healing, many conventional methods for generating macropores often require harsh processing conditions that preclude their use in injectable foams. In recent years, processes such as porogen leaching, gas foaming, and emulsion-templating have been adapted to generate macroporosity in injectable calcium phosphate cements, hydrogels, and hydrophobic polymers. While some of the more mature injectable foam technologies have been evaluated in clinical trials, there are challenges remaining to be addressed, such as the biocompatibility and ultimate fate of the sacrificial phase used to generate pores within the foam after it sets in situ. Furthermore, while implantable scaffolds can be washed extensively to remove undesirable impurities, all of the components required to synthesize injectable foams must be injected into the defect. Thus, every compound in the foam must be biocompatible and non-cytotoxic at the concentrations utilized. As future research addresses these critical challenges, injectable macroporous foams are anticipated to have an increasingly significant impact on improving patient outcomes for a number of clinical procedures. PMID:24127230

  2. Flexible and monolithic zinc oxide bionanocomposite foams by a bacterial cellulose mediated approach for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peipei; Zhao, Jun; Xuan, Ruifei; Wang, Yun; Zou, Chen; Zhang, Zhiquan; Wan, Yizao; Xu, Yan

    2014-05-14

    The use of self-assembled biomacromolecules in the development of functional bionanocomposite foams is one of the best lessons learned from nature. Here, we show that monolithic, flexible and porous zinc oxide bionanocomposite foams with a hierarchical architecture can be assembled through the mediation of bacterial cellulose. The assembly is achieved by controlled hydrolysis and solvothermal crystallization using a bacterial cellulose aerogel as a template in a non-aqueous polar medium. The bionanocomposite foam with a maximum zinc oxide loading of 70 wt% is constructed of intimately packed spheres of aggregated zinc oxide nanocrystals exhibiting a BET surface area of 92 m(2) g(-1). The zinc oxide bionanocomposite foams show excellent antibacterial activity, which give them potential value as self-supporting wound dressing and water sterilization materials. PMID:24647467

  3. Foam Separation of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis var. niger

    PubMed Central

    Grieves, R. B.; Wang, S. L.

    1967-01-01

    An experimental investigation established the effect of the presence of inorganic salts on the foam separation of Pseudomonas fluorescens and of Bacillus subtilis var. niger (B. globigii) from aqueous suspension by use of a cationic surfactant. For P. fluorescens, 5.0 μeq/ml of NaCl, KCl, Na2SO4, K2SO4, CaCl2, CaSO4, MgCl2, or MgSO4 produced increases in the cell concentration in the residual suspension (not carried into the foam) from 2.9 × 105 up to 1.6 × 106 to 2.8 × 107 cells per milliliter (initial suspensions contain from 3.3 × 107 to 4.8 × 107 cells per milliliter). The exceptional influence of magnesium was overcome by bringing the cells into contact first with the surfactant and then the salt. For B. subtilis, the presence of 5.0 μeq/ml of any of the eight salts increased the residual cell concentration by one order of magnitude from 1.2 × 104 to about 4.0 × 105 cells per milliliter. This occurred regardless of the sequence of contact as long as the surfactant contact period was sufficient. The presence of salts increased collapsed foam volumes with P. fluorescens and decreased collapsed foam volumes with B. subtilis. PMID:4961933

  4. Toxicity studies of a polyurethane rigid foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Schneider, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Relative toxicity tests were performed on a polyurethane foam containing a trimethylopropane-based polyol and an organophosphate flame retardant. The routine screening procedure involved the exposure of four Swiss albino male mice in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber to the products generated by pyrolyzing a 1.00 g sample at a heating rate of 40 deg C/min from 200 to 800 C in the absence of air flow. In addition to the routine screening, experiments were performed with a very rapid rise to 800 C, with nominal 16 and 48 ml/sec air flow and with varying sample rates. No unusual toxicity was observed with either gradual or rapid pyrolysis to 800 C. Convulsions and seizures similar to those previously reported were observed when the materials were essentially flash pyrolyzed at 800 C in the presence of air flow, and the toxicity appeared unusual because of low sample weights required to produce death.

  5. Solvent stimulated actuation of polyurethane-based shape memory polymer foams using dimethyl sulfoxide and ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, A. J.; Weems, A. C.; Hasan, S. M.; Nash, L. D.; Monroe, M. B. B.; Maitland, D. J.

    2016-07-01

    Solvent exposure has been investigated to trigger actuation of shape memory polymers (SMPs) as an alternative to direct heating. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol (EtOH) to stimulate polyurethane-based SMP foam actuation and the required solvent concentrations in water for rapid actuation of hydrophobic SMP foams. SMP foams exhibited decreased T g when submerged in DMSO and EtOH when compared to water submersion. Kinetic DMA experiments showed minimal or no relaxation for all SMP foams in water within 30 min, while SMP foams submerged in EtOH exhibited rapid relaxation within 1 min of submersion. SMP foams expanded rapidly in high concentrations of DMSO and EtOH solutions, where complete recovery over 30 min was observed in DMSO concentrations greater than 90% and in EtOH concentrations greater than 20%. This study demonstrates that both DMSO and EtOH are effective at triggering volume recovery of polyurethane-based SMP foams, including in aqueous environments, and provides promise for use of this actuation technique in various applications.

  6. A non-aqueous redox flow battery based on tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of iron(II) and cobalt(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xueqi; Zhao, Yicheng; Li, Yongdan

    2015-10-01

    A novel non-aqueous redox flow battery employing tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of iron(II) and cobalt(II) as active species is proposed and investigated for energy storage application. The [Fe(phen)3]2+/3+ and [Co(phen)3]+/2+ (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) redox couples are used as the positive and negative active materials, respectively, in an electrolyte consisting of TEAPF6 and acetonitrile. Electrochemical measurements display that the two redox couples possess a superior and stable potential difference (E°) with a value of 2.1 V vs. Ag/Ag+. The charge-discharge characteristics of the cell show that the charging and discharging current densities have important influences on the battery performance. Stable cycling performance is obtained with low charge-discharge current densities with an electrolyte flow rate of 25 mL min-1. The coulomb, voltage and energy efficiencies achieve up to 80%, 40% and 39%, respectively.

