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Sample records for aquic regimes

  1. [K fertility and K deficit index of aquic brown soil under different fertilization systems].

    PubMed

    Yu, Wan-Tai; Jiang, Zi-Shao; Shen, Shan-Min; Zhang, Lu

    2007-10-01

    A 15-year fertilization experiment was conducted on an aquic brown soil to study the variations of its K fertility and the index of K deficit under different fertilization systems. The results indicated that no K application accelerated the depletion of soil K, representing a certain decrease of soil available and slow-release K. Applying K alone could not keep soil K in balance, still having a decrease of soil available and slow-release K. The application of recycled compost combined with appropriate amount of fertilizer K could compensate soil K expenditure to a certain degree, and keep the concentrations of soil available and slow-release K somewhat constant. The statistic analysis on the past years test results showed that the critical values of soil available K in corn- and soybean fields obtained by crossing method were all 73 mg x kg(-1). PMID:18163304

  2. Temporal Variability of Physical Properties on an Aquic Argiudoll under no Tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglione, M. G.; Sasal, M. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Paz González, A.; Oszust, J. D.

    2012-04-01

    Practices for the implementation and development of crops affect soil properties and processes in space and time with consequences for the accumulation and movement of water, nutrients and pollutants, which affects plant growth. The aim of this study was to determine the temporal variability of soil physical properties and its link with the infiltration process, on an Aquic Argiudoll of the Argentine Pampas under no-till cultivation. Sampling was performed during six dates in the INTA EEA Paraná (Entre Ríos, Argentina), in the course of the succession of wheat/ soybean-corn. In each of those dates, rain simulations were performed under covered and uncovered soil. From these results it was determined the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), the runoff coefficient (EC), the accumulated rainfall up to ponding (Tp), the accumulated rainfall to reach the steady state infiltration rate (TI) and the decline slope of the infiltration rate (Pd). Also we determine: the initial soil water content (HI), bulk density (Dap), volume occupied by pores larger than 50 µm (> 50), volume occupied by pores between 10 and 50 µm (10-50), soil physical quality index (S) and structural stability (CDMP). On three dates HI was approximately 11%, two were between 22 and 27% and in the remaining time HI was 36%. Despite these variations we don't observed significant changes in most soil physical properties associated with the structure and pore size. However, we could prove significant differences between dates in Ks and EC, both on bare and cover soil. At the same time, differences in these parameters between coverage degrees were significant only in two dates. The HI affected the variability of Ks results. Also Ks ratio between covered and uncovered soil improved with HI increment, except for HI equal to 36%. We found highly significant linkage between Ks, CE and Pd with HI. This study reveals the importance of the temporal dynamics of water movement in this Aquic Argiudoll, although

  3. Effects of slow-release urea fertilizers on urease activity, microbial biomass, and nematode communities in an aquic brown soil.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiaoguang; Liang, Wenju; Chen, Lijun; Zhang, Haijun; Li, Qi; Wang, Peng; Wen, Dazhong

    2005-05-01

    A field experiment was carried out at the Shenyang Experimental Station of Ecology (CAS) in order to study the effects of slow-release urea fertilizers high polymer-coated urea (SRU1), SRU1 mixed with dicyandiamide DCD (SRU2), and SRU1 mixed with calcium carbide CaC2 (SRU3) on urease activity, microbial biomass C and N, and nematode communities in an aquic brown soil during the maize growth period. The results demonstrated that the application of slow-release urea fertilizers inhibits soil urease activity and increases the soil NH4+-N content. Soil available N increment could promote its immobilization by microorganisms. Determination of soil microbial biomass N indicated that a combined application of coated urea and nitrification inhibitors increased the soil active N pool. The population of predators/omnivores indicated that treatment with SRU2 could provide enough soil NH4+-N to promote maize growth and increased the food resource for the soil fauna compared with the other treatments. PMID:16089326

  4. Using magnetic susceptibility to discriminate between soil moisture regimes in selected loess and loess-like soils in northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valaee, Morteza; Ayoubi, Shamsollah; Khormali, Farhad; Lu, Sheng Gao; Karimzadeh, Hamid Reza

    2016-04-01

    This study used discriminant analysis to determine the efficacy of magnetic measures for discriminating between four soil moisture regimes in northern Iran. The study area was located on loess deposits and loess-like soils containing similar parent material. Four soil moisture regimes including aridic, xeric, udic, and aquic were selected. A total of 25 soil profiles were drug from each regime and composite soil samples were collected within the moisture control section. A set of magnetic measures including magnetic susceptibility at low (χlf) and high (χhf) frequencies, frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility (χfd), saturation isothermal remnant magnetization (SIRM), and isothermal remnant magnetization (IRM100 mT, IRM 20 mT) were measured in the laboratory. Dithionite citrate bicarbonate (Fed) and acid oxalate (Feo) contents of all soil samples were also determined. The lowest and highest χlf and χhf were observed in aquic and udic moisture regimes, respectively. A similar trend was obtained for Fed and Fed-Feo. The significant positive correlation between Fed and SIRM (r = 0.60; P < 0.01) suggested the formation of stable single domains (SSD) due to pedogenic processes. The results of discriminant analysis indicated that a combination of magnetic measures could successfully discriminate between the selected moisture regimes in the study area (average accuracy = 80%). It can thus be concluded that magnetic measures could be applied as a powerful indicator for differentiation of soil moisture regimes in the study area.

  5. Long-term fertilization of organic manure led to the succession of Bacillus community in an alluvial-aquic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruirui; Lin, Xiangui; Feng, Youzhi; Hu, Junli; Wang, Ruirui

    2014-05-01

    Long-term fertilization inevitably influences soil physic-chemical and biological properties. Our previous studies with a long-term fertilization experiment on an alluvial-aquic have revealed that specific Bacillus spp. was observed in organic manure-fertilized soils. The current study investigated the effects of long-term fertilization on the succession of Bacillus community in soils and their functions. The experiment included three fertilizer treatments: organic manure (OM), mineral fertilizers (NPK) and the control (without fertilizers). The results showed that long-term application of chemical fertilizers didn't increase the quantity of soil microbial population as much as organic fertilizers did, but it played an important role in maintaining the diversity and community structure of indigenous Bacilli. Correspondingly, long-term application of organic manure significantly increased the quantity while significantly decreased the diversity of Bacilli community. The ratio of Bacilli/bacteria was more constant in OM treatment than NPK indicating the stability of the response to long-term organic fertilizers. PCR-DGGE and clone library revealed the succession of Bacillus community after long-term application of organic manure and the dominant Bacillus spp occurred in the treatmen OM was Bacillus asahii. Our results also proved that Bacillus asahii was not derived from exogenous organic manure, but one of indigenous bacteria in the soil. Bacillus asahii was induced by the substrate after the application of organic manure, and gradually evolved into dominant Bacillus after 4 to 5 years. With an enzyme assay test of pure species and a soil incubation experiment, we came to a preliminary judgment, that the dominant Bacillus asahii didn't significantly influence the decomposition rate of cellulose and protein in the soil, but it promoted the decomposition of lipids, and could also improve the transformation process from fresh organic matter to humus. Applied organic

  6. [Effects of long-term application of organic fertilizer and superphosphate on accumulation and leaching of Olsen-P in Fluvo-aquic soil].

    PubMed

    Huang, Shao-Min; Guo, Dou-Dou; Zhang, Shui-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Based on a 20-year experiment of fertilization with organic and chemical fertilizers on a Fluvo-aquic soil under wheat-corn cropping system, this paper studied the relationships between Olsen-P concentration in plough layer and crop yields as well as the accumulation and vertical translocation of Olsen-P in soil profile. The results showed that when the Olsen-P concentration in plough layer maintained at 10-40 mg x kg(-1), the grain yields of wheat and corn were higher, whereas when the concentration of Olsen-P in plough layer was higher than 40 mg x kg(-1), it started to leach, which meant that in light loam Fluvo-aquic soil, the threshold value for P leaching might be 40 mg x kg(-1). In the treatments of chemical fertilization (NPK) and corn straw returning (SNPK) with the P application rate of 77-90 kg x hm(-2), the Olsen-P concentration in plough layer was increased by 0.63-0.72 mg x kg(-1) per 100 kg x hm(-2) of applied P, with an annual increment of 0.49-0.65 mg x kg(-1) and needed 45-60 years for reaching the threshold value for P leaching. In the treatments of chemical fertilization combined with manure application (MNPK, MNPK2, and 1.5MNPK), the formula of Olsen-P accumulation in 0-20 cm soil layer were Y(MNPK) = 3.1097x + 6.9615 (R2 = 0.8562), Y(MNPK2) = 2.4765x + 13.563 (R2 = 0.9307), and Y1.5MNPK = 4.506x + 6.4464 (R2 = 0.8862). It might take 8 years to reach the threshold value for Olsen-P leaching when the P application rate in treatment 1.5MNPK was 210 kg x hm(-2), 11 years when the P application rate in treatments MNPK2 and MNPK was 125 and 140 kg x hm(-2). Organic fertilization combined with chemical fertilization increased the Olsen-P accumulation rate being 2.5 times higher than chemical fertilization. Excessive application of organic fertilizer could increase the accumulation and leaching of Olsen-P in soil profile. PMID:21548294

  7. Characteristics of maize biochar with different pyrolysis temperatures and its effects on organic carbon, nitrogen and enzymatic activities after addition to fluvo-aquic soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiubin; Zhou, Wei; Liang, Guoqing; Song, Dali; Zhang, Xiaoya

    2015-12-15

    In this study, the characteristics of maize biochar produced at different pyrolysis temperatures (300, 450 and 600°C) and its effects on organic carbon, nitrogen and enzymatic activities after addition to fluvo-aquic soil were investigated. As pyrolysis temperature increased, ash content, pH, electrical conductivity, surface area, pore volume and aromatic carbon content of biochar increased while yield, ratios of oxygen:carbon and hydrogen: carbon and alkyl carbon content decreased. During incubation, SOC, total N, and ammonium-N contents increased in all biochar-amended treatments compared with the urea treatment; however, soil nitrate-N content first increased and then decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperature of the applied biochar. Extracellular enzyme activities associated with carbon transformation first increased and then decreased with biochars pyrolyzed at 450 and 600°C. Protease activity markedly increased with increased pyrolysis temperatures, whereas pyrolysis temperature had limited effect on soil urease activity. The results indicated that the responses of extracellular enzymes to biochar were dependent on the pyrolysis temperature, the enzyme itself and incubation time as well. PMID:26298256

  8. [Estimation of organic matter content of north fluvo-aquic soil based on the coupling model of wavelet transform and partial least squares].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Cang; Yang, Gui-Jun; Zhu, Jin-Shan; Gu, Xiao-He; Xu, Peng; Liao, Qin-Hong

    2014-07-01

    For improving the estimation accuracy of soil organic matter content of the north fluvo-aquic soil, wavelet transform technology is introduced. The soil samples were collected from Tongzhou district and Shunyi district in Beijing city. And the data source is from soil hyperspectral data obtained under laboratory condition. First, discrete wavelet transform efficiently decomposes hyperspectral into approximate coefficients and detail coefficients. Then, the correlation between approximate coefficients, detail coefficients and organic matter content was analyzed, and the sensitive bands of the organic matter were screened. Finally, models were established to estimate the soil organic content by using the partial least squares regression (PLSR). Results show that the NIR bands made more contributions than the visible band in estimating organic matter content models; the ability of approximate coefficients to estimate organic matter content is better than that of detail coefficients; The estimation precision of the detail coefficients fir soil organic matter content decreases with the spectral resolution being lower; Compared with the commonly used three types of soil spectral reflectance transforms, the wavelet transform can improve the estimation ability of soil spectral fir organic content; The accuracy of the best model established by the approximate coefficients or detail coefficients is higher, and the coefficient of determination (R2) and the root mean square error (RMSE) of the best model for approximate coefficients are 0.722 and 0.221, respectively. The R2 and RMSE of the best model for detail coefficients are 0.670 and 0.255, respectively. PMID:25269309

  9. Regime change?

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F.; Budlong-Sylvester, K. W.

    2004-01-01

    Following the 1998 nuclear tests in South Asia and later reinforced by revelations about North Korean and Iraqi nuclear activities, there has been growing concern about increasing proliferation dangers. At the same time, the prospects of radiological/nuclear terrorism are seen to be rising - since 9/11, concern over a proliferation/terrorism nexus has never been higher. In the face of this growing danger, there are urgent calls for stronger measures to strengthen the current international nuclear nonproliferation regime, including recommendations to place civilian processing of weapon-useable material under multinational control. As well, there are calls for entirely new tools, including military options. As proliferation and terrorism concerns grow, the regime is under pressure and there is a temptation to consider fundamental changes to the regime. In this context, this paper will address the following: Do we need to change the regime centered on the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)? What improvements could ensure it will be the foundation for the proliferation resistance and physical protection needed if nuclear power grows? What will make it a viable centerpiece of future nonproliferation and counterterrorism approaches?

  10. Arctic circulation regimes.

    PubMed

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L

    2015-10-13

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. PMID:26347536

  11. Arctic circulation regimes

    PubMed Central

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. PMID:26347536

  12. Regimes of Helium Burning

    SciTech Connect

    Timmes, F. X.; Niemeyer, J. C.

    2000-07-10

    The burning regimes encountered by laminar deflagrations and Zeldovich von Neumann Doering [ZND] detonations propagating through helium-rich compositions in the presence of buoyancy-driven turbulence are analyzed. Particular attention is given to models of X-ray bursts that start with a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a neutron star and to the thin-shell helium instability of intermediate-mass stars. In the X-ray burst case, turbulent deflagrations propagating in the lateral or radial direction encounter a transition from the distributed regime to the flamelet regime at a density of {approx}108 g cm-3. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than {approx}106 g cm-3. Self-sustained laminar deflagrations traveling in the radial direction cannot exist below this density. Similarly, the planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at {approx}107 g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. In the thin helium shell case, turbulent deflagrations traveling in the lateral or radial direction encounter the distributed regime at densities below {approx}107 g cm-3 and the flamelet regime at larger densities. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than {approx}104 g cm-3, indicating that steady state laminar deflagrations cannot form below this density. The planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at {approx}5x10{sup 4} g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  13. Dynamic Treatment Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Bibhas; Murphy, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic treatment regime consists of a sequence of decision rules, one per stage of intervention, that dictate how to individualize treatments to patients based on evolving treatment and covariate history. These regimes are particularly useful for managing chronic disorders, and fit well into the larger paradigm of personalized medicine. They provide one way to operationalize a clinical decision support system. Statistics plays a key role in the construction of evidence-based dynamic treatment regimes – informing best study design as well as efficient estimation and valid inference. Due to the many novel methodological challenges it offers, this area has been growing in popularity among statisticians in recent years. In this article, we review the key developments in this exciting field of research. In particular, we discuss the sequential multiple assignment randomized trial designs, estimation techniques like Q-learning and marginal structural models, and several inference techniques designed to address the associated non-standard asymptotics. We reference software, whenever available. We also outline some important future directions. PMID:25401119

  14. Examination Regimes and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    Examination regimes at the end of secondary school vary greatly intra- and cross-nationally, and in recent years have undergone important reforms often geared towards increasing student achievement. This research presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between examination regimes and student achievement in the OECD. Using a micro…

  15. Cloud regimes as phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stechmann, Samuel N.; Hottovy, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Clouds are repeatedly identified as a leading source of uncertainty in future climate predictions. Of particular importance are stratocumulus clouds, which can appear as either (i) closed cells that reflect solar radiation back to space or (ii) open cells that allow solar radiation to reach the Earth's surface. Here we show that these clouds regimes -- open versus closed cells -- fit the paradigm of a phase transition. In addition, this paradigm characterizes pockets of open cells as the interface between the open- and closed-cell regimes, and it identifies shallow cumulus clouds as a regime of higher variability. This behavior can be understood using an idealized model for the dynamics of atmospheric water as a stochastic diffusion process. With this new conceptual viewpoint, ideas from statistical mechanics could potentially be used for understanding uncertainties related to clouds in the climate system and climate predictions.

  16. Optics in the Relativistic Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2012-06-01

    Optics has extended the frontier of low energy physics. Here we present the progress in the opposite direction of relativistic intensity regime of optics. With intense and large energy laser, particles may be accelerated to high energies via laser wakefield acceleration (Tajima and Dawson, 1979) over a compact distance orders of magnitude shorter than the RF approach. We should be able to accelerate electrons (over 30m) and ions (over cm) toward TeV with an existing kJ laser. We can check Lorentz invariance in the ultrarelativistic regime. Further, laser allows us to explore the presence of weakly coupling fields such as Dark Matter and Dark Energy with an unprecedented sensitivity. We call this emerging capability as the Laser Particle Physics Paradigm (LP^3).

  17. Demystifying optimal dynamic treatment regimes.

    PubMed

    Moodie, Erica E M; Richardson, Thomas S; Stephens, David A

    2007-06-01

    A dynamic regime is a function that takes treatment and covariate history and baseline covariates as inputs and returns a decision to be made. Murphy (2003, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series B 65, 331-366) and Robins (2004, Proceedings of the Second Seattle Symposium on Biostatistics, 189-326) have proposed models and developed semiparametric methods for making inference about the optimal regime in a multi-interval trial that provide clear advantages over traditional parametric approaches. We show that Murphy's model is a special case of Robins's and that the methods are closely related but not equivalent. Interesting features of the methods are highlighted using the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and through simulation. PMID:17688497

  18. The emerging climate change regime

    SciTech Connect

    Bodansky, D.M.

    1995-11-01

    The emerging climate change regime--with the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) at its core--reflects the substantial uncertainties, high stakes and complicated politics of the greenhouse warming issue. The regime represents a hedging strategy. On the one hand, it treats climate change as a potentially serious problem, and in response, creates a long-term, evolutionary process to encourage further research, promote national planning, increase public awareness, and help create a sense of community among states. But it requires very little by way of substantive--and potentially costly--mitigation or adaptation measures. Although the FCCC parties have agreed to negotiate additional commitments, substantial progress is unlikely without further developments in science, technology, and public opinion. The FCCC encourages such developments, and is capable of evolution and growth, should the political will to take stronger international action emerge. 120 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. The International Climate Change Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamin, Farhana; Depledge, Joanna

    2005-01-01

    Aimed at the increasing number of policy-makers, stakeholders, researchers, and other professionals working on climate change, this volume presents a detailed description and analysis of the international regime established in 1992 to combat the threat of global climate change. It provides a comprehensive accessible guide to a high-profile area of international law and politics, covering not only the obligations and rights of countries, but ongoing climate negotiations as well.

