Sample records for aqueous nitrate plutonium

  1. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.

    1994-08-01

    According to the measurements made in this study, the only situation in which chromium (+6) could exist in a plutonium process solution is one in which a feed containing chromium is dissolved in a glass pot dissolver in high nitric acid concentration and at high temperature. But when the resulting feed is prepared for ion exchange, the chemical treatment reduces chromium to the +3 state. Any solution being processed through the evaporator will only contain chromium in the +3 state and any chromium salts remaining in the evaporator bottoms will be chromium +3 salts.

  2. Gas pressure in sealed sample cans concentrated plutonium nitrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1953-01-01

    The objective of this work was to establish as fact that the predominant gas evolved from concentrated plutonium nitrate solutions is oxygen. Four sample cans containing plutonium nitrate at various concentrations were sealed using plug valves equipped with pressure gages. The results obtained showed that the gas evolved from concentrated plutonium nitrate solutions is predominately oxygen. It is believed that

  3. Influence of Nitric Acid on Uranyl Nitrate Association in Aqueous Solutions: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xianggui Ye; R. Bryan Smith; Shengting Cui; Valmor de Almeida; Bamin Khomami

    2010-01-01

    Uranyl ion complexation with water and nitrate is a key aspect of the uranium\\/plutonium extraction process. We have carried out a molecular dynamics simulation study to investigate this complexation process, including the molecular composition of the various complex species, the corresponding structure, and the equilibrium distribution of the complexes. The observed structures of the complexes suggest that in aqueous solution,

  4. Simultaneous determination of americium and plutonium in plutonium nitrate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rebagay, T.V.; Huff, G.A.; Lee, R.S.

    1983-07-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of americium and plutonium in reprocessing solutions using an automated on-line concentration monitor has been developed and evaluated. The quantitative assays for plutonium were based on the intensities of the characteristic gamma rays of /sup 238/Pu, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 241/Pu in the 120 keV to 210 keV region of the solution spectra. The assay peaks for americium were the 59.5 keV and 125 keV lines of /sup 241/Am. The method is capable of measuring americium (1 to 1500 ppm) in plutonium (5 to 50 g/L) solutions with an accuracy better than + or -5% using the 59.5 keV peak of /sup 241/Am. The observed americium data were compared with those obtained by alpha spectrometry and the values derived from the calculated /sup 241/Am (125 keV)//sup 239/Pu (129 keV) ratios of the test solutions. An overall average deviation of 1% for /sup 239/Pu and 3% each for /sup 238/Pu, /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 241/Pu from the mass spectrometry data was noted for the isotopic distribution of plutonium. The elemental plutonium abundances compared very well with those measured by isotope dilution mass spectrometry and controlled-potential coulometry.

  5. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE EXTRACTION OF NITRIC ACID AND PLUTONIUM(IV) NITRATE WITH 30 VOL.% TRIBUTYL PHOSPHATE (TBP)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Kolarik

    1984-01-01

    Own and published data were evaluated for characterizing the effect of temperature on the distribution of nitric acid and plutonium(IV). The solutes were distributed between 30 vol.% TBP in an aliphatic diluent and aqueous solutions containing nitric acid and zero to macro amounts of plutonium(IV) and uranyl nitrates. The temperature dependence of the distribution ratios is described with empirical model

  6. Purification of aqueous plutonium chloride solutions via precipitation and washing.

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, M. A. (Mary Ann); Salazar, R. R. (Richard R.); Abney, Kent David; Bluhm, E. A. (Elizabeth A.); Danis, J. A. (Janet A.)

    2003-01-01

    Pyrochemical operations at Los Alamos Plutonium Facility (TA-55) use high temperature melt s of calcium chloride for the reduction of plutonium oxide to plutonium metal and hi gh temperature combined melts of sodium chloride and potassium chloride mixtures for the electrorefining purification of plutonium metal . The remaining plutonium and americium are recovered from thes e salts by dissolution in concentrated hydrochloric acid followed by either solvent extraction or io n exchange for isolation and ultimately converted to oxide after precipitation with oxalic acid . Figur e 1 illustrates the current aqueous chloride flow sheet used for plutonium processing at TA-55 .

  7. Influence of Acidity on Uranyl Nitrate Association in Aqueous Solutions: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Cui, Shengting [ORNL; Khomami, Bamin [ORNL; Ye, Xianggui [ORNL; Smith, Rodney Bryan [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Uranyl ion complexation with water and nitrate is a key aspect of the uranium/plutonium extraction process. We have carried out a molecular dynamics simulation study to investigate this complexation process, including the molecular composition of the various complex species, the corresponding structure, and the equilibrium distribution of the complexes. The observed structures of the complexes suggest that in aqueous solution, uranyls are generally hydrated by 5 water molecules in the equatorial plane. When associating with nitrate ions, a water molecule is replaced by a nitrate ion, preserving the five-fold coordination and planar symmetry. Analysis of the pair correlation function between uranyl and nitrate suggests that nitrates bind to uranyl in aqueous solution mainly in a monodentate mode, although a small portion of bidentates occur. Dynamic association and dissociation between uranyls and nitrates take place in aqueous solution with a substantial amount of fluctuation in the number of various uranyl nitrate species. The average number of the uranyl mononitrate complexes shows a dependence on acid concentration consistent with equilibrium-constant analysis, namely, the concentration of [UO2NO3]+ increases with nitric acid concentration.

  8. A Mechanism for the Aqueous Phase Production of Alkyl Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, E. E.; Saltzman, E. S.; DeBruyn, W. J.

    2002-05-01

    Measurements of alkyl nitrates in the surface ocean and marine boundary layer indicate that there is an oceanic source of alkyl nitrates to the marine troposphere. Alkyl nitrates make up a portion of the total reactive nitrogen in the troposphere. They can contribute significantly to the NOx budget in the remote marine atmosphere, affecting regional ozone formation. The origin of the alkyl nitrate in the surface ocean is unknown. One possible mechanism for aqueous alkyl nitrate formation is the reaction of alkyl peroxy radicals with NO (ROO + NO -> RONO2). Peroxy radicals and NO have been observed in seawater at levels that make this a viable reaction (Blough 1997) (Zafiriou and McFarland 1981). In this project, steady state irradiations of nitrite and alkane solutions were used to determine the yield of alkyl nitrates from this reaction. The yield for ethyl nitrate has been determined to be 101+/-12% and 102+/-8% total yield for propyl nitrates (n-propyl and iso-propyl) with no evident temperature dependence between 5 and 30° C. Alkyl nitrates were also generated by the irradiation of natural seawater and nitrite-spiked seawater. These results indicate that the proposed mechanism may be a viable source of alkyl nitrates in surface waters.

  9. Supporting Information Nitrate Ions and Ion Pairing at the Air-Aqueous Interface

    E-print Network

    1 Supporting Information Nitrate Ions and Ion Pairing at the Air-Aqueous Interface Man Xu, Cheng Y of the nitrate symmetric stretch peak as a function of molarity. Molarity units (dividing by volume) allows comparisons of transition moment strengths at different concentrations. Table S1. Nitrate concentrations

  10. Criticality experiments with mixed oxide fuel pin arrays in plutonium-uranium nitrate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Smolen, G.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1988-08-01

    A series of critical experiments was completed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions having a Pu/(Pu + U) ratio of approximately 0.22 in a boiler tube-type lattice assembly. These experiments were conducted as part of the Criticality Data Development Program between the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. A complete description of the experiments and data are included in this report. The experiments were performed with an array of mixed oxide fuel pins in aqueous plutonium-uranium solutions. The fuel pins were contained in a boiler tube-type tank and arranged in a 1.4 cm square pitch array which resembled cylindrical geometry. One experiment was perfomed with the fuel pins removed from the vessel. The experiments were performed with a water reflector. The concentration of the solutions in the boiler tube-type tank was varied from 4 to 468 g (Pu + U)/liter. The ratio of plutonium to total heavy metal (plutonium plus uranium) was approximately 0.22 for all experiments.

  11. Reillex/trademark/ HPQ: A new, macroporous polyvinylpyridine resin for separating plutonium using nitrate anion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.

    1989-01-01

    Anion exchange in nitric acid is the major aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium from impure scrap materials. Most strong-base anion exchange resins incorporate a styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer. A newly available, macroporous anion exchange resin based on a copolymer of 1-methyl-4-vinylpyridine and divinylbenzene has been evaluated. Comparative data for Pu(IV) sorption kinetics and capacity are presented for this new resin and two other commonly used anion exchange resins. The new resin offers high capacity and rapid sorption kinetics for Pu(IV) from nitric acid, as well as greater stability to chemical and radiolytic degradation. 8 refs., 12 figs.

  12. VIBRATIONAL SUM FREQUENCY AND RAMAN SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF AIR-AQUEOUS INTERFACES AND SOLUTIONS OF NITRATE SALTS, AND

    E-print Network

    OF NITRATE SALTS, AND AIR-SILICA SURFACE ADSORPTION STUDIES DISSERTATION Presented in Partial Fulfillment Nitrate ions are ubiquitous in aqueous-phase atmospheric aerosols as well as surface and ground waters understanding of nitrate ions at the air- aqueous interface is of prime importance with respect to understanding

  13. Formulas to Correct Excess Pressure and Pressure Shift to be Used in Volume Measurement for Plutonium Nitrate Solution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takashi Hosoma; Masanori Aritomi; Tsunemichi Kawa

    2000-01-01

    Excess pressure caused by the bubble and the pressure shift resulting from the air column in a dip-tube pressure measurement are the error sources to be considered for highly accurate density, level, and volume determination of plutonium nitrate solution in a tank. A new approach to estimate the maximum, the minimum, and the average of oscillating excess pressure as a

  14. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

  15. The aqueous phase yield of alkyl nitrates from ROO + NO: Implications for photochemical production in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Elizabeth E.; Saltzman, Eric S.; de Bruyn, Warren J.

    2003-03-01

    Alkyl nitrates have been observed in remote oceanic regions of the troposphere and in the surface ocean. The mechanism for their production in the oceans is not known. A likely source is the reaction of ROO + NO (where R is an alkyl group). Steady-state laboratory experiments show that alkyl nitrates are produced in the aqueous phase via this reaction, with branching ratios of 0.23 +/- 0.04, 0.67 +/- 0.03, and 0.71 +/- 0.04 for methyl, ethyl, and propyl nitrate respectively. The branching ratios in aqueous solution are significantly higher than in the gas phase. Irradiation of surface seawaters yield rates of alkyl nitrate production on the order of 10-18 mol cm-3 s-1, suggesting that the reaction of ROO and NO is an important source of alkyl nitrates in seawater.

  16. Method of separating thorium from plutonium

    DOEpatents

    Clifton, D.G.; Blum, T.W.

    1984-07-10

    A method is described for chemically separating plutonium from thorium. Plutonium and thorium to be separated are dissolved in an aqueous feed solution, preferably as the nitrate salts. The feed solution is acidified and sodium nitrite is added to the solution to adjust the valence of the plutonium to the +4 state. A chloride salt, preferably sodium chloride, is then added to the solution to induce formation of an anionic plutonium chloride complex. The anionic plutonium chloride complex and the thorium in solution are then separated by ion exchange on a strong base anion exchange column.

  17. Method of separating thorium from plutonium

    DOEpatents

    Clifton, David G. (Los Alamos, NM); Blum, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A method of chemically separating plutonium from thorium. Plutonium and thorium to be separated are dissolved in an aqueous feed solution, preferably as the nitrate salts. The feed solution is acidified and sodium nitrite is added to the solution to adjust the valence of the plutonium to the +4 state. A chloride salt, preferably sodium chloride, is then added to the solution to induce formation of an anionic plutonium chloride complex. The anionic plutonium chloride complex and the thorium in solution are then separated by ion exchange on a strong base anion exchange column.

  18. SULFATE AND NITRATE COATINGS ON MINERAL DUSTS: CRYSTALLINE OR AQUEOUS?

    E-print Network

    . Ammonium sulfate coatings of different layer thicknesses are deposited on #12;metal oxide particles 02138, USA Keywords: Phase transition; Atmospheric Aerosols; Ammonium sulfate; Ammonium nitrate Observational evidence shows that mineral dusts in Asian outflows become coated by sulfates and nitrates. Layer

  19. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1995-01-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO

  20. Synthesis and structures of plutonyl nitrate complexes: is plutonium heptavalent in PuO3(NO3)2(-) ?

    PubMed

    Maurice, Rémi; Renault, Eric; Gong, Yu; Rutkowski, Philip X; Gibson, John K

    2015-03-01

    Gas-phase plutonium nitrate anion complexes were produced by electrospray ionization (ESI) of a plutonium nitrate solution. The ESI mass spectrum included species with all four of the common oxidation states of plutonium: Pu(III), Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI). Plutonium nitrate complexes were isolated in a quadrupole ion trap and subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID). CID of complexes of the general formula PuOx(NO3)y(-) resulted in the elimination of NO2 to produce PuOx+1(NO3)y-1(-), which in most cases corresponds to an increase in the oxidation state of plutonium. Plutonyl species, Pu(V)O2(NO3)2(-) and Pu(VI)O2(NO3)3(-), were produced from Pu(III)(NO3)4(-) and Pu(IV)(NO3)5(-), respectively, by the elimination of two NO2 molecules. CID of Pu(VI)O2(NO3)3(-) resulted in NO2 elimination to yield PuO3(NO3)2(-), in which the oxidation state of plutonium could be VII, a known oxidation state in condensed phase but not yet in the gas phase. Density functional theory confirmed the nature of Pu(V)O2(NO3)2(-) and Pu(VI)O2(NO3)3(-) as plutonyl(V/VI) cores coordinated by bidentate equatorial nitrate ligands. The computed structure of PuO3(NO3)2(-) is essentially a plutonyl(VI) core, Pu(VI)O2(2+), coordinated in the equatorial plane by two nitrate ligands and one radical oxygen atom. The computations indicate that in the ground spin-orbit free state of PuO3(NO3)2(-), the unpaired electron of the oxygen atom is antiferromagnetically coupled to the spin-triplet state of the plutonyl core. The results indicate that Pu(VII) is not a readily accessible oxidation state in the gas phase, despite that it is stable in solution and solids, but rather that a Pu(VI)-O· bonding configuration is favored, in which an oxygen radical is involved. PMID:25695878

  1. Extraction of trivalent rare-earth metal nitrates from concentrated aqueous salt solutions by triisoamyl phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Pyartman, A.K.; Keskinov, V.A.; Puzikov, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    Equations are proposed for describing isotherms of extraction of trivalent rare earth metal nitrates from concentrated aqueous salt solutions by neat triisoamyl phosphate, which allow for variations in the activity coefficients of the components in organic phase over a wide range of its compositions. The phase extraction constants have been determined, with a hypothetical 1 mol kg{sup {minus}1} aqueous solution of a rare-earth metal nitrate and the state of pure components in organic phase with a mole fraction of 1.0 taken as standard.

  2. Photochemistry of nitrite and nitrate in aqueous solution: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Mack; James R. Bolton

    1999-01-01

    It has long been known that the photolysis of nitrite and nitrate solutions results in the formation of OH radicals. The mechanism of NO3? photolysis has been the subject of considerable controversy in the literature, however. This review summarizes the experimental work on NO2? and NO3? photolysis in the context of recent advances in the understanding of the chemistry of

  3. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  4. Room temperature electrodeposition and characterization of bismuth ferric oxide (BFO) thin films from aqueous nitrate bath

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. P. Gujar; V. R. Shinde; S. S. Kulkarni; H. M. Pathan; C. D. Lokhande

    2006-01-01

    Bismuth ferric oxide (BFO) thin films were prepared on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrates using electrodeposition method from aqueous nitrate bath at room temperature. The various preparative parameters, such as bath composition, current density, deposition time, etc were optimized to get good quality BFO thin films. The structural, surface morphological, optical and dielectrical properties of the films

  5. Vapor-liquid equilibria for nitric acid-water and plutonium nitrate-nitric acid-water solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1980-01-01

    The liquid-vapor equilibrium data for nitric acid and nitric acid-plutnonium nitrate-water solutions were examined to develop correlations covering the range of conditions encountered in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The scanty available data for plutonium nitrate solutions are of poor quality but allow an order of magnitude estimate to be made. A formal thermodynamic analysis was attempted initially but was not successful due to the poor quality of the data as well as the complex chemical equilibria involved in the nitric acid and in the plutonium nitrate solutions. Thus, while there was no difficulty in correlating activity coefficients for nitric acid solutions over relatively narrow temperature ranges, attempts to extend the correlations over the range 25/sup 0/C to the boiling point were not successful. The available data were then analyzed using empirical correlations from which normal boiling points and relative volatilities can be obtained over the concentration ranges 0 to 700 g/l Pu, 0 to 13 M nitric acid. Activity coefficients are required, however, if estimates of individual component vapor pressures are needed. The required ternary activity coefficients can be approximated from the correlations.

  6. Extraction of rare-earth metal(III) nitrates from concentrated aqueous solutions by diisoamyl methylphosphonate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Pyartman; V. A. Keskinov; E. A. Puzikov

    1995-01-01

    Equations have been developed for describing the isotherms of extraction of rare-earth metal(III) [REM(III)] nitrates from aqueous concentrated solutions by 100% diisoamyl methylphosphonate, taking into account the variation of activity coefficients of components in the organic phase when its composition is varied within broad limits. The thermodynamic parameters of the extraction equilibria have been calculated using as the standard states

  7. Plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David L.; Hecker, Siegfried S.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Neu, Mary P.

    The element plutonium occupies a unique place in the history of chemistry, physics, technology, and international relations. After the initial discovery based on submicrogram amounts, it is now generated by transmutation of uranium in nuclear reactors on a large scale, and has been separated in ton quantities in large industrial facilities. The intense interest in plutonium resulted fromthe dual-use scenario of domestic power production and nuclear weapons - drawing energy from an atomic nucleus that can produce a factor of millions in energy output relative to chemical energy sources. Indeed, within 5 years of its original synthesis, the primary use of plutonium was for the release of nuclear energy in weapons of unprecedented power, and it seemed that the new element might lead the human race to the brink of self-annihilation. Instead, it has forced the human race to govern itself without resorting to nuclear war over the past 60 years. Plutonium evokes the entire gamut of human emotions, from good to evil, from hope to despair, from the salvation of humanity to its utter destruction. There is no other element in the periodic table that has had such a profound impact on the consciousness of mankind.

  8. Radiolysis of hexavalent plutonium in solutions of uranyl nitrate containing fission product simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rance, Peter J. W.; Zilberman, B. Ya.; Akopov, G. A.

    2000-07-01

    The effect of the inherent radioactivity on the chemical state of plutonium ions in solution was recognized very shortly after the first macroscopic amounts of plutonium became available and early studies were conducted as part of the Manhattan Project. However, the behavior of plutonium ions, in nitric acid especially, has been found to be somewhat complex, so much so that a relatively modern summary paper included the comment that, "The vast amount of work carried out in nitric acid solutions can not be adequately summarized. Suffice it to say results in these solutions are plagued with irreproducibility and induction periods…" Needless to say, the presence of other ions in solution, as occurs when irradiated nuclear fuel is dissolved, further complicates matters. The purpose of the work described below was to add to the rather small amount of qualitative data available relating to the radiolytic behavior of plutonium in solutions of irradiated nuclear fuel.

  9. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    These analytical procedures are designed to show whether a given material meets the purchaser's specifications as to plutonium content, effective fissile content, and impurity content. The following procedures are described in detail: plutonium by controlled-potential coulometry; plutonium by amperometric titration with iron(II); free acid by titration in an oxalate solution; free acid by iodate precipitation-potentiometric titration method; uranium by Arsenazo I spectrophotometric method; thorium by thorin spectrophotometric method; iron by 1,10-phenanthroline spectrophotometric method; chloride by thiocyanate spectrophotometric method; fluoride by distillation-spectrophotometric method; sulfate by barium sulfate turbidimetric method; isotopic composition by mass spectrometry; americium-241 by extraction and gamma counting; americium-241 by gamma counting; gamma-emitting fission products, uranium, and thorium by gamma-ray spectroscopy; rare earths by copper spark spectrochemical method; tungsten, niobium (columbium), and tantalum by spectrochemical method; simple preparation by spectrographic analysis for general impurities. (JMT)

  10. Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

  11. Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick Spinney, and Heather C. Allen*

    E-print Network

    Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick, Columbus, Ohio 43210 ReceiVed: July 24, 2008; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed: December 4, 2008 The water surface structure of aqueous magnesium, calcium, and strontium nitrate solutions with six to seven water

  12. Nitrate Anions and Ion Pairing at the Air-Aqueous Interface Man Xu, Cheng Y. Tang, Aaron M. Jubb, Xiangke Chen, and Heather C. Allen*

    E-print Network

    Nitrate Anions and Ion Pairing at the Air-Aqueous Interface Man Xu, Cheng Y. Tang, Aaron M. Jubb, Columbus, Ohio 43210 ReceiVed: June 18, 2008; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed: October 31, 2008 Nitrate ions in a variety of atmospheric reactions. Thus, a fundamental understanding of nitrate ions at the air

  13. Development of New coated wire nitrate selective electrode sensor for determination of nitrate concentration in an aqueous sample

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Buchari; Indra Noviandri; Mitra Djamal; Maria Evita

    2011-01-01

    A coated wire nitrate selective electrode has been prepared and characterized. The electrochemical cell for potentiometric measurement consist of a miniaturized homemade Ag\\/AgCl reference electrode and a coated wire nitrate selective electrode (CWISE) immersed in nitrate solution to be studied, and mV-meter. Standard potential of the Ag\\/AgCl reference electrode was 0.2496 V. Preparation of CWISE was realized by covering platinum

  14. Extraction of rare-earth metal(III) nitrates by neutral organophosphorus compounds from concentrated aqueous salt solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Pyartman; E. A. Puzikov

    1995-01-01

    Equations describing isotherms of extraction of rare-earth metal(III) nitrates by neutral organo-phosphorus compounds over a wide range of component concentrations in aqueous and organic phases have been proposed. Constants of phase extraction and empirical parameters characterizing the influence of organic phase composition on the activity coefficients of the components have been presented.

  15. Extraction of rare-earth metal(III) nitrates by neutral organophosphorus compounds from concentrated aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pyartman, A.K.; Puzikov, E.A. [St. Petersburg Technological Institute (Russian Federation)

    1995-07-20

    Equations describing isotherms of extraction of rare-earth metal(III) nitrates by neutral organo-phosphorus compounds over a wide range of component concentrations in aqueous and organic phases have been proposed. Constants of phase extraction and empirical parameters characterizing the influence of organic phase composition on the activity coefficients of the components have been presented.

  16. Cobalt halide complex formation in aqueous calcium nitrate–ammonium nitrate melts. I. Cobalt(II) chlorides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Milan Vraneš; Slobodan B. Gadžuri?; István J. Zsigrai

    2007-01-01

    Absorption spectra of cobalt(II) chloride in calcium nitrate–ammonium nitrate–water system of the composition xCa(NO3)2·4H2O–(1?x)NH4NO3 (x=0.30, 0.50 and 0.70) have been investigated in the wavelength range 400–800 nm at temperatures 45, 55 and 65 °C. Addition of chloride to cobalt nitrate solution caused a pronounced shift of the absorption maximum toward lower energies and a significant increase of absorption intensity, indicating a change

  17. Complexation and redox interactions between aqueous plutonium and manganese oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shaughnessy, Dawn A.; Nitsche, Heino; Booth, Corwin H.; Shuh, David K.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Wilson, Richard E.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2001-11-01

    The sorption of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) onto manganite (MnOOH) and Hausmannite (Mn3O4) was studied at pH 5. Manganite sorbed 21-24% from a 1x10-4 M plutonium solution and the hausmannite removed between 43-66% of the plutonium. The increased sorption by hausmannite results from its larger surface area (about twice that of manganite) plus a larger number of active surface sites. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra taken at the Pu LIII edge were compared to standard spectra of plutonium in single oxidation states. Based on these spectra, it appears that both manganite and hausmannite reduce the higher valent plutonium species to Pu(IV). Between 53-59% of the plutonium was present as Pu(IV) in the manganite samples while 55-61% of the plutonium complexed to the hausmannite had also been reduced to Pu(IV). The exact mechanism behind this redox interaction between the plutonium and the manganese needs to be identified.

  18. Growth and perfection of crystals from aqueous solution: Case studies on barium nitrate and K-alum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ichiro Sunagawa; Katsuo Tsukamoto; Koji Maiwa; Kazuo Onuma

    1995-01-01

    Growth, dissolution and perfection of crystals from aqueous solution have been investigated using barium nitrate, Ba(NO3)2, and K-alum, KAl(SO4)2· 12H2O, crystals as representative cases. Both ex-situand in-situinvestigations were performed to analyze the following problems; (1) solutal transport phenomena around a growing or dissolving crystal and the effect upon the growth kinetics and perfection of the crystal, (2) relation between bulk

  19. Caffeine as non-toxic corrosion inhibitor for copper in aqueous solutions of potassium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallavena, Thuanny; Antonow, Muriel; Gonçalves, Reinaldo Simões

    2006-11-01

    Different electrochemical methods were employed in order to confirm the ability of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) to inhibit the corrosion processes of copper in aqueous potassium nitrate solutions in the absence and in the presence of chloride. Some experiments were repeated in potassium perchlorate in order to compare the influence of the medium. The interaction between the organic compound and the electrode surface occurs independently of the electrode potential. However, maximum interaction was observed at 0.0 V (Ag/AgCl) in aerated solutions, and at -0.25 V (Ag/AgCl) in deaerated solutions. The presence of the organic compound adsorbed on the electrode surface was confirmed by comparing the voltammograms of copper electrode in the absence and presence of 1.5 mmol L -1 of dissolved caffeine. The same results were observed by comparing polarization curves in the absence and in the presence of caffeine. Anodic currents decrease noticeably in the presence of the organic compound. Chronoamperometric experiments were conclusive to prove the inhibitor capability of caffeine to decrease the corrosion dissolution processes of copper under anodic polarization.

  20. Absorption spectra of cobalt(II) chloride and nitrate complexes in aqueous calcium nitrate–ammonium nitrate melts: The influence of solvent composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Milan Vraneš; Slobodan B. Gadžuri?; István J. Zsigrai; Sanja Doži?

    2010-01-01

    Influence of solvent composition, i.e. the salt mole fraction and water content on absorption spectra of cobalt(II) chloride and nitrate in xCa(NO3)2·zH2O–(1?x)NH4NO3 systems was investigated by spectrophotometric method in the wavelength range 400–800nm at 55°C. On the basis of absorption spectra of cobalt(II) chloride and nitrate complexes and overall molar absorption coefficients obtained in 13 investigated systems, the geometry of

  1. Aqueous ammonium nitrate blasting composition containing solid carbonaceous fuel and method of preparing same

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. W. Sheeran; M. H. Oriard

    1969-01-01

    A blasting agent utilizes ammonium nitrate fuel and water to form a desired plasticity. The compound is detonatable because it employs fuel which is water stable either chemically or physically or both and remains in intimate association with the ammonium nitrate in the presence of water whether in the solid phase or liquid phase. The total oxygen balance of ammonium

  2. Degree of dissociation of HNOâ in aqueous solutions saturated with uranyl nitrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. S. Fedorov; B. Y. Zilberman

    1986-01-01

    A method has been proposed for the comparative extraction by an inert solvent to find the degree of dissociation of HNOâ in solutions containing nitrate salts, for example uranyl nitrate. It was shown that in the case of equality of ratios of the ionic strength of the solution to the concentration of water in it, the degree of dissociation of

  3. Aqueous biphasic plutonium oxide extraction process with pH and particle control

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, D.J.; Mensah-Biney, R.

    1997-04-29

    A method is described for simultaneously partitioning a metal oxide and silica from a material containing silica and the metal oxide, using a biphasic aqueous medium having immiscible salt and polymer phases. 2 figs.

  4. Chemical species of plutonium in Hanford radioactive tank waste

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, G.S.

    1997-10-22

    Large quantities of radioactive wastes have been generated at the Hanford Site over its operating life. The wastes with the highest activities are stored underground in 177 large (mostly one million gallon volume) concrete tanks with steel liners. The wastes contain processing chemicals, cladding chemicals, fission products, and actinides that were neutralized to a basic pH before addition to the tanks to prevent corrosion of the steel liners. Because the mission of the Hanford Site was to provide plutonium for defense purposes, the amount of plutonium lost to the wastes was relatively small. The best estimate of the amount of plutonium lost to all the waste tanks is about 500 kg. Given uncertainties in the measurements, some estimates are as high as 1,000 kg (Roetman et al. 1994). The wastes generally consist of (1) a sludge layer generated by precipitation of dissolved metals from aqueous wastes solutions during neutralization with sodium hydroxide, (2) a salt cake layer formed by crystallization of salts after evaporation of the supernate solution, and (3) an aqueous supernate solution that exists as a separate layer or as liquid contained in cavities between sludge or salt cake particles. The identity of chemical species of plutonium in these wastes will allow a better understanding of the behavior of the plutonium during storage in tanks, retrieval of the wastes, and processing of the wastes. Plutonium chemistry in the wastes is important to criticality and environmental concerns, and in processing the wastes for final disposal. Plutonium has been found to exist mainly in the sludge layers of the tanks along with other precipitated metal hydrous oxides. This is expected due to its low solubility in basic aqueous solutions. Tank supernate solutions do not contain high concentrations of plutonium even though some tanks contain high concentrations of complexing agents. The solutions also contain significant concentrations of hydroxide which competes with other potential complexants. The sodium nitrate and sodium phosphate salts that form most of the salt cake layers have little interaction with plutonium in the wastes and contain relatively small plutonium concentrations. For these reasons the authors consider plutonium species in the sludges and supernate solutions only. The low concentrations of plutonium in waste tank supernate solutions and in the solid sludges prevent identification of chemical species of plutonium by ordinary analytical techniques. Spectrophotometric measurements are not sensitive enough to identify plutons oxidation states or complexes in these waste solutions. Identification of solid phases containing plutonium in sludge solids by x-ray diffraction or by microscopic techniques would be extremely difficult. Because of these technical problems, plutonium speciation was extrapolated from known behavior observed in laboratory studies of synthetic waste or of more chemically simple systems.

  5. Nitrate-induced photodegradation of atenolol in aqueous solution: kinetics, toxicity and degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuefei; Zeng, Chao; Ferronato, Corinne; Chovelon, Jean-Marc; Yang, Xi

    2012-07-01

    The extensive utilization of ?-blockers worldwide led to frequent detection in natural water. In this study the photolysis behavior of atenolol (ATL) and toxicity of its photodegradation products were investigated in the presence of nitrate ions. The results showed that ATL photodegradation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics upon simulated solar irradiation. The photodegradation was found to be dependent on nitrate concentration and increasing the nitrate from 0.5 mML(-1) to 10 mML(-1) led to the enhancement of rate constant from 0.00101 min(-1) to 0.00716 min(-1). Hydroxyl radical was determined to play a key role in the photolysis process by using isopropanol as molecular probe. Increasing the solution pH from 4.8 to 10.4, the photodegradation rate slightly decreased from 0.00246 min(-1) to 0.00195 min(-1), probably due to pH-dependent effect of nitrate-induced .OH formation. Bicarbonate decreased the photodegradation of ATL in the presence of nitrate ions mainly through pH effect, while humic substance inhibited the photodegradation via both attenuating light and competing radicals. Upon irradiation for 240 min, only 10% reduction of total organic carbon (TOC) can be achieved in spite of 72% transformation rate of ATL, implying a majority of ATL transformed into intermediate products rather than complete mineralization. The main photoproducts of ATL were identified by using solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS) techniques and possible nitrate-induced photodegradation pathways were proposed. The toxicity of the phototransformation products was evaluated using aquatic species Daphnia magna, and the results revealed that photodegradation was an effective mechanism for ATL toxicity reduction in natural waters. PMID:22497785

  6. Carcinogenesis and Inflammatory Effects of Plutonium-Nitrate Retention in an Exposed Nuclear Worker and Beagle Dogs.

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Christopher E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Xihai [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, Robert J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Brooks, Antone L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lovaglio, Jamie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Patton, Kristin M. [Battelle Toxicology Northwest, Richland, WA (United States); McComish, Stacey [United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries, Washington State University, College of Pharmacy, Richland, WA (United States); Tolmachev, Sergei Y. [United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries, Washington State University, College of Pharmacy, Richland, WA (United States); Morgan, William F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The genetic and inflammatory response pathways elicited following plutonium exposure in archival lung tissue of an occupationally exposed human and experimentally exposed beagle dogs were investigated. These pathways include: tissue injury, apoptosis and gene expression modifications related to carcinogenesis and inflammation. In order to determine which pathways are involved, multiple lung samples from a plutonium exposed worker (Case 0269), a human control (Case 0385), and plutonium exposed beagle dogs were examined using histological staining and immunohistochemistry. Examinations were performed to identify target tissues at risk of radiation-induced fibrosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. Case 0269 showed interstitial fibrosis in peripheral and subpleural regions of the lung, but no pulmonary tumors. In contrast, the dogs with similar and higher doses showed pulmonary tumors primarily in brochiolo-alveolar, peripheral and subpleural alveolar regions. The TUNEL assay showed slight elevation of apoptosis in tracheal mucosa, tumor cells, and nuclear debris was present in the inflammatory regions of alveoli and lymph nodes of both the human and the dogs. The expression of apoptosis and a number of chemokine/cytokine genes was slightly but not significantly elevated in protein or gene levels compared to that of the control samples. In the beagles, mucous production was increased in the airway epithelial goblet cells and glands of trachea, and a number of chemokine/cytokine genes showed positive immunoreactivity. This analysis of archival tissue from an accidentally exposed worker and in a large animal model provides valuable information on the effects of long-term retention of plutonium in the respiratory tract and the histological evaluation study may impact mechanistic studies of radiation carcinogenesis.

  7. Coordination and Hydrolysis of Plutonium Ions in Aqueous Solution using Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics Free Energy Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Odoh, Samuel O.; Bylaska, Eric J.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2013-11-27

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations have been used to examine the hydration structures, coordination energetics and the first hydrolysis constants of Pu3+, Pu4+, PuO2+ and PuO22+ ions in aqueous solution at 300 K. The coordination numbers and structural properties of the first shell of these ions are in good agreement with available experimental estimates. The hexavalent PuO22+ species is coordinated to 5 aquo ligands while the pentavalent PuO2+ complex is coordinated to 4 aquo ligands. The Pu3+ and Pu4+ ions are both coordinated to 8 water molecules. The first hydrolysis constants obtained for Pu3+ and PuO22+ are 6.65 and 5.70 respectively, all within 0.3 pH units of the experimental values (6.90 and 5.50 respectively). The hydrolysis constant of Pu4+, 0.17, disagrees with the value of -0.60 in the most recent update of the Nuclear Energy Agency Thermochemical Database (NEA-TDB) but supports recent experimental findings. The hydrolysis constant of PuO2+, 9.51, supports the experimental results of Bennett et al. (Radiochim. Act. 1992, 56, 15). A correlation between the pKa of the first hydrolysis reaction and the effective charge of the plutonium center was found.

  8. Apparent molar and partial molar volumes of aqueous ceric ammonium nitrate solutions at 20, 25, 30, and 35°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deosarkar, S. D.; Wanale, S. G.; Shelke, M. P.

    2014-07-01

    Present paper reports the measured densities (?) and refractive indices ( n D) of aqueous solutions of ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) at 20, 25, 30, and 35°C in different concentrations of solution. Apparent molar volumes (?v) have been calculated from the density data at different temperatures and fitted to Massons relation to get limiting partial molar volumes (?{v/0}) of CAN. Refractive index data were fitted to linear dependence over concentration of solutions and values of constant K and n {D/0} for different temperatures were evaluated. Specific refractions ( R D) of solutions were calculated from the refractive index and density data. Concentration and temperature effects on experimental and derived properties have been discussed in terms of structural interactions.

  9. Acid-catalyzed oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by ammonium nitrate in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, D.D.; Abraham, M.A. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (USA))

    1990-04-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was oxidized to CO{sub 2} and water by homogeneous, liquid-phase reaction with ammonium nitrate at temperatures between 250 and 450{degree}F and pressures below 100 psi. N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O were produced from the thermal decomposition of the ammonium nitrate oxidant. An unexpected maximum in conversion was observed at an intermediate reaction temperature, which was consistent with rapid thermal decomposition of the NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} oxidant. Postulated reaction pathways consisting of simultaneous oxidation of 2,4-D and decomposition of the oxidant allowed estimation of kinetic constants from best-fit analysis of the data. The proposed reaction model provided a mathematical description of 2,4-D conversion, which allowed extrapolation of the results to reaction conditions and reactor configurations that were not experimentally investigated.

  10. Selective Strontium Removal from a Sodium Nitrate Aqueous Medium by Nanofiltration - Complexation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Gaubert; H. Barnier; A. Maurel; J. Foos; A. Guy; C. Bardot; M. Lemaire

    1997-01-01

    In aqueous medium, selective complexation increases the ionic separation by nanofiltration. The combination of nanofiltration and complexation can be applied to the nuclear effluents treatment. To separate radioelements from a sodium salt medium, poly(acrylic acid) is associated to the FILMTEC NF 70 membrane. Effects of transmembrane pressure, pH, ligand concentration and ionic strength on salts retention are described, and the

  11. Photo-induced degradation of diuron in aqueous solution by nitrites and nitrates: Kinetics and pathways

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. V. Shankar; S. Nélieu; L. Kerhoas; J. Einhorn

    2007-01-01

    The photo-induced degradation of diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) in aqueous solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated in the presence of NO3-\\/NO2- ions. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including substrate and inducer concentrations, oxygen content and pH. The photoproducts were identified by extensive LC–ESI–MS and LC–ESI–MS–MS studies after SPE preconcentration on prepacked cartridges. In both NO3- and

  12. Selective Cesium Removal from a Sodium Nitrate Aqueous Medium by Nanofiltration—Complexation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Gaubert; H. Barnier; L. Nicod; A. Favre-Reguillon; J. Foos; A. Guy; C. Bardot; M. Lemaire

    1997-01-01

    In aqueous medium, selective complexation increases the ionic separation by nanofiltration. Within the context of the nuclear effluent treatment, the nanofiltration-complexation association is applied to sodium\\/cesium separation. Resorcinarene, a water-soluble ligand of cesium, is associated to the FILMTEC NF 70 membrane. Effects of pH, transmembrane pressure, ligand concentration, and ionic strength on salts retention and filtration fluxes are described. Finally,

  13. A spectrophotometric study of Am(III) complexation with nitrate in aqueous solution at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guoxin; Shuh, David K

    2014-10-21

    The complexation of americium(iii) with nitrate was studied at temperatures from 10 to 85 °C in 1 M HNO3-HClO4 by spectrophotometry. The 1?:?1 complex species, AmNO3(2+), was identified and the stability constants were calculated from the absorption spectra recorded for titrations at several temperatures. Specific ion interaction theory (SIT) was used for ionic strength corrections to obtain the stability constants of AmNO3(2+) at infinite dilution and variable temperatures. The absorption spectra of Am(iii) in diluted HClO4 were also reviewed, and the molar absorptivity of Am(iii) at around 503 nm and 813 nm was re-calibrated by titrations with standardized DTPA solutions to determine the concentration of Am(iii). PMID:24999760

  14. Kinetics of extraction of uranyl nitrate from aqueous electrolyte solutions with a composite material based on polymer-supported trialkylamine at various temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Pyartman; V. V. Lishchuk; V. A. Keskinov

    2008-01-01

    Kinetics of extraction of uranyl nitrate from aqueous electrolyte solutions with a composite material (CM) based on a polymer-supported\\u000a trialkylamine at T = 293.15–333.15 K is studied. The rate-determining stage of the process is found to be the interfacial diffusion (film kinetics).\\u000a The mass-transfer coefficients are determined, and, from their temperature dependences, the apparent activation energy E\\u000a a is estimated.

  15. THE MECHANISM OF MASS TRANSFER OF SOLUTES ACROSS LIQUID-LIQUID INTERFACES. III. THE TRANSFER OF URANYL NITRATE BETWEEN SOLVENT AND AQUEOUS PHASES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Lewis

    1958-01-01

    Over-all transfer coefficients were determined for the transfer of ; uranyl nitrate between water and the three solvents dibutoxy diethyl ether ; (D.B.C.), methyl iso-butyl ketone (hexone), and a 20 per cent solution of tri n-; butyl phosphate (T.B.P.) in odorless kerosene (O.K.), benzene, or carbon ; tetrachloride. In some experiments with D.B.C. the aqueous phase was 3N nitric ;

  16. Hollow fiber supported liquid membrane: a novel technique for separation and recovery of plutonium from aqueous acidic wastes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. S Rathore; J. V Sonawane; Anil Kumar; A. K Venugopalan; R. K Singh; D. D Bajpai; J. P Shukla

    2001-01-01

    Low plutonium content acidic waste is generated in nuclear chemical facilities. Study was initiated to develop hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) technique for quantitative separation and recovery of plutonium (Pu) from such wastes using tri-n-butyle phosphate (TBP) in dodecane as carrier. Hollow fiber test module was fabricated using 20 lumens of 33.91cm2 surface area and 9cm length. After satisfactory

  17. Size effect of hematite and corundum inclusions on the efflorescence relative humidities of aqueous ammonium nitrate particles

    E-print Network

    ammonium nitrate particles Jeong-Ho Han Department of Environmental Chemistry, Atmospheric Science Division for a mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation that proceeds by chemisorption of nitrate at the surface of the oxide, ammonium nitrate, mineral dusts, coated particles, heterogeneous nucleation 1. Introduction [2

  18. THE ACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS OF ALKALI METAL NITRATES AND PERCHLORATES IN DILUTE AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS AT 25 FROM DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. S. Harned; J. A. Shropshire

    1958-01-01

    The diffusion coefficients of lithium and cesium nitrates have been ; measured at 25 deg over a concentration range from 0.003 to 0.015 molar. From ; these data, the activity coefficients of these electrolytes have been compated at ; low concentrations. Similar calculations have been carried cat for lithium and ; potassium perchlorates and potassium nitrate solutions and the results

  19. Solvent extraction system for plutonium colloids and other oxide nano-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Soderholm, Lynda; Wilson, Richard E; Chiarizia, Renato; Skanthakumar, Suntharalingam

    2014-06-03

    The invention provides a method for extracting plutonium from spent nuclear fuel, the method comprising supplying plutonium in a first aqueous phase; contacting the plutonium aqueous phase with a mixture of a dielectric and a moiety having a first acidity so as to allow the plutonium to substantially extract into the mixture; and contacting the extracted plutonium with second a aqueous phase, wherein the second aqueous phase has a second acidity higher than the first acidity, so as to allow the extracted plutonium to extract into the second aqueous phase. The invented method facilitates isolation of plutonium polymer without the formation of crud or unwanted emulsions.

  20. A Study of the Distribution of Impurities in the Extraction of Uranyl Nitrate with Ether from Aqueous Solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Conard

    1946-01-01

    Early in 1942 it had been found on a laboratory scale that certain impurities such as the Rare Earths were removed by small water washes from an ether solution of Uranyl Nitrate. It was hoped that in the large production units to be constructed that the water soluble impurities would all be washed out by the time the radioactive Thorium

  1. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of cadmium chloride, cadmium bromide, cadmium iodide, cadmium nitrate, and cadmium sulphate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Apelblat; Eli Korin

    2007-01-01

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of cadmium salts (chloride, bromide, iodide, nitrate, and sulphate) were determined over the temperature range 280K to 322K and compared with the literature data. The vapour pressures determined were used to obtain the water activities, osmotic coefficients and the molar enthalpies of vaporization in the (cadmium salt+water) systems.