  7. Method of casting pitch based foam

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2002-01-01

    A process for producing molded pitch based foam is disclosed which minimizes cracking. The process includes forming a viscous pitch foam in a container, and then transferring the viscous pitch foam from the container into a mold. The viscous pitch foam in the mold is hardened to provide a carbon foam having a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts.

  8. Microgravity foam structure and rheology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durian, Douglas J.; Gopal, Anthony D.

    1994-01-01

    Our long-range objective is to establish the fundamental interrelationship between the microscopic structure and dynamics of foams and their macroscopic stability and rheology. Foam structure and dynamics are to be measured directly and noninvasively through the use and development of novel multiple light scattering techniques such as diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS). Foam rheology is to be measured in a custom rheometer which allows simultaneous optical access for multiple light drainage of liquid from in between gas bubbles as the liquid:gas volume fraction in increased towards the rigidity-loss transition.

  9. Modeling of Compositional Effects of Foam Assisted CO2 Storage Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi Beni, A.; Varavei, A.; Farajzadeh, R.; Delshad, M.

    2012-12-01

    Foaming of carbon dioxide (CO2, e.g. from fossil-fuel power plants) has been proposed as a possible strategy to resolve the limitations of direct disposal of CO2 into (saline) aquifers. Such limitations include gravity segregation that may damage the caprock and aquifer rock property alteration as a result of geochemical interactions. Foam may also block the CO2 leakage paths, resulting in an overall storage security enhancement. In this regard, specific aspects of composition and type of gas (N2 vs. CO2) may affect the foaming properties of gas-surfactant systems. The aim of this study is to determine these effects on the foaming properties of gas-surfactant solutions. To this end, we study the physics of foam assisted CO2 storage by modeling coreflood experiments. Different options such as simplified population balance foam model and a table-look-up approach were used to couple the fluid flow and mass transport equations in a reservoir simulator. Both laboratory and numerical results show that three regions along the flow direction can be distinguished: (i) an upstream region characterized by low liquid saturation, (ii) a region downstream of the foam front where the liquid saturation is still unchanged with a value of one and (iii) a frontal region characterized by a mixing of flowing foam and liquid, exhibiting fine fingering effects. It is also shown that the extent of the fingering behavior caused by the rock heterogeneity depends on foam strength. Additionally, permeation of gas through foam films is a strong function of water salinity and appears to have significant impact on foam in CO2 storage. It further turns out that the amount of dissolved CO2 in brine can be considerable and, therefore, the effect of water solubility cannot be neglected in simulation studies. In summary, the differences in the foaming behavior of nitrogen and carbon dioxide can be explained by the differences in their physical properties of solubility in water, interfacial tension, p

  10. A NOVEL ENVIRONMENT FRIENDLY METHOD FOR EXPANSION AND MOLDING OF POLYMERIC FOAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the project is to develop an environment friendly, novel and efficient alternative process for expansion and molding of polymeric foam. Spherical, expandable polymer beads are prepared from liquid monomer suspended in an aqueous medium, containing an expansion...

  11. Thermal resistance of superinsulation/foam composite panels

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.; Graves, R.S.; Childs, K.W.

    1996-05-01

    Laboratory data are presented on the thermal resistance of composite panels that incorporate superinsulation embedded in urethane foam. Composite panels were fabricated using four types of advanced insulations (three types of evacuated panel superinsulation and one type of gas-filled panel), and three foam blowing agents (CFC-11, HCFC-141b, and HCFC-142b/22 blend). Panels were also fabricated with only the urethane foam to serve as a baseline. Thermal measurements were performed using an ASTM C 518 Heat Flow Meter Apparatus. The thermal resistances of the panels were measured over a two-year period to detect whether any significant changes occurred. A computer model was used to analyze the data, normalizing for differences in size of the advanced insulations, and extrapolating to different sizes of composite panels.

  12. Thermal resistance of composite panels containing superinsulation and urethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.; Graves, R.S.; Childs, K.W.

    1996-09-01

    Laboratory data are presented on the thermal resistance of composite panels that incorporate superinsulation embedded in urethane foam. Composite panels were fabricated using four types of advanced insulations (three types of evacuated panel superinsulation and one type of gas-filled panel), and three foam blowing agents (CFC-11, HCFC-141b, and HCFC-142b/22 blend). Panels were also fabricated with only the urethane foam to serve as a baseline. Thermal measurements were performed using an ASTM C 518 Heat Flow Meter Apparatus. The thermal resistances of the panels were measured over a two-year period to detect whether any significant changes occurred. A computer model was used to analyze the data, adjusting for differences in size of the advanced insulations, and extrapolating to different sizes of composite panels.

  13. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  14. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  15. Metal foam heat exchangers for thermal management of fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odabaee, M.; Hooman, K.

    2012-05-01

    The present study explores the possibility of using metal foams for thermal management of fuel cells so that air-cooled fuel cell stacks can be commercialized as replacements for currently-available water-cooled counterparts. Experimental studies have been conducted to examine the heat transfer enhancement from a thin metal foam layer sandwiched between two bipolar plates of a cell. To do this, effects of the key parameters including the free stream velocity and characteristics of metal foam such as porosity, permeability, and form drag coefficient on heat and fluid flow are investigated. The improvements as a result of the application of metal foam layers on fuel cell systems efficiency have been analyzed and discussed. Non-optimized results have shown that to remove the same amount of generated heat, the air-cooled fuel cell systems using aluminum foams require half of the pumping power compared to water-cooled fuel cell systems.