  20. Hall effect in hopping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdonin, A.; Skupiński, P.; Grasza, K.

    2016-02-01

    A simple description of the Hall effect in the hopping regime of conductivity in semiconductors is presented. Expressions for the Hall coefficient and Hall mobility are derived by considering averaged equilibrium electron transport in a single triangle of localization sites in a magnetic field. Dependence of the Hall coefficient is analyzed in a wide range of temperature and magnetic field values. Our theoretical result is applied to our experimental data on temperature dependence of Hall effect and Hall mobility in ZnO.

  1. Merging of Rhine flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boessenkool, Berry; Bronstert, Axel; Bürger, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    The Rhine flow regime is changing: (a) in the alpine nival regime, snow melt floods occur earlier in the year and (b) in the pluvial middle-Rhine regime, rainfall induced flood magnitudes rise. The seasonality of each is currently separated in time, but it is conceivable that this may shift due to climate change. If extremes of both flood types coincide, this would create a new type of hydrologic extreme with disastrous consequences. Quantifying the probability for a future overlap of pluvial and nival floods is therefore of high relevance to society and particularly to reinsurance companies. In order to investigate possible changes in magnitude and timing of flood types, we are developing a chain of physical models for spatio-temporal combination of flood probabilities. As input, we aim to use stochastically downscaled temperature and rainfall extremes from climate model weather projections. Preliminary research shows a six-week forward-shift of peak discharge at the nival gauge Maxau in the past century. The aim of presenting our early-stage work as a poster is to induce an exchange of ideas with fellow scientists in close research disciplines.

  2. Breddin's graph for tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Célérier, Bernard; Séranne, Michel

    2001-05-01

    A simple graphical method is proposed to infer the tectonic regime from a fault and slip data set. An abacus is overlaid on a plot of the rake versus strike of the data. This yields the horizontal principal stress directions and a constraint on the stress tensor aspect ratio, in a manner similar to Breddin's graph for two-dimensional strain analysis. The main requirement is that one of the principal stress directions is close to the vertical. This method is illustrated on monophase synthetic and natural data, but is also expected to help sort out multiphase data sets.

  3. Ireland unveils new license regime

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-23

    Ireland has unveiled new terns designed to integrate the licensing regime for oil and gas exploration and development. They apply to new exploration and development authorizations and replace the exclusive offshore licensing terns introduced in 1975. Holders of existing licenses are still subject to the 1975 terms but can choose the new terns under appropriate circumstances. Frontier exploration licenses are currently available to complement the standard and deepwater exploration licenses in use. Rental fees are now spread evenly over the duration of the license, thereby eliminating large upfront payments. Lease extensions also have been introduced to enable operators to judge commerciality of a discovery beyond the set license period.

  4. A surfactant film spreading regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nikishov, V.I.

    1984-06-01

    Interest has recently increased in the study of the mechanisms whereby oil spills spread over sea and ocean surfaces. In the later stages of this process, when the petroleum film thickness becomes sufficiently small, the main forces determining the growth of its horizontal dimensions are surface tension and viscosity. In this case the flow characteristics do not depend on total quantity of spreading substance nor its surface concentration distribution. However, in the final stages of the spreading process the film becomes so thin that it is necessary to consider the effect of surface concentration distribution of the material on the process. Similar problems occur in the study of the spreading of a surfactant in the case where the total quantity of material is small and the surface tension regime sets in quickly. Therefore, the author examines here the spreading of a film in a regime wherein it is necessary to consider the total quantity of surfactant present, initially located on the surface of a viscous incompressible liquid.

  5. Adaptation in Collaborative Governance Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  6. Adaptation in collaborative governance regimes.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program. PMID:25073764

  7. Different regimes of dynamic wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustav, Amberg; Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Shiomi, Junichiro; Physiochemical fluid mechanics Team; Maruyama-Chiashi Laboratory Team

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting, as observed when a droplet contacts a dry solid surface, is important in various engineering processes, such as printing, coating, and lubrication. Our overall aim is to investigate if and how the detailed properties of the solid surface influence the dynamics of wetting. Here we discuss how surface roughness influences the initial dynamic spreading of a partially wetting droplet by studying the spreading on a solid substrate patterned with microstructures just a few micrometers in size. This is complemented by matching numerical simulations. We present a parameter map, based on the properties of the liquid and the solid surface, which identifies qualitatively different spreading regimes, where the spreading speed is limited by either the liquid viscosity, the surface properties, or the liquid inertia. The peculiarities of the different spreading regimes are studied by detailed numerical simulations, in conjuction with experiments. This work was financially supported in part by, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (J.W. and J.S) and Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (M.D.-Q. and G.A).

  8. Discriminatory Proofreading Regimes in Nonequilibrium Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Arvind; Huse, David A.; Leibler, Stanislas

    2014-04-01

    We use ideas from kinetic proofreading, an error-correcting mechanism in biology, to identify new kinetic regimes in nonequilibrium systems. These regimes are defined by the sensitivity of the occupancy of a state of the system to a change in its energy. In biological contexts, higher sensitivity corresponds to stronger discrimination between molecular substrates with different energetics competing in the same reaction. We study this discriminatory ability in systems with discrete states that are connected by a general network of transitions. We find multiple regimes of different discriminatory ability when the energy of a given state of the network is varied. Interestingly, the occupancy of the state can even increase with its energy, corresponding to an "antiproofreading" regime. The number and properties of such discriminatory regimes are limited by the topology of the network. Finally, we find that discriminatory regimes can be changed without modifying any "hard-wired" structural aspects of the system but rather by simply changing external chemical potentials.

  9. On unstable periodic regime of small HAWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosaev, Marat Z.; Klimina, Liubov A.; Selyutskiy, Yury D.; Tsai, Mi-Ching; Yang, Hong-Tzer

    2012-11-01

    Dynamics of a small HAWT is studied. The closed mathematical model involving phenomenological description of both aerodynamic load upon turbine blades and permanent magnet electric generator is developed, in order to take into account the inductive reactance of the electric circuit. A series of experiments is performed in the subsonic wind tunnel of the LMSU Institute of Mechanics that allowed verifying the model and identifying its parameters. Parameters of dynamic model are identified, such as the coefficient of electromechanical interaction, the active internal resistance of generator, the circuit reactance. Parametric analysis of steady regimes is performed. The model prediction that HAWT operating dynamic system has two stable steady regimes (high speed regime and low speed one) is confirmed by experiments. Transient regimes are registered depending on parameters of the system, which allows estimating the unstable steady regime. The characteristics of the unstable regime are experimentally determined. Obtained results are used for estimation of aerodynamic moment acting on HAWT blades.

  10. Propagation Regime of Iron Dust Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    A flame propagating through an iron-dust mixture can propagate in two asymptotic regimes. When the characteristic time of heat transfer between particles is much smaller than the characteristic time of particle combustion, the flame propagates in the continuum regime where the heat released by reacting particles can be modelled as a space-averaged function. In contrast, when the characteristic time of heat transfer is much larger than the particle reaction time, the flame can no longer be treated as a continuum due to dominating effects associated with the discrete nature of the particle reaction. The discrete regime is characterized by weak dependence of the flame speed on the oxygen concentration compared to the continuum regime. The discrete regime is observed in flames propagating through an iron dust cloud within a gas mixture containing xenon, while the continuum regime is obtained when xenon is substituted with helium.

  11. Multistability of synchronous regimes in rotator ensembles.

    PubMed

    Kryukov, A K; Petrov, V S; Osipov, G V; Kurths, J

    2015-12-01

    We study collective dynamics in rotator ensembles and focus on the multistability of synchronous regimes in a chain of coupled rotators. We provide a detailed analysis of the number of coexisting regimes and estimate in particular, the synchronization boundary for different types of individual frequency distribution. The number of wave-based regimes coexisting for the same parameters and its dependence on the chain length are estimated. We give an analytical estimation for the synchronization frequency of the in-phase regime for a uniform individual frequency distribution. PMID:26723160

  12. FISHER INFORMATION AND ECOSYSTEM REGIME CHANGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following Fisher’s work, we propose two different expressions for the Fisher Information along with Shannon Information as a means of detecting and assessing shifts between alternative ecosystem regimes. Regime shifts are a consequence of bifurcations in the dynamics of an ecosys...

  13. Capacitance densitometer for flow regime identification

    DOEpatents

    Shipp, Jr., Roy L.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to a capacitance densitometer for determining the flow regime of a two-phase flow system. A two-element capacitance densitometer is used in conjunction with a conventional single-beam gamma densitometer to unambiguously identify the prevailing flow regime and the average density of a flowing fluid.

  14. Regimes of DNA confined in a nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Doyle, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Scaling regimes for polymers confined to tubular channels are well established when the channel cross-sectional dimension is either very small (Odjik regime) or large (classic de Gennes regime) relative to the polymer Kuhn length. In the literature, there is no clear consensus regarding the intermediate region and if subregimes even exist to connect these two classic bounding regimes. The confluence of emerging single DNA mapping technologies and a resurged interest in the fundamental properties of confined polymers has led to extensive research in this area using DNA as a model system. Due to the DNA molecule's properties and limitations of nanofabrication, most experiments are performed in this intermediate regime with channel dimensions of a few Kuhn lengths. Here we use simulations and theory to reconcile conflicting theories and show that there are indeed extended de Gennes, partial alignment and hairpin regimes located between the two classic regimes. Simulations results for both chain extension and free energy support the existence of these regimes. This research was supported by the National Research Foundation Singapore through the Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology's research program in BioSystems and Micromechanics, the National Science Foundation (CBET-1335938).

  15. Blowout regimes of plasma wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Lotov, K V

    2004-04-01

    A wide region of beam parameters is numerically scanned and the dependence of wakefield properties on the beam length and current is clarified for the blowout regime of beam-plasma interaction. The main regimes of the plasma response are found, which qualitatively differ in the plasma behavior. To characterize the efficiency of the energy exchange between the beam and the plasma, the energy flux through the comoving window is introduced. Scalings of the energy flux for the linear plasma response and the main blowout regimes are studied. The most efficient energy transfer occurs in the so-called "strong beam" regime of interaction. For this regime, analytical approximations for various aspects of the plasma response are obtained. PMID:15169104

  16. Discrete fluorescent saturation regimes in multilevel systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1988-01-01

    Using models of multilevel atoms, the fluorescent process was examined for the ratio of the photooxidation rate, Pij, to the collisional oxidation rate, Cij, in the pumped resonance transition i-j. It is shown that, in the full range of the parameter Pij/Cij, there exist three distinct regimes (I, II, and III) which may be usefully exploited. These regimes are defined, respectively, by the following conditions: Pij/Cij smaller than about 1; Pij/Cij much greater than 1 and Pij much lower than Cki; and Pij/Cij much greater than 1 and Pij much higher than Cki, where Cki is the collisional rate populating the source level i. The only regime which is characterized by the sensitivity of fluorescent-fluorescent line intensity ratios to Pij is regime I. If regime III is reached, even fluorescent-nonfluorescent line ratios become independent of Pij. The analysis is applied to the resonant photoexcitation of a carbonlike ion.

  17. Snowpack regimes of the Western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Ernesto; Molotch, Noah P.

    2014-07-01

    Snow accumulation and melt patterns play a significant role in the water, energy, carbon, and nutrient cycles in the montane environments of the Western United States. Recent studies have illustrated that changes in the snow/rainfall apportionments and snow accumulation and melt patterns may occur as a consequence of changes in climate in the region. In order to understand how these changes may affect the snow regimes of the region, the current characteristics of the snow accumulation and melt patterns must be identified. Here we characterize the snow water equivalent (SWE) curve formed by the daily SWE values at 766 snow pillow stations in the Western United States, focusing on several metrics of the yearly SWE curves and the relationships between the different metrics. The metrics are the initial snow accumulation and snow disappearance dates, the peak snow accumulation and date of peak, the length of the snow accumulation season, the length of the snowmelt season, and the snow accumulation and snowmelt slopes. Three snow regimes emerge from these results: a maritime, an intermountain, and a continental regime. The maritime regime is characterized by higher maximum snow accumulations reaching 300 cm and shorter accumulation periods of less than 220 days. Conversely, the continental regime is characterized by lower maximum accumulations below 200 cm and longer accumulation periods reaching over 260 days. The intermountain regime lies in between. The regions that show the characteristics of the maritime regime include the Cascade Mountains, the Klamath Mountains, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The intermountain regime includes the Eastern Cascades slopes and foothills, the Blue Mountains, Northern and Central basins and ranges, the Columbia Mountains/Northern Rockies, the Idaho Batholith, and the Canadian Rockies. Lastly, the continental regime includes the Middle and Southern Rockies, and the Wasatch and Uinta Mountains. The implications of snow regime

  18. Abrupt climate-independent fire regime changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pausas, Juli G.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires have played a determining role in distribution, composition and structure of many ecosystems worldwide and climatic changes are widely considered to be a major driver of future fire regime changes. However, forecasting future climatic change induced impacts on fire regimes will require a clearer understanding of other drivers of abrupt fire regime changes. Here, we focus on evidence from different environmental and temporal settings of fire regimes changes that are not directly attributed to climatic changes. We review key cases of these abrupt fire regime changes at different spatial and temporal scales, including those directly driven (i) by fauna, (ii) by invasive plant species, and (iii) by socio-economic and policy changes. All these drivers might generate non-linear effects of landscape changes in fuel structure; that is, they generate fuel changes that can cross thresholds of landscape continuity, and thus drastically change fire activity. Although climatic changes might contribute to some of these changes, there are also many instances that are not primarily linked to climatic shifts. Understanding the mechanism driving fire regime changes should contribute to our ability to better assess future fire regimes.

  19. Earth Regime Network Evolution Study (ERNESt)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menrad, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Speaker and Presenter at the Lincoln Laboratory Communications Workshop on April 5, 2016 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, MA. A visual presentation titled Earth Regimes Network Evolution Study (ERNESt).

  20. Electron transport fluxes in potato plateau regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    Electron transport fluxes in the potato plateau regime are calculated from the solutions of the drift kinetic equation and fluid equations. It is found that the bootstrap current density remains finite in the region close to the magnetic axis, although it decreases with increasing collision frequency. This finite amount of the bootstrap current in the relatively collisional regime is important in modeling tokamak startup with 100{percent} bootstrap current. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Molecular motors in conservative and dissipative regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Carrasco, R.; Sancho, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of a rotatory molecular motor under a conservative torque regime. We show that conservative and dissipative regimes present a different observable phenomenology. Our approach starts with a preliminary deterministic calculation of the motor cycle, which is complemented with stochastic simulations of a Langevin equation under a flashing ratchet potential. Finally, by using parameter values obtained from independent experimental information, our theoretical predictions are compared with experimental data of the F1-ATPase motor of the Bacillus PS3.

  2. Regime Diagrams for K-Theory Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ronald B.

    2011-06-01

    In atmospheric dispersion, the "non-Gaussian" effects of gravitational settling, the vertical gradient in diffusivity and the surface deposition do not enter uniformly but rather break up parameter space into several discrete regimes. Here, we describe regime diagrams that are constructed for K-theory dispersion of effluent from a surface line source in unsheared inhomogeneous turbulence, using a previously derived Fourier-Hankel method. This K-theory formulation differs from the traditional one by keeping a non-zero diffusivity at the ground. This change allows for turbulent exchange between the canopy and the atmosphere and allows new natural length scales to emerge. The axes on the regime diagrams are non-dimensional distance defined as the ratio of downwind distance to the characteristic length scale for each effect. For each value of the ratio of settling speed to the K gradient, two to four regimes are found. Concentration formulae are given for each regime. The regime diagrams allow real dispersion problems to be categorized and the validity of end-state concentration formulae to be judged.

  3. Effect of Soil Drainage on Magnetic Susceptibility and Iron Compounds of Soils of Fars Province, Southern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owliaie, Hamidreza

    2010-05-01

    Soil drainage condition has significant effects on chemical properties of soil particularly on type and the extent of iron oxides. Soil magnetic susceptibility (χ) has appropriate relationship with drainage condition. Eight soil profiles in four regions of Fars province with aquic and non-aquic soil moisture regimes were studied in order to determine the effect of drainage condition on χ. Aquic soils had distinctly lower χ than non-aquic soils (19.9 vs. 32.5). Magnetic susceptibility of surface horizons was greater than that of the sub-surface horizons in most of the soils (31 vs. 19.6). This is probably a result of pedogenic formation of ferrimagnetic minerals in soil surface. Aquic and non-aquic soil lost 41 and 64 percent of their χ after CBD extraction, reflecting differences in the source of χ. Sequential heating of soil samples to 550 °C resulted in more enhancement of χ, in aquic soils compared with non-aquic soils, (451% vs. 155%) which was attributed to the conversion of canted antiferromagnetic minerals to ferromagnetic minerals. The χ decreased when heated from 550 to 700 °C (about 100% in both soil groups). Keywords: magnetism, drainage condition, iron oxide, heat treatment.

  4. A holistic view of marine regime shifts

    PubMed Central

    Conversi, Alessandra; Dakos, Vasilis; Gårdmark, Anna; Ling, Scott; Folke, Carl; Mumby, Peter J.; Greene, Charles; Edwards, Martin; Blenckner, Thorsten; Casini, Michele; Pershing, Andrew; Möllmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Understanding marine regime shifts is important not only for ecology but also for developing marine management that assures the provision of ecosystem services to humanity. While regime shift theory is well developed, there is still no common understanding on drivers, mechanisms and characteristic of abrupt changes in real marine ecosystems. Based on contributions to the present theme issue, we highlight some general issues that need to be overcome for developing a more comprehensive understanding of marine ecosystem regime shifts. We find a great divide between benthic reef and pelagic ocean systems in how regime shift theory is linked to observed abrupt changes. Furthermore, we suggest that the long-lasting discussion on the prevalence of top-down trophic or bottom-up physical drivers in inducing regime shifts may be overcome by taking into consideration the synergistic interactions of multiple stressors, and the special characteristics of different ecosystem types. We present a framework for the holistic investigation of marine regime shifts that considers multiple exogenous drivers that interact with endogenous mechanisms to cause abrupt, catastrophic change. This framework takes into account the time-delayed synergies of these stressors, which erode the resilience of the ecosystem and eventually enable the crossing of ecological thresholds. Finally, considering that increased pressures in the marine environment are predicted by the current climate change assessments, in order to avoid major losses of ecosystem services, we suggest that marine management approaches should incorporate knowledge on environmental thresholds and develop tools that consider regime shift dynamics and characteristics. This grand challenge can only be achieved through a holistic view of marine ecosystem dynamics as evidenced by this theme issue.