  2. The molar enthalpies of solution and vapour pressures of saturated aqueous solutions of aluminium chloride, aluminium nitrate and aluminium sulphate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Apelblat; Eli Korin

    2002-01-01

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of aluminium chloride, aluminium nitrate and aluminium sulphate were determined as a function of temperature. The vapour pressures served to evaluate the water activities, osmotic coefficients and molar enthalpies of vaporization. Molar enthalpies of solution of aluminium chloride hexahydrate, ?solHm(AlCl3·6H2O, T=295.02K, m=0.02084mol·kg?1)=?(54.6±2.1)kJ·mol?1, aluminium nitrate nonahydrate, ?solHm(Al(NO3)3·9H2O; T=296.62K, m=0.01342mol·kg?1)=(30.7±1.0)kJ·mol?1 and aluminium sulphate octadecahydrate, ?solHm(Al2(SO4)3·18H2O,

  3. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, John L. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  4. Nitrate Anion Recognition in Organic-Aqueous Solvent Mixtures by a Bis(triazolium)acridine-Containing [2]Rotaxane.

    PubMed

    Martí-Centelles, Vicente; Beer, Paul D

    2015-06-22

    The synthesis of a novel [2]rotaxane host system containing a bis(triazolium)acridine-based axle component is reported. (1) H?NMR anion-binding titrations reveal that the rotaxane is able to recognise selectively the NO3 (-) anion over a range of more basic oxoanions (AcO(-) , HCO3 (-) and H2 PO4 (-) ) in a competitive organic-aqueous solvent mixture. PMID:25925564

  5. Early processes in positron and positronium chemistry: possible scavenging of epithermal e+ by nitrate ion in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Serge V.; Byakov, Vsevolod M.; Duplâtre, Gilles; Zvezhinskiy, Dmitrii S.; Stepanov, Petr S.; Zaluzhnyi, Alexandr G.

    2015-06-01

    Positron ionization slowing down, formation of the positron track, reactions of e+ with track species and its interaction with a scavenger on a subpicosecond timescale, including the process of the positronium formation process are discussed. Interpretation of the positron annihilation lifetime data on positronium formation in aqueous solutions of NO?3 anions, known as efficient scavengers of the presolvated track electrons, suggests that these ions may also capture epithermal (presolvated) positrons as well.

  6. Subchronic inhalation of carbon tetrachloride alters the tissue retention of acutely inhaled plutonium-239 nitrate in F344 rats and syrian golden hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Barr, E.B.; Lundgren, D.L. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) has been used extensively in the nuclear weapons industry, so it is likely that nuclear plant workers have been exposed to both CCl{sub 4} and plutonium compounds. Future exposures may occur during {open_quotes}cleanup{close_quotes} operations at weapons productions sites such as the Hanford, Washington, and Rocky Flats, Colorado, facilities. Inhalation of 20 and 100 ppm CCl{sub 4} by hamsters reduces uptake of {sup 239}Pu solubilized from lung, shunting the {sup 239}Pu to the skeleton.

  7. Vapour pressures of saturated aqueous solutions of ammonium iodide, potassium iodide, potassium nitrate, strontium chloride, lithium sulphate, sodium thiosulphate, magnesium nitrate, and uranyl nitrate from T =(278 to 323) K

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Apelblat; Eli Korin

    1998-01-01

    Vapour pressures of saturated aqueous solutions of NH4I, KI, KNO3, SrCl2, Li2SO4, Na2S2O3, Mg(NO3)2, and UO2(NO3)2were determined in the temperature range (278 to 323) K using an electronic hygrometer with an electrolyte sensor, and compared with literature data. Water activities, osmotic coefficients, and molar enthalpies of vaporization and solution at saturation point were evaluated from the determined vapour pressures.

  8. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Gregory, Kevin M. (Woodridge, IL)

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  9. LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.

    2012-02-03

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

  10. Removal of americium from aqueous nitrate solutions by sorption onto PC88A-impregnated macroporous polymeric beads.

    PubMed

    Pathak, S K; Tripathi, S C; Singh, K K; Mahtele, A K; Kumar, Manmohan; Gandhi, P M

    2014-08-15

    The removal of Am (III) ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid-liquid extraction using indigenously synthesized Extractant Impregnated Macroporous Polymeric Beads (EIMPBs). These beads were prepared by an in situ phase inversion method using polyethersulfone (PES) as base polymer and 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (PC88A) as an extractant. The synthesized EIMPBs were characterized by FTIR, TGA and SEM techniques. The batch equilibration study using these beads for the uptake of Am (III) was carried out as a function of parameters, like pH, equilibration time, Am (III) concentration, etc. The blank polymeric beads, without PC88A, have shown negligible sorption of Am (III) under the experimental conditions. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of Am (III) on the polymeric beads fitted well in the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The synthesized polymeric beads exhibited very good sorption capacity for Am (III) at pH 3. The reusability of the beads was also ascertained by repetitive sorption/desorption of Am (III) up to 10 cycles of operation, without any significant change in their sorption characteristics. PMID:24997262

  11. Modified titrimetric determination of plutonium using photometric end-point detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baughman, W.J.; Dahlby, J.W.

    1980-04-01

    A method used at LASL for the accurate and precise assay of plutonium metal was modified for the measurement of plutonium in plutonium oxides, nitrate solutions, and in other samples containing large quantities of plutonium in oxidized states higher than +3. In this modified method, the plutonium oxide or other sample is dissolved using the sealed-reflux dissolution method or other appropriate methods. Weighed aliquots, containing approximately 100 mg of plutonium, of the dissolved sample or plutonium nitrate solution are fumed to dryness with an HC1O/sub 4/-H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ mixture. The dried residue is dissolved in dilute H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and the plutonium is reduced to plutonium (III) with zinc metal. The excess zinc metal is dissolved with HCl, and the solution is passed through a lead reductor column to ensure complete reduction of the plutonium to plutonium (III). The solution, with added ferroin indicator, is then titrated immediately with standardized ceric solution to a photometric end point. For the analysis of plutonium metal solutions, plutonium oxides, and nitrate solutions, the relative standard deviation are 0.06, 0.08, and 0.14%, respectively. Of the elements most likely to be found with the plutonium, only iron, neptunium, and uranium interfere. Small amounts of uranium and iron, which titrate quantitatively in the method, are determined by separate analytical methods, and suitable corrections are applied to the plutonium value. 4 tables, 4 figures.

  12. Extraction of rare earth metal(III) nitrates with trialkylmethylammonium nitrate from multicomponent solutions containing ammonium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Pyartman, A.K.; Puzikov, E.A.; Bogatov, K.B. [St. Petersburg Technological Institute (Russian Federation)

    1994-10-20

    A study has been made of the extraction of rare earth elements (III) (praseodymium-lutetium, yttrium) by trialkylmethylammonium nitrate in kerosine (1.10 M) from binary and multicomponent solutions containing 1.0-3.0 M of ammonium nitrate. Physicochemical and mathematical models have been proposed for the distribution of individual lanthanides (III) depending on the composition of the initial raw material and on the total REE(III) and ammonium nitrate concentrations in the aqueous phase. The optimal concentration ranges for total REE and ammonium nitrate in the aqueous phase have been found for separating complex REE concentrates by using trialkylmethylammonium nitrate in the diluent.

  13. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF INTERACTIONS OF IRRADIATED O-XYLENE/NOX/SO2/AIR MIXTURES WITH AQUEOUS MEDIA CONTAINING SODIUM FLUORIDE, SODIUM TRIFLUOROACETATE, AMMONIUM NITRATE AND HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate interactions between complex air mixtures and aqueous films containing hydrolysis products of hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) and hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) oxidation products. he experiments consisted of exposing aqueous films con...

  14. Nitrate Protocol

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The GLOBE Program, UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research)

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this resource is to measure the nitrate-nitrogen of water. Students will use a nitrate kit to measure the nitrate-nitrogen in the water at their hydrology site. The exact procedure depends on the instructions in the nitrate kit used.

  15. Supported Extractant Membranes for Americium and Plutonium Recovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony C. Muscatello; James D. Navratil; Milton E. Killion; Marlene Y. Price

    1987-01-01

    Solid supported liquid membranes(SLM) are useful in transferring and concentrating americium and plutonium from nitrate solutions. Specifically, DHDECMP (d ihexyl-N, N-diethylcarbamoyImethylphosphonate) supported on Accurel or Celgard polypropylene hollow fibers assembled in modular form transfers >95% of the americium and >70% of the plutonium from high nitrate (6.9 M), low acid (0.1 M) feeds into 0.25 M oxalic acid stripping solution.

  16. Kinetics of extraction and back extraction of Pr(III) and Nd(III) nitrates from aqueous electrolyte solutions with a composite material based on polymer-supported tri- n -butyl phosphate at various temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Pyartman; V. A. Keskinov; V. V. Lishchuk

    2008-01-01

    Kinetics of extraction and back extraction of Pr(III) and Nd(III) nitrates from aqueous electrolyte solutions with a composite\\u000a material (CM) based on polymer-supported tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) at 293.15–333.15 K is studied. The rate-determining stage of the processes is found to be the interfacial\\u000a diffusion (film kinetics). The mass-transfer coefficients are determined, and, from their temperature dependences, the apparent\\u000a activation energy

  17. Thermal Stability Studies of Candidate Decontamination Agents for Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant Plutonium-Contaminated Gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, Randall D.; Cooper, Thurman D.; Jones, Susan A.; Ewalt, John R.; Compton, James A.; Trent, Donald S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2005-09-29

    This report provides the results of PNNL's and Fluor's studies of the thermal stabilities of potential wastes arising from decontamination of Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant's plutonium contaminated gloveboxes. The candidate wastes arising from the decontamination technologies ceric nitrate/nitric acid, RadPro, Glygel, and Aspigel.

  18. Plutonium pyrophoricity

    SciTech Connect

    Stakebake, J.L.

    1992-06-02

    A review of the published literature on ignition and burning of plutonium metal was conducted in order to better define the characteristic of pyrophoric plutonium. The major parameter affecting ignition is the surface area/mass ratio of the sample. Based on this parameter, plutonium metal can be classified into four categories: (1) bulk metal, (2) film and foils, (3) chips and turnings, and (4) powder. Other parameters that can alter the ignition of the metal include experimental, chemical, physical, and environmental effects. These effects are reviewed in this report. It was concluded from this review that pyrophoric plutonium can be conservatively defined as: Plutonium metal that will ignite spontaneously in air at a temperature of 150{degrees}C or below in the absence of external heat, shock, or friction. The 150{degrees}C temperature was used to compensate for the self-heating of plutonium metal. For a practical definition of whether any given metal is pyrophoric, all of the factors affecting ignition must be considered.

  19. Dehydration of plutonium trichloride hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1991-12-31

    A process of preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride is provided.

  20. Extraction of rare-earth(III) nitrates by trialkylmethylammonium nitrate from multicomponent solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Pyartman; A. A. Kopyrin; E. A. Puzikov

    1994-01-01

    Extraction of rare-earth metal(III) (REM) [praseodymium-lutetium, yttrium(III)] nitrates by solutions of trialkylmethylammonium nitrate in kerosene (0.4-1.0 M) was studied. It was established that di- and trisolvates are formed in the organic phase. Extraction constants were determined. Physicochemical and mathematical models were developed to describe the extraction of REM(III) nitrates from binary and multicomponent aqueous solutions. The range of REM nitrate

  1. Standard test method for plutonium assay by plutonium (III) diode array spectrophotometry

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the determination of total plutonium as plutonium(III) in nitrate and chloride solutions. The technique is applicable to solutions of plutonium dioxide powders and pellets (Test Methods C 697), nuclear grade mixed oxides (Test Methods C 698), plutonium metal (Test Methods C 758), and plutonium nitrate solutions (Test Methods C 759). Solid samples are dissolved using the appropriate dissolution techniques described in Practice C 1168. The use of this technique for other plutonium-bearing materials has been reported (1-5), but final determination of applicability must be made by the user. The applicable concentration range for plutonium sample solutions is 10–200 g Pu/L. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropria...

  2. LaMnO 3 perovskite thin film deposition, from aqueous nitrate solutions of La and Mn, in a low-pressure plasma expanded through a nozzle (PETN)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. F. Miralaï; R. Avni; E. Francke; D. Morvan; J. Amouroux; H. Nickel

    1997-01-01

    A new low-pressure plasma coating process was developed using an inductively coupled radio-frequency plasma, expanded through a nozzle (PETN) and aqueous metallic salt injection in a pulsating mode. LaMnO3.15 perovskites were deposited on quartz and YSZ substrates, in an Ar + O2 plasma using La(NO3)3 and Mn(NO3)2 aqueous precursors. The microcrystalline structure of the deposits was investigated by X-ray diffraction

  3. A biological source of oceanic alkyl nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, E. E.; Lewis, C. B.; Velasco, F. L.; Escobar, C.; Kellogg, D.; Velcamp, M.

    2013-12-01

    Alkyl nitrates are an important component of reactive nitrogen in the troposphere. The oceans are a source of alkyl nitrates to the atmosphere, however the source of alkyl nitrates in the oceans is unknown. It has been demonstrated that the reaction of alkyl peroxy radicals (ROO) with nitric oxide (NO) produces alkyl nitrates in the aqueous phase. We hypothesize that alkyl nitrates may be formed by organisms through the same reaction and therefore biological production could be a source of alkyl nitrates to the troposphere. This work focuses on the production of alkyl nitrates by the diatoms Chaetoceros muelleri and Thalassiosira weisfloggi. Using chemostats, we measure alkyl nitrates formed under nitrate limited conditions. We also use triggers and inhibitors of nitric oxide formation to determine if alkyl nitrate formation is affected by changes in NO production. To date, the rates of production of alkyl nitrates in our cultures, lead us to estimate a production rate on the order of femtomolar/day for C1-C3 alkyl nitrates by diatom species in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. This suggests that diatoms may contribute to the overall ocean source of alkyl nitrates; however, it is possible that other types of phytoplankton, such as cyanobacteria, that are more abundant in the open ocean, may contribute to a greater extent.

  4. Modeling of the Extraction of Nitric Acid and Neodymium Nitrate from Aqueous Solutions over a Wide Range of Activities by CMPO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Belair; A. Labet; C. Mariet; P. Dannus

    2005-01-01

    A thermodynamic model that allows one to determine the number and the stoichiometry of the complexes formed between nitric acid, neodymium nitrate (Nd(NO3)3), and octyl(phenyl)?N,N?diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) diluted in nitrophenylhexyl ether (NPHE) also called 1?(hexyloxy)?2?nitrobenzene, is presented in this work. The Mikulin?Sergievskii?Dannus' model was used to model the extraction at 25°C of the HNO3?H2O?NPHE, HNO3?H2O?CMPO 0.2 mol kg?NPHE, Nd(NO3)3?H2O?CMPO 0.2 mol kg?NPHE and

  5. Processing of Non-PFP Plutonium Oxide in Hanford Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Susan A.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2011-03-10

    Processing of non-irradiated plutonium oxide, PuO2, scrap for recovery of plutonium values occurred routinely at Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) in glovebox line operations. Plutonium oxide is difficult to dissolve, particularly if it has been high-fired; i.e., calcined to temperatures above about 400°C and much of it was. Dissolution of the PuO2 in the scrap typically was performed in PFP’s Miscellaneous Treatment line using nitric acid (HNO3) containing some source of fluoride ion, F-, such as hydrofluoric acid (HF), sodium fluoride (NaF), or calcium fluoride (CaF2). The HNO3 concentration generally was 6 M or higher whereas the fluoride concentration was ~0.5 M or lower. At higher fluoride concentrations, plutonium fluoride (PuF4) would precipitate, thus limiting the plutonium dissolution. Some plutonium-bearing scrap also contained PuF4 and thus required no added fluoride. Once the plutonium scrap was dissolved, the excess fluoride was complexed with aluminum ion, Al3+, added as aluminum nitrate, Al(NO3)3•9H2O, to limit collateral damage to the process equipment by the corrosive fluoride. Aluminum nitrate also was added in low quantities in processing PuF4.

  6. Oxidation of nitric oxide in aqueous solution to nitrite but not nitrate: comparison with enzymatically formed nitric oxide from L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Ignarro, L J; Fukuto, J M; Griscavage, J M; Rogers, N E; Byrns, R E

    1993-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in oxygen-containing aqueous solution has a short half-life that is often attributed to a rapid oxidation to both NO2- and NO3-. The chemical fate of NO in aqueous solution is often assumed to be the same as that in air, where NO is oxidized to NO2 followed by dimerization to N2O4. Water then reacts with N2O4 to form both NO2- and NO3-. We report here that NO in aqueous solution containing oxygen is oxidized primarily to NO2- with little or no formation of NO3-. In the presence of oxyhemoglobin or oxymyoglobin, however, NO and NO2- were oxidized completely to NO3-. Methemoglobin was inactive in this regard. The unpurified cytosolic fraction from rat cerebellum, which contains constitutive NO synthase activity, catalyzed the conversion of L-arginine primarily to NO3- (NO2-/NO3- ratio = 0.25). After chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel or affinity chromatography using 2',5'-ADP-Sepharose 4B, active fractions containing NO synthase activity catalyzed the conversion of L-arginine primarily to NO2- (NO2-/NO3- ratio = 5.6) or only to NO2-, respectively. Unpurified cytosol from activated rat alveolar macrophages catalyzed the conversion of L-arginine to NO2- without formation of NO3-. Addition of 30 microM oxyhemoglobin to all enzyme reaction mixtures resulted in the formation primarily of NO3- (NO2-/NO3- ratio = 0.09 to 0.20). Cyanide ion, which displaces NO2- from its binding sites on oxyhemoglobin, inhibited the formation of NO3-, thereby allowing NO2- to accumulate. These observations indicate clearly that the primary decomposition product of NO in aerobic aqueous solution is NO2- and that further oxidation to NO3- requires the presence of additional oxidizing species such as oxyhemoproteins. PMID:7690141

  7. Toward a general parameterization of N2O5 reactivity on aqueous particles: the competing effects of particle liquid water, nitrate and chloride

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. H. Bertram; J. A. Thornton

    2009-01-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of N2O5 on mixed organic-inorganic aerosol particles was investigated using an entrained aerosol flow tube coupled to a custom-built chemical ionization mass spectrometer. Laboratory results on aqueous particles confirm a strong dependence of the reactive uptake coefficient (gamma) on particle liquid water, for particle water concentrations below 15 M, and the molar ratio of particle water to

  8. SOME ASPECTS OF THE ANION EXCHANGE BEHAVIOR OF URANYL NITRATE IN THE PRESENCE OF OTHER INORGANIC NITRATES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. K. Foreman; I. R. McGowan; T. D. Smith

    1959-01-01

    The addition of inorganic nitrates to aqueous solutions of uranyl ; nitrate enhances the uptake of uranium on the anion-exchange resin Deacidite FF ; in the onder anuninum> calcium> lithium> ammonium. The predominating cause is ; considered to be the facilitation of formation of nitrate complexes by the uranyl ; ion, and of the subsequent ion-exchange, due to the decrease

  9. Seaborg's Plutonium ?

    E-print Network

    Norman, Eric B; Telhami, Kristina E

    2014-01-01

    Passive x-ray and gamma-ray analysis was performed on UC Berkeley's EH&S Sample S338. The object was found to contain Pu-239 and no other radioactive isotopes. The mass of Pu-239 contained in this object was determined to be 2.0 +- 0.3 micrograms. These observations are consistent with the identification of this object being the 2.77-microgram plutonium oxide sample described by Glenn Seaborg and his collaborators as the first sample of Pu-239 that was large enough to be weighed.

  10. Seaborg's Plutonium?

    E-print Network

    Eric B. Norman; Keenan J. Thomas; Kristina E. Telhami

    2015-02-17

    Passive x-ray and gamma-ray analysis was performed on UC Berkeley's EH&S Sample S338. The object was found to contain Pu-239 and no other radioactive isotopes. The mass of Pu-239 contained in this object was determined to be 2.0 +- 0.3 micrograms. These observations are consistent with the identification of this object being the 2.77-microgram plutonium oxide sample described by Glenn Seaborg and his collaborators as the first sample of Pu-239 that was large enough to be weighed.

  11. THE CORROSION BEHAVIORS OF PLUTONIUM AND URANIUM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Waber

    1958-01-01

    The many similarities in the chemical reactivity of plutonium and ; uranium were used to gain a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved in ; the corrosion behavior of these metals and their alloys. It may be concluded ; that the reaction in aqueous environment is controlled by the rate of one or more ; reactions occurring at local anodes.

  12. STRIPPING PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kolodney

    1959-01-01

    A method for removing silver, nickel, cadmium, zinc, and indium coatings ; from plutonium objects while simultaneously rendering the plutonium object ; passive is described. The coated plutonium object is immersed as the anode in an ; electrolyte in which the plutonium is passive and the coating metal is not ; passive, using as a cathode a metal which does

  13. Extraction of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate from aqueous nitrate media

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Muscatello, A.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

    1981-05-01

    The extraction behavior of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions from nitrate solution was studied using relatively pure dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP). The data obtained for Am(III) and Eu(III) using DHDECMP were compared with analogous measurements obtained with dibutyl butylphosphonate (DB(BP)) and in certain cases with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylethylphosphonate (DHDECEP). It was found that both the nitrate and extractant concentration dependencies were third power. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) and for Eu(III) measured from low acid LiNO/sub 3/ solutions were similar for DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP), thus giving no evidence for any significant chelation effect for DHDECMP. Significant differences among DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP) are found for the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from 1 to 5 M HNO/sub 3/. These differences are explained by the ability of DHDECMP (and to a lesser extent, DHDECEP) to buffer itself against HNO/sub 3/ by protonation of the amide group. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) through Fm(III) and for La(III) through Lu(III) measured from LiNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3/ using DHDECMP show a definite tetrad effect when plotted as a function of Z. The K/sub d/'s for the lanthanides generally decrease with Z whereas the K/sub d/'s for the transplutonium elements change very little with Z.

  14. Electrolytic production of uranous nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Orebaugh, E.G.; Propst, R.C.

    1980-04-01

    Efficient production of uranous nitrate is important in nuclear fuel reprocessing because U(IV) acts as a plutonium reductant in solvent extraction and can be coprecipitated with plutonium and/or throium as oxalates during fuel reprocessing. Experimental conditions are described for the efficient electrolytic production of uranous nitrate for use as a reductant in the SRP Purex process. The bench-scale, continuous-flow, electrolysis cell exhibits a current efficiency approaching 100% in combination with high conversion rates of U(VI) to U(IV) in simulated and actual SRP Purex solutions. High current efficiency is achieved with a voltage-controlled mercury-plated platinum electrode and the use of hydrazine as a nitrite scavenger. Conversion of U(VI) to U(IV) proceeds at 100% efficiency. Cathodic gas generation is minimal. The low rate of gas generation permits a long residence time within the cathode, a necessary condition for high conversions on a continuous basis. Design proposals are given for a plant-scale, continuous-flow unit to meet SRP production requirements. Results from the bench-scale tests indicate that an 8-kW unit can supply sufficient uranous nitrate reductant to meet the needs of the Purex process at SRP.

  15. Method for dissolving delta-phase plutonium

    DOEpatents

    Karraker, David G. (1600 Sherwood Pl., SE., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1992-01-01

    A process for dissolving plutonium, and in particular, delta-phase plutonium. The process includes heating a mixture of nitric acid, hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) and potassium fluoride to a temperature between 40.degree. and 70.degree. C., then immersing the metal in the mixture. Preferably, the nitric acid has a concentration of not more than 2M, the HAN approximately 0.66M, and the potassium fluoride 0.1M. Additionally, a small amount of sulfamic acid, such as 0.1M can be added to assure stability of the HAN in the presence of nitric acid. The oxide layer that forms on plutonium metal may be removed with a non-oxidizing acid as a pre-treatment step.

  16. Anion Recognition Triggered Nanoribbon-Like Self-Assembly: A Fluorescent Chemosensor for Nitrate in Acidic Aqueous Solution and Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaping; Chen, Shiyan; Ni, Xin-Long

    2015-07-21

    A water-soluble ?-conjugated bispyridinium phenylenevinylene-based fluorogenic probe has been developed as a novel fluorescent chemosensor for highly selective, sensitive, and rapid detection of NO3(-) anion in acidic aqueous media. This system self-assembles to a nanoribbon as a result of ionic interaction. The positively charged chemosensor generates a nearly instantaneous significant fluorescence signal (475 vs 605 nm) in response to NO3(-) in the green/yellow spectral region, with a large Stokes shift (130 nm). The fluorescence changes can be attributed to the self-aggregation of the sensor triggered by ionic interaction, which occurs as a consequence of the subtle cooperation of electrostatic ionic bonding, van der Waals forces, and ?-stacking of the ?-conjugated aromatic moieties. Importantly, this chemosensor has been employed for the first time for the fluorescence detection of intracellular NO3(-) anion in cultured cells. PMID:26084357

  17. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, Jr., Jerry (Los Alamos, NM); Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Trujillo, Eddie A. (Espanola, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride is provided.

  18. Automated and rapid online determination of 15N abundance and concentration of ammonium, nitrite, or nitrate in aqueous samples by the SPINMAS technique.

    PubMed

    Stange, C Florian; Spott, Oliver; Apelt, Bernd; Russow, Rolf W B

    2007-09-01

    On the basis of the principle of reaction continuous-flow quadrupole mass spectrometry, an automated sample preparation unit for inorganic nitrogen (SPIN) species was developed and coupled to a quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (MAS). The SPINMAS technique was designed for an automated, sensitive, and rapid determination of 15N abundance and concentration of a wide variety of N-species involved in nitrogen cycling (e.g. NH4+, NO3-, NH2OH etc.). In this paper, the SPINMAS technique is evaluated with regard to the determination of 15N abundance and concentration of the most fundamental inorganic nitrogen compounds in ecosystems such as NH4+, NO2-, and NO3-. The presented paper describes the newly developed system in detail and demonstrates the general applicability of the system. For a precise determination of 15N abundance and concentration, a minimum total N-amount of 10 microg NH4+ - N, 0.03 microg NO2- - N, or 0.3 microg NO3- - N has to be supplied. Currently, the SPINMAS technique represents the most rapid and only fully automated all-round method for a simultaneous determination of 15N abundance and total N-amount of NH4+, NO2-, or NO3- in aqueous samples. PMID:17786668

  19. Standard test method for plutonium by Iron (II)/Chromium (VI) amperometric titration

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of plutonium in unirradiated nuclear-grade plutonium dioxide, uranium-plutonium mixed oxides with uranium (U)/plutonium (Pu) ratios up to 21, plutonium metal, and plutonium nitrate solutions. Optimum quantities of plutonium to measure are 7 to 15 mg. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  20. Plutonium Immobilization Puck Handling

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-01-26

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) will immobilize excess plutonium and store the plutonium in a high level waste radiation field. To accomplish these goals, the PIP will process various forms of plutonium into plutonium oxide, mix the oxide powder with ceramic precursors, press the mixture into pucks, sinter the pucks into a ceramic puck, load the pucks into metal cans, seal the cans, load the cans into magazines, and load the magazines into a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DPWF) canister. These canisters will be sent to the DWPF, an existing Savannah River Site (SRS) facility, where molten high level waste glass will be poured into the canisters encapsulating the ceramic pucks. Due to the plutonium radiation, remote equipment will perform these operations in a contained environment. The Plutonium Immobilization Project is in the early design stages and the facility will begin operation in 2005. This paper will discuss the Plutonium Immobilization puck handling conceptual design and the puck handling equipment testing.

  1. Plutonium metal burning facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. E. Hausburg; R. G. Leebl

    1977-01-01

    A glove-box facility was designed to convert plutonium skull metal or unburned oxide to an oxide acceptable for plutonium recovery and purification. A discussion of the operation, safety aspects, and electrical schematics are included.

  2. Plutonium scrap processing at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, A.E.; McKerley, B.J.; Christensen, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory currently has the newest plutonium handling facility in the nation. Los Alamos has been active in the processing of plutonium almost since the discovery of this man-made element in 1941. One of the functions of the new facility is the processing of plutonium scrap generated at LASL and other sites. The feed for the scrap processing program is extremely varied, and a wide variety of contaminants are often encountered. Depending upon the scrap matrix and contaminants present, the majority of material receives a nitric acid/hydrofluoric acid or nitric acid/calcium fluoride leach. The plutonium nitrate solutions are then loaded onto an anion exchange column charged with DOWEX 1 x 4, 50 to 100 mesh, nitrate form resin. The column is eluted with 0.48 M hydroxyl amine nitrate. The Pu(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ is then precipitated as plutonium III oxalate which is calcined at 450 to 500/sup 0/C to yield a purified PuO/sub 2/ product.

  3. History and stabilization of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.S., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-18

    The 231-Z Isolation Building or Plutonium Metallurgy Building is located in the Hanford Site`s 200 West Area, approximately 300 yards north of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) (234-5 Building). When the Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) built it in 1944 to contain the final step for processing plutonium, it was called the Isolation Building. At that time, HEW used a bismuth phosphate radiochemical separations process to make `AT solution,` which was then dried and shipped to Los Alamos, New Mexico. (AT solution is a code name used during World War II for the final HEW product.) The process was carried out first in T Plant and the 224-T Bulk Reduction Building and B Plant and the 224-B Bulk Reduction Building. The 224-T and -B processes produced a concentrated plutonium nitrate stream, which then was sent in 8-gallon batches to the 231-Z Building for final purification. In the 231-Z Building, the plutonium nitrate solution underwent peroxide `strikes` (additions of hydrogen peroxide to further separate the plutonium from its carrier solutions), to form the AT solution. The AT solution was dried and shipped to the Los Alamos Site, where it was made into metallic plutonium and then into weapons hemispheres.` The 231-Z Building began `hot` operations (operations using radioactive materials) with regular runs of plutonium nitrate on January 16, 1945.

  4. The efficacies of pure LICAM(C) and DTPA on the retention of plutonium-238 and americium-241 in rats after their inhalation as nitrate and intravenous injection as citrate.

    PubMed

    Stradling, G N; Stather, J W; Gray, S A; Moody, J C; Ellender, M; Hodgson, A; Volf, V; Taylor, D M; Wirth, P; Gaskin, P W

    1989-10-01

    The pure carboxylated catechoyl amide LICAM(C) and the calcium and zinc salts of diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA), were tested for efficacy for removing 238Pu and 241Am from rats after inhalation of the nitrate or intravenous injection of the citrate. The results were compared with the efficacy of methylated LICAM(C) used in previous experiments. It was shown that: (1) after inhalation of 238Pu nitrate, DTPA was far superior to pure LICAM(C); (2) after intravenous injection of 238Pu citrate, the infusion of DTPA plus LICAM(C) was only marginally more effective than DTPA alone; and (3) after inhalation or intravenous injection of 238Pu plus 241Am, the efficacy of pure LICAM(C) was only marginally more effective than the methylated form and neither form was effective for the decorporation of 241Am. It was concluded that DTPA, at present, remains the chelating agent of choice for treating persons accidentally contaminated with transportable forms of Pu and Am. PMID:2571662

  5. Plutonium recovery at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, E.L.

    1980-06-01

    Research programs have led to the adoption of procedures for all phases of plutonium recovery and purification. This report discusses some of the many procedures required to recover and purify the plutonium contained in the residues generated by LASL research, process development, and production activities. The report also discusses general plant facilities, the liquid and gaseous effluents, and solid waste management practices at the New Plutonium Facility, TA-55. Many of the processes or operations are merely steps in preparing the feed for one of the purification systems. For example, the plutonium is currently removed from noncombustibles in the pickling operation with an HNO/sub 3/ leach. The HNO/sub 3/ leach solution is the product of this operation and is sent to one of the nitrate anion-exchange systems for concentration and purification.

  6. Method for improved decomposition of metal nitrate solutions

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN); Stines, William B. (Knoxville, TN)

    1983-10-11

    A method for co-conversion of aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates wherein thermal decomposition within a temperature range of about 300.degree. to 800.degree. C. is carried out in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal.

  7. Method for improved decomposition of metal nitrate solutions

    DOEpatents

    Haas, P.A.; Stines, W.B.

    1981-01-21

    A method for co-conversion of aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates is described, wherein thermal decomposition within a temperature range of about 300 to 800/sup 0/C is carried out in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal.

  8. Hydroxylamine nitrate self-catalytic kinetics study with adiabatic calorimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lijun Liu; Chunyang Wei; Yuyan Guo; William J. Rogers; M. Sam Mannan

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) is an important member of the hydroxylamine compound family with applications that include equipment decontamination in the nuclear industry and aqueous or solid propellants. Due to its instability and autocatalytic behavior, HAN has been involved in several incidents at the Hanford and Savannah River Site (SRS) [Technical Report on Hydroxylamine Nitrate, US Department of Energy, 1998]. Much

  9. Evaluation of the Magnesium Hydroxide Treatment Process for Stabilizing PFP Plutonium/Nitric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Baker, Aaron B.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2000-09-28

    This document summarizes an evaluation of the magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] process to be used at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for stabilizing plutonium/nitric acid solutions to meet the goal of stabilizing the plutonium in an oxide form suitable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99. During the treatment process, nitric acid solutions bearing plutonium nitrate are neutralized with Mg(OH)2 in an air sparge reactor. The resulting slurry, containing plutonium hydroxide, is filtered and calcined. The process evaluation included a literature review and extensive laboratory- and bench-scale testing. The testing was conducted using cerium as a surrogate for plutonium to identify and quantify the effects of key processing variables on processing time (primarily neutralization and filtration time) and calcined product properties.

  10. Redox speciation of plutonium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Choppin; A. H. Bond; P. M. Hromadka

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge of the oxidation state distribution of plutonium in natural waters is necessary in modeling its behavior in environmental systems. The redox speciation of plutonium is complicated by such effects as hydrolysis, complexation, disproportionation, solubility, and redox interchange reactions. The insolubility of Pu(OH)4 is often the limiting factor of the net solubility of plutonium in oxic natural waters where Pu(V)O

  11. Extraction of REE(III) Nitrates with Polymer-Supported Trialkylmethylammonium Nitrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Pyartman; V. A. Keskinov; M. A. Mikhailenko; N. V. Nikitin; V. V. Lishchuk

    2004-01-01

    Extraction of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, and Y(III) nitrates with polymer-supported trialkylmethylammonium nitrate (Aliquat-336) in the presence 1-5 M NaNO3 in the aqueous phase is studied. The extraction isotherms are described taking into account formation of (R4N)2[Ln(NO3)5] in the extractant phase. The extraction constants decrease from La to Sm. The extraction constant of Y(III) is considerably lower than those

  12. 21 CFR 172.167 - Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2009-04-01 true Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution. 172.167 Section...Preservatives § 172.167 Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution. An aqueous solution...containing a mixture of silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide may be safely used in...

  13. Aqueous divalent metalnitrate interactions: hydration versus ion James P. Larentzos,b

    E-print Network

    in aqueous solution. A series of nitrate solutions, from low concentrations to saturated concentrations Nitrate aqueous solutions, Mg(NO3)2, Ca(NO3)2, Sr(NO3)2, and Pb(NO3)2, are investigated using Raman for surface reactivity and reaction mechanisms in atmospheric and geochemical systems. Aqueous solutions

  14. Plutonium weathering on Johnston Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, S.E.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Johnston Atoll was contaminated with transuranic elements, particularly plutonium, by atmospheric nuclear weapons tests and aborted nuclear devices. Initial cleanup operations and and an extensive soil remediation program were performed. However, many areas contained a low-level continuum of activity, and subsurface contamination has been detected. Discrete hot particles and contaminated soil were characterized to determine whether the spread of activity was caused by weathering. Analytical techniques included gamma spectrometry, alpha spectrometry, and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to determine transuranic elemental and isotopic composition. Ultrafiltration and small-particle handling techniques were employed to isolate individual particles. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, analytical transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy were used to characterize individual particles. Analyses of the hot particles showed that they are aborted nuclear warhead fragments that been melted and weathered in the presence of water and CaCO{sub 3}. It was concluded that the formation of aqueous ionic (Pu/Am)-CO{sub 3} coordinated complexes, during environmental exposure to large volumes of rainwater and carbonate-satured seawater, enhanced the solubility of transuranic elements. The (Pu/Am)-CO{sub 3} complexes sorbed onto colloidal CaCO{sub 3} and coral soil surfaces as they were exposed to rain and seawater. This mechanism led to greater dispersal of plutonium and americium than would be expected by physical transport of discrete hot particles alone.

  15. Plutonium Immobilization Canister Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, E.L.

    1999-01-26

    This disposition of excess plutonium is determined by the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (SPD-EIS) being prepared by the Department of Energy. The disposition method (Known as ''can in canister'') combines cans of immobilized plutonium-ceramic disks (pucks) with vitrified high-level waste produced at the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This is intended to deter proliferation by making the plutonium unattractive for recovery or theft. The envisioned process remotely installs cans containing plutonium-ceramic pucks into storage magazines. Magazines are then remotely loaded into the DWPF canister through the canister neck with a robotic arm and locked into a storage rack inside the canister, which holds seven magazines. Finally, the canister is processed through DWPF and filled with high-level waste glass, thereby surrounding the product cans. This paper covers magazine and rack development and canister loading concepts.

  16. Plutonium bioaccumulation in seabirds.

    PubMed

    Strumi?ska-Parulska, Dagmara I; Skwarzec, Bogdan; Fabisiak, Jacek

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the paper was plutonium (²³?Pu and ²³??²??Pu) determination in seabirds, permanently or temporarily living in northern Poland at the Baltic Sea coast. Together 11 marine birds species were examined: 3 species permanently residing in the southern Baltic, 4 species of wintering birds and 3 species of migrating birds. The obtained results indicated plutonium is non-uniformly distributed in organs and tissues of analyzed seabirds. The highest plutonium content was found in the digestion organs and feathers, the smallest in skin and muscles. The plutonium concentration was lower in analyzed species which feed on fish and much higher in herbivorous species. The main source of plutonium in analyzed marine birds was global atmospheric fallout. PMID:21864954

  17. Plutonium roundtable discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Penneman, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The roundtable discussion began with remarks by the chairman who pointed out the complicated nature of plutonium chemistry. Judging from the papers presented at this symposium, he noticed a pattern which indicated to him the result of diminished funding for investigation of basic plutonium chemistry and funding focused on certain problem areas. Dr. G.L. silver pointed to plutonium chemists' erroneous use of a simplified summary equation involving the disproportionation of Pu(EV) and their each of appreciation of alpha coefficients. To his appreciation of alpha coefficients. To his charges, Dr. J.T. Bell spoke in defense of the chemists. This discussion was followed by W.W. Schulz's comments on the need for experimental work to determine solubility data for plutonium in its various oxidation states under geologic repository conditions. Discussion then turned to plutonium pyrachemical process with Dana C. Christensen as the main speaker. This paper presents edited versions of participants' written version. (ATT)

  18. Uranium and plutonium in hair as an indicator of body burden in mice of different age and sex

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, K.W.; Wyatt, J.H.; Wilson, D.J.; Dixon, R.J.

    1982-06-01

    The uptake of uranium-235 and plutonium-239 in mice of different age and sex is examined in a controlled study. The animals received a single intraperitoneal dose of either plutonium-239 nitrate or uranium-235 nitrate at amounts of 0.2 mg/kg and 1.0 mg/kg respectively. Seven days after radioisotope administration, the animals were sacrificed and the uranium or plutonium content of the hair (including skin) was measured directly by delayed neutron analysis. Results show a higher retention of both uranium and plutonium in the whole body of young animals, but for specific whole body burden there was a marked increase with age for plutonium and only a slight increase for uranium. Sex did not appear to have any significant influence on the residual whole body or hair burdens. (JMT)

  19. Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV, V,and VI) using a liquid core waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Richard E.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Nitsche, Heino

    2003-06-28

    Understanding the aqueous chemistry of plutonium, in particular in environmental conditions, is often complicated by plutonium's complex redox chemistry. Because plutonium possesses four oxidation states, all of which can coexist in solution, a reliable method for the identification of these oxidation states is needed. The identification of plutonium oxidation states at low levels in aqueous solution is often accomplished through an indirect determination using series of liquid-liquid extraction procedures using oxidation state specific reagents such as HDEHP and TTA. While these methods, coupled with radioactive counting techniques provide superior limits of detection they may influence the plutonium redox equilibrium, are time consuming, waste intensive and costly. Other analytical methods such as mass spectrometry and radioactive counting as stand alone methods provide excellent detection limits but lack the ability to discriminate between the oxidation states of the plutonium ions in solution.

  20. QUANTIFICATION OF GALLIUM IN DRIED RESIDUE SAMPLES BY XRF: AN IMPROVED SAMPLE PREPARATION METHOD FOR ANALYZING PLUTONIUM METAL.

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, C. G. (Christopher G.)

    2001-01-01

    A novel XRF sample preparation method was investigated to quantify the concentration of gallium in plutonium metal and minimize the possibility of contaminating the instrument with radioactive material. To prepare homogenous specimens and to add an internal standard, the plutonium must first be dissolved. The currently established method then entails removing the plutonium by chromatography and analyzing the gallium remaining in solution. In the work presented here, plutonium solution aliquots containing zinc as an internal standard were cast onto Mylar, dried, and analyzed by XRF. Aqueous standards containing gallium and zinc were first cast as dried residues, and these residue standards were analyzed and calibrated. More recently aqueous standards containing plutonium, gallium, and zinc were prepared, cast as dried spots, and calibrated. Very linear calibrations were obtained for both sets of standards when zinc was used as the internal standard (RMS values =1% of the standards concentration range). Hence, this dried residue process appears very promising for quantifying gallium in plutonium metal.

  1. Ultra-small plutonium oxide nanocrystals: an innovative material in plutonium science.

    PubMed

    Hudry, Damien; Apostolidis, Christos; Walter, Olaf; Janssen, Arne; Manara, Dario; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Colineau, Eric; Vitova, Tonya; Prüssmann, Tim; Wang, Di; Kübel, Christian; Meyer, Daniel

    2014-08-11

    Apart from its technological importance, plutonium (Pu) is also one of the most intriguing elements because of its non-conventional physical properties and fascinating chemistry. Those fundamental aspects are particularly interesting when dealing with the challenging study of plutonium-based nanomaterials. Here we show that ultra-small (3.2±0.9?nm) and highly crystalline plutonium oxide (PuO2 ) nanocrystals (NCs) can be synthesized by the thermal decomposition of plutonyl nitrate ([PuO2 (NO3 )2 ]?3?H2 O) in a highly coordinating organic medium. This is the first example reporting on the preparation of significant quantities (several tens of milligrams) of PuO2 NCs, in a controllable and reproducible manner. The structure and magnetic properties of PuO2 NCs have been characterized by a wide variety of techniques (powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), TEM, IR, Raman, UV/Vis spectroscopies, and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry). The current PuO2 NCs constitute an innovative material for the study of challenging problems as diverse as the transport behavior of plutonium in the environment or size and shape effects on the physics of transuranium elements. PMID:25042621

  2. Plutonium radiation surrogate

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

    2010-02-02

    A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

  3. Aqueous phototransformation of zinc pyrithione

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. A. Sakkas; K. Shibata; Y. Yamaguchi; S. Sugasawa; T. Albanis

    2007-01-01

    The photochemical behavior of the antifouling agent zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) was studied in aqueous media of different composition under simulated solar irradiation using a xenon light source. The influence of important constituents of natural water (dissolved organic matter and nitrate) was also examined using a multivariate kinetic model. It was found that photodegradation proceeds via a pseudo first-order reaction. Kinetic

  4. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Morgan, Michael J. (Guilford, CT)

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  5. Biodegradation of Glycidol and Glycidyl Nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, David L.; Cornell, John H.; Kaplan, Arthur M.