  16. Aqueous U(VI) interaction with magnetite nanoparticles in a mixed flow reactor system: HR-XANES study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidchenko, I.; Heberling, F.; Kvashnina, KO; Finck, N.; Schild, D.; Bohnert, E.; Schäfer, T.; Rothe, J.; Geckeis, H.; Vitova, T.

    2016-05-01

    The redox variations and changes in local atomic environment of uranium (U) interacted with the magnetite nanoparticles were studied in a proof of principle experiment by the U L3 and M4 edges high energy resolution X-ray absorption near edge structure (HR-XANES) technique. We designed and applied a mixed flow reactor (MFR) set-up to maintain dynamic flow conditions during U-magnetite interactions. Formation of hydrolyzed, bi- and poly-nuclear U species were excluded by slow continuous injection of U(VI) (10-6 M) and pH control integrated in the MFR set-up. The applied U HR-XANES technique is more sensitive to minor changes in the U redox states and bonding compared to the conventional XANES method. Major U(VI) contribution in uranyl type of bonding is found in the magnetite nanoparticles after three days operation time of the MFR. Indications for shortening of the U-Oaxial bond length for the magnetite compared to the maghemite system are present too.

  17. Understanding Aqueous Electrolyte Stability through Combined Computational and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: A Case Study on Vanadium Redox Flow Battery Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.; Nie, Zimin; Walter, Eric D.; Hu, Jian Z.; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Redox flow battery (RFB) is a promising candidate for energy storage component in designing resilient grid scale power supply due to the advantage of the separation of power and energy. However, poorly understood chemical and thermal stability issues of electrolytes currently limit the performance of RFB. Designing of high performance stable electrolytes requires comprehensive knowledge about the molecular level solvation structure and dynamics of their redox active species. The molecular level understanding of detrimental V2O5 precipitation process led to successful designing of mixed acid based electrolytes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB). The higher stability of mixed acid based electrolytes is attributed to the choice of hydrochloric acid as optimal co-solvent, which provides chloride anions for ligand exchange process in vanadium solvation structure. The role of chloride counter anion on solvation structure and dynamics of vanadium species were studied using combined magnetic resonance spectroscopy and DFT based theoretical methods. Finally, the solvation phenomenon of multiple vanadium species and their impact on VRFB electrolyte chemical stability were discussed.

  18. High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam

    DOEpatents

    Mead, Judith W.; Montoya, Orelio J.; Rand, Peter B.; Willan, Vernon O.

    1984-01-01

    Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO.sub.2 in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

  19. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  20. Amorphous microcellular polytetrafluoroethylene foam film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chongzheng

    1991-11-01

    We report herein the preparation of novel low-density ultramicrocellular fluorocarbon foams and their application. These fluorocarbon foams are of interest for the biochemistry arena in numerous applications including foodstuff, pharmacy, wine making, beer brewery, fermentation medical laboratory, and other processing factories. All of those require good quality processing programs in which, after eliminating bacterium and virus, compressed air is needed. Ordinarily, compressed air contains bacterium and virus, its size is 0.01 - 2 micrometers fluorocarbon foam films. Having average porous diameter 0.04 - 0.1 micrometers , these are stable to high temperature (280 degree(s)C) and chemical environments, and generally have good engineering and mechanical properties (e.g., low coefficient of thermal expansion, high modulus, and good dimensional stability). Our new process for preparing low density fluorocarbon foams provides materials with unique properties. As such, they offer the possibility for being superior to earlier materials for a number of the filter applications mentioned.

  1. Ceramic Foams for TPS Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockpoole, Mairead

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic foams have potential in many areas of Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) including acreage and tile leading edges as well as being suitable as a repair approach for re-entry vehicles. NASA Ames is conducting ongoing research in developing lower-density foams from pre-ceramic polymer routes. One of the key factors to investigate, when developing new materials for re-entry applications, is their oxidation behavior in the appropriate re-entry environment which can be simulated using ground based arc jet (plasma jet) testing. Arc jet testing is required to provide the appropriate conditions (stagnation pressures, heat fluxes, enthalpies, heat loads and atmospheres) encountered during flight. This work looks at the response of ceramic foams (Si systems) exposed to simulated reentry environments and investigates the influence of microstructure and composition on the material? response. Other foam properties (mechanical and thermal) will also be presented.

  2. Microcellular foams via phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    A study of wide variety of processes for making plastic foams shows that phase separation processes for polymers from solutions offers the most viable methods for obtaining rigid plastic foams which met the physical requirements for fusion target designs. Four general phase separation methods have been shown to give polymer foams with densities less than 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ and cell sizes of 30..mu..m or less. These methods involve the utilization of non-solvent, chemical or thermal cooling processes to achieve a controlled phase separation wherein either two distinct phases are obtained where the polymer phase is a continuous phase or two bicontinuous phases are obtained where both the polymer and solvent are interpenetrating, continuous, labyrinthine phases. Subsequent removal of the solvent gives the final foam structure.

  3. Process for making carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2000-01-01

    The process obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  4. Advances in cryogenic foam insulations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.; Watts, C. R.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a discretely oriented thread-reinforced polyurethane foam thermal insulation system for liquid hydrogen fuel tanks. The 3-D foam and glass liner composite is designed to be adhesively bonded to the inside surface of the tank wall and to be in direct contact with liquid hydrogen. All elements of this insulation composite are capable of sustaining the loads and environmental conditions imposed by testing under simulated Space Shuttle vehicle requirements at temperatures between -423 and +350 F.