  5. Greenland Meltwater and Arctic Circulation Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukhovskoy, D. S.; Proshutinsky, A. Y.; Timmermans, M. L.; Myers, P. G.; Platov, G.

    2015-12-01

    Between 1948 and 1996, wind-driven components of ice drift and surface ocean currents experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability alternating between anticyclonic and cyclonic circulation regimes. During cyclonic regimes, low sea level atmospheric pressure dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean toward the sub-Arctic seas was intensified. During anticylonic circulation regimes, high sea level pressure dominated over the Arctic driving sea ice and ocean counter-clockwise; the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the sub-Arctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been dominated by an anticyclonic circulation regime with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for these regimes. Of essential importance is to discern the causes and consequences of the apparent break-down in the natural decadal variability of the Arctic climate system, and specifically: Why has the well-pronounced decadal variability observed in the 20th century been replaced by relatively weak interannual changes under anticyclonic circulation regime conditions in the 21st century? We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. In order to test this hypothesis, numerical experiments with several FAMOS (Forum for Arctic Modeling & Observational Synthesis) ice-ocean coupled models have been conducted. In these experiments, Greenland melt freshwater is tracked by passive tracers being constantly released along the Greenland coast. Propagation pathways and time scales of Greenland meltwater within the sub-Arctic seas are discussed.

  6. Identifying natural flow regimes using fish communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fi-John; Tsai, Wen-Ping; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Chen, Hung-kwai; Herricks, Edwin E.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryModern water resources management has adopted natural flow regimes as reasonable targets for river restoration and conservation. The characterization of a natural flow regime begins with the development of hydrologic statistics from flow records. However, little guidance exists for defining the period of record needed for regime determination. In Taiwan, the Taiwan Eco-hydrological Indicator System (TEIS), a group of hydrologic statistics selected for fisheries relevance, is being used to evaluate ecological flows. The TEIS consists of a group of hydrologic statistics selected to characterize the relationships between flow and the life history of indigenous species. Using the TEIS and biosurvey data for Taiwan, this paper identifies the length of hydrologic record sufficient for natural flow regime characterization. To define the ecological hydrology of fish communities, this study connected hydrologic statistics to fish communities by using methods to define antecedent conditions that influence existing community composition. A moving average method was applied to TEIS statistics to reflect the effects of antecedent flow condition and a point-biserial correlation method was used to relate fisheries collections with TEIS statistics. The resulting fish species-TEIS (FISH-TEIS) hydrologic statistics matrix takes full advantage of historical flows and fisheries data. The analysis indicates that, in the watersheds analyzed, averaging TEIS statistics for the present year and 3 years prior to the sampling date, termed MA(4), is sufficient to develop a natural flow regime. This result suggests that flow regimes based on hydrologic statistics for the period of record can be replaced by regimes developed for sampled fish communities.

  7. Learning Flow Regimes from Snapshot Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemati, Maziar

    2015-11-01

    Fluid flow regimes are often categorized based on the qualitative patterns observed by visual inspection of the flow field. For example, bluff body wakes are traditionally classified based on the number and groupings of vortices shed per cycle (e.g., 2S, 2P, P+S), as seen in snapshots of the vorticity field. Subsequently, the existence and nature of these identified flow regimes can be explained through dynamical analyses of the fluid mechanics. Unfortunately, due to the need for manual inspection, the approach described above can be impractical for studies that seek to learn flow regimes from large volumes of numerical and/or experimental snapshot data. Here, we appeal to established techniques from machine learning and data-driven dynamical systems analysis to automate the task of learning flow regimes from snapshot data. Moreover, by appealing to the dynamical structure of the fluid flow, this approach also offers the potential to reveal flow regimes that may be overlooked by visual inspection alone. Here, we will introduce the methodology and demonstrate its capabilities and limitations in the context of several model flows.

  8. Dynamic treatment regimes: technical challenges and applications

    PubMed Central

    Lizotte, Daniel J.; Qian, Min; Pelham, William E.; Murphy, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic treatment regimes are of growing interest across the clinical sciences because these regimes provide one way to operationalize and thus inform sequential personalized clinical decision making. Formally, a dynamic treatment regime is a sequence of decision rules, one per stage of clinical intervention. Each decision rule maps up-to-date patient information to a recommended treatment. We briefly review a variety of approaches for using data to construct the decision rules. We then review a critical inferential challenge that results from nonregularity, which often arises in this area. In particular, nonregularity arises in inference for parameters in the optimal dynamic treatment regime; the asymptotic, limiting, distribution of estimators are sensitive to local perturbations. We propose and evaluate a locally consistent Adaptive Confidence Interval (ACI) for the parameters of the optimal dynamic treatment regime. We use data from the Adaptive Pharmacological and Behavioral Treatments for Children with ADHD Trial as an illustrative example. We conclude by highlighting and discussing emerging theoretical problems in this area. PMID:25356091

  9. Gradual regime shifts in fairy circles

    PubMed Central

    Zelnik, Yuval R.; Meron, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2015-01-01

    Large responses of ecosystems to small changes in the conditions—regime shifts—are of great interest and importance. In spatially extended ecosystems, these shifts may be local or global. Using empirical data and mathematical modeling, we investigated the dynamics of the Namibian fairy circle ecosystem as a case study of regime shifts in a pattern-forming ecosystem. Our results provide new support, based on the dynamics of the ecosystem, for the view of fairy circles as a self-organization phenomenon driven by water–vegetation interactions. The study further suggests that fairy circle birth and death processes correspond to spatially confined transitions between alternative stable states. Cascades of such transitions, possible in various pattern-forming systems, result in gradual rather than abrupt regime shifts. PMID:26362787

  10. Spin glasses in the nonextensive regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Matthew; Young, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    Spin systems with long-range interactions are “nonextensive” if the strength of the interactions falls off sufficiently slowly with distance. It has been conjectured for ferromagnets and, more recently, for spin glasses that, everywhere in the nonextensive regime, the free energy is exactly equal to that for the infinite range model in which the characteristic strength of the interaction is independent of distance. In this paper we present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the one-dimensional long-range spin glasses in the nonextensive regime. Using finite-size scaling, our results for the transition temperatures are consistent with this prediction. We also propose and provide numerical evidence for an analogous result for diluted long-range spin glasses in which the coordination number is finite, namely, that the transition temperature throughout the nonextensive regime is equal to that of the infinite-range model known as the Viana-Bray model.

  11. Gradual regime shifts in fairy circles.

    PubMed

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Meron, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2015-10-01

    Large responses of ecosystems to small changes in the conditions--regime shifts--are of great interest and importance. In spatially extended ecosystems, these shifts may be local or global. Using empirical data and mathematical modeling, we investigated the dynamics of the Namibian fairy circle ecosystem as a case study of regime shifts in a pattern-forming ecosystem. Our results provide new support, based on the dynamics of the ecosystem, for the view of fairy circles as a self-organization phenomenon driven by water-vegetation interactions. The study further suggests that fairy circle birth and death processes correspond to spatially confined transitions between alternative stable states. Cascades of such transitions, possible in various pattern-forming systems, result in gradual rather than abrupt regime shifts. PMID:26362787

  12. Massive superstring scatterings in the Regge regime

    SciTech Connect

    He Song; Lee, Jen-Chi; Takahashi, Keijiro; Yang Yi

    2011-03-15

    We calculate four classes of high-energy massive string scattering amplitudes of fermionic string theory at arbitrary mass levels in the Regge regime (RR). We show that all four leading order amplitudes in the RR can be expressed in terms of the Kummer function of the second kind. Based on the summation algorithm of a set of extended signed Stirling number identities, we show that all four ratios calculated previously by the method of decoupling of zero-norm states among scattering amplitudes in the Gross regime can be extracted from this Kummer function in the RR. Finally, we conjecture and give evidence that the existence of these four Gross regime ratios in the RR persists to subleading orders in the Regge expansion of all high-energy fermionic string scattering amplitudes.

  13. Determination of the Hall Thruster Operating Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    L. Dorf; V. Semenov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2002-04-09

    A quasi one-dimensional (1-D) steady-state model of the Hall thruster is presented. For the same discharge voltage two operating regimes are possible -- with and without the anode sheath. For given mass flow rate, magnetic field profile and discharge voltage a unique solution can be constructed, assuming that the thruster operates in one of the regimes. However, we show that for a given temperature profile the applied discharge voltage uniquely determines the operating regime: for discharge voltages greater than a certain value, the sheath disappears. That result is obtained over a wide range of incoming neutral velocities, channel lengths and widths, and cathode plane locations. It is also shown that a good correlation between the quasi 1-D model and experimental results can be achieved by selecting an appropriate electron mobility and temperature profile.

  14. Massive superstring scatterings in the Regge regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Song; Lee, Jen-Chi; Takahashi, Keijiro; Yang, Yi

    2011-03-01

    We calculate four classes of high-energy massive string scattering amplitudes of fermionic string theory at arbitrary mass levels in the Regge regime (RR). We show that all four leading order amplitudes in the RR can be expressed in terms of the Kummer function of the second kind. Based on the summation algorithm of a set of extended signed Stirling number identities, we show that all four ratios calculated previously by the method of decoupling of zero-norm states among scattering amplitudes in the Gross regime can be extracted from this Kummer function in the RR. Finally, we conjecture and give evidence that the existence of these four Gross regime ratios in the RR persists to subleading orders in the Regge expansion of all high-energy fermionic string scattering amplitudes.

  15. Fermi's golden rule beyond the Zeno regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debierre, Vincent; Goessens, Isabelle; Brainis, Edouard; Durt, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    We reconsider the problem of the spontaneous emission of light by an excited atomic state. We scrutinize the survival probability of this excited state for very short times, in the so-called Zeno regime, for which we show that the dynamics is dictated by a coherent, in-phase, response of the on-shell and off-shell vacuum modes. We also develop a perturbative approach in order to interpolate between different temporal regimes: the Zeno, golden rule (linear), and Wigner-Weisskopf (exponential) regimes. We compare results obtained with the E ̂.x ̂ and A ̂.p ̂ interaction Hamiltonians, using successively the dipole approximation and the exact coupling.

  16. Transient regimes and crossover for epitaxial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Haselwandter, Christoph A; Vvedensky, Dimitri D

    2010-02-01

    We apply a formalism for deriving stochastic continuum equations associated with lattice models to obtain equations governing the transient regimes of epitaxial growth for various experimental scenarios and growth conditions. The first step of our methodology is the systematic transformation of the lattice model into a regularized stochastic equation of motion that provides initial conditions for differential renormalization-group (RG) equations for the coefficients in the regularized equation. The solutions of the RG equations then yield trajectories that describe the original model from the transient regimes, which are of primary experimental interest, to the eventual crossover to the asymptotically stable fixed point. We first consider regimes defined by the relative magnitude of deposition noise and diffusion noise. If the diffusion noise dominates, then the early stages of growth are described by the Mullins-Herring (MH) equation with conservative noise. This is the classic regime of molecular-beam epitaxy. If the diffusion and deposition noise are of comparable magnitude, the transient equation is the MH equation with nonconservative noise. This behavior has been observed in a recent report on the growth of aluminum on silicone oil surfaces [Z.-N. Fang, Thin Solid Films 517, 3408 (2009)]. Finally, the regime where deposition noise dominates over diffusion noise has been observed in computer simulations, but does not appear to have any direct experimental relevance. For initial conditions that consist of a flat surface, the Villain-Lai-Das Sarma (VLDS) equation with nonconservative noise is not appropriate for any transient regime. If, however, the initial surface is corrugated, the relative magnitudes of terms can be altered to the point where the VLDS equation with conservative noise does indeed describe transient growth. This is consistent with the experimental analysis of growth on patterned surfaces [H.-C. Kan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 146101 (2004); T

  17. On the regimes of charge reversal.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Angeles, Felipe; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2008-05-01

    Charge reversal of the planar electrical double layer is studied by means of a well known integral equation theory. By a numerical analysis, a diagram is constructed with the onset points of charge reversal in the space of the fundamental variables of the system. Within this diagram, two regimes of charge reversal are identified, which are referred to as oscillatory and nonoscillatory. We found that these two regimes can be distinguished through a simple formula. Furthermore, a symmetry between electrostatic and size correlations in charge reversal is exhibited. Agreement of our results with other theories and molecular simulations data is discussed. PMID:18465930

  18. Regimes of flow past a vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velte, C. M.; Okulov, V. L.; Naumov, I. V.

    2012-04-01

    A complete parametric investigation of the development of multi-vortex regimes in a wake past simple vortex generator has been carried out. It is established that the vortex structure in the wake is much more complicated than a simple monopole tip vortex. The vortices were studied by stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV). Based on the obtained SPIV data, a map of the regimes of flow past the vortex generator has been constructed. One region with a developed stable multivortex system on this map reaches the vicinity of the optimum angle of attack of the vortex generator.

  19. Anomalous Hall effect in localization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Zhu, Kai; Yue, Di; Tian, Yuan; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    The anomalous Hall effect in the ultrathin film regime is investigated in Fe(001)(1-3 nm) films epitaxial on MgO(001). The logarithmic localization correction to longitudinal resistivity and anomalous Hall resistivity are observed at low temperature. We identify that the coefficient of skew scattering has a reduction from metallic to localized regime, while the contribution of side jump has inconspicuous change except for a small drop below 10 K. Furthermore, we discover that the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity decreases with the reduction of thickness below 2 nm. Our results provide unambiguous experimental evidence to clarify the problem of localization correction to the anomalous Hall effect.

  20. Statistical regimes of random laser fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, Stefano; Cavalieri, Stefano; Oppo, Gian-Luca; Wiersma, Diederik S.

    2007-06-15

    Statistical fluctuations of the light emitted from amplifying random media are studied theoretically and numerically. The characteristic scales of the diffusive motion of light lead to Gaussian or power-law (Levy) distributed fluctuations depending on external control parameters. In the Levy regime, the output pulse is highly irregular leading to huge deviations from a mean-field description. Monte Carlo simulations of a simplified model which includes the population of the medium demonstrate the two statistical regimes and provide a comparison with dynamical rate equations. Different statistics of the fluctuations helps to explain recent experimental observations reported in the literature.

  1. Petrology, geochemistry, and fluid regime of tectonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letnikov, Feliks Artem'evich; Savel'Eva, Valentina Borisovna; Balyshev, Sergei Olegovich

    The book discusses the petrology, geochemisry, and fluid regime of the tectonite formation in rocks that differ with respect to the composition of their granulitic, amphylitic, and green-shale metamorphic facies. Tectonites in magma and metamorphic rocks of different composition are described in terms of their petrological, geochemical, and fluid-regime characteristics, and the pressure/temperature conditions of their formation. Using chemical and physical parameters, tectonites are classified according to their type models. The ore-generating capacity of tectonites in various rocks is estimated using a large geochemical database.

  2. Convective Regimes in Crystallizing Basaltic Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Neufeld, J. A.; Holness, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Cooling through the chamber walls drives crystallisation in crustal magma chambers, resulting in a cumulate pile on the floor and mushy regions at the walls and roof. The liquid in many magma chambers, either the bulk magma or the interstitial liquid in the mushy regions, may convect, driven either thermally, due to cooling, or compositionally, due to fractional crystallization. We have constructed a regime diagram of the possible convective modes in a system containing a basal mushy layer. These modes depend on the large-scale buoyancy forcing characterised by a global Rayleigh number and the proportion of the chamber height constituting the basal mushy region. We have tested this regime diagram using an analogue experimental system composed of a fluid layer overlying a pile of almost neutrally buoyant inert particles. Convection in this system is driven thermally, simulating magma convection above and within a porous cumulate pile. We observe a range of possible convective regimes, enabling us to produce a regime diagram. In addition to modes characterised by convection of the bulk and interstitial fluid, we also observe a series of regimes where the crystal pile is mobilised by fluid motions. These regimes feature saltation and scouring of the crystal pile by convection in the bulk fluid at moderate Rayleigh numbers, and large crystal-rich fountains at high Rayleigh numbers. For even larger Rayleigh numbers the entire crystal pile is mobilised in what we call the snowglobe regime. The observed mobilisation regimes may be applicable to basaltic magma chambers. Plagioclase in basal cumulates crystallised from a dense magma may be a result of crystal mobilisation from a plagioclase-rich roof mush. Compositional convection within such a mush could result in disaggregation, enabling the buoyant plagioclase to be entrained in relatively dense descending liquid plumes and brought to the floor. The phenocryst load in porphyritic lavas is often interpreted as a

  3. Comparative climatology of four marine stratocumulus regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Howard P.

    1990-01-01

    The climatology of marine stratocumulus (MSc) cloud regimes off the west coasts of California, Peru, Morocco, and Angola are examined. Long-term, annual averages are presented for several quantities of interest in the four MSc regimes. The climatologies were constructed using the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS). A 40 year time series of observations was extracted for 32 x 32 deg analysis domains. The data were taken from the monthly-averaged, 2 deg product. The resolution of the analysis is therefore limited to scales of greater than 200 km with submonthly variability not resolved. The averages of total cloud cover, sea surface temperature, and surface pressure are presented.

  4. Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amet, F.; Ke, C. T.; Borzenets, I. V.; Wang, J.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Deacon, R. S.; Yamamoto, M.; Bomze, Y.; Tarucha, S.; Finkelstein, G.

    2016-05-01

    A promising route for creating topological states and excitations is to combine superconductivity and the quantum Hall (QH) effect. Despite this potential, signatures of superconductivity in the QH regime remain scarce, and a superconducting current through a QH weak link has been challenging to observe. We demonstrate the existence of a distinct supercurrent mechanism in encapsulated graphene samples contacted by superconducting electrodes, in magnetic fields as high as 2 tesla. The observation of a supercurrent in the QH regime marks an important step in the quest for exotic topological excitations, such as Majorana fermions and parafermions, which may find applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  5. Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime.