    1982-01-01

    When calcium hydroxide is used to desensitize glycerol trinitrate (nitroglycerine)-containing waste streams, the epoxides glycidol and glycidyl nitrate are formed. The epoxide rings of both compounds are unstable to heat in aqueous solutions, and they open to form glycerol 1-mononitrate and presumably glycerol. These transformations were accelerated by microbial activity. Glycerol 1-mononitrate was slowly denitrated to form glycerol. Glycidol and glycidyl nitrate caused base-pair substitutions in the Ames test for mutagenicity, whereas glycerol 1-mononitrate tests were negative. PMID:16345917

  6. Plutonium: Requiem or reprieve

    SciTech Connect

    Pillay, K.K.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Many scientific discoveries have had profound effects on humanity and its future. However, the discovery of fissionable characteristics of a man-made element, plutonium, discovered in 1941 by Glenn Seaborg and associates, has probably had the greatest impact on world affairs. Although about 20 new elements have been synthesized since 1940, element 94 unarguably had the most dramatic impact when it was introduced to the world as the core of the nuclear bomb dropped on Nagasaki. Ever since, large quantities of this element have been produced, and it has had a major role in maintaining peace during the past 50 years. in addition, the rapid spread of nuclear power technology worldwide contributed to major growth in the production of plutonium as a by-product. This article discusses the following issues related to plutonium: plutonium from Nuclear Power Generation; environmental safety and health issues; health effects; safeguards issues; extended storage; disposal options.

  7. Plutonium dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Vest, Michael A. (Oak Park, IL); Fink, Samuel D. (Aiken, SC); Karraker, David G. (Aiken, SC); Moore, Edwin N. (Aiken, SC); Holcomb, H. Perry (North Augusta, SC)

    1996-01-01

    A two-step process for dissolving plutonium metal, which two steps can be carried out sequentially or simultaneously. Plutonium metal is exposed to a first mixture containing approximately 1.0M-1.67M sulfamic acid and 0.0025M-0.1M fluoride, the mixture having been heated to a temperature between 45.degree. C. and 70.degree. C. The mixture will dissolve a first portion of the plutonium metal but leave a portion of the plutonium in an oxide residue. Then, a mineral acid and additional fluoride are added to dissolve the residue. Alteratively, nitric acid in a concentration between approximately 0.05M and 0.067M is added to the first mixture to dissolve the residue as it is produced. Hydrogen released during the dissolution process is diluted with nitrogen.

  8. The Effect of Sedimentation on Plutonium Transport in Fourmile Branch

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.F.

    2002-02-21

    The major mechanisms of radioactive material transport and fate in surface water are sources, dilution, advection and dispersion of radionuclides by flow and surface waves, radionuclide decay, and interaction between sediment and radionuclides. STREAM II, an aqueous transport module of the Savannah River Site emergency response WIND system, accounts for the source term, and the effects of dilution, advection and dispersion. Although the model has the capability to account for nuclear decay, due to the short time interval of interest for emergency response, the effect of nuclear decay is very small and so it is not employed. The interactions between the sediment and radionuclides are controlled by the flow conditions and physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclides and the sediment constituents. The STREAM II version used in emergency response must provide results relatively quickly; it therefore does not model the effects of sediment deposition/resuspension. This study estimates the effects of sediment deposition/resuspension on aqueous plutonium transport in Fourmile Branch. There are no measured data on plutonium transport through surface water available for direct model calibration. Therefore, a literature search was conducted to find the range of plutonium partition coefficients based on laboratory experiments and field measurements. A sensitivity study of the calculated plutonium peak concentrations as a function of the input parameter of partition coefficient was then performed. Finally, an estimation of the plutonium partition coefficient was made for the Fourmile Branch.

  9. Disposition of separated plutonium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frans Berkhout; Anatoli Diakov; Harold Feiveson; Helen Hunt; Edwin Lyman; Marvin Miller; Frank von Hippel

    1993-01-01

    In the immediate term, plutonium, recovered from dismantled nuclear warheads and from civil reprocessing plants, will have to be stored securely, and under international safeguards if possible. In the intermediate term, the principal alternatives for disposition of this plutonium are: irradiation in mixed?oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in commercial unmodified light?water reactors or in specially adapted light?water reactors capable of operating

  10. Catalytic Reduction of Nitrate and Nitrite on Pt–Cu\\/Al 2O 3 Catalysts in Aqueous Solution: Role of the Interaction between Copper and Platinum in the Reaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Florence Epron; Florence Gauthard; Carole Pinéda; Jacques Barbier

    2001-01-01

    Bimetallic platinum copper catalysts were prepared by deposition of copper on a parent monometallic platinum catalyst. Two techniques were employed favoring the deposition of copper either on the parent metal or on the support. The activity and selectivity of copper and platinum monometallic catalysts are compared to those of their bimetallic counterparts. Copper reduces nitrates and nitrites according to a

  11. The Final Result of the Extraction in the Uranyl Nitrate-Diethyl Ether Water System. I. Continuous Aqueous Phase; EL EFECTO FINAL DE LA EXTRACCION EN EL SISTEMA NITRATO DE URANILO- ETER DIETILICO-AGUA. I. FASE CONTINUA ACUOSA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. P. Luina; L. G. Jodra; A. R. Miro

    1957-01-01

    The solute transfer of uranyl nitrate from diethylether to water was ; stadied in a spray column using water as dispersed phase and a direction of ; extraction from ether to water. The column is 102 cm long and has a diameter of ; 4.7 cm. The entrances of the phases are 77 cm apart. The rates of flow of

  12. Calculated critical parameters in simple geometries for oxide and nitrate water mixtures of U-233, U-235 and Pu239 with thorium. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. E. Converse; S. R. Bierman

    2011-01-01

    Calculations have been performed on water mixtures of oxides and nitrates of ²³³U, ²³U, and ²³Pu with chemically similar thorium compounds to determine critical dimensions for simple geometries (sphere, cylinder, and slab). Uranium enrichments calculated were 100%, 20%, 10%, and 5%; plutonium calculations assumed 100% ²³Pu. Thorium to uranium or plutonium weight ratios (Th: U or Pu) calculated were 0,

  13. THE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF TERNARY ALLOYS OF PLUTONIUM WITH URANIUM AND MOLYBDENUM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Foster; G. Phillips

    1960-01-01

    A procedure is described for the determination of plutonium, uranium, ; and molybdenum in their ternary alloys. The plutomum is separated from an acid ; solution of the alloy by absorption as the nitrate complex on a column of anion ; exchange resin. The uranium and molybdenum are recovered from the column ; effluent and determined without further separation. Uranium

  14. PLUTONIUM LOADING CAPACITY OF REILLEX HPQ ANION EXCHANGE COLUMN - AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FLOWSHEET FOR MOX

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.; King, W.; O'Rourke, P.

    2012-07-26

    Radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the dependence of column loading performance on the feed composition in the H-Canyon dissolution process for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). These loading experiments show that a representative feed solution containing {approx}5 g Pu/L can be loaded onto Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin from solutions containing 8 M total nitrate and 0.1 M KF provided that the F is complexed with Al to an [Al]/[F] molar ratio range of 1.5-2.0. Lower concentrations of total nitrate and [Al]/[F] molar ratios may still have acceptable performance but were not tested in this study. Loading and washing Pu losses should be relatively low (<1%) for resin loading of up to 60 g Pu/L. Loading above 60 g Pu/L resin is possible, but Pu wash losses will increase such that 10-20% of the additional Pu fed may not be retained by the resin as the resin loading approaches 80 g Pu/L resin.

  15. Extraction of Uranium, Neptunium and Plutonium from Caustic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia H.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Engle, Nancy L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Xu, Jade

    2004-03-28

    5 Fundamental research on uranium, neptunium and plutonium separation from alkaline media using solvent extraction is being conducted. Specific extractants for these actinides from alkaline media have been synthesized to investigate the feasibility of selective removal of these elements. Two families of extractants have been studied: terephthalamide and tetra(hydroxybenzyl)ethylene diamine derivatives. Fundamental studies were conducted to characterize their extraction behavior from a wide variety of aqueous conditions. The terephthalamide derivatives exhibit a significant extraction strength along with a discriminatory behavior among the actinides, plutonium being extracted the most strongly. Quantitative extraction of plutonium and moderate extraction of neptunium and uranium was achieved from a simple caustic solution. Interestingly, strontium is also quantitatively extracted by these derivatives. However, their stability to highly caustic solutions still needs to be imp roved. Tetra(hydroxybenzyl)ethylene diamine derivatives exhibit a very good stability to caustic conditions and are currently being studied.

  16. Superconductivity in plutonium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrao, J. L.; Bauer, E. D.; Mitchell, J. N.; Tobash, P. H.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    Although the family of plutonium-based superconductors is relatively small, consisting of four compounds all of which crystallize in the tetragonal HoCoGa5 structure, these materials serve as an important bridge between the known Ce- and U-based heavy fermion superconductors and the high-temperature cuprate superconductors. Further, the partial localization of 5f electrons that characterizes the novel electronic properties of elemental plutonium appears to be central to the relatively high superconducting transition temperatures that are observed in PuCoGa5, PuRhGa5, PuCoIn5, and PuRhIn5.

  17. METHOD FOR OBTAINING PLUTONIUM METAL AND ALLOYS OF PLUTONIUM FROM PLUTONIUM TRICHLORIDE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. Reavis; J. A. Leary; W. J. Maraman

    1962-01-01

    A process is given for both reducing plutonium trichloride to plutonium ; metal using cerium as the reductant and simultaneously alloying such plutonium ; metal with an excess of cerium or cerium and cobalt sufficient to yield the ; desired nuclear reactor fuel composition. The process is conducted at a ; temperature from about 550 to 775 deg C, at

  18. Field study of plutonium transport in the vadose zone. [Z-12 cribs

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, R.B.

    1981-11-01

    Past liquid waste disposal practices at the Hanford Site included the discharge of process waste solutions containing low-level plutonium concentrations directly to the ground via underground structures collectively termed cribs. A recent study was conducted to determine the spatial distribution of plutonium and americium beneath the retired 216-Z-12 Crib. The Z-12 Crib received low-salt aqueous waste from 1959 to 1973, when the crib was retired from service. During its active life, 2.8 x 10/sup 8/ L of aqueous waste containing 25.1 kg of plutonium was discharged to the crib. The distribution of plutonium and americium was determined by drilling wells in and around the Z-12 crib using specialized techniques and procedures for obtaining radioactively contaminated sediment samples. Samples from each well were analyzed to determine sediment type, moisture content, and plutonium and americium concentrations. Results of the study showed that the highest concentration of plutonium (approx. 5 x 10/sup 6/ pCi/g) occurred in the sediment immediately below the crib bottom. Plutonium concentrations decrease rapidly with distance from the bottom of the crib. Plutonium activity was less than 10/sup 3/ pCi/g, 3 m below the crib, and less than 1 pCi/g, 12 m below the crib. An increase in plutonium activity that ranged from a few to a few tens of picocuries per gram occurred from 30 to 36 m below the crib bottom. The activity was associated with a silt unit at that depth and was probably related to the greater sorption capacity of the silt unit. Results from ground-water monitoring beneath the Z-12 Crib indicate that breakthrough of measurable concentrations of plutonium to the ground water did not occur.

  19. Removal of boron, fluoride and nitrate by electrodialysis in the presence of organic matter 

    E-print Network

    Banasiak, Laura J.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The removal of the trace inorganic contaminants boron (B(OH)4?), fluoride (F?) and nitrate (NO3?) from synthetic aqueous solutions containing organic matter using electrodialysis was investigated. The transport of the contaminants through the ion...

  20. Complexation of Plutonium (IV) With Sulfate At Variable Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Xia; J.I. Friese; D.A> Moore; P.P. Bachelor; L. Rao

    2006-10-05

    The complexation of plutonium(IV) with sulfate at variable temperatures has been investigated by solvent extraction method. A NaBrO{sub 3} solution was used as holding oxidant to maintain the plutonium(IV) oxidation state throughout the experiments. The distribution ratio of Pu(IV) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of sulfate were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 and 1:2 Pu(IV)-HSO{sub 4}{sup -} complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase, were calculated from the effect of [HSO{sub 4}{sup -}] on the distribution ratio. The enthalpy and entropy of complexation were calculated from the stability constants at different temperatures using the Van't Hoff equation.

  1. Atomic spectrum of plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise, J.; Fred, M.; Gutmacher, R.G.

    1984-08-01

    This report contains plutonium wavelengths, energy level classifications, and other spectroscopic data accumulated over the past twenty years at Laboratoire Aime Cotton (LAC) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The primary purpose was term analysis: deriving the energy levels in terms of quantum numbers and electron configurations, and evaluating the Slater-Condon and other parameters from the levels.

  2. Uranyl nitrate pouring solution for producing nuclear fuel particles and a method for its preparation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hein

    1983-01-01

    Sorbitol, or another polyalcohol such as erythritol, dulcitol or xylitol, is added to a solution containing uranyl nitrate which may also contain another heavy metal, such as thorium or plutonium, prior to preneutralization with ammonia in order to provide a highly viscous solution that can be preneutralized to a great extent without premature precipitation of uranium. The high viscosity makes

  3. The vapour pressures of saturated aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, sodium bromide, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, potassium iodate, and rubidium chloride at temperatures from 227 K to 323 K

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Apelblat; Eli Korin

    1998-01-01

    The vapour pressures of saturated aqueous solutions of NaCl, NaBr, NaNO3, NaNO2, KIO3, and RbCl were determined in the temperature rangeT=(278 to 323) K using an electronic hygrometer with an electrolyte sensor and compared with the literature data, which are available only for the first four salts. These vapour pressures serve to evaluate the water activities, osmotic coefficients, and molar

  4. CSER 00-003 Criticality Safety Evaluation report for PFP Magnesium Hydroxide Precipitation Process for Plutonium Stabilization Glovebox 3

    SciTech Connect

    LAN, J.S.

    2000-07-13

    This Criticality Safety Evaluation Report analyzes the stabilization of plutonium/uranium solutions in Glovebox 3 using the magnesium hydroxide precipitation process at PFP. The process covered are the receipt of diluted plutonium solutions into three precipitation tanks, the precipitation of plutonium from the solution, the filtering of the plutonium precipitate from the solution, the scraping of the precipitate from the filter into boats, and the initial drying of the precipitated slurry on a hot plate. A batch (up to 2.5 kg) is brought into the glovebox as plutonium nitrate, processed, and is then removed in boats for further processing. This CSER establishes limits for the magnesium hydroxide precipitation process in Glovebox 3 to maintain criticality safety while handling fissionable material.

  5. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    SciTech Connect

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nass, R. [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

  6. Extraction of uranyl, La(III), and Y(III) nitrates with a composite solid extractant based on a polymeric support impregnated with trialkylmethylammonium nitrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Pyartman; V. A. Keskinov; V. V. Lishchuk; A. V. Konstantinova; V. V. Belova

    2007-01-01

    Extraction of uranyl, La(III), and Y(III) nitrates from aqueous solutions containing 0–4 M sodium nitrate with a composite\\u000a solid extractant based on a polymeric support impregnated with trialkylmethylammonium nitrate (Aliquat-336) was studied. The\\u000a extraction isotherms were analyzed assuming that uranyl, La(III), and Y(III) nitrates are extracted with the solid extractant\\u000a in the form of complexes (R4N)2[Ln(NO3)5] and (R4N)2[UO2(NO3)4], respectively. The

  7. Nitrate and glasshouse vegetables

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JPNL Roorda Van Eysinga

    1984-01-01

    Leafy vegetables grown under glass in winter have a rather high nitrate content. Three possibilities of reducing this content are discussed: the use of nitrification inhibitors, growing on NFT and omission of nitrogen during a certain period before harvest, and the breeding of varieties with a low nitrate content.

  8. MODELED WET NITRATE DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface water bodies. See below regarding decriptions on how original data was produced. These data will be part of futur...

  9. Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Coops, M.S.

    1992-06-02

    This patent describes a method for production of plutonium metal from plutonium oxide by metallic lithium reduction, with regeneration of lithium reactant. It comprises: reacting the plutonium oxide with metallic lithium; oxides and unreacted lithium; subliming the product lithium oxide and unreacted lithium from unreacted plutonium oxide with high heat and low pressure; recapturing the product lithium oxides; reacting the recaptured product lithium oxides with anhydrous hydrochloric acid to produce lithium chloride salt; and decomposing product lithium chloride salt by electrolysis to regenerate lithium metal.

  10. Surprising Coordination for Plutonium in the First Plutonium (III) Borate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The first plutonium(III) borate, Pu{sub 2}[B{sub 12}O{sub 18}(OH){sub 4}Br{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]·0.5H{sub 2}O, has been prepared by reacting plutonium(III) with molten boric acid under strictly anaerobic conditions. This compound contains a three-dimensional polyborate network with triangular holes that house the plutonium(III) sites. The plutonium sites in this compound are 9- and 10-coordinate and display atypical geometries.

  11. Gamma radiation characteristics of plutonium dioxide fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingo, P. J.

    1969-01-01

    Investigation of plutonium dioxide as an isotopic fuel for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators yielded the isotopic composition of production-grade plutonium dioxide fuel, sources of gamma radiation produced by plutonium isotopes, and the gamma flux at the surface.

  12. Proliferation aspects of plutonium recycling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruno Pellaud

    2002-01-01

    Plutonium recycling offers benefits in an energy perspective of sustainable development, and, moreover it contributes to non-proliferation. Prior to recycling, reactor-grade plutonium from light-water reactors does not lend itself easily to the assembly of explosive nuclear devices; thereafter, practically not at all. Control systems for material security and non-proliferation should identify and adopt several categories of plutonium covering various isotopic

  13. Electroactive Materials for Anion Separation - Technetium from Nitrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johanes H. Sukamto; William H. Smyrl; James McBreen; Timothy L. Hubler; Michael A. Lilga

    2000-01-01

    Many contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) exist as anions. These include the high priority pollutants chromate, pertechnetate, and nitrate ions. In addition, there are also industrial and urban applications where the separation of anionic species from aqueous streams is critical. Examples include industrial water recycle and waste water treatment (e.g., chloride ion removal for the

  14. Conversion of Uranium Oxide into Nitrate with Nitrogen Dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kayo Sawada; Daisuke Hirabayashi; Youichi Enokida; Ichiro Yamamoto

    2008-01-01

    In order to decrease the amount of aqueous liquid waste discharged from nuclear fuel reprocessing, the conversion of uranium dioxide into its nitrate using liquefied nitrogen dioxide was studied. Uranium dioxide powder was immersed in liquefied nitrogen dioxide at 313 K after a pretreatment by the oxidation of the uranium dioxide with nitrogen dioxide and air at 523 K. Seventy-nine

  15. Welding Plutonium Storage Containers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2004-01-01

    The outer can welder (OCW) in the FB-Line Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Gas Tungsten Arc Weld (GTAW) system used to create outer canisters compliant with the Department of Energy 3013 Standard, DOE-STD-3013-2000, Stabilization, Packaging, and Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Materials. The key welding parameters controlled and monitored on the outer can welder Data Acquisition System (DAS)

  16. Plutonium Air Shipments

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Nuclear Control Institute created a web site in response to a proposed standard for the shipment of radioactive materials. This site presents two world maps showing both sea and air routes that are planned or already in use for the shipment of plutonium. A series of papers by NCI-affiliated scientists and observers on the subject of radioactive materials shipments sets out the NCI position against such shipments.

  17. Welding Plutonium Storage Containers

    SciTech Connect

    HUDLOW, SL

    2004-04-20

    The outer can welder (OCW) in the FB-Line Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Gas Tungsten Arc Weld (GTAW) system used to create outer canisters compliant with the Department of Energy 3013 Standard, DOE-STD-3013-2000, Stabilization, Packaging, and Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Materials. The key welding parameters controlled and monitored on the outer can welder Data Acquisition System (DAS) are weld amperage, weld voltage, and weld rotational speed. Inner 3013 canisters from the Bagless Transfer System that contain plutonium metal or plutonium oxide are placed inside an outer 3013 canister. The canister is back-filled with helium and welded using the outer can welder. The completed weld is screened to determine if it is satisfactory by reviewing the OCW DAS key welding parameters, performing a helium leak check, performing a visual examination by a qualified weld inspector, and performing digital radiography of the completed weld. Canisters with unsatisfactory welds are cut open and repackaged. Canisters with satisfactory welds are deemed compliant with the 3013 standard for long-term storage.

  18. The modifying effect of ammonium nitrate and sodium hydroxide on poly(ethylene terephthalate) materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. P. Prorokova; S. Yu. Vavilova

    2004-01-01

    The characteristics of modification of PET with aqueous solutions of equimolar amounts of ammonium nitrate and sodium hydroxide are investigated. It is shown that such treatment of the polymer is not equivalent to treatment with weak aqueous solutions of ammonia. It removes a significant amount of oligomers contained in the polyester but does not cause their intensive decomposition. It was

  19. Theoretical study of plutonium(IV) complexes formed within the PUREX process: a proposal of a plutonium surrogate in fire conditions.

    PubMed

    Šulka, Martin; Cantrel, Laurent; Vallet, Valérie

    2014-10-30

    We present a relativistic quantum chemical study to determine the best surrogate for plutonium(IV) to be used in experimental investigations of the behavior of plutonium-nitrate-TBP in fire conditions that might occur in the nuclear fuel refining process known as PUREX. In this study geometries and stabilities of Pu(NO3)6(2-) and Pu(NO3)4(TBP)2 complexes were compared to that of equivalent complexes of selected elements from the lanthanide and actinide series (Ce, Th, U) chosen on the basis of similar ionic radii and stability as tetravalent species. PBE and PBE0 DFT functionals have proven to be sufficient and affordable for qualitative studies, performing as good as the wave function based correlated method MP2. On the basis of our results, cerium(IV) appears to be a good surrogate for plutonium(IV). PMID:25290588

  20. SOIL NITRATE TESTS FOR WISCONSIN

    E-print Network

    Balser, Teri C.

    SOIL NITRATE TESTS FOR WISCONSIN CROPPING SYSTEMS L.G. Bundy Dept. of Soil Science University of Wisconsin #12;Why Use Soil Nitrate Tests? · Agronomic and environmental benefits · Predict corn N needs ­ Improved accuracy ­ Site-and year-specific · Minimize nitrate loss #12;#12;Preplant Soil Nitrate Test (PPNT

  1. TERNARY ALLOY-CONTAINING PLUTONIUM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Waber

    1960-01-01

    Ternary alloys of uranium and plutonium containing as the third element ; either molybdenum or zirconium are reported. Such alloys are particularly useful ; as reactor fuels in fast breeder reactors. The alloy contains from 2 to 25 at.% ; of molybdenum or zirconium, the balance being a combination of uranium and ; plutonium in the ratio of from 1

  2. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM-TITANIUM ALLOYS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Coffinberry

    1959-01-01

    A plutonium-uranium alloy suitable for use as the fuel element in a fast ; breeder reactor is described. The alloy contains from 15 to 60 at.% titanium ; with the remainder uranium and plutonium in a specific ratio, thereby limiting ; the undesirable zeta phase and rendering the alloy relatively resistant to ; corrosion and giving it the essential characteristic

  3. Photochemical preparation of plutonium pentafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Rabideau, Sherman W. (Los Alamos, NM); Campbell, George M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    The novel compound plutonium pentafluoride may be prepared by the photodissociation of gaseous plutonium hexafluoride. It is a white solid of low vapor pressure, which consists predominantly of a face-centered cubic structure with a.sub.o =4.2709.+-.0.0005 .ANG..

  4. Protein tyrosine nitration

    PubMed Central

    Chaki, Mounira; Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide metabolism in plant cells has a relative short history. Nitration is a chemical process which consists of introducing a nitro group (-NO2) into a chemical compound. in biological systems, this process has been found in different molecules such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that can affect its function. This mini-review offers an overview of this process with special emphasis on protein tyrosine nitration in plants and its involvement in the process of nitrosative stress. PMID:19826215

  5. Plutonium Multiple Recycling In PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Nigon, Jean-Louis [COGEMA, DRD, 2 rue Paul Dautier 78141 Velizy - Villacoublay Cedex (France); Lenain, Richard [SERMA, CEA Saclay (France); Zaetta, Alain [SPRC - CEA Cadarache (France)

    2002-07-01

    Reprocessing and recycling open the road to a sustainable management of nuclear materials and an environment friendly management of nuclear waste. However, long or very long term recycling implies fast neutron reactors. High burn-ups of irradiated standard UO{sub 2} fuel as well as recycling of plutonium fuel in thermal reactors lead to a 'degradation' of plutonium that means a low fissile content, which is hardly compatible with recycling in LWRs. Thus the question of plutonium management has been raised; although there are some limitations, a truly large variety of options do exist; no one of the presently selected ways of plutonium management is a dead end road. Among these various options, some are fully compatible with the existing reactors and may be considered for the mid term future; they offer a competitive management of plutonium during the transition from thermal to fast reactors. (authors)

  6. Long term plutonium solubility and speciation studies in a synthetic brine

    SciTech Connect

    Nitsche, Heino; Roberts, K.; Xi, Ruihua [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1993-12-31

    The rate at which elements can be transported in groundwater systems is governed in part by the solubility of the element in the groundwater. This report documents plutonium solubility experiments in a brine simulant relevant to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Approximately 1 to 2.5 mL of five stock solutions containing single oxidation states of plutonium (Pu(IV)-polymer, Pu{sup 3+}, Pu{sup 4+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup +}, and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) were added to {approximately}75 mL of synthetic H-17 Brine in five reaction vessels. Initial plutonium concentrations ranged from 1.3 {times} l0{sup {minus}4} to 5.l {times} l0{sup {minus}4} M (moles per liter) total plutonium. Because these initial concentrations were far above the plutonium solubility limit in H-17 Brine, plutonium-containing solids precipitated. Aqueous plutonium concentrations were measured over time until steady-state was reached, requiring over 300 days in H-17 Brine.

  7. Vitrified magnesia dissolution and its impact on plutonium residue processing

    SciTech Connect

    Keith W. Fife; Jennifer L. Alwin; Coleman A. Smith; Michael D. Mayne; David A. Rockstraw

    2000-03-01

    Aqueous chloride operations at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility cannot directly dispose of acidic waste solutions because of compatibility problems with existing disposal lines. Consequently, all hydrochloric acid must be neutralized and filtered prior to exiting the facility. From a waste minimization standpoint, the use of spent magnesia pyrochemical crucibles as the acid neutralization agent is attractive since this process would take a stream destined for transuranic waste and use it as a reagent in routine plutonium residue processing. Since Los Alamos National Laboratory has several years of experience using magnesium hydroxide as a neutralizing agent for waste acid from plutonium processing activities, the use of spent magnesia pyrochemical crucibles appeared to be an attractive extension of this activity. In order to be competitive with magnesium hydroxide, however, size reduction of crucible shards had to be performed effectively within the constraints of glovebox operations, and acid neutralization time using crucible shards had to be comparable to neutralization times observed when using reagent-grade magnesium hydroxide. The study utilized non-plutonium-contaminated crucibles for equipment evaluation and selection and used nonradioactive acid solutions for completing the neutralization experiments. This paper discusses experience in defining appropriate size reduction equipment and presents results from using the magnesia crucibles for hydrochloric acid neutralization, a logical precursor to introduction into glovebox enclosures.

  8. Dissolution Behavior of Plutonium Containing Zirconia-Magnesia Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kiel Holliday; Thomas Hartmann; Gary Cerefice; Ken Czerwinski

    2012-03-01

    This study explores the dissolution properties of zirconia-magnesia ceramics containing plutonium as the basis of an inert atrix nuclear fuel. The magnesium oxide phase remains pure MgO, while the zirconia incorporates a small amount of magnesium oxide along with all of the plutonium oxide and erbium oxide. The performance of the material under reactor and repository environments was examined. Reactor conditions are examined using a pressure vessel to expose the material to 300 degrees C water. To assess the performance of the material as a waste form it was submerged in 90 degrees C water for 1000 h. In both aqueous dissolution studies there was minimal release of less than 0.8 wt.% of plutonium from the material. To examine the potential for recycling, the dissolution behavior of the fuel matrix was examined in acidic solutions: pure nitric acid and a nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid-peroxide solution. Both acidic media exhibit potential for dissolving plutonium from the zirconia matrix. The experiments performed in this study are meant to lay a foundation for the chemical performance of zirconia-magnesia inert matrix fuel containing fissile material and burnable poison.

  9. APPENDIX G Partition Coefficients For Plutonium

    E-print Network

    APPENDIX G Partition Coefficients For Plutonium #12;Appendix G Partition Coefficients For Plutonium G.1.0 Background A number of studies have focussed on the adsorption behavior of plutonium that Kd values for plutonium typically range over 4 orders of magnitude (Thibault et al., 1990). Also

  10. Plutonium oxide dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.

    1992-09-30

    Several processing options for dissolving plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from high-fired materials have been studied. The scoping studies performed on these options were focused on PuO{sub 2} typically generated by burning plutonium metal and PuO{sub 2} produced during incineration of alpha contaminated waste. At least two processing options remain applicable for dissolving high-fired PuO{sub 2} in canyon dissolvers. The options involve solid solution formation of PuO{sub 2} With uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) and alloying incinerator ash with aluminum. An oxidative dissolution process involving nitric acid solutions containing a strong oxidizing agent, such as cerium (IV), was neither proven nor rejected. This uncertainty was due to difficulty in regenerating cerium (IV) ions during dissolution. However, recent work on silver-catalyzed dissolution of PuO{sub 2} with persulfate has demonstrated that persulfate ions regenerate silver (II). Use of persulfate to regenerate cerium (IV) or bismuth (V) ions during dissolution of PuO{sub 2} materials may warrant further study.

  11. Plutonium oxide dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.H.

    1992-09-30

    Several processing options for dissolving plutonium oxide (PuO[sub 2]) from high-fired materials have been studied. The scoping studies performed on these options were focused on PuO[sub 2] typically generated by burning plutonium metal and PuO[sub 2] produced during incineration of alpha contaminated waste. At least two processing options remain applicable for dissolving high-fired PuO[sub 2] in canyon dissolvers. The options involve solid solution formation of PuO[sub 2] With uranium oxide (UO[sub 2]) and alloying incinerator ash with aluminum. An oxidative dissolution process involving nitric acid solutions containing a strong oxidizing agent, such as cerium (IV), was neither proven nor rejected. This uncertainty was due to difficulty in regenerating cerium (IV) ions during dissolution. However, recent work on silver-catalyzed dissolution of PuO[sub 2] with persulfate has demonstrated that persulfate ions regenerate silver (II). Use of persulfate to regenerate cerium (IV) or bismuth (V) ions during dissolution of PuO[sub 2] materials may warrant further study.

  12. Crystallization of sodium nitrate from radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Krapukhin, V.B.; Krasavina, E.P. Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

    1997-07-01

    From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) conducted research and development on processes to separate acetate and nitrate salts and acetic acid from radioactive wastes by crystallization. The research objective was to decrease waste volumes and produce the separated decontaminated materials for recycle. This report presents an account of the IPC/RAS experience in this field. Details on operating conditions, waste and product compositions, decontamination factors, and process equipment are described. The research and development was generally related to the management of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The waste solutions resulted from recovery and processing of uranium, plutonium, and other products from irradiated nuclear fuel, neutralization of nuclear process solutions after extractant recovery, regeneration of process nitric acid, equipment decontamination, and other radiochemical processes. Waste components include nitric acid, metal nitrate and acetate salts, organic impurities, and surfactants. Waste management operations generally consist of two stages: volume reduction and processing of the concentrates for storage, solidification, and disposal. Filtration, coprecipitation, coagulation, evaporation, and sorption were used to reduce waste volume. 28 figs., 40 tabs.

  13. Solubility of plutonium and waste evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    1993-10-22

    Chemical processing of irradiated reactor elements at the Savannah River Site separates uranium, plutonium and fission products; fission products and process-added chemicals are mixed with an excess of NaOH and discharged as a basic slurry into large underground tanks for temporary storage. The slurry is composed of base-insoluble solids that settle to the bottom of the tank; the liquid supemate contains a mixture of base-soluble chemicals--nitrates, nitrites aluminate, sulfate, etc. To conserve space in the waste tanks, the supemate is concentrated by evaporation. As the evaporation proceeds, the solubilities of some components are exceeded, and these species crystallize from solution. Normally, these components are soluble in the hot solution discharged from the waste tank evaporator and do not crystallize until the solution cools. However, concern was aroused at West Valley over the possibility that plutonium would precipitate and accumulate in the evaporator, conceivably to the point that a nuclear accident was possible. There is also a concern at SRS from evaporation of sludge washes, which arise from washing the base-insoluble solids ({open_quote}sludge{close_quote}) with ca. 1M NaOH to reduce the Al and S0{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} content. The sludge washes of necessity extract a low level of Pu from the sludge and are evaporated to reduce their volume, presenting the possibility of precipitating Pu. Measurements of the solubility of Pu in synthetic solutions of similar composition to waste supernate and sludge washes are described in this report.

  14. Probing phonons in plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Joe; Krisch, M.; Farber, D.; Occelli, F.; Schwartz, A.; Chiang, T.C.; Wall, M.; Boro, C.; Xu, Ruqing (UIUC); (LLNL); (ESRF); (LANL)

    2010-11-16

    Plutonium (Pu) is well known to have complex and unique physico-chemical properties. Notably, the pure metal exhibits six solid-state phase transformations with large volume expansions and contractions along the way to the liquid state: {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} {yields} {delta} {yields} {delta}{prime} {yields} {var_epsilon} {yields} liquid. Unalloyed Pu melts at a relatively low temperature {approx}640 C to yield a higher density liquid than that of the solid from which it melts, (Figure 1). Detailed understanding of the properties of plutonium and plutonium-based alloys is critical for the safe handling, utilization, and long-term storage of these important, but highly toxic materials. However, both technical and and safety issues have made experimental observations extremely difficult. Phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) are key experimenta l data to the understanding of the basic properties of Pu materials such as: force constants, sound velocities, elastic constants, thermodynamics, phase stability, electron-phonon coupling, structural relaxation, etc. However, phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) in plutonium (Pu) and its alloys have defied measurement for the past few decades since the discovery of this element in 1941. This is due to a combination of the high thermal-neutron absorption cross section of plutonium and the inability to grow the large single crystals (with dimensions of a few millimeters) necessary for inelastic neutron scattering. Theoretical simulations of the Pu PDC continue to be hampered by the lack of suitable inter -atomic potentials. Thus, until recently the PDCs for Pu and its alloys have remained unknown experimentally and theoretically. The experimental limitations have recently been overcome by using a tightly focused undulator x-ray micro-beam scattered from single -grain domains in polycrystalline specimens. This experimental approach has been applied successfully to map the complete PDCs of an fcc d-Pu-Ga alloy using the high resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (HRIXS) capability on ID28. The complete PDCs for an fcc Pu-0.6 wt% Ga alloy are plotted in Figure 2, and represent the first full set of phonon dispersions ever determined for any Pu-bearing materials. The solid curves (red) are calculated using a standard Born-von Karman (B-vK) force constant model. An adequate fit to the experimental data is obtained if interactions up to the fourth-nearest neighbours are included. The dashed curves (blue) are recent dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) results by Dai et al. The elastic moduli calculated from the slopes of the experimental phonon dispersion curves near the {Lambda} point are: C{sub 11} = 35.3 {+-} 1.4 GPa, C{sub 12} = 25.5 {+-} 1.5 GPa and C{sub 44} = 30.53 {+-} 1.1 GPa. These values are in excellent agreement with those of the only other measurement on a similar alloy (1 wt % Ga) using ultrasonic techniques as well as with those recently calculated from a combined DMFT and linear response theory for pure {delta}-Pu. Several unusual features, including a large elastic anisotropy, a small shear elastic modulus C{prime}, a Kohn-like anomaly in the T{sub 1}[011] branch, and a pronounced softening of the [111] transverse modes are found. These features can be related to the phase transitions of plutonium and to strong coupling between the lattice structure and the 5f valence instabilities. The HRIXS results also provide a critical test for theoretical treatments of highly correlated 5f electron systems as exemplified by recent dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) calculations for {delta}-plutonium. The experimental-theoretical agreements shown in Figure 2 in terms of a low shear elastic modulus C{prime}, a Kohn-like anomaly in the T{sub 1}[011] branch, and a large softening of the T[111] modes give credence to the DMFT approach for the theoretical treatment of 5f electron systems of which {delta}-Pu is a classic example. However, quantitative differences remain. These are the position of the Kohn anomaly along the T{sub 1}[011] branch, the energy maximum of the T[111] mode s

  15. Actinide recovery using aqueous biphasic extraction: Initial developmental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiko, D.J.; Mensah-Biney, R.; Mertz, C.J.; Rollins, A.N.

    1992-08-01

    Aqueous biphasic extraction systems are being developed to treat radioactive wastes. The separation technique involves the selective partitioning of either solutes or colloid-size particles between two scible aqueous phases. Wet grinding of plutonium residues to an average particle size of one micron will be used to liberate the plutonium from the bulk of the particle matrix. The goal is to produce a plutonium concentrate that will integrate with existing and developing chemical recovery processes. Ideally, the process would produce a nonTRU waste stream. Coupling physical beneficiation with chemical processing will result in a substantial reduction in the volume of mixed wastes generated from dissolution recovery processes. As part of this program, we will also explore applications of aqueous biphasic extraction that include the separation and recovery of dissolved species such as metal ions and water-soluble organics. The expertise and data generated in this work will form the basis for developing more cost-effective processes for handling waste streams from environmental restoration and waste management activities within the DOE community. This report summarizes the experimental results obtained during the first year of this effort. Experimental efforts were focused on elucidating the surface and solution chemistry variables which govern partitioning behavior of plutonium and silica in aqueous biphasic extraction systems. Additional efforts were directed toward the development of wet grinding methods for producing ultrafine particles with diameters of one micron or less.

  16. Simultaneous determination of nitrite, nitrate and ascorbic acid in canned vegetable juices by reverse?phase ion?interaction HPLC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. F. Cheng; C. W. Tsang

    1998-01-01

    A simple ion?interaction C18 reverse?phase high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for simultaneous determination of nitrite, nitrate and ascorbic acid in canned vegetable juices. The method makes use of 0.010 m octylammonium ortho?phosphate as the ion interacting reagent and 20% (v\\/v) aqueous methanol as the mobile phase. The content of nitrite, nitrate (expressed as nitrite ion and nitrate ion,

  17. A CHEMICAL MODEL OF THE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SYSTEM: NITRIC ACID URANYL NITRATE WATER - TRI-n-BUTYL PHOSPHATE (TBP) - DILUENT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jožef J. ?omor; Miroslav M. Kope?ni; Djordje M. Petkovi?

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model founded on the equilibrium constants expressions has been developed for the simultaneous extraction of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate with TBP in alkane diluents. The model uses chemical activities of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate in the aqueous phase and the stoichiometric concentrations of their TBP solvates in the organic phase. The apparent formation constants of the

  18. Investigation of Plutonium and Uranium Precipitation Behavior with Gadolinium as a Neutron Poison

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann E. Visser; Tracy S. Rudisill; Michael G. Bronikowski

    2005-01-01

    The caustic precipitation of plutonium (Pu)?containing solutions has been investigated to determine whether the presence of 1?3 Pu?uranium (U) in solutions stored in the H?Canyon Facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) would adversely impact the use of gadolinium nitrate [Gd(NO3)3] as a neutron poison. In the past, this disposition strategy has been successfully used to

  19. The chemistry of tributyl phosphate at elevated temperatures in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Process Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, G.S.; Cooper, T.D.

    1994-06-01

    Potentially violent chemical reactions of the tributyl phosphate solvent used by the Plutonium Finishing Plant at the Hanford Site were investigated. There is a small probability that a significant quantity of this solvent could be accidental transferred to heated process vessels and react there with nitric acid or plutonium nitrate also present in the solvent extraction process. The results of laboratory studies of the reactions show that exothermic oxidation of tributyl phosphate by either nitric acid or actinide nitrates is slow at temperatures expected in the heated vessels. Less than four percent of the tributyl phosphate will be oxidized in these vented vessels at temperatures between 125{degrees}C and 250{degrees}C because the oxidant will be lost from the vessels by vaporization or decomposition before the tributyl phosphate can be extensively oxidized. The net amounts of heat generated by oxidation with concentrated nitric acid and with thorium nitrate (a stand-in for plutonium nitrate) were determined to be about -150 and -220 joules per gram of tributyl phosphate initially present, respectively. This is not enough heat to cause violent reactions in the vessels. Pyrolysis of the tributyl phosphate occurred in these mixtures at temperatures of 110{degrees}C to 270{degrees}C and produced mainly 1-butene gas, water, and pyrophosphoric acid. Butene gas generation is slow at expected process vessel temperatures, but the rate is faster at higher temperatures. At 252{degrees}C the rate of butene gas generated was 0.33 g butene/min/g of tributyl phosphate present. The measured heat absorbed by the pyrolysis reaction was 228 J/g of tributyl phosphate initially present (or 14.5 kcal/mole of tributyl phosphate). Release of flammable butene gas into process areas where it could ignite appears to be the most serious safety consideration for the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

  20. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates 

    E-print Network

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-03-28

    three treatment methods for remov- ing nitrates/nitrites: ion exchange, reverse osmosis and electrodialysis. Reverse osmosis The most common treatment method for nitrate in a water supply is reverse osmosis (RO). This method is cost effective for a home... by passing the distilled water through a post filter. Most units will treat 5 to 11 gal- lons of water a day. Figure 4. Reverse osmosis treatment unit (Adapted from Kneen et al., 1995 and USEPA, 2003). The disadvantage of an RO unit is the small amount...

  1. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 89. Alkali Metal Nitrates. Part 1. Lithium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eysseltová, Jitka

    2010-09-01

    This paper is the first part in the nitrate solubility volume. The solubility data for lithium nitrate are reviewed. Where appropriate, binary, ternary, and multicomponent systems are critically evaluated. Most of the solubility results were obtained in water or aqueous solutions. The solubility in ethanol and in alcohol+water solvent mixtures is also included. All data were critically examined for their reliability. The best values were selected on the basis of critical evaluations and presented in tabular form. Fitting equations and plots are also provided. The quantities, units, and symbols used are in accord with IUPAC recommendations. The original data have been reported and, if necessary, transferred into the units and symbols recommended by IUPAC. The literature on solubility data was researched through 2007.