  5. Supercapacitors based on carbon foams

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.; Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    A high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes is described. The foams, derived from the pyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers, are high density (0.1 g/cc-1.0 g/cc) electrically conductive and have high surface areas (400 m.sup.2 /g-1000 m.sup.2 /g). Capacitances on the order of several tens of farad per gram of electrode are achieved.

  6. Supercapacitors based on carbon foams

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1993-11-09

    A high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes is described. The foams, derived from the pyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers, are high density (0.1 g/cc-1.0 g/cc) electrically conductive and have high surface areas (400 m[sup 2]/g-1000 m[sup 2]/g). Capacitances on the order of several tens of farad per gram of electrode are achieved. 9 figures.

  7. Equipment compatibility and logistics assessment for containment foam deployment.

    SciTech Connect

    McRoberts, Vincent M.; Martell, Mary-Alena; Jones, Joseph A.

    2005-09-01

    The deployment of the Joint Technical Operations Team (JTOT) is evolving toward a lean and mobile response team. As a result, opportunities to support more rapid mobilization are being investigated. This study investigates three specific opportunities including: (1) the potential of using standard firefighting equipment to support deployment of the aqueous foam concentrate (AFC-380); (2) determining the feasibility and needs for regional staging of equipment to reduce the inventory currently mobilized during a JTOT response; and (3) determining the feasibility and needs for development of the next generation AFC-380 to reduce the volume of foam concentrate required for a response. This study supports the need to ensure that requirements for alternative deployment schemes are understood and in place to support improved response activities.

  8. Hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation and multi-angle light scattering investigation of the size, shape and metal-release of silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium for nano-risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Marassi, Valentina; Casolari, Sonia; Roda, Barbara; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Panzavolta, Silvia; Tofail, Syed A M; Ortelli, Simona; Delpivo, Camilla; Blosi, Magda; Costa, Anna Luisa

    2015-03-15

    Due to the increased use of silver nanoparticles in industrial scale manufacturing, consumer products and nanomedicine reliable measurements of properties such as the size, shape and distribution of these nano particles in aqueous medium is critical. These properties indeed affect both functional properties and biological impacts especially in quantifying associated risks and identifying suitable risk-mediation strategies. The feasibility of on-line coupling of a fractionation technique such as hollow-fiber flow field flow fractionation (HF5) with a light scattering technique such as MALS (multi-angle light scattering) is investigated here for this purpose. Data obtained from such a fractionation technique and its combination thereof with MALS have been compared with those from more conventional but often complementary techniques e.g. transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence. The combination of fractionation and multi angle light scattering techniques have been found to offer an ideal, hyphenated methodology for a simultaneous size-separation and characterization of silver nanoparticles. The hydrodynamic radii determined by fractionation techniques can be conveniently correlated to the mean average diameters determined by multi angle light scattering and reliable information on particle morphology in aqueous dispersion has been obtained. The ability to separate silver (Ag(+)) ions from silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) via membrane filtration during size analysis is an added advantage in obtaining quantitative insights to its risk potential. Most importantly, the methodology developed in this article can potentially be extended to similar characterization of metal-based nanoparticles when studying their functional effectiveness and hazard potential. PMID:25698553

  9. Removal of High Concentration Chromium by a Foam-separating Technique Using Casein Proteins as a Foaming Reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Futoshi

    Foam separation of high concentration chromium in leather tanning wastewater was investigated using casein protein as a foaming reagent5mL of5w/v% ammonium acetate buffer was added to the sample chromium water. After adjusting the pH to 9.0,4g/L concentrations of casein and gelatin solution were added to recovery the coagulating flocs of chromium resulting foam separation. The sample water containing chromium flocs was incased in reactor, then mixed with distilled water and 1mL of ethanol to sum 200mL total. The foam separation was performed at time intervals of 3min with an air flow rate of 300mL/min. With casein reagent, the removal rate of chromium was not influenced by the presence of NaCl, however, the rate decreased tendency using with the use of gelatin. The proposed method, utilizing 4g/L of casein solution with water, was not influenced by the presence of calcium (<34mM), magnesium (<1mM), carbonate (<0.5mM), bicarbonate (<1.2mM) nor sulfate (<350mM) ions, and is ideal for foam separation in chromium concentrations of about 100mgCr/L.

  10. An Inexpensive Aqueous Flow Battery for Large-Scale Electrical Energy Storage Based on Water-Soluble Organic Redox Couples

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B; Hoober-Burkhardt, L; Wang, F; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2014-05-21

    We introduce a novel Organic Redox Flow Battery (ORBAT), for Meeting the demanding requirements of cost, eco-friendliness, and durability for large-scale energy storage. ORBAT employs two different water-soluble organic redox couples on the positive and negative side of a flow battery. Redox couples such as quinones are particularly attractive for this application. No precious metal catalyst is needed because of the fast proton-coupled electron transfer processes. Furthermore, in acid media, the quinones exhibit good chemical stability. These properties render quinone-based redox couples very attractive for high-efficiency metal-free rechargeable batteries. We demonstrate the rechargeability of ORBAT with anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid on the negative side, and 1,2-dihydrobenzoquinone- 3,5-disulfonic acid on the positive side. The ORBAT cell uses a membrane-electrode assembly configuration similar to that used in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Such a battery can be charged and discharged multiple times at high faradaic efficiency without any noticeable degradation of performance. We show that solubility and mass transport properties of the reactants and products are paramount to achieving high current densities and high efficiency. The ORBAT configuration presents a unique opportunity for developing an inexpensive and sustainable metal-free rechargeable battery for large-scale electrical energy storage. (C) The Author(s) 2014. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (CC BY, http://creativecommons.orgilicenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse of the work in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. All rights reserved.

  11. Stability of metallic foams studied under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wübben, Th; Stanzick, H.; Banhart, J.; Odenbach, S.