    PubMed

    Amet, F; Ke, C T; Borzenets, I V; Wang, J; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Deacon, R S; Yamamoto, M; Bomze, Y; Tarucha, S; Finkelstein, G

    2016-05-20

    A promising route for creating topological states and excitations is to combine superconductivity and the quantum Hall (QH) effect. Despite this potential, signatures of superconductivity in the QH regime remain scarce, and a superconducting current through a QH weak link has been challenging to observe. We demonstrate the existence of a distinct supercurrent mechanism in encapsulated graphene samples contacted by superconducting electrodes, in magnetic fields as high as 2 tesla. The observation of a supercurrent in the QH regime marks an important step in the quest for exotic topological excitations, such as Majorana fermions and parafermions, which may find applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing. PMID:27199424

  6. Delinating Thermohaline Double-Diffusive Rayleigh Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, T.; Walther, M.; Kolditz, O.; Liedl, R.

    2013-12-01

    In natural systems, convective flow induced from density differences may occur in near-coastal aquifers, atmospheric boundary layers, oceanic streams or within the earth crust. Whether an initially stable, diffusive regime evolves into a convective (stable or chaotic) regime, or vice versa, depends on the system's framing boundary conditions. A conventional parameter to express the relation between diffusive and convective forces of such a density-driven regime is Rayleigh number (Ra). While most systems are mainly dominated by only a single significant driving force (i.e. only temperature or salinity), some systems need to consider two boundary processes (e.g. deep, thus warm, haline flow in porous media). In that case, a two-dimensional, 'double-diffusive' Rayleigh system can be defined. Nield (1998) postulated a boundary between diffusive and convective regime at RaT + RaC = 4pi^2 in the first quadrant (Q1), with Rayleigh numbers for temperature and concentration respectively. The boundary in the forth quadrant (Q4) could not exactly be determined, yet the approximate position estimated. Simulations with HydroGeoSphere (Therrien, 2010) using a vertical, quadratic, homogeneous, isotropic setup confirmed the existence of the 4pi^2-boundary and revealed additional regimes (diffusive, single-roll, double-roll, chaotic) in Q1. Also, non-chaotic, oscillating patterns could be identified in Q4. More detailed investigations with OpenGeoSys (Kolditz, 2012) confirmed the preceding HGS results, and, using a 1:10-scaled domain (height:length), uncovered even more distinctive regimes (diffusive, minimum ten roles, supposely up to 25 roles, and chaotic?) in Q1, while again, oscillating patterns were found in the transition zone between diffusive and chaotic regimes in Q4. Output of numerical simulations from Q1 and Q4 show the mentioned regimes (diffusive, stable-convective, stable-oscillatory, chaotic) while results are displayed in context of a possible delination between

  7. Taxonomy of potential international safeguards regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Lemley, J.R.; Allentuck, J.

    1994-08-01

    Since the International Atomic Energy Agency`s (IAEA) search for the components of Iraq`s nuclear weapons program under the auspices of the United Nations Security Council, a consensus for enhancing, strengthening or expanding the scope of international safeguards has developed. Some of the enhanced safeguards concepts which have been suggested include the following: short-notice, challenge, and random inspections; effluent monitoring in onsite, near site, and fly-by modes; local and wide-area environmental monitoring; and utilization of data from space-platform sensors. Potential safeguards regimes can be classified according to the functional and technical criteria which would be necessary for implementation of various enhanced safeguards concepts. While the nature of the regime which will emerge cannot be predicted, the classification of possible regimes according to major characteristics can be useful for identifying functional criteria and implementation challenges, focusing development efforts on the functional criteria, and planning for efficient use of safeguards resources. Precedents established in previously negotiated treaties -- the Chemical Weapons Convention, the Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe, START, and Open Skies -- are examined with regard to enhancement of the international safeguards regime for nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction. Bilateral, multilateral and regional integration of enhanced safeguards elements is considered.

  8. Prolonged Instability Prior to a Regime Shift

    PubMed Central

    Spanbauer, Trisha L.; Allen, Craig R.; Angeler, David G.; Eason, Tarsha; Fritz, Sherilyn C.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Nash, Kirsty L.; Stone, Jeffery R.

    2014-01-01

    Regime shifts are generally defined as the point of ‘abrupt’ change in the state of a system. However, a seemingly abrupt transition can be the product of a system reorganization that has been ongoing much longer than is evident in statistical analysis of a single component of the system. Using both univariate and multivariate statistical methods, we tested a long-term high-resolution paleoecological dataset with a known change in species assemblage for a regime shift. Analysis of this dataset with Fisher Information and multivariate time series modeling showed that there was a∼2000 year period of instability prior to the regime shift. This period of instability and the subsequent regime shift coincide with regional climate change, indicating that the system is undergoing extrinsic forcing. Paleoecological records offer a unique opportunity to test tools for the detection of thresholds and stable-states, and thus to examine the long-term stability of ecosystems over periods of multiple millennia. PMID:25280010

  9. Knowledge Regimes and Contradictions in Education Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aasen, Petter; Prøitz, Tine Sophie; Sandberg, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The article outlines a theoretical framework for understanding education policy and education reforms based on the concept of knowledge regimes. The concept refers to understandings and definitions of governance and procedural aspects, manners of governing and curriculum issues, thus it comprises contents, structures, and processes of education…

  10. Drag-force regimes in granular impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Mukesh; Mohan, T. R. Krishna; Sen, Surajit

    2014-12-01

    We study the penetration dynamics of a projectile incident normally on a substrate comprising of smaller granular particles in three-dimensions using the discrete element method. Scaling of the penetration depth is consistent with experimental observations for small velocity impacts. Our studies are consistent with the observation that the normal or drag force experienced by the penetrating grain obeys the generalized Poncelet law, which has been extensively invoked in understanding the drag force in the recent experimental data. We find that the normal force experienced by the projectile consists of position and kinetic-energy-dependent pieces. Three different penetration regimes are identified in our studies for low-impact velocities. The first two regimes are observed immediately after the impact and in the early penetration stage, respectively, during which the drag force is seen to depend on the kinetic energy. The depth dependence of the drag force becomes significant in the third regime when the projectile is moving slowly and is partially immersed in the substrate. These regimes relate to the different configurations of the bed: the initial loose surface packed state, fluidized bed below the region of impact, and the state after the crater formation commences.

  11. Radiative effects of global MODIS cloud regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Kato, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    We update previously published Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 data set. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux data sets. Our results clearly show that the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave, and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles, to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance data sets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  12. Drag-force regimes in granular impact.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Mukesh; Mohan, T R Krishna; Sen, Surajit

    2014-12-01

    We study the penetration dynamics of a projectile incident normally on a substrate comprising of smaller granular particles in three-dimensions using the discrete element method. Scaling of the penetration depth is consistent with experimental observations for small velocity impacts. Our studies are consistent with the observation that the normal or drag force experienced by the penetrating grain obeys the generalized Poncelet law, which has been extensively invoked in understanding the drag force in the recent experimental data. We find that the normal force experienced by the projectile consists of position and kinetic-energy-dependent pieces. Three different penetration regimes are identified in our studies for low-impact velocities. The first two regimes are observed immediately after the impact and in the early penetration stage, respectively, during which the drag force is seen to depend on the kinetic energy. The depth dependence of the drag force becomes significant in the third regime when the projectile is moving slowly and is partially immersed in the substrate. These regimes relate to the different configurations of the bed: the initial loose surface packed state, fluidized bed below the region of impact, and the state after the crater formation commences. PMID:25615080

  13. The future of the nuclear nonproliferation regime.

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F.

    2004-01-01

    Following the 1998 nuclear tests in South Asia and later reinforced by revelations about North Korean and Iraqi nuclear activities, there has been growing concern about increasing proliferation dangers. At the same time, the prospects of radiological/nuclear terrorism are seen to be rising - since 9/11, concern over a proliferation/terrorism nexus has never been higher. In the face of this growing danger, there are urgent calls for stronger measures to strengthen the current international nuclear nonproliferation regime, including recommendations to place civilian processing of weapon-useable material under multinational control. As well, there are calls for entirely new tools, including military options. As proliferation and terrorism concerns grow, the regime is under pressure and there is a temptation to consider fundamental changes to the regime. In this context, this paper will address the following: Do we need to change the regime centered on the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)? What improvements could ensure it will be the foundation for the proliferation resistance and physical protection needed if nuclear power grows? What will make it a viable centerpiece of future nonproliferation and counterterrorism approaches?

  14. Forest damage and snow avalanche flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistl, T.; Bebi, P.; Christen, M.; Margreth, S.; Diefenbach, L.; Bartelt, P.

    2015-06-01

    Snow avalanches break, uproot and overturn trees causing damage to forests. The extent of forest damage provides useful information on avalanche frequency and intensity. However, impact forces depend on avalanche flow regime. In this paper, we define avalanche loading cases representing four different avalanche flow regimes: powder, intermittent, dry and wet. Using a numerical model that simulates both powder and wet snow avalanches, we study documented events with forest damage. First we show that in the powder regime, although the applied impact pressures can be small, large bending moments in the tree stem can be produced due to the torque action of the blast. The impact area of the blast extends over the entire tree crown. We find that, powder clouds with velocities over 20 m s-1 can break tree stems. Second we demonstrate that intermittent granular loadings are equivalent to low-density uniform dry snow loadings under the assumption of homogeneous particle distributions. The intermittent regime seldom controls tree breakage. Third we calculate quasi-static pressures of wet snow avalanches and show that they can be much higher than pressures calculated using dynamic pressure formulas. Wet snow pressure depends both on avalanche volume and terrain features upstream of the tree.

  15. Forest damage and snow avalanche flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistl, T.; Bebi, P.; Christen, M.; Margreth, S.; Diefenbach, L.; Bartelt, P.

    2015-01-01

    Snow avalanches break, uproot and overturn trees causing damage to forests. The extent of forest damage provides useful information on avalanche frequency and intensity. However, impact forces depend on avalanche flow regime. In this paper, we define avalanche loading cases representing four different avalanche flow regimes: powder, intermittent, dry and wet. In the powder regime, the blast of the cloud can produce large bending moments in the tree stem because of the impact area extending over the entire tree crown. We demonstrate that intermittent granular loadings are equivalent to low-density uniform dry snow loadings under the assumption of homogeneous particle distributions. In the wet snow case, avalanche pressure is calculated using a quasi-static model accounting for the motion of plug-like wet snow flows. Wet snow pressure depends both on avalanche volume and terrain features upstream of the tree. Using a numerical model that simulates both powder and wet snow avalanches, we study documented events with forest damage. We find (1) powder clouds with velocities over 20 m s-1 can break tree stems, (2) the intermittent regime seldom controls tree breakage and (3) quasi-static pressures of wet snow avalanches can be much higher than pressures calculated using dynamic pressure formulas.

  16. Impacts of different hydrodynamic regimes on flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Mendoza, Rafael; Souza, Alejandro; Amoudry, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    A number of activities carried out in coastal zones and estuaries are affected by sediment transport. Therefore, good knowledge of the processes involved is necessary to adequately manage these areas. Flocculation is a key process on fine sediment dynamics, which affects the effective particle size and settling velocity. The process is further complicated under the combined effect of currents and waves. This research seeks to improve our understanding of the flocculation process under the combined effect of currents and waves. The study site is the Dee Estuary located in Liverpool Bay, United Kingdom. Measurements of volume concentration, grain size and current velocities near the sea bed were obtained from a mooring deployed between 12 February 2008 and 9 March 2008. Turbulent properties could also be calculated because of the fast sampling rate used for current velocities. Water samples were taken from a research vessel during the first two days of the study in order to calibrate moored instruments and convert volume to mass concentration. The observations almost covered two fortnightly periods and three different dynamic regimes can be distinguished: currents-only, combined waves and currents, and wave dominated. During the currents-only regime, floc aggregation and breakup coincide with periods of low and high turbulent stress respectively. The combination of waves and spring tide currents makes the second regime and the floc breakup is most dominant when waves are higher than one meter and small flocs are found even with low turbulent stress from both waves and currents. The third regime is identified as wave-dominant during neap tides with current speed less than 0.25 m/s and waves of 1-2 meters height. In this regime the wave effect takes large sediment into suspension at the same time as small particle sizes from floc breakup. In this case the median particle size is strongly related to the wave height which means that a slight particle aggregation is still

  17. Regime shifts in the anthropocene: drivers, risks, and resilience.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers. PMID:26267896

  18. Regime Shifts in the Anthropocene: Drivers, Risks, and Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D.; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers. PMID:26267896

  19. Photon blockade in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

    PubMed

    Ridolfo, A; Leib, M; Savasta, S; Hartmann, M J

    2012-11-01

    We explore photon coincidence counting statistics in the ultrastrong coupling regime, where the atom-cavity coupling rate becomes comparable to the cavity resonance frequency. In this regime, usual normal order correlation functions fail to describe the output photon statistics. By expressing the electric-field operator in the cavity-emitter dressed basis, we are able to propose correlation functions that are valid for arbitrary degrees of light-matter interaction. Our results show that the standard photon blockade scenario is significantly modified for ultrastrong coupling. We observe parametric processes even for two-level emitters and temporal oscillations of intensity correlation functions at a frequency given by the ultrastrong photon emitter coupling. These effects can be traced back to the presence of two-photon cascade decays induced by counterrotating interaction terms. PMID:23215383

  20. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method developed for the classification of quasi-stationary events into a few planetary flow regimes and for the examination of transitions between these regimes is described. The method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and then to a 500-mbar data set for Northern Hemisphere (NH), for which cluster analysis was carried out in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters were found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, while transient clusters were found in the band-pass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band, three pairs of clusters determined EOFs 1, 2, and 3, respectively; they exhibited well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American pattern, and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data exhibited strong bimodality.

  1. Steady and transient regimes in hydropower plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajic, A.

    2013-12-01

    Hydropower plant that has been in operation for about 30 years has to be reconstructed. They have already installed 12 Kaplan turbines, the largest in the world at that time. The existing CAM relationship was determined based on hydraulic model tests and checked by efficiency on-site tests. It was also tested based on turbine bearing vibrations. In order to discover vibrations and long cracks on stay vanes detailed on-site measurements were performed. Influence of the modification of the trailing edges on the dynamic stresses of the stay vanes is also shown. In order to improve power output transient regimes were analyzed, both experimentally and numerically. Reversible hydropower plant, a pioneer in Europe since it was the first Pump storage power plant constructed with the highest head pump-turbines in the world. Analyses of transient regimes discover some problems with S-shaped characteristics coupled with non-symmetrical penstock.

  2. The optomechanical instability in the quantum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Max; Kubala, Björn; Marquardt, Florian

    2008-09-01

    We consider a generic optomechanical system, consisting of a driven optical cavity and a movable mirror attached to a cantilever. Systems of this kind (and analogues) have been realized in many recent experiments. It is well known that these systems can exhibit an instability towards a regime where the cantilever settles into self-sustained oscillations. In this paper, we briefly review the classical theory of the optomechanical instability, and then discuss the features arising in the quantum regime. We solve numerically a full quantum master equation for the coupled system, and use it to analyze the photon number, the cantilever's mechanical energy, the phonon probability distribution and the mechanical Wigner density, as a function of experimentally accessible control parameters. When a suitable dimensionless 'quantum parameter' is sent to zero, the results of the quantum mechanical model converge towards the classical predictions. We discuss this quantum-to-classical transition in some detail.

  3. Dominant takeover regimes for genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Baskaran, Subbiah

    1995-01-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is a machine-based optimization routine which connects evolutionary learning to natural genetic laws. The present work addresses the problem of obtaining the dominant takeover regimes in the GA dynamics. Estimated GA run times are computed for slow and fast convergence in the limits of high and low fitness ratios. Using Euler's device for obtaining partial sums in closed forms, the result relaxes the previously held requirements for long time limits. Analytical solution reveal that appropriately accelerated regimes can mark the ascendancy of the most fit solution. In virtually all cases, the weak (logarithmic) dependence of convergence time on problem size demonstrates the potential for the GA to solve large N-P complete problems.

  4. Bose polarons in the strongly interacting regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, Dhruv; Hu, Ming-Guang; van de Graaff, Michael; Corson, John; Cornell, Eric; Jin, Deborah

    2016-05-01

    Impurities immersed in and interacting with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are predicted to form quasiparticle excitations called Bose polarons. I will present experimental evidence of Bose polarons in cold atoms obtained using radio-frequency spectroscopy to measure the excitation spectrum of fermionic K-40 impurities interacting with a BEC of Rb-87 atoms. We use an interspecies Feshbach resonance to tune the interactions between the impurities and the bosons, and we take data in the strongly interacting regime.

  5. Predictive Bayesian inference and dynamic treatment regimes.

    PubMed

    Saarela, Olli; Arjas, Elja; Stephens, David A; Moodie, Erica E M

    2015-11-01

    While optimal dynamic treatment regimes (DTRs) can be estimated without specification of a predictive model, a model-based approach, combined with dynamic programming and Monte Carlo integration, enables direct probabilistic comparisons between the outcomes under the optimal DTR and alternative (dynamic or static) treatment regimes. The Bayesian predictive approach also circumvents problems related to frequentist estimators under the nonregular estimation problem. However, the model-based approach is susceptible to misspecification, in particular of the "null-paradox" type, which is due to the model parameters not having a direct causal interpretation in the presence of latent individual-level characteristics. Because it is reasonable to insist on correct inferences under the null of no difference between the alternative treatment regimes, we discuss how to achieve this through a "null-robust" reparametrization of the problem in a longitudinal setting. Since we argue that causal inference can be entirely understood as posterior predictive inference in a hypothetical population without covariate imbalances, we also discuss how controlling for confounding through inverse probability of treatment weighting can be justified and incorporated in the Bayesian setting. PMID:26259996

  6. The kinetic regime of the Vicsek model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepizhko, A. A.; Kulinskii, V. L.