  2. 7, 55535593, 2007 Nitrate aerosols

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 5553­5593, 2007 Nitrate aerosols today and in 2030 S. E. Bauer et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Nitrate aerosols today and in 2030: importance relative to other aerosol species and tropospheric, 5553­5593, 2007 Nitrate aerosols today and in 2030 S. E. Bauer et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  3. Proceedings of the Plutonium Futures ? The Science 2006 Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M; Hobart, D; Allan, P; Jarvinen, G

    2007-07-12

    Plutonium Futures--The Science 2006 provided opportunities to examine present knowledge of the chemical and physical properties of plutonium and other actinides in complex media and materials; to discuss the current and emerging science (chemistry, physics, materials science, nuclear science, and environmental effects) of plutonium and actinides relevant to enhancing global nuclear security; and to exchange ideas. This international conference also provided a forum for illustrating and enhancing capabilities and interests, and assessing issues in these areas. U.S. and international scientists, engineers, faculty, and students from universities, national laboratories, and DOE's nuclear complex were encouraged to participate and make technical contributions. The Conference ran from Sunday, July 9th through Thursday, July 13th. A popular aspect of the conference was the opening tutorial session on Sunday afternoon intended for students and scientists new to the area of plutonium research. The tutorial was well attended by novices and veterans alike, and featured such diverse topics as; plutonium metallurgy, plutonium in the environment, and international arms control and nonproliferation. Two plenary lectures began each morning and each afternoon session and highlighted the breakout sessions on coordination/organometallic chemistry, solid-state physics, environmental chemistry, materials science, separations and reprocessing, advanced fuels and waste forms, phase transformations, solution and gas-phase chemistry, compounds and complexes, electronic structure and physical properties, and more. Chemistry Highlights--Among the many chemistry highlights presented in this proceedings are the overview of concepts and philosophies on inert nuclear fuel matrices and concerns about the ever-increasing amounts of minor actinides and plutonium generated in the fuel cycle. The various ideas involve multiple reduction schemes for these materials, suggesting fuels for 'burning' or 'cradle-to-grave' accountability for various reactor types. Related work is presented on identification of the unique reaction mechanisms and identification of the intermediate products, including Pu(III), at the end of the PUREX process. In the important area of nuclear forensics, actual scenarios of nuclear materials confiscation and the successes of applying forensics protocols to determine attribution and possible intention are provided. In the area of reactor incidents, there is no other place on Earth like the Chernobyl Site Object Shelter and radioactive aerosol particle characterization studies reflect an important effort described herein. An additional report from another unique environmental site presents results on radionuclide monitoring, fate, and transport in the ecosystem of the Yenisei River in the Krasoyarsk region. In the area of nuclear waste disposal, a study of the ion irradiation damage to pyrochlore compounds with varying amounts of host elements and actinide dopants is presented. Papers on both the aqueous and nonaqueous chemistry of plutonium and other actinides are presented including anhydrous coordination chemistry and redox behavior in the presence of humic materials and the their sorption on common minerals in the environment. Also published herein are reports on the field of anhydrous coordination chemistry of the transuranic elements where there is scarce information. Solid-State and Materials Highlights--Plutonium solid-state and materials research is represented in these proceedings by a wealth of leading edge discovery class research. The breadth of this research is reflected in the topics covered: solid-state; materials science; superconductivity; phase changes, phonons, and entropy; electronic structure and physical properties; surface science and corrosion; and radiation effects, defects, impurities, and property changes. Indeed the scientific challenge and excitement of plutonium can best be highlighted by quoting the tutorial prospectus of Drs. Sarrao and Schwartz. 'Plutonium has long been recognized as a complex and scie

  4. Aromatic photonitration in homogeneous and heterogeneous aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Vione, Davide; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio; Vincenti, Marco; Pelizzetti, Ezio

    2003-01-01

    This work describes the nitration of aromatics upon near-UV photolysis of nitrate and nitrite in aqueous solution and upon photocatalytic oxidation of nitrite in TiO2 suspensions. Phenol is used in this work as a model aromatic molecule and as a probe for *NO2/N2O4. The photoinduced nitration of phenol in aqueous systems occurs upon the reaction between phenol and *NO2 or N2O4, and is enhanced by the photocatalytic oxidation of nitrite to *NO2 by TiO2. Aromatic photonitration in the liquid phase can play a relevant role in the formation of nitroaromatics in natural waters and atmospheric hydrometeors, thus being a potential pathway for the condensed-phase nitration of aromatics. Furthermore, the photoinduced oxidation of nitrite to nitrogen dioxide suggests a completely new role for nitrite in natural waters and atmospheric aerosols. PMID:14535647

  5. Reduction of nitrate and nitrite salts under hydrothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Foy, B.R.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Wilmanns, E.; McInroy, R.; Ely, J.; Robinson, J.M.; Buelow, S.J.

    1994-10-01

    The feasibility of reducing nitrate/nitrite salts under hydrothermal conditions for the treatment of aqueous mixed wastes stored in the underground tanks at the Department of Energy site at Hanford, Washington was studied. The reduction of nitrate and nitrite salts by reaction with EDTA using a tank waste simulant was examined at temperatures between 623K and 800K and pressures between 0.6 and 1.2 kbar. Continuous flow reactors were used to determine kinetics and products of reactions. All reactions were studied under pressures high enough to produce single phase conditions. The reactions are rapid, go to completion in less than a minute, and produce simple products, such as carbonate, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide gases. The experimental results demonstrate the ability of chemical reactions under hydrothermal conditions to reduce the nitrate and nitrite salts and destroy organic compounds in the waste mixtures.

  6. Extraction of rare-earth nitrates by phosphoryl podands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. N. Turanov; V. K. Karandashev; V. E. Baulin

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of trace amounts of rare-earth nitrates between aqueous solutions of NH4NO3 and organic solutions of phosphoryl podands is studied for Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y.\\u000a The stoichiometry of the extraction complexes is determined. The effect of the structure of the extractant and the nature\\u000a of the

  7. Destruction of nitrates, organics, and ferrocyanides by hydrothermal processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Robinson; B. R. Foy; P. C. DellOrco; G. Anderson; F. Archuleta; J. Atencio; D. Breshears; R. Brewer; H. Eaton; R. McFarland; R. McInroy; T. Reynolds; M. Sedillo; E. Wilmanns; S. J. Buelow

    1993-01-01

    This work targets the remediation of the aqueous mixed wastes stored in the underground tanks at the Department of Energy site in Hanford, Washington via hydrothermal processing. The feasibility of destroying the nitrate, organic, and ferrocyanide components of the wastes under supercritical and near critical conditions (623 [degree]K to 873[degree]K, 22.1 MPa to 103.4 MPa) is addressed. A novel method

  8. Destruction of nitrates, organics, and ferrocyanides by hydrothermal processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Robinson; B. R. Foy; G. Anderson; F. Archuleta; J. Atencio; D. Breshears; R. Brewer; H. Eaton; R. McFarland; R. McInroy; T. Reynolds; M. Sedillo; E. Wilmanns; S. J. Buelow

    1993-01-01

    This work targets the remediation of the aqueous mixed wastes stored in the underground tanks at the Department of Energy site in Hanford, Washington via hydrothermal processing. The feasibility of destroying the nitrate, organic, and ferrocyanide components of the wastes under supercritical and near critical conditions (623 °K to 873°K, 22.1 MPa to 103.4 MPa) is addressed. A novel method

  9. Plutonium solution analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    A fully automated analyzer has been developed for plutonium solutions. It was assembled from several commercially available modules, is based upon segmented flow analysis, and exhibits precision about an order of magnitude better than commercial units (0.5%-O.05% RSD). The system was designed to accept unmeasured, untreated liquid samples in the concentration range 40-240 g/L and produce a report with sample identification, sample concentrations, and an abundance of statistics. Optional hydraulics can accommodate samples in the concentration range 0.4-4.0 g/L. Operating at a typical rate of 30 to 40 samples per hour, it consumes only 0.074 mL of each sample and standard, and generates waste at the rate of about 1.5 mL per minute. No radioactive material passes through its multichannel peristaltic pump (which remains outside the glovebox, uncontaminated) but rather is handled by a 6-port, 2-position chromatography-type loop valve. An accompanying computer is programmed in QuickBASIC 4.5 to provide both instrument control and data reduction. The program is truly user-friendly and communication between operator and instrument is via computer screen displays and keyboard. Two important issues which have been addressed are waste minimization and operator safety (the analyzer can run in the absence of an operator, once its autosampler has been loaded).

  10. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  11. Nitrate-selective optical sensor applying a lipophilic fluorescent potential-sensitive dye

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Huber; Ingo Klimant; Christian Krause; Tobias Werner; Otto S Wolfbeis

    2001-01-01

    An optical sensor has been developed for continuous determination of nitrate that is based on a polymer-stabilized emulsion system consisting of a hydrogel with entrapped plasticizer droplets. The droplets contain a cationic potential-sensitive fluorescent dye (PSD) located near its surface. The cationic PSD also acts as an anion-exchange catalyst that extracts nitrate out of the aqueous solution to form a

  12. The chemistry, waste form development, and properties of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process

    SciTech Connect

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Youngblood, E.L.; Walker, J.F. Jr.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1994-06-01

    A process for the conversion of alkaline, aqueous nitrate wastes to ammonia gas at low temperature, based upon the use of the active metal reductant aluminum, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The process is also well suited for the removal of low-level waste (LLW) radioelements and hazardous metals which report to the solid, alumina-based by-product. ne chemistry of the interaction of aluminum powders with nitrate, and other waste stream metals is presented.

  13. TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING PLUTONIUM IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    E-print Network

    Nero Jr., A.V.

    2011-01-01

    Submitted to Nuclear Safety LBL-6873 Preprint TECHNIQUES FORTechniques for Monitoring Plutonium and Uranium Particulates Released from Nucleartechniques for monitoring plutonium may also be used for monitoring other nuclear

  14. Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yuanxian; Rao, Linfeng; Friese, Judah I.; Moore, Dean A.; Bachelor, Paula P.

    2010-02-02

    The complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride at elevated temperatures was studied by solvent extraction technique. A solution of NaBrO3 was used as holding oxidant to maintain the oxidation state of plutonium throughout the experiments. The distribution ratio of Pu(IV) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of fluoride were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 and 1:2 Pu(IV)-F- complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase under the experimental conditions, were calculated from the effect of fluoride ions on the distribution ratio. The thermodynamic parameters, including enthalpy and entropy of complexation between Pu(IV) and fluoride at 25 degrees C - 55 degrees C were calculated from the stability constants at different temperatures by using the Van’t Hoff equation.

  15. Some History of Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Dennis W.

    2003-12-01

    The history of saltpeter is an interesting combination of chemistry, world trade, technology, politics, and warfare. Originally it was obtained from the dirt floors of stables, sheep pens, pigeon houses, caverns, and even peasants' cottages; any place manure and refuse accumulated in soil under dry conditions. When these sources became inadequate to meet demand it was manufactured on saltpeter plantations, located in dry climates, where piles of dirt, limestone, and manure were allowed to stand for three to five years while soil microbes oxidized the nitrogen to nitrate—an example of early bioengineering. Extensive deposits of sodium nitrate were mined in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile from 1830 until the mid 1920s when the mines were displaced by the Haber Ostwald process.

  16. Design and fabrication of SGS plutonium standards

    SciTech Connect

    Hsue, S.T.; Simmonds, S.M.; Longmire, V.L.; Long, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes our experience of fabricating four sets of plutonium segmented gamma scanner (SGS) can standards. The fabrication involves careful planning, meticulous execution in weighing the plutonium oxide while minimizing contamination, chemical analyses by three different national laboratories to get accurate and independent plutonium concentrations, vertical scanning to assure mixing of the plutonium and the diluent, and finally the nondestructive verification measurement. By following these steps, we successfully fabricated 4 sets or 20 SGS can standards. 4 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M. (Los Alamos, NM); Coburn, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  18. Extraction of uranyl nitrate with a binary extractant based on di(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinic acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. S. Egorova; V. V. Belova; A. A. Voshkin; A. I. Khol’kin; A. K. Pyartman; V. A. Keskinov

    2008-01-01

    The extraction of uranyl nitrate with methyltrioctylammomium di(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinate is compared to uranyl nitrate\\u000a extraction with constituent cation-and anion-exchange extracting agents at various compositions of aqueous and organic phases.\\u000a In UO2(NO3)2 extraction with quaternary ammonium nitrate and dialkylphosphinic acid solutions in toluene, the compounds (R4N)2UO2(NO3)4 and UO2A2, respectively, are formed in the organic phase. The binary extraction of uranyl nitrate is

  19. Plutonium Immobilization Form Development Interim and Final Data Report Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    VanKonynenburg, R.; Ebbinghaus, B.

    2000-06-01

    Contained within this report are summaries of the available interim and final data summary reports provided by ANSTO, ANL, LLNL, and WSRC in support of work in the Form Development activity in the Plutonium Immobilization Development and Testing Program. Milestone reports and technical papers prepared for journals or conference proceedings are not included in this list. This document covers work from about 1997 to the present. All of the following reports are available from the Plutonium Immobilization Program Document Control Center (DCC) at LLNL. In most cases, the documents can also be obtained from the libraries the originating site or from the document's authors. All samples of the various formulations discussed in the following summaries were prepared by one of four processes: Wet-milling, dry-milling, an alkoxide-nitrate process, or attritor milling. The fabrication processes differ primarily in the mixing steps. The wet milling process is the one most commonly used. It is a simple ball milling process where water is added that provides intimate mixing of the materials. The dry milling process is a worst case dry mixing process. The alkoxide-nitrate process provides for very intimate mixing and is used when equilibrium samples are desired. The attritor milling process simulates the process being developed for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant. After mixing, the subsequent calcination and consolidation steps are generally the same. Most samples were consolidated by cold pressing and sintering although some of the earlier samples or Some of the single-phase samples were prepared by hot pressing. The sample identification numbers (ID's) that are referenced in the summaries (e.g. A-0, B3-13, etc.) are described in the Sample Test Matrix (PIP-99-012 and PIP-00-016). Samples which contain both plutonium and uranium are given the designation Hf-Pu-U samples. When Ce was used as a surrogate for Pu, the designation is Hf-Ce-U. When Th was used as a surrogate for Pu, the designation is Hf-Th-U. When Ce was used as a surrogate for Pu and U, the designation is Hf-Ce-Ce. Lastly, when Zr was used as a surrogate for Hf and Ce was used as a surrogate for Pu and U, the designation is Zr-Ce-Ce.

  20. Plutonium recycle in French PWR plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Rome; G. Francillon; M. le Bars

    1987-01-01

    A significant amount of plutonium from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel reprocessing will be available in France as soon as 1990. Due to the breeder program delay, this amount will be sufficient to permit plutonium recycle in a large number of French PWR plants. According to the French spent fuel reprocessing policy, plutonium recycling approaches two concerns: (1) economic

  1. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) STABILIZATION & PACKAGING PROJECT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2004-01-01

    Fluor Hanford is pleased to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Stabilization and Packaging Project (SPP) for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2004. The SPP thermally stabilized and\\/or packaged nearly 18 metric tons (MT) of plutonium and plutonium-bearing materials left in PFP facilities from 40 years of nuclear weapons production and experimentation. The

  2. Plutonium-the element of surprise

    E-print Network

    Short, Daniel

    Plutonium-the element of surprise G.R.ChoppinandB.E.Stout This year marked the soth annivrsary ol the original isolation o{ plutonium, making ita relativenewcomerto the PeriodicTable.Ovrthe past 50 years plutonium has become more familiar to tho generslpublic than manyothor,olderelem6nts

  3. PROPRITS MAGNTIQUES ET STRUCTURE LECTRONIQUE DU PLUTONIUM

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    699 PROPRIÉTÉS MAGNÉTIQUES ET STRUCTURE ÉLECTRONIQUE DU PLUTONIUM J.-M. FOURNIER Centre d obtenus sur la susceptibilité magnétique du plutonium-03B1. Nous proposons ensuite un schéma de structure de bande que nous utilisons pour expliquer les anomalies d'autres propriétés physiques du plutonium

  4. ANALYSIS FOR PLUTONIUM BY CONTROLLED POTENTIAL COULOMETRY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. A. Scott; R. M. Peekema

    1958-01-01

    A method for the determination of the plutonium content of reactor fuels ; has been developed using controlled potential coulometry. This method is ; superior to conventionnl procedures because it is independent of the plutonium ; isotopic content, has greater precision and sensitivity, and can be used for ; plant feeds and inprocess solutions as well as the plutonium product.

  5. COMPARISON OF MUTAGENIC ACTIVITIES OF SEVERAL PEROXYACL NITRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmonella typhimurium, strain TA100 was exposed to a series of peroxyacyl nitrates including peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), peroxypropionyl nitrate (PPN), peroxybutyryl nitrate (PBN), peroxybenzoyl nitrate (PBzN), and chloroperoxyacetyl nitrate (CPAN). as-phase concentrations for t...

  6. COMPARISON OF MUTAGENIC ACTIVITIES OF SEVERAL PEROXYACYL NITRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 was exposed to a series of peroxyacyl nitrates including peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), peroxypropionyl nitrate peroxybutyryl nitrate (PBN), peroxybenzoyl nitrate (PBzN), and chlororoxyacetyl nitrate (CPAN). as phase concentrations for the individ...

  7. Preventing pollution from plutonium processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-11-01

    The plutonium processing facility at Los Alamos has adopted the strategic goal of becoming a facility that processes plutonium in a way that produces only environmentally benign waste streams. Pollution prevention through source reduction and environmentally sound recycling are being pursued. General approaches to waste reductions are administrative controls, modification of process technologies, and additional waste polishing. Recycling of waste materials, such as spent acids and salts, are technical possibilities and are being pursued to accomplish additional waste reduction. Liquid waste stream polishing to remove final traces of plutonium and hazardous chemical constituents is accomplished through (a) process modifications, (b) use of alternative chemicals and sorbents for residue removal, (c) acid recycling, and (d) judicious use of a variety of waste polishing technologies. Technologies that show promise in waste minimization and pollution prevention are identified. Working toward this goal of pollution prevention is a worthwhile endeavor, not only for Los Alamos, but for the Nuclear Complex of the future.

  8. Extraction of Plutonium From Spiked INEEL Soil Samples Using the Ligand-Assisted Supercritical Fluid Extraction (LA-SFE) Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.V.; Mincher, B.J. (INEEL); Holmes, R.G.G. (British Nuclear Fuels, Inc.)

    1999-08-01

    In order to investigate the effectiveness of ligand-assisted supercritical fluid extraction for the removal of transuranic contaminations from soils an Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) silty-clay soil sample was obtained from near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex area and subjected to three different chemical preparations before being spiked with plutonium. The spiked INEEL soil samples were subjected to a sequential aqueous extraction procedure to determine radionuclide portioning in each sample. Results from those extractions demonstrate that plutonium consistently partitioned into the residual fraction across all three INEEL soil preparations whereas americium partitioned 73% into the iron/manganese fraction for soil preparation A, with the balance partitioning into the residual fraction. Plutonium and americium were extracted from the INEEL soil samples using a ligand-assisted supercritical fluid extraction technique. Initial supercritical fluid extraction runs produced plutonium extraction technique. Initial supercritical fluid extraction runs produced plutonium extraction efficiencies ranging from 14% to 19%. After a second round wherein the initial extraction parameters were changed, the plutonium extraction efficiencies increased to 60% and as high as 80% with the americium level in the post-extracted soil samples dropping near to the detection limits. The third round of experiments are currently underway. These results demonstrate that the ligand-assisted supercritical fluid extraction technique can effectively extract plutonium from the spiked INEEL soil preparations.

  9. Plutonium stabilization and packaging system

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This document describes the functional design of the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (Pu SPS). The objective of this system is to stabilize and package plutonium metals and oxides of greater than 50% wt, as well as other selected isotopes, in accordance with the requirements of the DOE standard for safe storage of these materials for 50 years. This system will support completion of stabilization and packaging campaigns of the inventory at a number of affected sites before the year 2002. The package will be standard for all sites and will provide a minimum of two uncontaminated, organics free confinement barriers for the packaged material.

  10. Bismuth nitrate pentahydrate-induced novel nitration of eugenol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Eugenol, the main constituent of clove oil possesses a number of medicinal activities. To enhance the medicinal property, structural modification is required. On the other hand, bismuth nitrate pentahydrate has been established as an excellent eco-friendly nitrating agent for several classes of organic compounds. Results Bismuth nitrate pentahydrate-induced nitration of eugenol has been investigated very thoroughly. Twenty five different conditions have been studied. The microwave-induced solvent-free reaction has been identified as the best condition. Conclusions Spectral analyses confirm that 5-nitroeugenol is the sole product in all the cases. No oxidized or isomerized product could be detected. PMID:22373430

  11. Development of Accelerated Net Nitrate Uptake 1

    PubMed Central

    MacKown, Charles T.; McClure, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    Upon initial nitrate exposure, net nitrate uptake rates in roots of a wide variety of plants accelerate within 6 to 8 hours to substantially greater rates. Effects of solution nitrate concentrations and short pulses of nitrate (?1 hour) upon `nitrate-induced' acceleration of nitrate uptake in maize (Zea mays L.) were determined. Root cultures of dark-grown seedlings, grown without nitrate, were exposed to 250 micromolar nitrate for 0.25 to 1 hour or to various solution nitrate concentrations (10-250 micromolar) for 1 hour before returning them to a nitrate-free solution. Net nitrate uptake rates were assayed at various periods following nitrate exposure and compared to rates of roots grown either in the absence of nitrate (CaSO4-grown) or with continuous nitrate for at least 20 hours. Three hours after initial nitrate exposure, nitrate pulse treatments increased nitrate uptake rates three- to four-fold compared to the rates of CaSO4-grown roots. When cycloheximide (5 micrograms per milliliter) was included during a 1-hour pulse with 250 micromolar nitrate, development of the accelerated nitrate uptake state was delayed. Otherwise, nitrate uptake rates reached maximum values within 6 hours before declining. Maximum rates, however, were significantly less than those of roots exposed continuously for 20, 32, or 44 hours. Pulsing for only 0.25 hour with 250 micromolar nitrate and for 1 hour with 10 micromolar caused acceleration of nitrate uptake, but the rates attained were either less than or not sustained for a duration comparable to those of roots pulsed for 1 hour with 250 micromolar nitrate. These results indicate that substantial development of the nitrate-induced accelerated nitrate uptake state can be achieved by small endogenous accumulations of nitrate, which appear to moderate the activity or level of root nitrate uptake. PMID:16666094

  12. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN SIMULATED SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.; Hobbs, D.; Edwards, T.

    2010-09-27

    To address the accelerated disposition of the supernate and salt portions of Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW), solubility experiments were performed to develop a predictive capability for plutonium (Pu) solubility. A statistically designed experiment was used to measure the solubility of Pu in simulated solutions with salt concentrations and temperatures which bounded those observed in SRS HLW solutions. Constituents of the simulated waste solutions included: hydroxide (OH{sup -}), aluminate (Al(OH){sub 4}{sup -}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}), and nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) anions. Each anion was added to the waste solution in the sodium form. The solubilities were measured at 25 and 80 C. Five sets of samples were analyzed over a six month period and a partial sample set was analyzed after nominally fifteen months of equilibration. No discernable time dependence of the measured Pu concentrations was observed except for two salt solutions equilibrated at 80 C which contained OH{sup -} concentrations >5 mol/L. In these solutions, the Pu solubility increased with time. This observation was attributed to the air oxidation of a portion of the Pu from Pu(IV) to the more soluble Pu(V) or Pu(VI) valence states. A data driven approach was subsequently used to develop a modified response surface model for Pu solubility. Solubility data from this study and historical data from the literature were used to fit the model. The model predicted the Pu solubility of the solutions from this study within the 95% confidence interval for individual predictions and the analysis of variance indicated no statistically significant lack of fit. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) model was compared with predicted values from the Aqueous Electrolyte (AQ) model developed by OLI Systems, Inc. and a solubility prediction equation developed by Delegard and Gallagher for Hanford tank waste. The agreement between measured or values predicted by the SRNL model and values predicted by the OLI AG model was very poor. The much higher predicted concentrations by the OLI AQ model appears to be the result of the model predicting the predominate Pu oxidation state is Pu(V) which is reported as unstable below sodium hydroxide (NaOH) concentrations of 6 M. There was very good agreement between the predicted Pu concentrations using the SRNL model and the model developed by Delegard and Gallagher with the exception of solutions that had very high OH{sup -} (15 M) concentrations. The lower Pu solubilities in these solutions were attributed to the presence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} and NO{sub 2}{sup -} which limit the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(V).

  13. Plutonium immobilization feed batching system concept report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.

    2000-07-19

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with high level waste glass for permanent storage. Feed batching is one of the first process steps involved with first stage plutonium immobilization. It will blend plutonium oxide powder before it is combined with other materials to make pucks. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization feed batching process preliminary concept, batch splitting concepts, and includes a process block diagram, concept descriptions, a preliminary equipment list, and feed batching development areas.

  14. Plutonium inventory characterization technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Wittman, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-10

    This is a technical report on the data, gathered to date, under WHC- SD-CP-TP-086, Rev. 1, on the integrity of the food pack cans currently being used to store plutonium or plutonium compounds at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Workplan PFP-96-VO-009, `Inspection of Special Nuclear Material Using X-ray`, was used to gather data on material and containment conditions using real time radiography. Some of those images are included herein. A matrix found in the `Plutonium Inventory Characterization Implementation Plan` was used to categorize different plutonium items based upon the type of material being stored and the life expectancy of the containers.

  15. Effects of nitrate supply on plant growth, nitrate accumulation, metabolic nitrate concentration and nitrate reductase activity in three leafy vegetables

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bao-Ming Chen; Zhao-Hui Wang; Sheng-Xiu Li; Gen-Xuan Wang; Hai-Xing Song; Xi-Na Wang

    2004-01-01

    Three leafy vegetables, rape (Brassica campestris L.), Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis var. Oleifera Makino et Nenoto) and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), were grown in plastic pots with 5kg soil per pot at five nitrate supply rates, 0.00 (N1), 0.15 (N2), 0.30 (N3), 0.45 (N4), and 0.60 (N5)gNkg?1 soil to investigate the effects of nitrate supply on plant growth, nitrate accumulation

  16. Nitrate source indicators in ground water of the Scimitar Subdivision, Peters Creek area, Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Bronwen; Strelakos, Pat M.; Jokela, Brett

    2000-01-01

    A combination of aqueous chemistry, isotopic measurement, and in situ tracers were used to study the possible nitrate sources, the factors contributing to the spatial distribution of nitrate, and possible septic system influence in the ground water in the Scimitar Subdivision, Municipality of Anchorage, Alaska. Two water types were distinguished on the basis of the major ion chemistry: (1) a calcium sodium carbonate water, which was associated with isotopically heavier boron and with chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) that were in the range expected from equilibration with the atmosphere (group A water) and (2) a calcium magnesium carbonate water, which was associated with elevated nitrate, chloride, and magnesium concentrations, generally isotopically lighter boron, and CFC's concentrations that were generally in excess of that expected from equilibration with the atmosphere (group B water). Water from wells in group B had nitrate concentrations that were greater than 3 milligrams per liter, whereas those in group A had nitrate concentrations of 0.2 milligram per liter or less. Nitrate does not appear to be undergoing extensive transformation in the ground-water system and behaves as a conservative ion. The major ion chemistry trends and the presence of CFC's in excess of an atmospheric source for group B wells are consistent with waste-water influences. The spatial distribution of the nitrate among wells is likely due to the magnitude of this influence on any given well. Using an expanded data set composed of 16 wells sampled only for nitrate concentration, a significant difference in the static water level relative to bedrock was found. Well water samples with less than 1 milligram per liter nitrate had static water levels within the bedrock, whereas those samples with greater than 1 milligram per liter nitrate had static water levels near or above the top of the bedrock. This observation would be consistent with a conceptual model of a low-nitrate fractured bedrock aquifer that receives slow recharge from an overlying nitrate-enriched surficial aquifer.

  17. Burning weapons-grade plutonium in reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, D.F.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of massive reductions in deployed nuclear warheads, and their subsequent dismantlement, large quantities of surplus weapons- grade plutonium will be stored until its ultimate disposition is achieved in both the US and Russia. Ultimate disposition has the following minimum requirements: (1) preclude return of plutonium to the US and Russian stockpiles, (2) prevent environmental damage by precluding release of plutonium contamination, and (3) prevent proliferation by precluding plutonium diversion to sub-national groups or nonweapons states. The most efficient and effective way to dispose of surplus weapons-grade plutonium is to fabricate it into fuel and use it for generation of electrical energy in commercial nuclear power plants. Weapons-grade plutonium can be used as fuel in existing commercial nuclear power plants, such as those in the US and Russia. This recovers energy and economic value from weapons-grade plutonium, which otherwise represents a large cost liability to maintain in safeguarded and secure storage. The plutonium remaining in spent MOX fuel is reactor-grade, essentially the same as that being discharged in spent UO{sub 2} fuels. MOX fuels are well developed and are currently used in a number of LWRs in Europe. Plutonium-bearing fuels without uranium (non-fertile fuels) would require some development. However, such non-fertile fuels are attractive from a nonproliferation perspective because they avoid the insitu production of additional plutonium and enhance the annihilation of the plutonium inventory on a once-through fuel cycle.

  18. Plutonium immobilization form evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L. W., LLNL

    1998-02-13

    The 1994 National Academy of Sciences study and the 1997 assessment by DOE`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security have emphasized the importance of the overall objectives of the Plutonium Disposition Program of beginning disposition rapidly. President Clinton and other leaders of the G-7 plus one (`Political Eight`) group of states, at the Moscow Nuclear Safety And Security Summit in April 1996, agreed on the objectives of accomplishing disposition of excess fissile material as soon as practicable. To meet these objectives, DOE has laid out an aggressive schedule in which large-scale immobilization operations would begin in 2005. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the lead laboratory for the development of Pu immobilization technologies for the Department of Energy`s Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD), was requested by MD to recommend the preferred immobilization form and technology for the disposition of excess weapons-usable Pu. In a series of three separate evaluations, the technologies for the candidate glass and ceramic forms were compared against criteria and metrics that reflect programmatic and technical objectives: (1) Evaluation of the R&D and engineering data for the two forms against the decision criteria/metrics by a technical evaluation panel comprising experts from within the immobilization program. (2) Integrated assessment by LLNL immobilization management of the candidate technologies with respect to the weighted criteria and other programmatic objectives, leading to a recommendation to DOE/MD on the preferred technology based on technical factors. (3) Assessment of the decision process, evaluation, and recommendation by a peer review panel of independent experts. Criteria used to assess the relative merits of the immobilization technologies were a subset of the criteria previously used by MD to choose among disposition options leading to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials, January 1997. Criteria were: (1) resistance to Pu theft, diversion, and recovery by a terrorist organization or rogue nation; (2) resistance to recovery and reuse by host nation; (3) technical viability, including technical maturity, development risk, and acceptability for repository disposal; (4) environmental, safety, and health factors; (5) cost effectiveness; and (6) timeliness. On the basis of the technical evaluation and assessments, in September, 1997, LLNL recommended to DOE/MD that ceramic technologies be developed for deployment in the planned Pu immobilization plant.

  19. PLUTONIUM TECHNOLOGY FOR REACTOR SYSTEMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. B. Waldron; A. G. Adwick; H. Lloyd; M. J. Notley; D. M. Poole; L. E. Russell; J. B. Sayers

    1959-01-01

    The possibility exists of using plutonium in both thermal and fast ; reactors as solid metal, ceramic, or cermet or as liquid metal solutions or ; suspensions. Technological studies were undertaken to evaluate the ; practicability of the various concepts. For solid metallic fuels, powder ; metallurgy and extrusion experiments are reported; binary alloys with iron, ; thorium, uranium, zirconium;

  20. THE PHYSICAL METALLURGY OF PLUTONIUM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. B. Waldron; J. Garstone; J. A. Lee; P. G. Mardon; J. A. C. Marples; D. M. Poole; G. K. Williamson

    1959-01-01

    Some physical properties of plutonium were redetermined using high-; purity metal, including transition temperatures by thermal analysis and ; dilatometry, expansion coefficients, and thermo-electric power. Thermal ; properties and the kinetics of the alpha in equilibrium BETA transformation ; were studied on metal of lower purity. The effect of aluminum additions on the ; negative expansion coefficient of the delta-phase

  1. PLUTONIUM METALLOGRAPHY AT LOS ALAMOS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RAMIRO A. PEREYRA; DARRYL LOVATO

    2007-01-01

    From early days of the Manhattan program to today, scientists and engineers have continued to investigate the metallurgical properties of plutonium (Pu). Although issues like aging was not a concern to the early pioneers, today the reliability of our aging stockpile is of major focus. And as the country moves toward a new generation of weapons similar problems that the

  2. Plutonium may fuel advanced unit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1994-01-01

    Dismantling thousands of nuclear warheads brought on by the end of the Cold War is spurring new interest in nuclear power by utilities and private developers. The Department of Energy is now considering three unsolicited proposals from those suggesting that the agency work down its growing stockpile of excess plutonium by combining the material with spent uranium-oxide powerplant fuel and

  3. Plutonium Recycle: The Fateful Step

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speth, J. Gustave; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Calls attention to the fact that if the Atomic Energy Commission proceeds with its plans to authorize the nuclear power industry to use plutonium as a fuel in commercial nuclear reactors around the country, this will result in a dramatic escalation in the risks posed by nuclear power. (PEB)

  4. Making plutonium a Soviet monopoly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beckmann

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Beckmann severely criticizes the Ford Foundation report that recommended abandonment of the nuclear breeder reactor program. The arguments in the report ''are largely contradictory, irrelevant, and forcibly recruited to bolster a preconceived and erroneous conclusion that plutonium technology in the electric power industry must result in the proliferation of nuclear weapons,'' he says. He further adds, ''such a strategy

  5. Plutonium from Chernobyl in Poland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerzy W. Mietelski

    1995-01-01

    Samples of coniferous forest litter collected in POland, of known ?-emitters activity, have been analysed for ? emitting plutonium isotopes. Specific as well as surface activities of the samples have been determined. Chernobyl and global fallout components have been distinguished for each sample. The observed maximum surface activity for Chernobyl fallout is above 25 Bq m?2 (for all ?-emitting Pu

  6. Determination of particle size distribution of salt crystals in aqueous slurries. [From reprocessing of fuel elements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1977-01-01

    A method for determining particle size distribution of water-soluble crystals in aqueous slurries is described. The salt slurries, containing sodium salts of predominantly nitrate, but also nitrite, sulfate, phosphate, aluminates, carbonate, and hydroxide, occur in radioactive, concentrated chemical waste from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel elements. The method involves separating the crystals from the aqueous phase, drying them, and then

  7. Nitrate And Bicarbonate Selective Chemfets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martijn M. G. Antonisse; Johan F. J. Engbersen; David N. Reinhoudt

    1995-01-01

    The development of durable anion selective CHEMFET micro sensors is described. Selectivity in these sensors is either obtained from differences in hydration energy of the anions (the Hlofmeister series, giving nitrate selectivity) or by introduction of a new class of uranyl salophene ionophores (bicarbonate selectivity). The durability of the nitrate sensor was enhanced by using polysiloxane membranes in which 1

  8. Photoelastic Effect in Lead Nitrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Bhagavantam; K. V. Krishna Rao

    1953-01-01

    IN an earlier communication1, it was reported that barium nitrate behaves in an exceptional manner in respect of its photo-elasticity. Since then, crystals of lead nitrate have also been studied, and differences between the stress-optical constants, as determined by a Babinet compensator for the sodium D lines, are found to be: .

  9. Nitrate | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    Nitrates and nitrites are nitrogen-oxygen chemical units that naturally occur in soil, water, and some foods. When taken into the body by drinking water and through other dietary sources, nitrate and nitrite can react with amines and amides to form N-nitroso compounds (NOC), which are known to cause cancer in animals and may cause cancer in humans.

  10. Aqueous ferrofluids based on manganese and cobalt ferrites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francisco Augusto Tourinho; Raymonde Franck; René Massart

    1990-01-01

    Synthesis of two new aqueous ferrofluids is performed chemically according to Massart's procedure. Manganese and cobalt ferrite magnetic particles are precipitated and treated in order to obtain colloidal sols by creating a charge density on their surface. Such “ionic” ferrofluids can be prepared in an acidic (after a treatment by ferric nitrate) or in an alkaline medium at a concentration

  11. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-06-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  12. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  13. Using Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Compositions of Nitrate to Distinguish Contaminant Sources in Hanford Soil and Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Mark; Bill, Markus

    2008-08-01

    The nitrogen ({delta}{sup 15}N) and oxygen ({delta}{sup 18}O) isotopic compositions of nitrate in the environment are primarily a function of the source of the nitrate. The ranges of isotopic compositions for nitrate resulting from common sources are outlined in Figure 1 from Kendall (1998). As noted on Figure 1, processes such as microbial metabolism can modify the isotopic compositions of the nitrate, but the effects of these processes are generally predictable. At Hanford, nitrate and other nitrogenous compounds were significant components of most of the chemical processes used at the site. Most of the oxygen in nitrate chemicals (e.g., nitric acid) is derived from atmospheric oxygen, giving it a significantly higher {delta}{sup 18}O value (+23.5{per_thousand}) than naturally occurring nitrate that obtains most of its oxygen from water (the {delta}{sup 18}O of Hanford groundwater ranges from -14{per_thousand} to -18{per_thousand}). This makes it possible to differentiate nitrate from Hanford site activities from background nitrate at the site (including most fertilizers that might have been used prior to the Department of Energy plutonium production activities at the site). In addition, the extreme thermal and chemical conditions that occurred during some of the waste processing procedures and subsequent waste storage in select single-shell tanks resulted in unique nitrate isotopic compositions that can be used to identify those waste streams in soil and groundwater at the site (Singleton et al., 2005; Christensen et al., 2007). This report presents nitrate isotope data for soil and groundwater samples from the Hanford 200 Areas and discusses the implications of that data for potential sources of groundwater contamination.

  14. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  15. Plutonium storage safety at major Department of Energy facilities. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, D.; De La Paz, A.; Fortenberry, K.; Tontodonato, R.; Von Holle, W.

    1994-04-14

    The report reviews the safety of plutonium stored at the Rocky Flats Plant, the Hanford Site, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Savannah River Site. It considers the inventory of bare (unencapsulated) plutonium metal, plutonium oxides, other plutonium compounds, solid plutonium scrap, and plutonium solutions. The report does not consider irradiated fuel, finished plutonium weapon components (pits), or plutonium-238.

  16. Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption to Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Hixon, Amy E.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Nitsche, Heino; Qafoku, Odeta; Powell, Brian A.

    2010-10-01

    Plutonium subsurface mobility is primarily controlled by its oxidation state, which in turn is loosely coupled to the oxidation state of iron in the system. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of sediment iron mineral composition and oxidation state on plutonium sorption and oxidation state. A pH 6.3 vadose zone sediment containing iron oxides and iron-containing phyllosilicates was treated with various complexants (ammonium oxalate) and reductants (dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate) to selectively leach and/or reduce iron oxide and phyllosilicate phases. Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to identify initial iron mineral composition of the sediment and monitor dissolution and reduction of iron oxides. Sorption of Pu(V) was monitored over one week for each of six treated sediment fractions. Plutonium oxidation state speciation in the aqueous and solid phases was monitored using solvent extraction, coprecipitation, and XANES. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the sediment contained 25-30% hematite, 60-65% Al-goethite, and <10%Fe(III) in phyllosilicate; there was no detectable Fe(II). Upon reduction with a strong chemical reductant (dithionite-citrate buffer, DCB), much of the hematite and goethite disappeared and the Fe in the phyllosilicate reduced to Fe(II). The rate of sorption was found to correlate with the 1 fraction of Fe(II) remaining within each treated sediment phase. Pu(V) was the only oxidation state measured in the aqueous phase, irrespective of treatment, whereas Pu(IV) and much smaller amounts of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) were measured in the solid phase. Surface-mediated reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) occurred in treated and untreated sediment samples; Pu(V) remained on untreated sediment surface for two days before reducing to Pu(IV). Similar to the sorption kinetics, the reduction rate was correlated with sediment Fe(II) concentration. The correlation between Fe(II) concentrations and Pu(V) reduction demonstrates the potential impact of changing iron mineralogy on plutonium subsurface transport through redox transition areas. These findings should influence the conceptual models of long-term stewardship of Pu contaminated sites that have fluctuating redox conditions, such as vadose zones or riparian zones.

  17. Influence of microwave heating on fluoride, chloride, nitrate and sulfate concentrations in water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduardo Costa Figueiredo; Jailson Cardoso Dias; Lauro Tatsuo Kubota; Mauro Korn; Pedro Vitoriano Oliveira; Marco Aurélio Zezzi Arruda

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study about the influence of microwave radiation using closed vessels on fluoride, chloride, nitrate and sulfate concentrations in aqueous media. The experiments were processed by heating water using PFA vessels and a microwave cavity oven, determining the anions by ion chromatography. The influence of the exposure time, the atmospheric composition, the kind of heating (water bath

  18. Graft Copolymerization of Methyl Methacrylate onto Silk Sericin Initiated by Ceric Ammonium Nitrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan Song; Yong Jin; Deqing Wei; Jing Sun

    2006-01-01

    A novel redox system, ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN)?silk sericin (SS) was applied to initiate graft copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) onto silk sericin in an acidic aqueous solution medium. The effects of monomer concentration, initiator concentration, reaction temperature, and time on grafting parameters had been investigated in detail. The results showed that the graft copolymerization occurred even at as a

  19. The System Uranyl Nitrate-Water-Tributylphosphate-Carbon Tetrachloride; HET SYSTEEM: URANYLNITRAAT-WATER-TRIBUTYLFOSFAAT- TETRACHLOORKOOLSTOF

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Van Aartsen

    1962-01-01

    The extraction of uranyl nitrate from aqueous solutions by mixtures of ; tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and carbon tetrachloride is governed by the ; equilibrium compositions on either side of the miscibility gap in the quaternary ; system UOâ(NOâ)â-- HâO- TBP- CClâ. Thermodynamic ; desc riptions of nonideal behavior in binary and ternary mixtures are first ; discussed. The materials used,

  20. Winter Wheat and Maize Response to Urea Ammonium Nitrate and a New Urea Formaldehyde Polymer Fertilizer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slow release nitrogen (N) fertilizers have potential to improve yield and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.). A slow release urea formaldehyde polymer (UFP) was compared with conventional aqueous urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) [(NH2)2CO, NH4NO3]...

  1. Air transport of plutonium metal: content expansion initiative for the plutonium air transportable (PAT01) packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Caviness, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mann, Paul T [NNSA/ALBUQUERQUE; Yoshimura, Richard H [SNL

    2010-01-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has submitted an application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the air shipment of plutonium metal within the Plutonium Air Transportable (PAT-1) packaging. The PAT-1 packaging is currently authorized for the air transport of plutonium oxide in solid form only. The INMM presentation will provide a limited overview of the scope of the plutonium metal initiative and provide a status of the NNSA application to the NRC.

  2. Air transport of plutonium metal : content expansion initiative for the Plutonium Air Transportable (PAT-1) packaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Paul T. (National Nuclear Security Administration); Caviness, Michael L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki

    2010-06-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has submitted an application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the air shipment of plutonium metal within the Plutonium Air Transportable (PAT-1) packaging. The PAT-1 packaging is currently authorized for the air transport of plutonium oxide in solid form only. The INMM presentation will provide a limited overview of the scope of the plutonium metal initiative and provide a status of the NNSA application to the NRC.

  3. Multi-generational stewardship of plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Pillay, K.K.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Materials Technology Div.

    1997-10-01

    The post-cold war era has greatly enhanced the interest in the long-term stewardship of plutonium. The management of excess plutonium from proposed nuclear weapons dismantlement has been the subject of numerous intellectual discussions during the past several years. In this context, issues relevant to long-term management of all plutonium as a valuable energy resource are also being examined. While there are differing views about the future role of plutonium in the economy, there is a recognition of the environmental and health related problems and proliferation potentials of weapons-grade plutonium. The long-term management of plutonium as an energy resource will require a new strategy to maintain stewardship for many generations to come.