    2003-01-01

    Metal foams are prepared by mixing a metal powder and a gas-releasing blowing agent, by densifying the mix to a dense precursor and finally foaming by melting the powder compact. The foaming process of aluminium foams is monitored in situ by x-ray radioscopy. One observes that foam evolution is accompanied by film rupture processes which lead to foam coalescence. In order to elucidate the importance of oxides for foam stability, lead foams were manufactured from lead powders having two different oxide contents. The two foam types were generated on Earth and under weightlessness during parabolic flights. The measurements show that the main function of oxide particles is to prevent coalescence, while their influence on bulk viscosity of the melt is of secondary importance.

  12. Foam shell project: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Overturf, G.; Reibold, B.; Cook, B.; Schroen-Carey, D.

    1994-03-25

    The authors report on their work to produce a foam shell target for two possible applications: (1) as liquid-layered cryogenic target on Omega Upgrade, and (2) as a back-up design for the NIF. This target consists of a roughly 1 mm diameter and 100 {mu}m thick spherical low-density foam shell surrounding a central void. The foam will be slightly overfilled with liquid D{sub 2} or DT, the overfilled excess being symmetrically distributed on the inside of the shell and supported by thermal gradient techniques. The outside of the foam is overcoated with full density polymer which must be topologically smooth. The technology for manufacturing this style of foam shell involves microencapsulation techniques and has been developed by the Japanese at ILE. Their goal is to determine whether this technology can be successfully adapted to meet US ICF objectives. To this end a program of foam shell development has been initiated at LLNL in collaboration with both the General Atomics DOE Target Fabrication Contract Corporation and the Target Fabrication Group at LLE.

  13. Strain compatibility tests for sprayed foam cryogenic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, W. L.; Kimberlin, D. O.

    1970-01-01

    Mechanical stress applied to foam-coated aluminum alloy specimens maintained at cryogenic temperature simulates actual use conditions of the foam insulation. The testing reveals defects in the polyurethane foam or in the foam to metal bond.

  14. Development of drilling foams for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, W.J.; Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; Chenevert, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of foam drilling fluids in geothermal applications is addressed. A description of foams - what they are, how they are used, their properties, equipment required to use them, the advantages and disadvantages of foams, etc. - is presented. Geothermal applications are discussed. Results of industry interviews presented indicate significant potential for foams, but also indicate significant technical problems to be solved to achieve this potential. Testing procedures and results of tests on representative foams provide a basis for work to develop high-temperature foams.

  15. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen

    2005-03-16

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research is to lay the groundwork for more-applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media.

  16. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen

    2005-01-05

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research will lay the groundwork for more applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media.

  17. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, F. E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de; Schneider, A. E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de; Elsner, P.

    2014-05-15

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO{sub 2} balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength)

  18. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, F.; Schneider, A.; Elsner, P.

    2014-05-01

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO2 balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength).

  19. Validation of a Polyimide Foam Model for Use in Transmission Loss Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Kwanwoo; Bolton, J. Stuart; Cano, Roberto J.; Weiser, Erik S.; Jensen, Brian J.; Silcox, Rich; Howerton, Brian M.; Maxon, John; Wang, Tongan; Lorenzi, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    The work described in this paper was focused on the use of a new polyimide foam in a double wall sound transmission loss application. Recall that polyimide foams are functionally attractive, compared to polyurethane foams, for example, owing to their fire resistance. The foam considered here was found to have a flow resistivity that was too high for conventional acoustical applications, and as a result, it was processed by partial crushing to lower the flow resistivity into an acceptable range. Procedures for measuring the flow resistivity and Young s modulus of the material have been described, as was an inverse characterization procedure for estimating the remaining Biot parameters based on standing wave tube measurements of transmission loss and absorption coefficient. The inverse characterization was performed using a finite element model implementation of the Biot poro-elastic material theory. Those parameters were then used to predict the sound transmission loss of a double panel system lined with polyimide foam, and the predictions were compared with full-scale transmission loss measurements. The agreement between the two was reasonable, especially in the high and low frequency limits; however, it was found that the SEA model resulted in an under-prediction of the transmission loss in the mid-frequency range. Nonetheless, it was concluded that the performance of polyimide foam could be predicted using conventional poro-elastic material models and that polyimide foam may offer an attractive alternative to other double wall linings in certain situations: e.g., when fire resistance is a key issue. Future work will concentrate on reducing the density of the foam to values similar to those used in current aircraft sidewall treatments, and developing procedures to improve the performance of the foam in transmission loss applications.

  20. Preparation and characterization of novel foamed porous glass-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sasmal, Nibedita; Garai, Mrinmoy; Karmakar, Basudeb

    2015-05-15

    Foamed glass-ceramics without using foaming agent have been synthesized in a novel glass system of SrO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-M{sub x}O{sub y} (where M = Ba, Mg, La, Ce and Ni) by a simple process of powder sintering. The glass and glass-ceramics are characterized by dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), heating stage microscopy (HSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), optical microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). All the glasses formed are amorphous and the glass transition temperature and dilatometric softening temperature of these glasses are found to be in the range 673–678 °C and 706–728 °C respectively. The glasses are highly stable as indicated by the DSC evaluated glass stability parameters of the range 195–240 °C. Quantitative sintering study of glass powder compacts revealed swelling in the samples with NiO and CeO{sub 2} corresponding to a geometry change of 75 and 108% around 900 °C respectively. With reference to this finding the glass powder compacts are heated to 900 °C and the foamed glass-ceramics are obtained. Characteristic crystalline silicate phases have been identified in the XRD studies and their microstructures are recorded by FESEM. Optical microscope study of the foamed samples revealed formation of bigger foamed cavity with residual pores in samples with NiO and CeO{sub 2} in comparison to samples with BaO, MgO and La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The mean pore diameters of the samples with NiO and CeO{sub 2} are determined to be 43 and 32 μm, and their respective porosities are 2.34 and 1.82 cm{sup 3}/g respectively. Thus NiO and CeO{sub 2} are found to be very effective to obtain foamed glass-ceramics without using foaming agent by the viscous flow sintering of fine glass powder compacts along with the reduction of the respective polyvalent ions. - Highlights: • Synthesis of foamed porous glass