    2009-12-01

    We consider the dynamics of the system of self-propelling particles modeled via the Vicsek algorithm in continuum time limit. It is shown that the alignment process for the velocities can be subdivided into two regimes: "fast" kinetic and "slow" hydrodynamic ones. In fast kinetic regime the alignment of the particle velocity to the local neighborhood takes place with characteristic relaxation time. So, that the bigger regions arise with the velocity alignment. These regions align their velocities thus giving rise to hydrodynamic regime of the dynamics. We propose the mean-field-like approach in which we take into account the correlations between density and velocity. The comparison of the theoretical predictions with the numerical simulations is given. The relation between Vicsek model in the zero velocity limit and the Kuramoto model is stated. The mean-field approach accounting for the dynamic change of the neighborhood is proposed. The nature of the discontinuity of the dependence of the order parameter in case of vectorial noise revealed in Gregorie and Chaite, Phys. Rev. Lett., 92, 025702 (2004) is discussed and the explanation of it is proposed.

  7. Particle optics in the Rayleigh regime.

    PubMed

    Moosmüller, Hans; Arnott, W Patrick

    2009-09-01

    Light scattering and absorption by particles suspended in the atmosphere modifies the transfer of solar energy in the atmosphere, thereby influencing global and regional climate change and atmospheric visibility. Of particular interest are the optical properties of particles in the Rayleigh regime, where particles are small compared with the wavelength of the scattered or absorbed light, because these particles experience little gravitational settlement and may have long atmospheric lifetimes. Optical properties of particles in the Rayleigh regime are commonly derived from electromagnetic theory using Maxwell's equations and appropriate boundary conditions. The size dependence of particle scattering and absorption are derived here from the most basic principles for coherent processes such as Rayleigh scattering (i.e., add amplitudes if in phase) and incoherent processes such as absorption (i.e., add cross sections), at the same time yielding understanding of the upper particle size limit for the Rayleigh regime. The wavelength dependence of Rayleigh scattering and absorption are also obtained by adding a basic scale invariance for particle optics. Simple consequences for particle single-scattering albedo ("whiteness") and the optical measurement of particle mass densities are explained. These alternative derivations complement the conventional understanding obtained from electromagnetic theory. PMID:19785268

  8. Constructing an interdisciplinary flow regime recommendation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally agreed that river rehabilitation most often relies on restoring a more natural flow regime, but credibly defining the desired regime can be problematic. I combined four distinct methods to develop and refine month-by-month and event-based flow recommendations to protect and partially restore the ecological integrity of the Cache la Poudre River through Fort Collins, Colorado. A statistical hydrologic approach was used to summarize the river's natural flow regime and set provisional monthly flow targets at levels that were historically exceeded 75% of the time. These preliminary monthly targets were supplemented using results from three Poudre-specific disciplinary studies. A substrate maintenance flow model was used to better define the high flows needed to flush accumulated sediment from the river's channel and help sustain the riparian zone in this snowmelt-dominated river. A hydraulic/habitat model and a water temperature model were both used to better define the minimum flows necessary to maintain a thriving cool water fishery. The result is a range of recommended monthly flows and daily flow guidance illustrating the advantage of combining a wide range of available disciplinary information, supplemented by judgment based on ecological principles and a general understanding of river ecosystems, in a highly altered, working river. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association.

  9. Three-dimensional null point reconnection regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, E. R.; Pontin, D. I.

    2009-12-15

    Recent advances in theory and computational experiments have shown the need to refine the previous categorization of magnetic reconnection at three-dimensional null points--points at which the magnetic field vanishes. We propose here a division into three different types, depending on the nature of the flow near the spine and fan of the null. The spine is an isolated field line which approaches the null (or recedes from it), while the fan is a surface of field lines which recede from it (or approach it). So-called torsional spine reconnection occurs when field lines in the vicinity of the fan rotate, with current becoming concentrated along the spine so that nearby field lines undergo rotational slippage. In torsional fan reconnection field lines near the spine rotate and create a current that is concentrated in the fan with a rotational flux mismatch and rotational slippage. In both of these regimes, the spine and fan are perpendicular and there is no flux transfer across spine or fan. The third regime, called spine-fan reconnection, is the most common in practice and combines elements of the previous spine and fan models. In this case, in response to a generic shearing motion, the null point collapses to form a current sheet that is focused at the null itself, in a sheet that locally spans both the spine and fan. In this regime the spine and fan are no longer perpendicular and there is flux transfer across both of them.

  10. Understanding the Early Regime of Drop Spreading.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Surjyasish; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2016-09-01

    We present experimental data to characterize the spreading of a liquid drop on a substrate kept submerged in another liquid medium. They reveal that drop spreading always begins in a regime dominated by drop viscosity where the spreading radius scales as r ∼ t with a nonuniversal prefactor. This initial viscous regime either lasts in its entirety or switches to an intermediate inertial regime where the spreading radius grows with time following the well-established inertial scaling of r ∼ t(1/2). This latter case depends on the characteristic viscous length scale of the problem. In either case, the final stage of spreading, close to equilibrium, follows Tanner's law. Further experiments performed on the same substrate kept in ambient air reveal a similar trend, albeit with limited spatiotemporal resolution, showing the universal nature of the spreading behavior. It is also found that, for early times of spreading, the process is similar to coalescence of two freely suspended liquid drops, making the presence of the substrate and consequently the three-phase contact line insignificant. PMID:27513708

  11. FISHER INFORMATION OF DYNAMIC REGIME TRANSITIONS IN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems often exhibit transitions between multiple dynamic regimes (or steady states). As ecosystems experience perturbations of varying regularity and intensity, they may either remain within the state space neighborhood of the current regime, or ?flip? into the neighborhood ...

  12. THE DYNAMIC REGIME CONCEPT FOR ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT AND RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dynamic regimes of ecosystems are multidimensional basis of attraction, characterized by particular species communities and ecosystems processes. Ecosystem patterns and processes rarely respond linerarly to disturbances, and the nonlinear cynamic regime concept offers a more real...

  13. Laboratory Exploration of Multiple Zonal Jet Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. A.; Speer, K. G.; Griffiths, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    The differentially heated, rotating annulus has classically been used to study wave interactions within a single, baroclinic jet. At high rotation rates, the baroclinic instability of the flow leads to a transition to a turbulent, eddy-dominated regime. In the presence of a topographic beta effect, the flow has been observed to produce multiple, meandering zonal jets that are qualitatively similar to those found in planetary atmospheres and in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Our study builds on previous annulus experiments [1] by making observations further within this new regime. We observe with PIV and other techniques how the structure of the flow responds to changes in various parameters such as tank geometry, gradient in the Coriolis parameter, rotation rate, and differential thermal forcing. By not employing the more typical direct forcing of small scales, but by applying a large scale forcing over the annulus gap width, this study allows the varying effects of eddy scale selection, enstrophy cascade, etc. to naturally generate flow that more closely resembles planetary atmospheres and the ACC. We seek nondimensional parameters that significantly control zonation in a real fluid. These observations will provide a metric for the comparison of various theoretical models for multiple zonal jet formation. Other properties of the jets, such as their migration, meandering, bifurcation, and merging, can also be observed in an idealized situation and compared to numerical simulations. Ultimately, this will aid the testing and development of sub-grid-scale parameterizations for the multiple zonal jet regime that remain robust in the face of multiple forcing parameters. [1] Wordsworth, R. D., Read, P. L., & Yamazaki, Y. H. (2008). Turbulence, waves, and jets in a differentially heated rotating annulus experiment Physics of Fluids, 20(12), 126602.Streak photograph of suspended particles visualizing the flow representative of multiple zonal jets

  14. The discrete regime of flame propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew

    The propagation of laminar dust flames in iron dust clouds was studied in a low-gravity envi-ronment on-board a parabolic flight aircraft. The elimination of buoyancy-induced convection and particle settling permitted measurements of fundamental combustion parameters such as the burning velocity and the flame quenching distance over a wide range of particle sizes and in different gaseous mixtures. The discrete regime of flame propagation was observed by substitut-ing nitrogen present in air with xenon, an inert gas with a significantly lower heat conductivity. Flame propagation in the discrete regime is controlled by the heat transfer between neighbor-ing particles, rather than by the particle burning rate used by traditional continuum models of heterogeneous flames. The propagation mechanism of discrete flames depends on the spa-tial distribution of particles, and thus such flames are strongly influenced by local fluctuations in the fuel concentration. Constant pressure laminar dust flames were observed inside 70 cm long, 5 cm diameter Pyrex tubes. Equally-spaced plate assemblies forming rectangular chan-nels were placed inside each tube to determine the quenching distance defined as the minimum channel width through which a flame can successfully propagate. High-speed video cameras were used to measure the flame speed and a fiber optic spectrometer was used to measure the flame temperature. Experimental results were compared with predictions obtained from a numerical model of a three-dimensional flame developed to capture both the discrete nature and the random distribution of particles in the flame. Though good qualitative agreement was obtained between model predictions and experimental observations, residual g-jitters and the short reduced-gravity periods prevented further investigations of propagation limits in the dis-crete regime. The full exploration of the discrete flame phenomenon would require high-quality, long duration reduced gravity environment

  15. Quantum gas mixtures in different correlation regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-March, Miguel Angel; Busch, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    We present a many-body description for two-component ultracold bosonic gases when one of the species is in the weakly interacting regime and the other is either weakly or strongly interacting. In the one-dimensional limit the latter is a hybrid in which a Tonks-Girardeau gas is immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate, which is an example of a class of quantum system involving a tunable, superfluid environment. We describe the process of phase separation microscopically as well as semiclassically in both situations and show that quantum correlations are maintained even in the separated phase.

  16. Imperfect relativistic mirrors in the quantum regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonça, J. T.; Serbeto, A.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2014-05-15

    The collective backscattering of intense laser radiation by energetic electron beams is considered in the relativistic quantum regime. Exact solutions for the radiation field are obtained, for arbitrary electron pulse shapes and laser intensities. The electron beams act as imperfect nonlinear mirrors on the incident laser radiation. This collective backscattering process can lead to the development of new sources of ultra-short pulse radiation in the gamma-ray domain. Numerical examples show that, for plausible experimental conditions, intense pulses of gamma-rays, due to the double Doppler shift of the harmonics of the incident laser radiation, can be produced using the available technology, with durations less than 1 as.

  17. Bose Polarons in the Strongly Interacting Regime.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Guang; Van de Graaff, Michael J; Kedar, Dhruv; Corson, John P; Cornell, Eric A; Jin, Deborah S

    2016-07-29

    When an impurity is immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate, impurity-boson interactions are expected to dress the impurity into a quasiparticle, the Bose polaron. We superimpose an ultracold atomic gas of ^{87}Rb with a much lower density gas of fermionic ^{40}K impurities. Through the use of a Feshbach resonance and radio-frequency spectroscopy, we characterize the energy, spectral width, and lifetime of the resultant polaron on both the attractive and the repulsive branches in the strongly interacting regime. The width of the polaron in the attractive branch is narrow compared to its binding energy, even as the two-body scattering length diverges. PMID:27517776

  18. Bose polarons in the strongly interacting regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Guang; van de Graaff, Michael; Kedar, Dhruv; Cornell, Eric; Jin, Deborah

    Impurities immersed in and interacting with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are predicted to form quasiparticle excitations called Bose polarons. I will present experimental evidence of Bose polarons in cold atoms obtained using radio-frequency spectroscopy to measure the excitation spectrum of fermionic 40K impurities interacting with a BEC of 87Rb atoms. We use an interspecies Feshbach resonance to tune the interactions between the impurities and the bosons, and we take data in the strongly interacting regime. This work is supported by NSF, NASA and NIST.

  19. Bose Polarons in the Strongly Interacting Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Guang; Van de Graaff, Michael J.; Kedar, Dhruv; Corson, John P.; Cornell, Eric A.; Jin, Deborah S.

    2016-07-01

    When an impurity is immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate, impurity-boson interactions are expected to dress the impurity into a quasiparticle, the Bose polaron. We superimpose an ultracold atomic gas of 87Rb with a much lower density gas of fermionic 40 impurities. Through the use of a Feshbach resonance and radio-frequency spectroscopy, we characterize the energy, spectral width, and lifetime of the resultant polaron on both the attractive and the repulsive branches in the strongly interacting regime. The width of the polaron in the attractive branch is narrow compared to its binding energy, even as the two-body scattering length diverges.

  20. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United...

  1. The relationship between void waves and flow regime transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Drew, D.A.; Kalkach-Navarro, S.; Park, J.W.

    1992-12-31

    The results of an extensive experimental and analytical study on the relationship between void waves and flow regime transition are presented, in particular, the bubbly/slug flow regime transition. It is shown that void wave instability signals a flow regime transition.

  2. 22 CFR 121.16 - Missile Technology Control Regime Annex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime Annex. 121.16... STATES MUNITIONS LIST Enumeration of Articles § 121.16 Missile Technology Control Regime Annex. Some of the items on the Missile Technology Control Regime Annex are controlled by both the Department...

  3. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United...

  4. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement among the United States, the United Kingdom,...

  5. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United...

  6. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United...

  7. Elastic regimes of subisostatic athermal fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licup, A. J.; Sharma, A.; MacKintosh, F. C.

    2016-01-01

    Athermal models of disordered fibrous networks are highly useful for studying the mechanics of elastic networks composed of stiff biopolymers. The underlying network architecture is a key aspect that can affect the elastic properties of these systems, which include rich linear and nonlinear elasticity. Existing computational approaches have focused on both lattice-based and off-lattice networks obtained from the random placement of rods. It is not obvious, a priori, whether the two architectures have fundamentally similar or different mechanics. If they are different, it is not clear which of these represents a better model for biological networks. Here, we show that both approaches are essentially equivalent for the same network connectivity, provided the networks are subisostatic with respect to central force interactions. Moreover, for a given subisostatic connectivity, we even find that lattice-based networks in both two and three dimensions exhibit nearly identical nonlinear elastic response. We provide a description of the linear mechanics for both architectures in terms of a scaling function. We also show that the nonlinear regime is dominated by fiber bending and that stiffening originates from the stabilization of subisostatic networks by stress. We propose a generalized relation for this regime in terms of the self-generated normal stresses that develop under deformation. Different network architectures have different susceptibilities to the normal stress but essentially exhibit the same nonlinear mechanics. Such a stiffening mechanism has been shown to successfully capture the nonlinear mechanics of collagen networks.

  8. Vibratory Regime Classification of Infant Phonation

    PubMed Central

    Buder, Eugene H.; Chorna, Lesya B.; Oller, D. Kimbrough; Robinson, Rebecca B.

    2008-01-01

    Infant phonation is highly variable in many respects, including the basic vibratory patterns by which the vocal tissues create acoustic signals. Previous studies have identified the regular occurrence of non-modal phonation types in normal infant phonation. The glottis is like many oscillating systems that, because of non-linear relationships among the elements, may vibrate in ways representing the deterministic patterns classified theoretically within the mathematical framework of non-linear dynamics. The infant’s pre-verbal vocal explorations present such a variety of phonations that it may be possible to find effectively all the classes of vibration predicted by non-linear dynamic theory. The current report defines acoustic criteria for an important subset of such vibratory regimes, and demonstrates that analysts can be trained to reliably use these criteria for a classification that includes all instances of infant phonation in the recorded corpora. The method is thus internally comprehensive in the sense that all phonations are classified, but it is not exhaustive in the sense that all vocal qualities are thereby represented. Using the methods thus developed, this study also demonstrates that the distributions of these phonation types vary significantly across sessions of recording in the first year of life, suggesting developmental changes. The method of regime classification is thus capable of tracking changes that may be indicative of maturation of the mechanism, the learning of categories of phonatory control, and the possibly varying use of vocalizations across social contexts. PMID:17509829

  9. Wavy regime of a viscoplastic film flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Symphony; Ruyer-Quil, Christian; Dandapat, Bhabani S.

    2010-11-01

    We consider a power-law fluid flowing down an inclined plane under the action of gravity. The divergence of the viscosity of a shear-thinning fluid at zero strain rate is taken care of by introducing a Newtonian plateau at small strain rate. Applying a weighted residual approach, a two-equations model is formulated in terms of two coupled evolution equations for the film thickness h and the local flow rate q within the framework of lubrication theory. The model accounts for the streamwise diffusion of momentum. Consistency of the model is achieved up to first order in the film parameter for inertia terms and up to second order for viscous terms. Comparison to Orr-Sommerfeld stability analysis and to DNS show convincing agreement in both linear and nonlinear regimes. In the case of shear-thinning fluids, lowering the power index has a non-trivial effect on the primary instability of the film: the threshold of the instability occurs at a smaller Reynolds number but the range of instable wavenumber is also reduced. In the nonlinear regime, we have evidenced a subcritical bifurcation of the traveling-wave solutions from marginal stability conditions.

  10. Elastic regimes of subisostatic athermal fiber networks.

    PubMed

    Licup, A J; Sharma, A; MacKintosh, F C

    2016-01-01

    Athermal models of disordered fibrous networks are highly useful for studying the mechanics of elastic networks composed of stiff biopolymers. The underlying network architecture is a key aspect that can affect the elastic properties of these systems, which include rich linear and nonlinear elasticity. Existing computational approaches have focused on both lattice-based and off-lattice networks obtained from the random placement of rods. It is not obvious, a priori, whether the two architectures have fundamentally similar or different mechanics. If they are different, it is not clear which of these represents a better model for biological networks. Here, we show that both approaches are essentially equivalent for the same network connectivity, provided the networks are subisostatic with respect to central force interactions. Moreover, for a given subisostatic connectivity, we even find that lattice-based networks in both two and three dimensions exhibit nearly identical nonlinear elastic response. We provide a description of the linear mechanics for both architectures in terms of a scaling function. We also show that the nonlinear regime is dominated by fiber bending and that stiffening originates from the stabilization of subisostatic networks by stress. We propose a generalized relation for this regime in terms of the self-generated normal stresses that develop under deformation. Different network architectures have different susceptibilities to the normal stress but essentially exhibit the same nonlinear mechanics. Such a stiffening mechanism has been shown to successfully capture the nonlinear mechanics of collagen networks. PMID:26871101

  11. Dynamic regimes of random fuzzy logic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Dominik M.; Theis, Fabian J.