  4. 10 CFR 71.63 - Special requirement for plutonium shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Special requirement for plutonium shipments. 71.63 Section 71.63...Standards § 71.63 Special requirement for plutonium shipments. Shipments containing plutonium must be made with the contents in...

  5. 10 CFR 71.63 - Special requirement for plutonium shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Special requirement for plutonium shipments. 71.63 Section 71.63...Standards § 71.63 Special requirement for plutonium shipments. Shipments containing plutonium must be made with the contents in...

  6. 10 CFR 71.63 - Special requirement for plutonium shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Special requirement for plutonium shipments. 71.63 Section 71.63...Standards § 71.63 Special requirement for plutonium shipments. Shipments containing plutonium must be made with the contents in...

  7. 10 CFR 71.63 - Special requirement for plutonium shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Special requirement for plutonium shipments. 71.63 Section 71.63...Standards § 71.63 Special requirement for plutonium shipments. Shipments containing plutonium must be made with the contents in...

  8. 10 CFR 71.63 - Special requirement for plutonium shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Special requirement for plutonium shipments. 71.63 Section 71.63...Standards § 71.63 Special requirement for plutonium shipments. Shipments containing plutonium must be made with the contents in...

  9. Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Can loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-01-18

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP scope includes unloading transportation containers, preparing the feed streams, converting the metal feed to an oxide, adding the ceramic precursors, pressing the pucks, inspecting pucks, and sintering pucks. The PIP scope also includes loading the pucks into metal cans, sealing the cans, inspecting the cans, loading the cans into magazines, loading magazines into Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and transporting the canisters to the DWPF. The DWPF fills the canister with a mixture of high level radioactive waste and glass for permanent storage. Due to the radiation, remote equipment must perform PIP operations in a contained environment.

  10. Alpha-plutonium's Grüneisen parameter.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, Hassel; Lawson, Andrew; Migliori, Albert

    2010-04-28

    Reported Grüneisen parameters ? of alpha-plutonium range from 3.0 to 9.6, which is remarkable because typical Grüneisen parameter uncertainty seldom exceeds ± 0.5. Our six new estimates obtained by different methods range from 3.2 to 9.6. The new estimates arise from Grüneisen's rule, from Einstein model and Debye model fits to low-temperature ?V/V, from the bulk modulus temperature dependence, from the zero-point-energy contribution to the bulk modulus, and from another Grüneisen relationship whereby ? is estimated from only the bulk modulus and volume changes with temperature (or pressure). We disregard several high estimates because of the itinerant-localized 5f-electron changes during temperature changes and pressure changes. Considering all these estimates, for alpha-plutonium, we recommend ? = 3.7 ± 0.4, slightly high compared with values for all elemental metals. PMID:21386421

  11. Standard test method for quantitative determination of americium 241 in plutonium by Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1994-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of americium 241 by gamma-ray spectrometry in plutonium nitrate solution samples that do not contain significant amounts of radioactive fission products or other high specific activity gamma-ray emitters. 1.2 This test method can be used to determine the americium 241 in samples of plutonium metal, oxide and other solid forms, when the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. PLUTONIUM METAL: OXIDATION CONSIDERATIONS AND APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Estochen, E.

    2013-03-20

    Plutonium is arguably the most unique of all metals when considered in the combined context of metallurgical, chemical, and nuclear behavior. Much of the research in understanding behavior and characteristics of plutonium materials has its genesis in work associated with nuclear weapons systems. However, with the advent of applications in fuel materials, the focus in plutonium science has been more towards nuclear fuel applications, as well as long term storage and disposition. The focus of discussion included herein is related to preparing plutonium materials to meet goals consistent with non-proliferation. More specifically, the emphasis is on the treatment of legacy plutonium, in primarily metallic form, and safe handling, packaging, and transport to meet non-proliferation goals of safe/secure storage. Elevated temperature oxidation of plutonium metal is the treatment of choice, due to extensive experiential data related to the method, as the oxide form of plutonium is one of only a few compounds that is relatively simple to produce, and stable over a large temperature range. Despite the simplicity of the steps required to oxidize plutonium metal, it is important to understand the behavior of plutonium to ensure that oxidation is conducted in a safe and effective manner. It is important to understand the effect of changes in environmental variables on the oxidation characteristics of plutonium. The primary purpose of this report is to present a brief summary of information related to plutonium metal attributes, behavior, methods for conversion to oxide, and the ancillary considerations related to processing and facility safety. The information provided is based on data available in the public domain and from experience in oxidation of such materials at various facilities in the United States. The report is provided as a general reference for implementation of a simple and safe plutonium metal oxidation technique.

  13. Plutonium Proliferation: The Achilles Heel of Disarmament

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leventhal

    2001-01-01

    Plutonium is a byproduct of nuclear fission, and it is produced at the rate of about 70 metric tons a year in the world's nuclear power reactors. Concerns about civilian plutonium ran high in the 1970s and prompted enactment of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 to give the United States a veto over separating plutonium from U.S.-supplied uranium fuel.

  14. Plutonium—an Element Never at Equilibrium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siegfried S. Hecker

    2008-01-01

    The relentless deposition of energy from the ?-particle decay of plutonium damages its crystal lattice and transmutes plutonium into other elements over time (principally,\\u000a helium, americium, uranium, and neptunium). At cryogenic temperatures (4 K), lattice damage causes significant volume expansion\\u000a of pure plutonium and contraction of face-centered-cubic stabilized alloys, and both appear to lose crystallinity at long\\u000a irradiation times. At room

  15. Plutonium may fuel advanced unit

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, F.H.

    1994-04-25

    Dismantling thousands of nuclear warheads brought on by the end of the Cold War is spurring new interest in nuclear power by utilities and private developers. The Department of Energy is now considering three unsolicited proposals from those suggesting that the agency work down its growing stockpile of excess plutonium by combining the material with spent uranium-oxide powerplant fuel and using the mix to run nuclear reactors.

  16. Multiple intermediate valence in plutonium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. V. Mirmelstein; E. S. Clementyev; O. V. Kerbel

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the concepts of an intermediate-valence (IV) regime, an empirical model is proposed that quantitatively describes\\u000a the magnetic susceptibility, specific heat, and effective atomic volume of the low-temperature ? phase and the gallium or\\u000a aluminum-stabilized face-centered cubic (fcc) ? phase of plutonium metal. The results of the paper allow one to estimate the\\u000a entropy change associated with

  17. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Vienna; D. L. Alexander; Hong Li

    1996-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation`s defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu

  18. PLUTONIUM ALLOYS CONTAINING CONTROLLED AMOUNTS OF PLUTONIUM ALLOTROPES OBTAINED BY APPLICATION OF HIGH PRESSURES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. O. Elliott; K. A. Jr. Gschneidner

    1962-01-01

    A method of making stabilized plutonium alloys which are free of voids ; and cracks and have a controlled amount of plutonium allotropes is described. ; The steps include adding at least 4.5 at.% of hafnium, indium, or erbium to the ; melted plutonium metal, homogenizing the resulting alloy at a temperature of 450 ; deg C, cooling to room

  19. Thorium plutonium (TREX) fuel for weapons-grade plutonium disposition in pressurized water reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Comfort; C. Ferguson; S. Klima; D. E. Lilly; F. Rahnema

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this study was to create a pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor assembly (17 x 17) that would burn weapons-grade plutonium (WGP). Current designs of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels combine WGP with uranium as the fuel. MOX fuel assemblies will destroy plutonium, but only 40 to 50% of the plutonium present in the fuel. This percentage is limited by

  20. PLUTONIUM ALLOYS CONTAINING CONTROLLED AMOUNTS OF PLUTONIUM ALLOTROPES OBTAINED BY APPLICATION OF HIGH PRESSURES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. O. Elliott; K. A. Jr. Gschneidner

    1962-01-01

    A method is given for making stabilized plutonium alloys which are free ; of voids and cracks and have a controlled amount of plutonium allotropes. The ; steps include adding at least 4.5 at.% of hafnium, indium, or erbium to the ; melted plutonium metal, homogenizing the resulting alloy at a temperature of 450 ; deg C, cooling to room

  1. PLUTONIUM FUELS DEVELOPMENT, PLUTONIUM METALLURGY OPERATION QUARTERLY REPORT-JANUARY, FEBRUARY, MARCH 1958

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wick

    1958-01-01

    The last two of four Zircaloy-clad capsules containing aluminum-; plutonium and aluminum-- silicon--plutonium were discharged from the MTR and are ; undergoing examination. These capsules withstood a fractional bunnout of ; plutonium atoms of 55 to 60% as determined by flux monitoring wires attached to ; the capsule holder. Additional capsules of these fuel alloys containing a higher ; concentration

  2. Air transport of plutonium metal: content expansion initiative for the plutonium air transportable (PAT01) packaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael L Caviness; Paul T Mann; Richard H Yoshimura

    2010-01-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has submitted an application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the air shipment of plutonium metal within the Plutonium Air Transportable (PAT-1) packaging. The PAT-1 packaging is currently authorized for the air transport of plutonium oxide in solid form only. The INMM presentation will provide a limited overview of the scope of the

  3. Air transport of plutonium metal : content expansion initiative for the Plutonium Air Transportable (PAT1) packaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul T. Mann; Michael L. Caviness; Richard Hiroyuki Yoshimura

    2010-01-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has submitted an application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the air shipment of plutonium metal within the Plutonium Air Transportable (PAT-1) packaging. The PAT-1 packaging is currently authorized for the air transport of plutonium oxide in solid form only. The INMM presentation will provide a limited overview of the scope of the

  4. EQUILIBRIUM OF THE SYSTEM LANTHANUM NITRATE-PRASEODYMIUM NITRATE-NITRIC ACID-WATER-TRIBUTYL PHOSPHATE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. M. Sharp; M. Smutz

    1960-01-01

    A study of the extraction characteristics of the three systems lanthanum nitrate--nitric acid--water--tributyl phosphate, praseodymium nitrate--nitric acid--water--tributyl phosphate, and lanthanum nitrate--praseodymium nitrate nitric acid -water--tributyl phosphate was conducted. The separation factors between praseodymium and lanthanum for the system lanthanum nitrate--praseodymium nitrate-nitric acid--water--tributyl phosphate were shown to be a function of the total nitrate concentration of an equilibrium phase and ;

  5. Unique photochemistry of surface nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.; Finlayson-Pitts, B.J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1995-11-23

    Unique inorganic surface nitrate species are known to be formed by the reactions of alkali halides such as solid NaCl with gaseous NO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}, and N{sub 2}O{sub 5}. We report here that these surface nitrate species do not give nitrite ions upon UV photolysis, unlike stable crystalline inorganic nitrates such as NaNO{sub 3}. No infrared active products are detected in the salt while the surface nitrate photodecomposes, demonstrating that the surface nitrate species has a unique photochemistry that is distinct from that of crystalline NaNO{sub 3}. On the other hand, if the surface nitrate is transformed into microcrystallites of NaNO{sub 3} through a water-induced surface reorganization, the formation of nitrite is observed upon photolysis, as expected for the stable crystalline salt. A possible mechanism for the decomposition of the surface nitrate involves production of NO{sub 2}: NO{sub 3}{sup -}{sub surf} + hv {yields} NO{sub 2} + O{sup -}{sub surf} (8) rather than NO{sub 2}{sup -} + O or ONOO{sup -} as observed in earlier studies. The atmospheric implications of these observations are discussed. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Nitrate concentrations under irrigated agriculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaporozec, A.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, considerable interest has been expressed in the nitrate content of water supplies. The most notable toxic effect of nitrate is infant methemoglobinemia. The risk of this disease increases significantly at nitrate-nitrogen levels exceeding 10 mg/l. For this reason, this concentration has been established as a limit for drinking water in many countries. In natural waters, nitrate is a minor ionic constituent and seldom accounts for more than a few percent of the total anions. However, nitrate in a significant concentration may occur in the vicinity of some point sources such as septic tanks, manure pits, and waste-disposal sites. Non-point sources contributing to groundwater pollution are numerous and a majority of them are related to agricultural activities. The largest single anthropogenic input of nitrate into the groundwater is fertilizer. Even though it has not been proven that nitrogen fertilizers are responsible for much of nitrate pollution, they are generally recognized as the main threat to groundwater quality, especially when inefficiently applied to irrigated fields on sandy soils. The biggest challenge facing today's agriculture is to maintain the balance between the enhancement of crop productivity and the risk of groundwater pollution. ?? 1982 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  7. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, M.S.

    1994-08-01

    The zone refining process was applied to Pu metal containing known amounts of impurities. Rod specimens of plutonium metal were melted into and contained in tantalum boats, each of which was passed horizontally through a three-turn, high-frequency coil in such a manner as to cause a narrow molten zone to pass through the Pu metal rod 10 times. The impurity elements Co, Cr, Fe, Ni, Np, U were found to move in the same direction as the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. The elements Al, Am, and Ga moved in the opposite direction of the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. As the impurity alloy was zone refined, {delta}-phase plutonium metal crystals were produced. The first few zone refining passes were more effective than each later pass because an oxide layer formed on the rod surface. There was no clear evidence of better impurity movement at the slower zone refining speed. Also, constant or variable coil power appeared to have no effect on impurity movement during a single run (10 passes). This experiment was the first step to developing a zone refining process for plutonium metal.

  8. Destruction of nitrates, organics, and ferrocyanides by hydrothermal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.M.; Foy, B.R.; Dell'Orco, P.C.; Anderson, G.; Archuleta, F.; Atencio, J.; Breshears, D.; Brewer, R.; Eaton, H.; McFarland, R.; McInroy, R.; Reynolds, T.; Sedillo, M.; Wilmanns, E.; Buelow, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    This work targets the remediation of the aqueous mixed wastes stored in the underground tanks at the Department of Energy site in Hanford, Washington via hydrothermal processing. The feasibility of destroying the nitrate, organic, and ferrocyanide components of the wastes under supercritical and near critical conditions (623 [degree]K to 873[degree]K, 22.1 MPa to 103.4 MPa) is addressed. A novel method was developed for determining the solubility of nitrate salts in supercritical water solutions at pressures ranging from 24.8 MPa to 30.3 MPa (3600 psi to 4400 psi) and temperatures from 723 [degree]K to 798 [degree]K. Sodium nitrate solubilities ranged from 293 mg/kg at 24.8 MPa and 798 [degree]K to 1963 mg/kg at 30.3 MPa and 723[degree]K. Solubility was found to vary directly with pressure, and inversely with temperature. An empirical relationship was developed for the estimation of sodium nitrate solubility at water densities between 0.08 and 0.16 kg/L and temperatures between 723[degree]K and 798[degree]K. A small volume batch reactor equipped with optical diagnostics was used to monitor the phase behavior of a diluted variant of a tank 101-SY simulant. Preliminary results suggest that a single phase is formed at 83 MPa at 773 [degree]K.

  9. The Vapor Pressure of Plutonium Halides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. E. Phipps; G. W. Sears; R. L. Seifert; O. C. Simpson

    1950-01-01

    Vapor pressure measurements have been made with three halides of plutonium by a modification of the Knudsen effusion method. Measurements with solid plutonium trifluoride from 1200°K to 1440°K give the vapor pressure-temperature relation log10pmm=12.468–21,120\\/T. Measurements with liquid plutonium trifluoride from 1440°K to 1770°K give log10pmm=11.273–19,400\\/T. Measurements with solid plutonium trichloride from 850°K to 1007°K give log10pmm=12.726–15,910\\/T; with liquid trichloride from

  10. Plutonium—an Element Never at Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2008-07-01

    The relentless deposition of energy from the ?-particle decay of plutonium damages its crystal lattice and transmutes plutonium into other elements over time (principally, helium, americium, uranium, and neptunium). At cryogenic temperatures (4 K), lattice damage causes significant volume expansion of pure plutonium and contraction of face-centered-cubic stabilized alloys, and both appear to lose crystallinity at long irradiation times. At room temperature, much of the lattice damage is annealed out because defects produced by self-irradiation are sufficiently mobile. Nevertheless, plutonium’s delicate balance of stability with changes in temperature, pressure, or chemistry may be affected by self-irradiation. For example, at room temperature the lattice of fcc plutonium alloys expands and exhibits nanoscale bubbles at irradiation levels <0.1 displacements per atom (dpa). In addition to self-irradiation damage, it is now generally agreed that most fcc alloys previously believed to be thermodynamically stable at room temperature are in fact metastable. They undergo eutectoidal decomposition to ?-plutonium, plus the nearest intermetallic compound. However, for most practical purposes, the kinetics of phase decomposition are too slow to be of concern. So, although plutonium may not be “far” from equilibrium, it is never at equilibrium because of the very nature of its radioactive decay. Surface reactions in plutonium can be increased catastrophically by the presence of moist air or hydrogen.

  11. ALTERNATIVE MODELS FOR PREDICTING THE EXTRACTION OF WATER AND URANYL NITRATE IN THE TWO-PHASE SYSTEM: WATER-URANYL NITRATE-TRIBUTYL PHOSPHATE-AMSCO 125-82

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. William Tedder; Wallace Davis Jr

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data for the distribution of uranyl nitrate and water between an aqueous phase and an organic phase containing 5-100 vol % trlbutyl phosphate (TBP) in an odorless kerosene-like diluent (Amsco 125-82) have been reexamined by considering alternative models in which competitive equilibria involving water and uranyl nitrate are assumed. These models are compared and contrasted with earlier analyses which

  12. Nitrate removal from contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, S.; Mann, M.A. [Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, La Verne, CA (United States); Guter, G.A. [Guter Consulting--Advanced Water Technology, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Kim, P.H.S.; Hardan, D.L. [Boyle Engineering Corp., Bakersfield, CA (United States)

    1999-02-01

    Data from bench-scale tests were used in conjunction with computer model simulations to develop design criteria for an ion exchange treatment process for removing nitrate. This approach is a potentially economical means of predicting nitrate breakthrough profiles, which can be used to make preliminary assessments of nitrate operating capacity, as well as the effects of changing process parameters, on the operational efficiency of various ion exchange processes. In addition, the effects of volatile various ion exchange processes. In addition, the effects of volatile organic chemicals, strong oxidants such as chlorine, and arsenic adsorption on ion exchange resin degradation were assessed.

  13. Development program to recycle and purify plutonium-238 oxide fuel from scrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Louis D.; Silver, Gary L.; Avens, Larry R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Espinoza, Jacob; Foltyn, Elizabeth M.; Rinehart, Gary H.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has initiated a development program to recover & purify plutonium-238 oxide from impure sources. A glove box line has been designed and a process flowsheet developed to perform this task on a large scale. Our initial effort has focused on purification of 238PuO2 fuel that fails to meet General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) specifications because of impurities. The most notable non-actinide impurity was silicon, but aluminum, chromium, iron and nickel were also near or in excess of limits specified by GPHS fuel powder specifications. 234U was by far the largest actinide impurity observed in the feed material because it is the daughter product of 238Pu by alpha decay. An aqueous method based on nitric acid was selected for purification of the 238PuO2 fuel. All aqueous processing used high purity reagents, and was performed in PTFE apparatus to minimize introduction of new contaminants. Impure 238PuO2 was finely milled, then dissolved in refluxing HNO3/HF and the solution filtered. The dissolved 238Pu was adjusted to the trivalent state by an excess of reducing reagents to compensate for radiolytic effects, precipitated as plutonium(III) oxalate, and recovered by filtration. The plutonium(III) oxalate was subsequently calcined to convert the plutonium to the oxide. Decontamination factors for silicon, phosphorus and uranium were excellent. Decontamination factors for aluminum, chromium, iron and nickel were very good. The purity of the 238PuO2 recovered from this operation was significantly better than specifications. Efforts continue to develop the capability for efficient, safe, cost-effective, and environmentally acceptable methods to recover and purify 238PuO2 fuel in a glove box environment. Plutonium-238 materials targeted for recovery includes impure oxide and scrap items that are lean in 238Pu values.

  14. Hydroxylamine nitrate self-catalytic kinetics study with adiabatic calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Wei, Chunyang; Guo, Yuyan; Rogers, William J; Sam Mannan, M

    2009-03-15

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) is an important member of the hydroxylamine compound family with applications that include equipment decontamination in the nuclear industry and aqueous or solid propellants. Due to its instability and autocatalytic behavior, HAN has been involved in several incidents at the Hanford and Savannah River Site (SRS) [Technical Report on Hydroxylamine Nitrate, US Department of Energy, 1998]. Much research has been conducted on HAN in different areas, such as combustion mechanism, decomposition mechanism, and runaway behavior. However, the autocatalytic decomposition behavior of HAN at runaway stage has not been fully addressed due to its highly exothermic and rapid decomposition behavior. This work is focused on extracting HAN autocatalytic kinetics and analyzing HAN critical behavior from adiabatic calorimetry measurements. A lumped autocatalytic kinetic model for HAN and associated model parameters are determined. Also the storage and handling critical conditions of diluted HAN solution without metal presence are quantified. PMID:18639378

  15. Synthesis of nanosized CuCrO 2 porous powders via a self-combustion glycine nitrate process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Te-Wei Chiu; Bing-Sheng Yu; Yuh-Ruey Wang; Kun-Te Chen; Yu-Te Lin

    2011-01-01

    The glycine nitrate process has been successfully employed to prepare nanosized, porous, stoichiometric, homogeneous CuCrO2 powders without ambient control. In this method, a precursor solution was prepared by mixing glycine with an aqueous solution of blended (Cu–Cr) metal–nitrates in their stoichiometric ratios. The glycine-mixed precursor solution was first heated in a beaker to evaporate excess water for forming a viscous

  16. Extraction of Th(IV), La(III), and Y(III) nitrates with a composite solid extractant based on a polymeric support impregnated with trialkylmethylammonium nitrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Pyartman; V. A. Keskinov; V. V. Lishchuk; A. V. Konstantinova; V. V. Belova

    2006-01-01

    Extraction of Th(IV), La(III), and Y(III) from aqueous solutions containing 0–4 M sodium nitrate with a composite solid extractant\\u000a based on a polymeric support impregnated with trialkylmethylammonium nitrate (Aliquat-336) was studied. The extraction isotherms\\u000a were analyzed assuming that lanthanides and thorium are extracted with the solid extractant in the form of complexes (R4N)2[Ln(NO3)5] and (R4N)2[Th(NO3)6], respectively. The extraction constants were

  17. Factors Controlling Redox Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in Extraction Separation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Paulenova, Alena [Principal Investigator; Vandegrift, III, George F. [Collaborator

    2013-09-24

    The objective of the project was to examine the factors controlling redox speciation of plutonium and neptunium in UREX+ extraction in terms of redox potentials, redox mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics. Researchers employed redox-speciation extractions schemes in parallel to the spectroscopic experiments. The resulting distribution of redox species w studied uring spectroscopic, electrochemical, and spectro-electrochemical methods. This work reulted in collection of data on redox stability and distribution of redox couples in the nitric acid/nitrate electrolyte and the development of redox buffers to stabilize the desired oxidation state of separated radionuclides. The effects of temperature and concentrations on the redox behavior of neptunium were evaluated.

  18. Studies of nitrate reductase in marine phytoplankton

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. EPPLEY; J. L. COATSWORTH; LUCIA SOLÓRZANO

    1969-01-01

    Certain marine phytoplankton contain the enzyme nitrate rcductase when growing on nitrate, but only low levels of enzyme were found during growth with ammonium or when the nitrogen source was depleted. Netted samples of oceanic phytoplankton contained the enzyme when taken from waters with nitrate concentrations 2-10 PM. Ammonium was assimilated in preference to nitrate in phytoplankton cultures supplied with

  19. Nitrate and Prussic Acid Poisoning 

    E-print Network

    Stichler, Charles; Reagor, John C.

    2001-09-05

    Nitrate and prussic acid poisoning in cattle are noninfectious conditions that can kill livestock. This publication explains the causes and symptoms of these conditions as well as preventive measures and sampling and testing steps....

  20. Pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from an electrolyte salt

    DOEpatents

    Mullins, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Christensen, Dana C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from a plutonium-bearing salt is disclosed. The process is particularly useful in the recovery of plutonium from electrolyte salts which are left over from the electrorefining of plutonium. In accordance with the process, the plutonium-bearing salt is melted and mixed with metallic calcium. The calcium reduces ionized plutonium in the salt to plutonium metal, and also causes metallic plutonium in the salt, which is typically present as finely dispersed metallic shot, to coalesce. The reduced and coalesced plutonium separates out on the bottom of the reaction vessel as a separate metallic phase which is readily separable from the overlying salt upon cooling of the mixture. Yields of plutonium are typically on the order of 95%. The stripped salt is virtually free of plutonium and may be discarded to low-level waste storage.

  1. Pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from an electrolyte salt

    DOEpatents

    Mullins, L.J.; Christensen, D.C.

    1982-09-20

    A pyrochemical process for extracting plutonium from a plutonium-bearing salt is disclosed. The process is particularly useful in the recovery of plutonium for electrolyte salts which are left over from the electrorefining of plutonium. In accordance with the process, the plutonium-bearing salt is melted and mixed with metallic calcium. The calcium reduces ionized plutonium in the salt to plutonium metal, and also causes metallic plutonium in the salt, which is typically present as finely dispersed metallic shot, to coalesce. The reduced and coalesced plutonium separates out on the bottom of the reaction vessel as a separate metallic phase which is readily separable from the overlying salt upon cooling of the mixture. Yields of plutonium are typically on the order of 95%. The stripped salt is virtually free of plutonium and may be discarded to low-level waste storage.

  2. Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Robotic canister loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-04-28

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. When operational in 2008, the PIP will fulfill the nation's nonproliferation commitment by placing surplus weapons-grade plutonium in a permanently stable ceramic form.

  3. LIQUID METAL FUEL REACTOR WITH RECYCLED PLUTONIUM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. T. Miles; T. V. Sheehan; D. H. Gurinsky; H. J. C. Kouts

    1958-01-01

    A liquid metal reactor (LMFR) fueled with recycled plutonium dissolved ; in bismuth is described. The LMFR plutonium burner discussed was designed to use ; technology developed for a proposed U²³³ breeder. The design is ; conservative in that it attempts to avoid the problem associated with two fluids ; in the reactor core, e.g., the leakage of fluids into

  4. Low-Temperature Synthesis of Plutonium Hexafluoride

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. E. Erilov; V. V. Titov; V. F. Serik; V. B. Sokolov

    2002-01-01

    Fluoridation of uranium tetrafluoride by atomic fluorine and radiolytic plutonium tetrafluoride by atomic fluorine and dioxygen difluoride are investigated. The mechanism and the limiting stages of the processes with atomic fluorine are described. It is shown that plutonium tetrafluoride is fluoridated directly by dioxygen difluoride molecules and not by the products of its thermal decomposition.

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry of plutonium isotopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. K. Fifield; R. G. Cresswell; M. L. di Tada; T. R. Ophel; J. P. Day; A. P. Clacher; S. J. King; N. D. Priest

    1996-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring plutonium isotope ratios by accelerator mass spectrometry has been demonstrated. Measurements on a test sample of known composition and on a blank showed that isotope ratios could be determined quantitatively, and that the present limit of detection by AMS is ? 106 atoms of plutonium. For 239Pu, this limit is at least two orders of magnitude

  6. Reactive sintering of plutonium-bearing titanates.

    SciTech Connect

    Hash, M. C.

    1999-06-24

    Titanate ceramics are being developed for the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium. These multi-phase ceramics are intended to be both corrosion and proliferation resistant. Reactive sintering techniques were refined to reproducibly provide titanate ceramics for further characterization and testing. Plutonium-bearing pyrochlore-rich composites were consolidated to greater than 90% of their theoretical density.

  7. Nondestructive assay methods for solids containing plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Macmurdo, K.W.; Gray, L.W.; Gibbs, A.

    1984-06-01

    Specific nondestructive assay (NDA) methods, e.g. calorimetry, coincidence neutron counting, singles neutron counting, and gamma ray spectrometry, were studied to provide the Savannah River Plant with an NDA method to measure the plutonium content of solid scrap (slag and crucible) generated in the JB-Line plutonium metal production process. Results indicate that calorimetry can be used to measure the plutonium content to within about 3% in 4 to 6 hours by using computerized equilibrium sample power predictive models. Calorimetry results confirm that a bias exists in the present indirect measurement method used to estimate the plutonium content of slag and crucible. Singles neutron counting of slag and crucible can measure plutonium to only +-30%, but coincidence neutron counting methods improve measurement precision to better than +-10% in less than ten minutes. Only four portions of a single slag and crucible sample were assayed, and further study is recommended.

  8. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  9. REMOVAL OF LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS FROM SWEDEN

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Kerry A. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Bellamy, J. Steve [Savannah River National Laboratory; Chandler, Greg T. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Iyer, Natraj C. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of; Koenig, Rich E.; Leduc, D. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Hackney, B. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Leduc, Dan R. [Savannah River National Laboratory

    2013-08-18

    U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Global Threat Reduction (GTRI) recently removed legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in collaboration with AB SVAFO, Sweden. This paper details the activities undertaken through the U.S. receiving site (Savannah River Site (SRS)) to support the characterization, stabilization, packaging and removal of legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in 2012. This effort was undertaken as part of GTRI’s Gap Materials Program and culminated with the successful removal of plutonium from Sweden as announced at the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit. The removal and shipment of plutonium materials to the United States was the first of its kind under NNSA’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative. The Environmental Assessment for the U.S. receipt of gap plutonium material was approved in May 2010. Since then, the multi-year process yielded many first time accomplishments associated with plutonium packaging and transport activities including the application of the of DOE-STD-3013 stabilization requirements to treat plutonium materials outside the U.S., the development of an acceptance criteria for receipt of plutonium from a foreign country, the development and application of a versatile process flow sheet for the packaging of legacy plutonium materials, the identification of a plutonium container configuration, the first international certificate validation of the 9975 shipping package and the first intercontinental shipment using the 9975 shipping package. This paper will detail the technical considerations in developing the packaging process flow sheet, defining the key elements of the flow sheet and its implementation, determining the criteria used in the selection of the transport package, developing the technical basis for the package certificate amendment and the reviews with multiple licensing authorities and most importantly integrating the technical activities with the Swedish partners.

  10. Progress in the studies of the advanced plutonium fuel assembly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Puill; J. Bergeron; M. Rohart; S. Aniel-Buchheit; A. Bergeron; P. Matheron

    2001-01-01

    A new assembly concept, designated APA (for Advanced Plutonium fuel Assembly), should make it possible to multi-recycle plutonium in pressurized water reactors. The basic idea is founded on the manufacture of a large plutonium thin annular fuel rod with an inert support, cooled on both faces. The absence of plutonium generation, combined with moderate fuel temperature should make it possible

  11. Nitration of the Birch Pollen Allergen Bet v 1.0101: Efficiency and Site-Selectivity of Liquid and Gaseous Nitrating Agents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nitration of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 alters the immune responses toward this protein, but the underlying chemical mechanisms are not yet understood. Here we address the efficiency and site-selectivity of the nitration reaction of recombinant protein samples of Bet v 1.0101 with different nitrating agents relevant for laboratory investigations (tetranitromethane, TNM), for physiological processes (peroxynitrite, ONOO–), and for the health effects of environmental pollutants (nitrogen dioxide and ozone, O3/NO2). We determined the total tyrosine nitration degrees (ND) and the NDs of individual tyrosine residues (NDY). High-performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detection and HPLC coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis of intact proteins, HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry analysis of tryptic peptides, and amino acid analysis of hydrolyzed samples were performed. The preferred reaction sites were tyrosine residues at the following positions in the polypeptide chain: Y83 and Y81 for TNM, Y150 for ONOO–, and Y83 and Y158 for O3/NO2. The tyrosine residues Y83 and Y81 are located in a hydrophobic cavity, while Y150 and Y158 are located in solvent-accessible and flexible structures of the C-terminal region. The heterogeneous reaction with O3/NO2 was found to be strongly dependent on the phase state of the protein. Nitration rates were about one order of magnitude higher for aqueous protein solutions (?20% per day) than for protein filter samples (?2% per day). Overall, our findings show that the kinetics and site-selectivity of nitration strongly depend on the nitrating agent and reaction conditions, which may also affect the biological function and adverse health effects of the nitrated protein. PMID:24517313

  12. A Study of the Stability and Characterization Plutonium Dioxide and Chemical Characterization [of] Rocky Flats and Los Alamos Plutonium-Containing Incinerator Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, A.K.; Boettger, J.C.; Behrens, Robert G.

    1999-11-29

    In the presentation ''A Study of the Stability and Characterization of Plutonium Dioxide'', the authors discuss their recent work on actinide stabilities and characterization, in particular, plutonium dioxide PuO{sub 2}. Earlier studies have indicated that PuO{sub 2} has the fluorite structure of CaF{sub 2} and typical oxide semiconductor properties. However, detailed results on the bulk electronic structure of this important actinide oxide have not been available. The authors have used all-electron, full potential linear combinations Gaussian type orbitals fitting function (LCGTO-FF) method to study PuO{sub 2}. The LCGTO-FF technique characterized by its use of three independent GTO basis sets to expand the orbitals, charge density, and exchange-correlation integral kernels. Results will be presented on zero pressure using both the Hedin-Lundquist local density approximation (LDA) model or the Perdew-Wang generalized gradient approximation (GGA) model. Possibilities of different characterizations of PuO{sub 2} will be explored. The paper ''Chemical Characterization Rocky Flats and Los Alamos Plutonium-Containing Incinerator Ash'' describes the results of a comprehensive study of the chemical characteristics of virgin, calcined and fluorinated incinerator ash produced at the Rocky Flats Plant and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory prior to 1988. The Rocky Flats and Los Alamos virgin, calcined, and fluorinated ashes were also dissolved using standard nitrate dissolution chemistry. Corresponding chemical evaluations were preformed on the resultant ash heel and the results compared with those of the virgin ash. Fluorination studies using FT spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool were also performed to evaluate the chemistry of phosphorus, sulfur, carbon, and silicon containing species in the ash. The distribution of plutonium and other chemical elements with the virgin ash, ash heel, fluorinated ash, and fluorinated ash heel particulates were studied in detail using microprobe analysis. Some of the more interesting results of these investigations are presented.

  13. Plutonium focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) in October 1995. The PFA {open_quotes}...provides for peer and technical reviews of research and development in plutonium stabilization activities...{close_quotes} In addition, the PFA identifies and develops relevant research and technology. The purpose of this document is to focus attention on the requirements used to develop research and technology for stabilization, storage, and preparation for disposition of nuclear materials. The PFA Technology Summary presents the approach the PFA uses to identify, recommend, and review research. It lists research requirements, research being conducted, and gaps where research is needed. It also summarizes research performed by the PFA in the traditional research summary format. This document encourages researchers and commercial enterprises to do business with PFA by submitting research proposals or {open_quotes}white papers.{close_quotes} In addition, it suggests ways to increase the likelihood that PFA will recommend proposed research to the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG) of DOE.

  14. Thermodynamic parameters of solvation and complexing of copper(II) nitrate and nickel(II) nitrate in water + acetamide mixtures at 298.15 K

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. N. Vandyshev

    2008-01-01

    The heats of mixing of aqueous solutions of copper(II) or nickel(II) nitrate in water + acetamide (AA) mixtures in the existing\\u000a range of amide concentrations have been studied. A rise in the amide concentration enhances solvation more strongly in copper(II)\\u000a salt solutions. Data are analyzed with reference to previous results on the enthalpies of transfer of the salts studied in

  15. Cryoscopic Studies of the Uranyl Sulfate–Water, Uranyl Nitrate–Water, and Uranyl Nitrate–Nitric Acid–Water Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Apelblat

    1999-01-01

    Freezing point lowerings of aqueous solutions of uranyl sulfate in the concentration range m = 0.40 mol-kg-1 and the activity and osmotic coefficients, which were calculated using the Pitzer equations for 2:2 electrolytes, are presented. Crystallization temperatures are reported for 0 to 13 molar nitric acid and 10–150 g uranium per liter uranyl nitrate–nitric acid–water solutions.

  16. Excess Plutonium: Weapons Legacy or National Asset?

    SciTech Connect

    Klipa, G.; Boeke, S.; Hottel, R.

    2002-02-27

    The Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative was established in January, 2000, to accelerate the work of achieving integration and cutting long-term costs associated with the management of nuclear materials. As part of that initiative, the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM), has established Nuclear Material Management Groups for the management of excess nuclear materials. As one of these groups, the Plutonium Material Management Group (PMMG) has been chartered to serve as DOE's complex wide resource and point of contact for technical coordination and program planning support in the safe and efficient disposition of the nations excess Plutonium 239. This paper will explain the mission, goals, and objectives of the PMMG. In addition, the paper will provide a broad overview of the status of the plutonium inventories throughout the DOE complex. The DOE currently manages approximately 99.5 MT of plutonium isotopes. Details of the various categories of plutonium, from material designated for national security needs through material that has been declared excess, will be explained. For the plutonium that has been declared excess, the various pathways to disposition (including reuse, recycling, sale, transfer, treatment, consumption, and disposal) will be discussed. At this time 52.5 MT of plutonium has been declared excess and the method of disposition for that material is the subject of study and evaluation within DOE. The role of the PMMG in those evaluations will be outlined.

  17. Influence of Pt particle size and support type on the aqueous-phase reforming of glycerol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kerstin Lehnert; Peter Claus

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic conversion of glycerol to hydrogen by aqueous-phase reforming (APR) on several platinum based catalysts was studied. Catalysts prepared from a variety of metal precursors, such as platinum ethanolamine, platinum(II)-nitrate, platinum sulfite and tetrammine platinum(II)-nitrate showed similar activities (glycerol conversion 45%) and also identical selectivity (85%) towards hydrogen. The application of different pre-treatment conditions resulted in catalysts with metal

  18. Short-term effects of a high nitrate diet on nitrate metabolism in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Liu, Alex H; Croft, Kevin D; Ward, Natalie C; Puddey, Ian B; Woodman, Richard J; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2015-03-01

    Dietary nitrate, through the enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, can improve blood pressure and arterial stiffness. How long systemic nitrate and nitrite remain elevated following cessation of high nitrate intake is unknown. In 19 healthy men and women, the time for salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite to return to baseline after 7 days increased nitrate intake from green leafy vegetables was determined. Salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite was measured at baseline [D0], end of high nitrate diet [D7], day 9 [+2D], day 14 [+7D] and day 21 [+14D]. Urinary nitrite and nitrate was assessed at D7 and +14D. Increased dietary nitrate for 7 days resulted in a more than fourfold increase in saliva and plasma nitrate and nitrite (p < 0.001) measured at [D7]. At [+2D] plasma nitrite and nitrate had returned to baseline while saliva nitrate and nitrite were more than 1.5 times higher than at baseline levels. By [+7D] all metabolites had returned to baseline levels. The pattern of response was similar between men and women. Urinary nitrate and nitrate was sevenfold higher at D7 compared to +14D. These results suggest that daily ingestion of nitrate may be required to maintain the physiological changes associated with high nitrate intake. PMID:25774606

  19. Hydride-catalyzed corrosion of plutonium by air: Initiation by plutonium monoxide monohydride

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. H. Allen; J. M. Haschke

    1998-01-01

    Chemistry and kinetics of air reactions with plutonium monoxide monohydride (PuOH) and with mixtures of the oxide hydride and plutonium metal are defined by results of pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) measurements. Test with specimens prepared by total and partial corrosion of plutonium in 0.05 M sodium chloride solution show that reaction of residual water continues to generate Hâ after liquid water is

  20. XPS-AES characterization of plutonium oxides and oxide carbide. The existence of plutonium monoxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. T. Larson; John M. Haschke

    1981-01-01

    The plutonium-oxygen phase diagrams has been clarified by XPS and AES results which show that three oxygen-containing plutonium phases, PuOâ, ..cap alpha..-PuâOâ, and PuO\\/sub x\\/C\\/sub y\\/, are successively formed when oxide-coated plutonium metal is heated in vacuo to 500°C. Formation of the oxide carbide is evidenced by the fact that a shift in the Pu(4fââ) binding energy is coincident with

  1. Solvent Extraction of Plutonium(IV), Uranium(VI), and Some Fission Products with Di-n-octylsulfoxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Shukla; S. A. Pai; M. S. Subramanian

    1979-01-01

    Extraction behavior of plutonium(IV), uranium(VI), and some fission products from aqueous nitric acid media with di-n-octylsulfoxide (DOSO) has been studied over a wide range of conditions. Both the actinides are extracted essentially completely, whereas fission product contaminants like Zr, Ru, Ce, Eu, and Sr show negligible extraction. The absorption spectra of sulfoxide extracts containing either Pu or UO2 indicate the

  2. Spectrophotometric determination of plutonium-239 based on the spectrum of plutonium(III) chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Temer, D.J.; Walker, L.F.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes a spectrophotometric method for determining plutonium-239 (Pu-239) based on the spectrum of Pu(III) chloride. The authors used the sealed-reflux technique for the dissolution of plutonium oxide with hydrochloric acid (HCl) and small amounts of nitric and hydrofluoric acids. To complex the fluoride, they added zirconium, and to reduce plutonium to Pu(III), they added ascorbic acid. They then adjusted the solution to a concentration of 2 M HCl and measured the absorbances at five wavelengths of the Pu(III) chloride spectrum. This spectrophotometric determination can also be applied to samples of plutonium metal dissolved in HCl.

  3. Observed changes in the mechanism and rates of Pu(V) reduction on hematite as a function of total plutonium concentration.

    PubMed

    Hixon, Amy E; Powell, Brian A

    2014-08-19

    Changes in aqueous- and solid-phase plutonium oxidation states were monitored as a function of time and plutonium concentration in hematite (?-Fe2O3) suspensions containing initially Pu(V). Batch kinetic experiments were conducted at plutonium concentrations between 10(-8) and 10(-6) M at pH 5 and 0.3 g/L (9.3 m(2)/L) hematite. Surface-mediated reduction of Pu(V) was observed under all conditions studied. However, differences in the reaction kinetics demonstrate that the mechanism of Pu(V) reduction changes as a function of plutonium concentration. Adsorption of Pu(V) was found to be the rate-limiting step at plutonium concentrations less than approximately 10(-7) M Pu(V). Plutonium reduction in these systems was attributed to trace amounts of Fe(II) in the hematite structure. Reduction of Pu(V) was found to be the rate-limiting step at concentrations higher than approximately 10(-6) M Pu(V) and is attributed to the formation of PuO(2+x)·nH2O nanoparticles and the Nernstian favorability of Pu(IV) surface complexes. The reaction order with respect to plutonium concentration was found to be -0.68 ± 0.09, indicating that there is a concentration dependence in these systems. This work strongly suggests that the kinetics of experiments carried out under high plutonium concentrations (i.e., >10(-7) M Pu) cannot be directly extrapolated to environmental concentrations of plutonium. PMID:25003955

  4. Design-only conceptual design report: Plutonium Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A A

    2000-05-01

    This design-only conceptual design report was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition for engineering and design of the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will be used to immobilize up to 50 tonnes of surplus plutonium. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant will be located at the Savannah River Site pursuant to the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, January 4, 2000. This document reflects a new facility using the ceramic immobilization technology and the can-in-canister approach. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant accepts plutonium oxide from pit conversion and plutonium and plutonium oxide from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into mineral-like forms that are subsequently encapsulated within a large canister of high-level waste glass. The final immobilized product must make the plutonium as inherently unattractive and inaccessible for use in nuclear weapons as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors; it must also be suitable for geologic disposal. Plutonium immobilization at the Savannah River Site uses a new building, the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will receive and store feed materials, convert non-pit surplus plutonium to an oxide form suitable for the immobilization process, immobilize the plutonium oxide in a titanate-based ceramic form, place cans of the plutonium-ceramic forms into magazines, and load the magazines into a canister. The existing Defense Waste Processing Facility is used for the pouring of high-level waste glass into the canisters. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant uses existing Savannah River Site infrastructure for analytical laboratory services, waste handling, fire protection, training, and other support utilities and services. This design-only conceptual design report also provides the cost for a Plutonium Immobilization Plant which would process and immobilize 17 tonnes of plutonium in ten years. The project schedule for either case is shown in a table.