  1. Application of low density foam pigs offshore Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, P.C.R.; Alves, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    In complex offshore installations, such as in the Campos Basin, it is relatively common to encounter pipeline systems where conventional pigs can not be run due to several factors. Changing pipe diameters, and presence of wet X-mas trees and manifolds are the most troublesome ones. In this work a new successful concept of using low cost and low density foam pigs for both liquid removal in wet-gas pipelines, and paraffin removal in oil and multiphase flow pipelines, is presented. Experimental work conducted in a 4 in laboratory facility, including a small scale glass manifold and a 6 in steel manifold, proved these pigs to be very effective. The performance of almost all kind of flexible polyurethane foams manufactured in Brazil is evaluated. Three field tests are also reported. The first low density foam pig operation was performed on a 127 mile long, 16 in diameter wet-gas offshore pipeline where the foam pig showed even higher liquid removal efficiency than the conventional inflatable spheres. The second operation was performed on a 6 mile long, 12 in diameter multiphase production offshore pipeline, which has never been pigged during its 9 year operation, and resulted in the removal of approximately 200 tons of paraffin. Finally, the third successful case is the cleaning of a 2 mile long flexible flow line of a subsea completed satellite well, in which the foam pigs were sent through a 2.5 in gas lift line, through a wet x-mas tree, not designed to be pigged, and then back through the 4 in production flow line. In spite of the fact that this paper is focusing on condensate and paraffin removal in pipeline, the basic principles can be applied to several kinds of operations: general pipeline cleaning; products separation in pipeline; corrosion evaluation; chemical product application.

  2. Foaming of mixtures of pure hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. V.; Woods, W. W.

    1950-01-01

    Mixtures of pure liquid hydrocarbons are capable of foaming. Nine hydrocarbons were mixed in pairs, in all possible combinations, and four proportions of each combination. These mixtures were sealed in glass tubes, and the foaming was tested by shaking. Mixtures of aliphatic with other aliphatic hydrocarbons, or of alkyl benzenes with other alkyl benzenes, did not foam. Mixtures of aliphatic hydrocarbons with alkyl benzenes did foam. The proportions of the mixtures greatly affected the foaming, the maximum foaming of 12 of 20 pairs being at the composition 20 percent aliphatic hydrocarbon, 80 percent alkyl benzene. Six seconds was the maximum foam lifetime of any of these mixtures. Aeroshell 120 lubricating oil was fractionated into 52 fractions and a residue by extraction with acetone in a fractionating extractor. The index of refraction, foam lifetime, color, and viscosity of these fractions were measured. Low viscosity and high index fractions were extracted first. The viscosity of the fractions extracted rose and the index decreased as fractionation proceeded. Foam lifetimes and color were lowest in the middle fractions. Significance is attached to the observation that none of the foam lifetimes of the fractions or residue is as high as the foam lifetime of the original Aeroshell, indicating that the foaming is not due to a particular foaming constituent, but rather to the entire mixture.

  3. Size and mass determination of silver nanoparticles in an aqueous matrix using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer and ultraviolet-visible detectors.

    PubMed

    Geiss, Otmar; Cascio, Claudia; Gilliland, Douglas; Franchini, Fabio; Barrero-Moreno, Josefa

    2013-12-20

    The powerful antibacterial properties of engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have, in recent years, led to a great increase in their use in consumer products such as textiles and personal care products offers. This widespread and often indiscriminate use of nano-silver is inevitably increasing the probability that such materials be accidentally or deliberately lost into the environment. Once present in the environment the normally useful antibacterial properties of the silver may instead become a potential hazard to both man and the environment. In the face of such concerns it therefore desirable to develop easy, reliable and sensitive analytical methods for the determination of nano-sized silver in various matrices. This paper describes a method for the simultaneous determination of particles-size and mass-concentration of citrate-stabilized silver nano-particles in aqueous matrices by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation coupled to an ICP-mass spectrometer and UV/vis detector. In particular, this work has evaluated the use of pre-channel injections of mono-dispersed silver nano-particles as a means of accurate size and mass-calibration. The suitability of the method as a means to generate accurate and reliable results was verified by determination of parameters such as precision under repeatability conditions, linearity, accuracy, recovery and analytical sensitivity. PMID:24238704

  4. Performance evaluation of OpenFOAM on many-core architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Brzobohatý, Tomáš; Říha, Lubomír; Karásek, Tomáš Kozubek, Tomáš

    2015-03-10

    In this article application of Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM) C++ libraries for solving engineering problems on many-core architectures is presented. Objective of this article is to present scalability of OpenFOAM on parallel platforms solving real engineering problems of fluid dynamics. Scalability test of OpenFOAM is performed using various hardware and different implementation of standard PCG and PBiCG Krylov iterative methods. Speed up of various implementations of linear solvers using GPU and MIC accelerators are presented in this paper. Numerical experiments of 3D lid-driven cavity flow for several cases with various number of cells are presented.