    2011-01-01

    Random multistate networks, generalizations of the Boolean Kauffman networks, are generic models for complex systems of interacting agents. Depending on their mean connectivity, these networks exhibit ordered as well as chaotic behavior with a critical boundary separating both regimes. Typically, the nodes of these networks are assigned single discrete states. Here, we describe nodes by fuzzy numbers, i.e. vectors of degree-of-membership (DOM) functions specifying the degree to which the nodes are in each of their discrete states. This allows our models to deal with imprecision and uncertainties. Compatible update rules are constructed by expressing the update rules of the multistate network in terms of Boolean operators and generalizing them to fuzzy logic (FL) operators. The standard choice for these generalizations is the Gödel FL, where AND and OR are replaced by the minimum and maximum of two DOMs, respectively. In mean-field approximations we are able to analytically describe the percolation and asymptotic distribution of DOMs in random Gödel FL networks. This allows us to characterize the different dynamic regimes of random multistate networks in terms of FL. In a low-dimensional example, we provide explicit computations and validate our mean-field results by showing that they agree well with network simulations.

  12. Dynamic regime marginal structural mean models for estimation of optimal dynamic treatment regimes, Part I: main content.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Liliana; Rotnitzky, Andrea; Robins, James M

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic treatment regimes are set rules for sequential decision making based on patient covariate history. Observational studies are well suited for the investigation of the effects of dynamic treatment regimes because of the variability in treatment decisions found in them. This variability exists because different physicians make different decisions in the face of similar patient histories. In this article we describe an approach to estimate the optimal dynamic treatment regime among a set of enforceable regimes. This set is comprised by regimes defined by simple rules based on a subset of past information. The regimes in the set are indexed by a Euclidean vector. The optimal regime is the one that maximizes the expected counterfactual utility over all regimes in the set. We discuss assumptions under which it is possible to identify the optimal regime from observational longitudinal data. Murphy et al. (2001) developed efficient augmented inverse probability weighted estimators of the expected utility of one fixed regime. Our methods are based on an extension of the marginal structural mean model of Robins (1998, 1999) which incorporate the estimation ideas of Murphy et al. (2001). Our models, which we call dynamic regime marginal structural mean models, are specially suitable for estimating the optimal treatment regime in a moderately small class of enforceable regimes of interest. We consider both parametric and semiparametric dynamic regime marginal structural models. We discuss locally efficient, double-robust estimation of the model parameters and of the index of the optimal treatment regime in the set. In a companion paper in this issue of the journal we provide proofs of the main results. PMID:21969994

  13. Institutional design and regime effectiveness in transboundary river management - the Elbe water quality regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowsky, I.

    2007-06-01

    The literature on transboundary river management suggests that institutions play an important role in bringing cooperation about. However, the knowledge on how they should be designed in order to do so remains limited. One way to learn more about adequate institutional design is to assess the effectiveness of existing regimes, and to trace the causal relationships leading to the respective outcomes. In order to gain further insights into the relationship of institutional design and regime effectiveness, this paper presents a study on the water quality regime of the International Commission for the Protection of the Elbe (ICPE). The analysis is based on a review of pertinent documents and ten qualitative interviews with Czech and German Commission members and NGO representatives. Particular emphasis has been put on determining the ICPE's specific contribution and the no-regime counterfactual as well as on the perceived expedience of the institutional arrangements. The study shows that overall due to external as well as internal institutional factors the ICPE proved relatively successful, and as such it also provides insights into how institutions matter: The commission served as platform for joint problem solving by identifying priorities for action. These international obligations increased the power of national administrations and their access to funds. At the same time, the Commission's reporting to the public served as an enforcement mechanism. However, the ICPE's contribution towards achieving the various goals varied significantly between the different areas of activity. It was high where the main responsibility for action was with the public authorities, such as in the area of wastewater treatment and the establishment of an international alarm plan and model. It was practically non existent in the reduction of non-point pollution from agriculture, where the success depended on the behavior of individual private actors (farmers). From a methodological point

  14. The Great Lakes' regional climate regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Noriyuki

    For the last couple of decades, the Great Lakes have undergone rapid surface warming. In particular, the magnitude of the summer surface-warming trends of the Great Lakes have been much greater than those of surrounding land (Austin and Colman, 2007). Among the Great Lakes, the deepest Lake Superior exhibited the strongest warming trend in its annual, as well as summer surface water temperature. We find that many aspects of this behavior can be explained in terms of the tendency of deep lakes to exhibit multiple regimes characterized, under the same seasonally varying forcing, by the warmer and colder seasonal cycles exhibiting different amounts of wintertime lake-ice cover and corresponding changes in the summertime lake-surface temperatures. In this thesis, we address the problem of the Great Lakes' warming using one-dimensional lake modeling to interpret diverse observations of the recent lake behavior. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  15. Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    2000-01-01

    Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

  16. Nonlinear regimes of forced magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Vekstein, G.; Kusano, K.

    2015-09-15

    This letter presents a self-consistent description of nonlinear forced magnetic reconnection in Taylor's model of this process. If external boundary perturbation is strong enough, nonlinearity in the current sheet evolution becomes important before resistive effects come into play. This terminates the current sheet shrinking that takes place at the linear stage and brings about its nonlinear equilibrium with a finite thickness. Then, in theory, this equilibrium is destroyed by a finite plasma resistivity during the skin-time, and further reconnection proceeds in the Rutherford regime. However, realization of such a scenario is unlikely because of the plasmoid instability, which is fast enough to develop before the transition to the Rutherford phase occurs. The suggested analytical theory is entirely different from all previous studies and provides proper interpretation of the presently available numerical simulations of nonlinear forced magnetic reconnection.

  17. Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ming-Tso; Amet, François; Ke, Chung-Ting; Borzenets, Ivan; Wang, Jiyingmei; Watanabe, Keji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Deacon, Russell; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Bomze, Yuriy; Tarucha, Seigo; Finkelstein, Gleb

    Combining superconductivity and the quantum Hall (QH) effect is a promising route for creating new types of topological excitations. Despite this potential, signatures of superconductivity in the quantum Hall regime remain scarce, and a superconducting current through a QH weak link has so far eluded experimental observation. Here we demonstrate the existence of a novel type of Josephson coupling through a QH region at magnetic fields as high as 2 Tesla. The supercurrent is mediated by states encompassing QH edge channels, which are flowing on opposite sides of the sample. The edges are coupled together by the hybrid electron-hole modes at the interfaces between the QH region and the superconducting contacts. These chiral modes, which share some features with Majorana modes, are formed when electron and hole edge states are mixed by the superconductor.

  18. Environment Flow Assessment with Flow Regime Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Ho, C. C.; Chang, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    To avoid worsen river and estuarine ecosystems cause by overusing water resources, environmental flows conservation is applied to reduce the impact of river environment. Environmental flows refer to water provided within a river, wetland or coastal zone to sustain ecosystems and benefits to human wellbeing. Environment flow assessment is now widely accepted that a naturally variable flow regime, rather than just a minimum low flow. In this study, we propose four methods, experience method, Tenant method, hydraulic method and habitat method to assess the environmental flow of base flow, flush flow and overbank flow with different discharge, frequency and occurrence period. Dahan River has been chosen as a case to demonstrate the assessment mechanism. The alternatives impact analysis of environment and human water used provides a reference for stakeholders when holding an environmental flow consultative meeting.

  19. Deterministic-random separation in nonstationary regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, D.; Antoni, J.; Sieg-Zieba, S.; Eltabach, M.

    2016-02-01

    In rotating machinery vibration analysis, the synchronous average is perhaps the most widely used technique for extracting periodic components. Periodic components are typically related to gear vibrations, misalignments, unbalances, blade rotations, reciprocating forces, etc. Their separation from other random components is essential in vibration-based diagnosis in order to discriminate useful information from masking noise. However, synchronous averaging theoretically requires the machine to operate under stationary regime (i.e. the related vibration signals are cyclostationary) and is otherwise jeopardized by the presence of amplitude and phase modulations. A first object of this paper is to investigate the nature of the nonstationarity induced by the response of a linear time-invariant system subjected to speed varying excitation. For this purpose, the concept of a cyclo-non-stationary signal is introduced, which extends the class of cyclostationary signals to speed-varying regimes. Next, a "generalized synchronous average'' is designed to extract the deterministic part of a cyclo-non-stationary vibration signal-i.e. the analog of the periodic part of a cyclostationary signal. Two estimators of the GSA have been proposed. The first one returns the synchronous average of the signal at predefined discrete operating speeds. A brief statistical study of it is performed, aiming to provide the user with confidence intervals that reflect the "quality" of the estimator according to the SNR and the estimated speed. The second estimator returns a smoothed version of the former by enforcing continuity over the speed axis. It helps to reconstruct the deterministic component by tracking a specific trajectory dictated by the speed profile (assumed to be known a priori).The proposed method is validated first on synthetic signals and then on actual industrial signals. The usefulness of the approach is demonstrated on envelope-based diagnosis of bearings in variable

  20. Weather Regimes: Recurrence and Quasi Stationarity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelangeli, Paul-Antoine; Vautard, Robert; Legras, Bernard

    1995-04-01

    Two different definitions of midlatitude weather regimes are compared. The first seeks recurrent atmospheric patterns. The second seeks quasi-stationary patterns, whose average tendency vanishes. Recurrent patterns are identified by cluster analysis, and quasi-stationary patterns are identified by solving a nonlinear equilibration equation. Both methods are applied on the same dataset: the NMC final analyses of 700-hPa geopotential heights covering 44 winters. The analysis is performed separately over the Atlantic and Pacific sectors.The two methods give the same number of weather regimes-four over the Atlantic sector and three over the Pacific sector. However, the patterns differ significantly. The investigation of the tendency, or drift, of the clusters shows that recurrent flows have a systematic slow evolution, explaining this difference. The patterns are in agreement with the ones obtained from previous studies, but their number differs.The cluster analysis algorithm used here is a partitioning algorithm, which agglomerates data around randomly chosen seeds and iteratively finds the partition that minimizes the variance within clusters, given a prescribed number of clusters. The authors develop a classifiability index, based on the correlation between the cluster centroids obtained from different initial pullings. By comparing the classifiability index of observations with that obtained from a multivariate noise model, an objective definition of the number of clusters present in the data is given. Although the classifiability index is maximal by prescribing two clusters in both sectors, it only differs significantly from that obtained with the noise model using four Atlantic clusters and three Pacific clusters. The partitioning clustering method turns out to give more statistically stable clusters than hierarchical clustering schemes.

  1. Rheological equations in asymptotic regimes of granular flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.; Ling, C.-H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper assesses the validity of the generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model in light of the established constitutive relations in two asymptotic flow regimes, namely, the macroviscous and grain-inertia regimes. A comprehensive review of the literature on constitutive relations in both regimes reveals that except for some material constants, such as the coefficient of restitution, the normalized shear stress in both regimes varies only with the grain concentration, C. It is found that Krieger-Dougherty's relative viscosity, ??*(C), is sufficiently coherent among the monotonically nondecreasing functions of C used in describing the variation of the shear stress with C in both regimes. It not only accurately represents the C-dependent relative viscosity of a suspension in the macroviscous regime, but also plays a role of the radial distribution function that describes the statistics of particle collisions in the grain-inertia regime. Use of ??*(C) alone, however, cannot link the two regimes. Another parameter, the shear-rate number, N, is needed in modelling the rheology of neutrally buoyant granular flows in transition between the two asymptotic regimes. The GVF model proves compatible with most established relations in both regimes.

  2. Evaluating temperature regimes for protection of brown trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armour, Carl L.

    1994-01-01

    Geographic distribution and population success of brown trout (Salmo trutta) are affected by temperature regimes. Concepts are presented for evaluating alternative temperature regimes for brown trout based on published temperature information and professional judgment. Temperature information from the literature is included for spawning runs, spawning, egg and larval development, growth, and other subjects. The objective is to aid biologists in evaluating alternative temperature regimes so as to select those that will protect and enhance environmental quality for brown trout.

  3. Stability analysis of synchronization regimes of spinning rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dron, N. M.

    1993-10-01

    A method is studied for estimating the formation of synchronization regimes in rocket ballistic flight in which the roll rate approaches the pitch rate. Supporting resonance angular motion regimes due to induced moments are analyzed, and the nonlinear second-order differential equation of the rolling motion is addressed. The results permit synchronization regimes to be prevented, which is important for motion stability and trajectory parameter dispersion in sounding rockets.

  4. CSDP: The seismology of continental thermal regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1990-05-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 3 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. The past year has been extremely productive especially in the area of interpretation theory, including the following two major break-throughs. One is the derivation of an integral equation for time-dependent power spectra, which unified all the existing theories on seismic scattering (including the radiative transfer theory for total energy and single and multiple scattering theories based on the ray approach) and offers more complete and economical solutions to the problems of seismic scattering and attenuation. The other is the new formula for synthetic seismograms for layered media with irregular interfaces, combining the T-matrix method for an arbitrary shaped inclusion and the method of global generalized reflection/transmission coefficients for layered media. Both breakthroughs will enable us to deal with seismic observations in complex earth structures more efficiently and accurately. In the area of experimental studies, we discovered seismic guided waves trapped in the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. 54 refs., 14 figs.

  5. On spinfoam models in large spin regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Muxin

    2014-01-01

    We study the semiclassical behavior of Lorentzian Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine (EPRL) spinfoam model, by taking into account the sum over spins in the large spin regime. We also employ the method of stationary phase analysis with parameters and the so-called, almost analytic machinery, in order to find the asymptotic behavior of the contributions from all possible large spin configurations in the spinfoam model. The spins contributing the sum are written as Jf = λjf, where λ is a large parameter resulting in an asymptotic expansion via stationary phase approximation. The analysis shows that at least for the simplicial Lorentzian geometries (as spinfoam critical configurations), they contribute the leading order approximation of spinfoam amplitude only when their deficit angles satisfy \\gamma \\mathring{\\Theta }_f\\le \\lambda ^{-1/2} mod 4\\pi {Z}. Our analysis results in a curvature expansion of the semiclassical low energy effective action from the spinfoam model, where the UV modifications of Einstein gravity appear as subleading high-curvature corrections.

  6. RF Profile Control for Sustained Plasma Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosea, J.; Bernabei, S.; Leblanc, B.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J. R.

    1999-11-01

    For advancing plasma operation regimes for AT tokamaks and steady state concepts, as well as for forming and sustaining alternate concepts, it is necessary to provide control of the spatial profiles for the important plasma parameters - pressure, current, etc.. RF techniques offer considerable promise for providing this control and should be further developed as rapidly as possible within the well established tokamak program for forming a basis for application to all confinement concepts. Notably, IBW promises to provide internal transport barrier control if the coupling physics can be understood and efficient antenna coupling to the Bernstein wave can be developed. We will review the IBW experience and discuss possible explanations and solutions for the coupling problems encountered. In particular, the competing roles of parametric decay instability and surface mode excitation will be examined in order to elucidate the increase in surface power losses for the larger devices DIII-D and TFTR. Also, issues which need to be understood for employing ICRF and LH techniques to best advantage, such as antenna bombardment and energetic electron excitation, respectively, will be outlined.

  7. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method was developed to identify spatial patterns of planetary flow regimes, and to study transitions between them. This method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and second to Northern Hemisphere (NH) 500 mb data. The dynamical model is governed by the fully-nonlinear, equivalent-barotropic vorticity equation on the sphere. Clusters of point in the model's phase space are associated with either a few persistent or with many transient events. Two stationary clusters have patterns similar to unstable stationary model solutions, zonal, or blocked. Transient clusters of wave trains serve as way stations between the stationary ones. For the NH data, cluster analysis was performed in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters are found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, and transient clusters in the bandpass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band three pairs of clusters determine, respectively, EOFs 1, 2, and 3. They exhibit well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data show strong bimodality. Clusters in the bandpass window show wave-train patterns in the two jet exit regions. They are related, as in the model, to transitions between stationary clusters.

  8. Flow regimes in a trapped vortex cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasagna, D.; Iuso, G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results of an experimental investigation on the flow in a trapped vortex cell, embedded into a flat plate, and interacting with a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. The objective of the work is to describe the flow features and elucidate some of the governing physical mechanisms, in the light of recent investigations on flow separation control using vortex cells. Hot-wire velocity measurements of the shear layer bounding the cell and of the boundary layers upstream and downstream are reported, together with spectral and correlation analyses of wall-pressure fluctuation measurements. Smoke flow visualisations provide qualitative insight into some relevant features of the internal flow, namely a large-scale flow unsteadiness and possible mechanisms driving the rotation of the vortex core. Results are presented for two very different regimes: a low-Reynolds-number case where the incoming boundary layer is laminar and its momentum thickness is small compared to the cell opening, and a moderately high-Reynolds-number case, where the incoming boundary layer is turbulent and the ratio between the momentum thickness and the opening length is significantly larger than in the first case. Implications of the present findings to flow control applications of trapped vortex cells are also discussed.

  9. Global fishery prospects under contrasting management regimes.

    PubMed

    Costello, Christopher; Ovando, Daniel; Clavelle, Tyler; Strauss, C Kent; Hilborn, Ray; Melnychuk, Michael C; Branch, Trevor A; Gaines, Steven D; Szuwalski, Cody S; Cabral, Reniel B; Rader, Douglas N; Leland, Amanda

    2016-05-01

    Data from 4,713 fisheries worldwide, representing 78% of global reported fish catch, are analyzed to estimate the status, trends, and benefits of alternative approaches to recovering depleted fisheries. For each fishery, we estimate current biological status and forecast the impacts of contrasting management regimes on catch, profit, and biomass of fish in the sea. We estimate unique recovery targets and trajectories for each fishery, calculate the year-by-year effects of alternative recovery approaches, and model how alternative institutional reforms affect recovery outcomes. Current status is highly heterogeneous-the median fishery is in poor health (overfished, with further overfishing occurring), although 32% of fisheries are in good biological, although not necessarily economic, condition. Our business-as-usual scenario projects further divergence and continued collapse for many of the world's fisheries. Applying sound management reforms to global fisheries in our dataset could generate annual increases exceeding 16 million metric tons (MMT) in catch, $53 billion in profit, and 619 MMT in biomass relative to business as usual. We also find that, with appropriate reforms, recovery can happen quickly, with the median fishery taking under 10 y to reach recovery targets. Our results show that commonsense reforms to fishery management would dramatically improve overall fish abundance while increasing food security and profits. PMID:27035953

  10. Global fishery prospects under contrasting management regimes

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Christopher; Ovando, Daniel; Clavelle, Tyler; Strauss, C. Kent; Hilborn, Ray; Melnychuk, Michael C.; Branch, Trevor A.; Gaines, Steven D.; Szuwalski, Cody S.; Cabral, Reniel B.; Rader, Douglas N.; Leland, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Data from 4,713 fisheries worldwide, representing 78% of global reported fish catch, are analyzed to estimate the status, trends, and benefits of alternative approaches to recovering depleted fisheries. For each fishery, we estimate current biological status and forecast the impacts of contrasting management regimes on catch, profit, and biomass of fish in the sea. We estimate unique recovery targets and trajectories for each fishery, calculate the year-by-year effects of alternative recovery approaches, and model how alternative institutional reforms affect recovery outcomes. Current status is highly heterogeneous—the median fishery is in poor health (overfished, with further overfishing occurring), although 32% of fisheries are in good biological, although not necessarily economic, condition. Our business-as-usual scenario projects further divergence and continued collapse for many of the world’s fisheries. Applying sound management reforms to global fisheries in our dataset could generate annual increases exceeding 16 million metric tons (MMT) in catch, $53 billion in profit, and 619 MMT in biomass relative to business as usual. We also find that, with appropriate reforms, recovery can happen quickly, with the median fishery taking under 10 y to reach recovery targets. Our results show that commonsense reforms to fishery management would dramatically improve overall fish abundance while increasing food security and profits. PMID:27035953

  11. Institutional design and regime effectiveness in transboundary river management - the Elbe water quality regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowsky, I.