  5. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing agent in the...

  6. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing agent in the...

  7. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing agent in the...

  8. Study of Pulsed Columns with the System. Uranyl Nitrate-Nitric Acid-Water- Tributylphosphate; ETUDE DES COLONNES A PULSATIONS A L'AIDE DU SYSTEME NITRATE D'URANYLE-ACIDE NITRIQUEEAU-TRIBUTYLPHOSPHATE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Durandet; D. Defives; B. Choffe; Y. L. Gladel

    1959-01-01

    The performsnce of a pulsed column with perforated plates was studied ; with the aid of a uranyl nitrate-nitric acid --water --tributyl phosphate system. ; The extraction of uranium from an aqueous acidic solution by an organic solvent ; and the extraction of uranium from organic solutions by water were the two cases ; investigated. The variation of the efficiency

  9. Uranium plutonium oxide fuels. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, C.M.; Leggett, R.D.; Weber, E.T.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium plutonium oxide is the principal fuel material for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR's) throughout the world. Development of this material has been a reasonably straightforward evolution from the UO/sub 2/ used routinely in the light water reactor (LWR's); but, because of the lower neutron capture cross sections and much lower coolant pressures in the sodium cooled LMFBR's, the fuel is operated to much higher discharge exposures than that of a LWR. A typical LMFBR fuel assembly is shown. Depending on the required power output and the configuration of the reactor, some 70 to 400 such fuel assemblies are clustered to form the core. There is a wide variation in cross section and length of the assemblies where the increasing size reflects a chronological increase in plant size and power output as well as considerations of decreasing the net fuel cycle cost. Design and performance characteristics are described.

  10. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  11. A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

  12. Plutonium Immobilization Bagless Transfer Can Size Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Stokes, M.; Rogers, L.; Ward, C.

    1998-02-01

    This report identifies and documents the most appropriate bagless transfer can size to support Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading operations. Also, this report considers can diameter, can wall thickness, and can length.

  13. Plutonium finishing plant dangerous waste training plan

    SciTech Connect

    ENTROP, G.E.

    1999-05-24

    This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the Plutonium Finish Plant (PFP) waste generation facilities, permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) units, and the 90-Day Accumulation Areas.

  14. Interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Dunwoody, John T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, Richard E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freibert, Franz J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Willson, Stephen P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veirs, Douglas K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worl, Laura A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Alonso [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conger, Donald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Long-term storage of excess plutonium is of great concern in the U.S. as well as abroad. The current accepted configuration involves intimate contact between the stored material and an iron-bearing container such as stainless steel. While many safety scenario studies have been conducted and used in the acceptance of stainless steel containers, little information is available on the physical interaction at elevated temperatures between certain forms of stored material and the container itself. The bulk of the safety studies has focused on the ability of a package to keep the primary stainless steel containment below the plutonium-iron eutectic temperature of approximately 410 C. However, the interactions of plutonium metal with stainless steel have been of continuing interest. This paper reports on a scoping study investigating the interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal in a pseudo diffusion couple at temperatures above the eutectic melt-point.

  15. A Plutonium Storage Container Pressure Measurement Technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grim

    2002-01-01

    Plutonium oxide and metal awaiting final disposition are currently stored at the Savannah River Site in crimp sealed food pack cans. Surveillances to ensure continued safe storage of the cans include periodic lid deflection measurements using a mechanical device.

  16. LANL Plutonium-Processing Facilities National Security

    E-print Network

    energy. Operations at TA-55 maintain a critical skill base of plutonium expertise across a broad suite and nondestructive analysis laboratories. Additionally, TA-55 can safely and securely ship, receive, handle

  17. Effects of the physical state of tropospheric ammonium-sulfate-nitrate particles on global aerosol direct radiative forcing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. T. Martin; H.-M. Hung; R. J. Park; D. J. Jacob; R. J. D. Spurr; K. V. Chance; M. Chin

    2003-01-01

    The effect of aqueous versus crystalline sulfate- nitrate-ammonium tropospheric particles on global aerosol direct radiative forcing is assessed. A global three- dimensional chemical transport model predicts sulfate, ni- trate, and ammonium aerosol mass. An aerosol thermody- namics model is called twice, once for the upper side (US) and once for lower side (LS) of the hysteresis loop of parti- cle

  18. Wettability of Ammonium Nitrate Prills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    QUEENIE S. M. KWOK; PEETER KRUUS; DAVID E. G. JONES

    2004-01-01

    The wettability of ammonium nitrate (AN) prills is one of the primary factors determining the physical stability and detonation behavior of ANFO. The wettabilities of various types of AN prills were compared using capillary penetration measurements. Complementary characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry (TG) were performed to rationalize the observed differences in wettability. The wettability of AN

  19. Phosphate, Nitrate, and Sulfate Biosensors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aziz Amine; Giuseppe Palleschi

    2004-01-01

    Construction and assembly of phosphate, nitrate, and sulfate biosensors has been reviewed to give readers up?to?date information on the state of the art in this area which is becoming more and more important for the solution of practical problems faced in the monitoring of food safety and the environment. Special attention was paid concerning the papers published during the last

  20. Plutonium-238 processing at Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Burney, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Plutonium-238 is produced by irradiating NpO/sub 2/-Al cermet slugs or tubes with neutrons. The neptunium-237 is produced as a by-product when natural or enriched uranium is irradiated with neutrons. The neptunium is separated by solvent extraction and ion exchange and precipitated as neptunium oxalate. Neptunium oxalate is calcined to neptunium oxide and fabricated into targets for irradiation. The irradiation conditions are controlled to produce plutonium with 80 to 90 wt % /sup 238/Pu.

  1. Excess Weapons Plutonium Immobilization in Russia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Jardine; G. B. Borisov

    2000-01-01

    The joint goal of the Russian work is to establish a full-scale plutonium immobilization facility at a Russian industrial site by 2005. To achieve this requires that the necessary engineering and technical basis be developed in these Russian projects and the needed Russian approvals be obtained to conduct industrial-scale immobilization of plutonium-containing materials at a Russian industrial site by the

  2. Analysis of plutonium in soil samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. P. Rubio Montero; A. Mart??n Sánchez; M. T. Crespo Vázquez; J. L. Gascón Murillo

    2000-01-01

    Procedures for analysis of plutonium in soil samples were developed using anion exchange as a purification technique. Special attention was paid to removing impurities of 228Th which interferes in 238Pu determination by alpha spectrometry. Two anion-exchange methods were compared. The determination of plutonium in soil involves the conversion of soil samples to acid-soluble form. Two methods for the extraction of

  3. Explosive properties of reactor?grade plutonium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Carson Marka

    1993-01-01

    The following discussion focuses on the question of whether a terrorist organization or a threshold state could make use of plutonium recovered from light?water?reactor fuel to construct a nuclear explosive device having a significantly damaging yield. Questions persist in some nonproliferation policy circles as to whether a bomb could be made from reactor?grade plutonium of high burn?up, and if so,

  4. 3, 59195976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 3, 5919­5976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol field over Europe M. Schaap et al. Title Page Abstract/5919/ © European Geosciences Union 2003 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions The nitrate aerosol field.schaap@phys.uu.nl) 5919 #12;ACPD 3, 5919­5976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol field over Europe M. Schaap et al. Title Page

  5. 8, 48114829, 2008 SOA and nitrate

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 4811­4829, 2008 SOA and nitrate volatility in Mexico City C. J. Hennigan et al. Title Page of newly formed nitrate and water soluble organic aerosol in Mexico City C. J. Hennigan1 , A. P. Sullivan2 Geosciences Union. 4811 #12;ACPD 8, 4811­4829, 2008 SOA and nitrate volatility in Mexico City C. J. Hennigan

  6. 6, 1071310731, 2006 Nitrate photolysis on

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 10713­10731, 2006 Nitrate photolysis on ice surfaces T. Bartels-Rausch and D. J. Donaldson Chemistry and Physics Discussions HONO and NO2 evolution from irradiated nitrate-doped ice and frozen nitrate solutions T. Bartels-Rausch1,* and D. J. Donaldson1 1 University of Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6

  7. Spatial Inference of Nitrate Concentrations in Groundwater

    E-print Network

    West, Mike

    Spatial Inference of Nitrate Concentrations in Groundwater DAWN B. WOODARD, ROBERT L. WOLPERT on a nonparametric spatial statistical model. We apply this method to estimate nitrate concentra- tions of the fine-scale estimated nitrate concentration is obtained, as well as maps of the estimated county

  8. Measuring nitrate fluxes to assess estuarine eutrophication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Newton; A. Devol; W. Ruef

    2009-01-01

    Summary form only given.The availability of nitrate sensors has enabled integration of these instruments into real-time profiling buoys and, when coupled with current meters, allows for calculation of nitrate fluxes into and out of estuaries. As the United States' estuaries are increasingly experiencing eutrophication this technological development is timely. We report on the use of nitrate sensors on our profiling

  9. Efflux Of Nitrate From Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Aslam, M.; Ward, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to measure influx, and efflux of nitrate from hydroponically grown wheat seedlings. Ratio between efflux and influx greater in darkness than in light; increased with concentration of nitrate in nutrient solution. On basis of experiments, authors suggest nutrient solution optimized at lowest possible concentration of nitrate.

  10. Nitrate removal from drinking water -- Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anoop Kapoor; T. Viraraghavan

    1997-01-01

    Nitrate concentrations in surface water and especially in ground water have increased in Canada, the US, Europe, and other areas of the world. This trend has raised concern because nitrates cause methemoglobiinemia in infants. Several treatment processes including ion exchange, biological denitrification, chemical denitrification, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, and catalytic denitrification can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency,

  11. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  12. Guidelines for international plutonium management: Overview and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Bryson, M.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Fitzgerald, C.P.; Kincaid, C. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-12-31

    In September, 1997, nine of the world`s plutonium-using countries agreed to a set of guidelines for international plutonium management, with acceptances to be submitted to the International Atomic Energy Agency on December 1. Following three years of discussion, the guidelines provide a unified package of accepted rules for the storage, handling, and transportation of civil plutonium as well as military plutonium that has been declared as no longer required for defense purposes. New requirements include a formal declaration of national plutonium strategies, which will recognize the environmental, economic, and proliferation concerns and the consequent importance of balancing plutonium supply and demand. Nations will also make annual declaration of their non-military stockpiles of unirradiated plutonium, together with estimates of the plutonium content in spent reactor fuel. These guidelines represent the first formally accepted recognition of the need for plutonium management of this scope and could thus provide a partial basis for future monitoring and policy regimes.

  13. Plutonium: The first 50 years. United States plutonium production, acquisition, and utilization from 1944 through 1994

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1996-02-01

    The report contains important newly declassified information regarding the US production, acquisition, and removals of plutonium. This new information, when combined with previously declassified data, has allowed the DOE to issue, for the first time, a truly comprehensive report on the total DOE plutonium inventory. At the December 7, 1993, Openness Press Conference, the DOE declassified the plutonium inventories at eight locations totaling 33.5 metric tons (MT). This report declassifies the remainder of the DOE plutonium inventory. Newly declassified in this report is the quantity of plutonium at the Pantex Site, near Amarillo, Texas, and in the US nuclear weapons stockpile of 66.1 MT, which, when added to the previously released inventory of 33.5 MT, yields a total plutonium inventory of 99.5 MT. This report will document the sources which built up the plutonium inventory as well as the transactions which have removed plutonium from that inventory. This report identifies four sources that add plutonium to the DOE/DoD inventory, and seven types of transactions which remove plutonium from the DOE/DoD inventory. This report also discusses the nuclear material control and accountability system which records all nuclear material transactions, compares records with inventory and calculates material balances, and analyzes differences to verify that nuclear materials are in quantities as reported. The DOE believes that this report will aid in discussions in plutonium storage, safety, and security with stakeholders as well as encourage other nations to declassify and release similar data. These data will also be available for formulating policies with respect to disposition of excess nuclear materials. The information in this report is based on the evaluation of available records. The information contained in this report may be updated or revised in the future should additional or more detailed data become available.

  14. The effect of dietary nitrate on salivary, plasma, and urinary nitrate metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Pannala, Ananth S; Mani, Ali R; Spencer, Jeremy P E; Skinner, Vernon; Bruckdorfer, K Richard; Moore, Kevin P; Rice-Evans, Catherine A

    2003-03-01

    Dietary nitrate is metabolized to nitrite by bacterial flora on the posterior surface of the tongue leading to increased salivary nitrite concentrations. In the acidic environment of the stomach, nitrite forms nitrous acid, a potent nitrating/nitrosating agent. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of dietary nitrate in relation to the formation of salivary, plasma, and urinary nitrite and nitrate in healthy subjects. A secondary aim was to determine whether dietary nitrate increases the formation of protein-bound 3-nitrotyrosine in plasma, and if dietary nitrate improves platelet function. The pharmacokinetic profile of urinary nitrate excretion indicates total clearance of consumed nitrate in a 24 h period. While urinary, salivary, and plasma nitrate concentrations increased between 4- and 7-fold, a significant increase in nitrite was only detected in saliva (7-fold). High dietary nitrate consumption does not cause a significant acute change in plasma concentrations of 3-nitrotyrosine or in platelet function. PMID:12614846

  15. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) STABILIZATION & PACKAGING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER, M.S.

    2004-01-14

    Fluor Hanford is pleased to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Stabilization and Packaging Project (SPP) for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2004. The SPP thermally stabilized and/or packaged nearly 18 metric tons (MT) of plutonium and plutonium-bearing materials left in PFP facilities from 40 years of nuclear weapons production and experimentation. The stabilization of the plutonium-bearing materials substantially reduced the radiological risk to the environment and security concerns regarding the potential for terrorists to acquire the non-stabilized plutonium products for nefarious purposes. The work was done In older facilities which were never designed for the long-term storage of plutonium, and required working with materials that were extremely radioactive, hazardous, pyrophoric, and In some cases completely unique. I n some Instances, one-of-a-kind processes and equipment were designed, installed, and started up. The SPP was completed ahead of schedule, substantially beating all Interim progress milestone dates set by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) and in the Hanford Site's Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), and finished $1-million under budget.

  16. A DGT technique for plutonium bioavailability measurements.

    PubMed

    Cusnir, Ruslan; Steinmann, Philipp; Bochud, François; Froidevaux, Pascal

    2014-09-16

    The toxicity of heavy metals in natural waters is strongly dependent on the local chemical environment. Assessing the bioavailability of radionuclides predicts the toxic effects to aquatic biota. The technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) is largely exploited for bioavailability measurements of trace metals in waters. However, it has not been applied for plutonium speciation measurements yet. This study investigates the use of DGT technique for plutonium bioavailability measurements in chemically different environments. We used a diffusion cell to determine the diffusion coefficients (D) of plutonium in polyacrylamide (PAM) gel and found D in the range of 2.06-2.29 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1). It ranged between 1.10 and 2.03 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) in the presence of fulvic acid and in natural waters with low DOM. In the presence of 20 ppm of humic acid of an organic-rich soil, plutonium diffusion was hindered by a factor of 5, with a diffusion coefficient of 0.50 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1). We also tested commercially available DGT devices with Chelex resin for plutonium bioavailability measurements in laboratory conditions and the diffusion coefficients agreed with those from the diffusion cell experiments. These findings show that the DGT methodology can be used to investigate the bioaccumulation of the labile plutonium fraction in aquatic biota. PMID:25141175

  17. Behaviors of acrylamide/itaconic acid hydrogels in uptake of uranyl ions from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Karadag, E.; Saraydin, D. [Cumhuriyet Univ., Sivas (Turkey); Gueven, O. [Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey)

    1995-12-01

    In this study, adsorptions of uranyl ions from two different aqueous uranyl solutions by acrylamide-itaconic acid hydrogels were investigated by a spectroscopic method. The hydrogels were prepared by irradiating with {gamma}-radiation. In the experiment of uranyl ions adsorption, Type II adsorption was found. One gram of acrylamide-itaconic acid hydrogels sorbed 178-219 mg uranyl ions from the solutions of uranyl acetate, 42-76 mg uranyl ions from the aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate, while acrylamide hydrogel did not sorb any uranyl ion. For the hydrogel containing 40 mg of itaconic acid and irradiated to 3.73 kGy, swelling of the hydrogels was observed in water (1660%), in the aqueous solution of uranyl acetate (730%), and in the aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate (580%). Diffusions of water onto hydrogels were a non-Fickian type of diffusion, whereas diffusions of uranyl ions were a Fickian type of diffusion.

  18. Measurement of intracellular nitrate concentrations in Chara using nitrate-selective microelectrodes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony J. Miller; Rui-Guang Zhen

    1991-01-01

    Nitrate-selective microelectrodes have been made using a quaternary ammonium sensor, methyl-tridodecylammonium nitrate, in a Polyvinylchloride matrix. These electrodes showed a log-linear response from 0.1 to 100 mol · m-3 nitrate with a typical slope of 55.6 mV per decade change in nitrate concentration. The only physiologically significant interfering anion was chloride but the lower limit of nitrate detection was 0.5

  19. Perovskite membranes by aqueous combustion synthesis: synthesis and properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander S. Mukasyan; Colleen Costello; Katherine P. Sherlock; David Lafarga; Arvind Varma

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work is to identify optimum synthesis, compacting and sintering conditions in order to achieve a pure phase fully densified La0.8Sr0.2CrO3 (LSC) perovskite membrane. The aqueous combustion synthesis of LSC powders was investigated over a wide range of synthesis conditions by using the metal nitrates (oxidizer)–glycine (fuel) system. The powders were pressed and sintered to create dense

  20. Influence of temperature on strength of cemented surrogate nitrate salt waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) generates large volumes of a low level aqueous waste stream high in nitrate salts. The aqueous waste is concentrated by evaporation and then mixed with Portland cement prior to transport and disposal. Planned process upgrades include a new horizontal thin film evaporator. Temperature of brine at discharge end of the new evaporator will be near boiling point. Introduction of hot water to cement can degrade the monolithic waste form. However, the RFP salt waste contains high concentrations of compounds known to retard hydration. This paper discusses impact of introducing high temperature waste to cement. The study evaluated three waste compositions: (1) highest probable nitrate composition, (2) highest probable chloride composition, and (3) current composition. Results showed that compressive strength of final waste form increased with brine temperature, and waste forms from brine at the boiling point exhibited a near doubling of compressive strength when compared to waste forms from brine at room temperature.

  1. Development of plutonium recycle in thermal reactors. Evaluation of plutonium recycle in pressurized water reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Tomonto; J. S. Tulenko; J. Fiscella; J. Ray

    1969-01-01

    An evaluation of the utilization of plutonium recycle fuel in the ; Obrigheim power reactor was performed in order to study the characteristics of ; typical large PWR's operated with plutonium recycle fuel. The evaluation ; included nuclear characteristics, fuel management, a thermal-hydraulic analysis, ; and an economic analysis. (JWR)

  2. What is plutonium stabilization, and what is safe storage of plutonium?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1995-01-01

    The end of the cold war has resulted in the shutdown of nuclear weapons production and the start of dismantlement of significant numbers of nuclear weapons. This, in turn, is creating an inventory of plutonium requiring interim and long-term storage. A key question is, ``What is required for safe, multidecade, plutonium storage?`` The requirements for storage, in turn, define what

  3. Effects of nitrate on the stability of uranium in a bioreduced region of the subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weimin [Stanford University; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Green, Stefan [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Luo, Jian [Georgia Institute of Technology; Kelly, Shelly D [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Van Nostrand, Joy [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Boonchayanant, Dr. Benjaporn [Stanford University; Loeffler, Frank E [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [ORNL

    2010-06-01

    The effects of nitrate on the stability of reduced, immobilized uranium were evaluated in field experiments at a U.S. Department of Energy site in Oak Ridge, TN. Nitrate (2.0 mM) was injected into a reduced region of the subsurface containing high levels of previously immobilized U(IV). The nitrate was reduced to nitrite, ammonium, and nitrogen gas; sulfide levels decreased; and Fe(II) levels increased then deceased. Uranium remobilization occurred concomitant with nitrite formation, suggesting nitrate-dependent, iron-accelerated oxidation of U(IV). Bromide tracer results indicated changes in subsurface flowpaths likely due to gas formation and/or precipitate. Desorption-adsorption of uranium by the iron-rich sediment impacted uranium mobilization and sequestration. After rereduction of the subsurface through ethanol additions, background groundwater containing high levels of nitrate was allowed to enter the reduced test zone. Aqueous uranium concentrations increased then decreased. Clone library analyses of sediment samples revealed the presence of denitrifying bacteria that can oxidize elemental sulfur, H{sub 2}S, Fe(II), and U(IV) (e.g., Thiobacillus spp.), and a decrease in relative abundance of bacteria that can reduce Fe(III) and sulfate. XANES analyses of sediment samples confirmed changes in uranium oxidation state. Addition of ethanol restored reduced conditions and triggered a short-term increase in Fe(II) and aqueous uranium, likely due to reductive dissolution of Fe(III) oxides and release of sorbed U(VI). After two months of intermittent ethanol addition, sulfide levels increased, and aqueous uranium concentrations gradually decreased to <0.1 {mu}M.

  4. Complexation of Lanthanides with Nitrate at Variable Temperatures: Thermodynamics and Coordination Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin

    2008-12-10

    Complexation of neodymium(III) with nitrate was studied at variable temperatures (25, 40, 55 and 70 C) by spectrophotometry and microcalorimetry. The NdNO{sub 3}{sup 2+} complex is weak and becomes slightly stronger as the temperature is increased. The enthalpy of complexation at 25 C was determined by microcalorimetry to be small and positive, (1.5 {+-} 0.2) kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, in good agreement with the trend of the stability constant at variable temperatures. Luminescence emission spectra and lifetime of Eu(III) in nitrate solutions suggest that inner-sphere and bidentate complexes form between trivalent lanthanides (Nd{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+}) and nitrate in aqueous solutions. Specific Ion Interaction approach (SIT) was used to obtain the stability constants of NdNO{sub 3}{sup 2+} at infinite dilution and variable temperatures.

  5. Nitrated fatty acids: Synthesis and measurement

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Steven R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Gelhaus, Stacy L.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids are the product of nitrogen dioxide reaction with unsaturated fatty acids. The discovery of peroxynitrite and peroxidase-induced nitration of biomolecules led to the initial reports of endogenous nitrated fatty acids. These species increase during ischemia reperfusion, but concentrations are often at or near the limits of detection. Here, we describe multiple methods for nitrated fatty acid synthesis, sample extraction from complex biological matrices, and a rigorous method of qualitative and quantitative detection of nitrated fatty acids by LC-MS. In addition, optimized instrument conditions and caveats regarding data interpretation are discussed. PMID:23200809

  6. Preparation of hydrophobic nano-silver colloid and aqueous nano-silver colloid by phase transfer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shanshan Wei; Xiangyang Xu; Yuejun Liu; Junming Yang

    2011-01-01

    A novel and facile method to prepare hydrophobic nano-silver colloid and aqueous coordinate was proposed. Chemical reduction of silver nitrate in a tributyl phosphate (TBP) solution containing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was conducted and stable hydrophobic nano-silver\\/TBP\\/PVP colloids were obtained. Adopting a phase transfer process, the as-prepared colloids can be diverted into an aqueous system to obtain hydrophilic nano-silver colloids. The resultant

  7. Method for Plutonium-Gallium Separation by Anodic Dissolution of a Solid Plutonium-Gallium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William E.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1998-12-08

    Purified plutonium and gallium are efficiently recovered from a solid plutonium-gallium (Pu-Ga) alloy by using an electrorefining process. The solid Pu-Ga alloy is the cell anode, preferably placed in a moving basket within the electrolyte. As the surface of the Pu-Ga anode is depleted in plutonium by the electrotransport of the plutonium to a cathode, the temperature of the electrolyte is sufficient to liquify the surface, preferably at about 500 C, resulting in a liquid anode layer substantially comprised of gallium. The gallium drips from the liquified surface and is collected below the anode within the electrochemical cell. The transported plutonium is collected on the cathode surface and is recovered.

  8. On-line monitoring of plutonium in mixed uranium-plutonium solutions. [Coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K. J.; Rebagay, T. V.; Huff, G. A.

    1980-03-01

    The measurement of the total and isotopic plutonium concentrations in mixed uranium-plutonium solutions blended with highly radioactive fission product nuclides and other radionuclides (e.g., Cs-137 and Co-60) has been investigated at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP). An on-line total and isotopic plutonium monitoring system is being tested for its ability to assay the plutonium abundances in solutions as might be found in the process streams of a light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel processing plant. The monitoring system is fully automated and designed to be maintained remotely. It is capable of near real-time inventory of plutonium in process streams and provides the basis for on-line computerized accounting of special nuclear materials.

  9. Extraction of REE(III) Nitrates with Polymer-Supported Tributyl Phosphate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Pyartman; V. A. Keskinov; M. A. Mikhailenko; N. V. Nikitin; V. V. Lishchuk

    2004-01-01

    Extraction of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, and Y(III) nitrates with polymer-supported TBP in the presence of 1-5 M NaNO3 in the aqueous phase is studied. The extraction isotherms are described taking into account formation of [Ln(NO3)3(TBP)j](o) (j = 3, 4) in the extractant phase. The extraction constants corrected for the TBP concentration in the extractant phase are considerably higher

  10. Deconstructing nitrate isotope dynamics in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, J.

    2012-12-01

    The natural abundance N and O stable isotope ratios of nitrate provide an invaluable tool to differentiate N sources to the environment, track their dispersal, and monitor their attenuation by biological transformations. The interpretation of patterns in isotope abundances relies on knowledge of the isotope ratios of the source end-members, as well as on constraints on the isotope discrimination imposed on nitrate by respective biological processes. Emergent observations from mono-culture experiments of denitrifying bacteria reveal nitrate fractionation trends that appear at odds with trends ascribed to denitrification in soils and aquifers. This discrepancy raises the possibility that additional biological N transformations may be acting in tandem with denitrification. Here, the N and O isotope enrichments associated with nitrate removal by denitrification in aquifers are posited to bear evidence of coincident biological nitrate production - from nitrification and/or from anammox. Simulations are presented from a simple time-dependent one-box model of a groundwater mass ageing that is subject to net nitrate loss by denitrification with coincident nitrate production by nitrification or anammox. Within boundary conditions characteristic of freshwater aquifers, the apparent slope of the parallel enrichments in nitrate N and O isotopes associated with net N loss to denitrification can vary in proportion to the nitrate added simultaneous by oxidative processes. Pertinent observations from nitrate plumes in suboxic to anoxic aquifers are examined to validate this premise. In this perspective, nitrate isotope distributions suggest that we may be missing important N fluxes inherent to most aquifers.

  11. Dietary nitrate supplementation and exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew M

    2014-05-01

    Dietary nitrate is growing in popularity as a sports nutrition supplement. This article reviews the evidence base for the potential of inorganic nitrate to enhance sports and exercise performance. Inorganic nitrate is present in numerous foodstuffs and is abundant in green leafy vegetables and beetroot. Following ingestion, nitrate is converted in the body to nitrite and stored and circulated in the blood. In conditions of low oxygen availability, nitrite can be converted into nitric oxide, which is known to play a number of important roles in vascular and metabolic control. Dietary nitrate supplementation increases plasma nitrite concentration and reduces resting blood pressure. Intriguingly, nitrate supplementation also reduces the oxygen cost of submaximal exercise and can, in some circumstances, enhance exercise tolerance and performance. The mechanisms that may be responsible for these effects are reviewed and practical guidelines for safe and efficacious dietary nitrate supplementation are provided. PMID:24791915

  12. Dosimetric and spectrometric neutron measurements around an annular vessel containing a plutonium nitrate fissile solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, B.; Itié, C.; Médioni, R.; Rich, C.; Mussoni, F.; Camus, L.; Pichenot, G.; Crovisier, Ph.; Cutarella, D.; Asselineau, B.; Groetz, J. E.

    2002-01-01

    The new ICPR60 recommendations and the consideration of the ALARA principle have led the operators of nuclear facilities to evaluate with a higher care, the doses received by workers. The aim of this paper is to present a recent study concerning mixed field characterisation at a workplace located in a reprocessing laboratory. As a first step, neutron spectrum determination was achieved by two ways: simulation using MCNP code and experimental measurements with Bonner spheres and recoil proton counters. Neutron spectrum allowed the evaluation of dosimetric quantities. Measurements were then performed with different devices routinely used in radioprotection. The authors describe the measurement techniques, present the results obtained, and finally compare and discuss them.

  13. Hot spots in ammonium nitrate

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Nicholas

    2011-07-12

    possible without the assistance of others. Corporately, Orica Mining Services and the Atomic Weapons Establishment envisioned and funded the project. From Orica, Ian Kirby, Jim Chan, John Cooper and Richard Goodridge all provided useful support, insight... sample of Nitram prills; high-purity am- monium nitrate fertilizer prills are understandably difficult to obtain from garden centres. Without Ray Flaxman and Bob Marrah of the Cavendish workshops, and Saevar Sigurdsson of the electronics workshop, it...

  14. Equations for plutonium and americium-241 decay corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, T.E.; Parker, J.L.

    1986-06-01

    We present derivations of equations used in various plutonium accountability measurements to correct for plutonium decay and /sup 241/Am ingrowth and decay. The equations are formulated in terms of the most widely available variables and are derived without approximation.

  15. The design and evaluation of an international plutonium storage system

    E-print Network

    Bae, Eugene

    2001-01-01

    To address the proliferation risk of separated plutonium, a technical and institutional design of an international plutonium storage system (IPSS) is presented. The IPSS is evaluated from two perspectives: its ability to ...

  16. Preserving Plutonium-244 as a National Asset

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Alexander, Charles W [ORNL; Benker, Dennis [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Romano, Catherine E [ORNL; Wham, Robert M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Plutonium-244 (244 Pu) is an extremely rare and long-lived isotope of plutonium with a half-life of 80 million years. Measureable amounts of 244 Pu are found in neither reactor-grade nor weapons-grade plutonium. Production of this isotope requires a very high thermal flux to permit the two successive neutron captures that convert 242 Pu to 243 Pu to 244 Pu, particularly given the short (about 5 hour) half-life of 243 Pu. Such conditions simply do not exist in plutonium production processes. Therefore, 244 Pu is ideal for precise radiochemical analyses measuring plutonium material properties and isotopic concentrations in items containing plutonium. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry is about ten times more sensitive when using 244 Pu rather than 242 Pu for determining plutonium isotopic content. The isotope can also be irradiated in small quantities to produce superheavy elements. The majority of the existing global inventory of 244 Pu is contained in the outer housing of Mark-18A targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The total inventory is about 20 grams of 244 Pu in about 400 grams of plutonium distributed among the 65 targets. Currently, there are no specific plans to preserve these targets. Although the cost of separating and preserving this material would be considerable, it is trivial in comparison to new production costs. For all practical purposes, the material is irreplaceable, because new production would cost billions of dollars and require a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles spanning up to 50 years. This paper will discuss a set of options for overcoming the significant challenges to preserve the 244 Pu as a National Asset: (1) the need to relocate the material from SRS in a timely manner, (2) the need to reduce the volume of material to the extent possible for storage, and (3) the need to establish an operational capability to enrich the 244 Pu in significant quantities. This paper suggests that if all the Mark-18A plutonium is separated, it would occupy a small volume and would be inexpensive to store while an enrichment capability is developed. Very small quantities could be enriched in existing mass separators to support critical needs.

  17. Recovery of plutonium and americium from chloride salt wastes by solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Reichley-Yinger, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    Plutonium and americium can be recovered from aqueous waste solutions containing a mixture of HCl and chloride salt wastes by the coupling of two solvent extraction systems: tributyl phosphate (TBP) in tetrachloroethylene (TCE) and octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) in TCE. In the flowsheet developed, the salt wastes are dissolved in HCl, the Pu(III) is oxidized to the IV state with NaClO/sub 2/ and recovered in the TBP-TCE cycle, and the Am is then removed from the resultant raffinate by the CMPO-TCE cycle. The consequences of the feed solution composition and extraction behavior of these species on the process flowsheet design, the Pu-product purity, and the decontamination of the aqueous raffinate from transuranic elements are discussed. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Dispersion of plutonium from contaminated pond sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rees, T.F.; Cleveland, J.M.; Carl, Gottschall W.

    1978-01-01

    Sediment-water distributions of plutonium as a function of pH and contact time are investigated in a holding pond at the Rocky Flats plant of the Department of Energy. Although plutonium has been shown to sorb from natural waters onto sediments, the results of this study indicate that under the proper conditions it can be redispersed at pH 9 and above. Concentrations greater than 900 pCi Pu/L result after 34 h contact at pH 11 or 12 and the distribution coefficient, defined as the ratio of concentration in the sediment to that in the liquid, decreases from 1.1 ?? 105 at pH 7 to 1.2 ?? 103 at pH 11. The plutonium is probably dispersed as discrete colloids or as hydrolytic species adsorbed onto colloidal sediment particles whose average size decreases with increasing pH above pH 9. About 5% of the total plutonium is dispersed at pH 12, and the dispersion seems to readsorb on the sediment with time. Consequently, migration of plutonium from the pond should be slow, and it would be difficult to remove this element completely from pond sediment by leaching with high pH solutions. ?? 1978 American Chemical Society.

  19. Distribution of Plutonium Isotopes in Cooling Water from a PWR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qingjiang CHEN; Sven P. NIELSEN; Asker AARKROG; Henning DAHLGAARD; Simon DUNIEC

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of plutonium isotopes in the primary cooling system of the Ringhals unit 2 (PWR) during normal operation has shown average concentrations of 0.03 Bq·l of Pu and 0.02 Bq·l of Pu. A major fraction of plutonium is associated with particles in contrast to dissolved plutonium in ionic form. The observed concentrations of plutonium isotopes in cooling water are

  20. Plutonium metal and alloy preparation by molten chloride reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Reavis, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Satisfactory reduction of molten plutonium trichloride (pure and in combination with 20 wt % sodium chloride) by calcium, lanthanum, and cerium has been demonstrated on the 10-g scale. The yields were satisfactory for this scale of operation, and it is indicated that these reductions may be useful for large-scale operations. Significant separations of plutonium from rare earth impurities was demonstrated for lanthanum and cerium reductions. Preparation of plutonium-cerium and plutonium-cerium-cobalt alloys during reduction was also demonstrated.

  1. Extraction of uranyl, La(III), and Y(III) nitrates with a composite solid extractant based on a polymeric support impregnated with trialkylamine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Pyartman; V. V. Lishchuk; V. A. Keskinov

    2007-01-01

    Extraction of uranyl, La(III), and Y(III) nitrates from aqueous solutions containing 0–4 M sodium nitrate with a composite\\u000a solid extractant based on a polymeric support impregnated with trialkylamine (C7-C9) was studied. The extraction isotherms were analyzed assuming that La(III), Y(III), and uranyl nitrates are extracted with\\u000a the solid extractant in the form of complexes (R3NH)3[Ln(NO3)6] and (R3NH)2[UO2(NO3)4], respectively. The extraction

  2. Plutonium scrap recovery at Savannah River: Past, present, and vision of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.W.; Gray, J.H.; Blancett, A.L.; Lower, M.W.; Rudisill, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    As a result of the changing requirement, plus environmental and regulatory commitments, SRP now has essentially completed its paradigm shift. SRP has been transformed from primarily a reprocessor of irradiated uranium targets to primarily a reprocessor of non-specification plutonium. This is the mission which will carry SRP into the 21st Century. Accomplishment of the defined goals for the three-pronged RandD program will achieve several objectives: exploit new processes for recovering low-grade scraps; enhance SRP's position to incorporate pyrochemical processes where they are attractive or beneficial to plant scrap recovery; provide SRL/SRP with a capability to develop compatible aqueous pyrochemical processes; identify material compatibility requirements for the incorporation of pyrochemical processes at SRP; promote development and demonstration of improved NDA instrumentation to accurately measure plutonium holdups in solid residues; identify and implement the technology required for reagent preparation and atmospheric quality control; provide a means to compare economic options for emerging new processes; and as a result, identify process steps which will also put SRP in a position to readily adapt to changing plutonium missions.

  3. Fused salt processing of impure plutonium dioxide to high-purity plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, L.J.; Christensen, D.C.; Babcock, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    A process for converting impure plutonium dioxide (approx. 96% pure) to high-purity plutonium metal (>99.9%) was developed. The process consists of reducing the oxide to an impure plutonium metal intermediate with calcium metal in molten calcium chloride. The impure intermediate metal is cast into an anode and electrorefined to produce high-purity plutonium metal. The oxide reduction step is being done now on a 0.6-kg scale with the resulting yield being >99.5%. The electrorefining is being done on a 4.0-kg scale with the resulting yield being 80 to 85%. The purity of the product, which averages 99.98%, is essentially insensitive to the purity of the feed metal. The yield, however, is directly dependent on the chemical composition of the feed. To date, approximately 250 kg of impure oxide has been converted to pure metal by this processing sequence. The availability of impure plutonium dioxide, together with the need for pure plutonium metal, makes this sequence a valuable plutonium processing tool.

  4. Non-biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen to nitrate on titanium dioxide and desert soil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Taani, Ahmed A.

    Elevated nitrate levels have frequently been observed in soils and the associated groundwater in arid regions of the U.S, many of which are distant from anthropogenic sources. Although these elevated nitrate concentrations have generally been linked to atmospheric precipitation, the current study indicates that at least a portion of these nitrates may have been formed through photochemical and thermal transformation reactions on soil surfaces. Photochemical nitrogen fixation to nitrate was observed on pure TiO 2 (both anatase and rutile) and desert soil surfaces when exposed to sunlight from 2 to 80 days. The yields of nitrate were generally proportional to irradiation time and increased substantially when sodium hydroxide was added. Larger surface films of soils or TiO2 generated higher yields of nitrate. Soils with higher content of both titanium and calcium exhibit higher photoactivities, and the production rate varied slightly with particle size. Traces of nitrite and ammonia detected on irradiated TiO2 surface were similar to background levels, and are probably not intermediates in the formation of nitrate. TiO2 and soils obtained from Atacama Desert in northern Chile and Pyramid Lake, NV were irradiated with sunlight for 32 days in either 15N labeled or unlabeled nitrogen and produced nitrates enriched in 15N and that nearly all isotopic values were higher than that of atmospheric 15N. Nitrate produced photochemically on Atacama Desert soils have isotopic values that are similar to those of the subsoil nitrates of the Atacama Desert. During our experimental investigation and while preparing thin films of TiO2 by thermal evaporation of an aqueous suspension in Petri dishes, we consistently observed an increase in nitrate concentrations in all samples (even the controls) whenever TiO2 slurries came in contact with heat and air. An expanded series of experiments was carried out in a conventional oven in the absence of light; photocatalytic reactions are not involved. Nitrate was produced over the temperature range of 50-200°C following 2 hours of heating and gave yields that were linear with increases in temperature. Nitrate formation was also observed on certain arid land soils thermally treated in the normal atmosphere at 200°C for 2-50 hours or at 70°C for 15 hours or one week, although the rate of nitrate formation varied with different soils. Under the conditions employed, the yield of nitrate was a function of the area of the TiO2 or soils on the Petri dish. Formation of minor amounts of nitrite was also observed. Nitrate yields were produced in approximately equal amounts following a series of successive cycles of heating and extraction of the same soil fractions or TiO2 material indicating that the measured nitrate concentrations are not a result of soil nitrate release. Soils from Atacama Desert and Pyramid Lake have shown higher thermal activities and produced larger yields of nitrate than that measured for other soils tested. Additions of stoichiometric amounts of sodium, potassium or calcium hydroxide increased the amount of nitrate observed on both TiO 2 and on soils. Nitrates generated thermally on TiO2 or on soils from Pyramid Lake and from Atacama Desert have been enriched in 15N when heated in 5ml of 15N labeled nitrogen. The majority of d15N values of nitrate produced on TiO2 or on soil surfaces heated in air have d 15N ratios larger than that of atmospheric N. The isotopic composition of nitrate formed on heated soil surface has values similar to those observed for desert subsoil nitrates and linked to atmospheric processes. Nitrate was also detected on soils heated at 70°C suggesting that this process is likely occurring naturally on desert soils by the influence of sunlight heating. Consideration of these processes will likely raise the question on the origin of subsoil nitrate in arid and semiarid land and potentially help to explain the elevated nitrate levels observed in desert soils and groundwater which have been largely attributed to long-term atmospheric nitrate precipitation.

  5. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.

    1994-12-05

    Magnesium oxide will be used as a neutralizing agent for acidic plutonium-containing solutions. It is expected that as the magnesium oxide dissolves, the pH of the solution will rise, and plutonium will precipitate. The resulting solid will be tested for suitability to storage. The liquid is expected to contain plutonium levels that meet disposal limit requirements.

  6. 15. VIEW OF THE SAFE GEOMETRY PLUTONIUM METAL STORAGE PALLETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF THE SAFE GEOMETRY PLUTONIUM METAL STORAGE PALLETS FROM THE INSIDE OF AN INPUT-OUTPUT STATION. INDIVIDUAL CONTAINERS OF PLUTONIUM ARE STORED IN THE WATER-FILLED, DOUBLE-WALLED STAINLESS STEEL TUBES THAT ARE WELDED ONTO THE PALLETS. (12/3/88) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery Facility, Northwest portion of Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  7. Preparation of a glovebox for casting enriched plutonium.

    SciTech Connect

    Ronquillo, R. D. (Richard D.); Trujillo, C. M. (Chris M.); Trujillo, C. C. (Claudette C.)

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Prepare existing glovebox for casting, heat treating and storing enriched plutonium, Upgrade seismic systems to reduce dispersion hazard, Upgrade atmospheric systems to reduce oxidation of plutonium, Upgrade vacuum system to prevent oxidation, InstalI/upgrade induction heating systems to melt plutonium and heat mold

  8. 10 CFR 71.88 - Air transport of plutonium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Air transport of plutonium. 71.88 Section 71.88 Energy...Procedures § 71.88 Air transport of plutonium. (a) Notwithstanding the provisions...applicable, the licensee shall assure that plutonium in any form, whether for...

  9. SUSCEPTIBILIT MAGNTIQUE DE QUELQUES SULFURES ET OXYDES DE PLUTONIUM

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    261. SUSCEPTIBILITÉ MAGNÉTIQUE DE QUELQUES SULFURES ET OXYDES DE PLUTONIUM Par GEORGES RAPHAEL et CHARLES DE NOVION, S.E.C.P.E.R., Section d'Études des Céramiques à base de Plutonium, Centre d susceptibilite magnétique des sulfures de plutonium : PuS, Pu3S4, PU2S3CXI PuS2. Ces composes non conduc- teurs

  10. Calculated Phonon Spectra of Plutonium at High Temperatures

    E-print Network

    Savrasov, Sergej Y.