  5. Porous media properties of reticulated shape memory polymer foams and mock embolic coils for aneurysm treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Shape memory polymer (SMP) foams are being investigated as an alternative aneurysm treatment method to embolic coils. The goal of both techniques is the reduction of blood flow into the aneurysm and the subsequent formation of a stable thrombus, which prevents future aneurysm rupture. The purpose of this study is to experimentally determine the parameters, permeability and form factor, which are related to the flow resistance imposed by both media when subjected to a pressure gradient. Methods The porous media properties—permeability and form factor—of SMP foams and mock embolic coils (MECs) were measured with a pressure gradient method by means of an in vitro closed flow loop. We implemented the Forchheimer-Hazen-Dupuit-Darcy equation to calculate these properties. Mechanically-reticulated SMP foams were fabricated with average cell sizes of 0.7E-3 and 1.1E-3 m, while the MECs were arranged with volumetric packing densities of 11-28%. Results The permeability of the SMP foams was an order of magnitude lower than that of the MECs. The form factor differed by up to two orders of magnitude and was higher for the SMP foams in all cases. The maximum flow rate of all samples tested was within the inertial laminar flow regime, with Reynolds numbers ranging between 1 and 35. Conclusions The SMP foams impose a greater resistance to fluid flow compared to MECs, which is a result of increased viscous and inertial losses. These results suggest that aneurysms treated with SMP foam will have flow conditions more favorable for blood stasis than those treated with embolic coils having packing densities ≤ 28%. PMID:24120254

  6. Stray-field NMR diffusion q-space diffraction imaging of monodisperse coarsening foams.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kieron; Burbidge, Adam; Apperley, David; Hodgkinson, Paul; Markwell, Fraser A; Topgaard, Daniel; Hughes, Eric

    2016-08-15

    The technique of stray field diffusion NMR is adapted to study the diffusion properties of water in monodisperse wet foams. We show for the first time, that the technique is capable of observing q-space diffusion diffraction peaks in monodisperse aqueous foams with initial bubble sizes in the range of 50-85μm. The position of the peak maximum can be correlated simply to the bubble size in the foam leading to a technique that can investigate the stability of the foam over time. The diffusion technique, together with supplementary spin-spin relaxation analysis of the diffusion data is used to follow the stability and coarsening behaviour of monodisperse foams with a water fraction range between 0.24 and 0.33. The monodisperse foams remain stable for a period of hours in terms of the initial bubble size. The duration of this stable period correlates to the initial size of the bubbles. Eventually the bubbles begin to coarsen and this is observed in changes in the position of the diffusion diffraction maxima. PMID:27179175

  7. Development of carbon coatings for cordierite foams: an alternative to cordierite honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Hódar, Francisco José; Morales-Torres, Sergio; Ribeiro, Filipa; Silva, Elisabete Ribeiro; Pérez-Cadenas, Agustín Francisco; Carrasco-Marín, Francisco; Oliveira, Fernando A Costa

    2008-04-01

    Cordierite foams were prepared by replication of polyurethane foams and were coated with three types of carbon xerogels. The dip coating and synthesis conditions were optimized, and the coated foams were characterized exhaustively. The composition of the starting solution, coat loading, and carbonization temperature are the most important parameters determining both textural and mechanical properties. Carbon xerogel coatings obtained from aqueous solutions of resorcinol (R) and formaldehyde (F) are macro-, meso-, and microporous but present the greatest shrinkage, which causes a loss of adhesion between ceramic foams and carbon coatings. The coatings from polyfurfuryl alcohol (PFA) and RF-poly(vinyl butyral) (Butvar) resin are highly microporous and present very good adhesion even after carbonization. In all cases, coatings induce the improvement of the mechanical properties, which is related to the fact that the coating fills the defects present in the cordierite foams, thereby affecting both the rigidity and the way cracks propagate through the coated samples. These materials, due to the synergetic role of the highly porous coatings and the tortuous channels of the ceramic foams, are suitable materials for adsorption or catalytic treatments of fluids. PMID:18290682

  8. Metal-doped organic foam and method of making same. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, J.A.

    Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for producing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers.

  9. Starch graft poly(methyl acrylate) loose-fill foam: preparation, properties and degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Gordon, S H; Imam, S H

    2004-01-01

    Starch graft poly(methyl acrylate) (S-g-PMA) was prepared by ceric ion initiation of methyl acrylate in an aqueous corn starch slurry (prime starch) which maximized the accessibility of the starch for graft polymerization. A new ceric ion reaction sequence was established as starch-initiator-methyl acrylate followed by addition of a small amount of ceric ion solution when the graft polymerization was almost complete to quench the reaction. As a result of this improved procedure, no unreacted methyl acrylate monomer remained, and thus, essentially no ungrafted poly(methyl acrylate) homopolymer was formed in the final grafted product. Quantities of the high purity S-g-PMA so prepared in pilot scale were converted to resin pellets and loose-fill foam by single screw and twin screw extrusion. The use of prime starch significantly improved the physical properties of the final loose-fill foam, in comparison to foam produced from regular dry corn starch. The S-g-PMA loose-fill foam had compressive strength and resiliency comparable to expanded polystyrene but higher bulk density. The S-g-PMA loose-fill foam also had better moisture and water resistance than other competitive starch-based materials. Studies indicated that the starch portion in S-g-PMA loose-fill foam biodegraded rapidly, whereas poly(methyl acrylate) remained relatively stable under natural environmental conditions. PMID:14715032

  10. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOEpatents

    Kosny, Jan; Gaskin, Sally

    2009-10-20

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  11. Foam formation in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis C.; Mcmanus, Samuel P.; Matthews, John; Patel, Darayas

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus that produced the first polyurethane foam in low gravity has been described. The chemicals were mixed together in an apparatus designed for operation in low gravity. Mixing was by means of stirring the chemicals with an electric motor and propeller in a mixing chamber. The apparatus was flown on Consort 1, the first low-gravity materials payload launched by a commercial rocket launch team. The sounding rocket flight produced over 7 min of low gravity during which a polyurethane spheroidal foam of approximately 2300 cu cm was formed. Photographs of the formation of the foam during the flight show the development of the spheroidal form. This begins as a small sphere and grows to approximately a 17-cm-diam spheroid. The apparatus will be flown again on subsequent low-gravity flights.