    2008-02-01

    The literature on transboundary river management suggests that institutions play an important role in bringing about cooperation. However, knowledge about how such institutions should be designed in order to do so remains limited. One way to learn more about adequate institutional design is to assess the effectiveness of existing regimes, and to trace the causal relationships that lead to the respective outcomes. In order to gain further insights into the relationship between institutional design and regime effectiveness, this paper presents a study on the water quality regime of the International Commission for the Protection of the Elbe (ICPE). The analysis is based on a review of pertinent documents and ten qualitative interviews with Czech and German Commission members and NGO representatives. Particular emphasis has been put on determining the ICPE's specific contribution and the no-regime counterfactual as well as on the perceived expediency of the institutional arrangements. The study shows overall that the countries were relatively successful in improving water quality in the Elbe basin. However, this outcome can only partly be attributed to the ICPE itself. Furthermore, the ICPE's contribution towards achieving the various goals varied significantly between the different areas of activity: it was relatively significant where the main responsibility for action lay with the public authorities, such as in the area of wastewater treatment and the establishment of an international alarm plan and model, but was practically non-existent in the reduction of non-point pollution from agriculture, where success depended on the behavior of individual private actors (farmers). The commission contributed towards problem solving by serving as a forum for the joint identification of priorities for action from a basin-wide perspective. The resulting international obligations increased the power of national water administrations and their access to funds. At the same time

  12. Dissipation regimes for short wind waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulliez, Guillemette

    2013-02-01

    The dissipation processes affecting short wind waves of centimeter and decimeter scales are investigated experimentally in laboratory. The processes include damping due to molecular viscosity, generation of capillary waves, microbreaking, and breaking. The observations were made in a large wind wave tank for a wide range of fetches and winds, using a laser sheet and a high-resolution video camera. The work aims at constructing a comprehensive picture of dissipative processes in the short wind wave field, to find for which scales particular dissipative mechanism may become important. Four distinct regimes have been identified. For capillary-gravity wave fields, i.e., for dominant waves with scales below 4 cm, viscous damping is found to be the main dissipation mechanism. The gravity-capillary wave fields with dominant wavelength less than 10 cm usually exhibit a train of capillary ripples at the crest wavefront, but no wave breaking. For such waves, the main dissipation process is molecular viscosity occurring through nonlinear energy cascade toward high-frequency motions. Microscale breaking takes place for waves longer than 10 cm and manifests itself in a very localized surface disruption on the forward face of the crest. Such events generate turbulent motions in water and thus enhance wave dissipation. Plunging breaking, characterized by formation of a crest bulge, a microjet hitting the water surface and a splash-up, occurs for short gravity waves of wavelength exceeding 20 cm. Macroscale spilling breaking is also observed for longer waves at high winds. In both cases, the direct momentum transfer from breaking waves to the water flow contributes significantly to wave damping.

  13. The seismology of geothermal regimes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have been developing seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in geothermal areas for a better understanding of the earth`s geothermal regimes. The questions the y have addressed in their research may be summarized as ``What is going on in the earth`s crust under tectonically active regions; what are the structures and processes responsible for such activities as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; and how can one capture their essence effectively by means of seismological studies?`` First, the authors found clear evidence for localization of scattered seismic energy in the deep magmatic system of the volcano on the island of Reunion in the Indian Ocean. The seismic coda of local earthquakes show concentrated energy in the intrusive zones as late as 30 to 40 seconds after the origin time. This offers a very effective method for defining a zone of strong heterogeneity on a regional scale, complementary to the high resolution study using trapped modes as pursued in the past project. Secondly, the authors identified about 700 long-period events with various frequencies and durations from the data collected during the past 5 years which included three episodes of eruption. They are applying a finite-element method to the simplest event with the longest period and the shortest duration in order to find the location, geometry and physical properties of their source deterministically. The preliminary result described here suggests that their sources may be a horizontally lying magma-filled crack at a shallow depth under the summit area. In addition to the above work on the Reunion data, they have continued the theoretical and observational studies of attenuation and scattering of seismic waves.

  14. CSDP: Seismology of continental thermal regime

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1989-04-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 2 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. During the past year, two Ph.D. thesis works were completed under the present project. One is a USC thesis on seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media with application to defining fractures in the earth. The other is a MIT thesis on seismic Q and velocity structure for the magma-hydrothermal system of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The P.I. co-organized the first International Workshop on Volcanic Seismology at Capri, Italy in October 1988, and presented the keynote paper on the state-of-art of volcanic seismology''. We presented another paper at the workshop on Assorted Seismic Signals from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Another international meeting, namely, the Chapman Conference on seismic anisotropy in the earth's crust at Berkeley, California in May 1988, was co-organized by the co-P.I. (P.C.L), and we presented our work on seismic waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media. Adding the publications and presentations made in the past year to the list for the preceding year, the following table lists 21 papers published, submitted or presented in the past two years of the present project. 65 refs., 334 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Magnetised Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the intermediate regime between subsonic and supersonic regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Henri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Faganello, M.

    2012-07-15

    The understanding of the dynamics at play at the Earth's Magnetopause, the boundary separating the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind plasmas, is of primary importance for space plasma modeling. We focus our attention on the low latitude flank of the magnetosphere where the velocity shear between the magnetosheath and the magnetospheric plasmas is the energetic source of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. On the shoulder of the resulting vortex chain, different secondary instabilities are at play depending on the local plasma parameters and compete with the vortex pairing process. Most important, secondary instabilities, among other magnetic reconnection, control the plasma mixing as well as the entry of solar wind plasma in the magnetosphere. We make use of a two-fluid model, including the Hall term and the electron mass in the generalized Ohm's law, to study the 2D non-linear evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetosheath-magnetosphere interface, in the intermediate regime between subsonic and supersonic regimes. We study the saturation mechanisms, depending on the density jump across the shear layer and the magnetic field strength in the plane. In the presence of a weak in-plane magnetic field, the dynamics of the Kelvin-Helmholtz rolled-up vortices self-consistently generates thin current sheets where reconnection instability eventually enables fast reconnection to develop. Such a system enables to study guide field multiple-island collisionless magnetic reconnection as embedded in a large-scale dynamic system, unlike the classical static, ad hoc reconnection setups. In this regime, reconnection is shown to inhibit the vortex pairing process. This study provides a clear example of nonlinear, cross-scale, collisionless plasma dynamics.

  16. Disciplinary Regimes of "Care" and Complementary Alternative Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Pat; Pennacchia, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    In schools, the notion of "care" is often synonymous with welfare and disciplinary regimes. Drawing on Foucault, and a study of alternative education (AE) across the UK, and looking in depth at two cases of complementary AE, we identify three types of disciplinary regimes at work in schools: (1) dominant performative reward and…

  17. Bargaining among Nations: Culture, History, and Perceptions in Regime Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschutz, Ronnie D.

    1991-01-01

    The formation of regimes (collective international schemes) for managing global problems depends on culture, history, and perceptions. The ways in which these elements affect bargaining among nations over issues of the global commons are discussed. Implications are reviewed for a regime to deal with atmospheric conditions and global warming. (SLD)

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF REGIME SHIFTS IN TIME SERIES USING NEIGHBORHOOD STATISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The identification of alternative dynamic regimes in ecological systems requires several lines of evidence. Previous work on time series analysis of dynamic regimes includes mainly model-fitting methods. We introduce two methods that do not use models. These approaches use state-...

  19. Detection and Assessment of Ecosystem Regime Shifts from Fisher Information

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystem regime shifts, which are long-term system reorganizations, have profound implications for sustainability. There is a great need for indicators of regime shifts, particularly methods that are applicable to data from real systems. We have developed a form of Fisher info...

  20. Plasma Physics Regimes in Tokamaks with Li Walls

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharo; N.N. Gorelenkov; R.B. White; S.I. Krasheninnikov; G.V. Pereverzev

    2003-08-21

    Low recycling regimes with a plasma limited by a lithium wall surface suggest enhanced stability and energy confinement, both necessary for tokamak reactors. These regimes could make ignition feasible in compact tokamaks. Ignited Spherical Tokamaks (IST), self-sufficient in the bootstrap current, are introduced as a necessary step for development of the physics and technology of power reactors.

  1. Water use regimes: Characterizing direct human interaction with hydrologic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiskel, Peter K.; Vogel, Richard M.; Steeves, Peter A.; Zarriello, Philip J.; Desimone, Leslie A.; Ries, Kernell G.

    2007-04-01

    The sustainability of human water use practices is a rapidly growing concern in the United States and around the world. To better characterize direct human interaction with hydrologic systems (stream basins and aquifers), we introduce the concept of the water use regime. Unlike scalar indicators of anthropogenic hydrologic stress in the literature, the water use regime is a two-dimensional, vector indicator that can be depicted on simple x-y plots of normalized human withdrawals (hout) versus normalized human return flows (hin). Four end-member regimes, natural-flow-dominated (undeveloped), human-flow-dominated (churned), withdrawal-dominated (depleted), and return-flow-dominated (surcharged), are defined in relation to limiting values of hout and hin. For illustration, the water use regimes of 19 diverse hydrologic systems are plotted and interpreted. Several of these systems, including the Yellow River Basin, China, and the California Central Valley Aquifer, are shown to approach particular end-member regimes. Spatial and temporal regime variations, both seasonal and long-term, are depicted. Practical issues of data availability and regime uncertainty are addressed in relation to the statistical properties of the ratio estimators hout and hin. The water use regime is shown to be a useful tool for comparative water resources assessment and for describing both historic and alternative future pathways of water resource development at a range of scales.

  2. Extractive Regimes: Toward a Better Understanding of Indonesian Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellert, Paul K.

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes the concept of an extractive regime to understand Indonesia's developmental trajectory from 1966 to 1998. The concept contributes to world-systems, globalization, and commodity-based approaches to understanding peripheral development. An extractive regime is defined by its reliance on extraction of multiple natural resources…

  3. A Tale of Two Regimes: Instrumentality and Commons Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toly, Noah J.

    2005-01-01

    Technical developments have profound social and environmental impacts. Both are observed in the implications of regimes of instrumentality for commons access regimes. Establishing social, material, ecological, intellectual, and moral infrastructures, technologies are partly constitutive of commons access and may militate against governance…

  4. Global regime shift dynamics of catastrophic sea urchin overgrazing

    PubMed Central

    Ling, S. D.; Scheibling, R. E.; Rassweiler, A.; Johnson, C. R.; Shears, N.; Connell, S. D.; Salomon, A. K.; Norderhaug, K. M.; Pérez-Matus, A.; Hernández, J. C.; Clemente, S.; Blamey, L. K.; Hereu, B.; Ballesteros, E.; Sala, E.; Garrabou, J.; Cebrian, E.; Zabala, M.; Fujita, D.; Johnson, L. E.

    2015-01-01

    A pronounced, widespread and persistent regime shift among marine ecosystems is observable on temperate rocky reefs as a result of sea urchin overgrazing. Here, we empirically define regime-shift dynamics for this grazing system which transitions between productive macroalgal beds and impoverished urchin barrens. Catastrophic in nature, urchin overgrazing in a well-studied Australian system demonstrates a discontinuous regime shift, which is of particular management concern as recovery of desirable macroalgal beds requires reducing grazers to well below the initial threshold of overgrazing. Generality of this regime-shift dynamic is explored across 13 rocky reef systems (spanning 11 different regions from both hemispheres) by compiling available survey data (totalling 10 901 quadrats surveyed in situ) plus experimental regime-shift responses (observed during a total of 57 in situ manipulations). The emergent and globally coherent pattern shows urchin grazing to cause a discontinuous ‘catastrophic’ regime shift, with hysteresis effect of approximately one order of magnitude in urchin biomass between critical thresholds of overgrazing and recovery. Different life-history traits appear to create asymmetry in the pace of overgrazing versus recovery. Once shifted, strong feedback mechanisms provide resilience for each alternative state thus defining the catastrophic nature of this regime shift. Importantly, human-derived stressors can act to erode resilience of desirable macroalgal beds while strengthening resilience of urchin barrens, thus exacerbating the risk, spatial extent and irreversibility of an unwanted regime shift for marine ecosystems.

  5. Water use regimes: Characterizing direct human interaction with hydrologic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiskel, P.K.; Vogel, R.M.; Steeves, P.A.; Zarriello, P.J.; DeSimone, L.A.; Ries, Kernell G., III

    2007-01-01

    [1] The sustainability of human water use practices is a rapidly growing concern in the United States and around the world. To better characterize direct human interaction with hydrologic systems (stream basins and aquifers), we introduce the concept of the water use regime. Unlike scalar indicators of anthropogenic hydrologic stress in the literature, the water use regime is a two-dimensional, vector indicator that can be depicted on simple x-y plots of normalized human withdrawals (hout) versus normalized human return flows (hin). Four end-member regimes, natural-flow-dominated (undeveloped), human-flow-dominated (churned), withdrawal-dominated (depleted), and return-flow-dominated (surcharged), are defined in relation to limiting values of hout and hin. For illustration, the water use regimes of 19 diverse hydrologic systems are plotted and interpreted. Several of these systems, including the Yellow River Basin, China, and the California Central Valley Aquifer, are shown to approach particular end-member regimes. Spatial and temporal regime variations, both seasonal and long-term, are depicted. Practical issues of data availability and regime uncertainty are addressed in relation to the statistical properties of the ratio estimators hout and hin. The water use regime is shown to be a useful tool for comparative water resources assessment and for describing both historic and alternative future pathways of water resource development at a range of scales. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. FISHER INFORMATION AS A METRIC FOR SUSTAINABLE SYSTEM REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. We propose Fisher Information as a metric for the sustainability of dynamic regimes in complex systems. The quantity now known ...

  7. FISHER INFORMATION AS A METRIC FOR SUSTAINABLE REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. We propose Fisher Information as a metric for the sustainability of dynamic regimes in complex systems. The quantity now known ...

  8. Flow regimes in a single dimple on the channel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, G. V.; Terekhov, V. I.; Khalatov, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    The boundaries of the domains of existence of flow regimes past single dimples made as spherical segments on a flat plate are determined with the use of available experimental results. Regimes of a diffuser-confuser flow, a horseshoe vortex, and a tornado-like vortex in the dimple are considered. Neither a horseshoe vortex nor a tornado-like vortex is observed in dimples with the relative depth smaller than 0.1. Transformations from the diffuser-confuser flow regime to the horseshoe vortex regime and from the horseshoe vortex flow to the tornado-like vortex flow are found to depend not only on the Reynolds number, but also on the relative depth of the spherical segment. Dependences for determining the boundaries of the regime existence domains are proposed, and parameters at which the experimental results can be generalized are given.

  9. Monitoring and diagnostics systems for nuclear power plant operating regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Abagyan, A.A.; Dmitriev, V.M.; Klebanov, L.A.; Kroshilin, A.E.; Larin, E.P.; Morozov, S.K.

    1988-05-01

    The development of new monitoring and diagnostics systems for Soviet reactors is discussed. An experimental test station is described where industrial operation of new experimental systems can be conducted for purposes of bringing their performance to the level of standard Soviet systems for monitoring reactor operation regimes and equipment resources. The requirements and parameters of the systems are described on a unit-by-unit basis, including the sensor reading monitoring unit, the vibroacoustic monitoring unit, the noise monitoring unit, the accident regime identification unit, and the nonstationary regime monitoring unit. Computer hardware and software requirements are discussed. The results of calculational and experimental research on two complex nonstationary regimes of reactor operation are given. The accident regimes identification unit for the VVER-1000 is analyzed in detail.

  10. Human influence on California fire regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Syphard, A.D.; Radeloff, V.C.; Keeley, J.E.; Hawbaker, T.J.; Clayton, M.K.; Stewart, S.I.; Hammer, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Periodic wildfire maintains the integrity and species composition of many ecosystems, including the mediterranean-climate shrublands of California. However, human activities alter natural fire regimes, which can lead to cascading ecological effects. Increased human ignitions at the wildland-urban interface (WUI) have recently gained attention, but fire activity and risk are typically estimated using only biophysical variables. Our goal was to determine how humans influence fire in California and to examine whether this influence was linear, by relating contemporary (2000) and historic (1960-2000) fire data to both human and biophysical variables. Data for the human variables included fine-resolution maps of the WUI produced using housing density and land cover data. Interface WUI, where development abuts wildland vegetation, was differentiated from intermix WUI, where development intermingles with wildland vegetation. Additional explanatory variables included distance to WUI, population density, road density, vegetation type, and ecoregion. All data were summarized at the county level and analyzed using bivariate and multiple regression methods. We found highly significant relationships between humans and fire on the contemporary landscape, and our models explained fire frequency (R2 = 0.72) better than area burned (R2 = 0.50). Population density, intermix WUI, and distance to WUI explained the most variability in fire frequency, suggesting that the spatial pattern of development may be an important variable to consider when estimating fire risk. We found nonlinear effects such that fire frequency and area burned were highest at intermediate levels of human activity, but declined beyond certain thresholds. Human activities also explained change in fire frequency and area burned (1960-2000), but our models had greater explanatory power during the years 1960-1980, when there was more dramatic change in fire frequency. Understanding wildfire as a function of the

  11. Mercury's thermal evolution and core crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoldini, A.; Van Hoolst, T.; Dumberry, M.; Steinle-Neumann, G.