    Calculated Phonon Spectra of Plutonium at High Temperatures X. Dai,1 S. Y. Savrasov,2 * G. Kotliar dynamical proper- ties of plutonium using an electronic structure method, which incorporates correlation anharmonic and can be stabilized at high temperatures by its phonon entropy. Plutonium (Pu) is a material

  11. Importance of poly(ethylene glycol) conformation for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles in aqueous solution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the formation of silver nanoparticles (NPs) using silver nitrate in a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) aqueous solution, which acts as both a reducing and stabilizing agent, the PEG chain structure was found to play a significant role. Even though PEG 100 (100 kg/mol) has limited reducing sites of hyd...

  12. Light-induced reversible hydrophilicity of ZnO structures grown by aqueous chemical growth

    E-print Network

    -generation of smart, self-cleaning surfaces [5]. Comparing various oxides and their wetting properties, one can easily structures deposited on glass and ITO substrates at low temperatures were studied, in relation to deposition by ACG on both glass and ITO substrates using an equimolar (0.01 m) aqueous solution of zinc nitrate

  13. Computerized plutonium wound-analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Waechter, D.A.; Brake, R.J.; Vasilik, D.G.; Erkkila, B.H.

    1983-01-01

    A new plutonium wound monitor has been developed at Los Alamos to upgrade a system which has been in use for about five years. The instrument, called a Computerized Wound Screening System, is designed around a readily available personal computer. It includes a full-function 256-channel pulse height analyzer and software necessary to calculate plutonium and americium activity from a spectrum. This new system provides medical and health physics personnel with considerable flexability in recognizing and recording situations where a wound incurred in a plutonium processing facility might be contaminated. This flexibility includes fast, accurate determination of contaminants in a wound, hard copy printout of results, and full patient logging capabilities via flexible disk storage. Use of a low cost computer greatly simplifies hardware and software design, and makes duplication of the instrument very simple and inexpensive.

  14. Neutron energy measurements for impure plutonium samples

    SciTech Connect

    Rael, C. D. (Carlos D.); Menlove, Howard O.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a technique used to measure the average neutron energy on impure plutonium samples. This measurement is done using the Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC). The measurement of neutron energy is done at the same time as the accountability or safeguards measurement. Neutron totals and coincidence measurements of plutonium have the problem that impurities present in sample add to the observed neutron counts because of alpha particle induced source neutrons and the related multiplication. The primary signal that is needed to measure the {sup 240}Pu effective mass is the spontaneous fission rate; however, induced fissions related to the impurities increase the observed response. In most cases, the (a,n) source neutrons have an energy distribution that is different than for spontaneous fission. Thus, the ability to measure the neutron energy distribution helps in the identification of impure plutonium samples. A description of the ENMC detector components and discussion on the average neutron energy calibration are provided.

  15. ESTIMATING IMPURITIES IN SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FOR DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Allender, J.; Moore, E.

    2013-07-17

    The United States holds at least 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) operates a Feed Characterization program for the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition of the National Nuclear Security Administration and the DOE Office of Environmental Management. Many of the items that require disposition are only partially characterized, and SRNL uses a variety of techniques to predict the isotopic and chemical properties that are important for processing through the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility and alternative disposition paths. Recent advances in laboratory tools, including Prompt Gamma Analysis and Peroxide Fusion treatment, provide data on the existing inventories that will enable disposition without additional, costly sampling and destructive analysis.

  16. Excess plutonium disposition: The deep borehole option

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, K.L.

    1994-08-09

    This report reviews the current status of technologies required for the disposition of plutonium in Very Deep Holes (VDH). It is in response to a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report which addressed the management of excess weapons plutonium and recommended three approaches to the ultimate disposition of excess plutonium: (1) fabrication and use as a fuel in existing or modified reactors in a once-through cycle, (2) vitrification with high-level radioactive waste for repository disposition, (3) burial in deep boreholes. As indicated in the NAS report, substantial effort would be required to address the broad range of issues related to deep bore-hole emplacement. Subjects reviewed in this report include geology and hydrology, design and engineering, safety and licensing, policy decisions that can impact the viability of the concept, and applicable international programs. Key technical areas that would require attention should decisions be made to further develop the borehole emplacement option are identified.

  17. Binary lanthanide(III)/nitrate and ternary lanthanide(III)/nitrate/chloride complexes in an ionic liquid containing water: optical absorption and luminescence studies.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Seraj A; Liu, Lisheng; Rao, Linfeng

    2015-02-14

    The formation of binary Ln(iii)/nitrate and ternary Ln(iii)/nitrate/chloride complexes in a water-saturated ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (denoted BumimTf(2)N), was investigated by absorption spectrophotometry and luminescence spectroscopy. Four successive binary complexes, Nd(NO(3))(2+), Nd(NO(3))(2)(+), Nd(NO(3))(3), and Nd(NO(3))(4)(-), were identified, and their stability constants in water-saturated BumimTf(2)N are several orders of magnitude higher than those in aqueous solutions, but much lower than those observed in dry BumimTf(2)N. The complexation of lanthanides with nitrate in wet BumimTf(2)N proceeds via the replacement of water molecules by bidentate nitrate anions from the inner solvation spheres of Ln(3+) cations. In the absence of nitrate, the precipitation of Ln(iii)/chloride complex(es) occurs at low ratios of C(Cl)/C(Ln) (<6) in BumimTf(2)N, which precludes the determination of stability constants of binary Ln(iii)/chloride complexes by spectrophotometry or luminescence spectroscopy. However, using a competition approach, the formation of two ternary complexes, Ln(NO(3))(3)Cl(2)(2-) and Ln(NO(3))(2)Cl(4)(3-), has been observed and their stability constants in wet BumimTf(2)N were determined. Data indicate that both nitrate and chloride are stronger ligands than water for lanthanides in BumimTf(2)N. PMID:25567210

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FOR DISPOSITION OPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Allender, J; Edwin Moore, E; Scott Davies, S

    2008-07-15

    The United States (U.S.) has identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Except for materials that remain in use for programs outside of national defense, including programs for nuclear-energy development, the surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. Some items will be disposed as transuranic waste, low-level waste, or spent fuel. The remaining surplus plutonium will be managed through: (1) the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (FFF), to be constructed at the Savannah River Site (SRS), where the plutonium will be converted to fuel that will be irradiated in civilian power reactors and later disposed to a high-level waste (HLW) repository as spent fuel; (2) the SRS H-Area facilities, by dissolving and transfer to HLW systems, also for disposal to the repository; or (3) alternative immobilization techniques that would provide durable and secure disposal. From the beginning of the U.S. program for surplus plutonium disposition, DOE has sponsored research to characterize the surplus materials and to judge their suitability for planned disposition options. Because many of the items are stored without extensive analyses of their current chemical content, the characterization involves three interacting components: laboratory sample analysis, if available; non-destructive assay data; and rigorous evaluation of records for the processing history for items and inventory groups. This information is collected from subject-matter experts at inventory sites and from materials stabilization and surveillance programs, in cooperation with the design agencies for the disposition facilities. This report describes the operation and status of the characterization program.

  19. Phylogenomics of Mycobacterium Nitrate Reductase Operon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinqin; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    NarGHJI operon encodes a nitrate reductase that can reduce nitrate to nitrite. This process enhances bacterial survival by nitrate respiration under anaerobic conditions. NarGHJI operon exists in many bacteria, especially saprophytic bacteria living in soil which play a key role in the nitrogen cycle. Most actinomycetes, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, possess NarGHJI operons. M. tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that expands in macrophages and has the ability to persist in a non-replicative form in granuloma lifelong. Nitrogen and nitrogen compounds play crucial roles in the struggle between M. tuberculosis and host. M. tuberculosis can use nitrate as a final electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions to enhance its survival. In this article, we reviewed the mechanisms regulating nitrate reductase expression and affecting its activity. Potential genes involved in regulating the nitrate reductase expression in M. tuberculosis were identified. The conserved NarG might be an alternative mycobacterium taxonomic marker. PMID:25980349

  20. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Nitric Acid, Nitrates, and Nitro Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherick, Leslie

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are the potential hazards associated with nitric acid, inorganic and organic nitrate salts, alkyl nitrates, acyl nitrates, aliphatic nitro compounds, aromatic nitro compounds, and nitration reactions. (CW)

  1. Solubility of plutonium from rumen contents of cattle grazing on plutonium- contaminated desert vegetation in in vitro bovine gastrointestinal fluids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Barth; M. G. White; P. B. Dunaway

    1975-01-01

    Rumen contents of cattle grazing on plutonium-contaminated desert ; vegetation at the Nevada Test Site were incubated in simulated bovine ; gastrointestinal fluids to study the alimentary solubility of plutonium. Trials ; were run during November 1973, and during February, May, July and August 1974. ; During the May and July trials, a large increase in plutonium solubility ; accompanied

  2. Materials identification and surveillance project item evaluation: Items, impure plutonium oxide (ATL27960) and pure plutonium oxide (PEOR3258)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Allen; Q. Appert; C. Davis

    1997-01-01

    In this report, Los Alamos scientists characterize properties relevant to storage of an impure plutonium oxide (74 mass % plutonium) in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) standard DOE-STD-3013-96. This oxide is of interest because it is the first impure plutonium oxide sample to be evaluated and it is similar to other materials that must be stored. Methods used

  3. Nitrate reductase activity in Zostera marina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. C. Roth; A. M. Pregnall

    1988-01-01

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) has access to nutrient pools in both the water column and sediments. We investigated the potential for eelgrass to utilize nitrate nitrogen by measuring nitrate reductase (NR) activity with an in vivo tissue assay. Optimal incubation media contained 60 mM nitrate, 100 mM phosphate, and 0.5% 1-propanol at pH 7.0. Leaves had significantly higher NR activity

  4. Root branching responses to phosphate and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Desnos, Thierry

    2008-02-01

    Plant roots favour colonization of nutrient-rich zones in soil. Molecular genetic evidences demonstrate that roots sense and respond to local and global concentrations of inorganic phosphate and nitrate, in a fashion that depends on the shoot nutrient status. Recent investigations in Arabidopsis highlighted the role of the root tip in phosphate sensing and attributed to already known proteins (multicopper oxidases and nitrate transporters) new and unexpected functions in the root growth response to phosphate or nitrate. PMID:18024148

  5. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate...Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY...

  6. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate...Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY...

  7. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate...Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY...

  8. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 4 (Flammable Solids), Class 5 (Oxidizers and Organic Peroxides), and Division 1.5 Materials § 176.410 Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate...

  9. Studies on the reverse osmosis treatment of uranyl nitrate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakar, S.; Panicker, S.T.; Misra, B.M.; Ramani, P.S. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India))

    1992-03-01

    The aqueous effluent generated in uranium processing, particularly in the nuclear fuel fabrication step, contains mainly uranium nitrate. This requires treatment before discharge into the environment to meet stringent standards. This paper presents the performance of cellulose acetate membranes with regard to rejection of uranium under reverse osmotic conditions for feed concentrations up to 200 mg/l of uranium, which corresponds to the levels normally prevalent in the effluents. The use of additives like the disodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium sulfate for the improvement of reverse osmosis performance of the above membranes was also investigated. In the light of the experimental results, the suitability of reverse osmosis for the decontamination of uranium effluents is discussed.

  10. Groundwater nitrate contamination: Factors and indicators

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Katharina; Heumesser, Christine; Schmid, Erwin

    2012-01-01

    Identifying significant determinants of groundwater nitrate contamination is critical in order to define sensible agri-environmental indicators that support the design, enforcement, and monitoring of regulatory policies. We use data from approximately 1200 Austrian municipalities to provide a detailed statistical analysis of (1) the factors influencing groundwater nitrate contamination and (2) the predictive capacity of the Gross Nitrogen Balance, one of the most commonly used agri-environmental indicators. We find that the percentage of cropland in a given region correlates positively with nitrate concentration in groundwater. Additionally, environmental characteristics such as temperature and precipitation are important co-factors. Higher average temperatures result in lower nitrate contamination of groundwater, possibly due to increased evapotranspiration. Higher average precipitation dilutes nitrates in the soil, further reducing groundwater nitrate concentration. Finally, we assess whether the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a valid predictor of groundwater nitrate contamination. Our regression analysis reveals that the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a statistically significant predictor for nitrate contamination. We also show that its predictive power can be improved if we account for average regional precipitation. The Gross Nitrogen Balance predicts nitrate contamination in groundwater more precisely in regions with higher average precipitation. PMID:22906701

  11. Photochemistry of Nitrate Adsorbed on Mineral Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gankanda, A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust particles in the atmosphere are often associated with adsorbed nitrate from heterogeneous reactions with nitrogen oxides including HNO3 and NO2. Although nitrate ion is a well-studied chromophore in natural waters, the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on mineral dust particles is yet to be fully explored. In this study, wavelength dependence of the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on different model components of mineral dust aerosol has been investigated using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Al2O3, TiO2 and NaY zeolite were used as model systems to represent non-photoactive oxides, photoactive semiconductor oxides and porous materials respectively, present in mineral dust aerosol. In this study, adsorbed nitrate is irradiated with 254 nm, 310 nm and 350 nm narrow band light. In the irradiation with narrow band light, NO2 is the only detectable gas-phase product formed from nitrate adsorbed on Al2O3 and TiO2. The NO2 yield is highest at 310 nm for both Al2O3 and TiO2. Unlike Al2O3 and TiO2, in zeolite, adsorbed nitrate photolysis to nitrite is observed only at 310 nm during narrow band irradiation. Moreover gas phase products were not detected during nitrate photolysis in zeolite at all three wavelengths. The significance of these differences as related to nitrate photochemistry on different mineral dust components will be highlighted.

  12. The effect of endogenous and externally supplied nitrate on nitrate uptake and reduction in sugarbeet seedlings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gisela Mäck; Rudolf Tischner

    1990-01-01

    The pericarp of the dormant sugarbeet fruit acts as a storage reservoir for nitrate, ammonium and a-amino-N. These N-reserves enable an autonomous development of the seedling for 8–10 d after imbibition. The nitrate content of the seed (1% of the whole fruit) probably induces nitrate-reductase activity in the embryo enclosed in the pericarp. Nitrate that leaks out of the pericarp

  13. The oral bioavailability of nitrate from nitrate-rich vegetables in humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Agnes G. van Velzen; Adrienne J. A. M. Sips; Ronald C. Schothorst; Annette C. Lambers; Jan Meulenbelt

    2008-01-01

    High dietary nitrate intake may pose a risk to human health. Since up to 80–85% of dietary nitrate intake comes from vegetables, the aim of this study was to determine the absolute bioavailability of nitrate from three nitrate-rich vegetables. In an open, four-way cross-over, single dose study, 12 human subjects underwent the following treatments: (1) intravenous infusion of 500mg sodium

  14. Plutonium dispersal in fires: Summary of what is known

    SciTech Connect

    Condit, R.H.

    1993-07-01

    In view of the great public apprehension about plutonium and nuclear weapons we should explore ways to prevent, limit, or mitigate possible plutonium dispersals. This review is primarily a tutorial on what is known about plutonium dispersal in fires. It concludes that in most types of fires involving plutonium the amount released will not be an immediate danger to life. Indeed, in many cases very few personnel will receive more than the lung burden allowed by current regulations for plutonium workers. However, the dangers may be significant in special situations, unusual terrains, certain meteorological conditions, and very high burn temperatures.

  15. Fe(III) oxides accelerate microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation by Klebsiella pneumoniae L17.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Min; Li, Fangbai

    2014-06-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae L17 is a fermentative bacterium that can reduce iron oxide and generate electricity under anoxic conditions, as previously reported. This study reveals that K. pneumoniae L17 is also capable of dissimilatory nitrate reduction, producing NO2(-), NH4(+), NO and N2O under anoxic conditions. The presence of Fe(III) oxides (i.e., ?-FeOOH, ?-FeOOH, ?-Fe2O3 and ?-Fe2O3) significantly accelerates the reduction of nitrate and generation of electricity by K. pneumoniae L17, which is similar to a previous report regarding another fermentative bacterium, Bacillus. No significant nitrate reduction was observed upon treatment with Fe(2+) or ?-FeOOH+Fe(2+), but a slight facilitation of nitrate reduction and electricity generation was observed upon treatment with L17+Fe(2+). This result suggests that aqueous Fe(II) or mineral-adsorbed Fe(II) cannot reduce nitrate abiotically but that L17 can catalyze the reduction of nitrate and generation of electricity in the presence of Fe(II) (which might exist as cell surface-bound Fe(II)). To rule out the potential effect of Fe(II) produced by L17 during microbial iron reduction, treatments with the addition of TiO2 or Al2O3 instead of Fe(III) oxides also exhibited accelerated microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation, indicating that cell-mineral sorption did account for the acceleration effect. However, the acceleration caused by Fe(III) oxides is only partially attributed to the cell surface-bound Fe(II) and cell-mineral sorption but may be driven by the iron oxide conduction band-mediated electron transfer from L17 to nitrate or an electrode, as proposed previously. The current study extends the diversity of bacteria of which nitrate reduction and electricity generation can be facilitated by the presence of iron oxides and confirms the positive role of Fe(III) oxides on microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation by particular fermentative bacteria in anoxic environments. PMID:24703664

  16. Using magnetization measurements to detect small amounts of plutonium hydride formation in plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae Wook [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Mielke, Charles H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zapf, Vivien [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baiardo, Joseph P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mitchell, Jeremy N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schwartz, Daniel S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mun, Eun D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Alice Iulia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-20

    We report the formation of plutonium hydride in 2 at % Ga-stabilized ?-Pu, with 1 atomic % H charging. We show that magnetization measurements are a sensitive, quantitative measure of ferromagnetic plutonium hydride against the nonmagnetic background of plutonium. It was previously shown that at low hydrogen concentrations, hydrogen forms super-abundant vacancy complexes with plutonium, resulting in a bulk lattice contraction. Here we use magnetization, X-ray and neutron diffraction measurements to show that in addition to forming vacancy complexes, at least 30% of the H atoms bond with Pu to precipitate PuHx, largely on the surface of the sample with x ~ 1.9. We observe magnetic hysteresis loops below 40 K with magnetic remanence, consistent with precipitates of ferromagnetic PuH1.9.

  17. The NreA protein functions as a nitrate receptor in the staphylococcal nitrate regulation system.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Volker; Koch-Singenstreu, Mareike; Neu, Ancilla; Nilkens, Stephanie; Götz, Friedrich; Unden, Gottfried; Stehle, Thilo

    2014-04-01

    Staphylococci are able to use nitrate as an alternative electron acceptor during anaerobic respiration. The regulation of energy metabolism is dependent on the presence of oxygen and nitrate. Under anaerobic conditions, staphylococci employ the nitrate regulatory element (Nre) for transcriptional activation of genes involved in reduction and transport of nitrate and nitrite. Of the three proteins that constitute the Nre system, NreB has been characterized as an oxygen sensor kinase and NreC has been characterized as its cognate response regulator. Here, we present structural and functional data that establish NreA as a new type of nitrate receptor. The structure of NreA with bound nitrate was solved at 2.35Å resolution, revealing a GAF domain fold. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments showed that NreA binds nitrate with low micromolar affinity (KD=22?M). Two crystal forms for NreA were obtained, with either bound nitrate or iodide. While the binding site is hydrophobic, two helix dipoles and polar interactions contribute to specific binding of the ions. The expression of nitrate reductase (NarGHI) was examined using a narG-lip (lipase) reporter gene assay in vivo. Expression was regulated by the presence of NreA and nitrate. Structure-guided mutations of NreA reduced its nitrate binding affinity and also affected the gene expression, thus providing support for the function of NreA as a nitrate receptor. PMID:24389349

  18. REDUCTION OF NITRATE THROUGH THE USE OF NITRATE REDUCTASE FOR THE SMARTCHEM AUTOANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard method for the determination of nitrate in drinking water, USEPA Method 353.2 ¿Determination of Nitrate-Nitrite by Automated Colorimetry,¿ employs cadmium as the reductant for the conversion of nitrate to nitrite. The nitrite is then analyzed colorimetrically by way ...

  19. Arabidopsis Nitrate Transporter NRT1.9 Is Important in Phloem Nitrate Transport[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Yun; Tsay, Yi-Fang

    2011-01-01

    This study of the Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate transporter NRT1.9 reveals an important function for a NRT1 family member in phloem nitrate transport. Functional analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that NRT1.9 is a low-affinity nitrate transporter. Green fluorescent protein and ?-glucuronidase reporter analyses indicated that NRT1.9 is a plasma membrane transporter expressed in the companion cells of root phloem. In nrt1.9 mutants, nitrate content in root phloem exudates was decreased, and downward nitrate transport was reduced, suggesting that NRT1.9 may facilitate loading of nitrate into the root phloem and enhance downward nitrate transport in roots. Under high nitrate conditions, the nrt1.9 mutant showed enhanced root-to-shoot nitrate transport and plant growth. We conclude that phloem nitrate transport is facilitated by expression of NRT1.9 in root companion cells. In addition, enhanced root-to-shoot xylem transport of nitrate in nrt1.9 mutants points to a negative correlation between xylem and phloem nitrate transport. PMID:21571952

  20. MCNP5 CALCULATIONS REPLICATING ARH-600 NITRATE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    FINFROCK SH

    2011-10-25

    This report serves to extend the previous document: 'MCNP Calculations Replicating ARH-600 Data' by replicating the nitrate curves found in ARH-600. This report includes the MCNP models used, the calculated critical dimension for each analyzed parameter set, and the resulting data libraries for use with the CritView code. As with the ARH-600 data, this report is not meant to replace the analysis of the fissile systems by qualified criticality personnel. The M CNP data is presented without accounting for the statistical uncertainty (although this is typically less than 0.001) or bias and, as such, the application of a reasonable safety margin is required. The data that follows pertains to the uranyl nitrate and plutonium nitrate spheres, infinite cylinders, and infinite slabs of varying isotopic composition, reflector thickness, and molarity. Each of the cases was modeled in MCNP (version 5.1.40), using the ENDF/B-VI cross section set. Given a molarity, isotopic composition, and reflector thickness, the fissile concentration and diameter (or thicknesses in the case of the slab geometries) were varied. The diameter for which k-effective equals 1.00 for a given concentration could then be calculated and graphed. These graphs are included in this report. The pages that follow describe the regions modeled, formulas for calculating the various parameters, a list of cross-sections used in the calculations, a description of the automation routine and data, and finally the data output. The data of most interest are the critical dimensions of the various systems analyzed. This is presented graphically, and in table format, in Appendix B. Appendix C provides a text listing of the same data in a format that is compatible with the CritView code. Appendices D and E provide listing of example Template files and MCNP input files (these are discussed further in Section 4). Appendix F is a complete listing of all of the output data (i.e., all of the analyzed dimensions and the resulting k{sub eff} values).

  1. Convergence of biological nitration and nitrosation via symmetrical nitrous anhydride.

    PubMed

    Vitturi, Dario A; Minarrieta, Lucia; Salvatore, Sonia R; Postlethwait, Edward M; Fazzari, Marco; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Lancaster, Jack R; Freeman, Bruce A; Schopfer, Francisco J

    2015-07-01

    The current perspective holds that the generation of secondary signaling mediators from nitrite (NO2(-)) requires acidification to nitrous acid (HNO2) or metal catalysis. Herein, the use of stable isotope-labeled NO2(-) and LC-MS/MS analysis of products reveals that NO2(-) also participates in fatty acid nitration and thiol S-nitrosation at neutral pH. These reactions occur in the absence of metal centers and are stimulated by autoxidation of nitric oxide ((•)NO) via the formation of symmetrical dinitrogen trioxide (nitrous anhydride, symN2O3). Although theoretical models have predicted physiological symN2O3 formation, its generation is now demonstrated in aqueous reaction systems, cell models and in vivo, with the concerted reactions of (•)NO and NO2(-) shown to be critical for symN2O3 formation. These results reveal new mechanisms underlying the NO2(-) propagation of (•)NO signaling and the regulation of both biomolecule function and signaling network activity via NO2(-)-dependent nitrosation and nitration reactions. PMID:26006011

  2. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options

    SciTech Connect

    Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

    1993-06-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

  3. Fifty years of plutonium exposure to the Mahattan Project plutonium workers: An update

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George L. Voelz; James N. P. Lawrence; Emily R. Johnson

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-six white male workers who did the original plutonium research and development work at Los Alamos have been examined periodically over the past 50 y to identify possible health effects from internal plutonium depositions. Their effective doses range from 0.1 to 7.2 Sv with a median value of 1.25 Sv. As of the end of 1994, 7 individuals have died

  4. Method for calibration of plutonium NDA

    SciTech Connect

    Lemming, J.F.; Campbell, A.R.; Rodenburg, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    Calibration materials characterized by calorimetric assay can be a practical alternative to synthetic standards for the calibration of plutonium nondestructive assay. Calorimetric assay is an effective measurement system for the characterization because: it can give an absolute assay from first principles when the isotopic composition is known, it is insensitive to most matrix effects, and its traceability to international measurement systems has been demonstrated.

  5. Plutonium recycling experience in Japanese PWRs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiromasa Nishioka; Shigemitsu Suzuki; Kazuya Seki; Toshikazu Ida

    1992-01-01

    Plutonium recycling is an important policy for saving natural uranium resources in Japan. In March 1988, four demonstration mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies were loaded at Mihama Unit 1 and irradiated for three cycles. Mihama Unit 1 is a two-loop type pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant of Kansai Electric Power Company and was loaded with 121 fuel assemblies of the 14

  6. NNSS Soils Monitoring: Plutonium Valley (CAU366)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve A.; Nikolich, George; Campbell, Scott

    2012-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Contamination Area (CA) during precipitation runoff events.

  7. PLUTONIUM SPECIATION, SOLUBILIZATION, AND MIGRATION IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DOE is currently conducting cleanup activities at its nuclear weapons development sites, many of which have accumulated plutonium (Pu) in soils for 50 years. There is scientific uncertainty about the levels of risk to human health posed by this accumulation and whether Pu is ...

  8. High temperature vapor pressure of pure plutonium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. H. Bradbury; R. W. Ohse

    1979-01-01

    High temperature vapor pressure measurements have been made on pure plutonium metal by the Knudsen effusion technique. The reported experimental results extend into the transition region between molecular and viscous or hydrodynamic flow. Under the conditions used, linearity was observed up to temperatures in excess of 2200 K where pressures approaching 100 Pa were measured. The results over the temperature

  9. Preparation of Plutonium Hexafluoride. Recovery of Plutonium from Waste Dross; PREPARATION DE L'HEXAFLUORURE DE PLUTONIUM. RECUPERATION DU PLUTONIUM DES SCORIES D'ELABORATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gendre

    1962-01-01

    The influence of various physical factors on the rate of fluorination of ; solid plutonium tetrafluoride by fluorine was studied. In a horizontal oven with ; a circulation for pure fluorine at atmospheric pressure and 520#DEC, at a ; fluorine rate of 9 liters\\/hour, it is possible to transform 3 gm of tetrafluoride ; to hexafluoride with about 100% transformation

  10. Electrochemically Modulated Separation for Plutonium Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Sandra H.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Arrigo, Leah M.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2013-12-31

    Accurate and timely analysis of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel is critical in nuclear safeguards for detection of both protracted and rapid plutonium diversions. Gamma spectroscopy is a viable method for accurate and timely measurements of plutonium provided that the plutonium is well separated from the interfering fission and activation products present in spent nuclear fuel. Electrochemically modulated separation (EMS) is a method that has been used successfully to isolate picogram amounts of Pu from nitric acid matrices. With EMS, Pu adsorption may be turned "on" and "off" depending on the applied voltage, allowing for collection and stripping of Pu without the addition of chemical reagents. In this work, we have scaled up the EMS process to isolate microgram quantities of Pu from matrices encountered in spent nuclear fuel during reprocessing. Several challenges have been addressed including surface area limitations, radiolysis effects, electrochemical cell performance stability, and chemical interferences. After these challenges were resolved, 6 µg Pu was deposited in the electrochemical cell with approximately an 800-fold reduction of fission and activation product levels from a spent nuclear fuel sample. Modeling showed that these levels of Pu collection and interference reduction may not be sufficient for Pu detection by gamma spectroscopy. The main remaining challenges are to achieve a more complete Pu isolation and to deposit larger quantities of Pu for successful gamma analysis of Pu. If gamma analyses of Pu are successful, EMS will allow for accurate and timely on-site analysis for enhanced Pu safeguards.

  11. Design-Only Conceptual Design Report: Plutonium Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A.; Loftus, D.

    1999-01-01

    This design-only conceptual design report was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition for engineering and design of the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will be used to immobilize up to 50 tonnes of surplus plutonium. The siting for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant will be determined pursuant to the site-specific Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement in a Plutonium Deposition Record of Decision in early 1999. This document reflects a new facility using the preferred technology (ceramic immobilization using the can-in-canister approach) and the preferred site (at Savannah River). The Plutonium Immobilization Plant accepts plutonium from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into mineral-like forms that are subsequently encapsulated within a large canister of high-level waste glass. The final immobilized product must make the plutonium as inherently unattractive and inaccessible for use in nuclear weapons as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors and must be suitable for geologic disposal. Plutonium immobilization at the Savannah River Site uses: (1) A new building, the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will convert non-pit surplus plutonium to an oxide form suitable for the immobilization process, immobilize plutonium in a titanate-based ceramic form, place cans of the plutonium-ceramic forms into magazines, and load the magazines into a canister; (2) The existing Defense Waste Processing Facility for the pouring of high-level waste glass into the canisters; and (3) The Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility to receive and store feed materials. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant uses existing Savannah River Site infra-structure for analytical laboratory services, waste handling, fire protection, training, and other support utilities and services. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant may share the disposition of the 50 tonnes of plutonium with the mixed oxide fuel/reactor disposition alternative. For this case, immobilization will process 18.2 tonnes of plutonium in 10 years.

  12. Transactions of the ASABE UNCERTAINTIES IN ASSESSING ANNUAL NITRATE

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Transactions of the ASABE UNCERTAINTIES IN ASSESSING ANNUAL NITRATE LOADS AND CONCENTRATION the uncertainty in annual nitrate loads and concentrations (such as annual average and median concentrations, France, were analyzed. Original (high frequency) nitrate concentration and flow data were numerically

  13. 70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM NITRATE IN STORAGE. APRIL 18, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  14. 78 FR 32690 - Certain Ammonium Nitrate From Ukraine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ...Review)] Certain Ammonium Nitrate From Ukraine Determination On the basis of the record...order on certain ammonium nitrate from Ukraine would be likely to lead to continuation...entitled Certain Ammonium Nitrate from Ukraine: Investigation No....

  15. NITRATE AND NITRITE CONTAMINATION IN VEGETABLES IN CHINA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ZE-YI ZHOU; MING-JIAN WANG; JU-SI WANG

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews recent studies of nitrate and nitrite contamination in Chinese vegetables. Nitrate and nitrite contamination is very serious and increases the amount of nitrogenous fertilizer applications. Factors influencing nitrate and nitrite contamination in vegetables are analyzed and discussed.

  16. The contributions of nitrate uptake and efflux to isotope fractionation during algal nitrate assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsh, K. L.; Trull, T. W.; Sigman, D. M.; Thompson, P. A.; Granger, J.

    2014-05-01

    In order to strengthen environmental application of nitrate N and O isotopes, we measured the N and O isotopic fractionation associated with cellular nitrate uptake and efflux in the nitrate-assimilating marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. We isolated nitrate uptake and efflux from nitrate reduction by growing the cells in the presence of tungsten, which substitutes for molybdenum in assimilatory nitrate reductase, yielding an inactive enzyme. After growth on ammonium and then N starvation, cells were exposed to nitrate. Numerical models fit to the evolution of intracellular nitrate concentration and N and O isotopic composition yielded distinct N isotope effects (15?) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux (2.0 ± 0.3‰ and 1.2 ± 0.4‰, respectively). The O isotope effects (18?) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux were indistinguishable (2.8 ± 0.6‰), yielding a ratio of O to N isotopic fractionation for uptake of 1.4 ± 0.4 and for efflux of 2.3 ± 0.9. The 15? for nitrate uptake can account for at most 40% of the organism-level N isotope effect (15?org) measured in laboratory studies of T. weissflogii and in the open ocean (typically 5‰ or greater). This observation supports previous evidence that most isotope fractionation during nitrate assimilation is due to intracellular nitrate reduction, with nitrate efflux allowing the signal to be communicated to the environment. An O to N fractionation ratio (18?org:15?org) of ˜1 has been measured for nitrate assimilation in algal cultures and linked to the N and O isotope effects of nitrate reductase. Our results suggest that the ratios of O to N fractionation for both nitrate uptake and efflux may be distinct from a ratio of 1, to a degree that could cause the net 18?org:15?org to rise appreciably above 1 when 15?org is low (e.g., yielding a ratio of 1.1 when 15?org is 5‰). However, field and culture studies have consistently measured nearly equivalent fractionation of N and O isotopes in association with low isotope effects, calling for isotopic studies of nitrate transport by other phytoplankton strains.

  17. Nitric oxide, oxidants, and protein tyrosine nitration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rafael Radi

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of protein tyrosine nitration under disease conditions is now firmly established and represents a shift from the signal transducing physiological actions of NO to oxidative and potentially pathogenic pathways. Tyrosine nitration is mediated by reactive nitrogen species such as peroxynitrite anion (ONOO-) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formed as secondary products of NO metabolism in the presence of oxidants

  18. Nitrates and Prussic Acid in Forages

    E-print Network

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2003-01-06

    When nitrates and prussic acid accumulate in forage, the feed may not be safe for livestock consumption. Learn the symptoms of nitrate and prussic acid poisoning and which plants are most likely to pose a risk to livestock. Also learn sampling...

  19. COMPARTMENTAL MODEL OF NITRATE RETENTION IN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compartmental modeling approach is presented to route nitrate retention along a cascade of stream reach sections. A process transfer function is used for transient storage equations with first order reaction terms to represent nitrate uptake in the free stream, and denitrifica...

  20. Nitrate reductase in Peru current phytoplankton

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Eppley; T. T. Packard; J. J. MacIsaac

    1970-01-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) activity was assayed by measuring the NADH-dependent formation of nitrite in phytoplankton extracts. NR specific activity increased with the nitrate concentration of the water in upwelling areas of the Peru Current. The temperature optimum for NR for natural phytoplankton was 15° to 20°C. NR activity showed diel periodicity, with maximum activity about noon and minimum activity near

  1. Winter Wheat Fertilization: Post Ammonium Nitrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Byron Irvine; Guy Lafond; Randy Kutcher

    Summary The potential for overwinter losses of nitrogen by denitrification and leaching have led to the recommendation that nitrogen fertilization of winter wheat be done using ammonium nitrate broadcast in the spring. However, spring broadcast application of urea can result in significant loss of nitrogen by volatilization and immobilization by surface residues. Since prilled ammonium nitrate is not available for

  2. 8, 1103911062, 2008 Nitrate in polar ice

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 11039­11062, 2008 Nitrate in polar ice E. W. Wolff et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction in polar ice cores using evidence from snow and atmospheric measurements E. W. Wolff, A. E. Jones, S. J Geosciences Union. 11039 #12;ACPD 8, 11039­11062, 2008 Nitrate in polar ice E. W. Wolff et al. Title Page

  3. NITRATE CONTAMINATION OF GROUND WATER (GW-761)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of nitrate and related compounds in ground water is discussed from the perspectives of its natural as well as anthropogenic origins. A brief explanation of the nitrogen cycle touches on the production as well as utilization of ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, and nitrog...

  4. Bacterial nitrate assimilation: gene distribution and regulation.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Gates, Andrew J; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Ferguson, Stuart J; Richardson, David J; Roldán, M Dolores

    2011-12-01

    In the context of the global nitrogen cycle, the importance of inorganic nitrate for the nutrition and growth of marine and freshwater autotrophic phytoplankton has long been recognized. In contrast, the utilization of nitrate by heterotrophic bacteria has historically received less attention because the primary role of these organisms has classically been considered to be the decomposition and mineralization of dissolved and particulate organic nitrogen. In the pre-genome sequence era, it was known that some, but not all, heterotrophic bacteria were capable of growth on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source. However, examination of currently available prokaryotic genome sequences suggests that assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas) systems are widespread phylogenetically in bacterial and archaeal heterotrophs. Until now, regulation of nitrate assimilation has been mainly studied in cyanobacteria. In contrast, in heterotrophic bacterial strains, the study of nitrate assimilation regulation has been limited to Rhodobacter capsulatus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Azotobacter vinelandii and Bacillus subtilis. In Gram-negative bacteria, the nas genes are subjected to dual control: ammonia repression by the general nitrogen regulatory (Ntr) system and specific nitrate or nitrite induction. The Ntr system is widely distributed in bacteria, whereas the nitrate/nitrite-specific control is variable depending on the organism. PMID:22103536

  5. Polarographic determination of nitrate in vegetables

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. I. N Ximenes; S Rath; F. G. R Reyes

    2000-01-01

    A polarographic method for the determination of nitrate in vegetables is presented. The method is based on the reduction of nitrate to nitric oxide which reacts in solution with colbalt (II) and thiocyanate ions forming an electroactive complex that is reduced at the dropping mercury electrode at ?0.5 V (vs. SCE). The nitric oxide is generated outside the polarographic cell

  6. Nitrates and Prussic Acid in Forages 

    E-print Network

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2003-01-06

    When nitrates and prussic acid accumulate in forage, the feed may not be safe for livestock consumption. Learn the symptoms of nitrate and prussic acid poisoning and which plants are most likely to pose a risk to livestock. Also learn sampling...

  7. Nitrate contra auxin: nutrient sensing by roots.

    PubMed

    Beeckman, Tom; Friml, Jirí

    2010-06-15

    In a new study published in this issue of Developmental Cell, Krouk et al. reveal a surprising mechanism by which plant root systems adapt their architecture for soil exploitation. The dual transporter NRT1.1 uses both nitrate and the plant hormone auxin as substrates, enabling soil nitrate availability to regulate auxin-driven lateral root development. PMID:20627068

  8. NITRATE LEACHING IN FLORIDA URBAN ENVIRONMENTS

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    ....................................................................................3 Background- Nitrate Behavior in Soil and Florida Groundwater Vulnerability.......4 Urban Ecology and application of fertilizer. Fertilizer nitrogen is a pollutant in Florida's shallow groundwater. Excessive abortions, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Average groundwater background nitrate concentrations are less than 2

  9. Relationships between external nitrate availability, nitrate uptake and expression of nitrate reductase in roots of barley grown in N-limited split-root cultures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisabeth Öhlén; Björn Ingemarsson; Wilbur H. Campbell; Carl-Magnus Larsson

    1995-01-01

    Despite the large number of studies of nitrate metabolism in plants, it remains undetermined to what extent this key plant system is controlled by overall plant N nutrition on the one hand, and by the nitrate ion itself on the other hand. To investigate these questions, Vmax for nitrate uptake (high-affinity range), and nitrate reductase (NR) mRNA and activity, were

  10. Use of nitrates in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Giuseppe, Cocco; Paul, Jerie; Hans-Ulrich, Iselin

    2015-08-01

    Short-acting nitrates are beneficial in acute myocardial ischemia. However, many unresolved questions remain about the use of long-acting nitrates in stable ischemic heart disease. The use of long-acting nitrates is weakened by the development of endothelial dysfunction and tolerance. Also, we currently ignore whether lower doses of transdermal nitroglycerin would be better than those presently used. Multivariate analysis data from large nonrandomized studies suggested that long-acting nitrates increase the incidence of acute coronary syndromes, while data from another multivariate study indicate that they have positive effects. Because of methodological differences and open questions, the two studies cannot be compared. A study in Japanese patients with vasospastic angina has shown that, when compared with calcium antagonists, long-acting nitrates do not improve long-term prognosis and that the risk for cardiac adverse events increases with the combined therapy. We have many unanswered questions. PMID:26027641

  11. Methemoglobinemia: nitrate toxicity in rural America

    SciTech Connect

    Kross, B.C.; Ayebo, A.D.; Fuortes, L.J. (University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City (United States))

    1992-07-01

    Nitrates are frequently found in vegetables and ground water. Nitrate levels in ground water have increased over the past two decades because of the heightened use of nitrogenous fertilizers. Following ingestion, nitrates are converted to nitrites by fecal organisms. Nitrites are absorbed and form methemoglobin, which interferes with the oxygen-carrying capacity of hemoglobin. Infants are particularly susceptible to nitrate poisoning because fetal hemoglobin is more readily oxidized to methemoglobin. In infants, the most common source of nitrate exposure is well water, which is mixed with infant formula. Affected infants may present with asymptomatic cyanosis, which can progress to dyspnea and lethargy or coma. Blood methemoglobin concentrations are elevated. Treatment consists of the administration of oxygen and intravenous and oral methylene blue.24 references.

  12. Om plutoniums giftighed Inden for de seneste mneder har sagen om

    E-print Network

    1 Om plutoniums giftighed Inden for de seneste måneder har sagen om Thule-arbejderne nået sit plutonium-239, der blev spredt på isen ved flystyrtet. Plutonium og kræftsygdomme Plutonium er et stof, man tungt opløselig form. Da plutonium kun udsender alfa-stråling er det - set fra et helsefysisk synspunkt

  13. Extraction of lanthanide(III) nitrates with composite solid extractants based on a polymeric support impregnated with trialkylmethylammonium nitrate or TBP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Pyartman; V. V. Lishchuk; V. A. Keskinov

    2006-01-01

    Extraction of lanthanides(III) and Y(III) from 1–5 M aqueous NaNO3 with composite solid extractants based on a polymeric support impregnated with trialkylmethylammonium nitrate (Aliquat-336)\\u000a or TBP was studied, and the extraction constants were determined. The extraction isotherms were analyzed assuming that lanthanides\\u000a are extracted with the solid extractants in the form of complexes (R4N)2[Ln(NO3)5] and Ln(NO3)3(TBP)3.

  14. Plutonium, Mineralogy and Radiation Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.

    2006-05-01

    During the past fifty years, more than 1,800 metric tonnes of Pu and substantial quantities of other "minor" actinides, such as Np, Am and Cm, have been generated in nuclear reactors. Some of these transuranic elements can be a source of energy in fission reactions (e.g., 239Pu), a source of fissile material for nuclear weapons (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np), or are of environmental concern because of their long half- lives and radiotoxicity (e.g., 239Pu, t1/2 = 24,100 years, and 237Np, t1/2 = 2.1 million years). There are two basic strategies for the disposition of these elements: 1.) to "burn" or transmute the actinides using nuclear reactors or accelerators; 2.) to "sequester" the actinides in chemically durable, radiation-resistant materials that are suitable for geologic disposal. There has been substantial interest in the use of actinide-bearing minerals, such as zircon or isometric pyrochlore, A2B2O7 (A = rare earths; B = Ti, Zr, Sn, Hf; Fd3m; Z=8), for the immobilization of actinides, particularly plutonium. One of the principal concerns has been the accumulation of structural damage caused by alpha-decay events, particularly from the recoil nucleus. Systematic ion beam irradiation studies of rare-earth pyrochlores have led to the discovery that certain compositions (B = Zr, Hf) are stable to very high fluences of alpha-decay event damage. Some compositions, Gd2Ti2O7, are amorphized at relatively low doses (0.2 displacements per atom, dpa, at room temperature), while other compositions, Gd2Zr2O7, do not amorphize (even at doses of > 40 dpa at 25K), but instead disorder to a defect fluorite structure. By changing the composition of the A-site (e.g., substitution of different rare earth elements), the temperature above which the pyrochlore composition can no longer be amorphized, Tc, varies by >600 K (e.g., Lu2Ti2O7: Tc = 480 K; Gd2Ti2O7: Tc = 1120 K). The variation in response to irradiation as a function of composition can be used to model the long-term accumulation of radiation damage as a function of the thermal period of a geologic repository. As an example, with a 10 wt.% loading of 239Pu, Gd2Ti2O7 will become amorphous in less than 1,000 years, while Gd2Zr2O7 will persist as a disordered defect fluorite structure. Thus, the radiation stability of different pyrochlores is closely related to the structural distortions that occur for specific pyrochlore compositions and the electronic structure of the B-site cation. This understanding provides the basis for designing materials for the safe, long-term immobilization and sequestration of actinides.