  12. Microcellular carbon foam and method

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.

    1993-05-04

    A microcellular carbon foam is characterized by a density in the range of about 30 to 1,000 mg/cm[sup 3], substantially uniform distribution of cell sizes of diameters less than 100 [mu]m with a majority of the cells being of a diameter of less than about 10 [mu]m. The foam has a well interconnected strut morphology providing open porosity, and an expanded d(002) X-ray turbostatic spacing greater than 3.50 angstroms. The precursor for the carbon foam is prepared by the phase inversion of polyacrylonitrile in a solution consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal halide and a phase inversion solvent for the polyacrylonitrile.

  13. Foam: The "Right Stuff" for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Imi-Tech Corporation, in cooperation with Johnson Space Center, introduced the Solimide AC-500 series of polyimide foam products designed to meet the needs of the aircraft/aerospace industry. These foams accomodate the requirements of state-of-the-art insulation systems. Solimide polyimide foams are currently used in defense, industrial and commercial applications.

  14. Highly concentrated foam formulation for blast mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D.; Gao, Huizhen

    2010-12-14

    A highly concentrated foam formulation for blast suppression and dispersion mitigation for use in responding to a terrorism incident involving a radiological dispersion device. The foam formulation is more concentrated and more stable than the current blast suppression foam (AFC-380), which reduces the logistics burden on the user.

  15. Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, Jonathan D

    2011-07-05

    Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

  16. Foam formation and mitigation in a three-phase gas-liquid-particulate system.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Krishna; Nikolov, Alex; Wasan, Darsh

    2006-11-16

    Foaming is of great concern in a number of industrial processes involving three-phase gas-liquid-finely divided solid systems such as those encountered in the vitrification of highly radioactive nuclear waste slurries and sludges. Recent work has clearly shown that the surface properties of the particles such as hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity or biphilicity (i.e. partially wetted by water) are the cause of foamability and foam stability. The literature data on particles causing foaminess and foam stability in the absence of any surfactant are rather scarce. This paper presents experimental observations on aqueous foams with polyhedral structures containing over 90% air generated due to the presence of irregularly-shaped fine crystalline particles of sodium chloride which were modified into amphiphilic particles by physical adsorption of a cationic surfactant. Cross-polarized light microscopy was used to visualize the physical adsorption of the surfactant on the crystal surface. It is shown that these biphilic or amphiphilic particles attach to the air bubble surface and prevent the coalescence of bubbles, thereby extending the life of the foam. The foaming power of solid particles increases with an increase in the concentration of amphiphilic particles, and a maximum in foaminess is observed which is due to two competing effects. Amphiphilic particles promote foamability by attachment to the bubble surfaces as individual particles and foam inhibition due to the clustering or flocculation of particles in the bulk at high particle concentrations. We studied the adsorption of amphiphilic particles at a planar air-water surface and found that the degree of foamability correlates well with the particle coverage (i.e. adsorption density) at the air-liquid surface. An exploratory study was also conducted using an antifoam recently developed by IIT researchers to mitigate foaming in particle-laden gas-liquid systems. PMID:16997269

  17. OpenFOAM for beginners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedyalkov, Ivaylo; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    OpenFOAM has gained significant popularity in academia and industry, but is still not widely introduced to CFD novices - e.g., undergraduate students. This is likely due to the steep learning curve of the software. A relatively short tutorial was developed to introduce students to the basic features of OpenFOAM, allowing them to modify and create simulations, and to better understand other online resources. The tutorial has been successfully introduced to students working on undergraduate capstone projects at the University of New Hampshire and parts of it were presented at a tech-camp for K-12 students.

  18. Thermal Expansion of Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2006-01-01

    Closed cell foams are often used for thermal insulation. In the case of the Space Shuttle, the External Tank uses several thermal protection systems to maintain the temperature of the cryogenic fuels. A few of these systems are polyurethane, closed cell foams. In an attempt to better understand the foam behavior on the tank, we are in the process of developing and improving thermal-mechanical models for the foams. These models will start at the microstructural level and progress to the overall structural behavior of the foams on the tank. One of the key properties for model characterization and verification is thermal expansion. Since the foam is not a material, but a structure, the modeling of the expansion is complex. It is also exacerbated by the anisoptropy of the material. During the spraying and foaming process, the cells become elongated in the rise direction and this imparts different properties in the rise direction than in the transverse directions. Our approach is to treat the foam as a two part structure consisting of the polymeric cell structure and the gas inside the cells. The polymeric skeleton has a thermal expansion of its own which is derived from the basic polymer chemistry. However, a major contributor to the thermal expansion is the volume change associated with the gas inside of the closed cells. As this gas expands it exerts pressure on the cell walls and changes the shape and size of the cells. The amount that this occurs depends on the elastic and viscoplastic properties of the polymer skeleton. The more compliant the polymeric skeleton, the more influence the gas pressure has on the expansion. An additional influence on the expansion process is that the polymeric skeleton begins to breakdown at elevated temperatures and releases additional gas species into the cell interiors, adding to the gas pressure. The fact that this is such a complex process makes thermal expansion ideal for testing the models. This report focuses on the thermal

  19. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    SciTech Connect

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  20. Microcellular carbon foam and method

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.

    1993-12-07

    A microcellular carbon foam is characterized by a density in the range of about 30 to 1000 mg/cm[sup 3], substantially uniform distribution of cell sizes of diameters less than 100 [mu]m with a majority of the cells being of a diameter of less than about 10 [mu]m, well interconnected strut morphology providing open porosity, and an expanded d(002) X-ray turbostatic spacing greater than 3.50 angstroms. The precursor for the carbon foam is prepared by the phase inversion of polyacrylonitrile in a solution consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal halide and a phase inversion solvent for the polyacrylonitrile.