  15. Toward a Deeper Understanding of Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A J; Wolfer, W G

    2007-06-21

    Plutonium is a very complex element lying near the middle of the actinide series. On the lower atomic number side of Pu is the element neptunium; its 5f electrons are highly delocalized or itinerant, participating in metallic-like bonding. The electrons in americium, the element to the right of Pu, are localized and do not participant significantly in the bonding. Plutonium is located directly on this rather abrupt transition. In the low-temperature {alpha} phase ground state, the five 5f electrons are mostly delocalized leading to a highly dense monoclinic crystal structure. Increases in temperature take the unalloyed plutonium through a series of five solid-state allotropic phase transformations before melting. One of the high temperature phases, the close-packed face centered cubic {delta} phase, is the least dense of all the phases, including the liquid. Alloying the Pu with Group IIIA elements such as aluminum or gallium retains the {delta} phase in a metastable state at ambient conditions. Ultimately, this metastable {delta} phase will decompose via a eutectoid transformation to {alpha} + Pu{sub 3}Ga. These low solute-containing {delta}-phase Pu alloys are also metastable with respect to low temperature excursions or increases in pressure and will transform to a monoclinic crystal structure at low temperatures via an isothermal martensitic phase transformation or at slightly elevated pressure. The delocalized to localized 5f electron bonding transition that occurs in the light actinides surrounding Pu gives rise to a plethora of unique and anomalous properties but also severely complicates the modeling and simulation. The development of theories and models that are sufficiently sensitive to capture the details of this transition and capable of elucidating the fundamental properties of plutonium and plutonium alloys is currently a grand challenge in actinide science. Recent advances in electronic structure theory, semi-empirical interatomic potentials, and raw computing power have enabled remarkable progress in our abilities to model many of the anomalous properties of Pu. This special issue of the Journal of Computer-Aided Materials Design highlights a number of these advances in the area of the aging of plutonium. This aging is a long-term process due to the slow radioactive decay with a long half-life of 24400 years for the major isotope of plutonium. The challenge then is to predict the changes in properties of plutonium and its alloys from experimental results of plutonium aged only for a few decades and from theory and computational models that are build on a thorough, first-principle understanding of all the complex phenomena displayed by this material. We hope that progress and success of this enterprise will guide other endeavors in Computer-Aided Materials Design and prediction of materials performance.

  16. Interim Storage of Plutonium in Existing Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Woodsmall, T.D.

    1999-05-10

    'In this era of nuclear weapons disarmament and nonproliferation treaties, among many problems being faced by the Department of Energy is the safe disposal of plutonium. There is a large stockpile of plutonium at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Center and it remains politically and environmentally strategic to relocate the inventory closer to a processing facility. Savannah River Site has been chosen as the final storage location, and the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF) is currently under construction for this purpose. With the ability of APSF to receive Rocky Flats material an estimated ten years away, DOE has decided to use the existing reactor building in K-Area of SRS as temporary storage to accelerate the removal of plutonium from Rocky Flats. There are enormous cost savings to the government that serve as incentive to start this removal as soon as possible, and the KAMS project is scheduled to receive the first shipment of plutonium in January 2000. The reactor building in K-Area was chosen for its hardened structure and upgraded seismic qualification, both resulting from an effort to restart the reactor in 1991. The KAMS project has faced unique challenges from Authorization Basis and Safety Analysis perspectives. Although modifying a reactor building from a production facility to a storage shelter is not technically difficult, the nature of plutonium has caused design and safety analysis engineers to make certain that the design of systems, structures and components included will protect the public, SRS workers, and the environment. A basic overview of the KAMS project follows. Plutonium will be measured and loaded into DOT Type-B shipping packages at Rocky Flats. The packages are 35-gallon stainless steel drums with multiple internal containment boundaries. DOE transportation vehicles will be used to ship the drums to the KAMS facility at SRS. They will then be unloaded, stacked and stored in specific locations throughout the reactor building. The storage life is projected to be ten years to allow the preparation of APSF. DOE has stipulated that there be no credible release during storage, since there are no design features in place to mitigate a release of plutonium (i.e. HEPA filters, facility containment boundaries, etc.). This mandate has presented most of the significant challenges to the safety analysis team. The shipping packages are designed to withstand certain accidents and conditions, but in order to take credit for these the storage environment must be strictly controlled. Damages to the packages from exposure to fire, dropping, crushing and other impact accidents have been analyzed, and appropriate preventative design features have been incorporated. Other efforts include the extension of the shipping life (roughly two years) to a suitable storage life of ten years. These issues include the effects of internal pressure increases, seal degradation and the presence of impurities. A process known as the Container Qualification Program has been conducted to address these issues. The KAMS project will be ready to receive the first shipment from Rocky Flats in January 2000. No credible design basis scenarios resulting in the release of plutonium exist. This work has been useful in the effort to provide a safer disposition of plutonium, but also the lessons learned and techniques established by the team will help with the analysis of future facility modifications.'

  17. Ultraviolet irradiation effects incorporation of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen into aquatic natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    One of the concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of ultraviolet radiation for treatment of drinking water and wastewater is the fate of nitrate, particularly its photolysis to nitrite. In this study, 15N NMR was used to establish for the first time that UV irradiation effects the incorporation of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen into aquatic natural organic matter (NOM). Irradiation of 15N-labeled nitrate in aqueous solution with an unfiltered medium pressure mercury lamp resulted in the incorporation of nitrogen into Suwannee River NOM (SRNOM) via nitrosation and other reactions over a range of pH from approximately 3.2 to 8.0, both in the presence and absence of bicarbonate, confirming photonitrosation of the NOM. The major forms of the incorporated label include nitrosophenol, oxime/nitro, pyridine, nitrile, and amide nitrogens. Natural organic matter also catalyzed the reduction of nitrate to ammonia on irradiation. The nitrosophenol and oxime/nitro nitrogens were found to be susceptible to photodegradation on further irradiation when nitrate was removed from the system. At pH 7.5, unfiltered irradiation resulted in the incorporation of 15N-labeled nitrite into SRNOM in the form of amide, nitrile, and pyridine nitrogen. In the presence of bicarbonate at pH 7.4, Pyrex filtered (cutoff below 290–300 nm) irradiation also effected incorporation of nitrite into SRNOM as amide nitrogen. We speculate that nitrosation of NOM from the UV irradiation of nitrate also leads to production of nitrogen gas and nitrous oxide, a process that may be termed photo-chemodenitrification. Irradiation of SRNOM alone resulted in transformation or loss of naturally abundant heterocyclic nitrogens.

  18. Reflectance of aqueous solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querry, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    The optical properties and optical constants of water and aqueous solutions were studied to develop an accurate tabulation of graphical representations of the optical constants through a broad spectrum. Manuscripts of articles are presented concerning extinction coefficients, relative specular reflectance, and temperature effect on the water spectrum. Graphs of absolute reflectance, phase shifts, index of refraction, and extinction coefficients for water, heavy water and aqueous solutions are included.

  19. 10 CFR 140.13a - Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants...Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants...70 of this chapter to possess and use plutonium at a plutonium processing and...

  20. 10 CFR 140.13a - Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants...Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants...70 of this chapter to possess and use plutonium at a plutonium processing and...

  1. 10 CFR 140.13a - Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants...Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants...70 of this chapter to possess and use plutonium at a plutonium processing and...

  2. 10 CFR 140.13a - Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants...Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants...70 of this chapter to possess and use plutonium at a plutonium processing and...

  3. 10 CFR 140.13a - Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants...Amount of financial protection required for plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants...70 of this chapter to possess and use plutonium at a plutonium processing and...

  4. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Ehsan; Fausey, Norman R; Brown, Larry C

    2015-03-15

    Denitrification beds are promoted to reduce nitrate load in agricultural subsurface drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution of surface water. In this system, drainage water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transformed into nitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to model a denitrification bed treating drainage water and evaluate its adverse greenhouse gas emissions. Field experiments were conducted at an existing denitrification bed. Evaluations showed very low greenhouse gas emissions (mean N2O emission of 0.12 ?g N m(-2) min(-1)) from the denitrification bed surface. Field experiments indicated that nitrate removal rate was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with the Michaelis-Menten constant of 7.2 mg N L(-1). We developed a novel denitrification bed model based on the governing equations for water flow and nitrate removal kinetics. The model evaluation statistics showed satisfactory prediction of bed outflow nitrate concentration during subsurface drainage flow. The model can be used to design denitrification beds with efficient nitrate removal which in turn leads to enhanced drainage water quality. PMID:25638338

  5. Process modeling of plutonium conversion and MOX fabrication for plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, K.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1998-10-01

    Two processes are currently under consideration for the disposition of 35 MT of surplus plutonium through its conversion into fuel for power production. These processes are the ARIES process, by which plutonium metal is converted into a powdered oxide form, and MOX fuel fabrication, where the oxide powder is combined with uranium oxide powder to form ceramic fuel. This study was undertaken to determine the optimal size for both facilities, whereby the 35 MT of plutonium metal will be converted into fuel and burned for power. The bounding conditions used were a plutonium concentration of 3--7%, a burnup of 20,000--40,000 MWd/MTHM, a core fraction of 0.1 to 0.4, and the number of reactors ranging from 2--6. Using these boundary conditions, the optimal cost was found with a plutonium concentration of 7%. This resulted in an optimal throughput ranging from 2,000 to 5,000 kg Pu/year. The data showed minimal costs, resulting from throughputs in this range, at 3,840, 2,779, and 3,497 kg Pu/year, which results in a facility lifetime of 9.1, 12.6, and 10.0 years, respectively.

  6. Determination of nitrate in atmospheric particulate matter by thermal decomposition and chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, C.W.; Joseph, D.W.; Schumacher, P.M.

    1985-10-01

    A thermal decomposition/chemiluminescence method is presented for determining nitrate in atmospheric particular matter. Nitrate in the sample is thermally decomposed to NO/sub x/, which is then determined with a commercial chemiluminescence NO/sub x/ monitor. The nitrate in a filter sample can be determined directly by heating a segment of the filter in a furnace or after extraction of the filter by flash heating the aqueous extract in a sample loop. In either case, the sample is decomposed in a nitrogen atmosphere to avoid interference from ammonium. The NO/sub x/ peak from nitrate decomposition can be quantified by integrating the chemiluminescence signal or by integrating the gas sample in a Tedlar bag prior to the chemiluminescence measurement. The technique is straightforward, fast, and sensitive, and interferences in atmospheric samples are negligible. A comparison of the thermal decomposition/chemiluminescence method with ion chromatography using filter samples collected in ambient air showed good agreement over a wide range of concentrations. 26 references.

  7. Phase equilibria and critical phenomena in the cesium nitrate-water-diethylamine ternary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'in, K. K.; Kurskii, V. F.; Cherkasov, D. G.

    2008-12-01

    Phase equilibria and critical phenomena in the cesium nitrate-water-diethylamine ternary system were studied by the visual-polythermal method over the temperature range 60-150 °C, where the boundary binary liquid system was characterized by stratification with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST). The introduction of cesium nitrate into the water-diethylamine system decreased the LCST of this system from 146.1 to 69.3°C and lowered the mutual solubility of the components. The diethylamine distribution coefficients between the aqueous and organic phases were calculated for monotectic equilibria at various temperatures. The salting out of diethylamine with cesium nitrate grew stronger as the temperature increased. The conclusion was drawn that the isotherms of the phase states of the system substantiated the generalized scheme of topological transformations of phase diagrams for salt-binary solvent ternary systems with salting out. The salting out effects of cesium and potassium nitrates on the water-diethylamine binary system were compared.

  8. The plutonium problem: the Royal Society sits on the fence.

    PubMed

    Barnaby, F

    1998-01-01

    A recent Royal Society report, Management of Separated Plutonium, considers the production and disposal of plutonium from the spent fuel from civil and nuclear power reactors. It accepts the need for dealing with plutonium stocks because of the toxicity of the element and as it can be used to fabricate nuclear weapons, and expresses concern that it might be illicitly acquired by terrorists. It recommends an independent Government commission on the management of plutonium, and considers the various options for this. However, it does not analyse the arguments against plutonium as a reactor fuel, and underestimates the risks of diversion to nuclear weapons and nuclear terrorism. This paper reviews the options, and concludes that separated plutonium should be added to high-level waste, vitrified, and eventually buried in a deep geological repository. PMID:9772826

  9. Plutonium disposition via immobilization in ceramic or glass

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Shaw, H.F.; Armantrout, A.

    1997-03-05

    The management of surplus weapons plutonium is an important and urgent task with profound environmental, national, and international security implications. In the aftermath of the Cold War, Presidential Policy Directive 13, and various analyses by renown scientific, technical, and international policy organizations have brought about a focused effort within the Department of Energy to identify and implement paths for the long term disposition of surplus weapons- usable plutonium. The central goal of this effort is to render surplus weapons plutonium as inaccessible and unattractive for reuse in nuclear weapons as the much larger and growing stock of plutonium contained in spent fuel from civilian reactors. One disposition option being considered for surplus plutonium is immobilization, in which the plutonium would be incorporated into a glass or ceramic material that would ultimately be entombed permanently in a geologic repository for high-level waste.

  10. A Versatile two-step process for immobilizing excess plutonium.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Holleran, T. P.

    1998-05-18

    As a consequence of weapon stockpile reduction and the associated shutdown of weapons production facilities, approximately 50 metric tons of plutonium (both weapons-grade and non-weapons-grade) has been declared excess by the US. Recent experiments demonstrated the feasibility of using high-level waste stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to immobilize plutonium. The most effective plutonium host phase identified in these experiments was a plutonium zirconate solid solution. Results of recent experiments are reported that show the feasibility of using the highly durable plutonium zirconate host phase as a feed material for high and low temperature encapsulation processes, thereby increasing the potential applications of this material for plutonium dispositioning.

  11. Microbial Uranium Immobilization Independent of Nitrate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Andrew [ORNL; Smith, April [Florida State University; Balkwill, Dr. David [Florida State University; Fagan, Lisa Anne [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in-situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low pH environments at this study site and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This project investigates the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Successful enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 4.9-5.6 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Higher pH enrichments also demonstrated similar U reduction capacity with 5-30% nitrate loss within one week. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.7) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and T-RFLP profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate.

  12. 10 CFR 71.23 - General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material...Licenses § 71.23 General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material...transport fissile material in the form of plutonium-beryllium (Pu-Be)...

  13. 10 CFR 71.23 - General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material...Licenses § 71.23 General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material...transport fissile material in the form of plutonium-beryllium (Pu-Be)...

  14. 10 CFR 71.64 - Special requirements for plutonium air shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Special requirements for plutonium air shipments. 71.64 Section 71... § 71.64 Special requirements for plutonium air shipments. (a) A package for the shipment of plutonium by air subject to §...

  15. 10 CFR 71.23 - General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material...Licenses § 71.23 General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material...transport fissile material in the form of plutonium-beryllium (Pu-Be)...

  16. 10 CFR 71.64 - Special requirements for plutonium air shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Special requirements for plutonium air shipments. 71.64 Section 71... § 71.64 Special requirements for plutonium air shipments. (a) A package for the shipment of plutonium by air subject to §...

  17. 10 CFR 71.64 - Special requirements for plutonium air shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Special requirements for plutonium air shipments. 71.64 Section 71... § 71.64 Special requirements for plutonium air shipments. (a) A package for the shipment of plutonium by air subject to §...

  18. 10 CFR 71.23 - General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material...Licenses § 71.23 General license: Plutonium-beryllium special form material...transport fissile material in the form of plutonium-beryllium (Pu-Be)...

  19. 10 CFR 71.64 - Special requirements for plutonium air shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Special requirements for plutonium air shipments. 71.64 Section 71... § 71.64 Special requirements for plutonium air shipments. (a) A package for the shipment of plutonium by air subject to §...

  20. 10 CFR 71.64 - Special requirements for plutonium air shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Special requirements for plutonium air shipments. 71.64 Section 71... § 71.64 Special requirements for plutonium air shipments. (a) A package for the shipment of plutonium by air subject to §...

  1. Los Alamos Plutonium Facility Waste Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Montoya, A.; Wieneke, R.; Wulff, D.; Smith, C.; Gruetzmacher, K.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the new computer-based transuranic (TRU) Waste Management System (WMS) being implemented at the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Waste Management System is a distributed computer processing system stored in a Sybase database and accessed by a graphical user interface (GUI) written in Omnis7. It resides on the local area network at the Plutonium Facility and is accessible by authorized TRU waste originators, count room personnel, radiation protection technicians (RPTs), quality assurance personnel, and waste management personnel for data input and verification. Future goals include bringing outside groups like the LANL Waste Management Facility on-line to participate in this streamlined system. The WMS is changing the TRU paper trail into a computer trail, saving time and eliminating errors and inconsistencies in the process.

  2. Plutonium Elastic Moduli, Electron Localization, and Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Mihut-Stroe, Izabella; Betts, Jon B. [National High Magnetic Field Lab, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS E 536, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    In almost all materials, compression is accompanied naturally by stiffening. Even in materials with zero or negative thermal expansion, where warming is accompanied by volume contraction it is the volume change that primarily controls elastic stiffness. Not so in the metal plutonium. In plutonium, alloying with gallium can change the sign of thermal expansion, but for the positive thermal- expansion monoclinic phase as well as the face-centered-cubic phase with either sign of thermal expansion, and the orthorhombic phase, recent measurements of elastic moduli show soften on warming by an order of magnitude more than expected, the shear and compressional moduli track, and volume seems irrelevant. These effects point toward a novel mechanism for electron localization, and have important implication for the pressure dependence of the bulk compressibility. (authors)

  3. 14. END VIEW OF THE PLUTONIUM STORAGE VAULT FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. END VIEW OF THE PLUTONIUM STORAGE VAULT FROM THE REMOTE CONTROL STATION. THE STACKER-RETRIEVER, A REMOTELY-OPERATED, MECHANIZED TRANSPORT SYSTEM, RETRIEVES CONTAINERS OF PLUTONIUM FROM SAFE GEOMETRY PALLETS STORED ALONG THE LENGTH OF THE VAULT. THE STACKER-RETRIEVER RUNS ALONG THE AISLE BETWEEN THE PALLETS OF THE STORAGE CHAMBER. (3/2/86) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery Facility, Northwest portion of Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  4. Plutonium speciation in water from Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cleveland, J.M.; Rees, T.F.; Nash, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    The solubility of plutonium in Mono Lake water is enhanced by the presence of large concentrations of indigenous carbonate ions and moderate concentrations of fluoride ions. In spite of the complex chemical composition of this water, only a few ions govern the behavior of plutonium, as demonstrated by the fact that it was possible to duplicate plutonium speciation in a synthetic water containing only the principal components of Mono Lake water.

  5. Plutonium Immobilization Program cold pour tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hovis, G.L.; Stokes, M.W.; Smith, M.E.; Wong, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to carry out the disposition of excess weapons-grade plutonium. This program uses the can-in-canister (CIC) approach. CIC involves encapsulating plutonium in ceramic forms (or pucks), placing the pucks in sealed stainless steel cans, placing the cans in long cylindrical magazines, latching the magazines to racks inside Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and filling the DWPF canisters with high-level waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it attractive for reuse. At present, the DWPF pours glass into empty canisters. In the CIC approach, the addition of a stainless steel rack, magazines, cans, and ceramic pucks to the canisters introduces a new set of design and operational challenges: All of the hardware installed in the canisters must maintain structural integrity at elevated (molten-glass) temperatures. This suggests that a robust design is needed. However, the amount of material added to the DWPF canister must be minimized to prevent premature glass cooling and excessive voiding caused by a large internal thermal mass. High metal temperatures, minimizing thermal mass, and glass flow paths are examples of the types of technical considerations of the equipment design process. To determine the effectiveness of the design in terms of structural integrity and glass-flow characteristics, full-scale testing will be conducted. A cold (nonradioactive) pour test program is planned to assist in the development and verification of a baseline design for the immobilization canister to be used in the PIP process. The baseline design resulting from the cold pour test program and CIC equipment development program will provide input to Title 1 design for second-stage immobilization. The cold pour tests will be conducted in two major phases during fiscal years 1999 and 2000.

  6. Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility Documented Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    DODD, E.N.

    2003-10-08

    This document provides the documented safety analysis (DSA) and Central Plateau Remediation Project (CP) requirements that apply to surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility. This DSA was developed in accordance with DOE-STD-1120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities''. Upon approval and implementation of this document, the current safety basis documents will be retired.

  7. Low-temperature synthesis of plutonium hexafluoride

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. Malm; P. G. Eller; L. B. Asprey

    1984-01-01

    The preparation of PuFâ by the action of dioxygen difluoride (OâFâ) on plutonium fluorides, oxides, and oxyfluorides at room temperature or below is described. Previously, direct synthesis of PuFâ could only be achieved by high temperature (>300°C) fluorination and by microwave or photolytic generation of fluorine atoms. Six experiments are described that illustrate the potency of OâFâ which is the

  8. Development of plutonium aerosol fractionation system 

    E-print Network

    Mekala, Malla R.

    1993-01-01

    - Emitting Aerosol Particles. Health Physics: 400-406 (1992). 8. Chan, T. and M. Lippmann: Particle Collection Efficiencies of Air Sampling Cyclones: An Empirical Theory. Environ. Sci. ck Technol. 11:377-382 (1977). 9. John, W. and G. Reiscbl: A Cyclone.... McFarland A fractionation system has been developed to determine the aerodynamic size distribution of ambient plutonium aerosol. This system consists of an inlet section, and a flow splitter to separate the inlet air stream into four separate...

  9. Surplus Plutonium Disposition (SPD) Environmental Data Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Fledderman, P.D.

    2000-08-24

    This document provides an overview of existing environmental and ecological information at areas identified as potential locations of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Surplus Plutonium Disposition (SPD) facilities. This information is required to document existing environmental and baseline conditions from which SPD construction and operation impacts can be defined. It will be used in developing the required preoperational monitoring plan to be used at specific SPD facilities construction sites.

  10. Nuclear weapons and power-reactor plutonium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amory B. Lovins

    1980-01-01

    1-10 that for making nuclear bombs, 'reactor-grade' plutonium produced by the normal operation of uranium-fuelled power reactors is necessarily much inferior to specially made 'weapons-grade' Pu: so infe- rior in explosive power or predictability that its potential use by amateurs is not a serious problem and that governments would instead make the higher-performance weapons-grade Pu in special production reactors. Although

  11. Dose estimates of alternative plutonium pyrochemical processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Kornreich, D. E. (Drew E.); Jackson, J. W. (Joseph W.); Boerigter, S. T. (Stephen T.); Averill, W. A. (William A.); Fasel, J. H. (Joseph H.)

    2002-01-01

    We have coupled our dose calculation tool Pandemonium with a discrete-event, object-oriented, process-modeling system ProMosO to analyze a set of alternatives for plutonium purification operations. The results follow expected trends and indicate, from a dose perspective, that an experimental flowsheet may warrant further research to see if it can be scaled to industrial levels. Flowsheets that include fluoride processes resulted in the largest doses.

  12. Dresden 1 plutonium recycle program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bresnick, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    This is the final report on the Dresden 1 Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program. It covers the work performed from July 1, 1978 to completion, which includes in-pool inspection of two fuel assemblies, removal of two fuel rods, and post-irradiation examination (PIE) of six fuel rods. Appendix A describes the inspection and rod removal operations, and Appendix B describes the PIE work.

  13. Redox speciation of plutonium in natural waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Choppin

    1991-01-01

    Data on the stability of Pu(V) as the dominant oxidation state of tracer concentrations of plutonium in natural waters is reviewed. Laboratory experiments for solutions of 0.1 and 1.0M (NaCl) ionic strength and pH 3–10 confirm the dominance of Pu(V) as the state in solution. Humics in the waters can cause reduction to Pu(IV).

  14. Extraction of trivalent rare-earth metal nitrates by solutions of tributyl phosphate and diisooctylmethylphosphonate in kerosene

    SciTech Connect

    Pyartman, A.K.; Puzikov, E.A.; Kopyrin, A.A. [and others

    1995-01-01

    Isotherms of extraction of trivalent rare-earth metal nitrates in the series lanthanum-lutetium, yttrium by 0.5-2.5 M solutions of tri-n-buty1 phosphate and diisooctyl methylphosphonate in kerosene at 298.15 K, pH 2 are presented. The influence of the ionic strength of aqueous phase and extractant concentration on the concentration extraction constants in the case of formation of metal(III) trisolvates in organic phase is given by equation.

  15. Catalytic reduction of nitrates and nitrites in water solution on pumice-supported Pd–Cu catalysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F Deganello; L. F Liotta; A Macaluso; A. M Venezia; G Deganello

    2000-01-01

    Two series of pumice-supported palladium and palladium–copper catalysts, prepared by impregnation with different palladium and copper precursors, were tested for the hydrogenation of aqueous nitrate and nitrite solutions. Measurements were performed in a stirred tank reactor, operating in batch conditions, in buffered water solution at atmospheric pressure and at 293K. The activities of the catalysts were calculated in terms of

  16. EQUILIBRIUM CALCULATION IN THE SYSTEM: URANYL NITRATE, NITRIC ACID, WATER, TBP, AND KEROSENE DILUENT USING THE ORACLE DIGITAL COMPUTER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. H. Jury; M. E. Whatley

    1959-01-01

    A set of equations was written which allowed the calculation of ;\\u000a equilibrium concentrations in the solvent phase of nitric acid and uranyl ;\\u000a nitrate, given the initial TBP concentration in the solvent and the aqueous phase ;\\u000a concentrations of acid and uranium. An ORACLE subroutine was written based on ;\\u000a these equations which will calculate a set of equilibrium

  17. Nitrate dry deposition measurements with surrogate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiang

    Nitrate dry deposition is one of the most important topics in the study of the dry deposition of acidic and acidifying substances. This study measured nitrate dry deposition to (1) a water surface sampler (WSS) which was recently developed in the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology, (2) a Nylasorb filter on a knife-edge surrogate surface and (3) a greased strip on a knife-edge surrogate surface. Airborne nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HNO2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations were also measured concurrently with the flux measurements. These measurements were then used to evaluate the utility of using surrogate surfaces, and in particular the WSS, to measure nitrate dry deposition. The nitrogen containing species that may be responsible for nitrate dry deposition to the WSS include nitrogen monoxide (NO), NO2, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4+), HNO2,/ HNO3, and particulate nitrate. Theoretical calculations and experiments showed that HNO3 and particulate nitrate appear to be the major nitrate contributors to the water surface sampler. Nitrate dry deposition to the water surface, Nylasorb filter and the greased strip were measured during the daytime in June and July 1995 and during both the day and night time in September and October 1995. The results showed that during the daytime in June and July the average nitrate dry deposition to the WSS (36.28 mg/m2-day) was much higher than that to the Nylasorb filter (14.04 mg/m2-day). However, during September and October there is no statistically significant difference in nitrate deposition flux between the WSS (average 4.59 mg/m2-day for the nighttime and 10.58 mg/m2-day for the daytime) and the Nylasorb filter (average 4.53 mg/m2-day for the nighttime and 8.87 mg/m2-day). A set of three experiments showed that particulate nitrate fluxes measured with the greased strip were underestimated due to the loss of volatile particulate nitrate. These experiments included a comparison of nitrate fluxes from greased strip samples extracted immediately after sampling and extracted later, a heating experiment with the greased strip samples, and a comparison between short-term and long-term greased strip samples. After precautions were taken to prevent particulate nitrate loss during sampling, a new set of samples was taken in November of 1996. The results showed that there is no statistically significant difference between the mass transfer coefficient of HNO3 (average 1.68 cm/sec) and that of sulfur dioxide (SO2) (average 1.41 cm/sec) as expected from theory. The mass transfer coefficient of HNO3 was obtained by dividing HNO3 flux (obtained by subtracting the particulate nitrate flux measured with greased strip from total nitrate flux measured with the WSS) by HNO3 concentration.

  18. Uranyl nitrate complex extraction into TBP/dodecane organic solutions: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xianggui; Cui, Shengting; de Almeida, Valmor F; Hay, Benjamin P; Khomami, Bamin

    2010-12-21

    Liquid-liquid extraction of uranyl is studied by conducting atomistic molecular dynamics simulation using quantum chemistry calibrated force fields via restrained electrostatic potential fitting of atomic forces. The simulations depict the migration of uranyl nitrate complexes from the aqueous-organic interface into the tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/dodecane organic phase, in the form of UO(2)(NO(3))(2)·H(2)O·2TBP and UO(2)(NO(3))(2)·3TBP. The migration process is characterized by the gradual breaking of all the hydrogen bonds between the complex and the water molecules at the interface. Moreover, our simulation results suggest that the experimentally observed complex UO(2)(NO(3))(2)·2TBP is formed after the migration of the aforementioned complexes into the organic phase by means of a reorganization of the nitrate binding mode from mono to bidentate which removes the excess oxygen atoms bound to uranyl. PMID:20967313

  19. Comparative ease of separation of mixtures of selected nuisance anions (nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, phosphate) using Octolig.

    PubMed

    Stull, Frederick W; Martin, Dean F

    2009-12-01

    Mixtures of sodium salts of nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and phosphate were prepared in relative amounts present in atomic waste containers with a view to effect removal by chromatography over Octolig, commercially available material with polyethylenediamine moieties covalently attached to high-surface area silica gel. Separation was attempted using aqueous solutions and column chromatography with Octolig. It is presumed that this material is capable of removing the anions by means of encapsulation. Matrix effects were tested by varying the relative concentrations. Rates of elution were varied 5-fold without adverse effect. The order of selectivity was found to be phosphate > sulfate > nitrite > nitrate through experiments altering the volume and relative concentrations. Quantitative removal of all anions (375 ppm of each) could be achieved given reasonable volumes of Octolig. An effort at regeneration by altering the pH of the eluant indicated the stability of the encapsulated anions. PMID:20183512

  20. Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Robotic canister loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, R.L.

    2000-01-04

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site (SRS), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). When operational in 2008, the PIP will fulfill the nation's nonproliferation commitment by placing surplus weapons-grade plutonium in a permanently stable ceramic form and making it unattractive for reuse. Since there are significant radiation and security concerns, the program team is developing novel and unique technology to remotely perform plutonium immobilization tasks. The remote task covered in this paper employs a jointed arm robot to load seven 3.5 inch diameter, 135-pound cylinders (magazines) through the 4 inch diameter neck of a stainless steel canister. Working through the narrow canister neck, the robot secures the magazines into a specially designed rack pre-installed in the canister. To provide the deterrent effect, the canisters are filled with a mixture of high-level waste and glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF).

  1. Characterizing surplus US plutonium for disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Allender, Jeffrey S.; Moore, Edwin N.

    2013-02-26

    The United States (US) has identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) operates a Feed Characterization program for the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM). SRNL manages a broad program of item tracking through process history, laboratory analysis, and non-destructive assay. A combination of analytical techniques allows SRNL to predict the isotopic and chemical properties that qualify materials for disposition through the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The research also defines properties that are important for other disposition paths, including disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as transuranic waste (TRUW) or to high-level waste (HLW) systems.

  2. A Plutonium-Contaminated Wound, 1985, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Doran M. Christensen, DO, REAC /TS Associate Director and Staff Physician Eugene H. Carbaugh, CHP, Staff Scientist, Internal Dosimetry Manager, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

    2012-02-02

    A hand injury occurred at a U.S. facility in 1985 involving a pointed shaft (similar to a meat thermometer) that a worker was using to remove scrap solid plutonium from a plastic bottle. The worker punctured his right index finger on the palm side at the metacarpal-phalangeal joint. The wound was not through-and- through, although it was deep. The puncture wound resulted in deposition of ~48 kBq of alpha activity from the weapons-grade plutonium mixture with a nominal 12 to 1 Pu-alpha to {sup 241}Am-alpha ratio. This case clearly showed that DTPA was very effective for decorporation of plutonium and americium. The case is a model for management of wounds contaminated with transuranics: (1) a team approach for dealing with all of the issues surrounding the incident, including the psychological, (2) early surgical intervention for foreign-body removal, (3) wound irrigation with DTPA solution, and (4) early and prolonged DTPA administration based upon bioassay and in vivo dosimetry.

  3. PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-07

    Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

  4. Electrophilic and free radical nitration of benzene and toluene with various nitrating agents*

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Lin, Henry C.; Olah, Judith A.; Narang, Subhash C.

    1978-01-01

    Electrophilic nitration of toluene and benzene was studied under various conditions with several nitrating systems. It was found that high orthopara regioselectivity is prevalent in all reactions and is independent of the reactivity of the nitrating agent. The methyl group of toluene is predominantly ortho-para directing under all reaction conditions. Steric factors are considered to be important but not the sole reason for the variation in the ortho/para ratio. The results reinforce our earlier views that, in electrophilic aromatic nitrations with reactive nitrating agents, substrate and positional selectivities are determined in two separate steps. The first step involves a ?-aromatic-NO2+ ion complex or encounter pair, whereas the subsequent step is of arenium ion nature (separate for the ortho, meta, and para positions). The former determines substrate selectivity, whereas the latter determines regioselectivity. Thermal free radical nitration of benzene and toluene with tetranitromethane in sharp contrast gave nearly statistical product distributions. PMID:16592503

  5. Process for recovering useable products from by-product ammonium nitrate formed in the manufacture of nuclear reactor fuels or breeder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Morschl, P.; Zimmer, E.

    1980-02-05

    Radiation-contaminated ammonium nitrate is heated in solution to about 100/sup 0/C in the presence of finely powdered calcium oxide or lithium hydroxide. Ammonia and water vapor are given off leaving an alkaline or alkaline earth nitrate which can then be safely decomposed by calcination into a metal oxide and oxides of nitrogen. The metal oxide can be recycled in a continuation of the process. The oxides of nitrogen can be passed through water to produce nitric acid useable in dissolving oxides of fissionable materials and the ammonia may be used in aqueous solution to react with nitrates of nuclear fuel or breeder metals in the very process that produces the by-product ammonium nitrate. Thus, all by-products and reagents can be reconverted and recycled.

  6. Design of the improved plutonium canister assay system (IPCAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Abhold, M. E. (Mark E.); Baker, M. C. (Michael C.); Bourret, S. C.; Polk, P. J. (Paul J.); Vo, Duc T.

    2001-01-01

    The improved Plutonium Canister Assay System (iPCAS) is designed to detect gross and partial defects in the declared plutonium content of plutonium and MOX storage canisters during transfer to storage and process areas of the MOX fuel fabrication facility in Kokkasho, Japan. In addition, an associated Gamma Isotopics System (GIS) will be used to confirm facility-declared plutonium isotopics with accuracy sufficient to reduce the amount of destructive isotopic analysis needed. The design of the iPCAS instrument and its associated GIS is described and the expected performance of the instrument is discussed.

  7. Plutonium immobilization program - Cold pour Phase 1 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-04-28

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. It uses the can-in-canister approach that involves placing plutonium-ceramic pucks in sealed cans that are then placed into Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters. These canisters are subsequently filled with high-level radioactive waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it unattractive for reuse. A cold (non-radioactive) glass pour program was performed to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping test results.

  8. Plutonium Immobilization Program -- Cold pour Phase 1 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-01-18

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. It uses the can-in-canister approach that involves placing plutonium-ceramic pucks in sealed cans that are then placed into Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters. These canisters are subsequently filled with high-level radioactive waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it unattractive for reuse. A cold (non-radioactive) glass pour program was performed to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping test results.

  9. Geomorphology of plutonium in the Northern Rio Grande

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, W.L. [Arizona Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept., of Geography

    1993-03-01

    Nearly all of the plutonium in the natural environment of the Northern Rio Grande is associated with soils and sediment, and river processes account for most of the mobility of these materials. A composite regional budget for plutonium based on multi-decadal averages for sediment and plutonium movement shows that 90 percent of the plutonium moving into the system is from atmospheric fallout. The remaining 10 percent is from releases at Los Alamos. Annual variation in plutonium flux and storage exceeds 100 percent. The contribution to the plutonium budget from Los Alamos is associated with relatively coarse sediment which often behaves as bedload in the Rio Grande. Infusion of these materials into the main stream were largest in 1951, 1952, 1957, and 1968. Because of the schedule of delivery of plutonium to Los Alamos for experimentation and weapons manufacturing, the latter two years are probably the most important. Although the Los Alamos contribution to the entire plutonium budget was relatively small, in these four critical years it constituted 71--86 percent of the plutonium in bedload immediately downstream from Otowi.

  10. The effect of aqueous solution in Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Yuan, Xiaojuan; Dong, Xiao; Gu, Huaimin

    2009-08-01

    In Raman detection, the most popular solution for the samples is tri-distilled water. But the effect of aqueous solution is barely studied in Raman spectroscopy. In fact Raman spectroscopy of solid-state and liquid-state are obvious different. In addition, FWHM of Raman spectral peaks also change evidently. In this paper, several samples were selected for the experiment; including sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, glucose and caffeine. By comparing the Raman spectroscopy of samples at different concentrations, it is found that the concentration of the sample can affect the strength of Raman spectroscopy, but it can hardly impact FWHM of Raman spectral peaks. By comparing the Raman spectroscopy of liquid-state with the Raman spectroscopy of solid-state, it is observed that the FWHM of some Raman spectral peaks varied obviously; that may be because when the sample was dissolved into the water, the crystal lattice structure was broken, and for some samples atom form became ion form in aqueous solution. Those structural variations caused the variation of the FWHM. The Raman spectroscopy of caffeine aqueous solution at very low concentration was also detected and analyzed. Compared with the Raman spectra of solid-state samples, it is found that some Raman spectral peaks disappeared when the sample was dissolved in water. It is possible that the low concentration of the sample result in the weakening of Raman signals and the disappearing of some weak Raman spectral peaks. Then Ag nanoparticles were added into the caffeine aqueous solution, the results suggest that surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) not only can enhance the Raman spectral signal, but also can reduce the effect of aqueous solution. It is concluded that the concentration of sample only affects the strength of Raman spectroscopy; the aqueous solution can affect the FWHM of Raman spectral peaks; and SERS can reduce the effect of aqueous solution.

  11. Original Articles Cytometric Quantification of Nitrate Reductase by

    E-print Network

    Jochem, Frank J.

    Original Articles Cytometric Quantification of Nitrate Reductase by Immunolabeling in the Marine November 1999; Accepted 24 November 1999 Background: The uptake of nitrate by phytoplankton is a central of biogenic carbon. Nitrate reductase catalyzes the first step of nitrate assimilation, the reduction of NO3

  12. The distribution of nitrate 15 N in marine sediments

    E-print Network

    Sigman, Daniel M.

    The distribution of nitrate 15 N/14 N in marine sediments and the impact of benthic nitrogen loss on the isotopic composition of oceanic nitrate Moritz F. Lehmann a,*, Daniel M. Sigman b , Daniel C. McCorkle c 15 N/14 N ratios of porewater nitrate in sediments from the Bering Sea basin, where microbial nitrate

  13. Hydrothermal oxidation of organic wastes using reclaimed ammonium nitrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. I. Proesmans; L. Luan; S. J. Buelow

    1996-01-01

    Ammonium nitrate is being studied as an alternative for ammonium perchlorate as an oxidizing agent in Department of Defense 1.1 and 1.3 rocket propellants. Use of ammonium nitrate would eliminate the HCl produced by ammonium perchlorate upon thermal decomposition. To stabilize the ammonium nitrate, which suffers from phase instability, potassium dinitramide (KDN) is added. This increased use of ammonium nitrate

  14. Review Nitrate in vegetables: toxicity, content, intake and EC regulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pietro Santamaria

    Nitrate content is an important quality characteristic of vegetables. Vegetable nitrate content is of interest to governments and regulators owing to the possible implications for health and to check that controls on the content are effective. Nitrate itself is relatively non-toxic but its metabolites may produce a number of health effects. Until recently nitrate was perceived as a purely harmful

  15. Nitrate stimulation of indigenous nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidising bacterial community in wastewater anaerobic biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juan Garcia-de-Lomas; Alfonso Corzo; M. Carmen Portillo; Juan M. Gonzalez; Jose A. Andrades; Cesáreo Saiz-Jimenez; Emilio Garcia-Robledo

    2007-01-01

    The role of the nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidising bacteria (NR-SOB) in the nitrate-mediated inhibition of sulfide net production by anaerobic wastewater biofilms was analyzed in two experimental bioreactors, continuously fed with the primary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant, one used as control (BRC) and the other one supplemented with nitrate (BRN). This study integrated information from H2S and pH microelectrodes, RNA-based

  16. STUDIES OF JOINT SOLUBILITY OF URANYL NITRATE AND NITRATES OF ALKALI EARTH METALS IN WATER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Yakimov; N. F. Nosova; V. A. Grishin

    1958-01-01

    Isothermic solubility was studied in ternary systems Hâ O, 25, and ; 50 d . The eutectoid point for this system was not found. Three ; solubiliiy curves corresponding to the solubility of tetrahydrate of strontium ; nitrate, anhydrous strontium nitrate, and hexahydrate of uranyl nitrate ; (transition points at 37.33% UOâ(NOâ)â, 13.18% Sr(NOâ)\\/; sub 2\\/, and 5 UOâ(NOâ)â, 4.78%

  17. Phase stabilization of ammonium nitrate with binary additives consisting of potassium nitrate and complexone salts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. F. Klyakin; V. A. Taranushich

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the search for and optimization of a method for preparing phase-stabilized ammonium nitrate as oxidant\\u000a for solid propellants with environmentally friendly combustion products. The effect exerted on the energy of the V ? IV and\\u000a IV ? III polymorphous transitions of ammonium nitrate by the total content of the binary additive potassium nitrate-disodium\\u000a tetrahydrogen nitrilotris-(methylenephosphonate), component

  18. Nitrate isotope fractionations during biological nitrate reduction: Insights from first principles theoretical modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Guo; J. Granger; D. M. Sigman

    2010-01-01

    Coupled fractionations of N and O isotopes during biological nitrate reduction provide important constraints on the marine nitrogen cycle at present and in the geologic past. Recent laboratory experiments with mono-cultures of nitrate-assimilative algae and plankton, and denitrifying bacteria demonstrate that N and O isotopic compositions of the residual nitrate co-vary linearly with a constant ratio (i.e., Deltadelta18O: Deltadelta15N) of

  19. Supplementary data for "Relativistic density functional theory modeling of plutonium and

    E-print Network

    Titov, Anatoly

    Supplementary data for "Relativistic density functional theory modeling of plutonium and americium equilibrium geometries of plutonium and americium oxide molecules (standard .xyz files separated by empty

  20. Fine PMN powders prepared from nitrate solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Yoshikawa

    1994-01-01

    A partial coprecipitation method was developed in order to synthesize lead magnesium niobate Pb(Mg1\\/3Nb(2\\/3))O3 (PMN) powders from nitrate solutions. To obtain a niobium precursor compatible with the chemical routes, peroxo-niobium complex solutions were prepared by dissolving hydrated niobia precipitates in a dilute nitric acid solution with hydrogen peroxide. Fine PMN powders were prepared from these nitrate solutions by two-stage hydrolysis.