    2015-10-01

    Unlike the Earth, where the liquid core isentrope is shallower than the core liquidus, at the lower pressures inside Mercury's core the isentrope can be steeper than the melting temperature. As a consequence, upon cooling, the isentrope may first enter a solid stability field near the core mantle boundary and produce ironrich snow that sinks under gravity and produces buoyant upwellings of iron depleted fluid. Similar to bottom up crystallization, crystallization initiated near the top might generate sufficient buoyancy flux to drive magnetic field generation by compositional convection.In this study we model Mercury's thermal evolution by taking into account the formation of iron-rich snow to assess when the conditions for an internally magnetic field can be satisfied. We employ a thermodynamic consistent description of the iron high-pressure phase diagram and thermoelastic properties of iron alloys as well as the most recent data about the thermal conductivity of core materials. We use a 1-dimensional parametrized thermal evolution model in the stagnant lid regime for the mantle (e.g. [1]) that is coupled to the core. The model for the mantle takes into account the formation of the crust due to melting at depth. Mantle convection is driven by heat producing radioactive elements, heat loss from secular cooling and from the heat supplied by the core. The heat generated inside the core is mainly provided from secular cooling, from the latent heat released at iron freezing, and from gravitational energy resulting form the release of light elements at the inner core-outer core boundary as well as from the sinking of iron-rich snow and subsequent upwellings of light elements in the snow zone. If the heat flow out of the core is smaller than the heat transported along the core isentrope a thermal boundary will from at the top of the outer core. To determine the extension of the convecting region inside the liquid core we calculate the convective power [2]. Finally, we

  12. Constraints on flow regimes in wide-aperture fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2004-02-28

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the complex flow processes in individual fractures, aided by flow visualization experiments and conceptual modeling efforts. These advances have led to the recognition of several flow regimes in individual fractures subjected to different initial and boundary conditions. Of these, the most important regimes are film flow, rivulet flow, and sliding of droplets. The existence of such significantly dissimilar flow regimes has been a major hindrance in the development of self-consistent conceptual models of flow for single fractures that encompass all the flow regimes. The objective of this study is to delineate the existence of the different flow regimes in individual fractures. For steady-state flow conditions, we developed physical constraints on the different flow regimes that satisfy minimum energy configurations, which enabled us to segregate the wide range of fracture transmissivity (volumetric flow rate per fracture width) into several flow regimes. These are, in increasing order of flow rate, flow of adsorbed films, flow of sliding drops, rivulet flow, stable film flow, and unstable (turbulent) film flow. The scope of this study is limited to wide-aperture fractures with the flow on the opposing sides of fracture being independent.

  13. Marine regime shifts: drivers and impacts on ecosystems services

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, J.; Yletyinen, J.; Biggs, R.; Blenckner, T.; Peterson, G.

    2015-01-01

    Marine ecosystems can experience regime shifts, in which they shift from being organized around one set of mutually reinforcing structures and processes to another. Anthropogenic global change has broadly increased a wide variety of processes that can drive regime shifts. To assess the vulnerability of marine ecosystems to such shifts and their potential consequences, we reviewed the scientific literature for 13 types of marine regime shifts and used networks to conduct an analysis of co-occurrence of drivers and ecosystem service impacts. We found that regime shifts are caused by multiple drivers and have multiple consequences that co-occur in a non-random pattern. Drivers related to food production, climate change and coastal development are the most common co-occurring causes of regime shifts, while cultural services, biodiversity and primary production are the most common cluster of ecosystem services affected. These clusters prioritize sets of drivers for management and highlight the need for coordinated actions across multiple drivers and scales to reduce the risk of marine regime shifts. Managerial strategies are likely to fail if they only address well-understood or data-rich variables, and international cooperation and polycentric institutions will be critical to implement and coordinate action across the scales at which different drivers operate. By better understanding these underlying patterns, we hope to inform the development of managerial strategies to reduce the risk of high-impact marine regime shifts, especially for areas of the world where data are not available or monitoring programmes are not in place.

  14. Toward a Physical Characterization of Raindrop Collision Outcome Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testik, F. Y.; Barros, Ana P.; Bilven, Francis L.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive raindrop collision outcome regime diagram that delineates the physical conditions associated with the outcome regimes (i.e., bounce, coalescence, and different breakup types) of binary raindrop collisions is proposed. The proposed diagram builds on a theoretical regime diagram defined in the phase space of collision Weber numbers We and the drop diameter ratio p by including critical angle of impact considerations. In this study, the theoretical regime diagram is first evaluated against a comprehensive dataset for drop collision experiments representative of raindrop collisions in nature. Subsequently, the theoretical regime diagram is modified to explicitly describe the dominant regimes of raindrop interactions in (We, p) by delineating the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of distinct types of collision-induced breakup (neck/filament, sheet, disk, and crown breakups) based on critical angle of impact consideration. Crown breakup is a subtype of disk breakup for lower collision kinetic energy that presents distinctive morphology. Finally, the experimental results are analyzed in the context of the comprehensive collision regime diagram, and conditional probabilities that can be used in the parameterization of breakup kernels in stochastic models of raindrop dynamics are provided.

  15. An Examination of the Nature of Global MODIS Cloud Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Kato, Seiji; Huffman, George J.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce global cloud regimes (previously also referred to as "weather states") derived from cloud retrievals that use measurements by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites. The regimes are obtained by applying clustering analysis on joint histograms of retrieved cloud top pressure and cloud optical thickness. By employing a compositing approach on data sets from satellites and other sources, we examine regime structural and thermodynamical characteristics. We establish that the MODIS cloud regimes tend to form in distinct dynamical and thermodynamical environments and have diverse profiles of cloud fraction and water content. When compositing radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System instrument and surface precipitation from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project, we find that regimes with a radiative warming effect on the atmosphere also produce the largest implied latent heat. Taken as a whole, the results of the study corroborate the usefulness of the cloud regime concept, reaffirm the fundamental nature of the regimes as appropriate building blocks for cloud system classification, clarify their association with standard cloud types, and underscore their distinct radiative and hydrological signatures.

  16. Past and Future Drought Regimes in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Burak; Topcu, Sevilay; Turkes, Murat; Sen, Baha

    2010-05-01

    Climate variability in the 20th century was characterized by apparent precipitation variability at both temporal and spatial scales. In addition to the well-known characteristic seasonal and year-to-year variability, some marked and long-term changes in precipitation occurred in Turkey, particularly after the early 1970s. Drought, originating from a deficiency of precipitation over an extended time period (which is usually a season or more) has become a recurring phenomenon in Turkey in the past few decades. Spatially coherent with the significant drought events since early 1970s, water stress and shortages for all water user sectors have also reached their critical points in Turkey. Analyzing the historical occurrence of drought provides an understanding of the range of climate possibilities for a country, resulting in more informed management decision-making. However, future projections about spatial and temporal changes in drought characteristics such as frequency, intensity and duration can be challenging for developing appropriate mitigation and adaptation strategies. Hence, the objectives of this study are (i) to analyze the spatial and temporal dimensions of historical droughts in Turkey, (2) to predict potential intensity, frequency and duration of droughts in Turkey for the future (2070-2100). The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and the Percent to Normal Index (PNI) have been used to assess the drought characteristics. Rainfall datasets for the reference period, 1960-1990, were acquired from 52 stations (representative of all kinds of regions with different rainfall regimes in the country) of the Turkish State Meteorological Service (TSMS). The future rainfall series for the 2070-2100 period were simulated using a regional climate model (RegCM3) for IPCC's SRESS-A2 scenario conditions. For verification of RegCM3 simulations, the model was performed for the reference period and simulated rainfall data were used for computing two drought indices (SPI

  17. Flow regime shifts in the Little Piney creek (US)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, G.

    2014-09-01

    Non-stationarity of climate drivers and soil-use strongly affects the hydrologic cycle, producing significant inter-annual and multi-decadal fluctuations of river flow regimes. Understanding the temporal trajectories of hydrologic regimes is a key issue for the management of freshwater ecosystems and the security of human water uses. Here, long-term changes in the seasonal flow regime of the Little Piney creek (US) are analyzed with the aid of a stochastic mechanistic approach that expresses analytically the streamflow distribution in terms of a few measurable hydroclimatic parameters, providing a basis for assessing the impact of climate and landscape modifications on water resources. Mean rainfall and streamflow rates exhibit a pronounced inter-annual variability across the last century, though in the absence of clear sustained drifts. Long-term modifications of streamflow regimes across different periods of 2 and 8 years are likewise significant. The stochastic model is able to reasonably reproduce the observed 2-years and 8-years regimes in the Little Piney creek, as well as the corresponding inter-annual variations of streamflow probability density. The study evidences that a flow regime shift occurred in the Little Piney creek during the last century, with erratic regimes typical of the 30s/40s that had been progressively replaced by persistent flow regimes featured by more dumped streamflow fluctuations. Causal drivers of regime shift are identified as the increase of the frequency of events (a byproduct of climate variability) and the decrease of recession rates (induced by a decrease of cultivated lands). The approach developed offers an objective basis for the analysis and prediction of the impact of climate/landscape change on water resources.

  18. Consequences of regime shifts for marine food webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alheit, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    Climate-mediated ecological regime shifts can re-structure entire ecosystems from primary producers to top predators. As a consequence, major trophodynamic pathways change with the altered mix of dominating species. Four cases of ecosystem regime shifts forced by climate variability are presented (North Sea, central Baltic Sea, central North Pacific and Humboldt Current ecosystems) and the effect on food chains is elucidated. Different types of trophodynamic control mechanisms set in motion through the impact of climate variability and the potential impact of regime shifts on biogeochemical cycles are discussed.

  19. Multiple planetary flow regimes in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoden, Shigeo; Shiotani, Masato; Hirota, Isamu

    1987-01-01

    Low-frequency variations in the general circulation of the Southern Hemisphere during 1983 were studied using daily geopotential height and temperature analyses for 12 pressure levels from 1000 mb up to 50 mb, performed by the National Meteorological Center of Japan. Results disclosed the presence, in the Southern Hemisphere troposphere, of an irregular fluctuation of two zonal mean geostrophic wind patterns (named single-jet and double-jet regimes) during wintertime. The fluctuation is characterized by the persistence of one geostrophic wind regime, with characteristic duration of a month, followed by a rather rapid transition to another regime.

  20. Raman amplification in the coherent wave-breaking regime.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J P; Pukhov, A

    2015-12-01

    In regimes far beyond the wave-breaking threshold of Raman amplification, we show that significant amplification can occur after the onset of wave breaking, before phase mixing destroys the coherent coupling between pump, probe, and plasma wave. Amplification in this regime is therefore a transient effect, with the higher-efficiency "coherent wave-breaking" (CWB) regime accessed by using a short, intense probe. Parameter scans illustrate the marked difference in behavior between below wave breaking, in which the energy-transfer efficiency is high but total energy transfer is low, wave breaking, in which efficiency is low, and CWB, in which moderate efficiencies allow the highest total energy transfer. PMID:26764840

  1. Boundary between stable and unstable regimes of accretion. Ordered and chaotic unstable regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinova, A. A.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new study of the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable regime of accretion on to rotating magnetized stars in a set of high grid resolution three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations performed in low-viscosity discs. We find that the boundary between the stable and unstable regimes is determined almost entirely by the fastness parameter ωs = Ω⋆/ΩK(rm), where Ω⋆ is the angular velocity of the star and ΩK(rm) is the angular velocity of the Keplerian disc at the disc-magnetosphere boundary r = rm. We found that accretion is unstable if ωs ≲ 0.6. Accretion through instabilities is present in stars with different magnetospheric sizes. However, only in stars with relatively small magnetospheres, rm/R⋆ ≲ 7, do the unstable tongues produce chaotic hotspots on the stellar surface and irregular light curves. At even smaller values of the fastness parameter, ωs ≲ 0.45, multiple irregular tongues merge, forming one or two ordered unstable tongues that rotate with the angular frequency of the inner disc. This transition occurs in stars with even smaller magnetospheres, rm/R⋆ ≲ 4.2. Most of our simulations were performed at a small tilt of the dipole magnetosphere, Θ = 5°, and a small viscosity parameter α = 0.02. Test simulations at higher α values show that many more cases become unstable, and the light curves become even more irregular. Test simulations at larger tilts of the dipole Θ show that instability is present, however, accretion in two funnel streams dominates if Θ ≳ 15°. The results of these simulations can be applied to accreting magnetized stars with relatively small magnetospheres: Classical T Tauri stars, accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars, and cataclysmic variables.

  2. The effect of refrigerants in the mixed lubrication regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuhara, Kazuyuki; Tomimoto, Makoto

    1997-12-31

    Because of environmental concerns, CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) refrigerants must be replaced with HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons). As a result, many tribological problems are caused especially in rotary piston compressors. To solve the problem, the effects of refrigerants on friction and wear characteristics of the oil and refrigerant mixtures at the mixed lubrication regime are investigated. The difference in refrigerants are clearly observed not only in boundary but also in the mixed lubrication regime. The effects of operating conditions on sliding conditions and experimental results are also discussed. It is concluded that for practical application where long life is essential, experiments must be conducted under the mixed lubrication regime. Also, the importance of defining the lubrication regime in terms of film parameter is emphasized.

  3. Nonlinear Trapped Electron Mode Pinch in Strong Turbulence Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, David; Terry, P. W.

    2006-10-01

    Recent work has shown that there is an inward flux component in collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence produced by a nonlinear cross phase^2. The result was obtained for a weak turbulence regime, consistent with near threshold conditions. We extend this work to the strong turbulence regime, applying asymptotic analysis to the nonlinear frequency expressions generated from self-consistent statistical closure theory. We first check to see if there is a consistent strong turbulence regime for the previously considered threshold ordering^2, and examine the properties and scalings of the inward flux components. We then examine other orderings that are further above the instability threshold. The orderings will be compared with experimental profiles to determine likely regimes and nonlinear pinch properties. ^2P.W. Terry and R. Gatto, Phys. Plasmas 13, 062309 (2006).

  4. FISHER INFORMATION AND DYNAMIC REGIME CHANGES IN ECOLOGICAL SYTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems often exhibit transitions between dynamic regimes (or steady states), such as the conversion of oligotrophic to eutrophic conditions and associated aquatic ecological communities, due to natural (or increasingly) anthropogenic disturbances. As ecosystems experience per...

  5. Regime shifts and resilience in China's coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke

    2016-02-01

    Regime shift often results in large, abrupt, and persistent changes in the provision of ecosystem services and can therefore have significant impacts on human wellbeing. Understanding regime shifts has profound implications for ecosystem recovery and management. China's coastal ecosystems have experienced substantial deterioration within the past decades, at a scale and speed the world has never seen before. Yet, information about this coastal ecosystem change from a dynamics perspective is quite limited. In this review, I synthesize existing information on coastal ecosystem regime shifts in China and discuss their interactions and cascading effects. The accumulation of regime shifts in China's coastal ecosystems suggests that the desired system resilience has been profoundly eroded, increasing the potential of abrupt shifts to undesirable states at a larger scale, especially given multiple escalating pressures. Policy and management strategies need to incorporate resilience approaches in order to cope with future challenges and avoid major losses in China's coastal ecosystem services. PMID:26286204

  6. Fixed points, stable manifolds, weather regimes, and their predictability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deremble, Bruno; D'Andrea, Fabio; Ghil, Michael

    2009-10-27

    In a simple, one-layer atmospheric model, we study the links between low-frequency variability and the model’s fixed points in phase space. The model dynamics is characterized by the coexistence of multiple ''weather regimes.'' To investigate the transitions from one regime to another, we focus on the identification of stable manifolds associated with fixed points. We show that these manifolds act as separatrices between regimes. We track each manifold by making use of two local predictability measures arising from the meteorological applications of nonlinear dynamics, namely, ''bred vectors'' and singular vectors. These results are then verified in the framework of ensemblemore » forecasts issued from clouds (ensembles) of initial states. The divergence of the trajectories allows us to establish the connections between zones of low predictability, the geometry of the stable manifolds, and transitions between regimes.« less

  7. Fixed points, stable manifolds, weather regimes, and their predictability

    SciTech Connect

    Deremble, Bruno; D'Andrea, Fabio; Ghil, Michael

    2009-10-27

    In a simple, one-layer atmospheric model, we study the links between low-frequency variability and the model’s fixed points in phase space. The model dynamics is characterized by the coexistence of multiple ''weather regimes.'' To investigate the transitions from one regime to another, we focus on the identification of stable manifolds associated with fixed points. We show that these manifolds act as separatrices between regimes. We track each manifold by making use of two local predictability measures arising from the meteorological applications of nonlinear dynamics, namely, ''bred vectors'' and singular vectors. These results are then verified in the framework of ensemble forecasts issued from clouds (ensembles) of initial states. The divergence of the trajectories allows us to establish the connections between zones of low predictability, the geometry of the stable manifolds, and transitions between regimes.

  8. Stochastic regimes in very-low-frequency fluidic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesař, Václav

    2016-03-01

    Paper discusses interesting unexpected stochastic regimes discovered in a fluidic oscillator designed for operation at very low oscillation frequencies - without the inconvenience of the long feedback loops needed in standard low-frequency oscillator designs. The new oscillator contains a pair of bistable turn-down active valves operating in anti-parallel — essentially analogous to Abraham & Bloch electric "multibrateur" invented in 1919. Three different self-excited oscillation regimes were found. In the order of increasing supplied flow rate, these regimes are characterised by: (A) generation of stochastic-duration multi-pulse packs, (B) generation of individual pulses with a degree of periodicity, and (C) regime with randomly appearing flow pulses separated by intervals of the order of seconds.

  9. The Hadley and Rossby regimes in a spherical atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, S. B.; Clark, J. H. E.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of the steady Hadley and Rossby regimes for a thermally forced rotating fluid on a sphere are studied. The two layer modified geostrophic model is employed which allows for thermal advection by the divergent wind and time dependent static stability. Heating processes are parameterized using the Newtonian approximation and Rayleigh friction is accounted for. The equations are transformed to spectral form using spherical harmonics and then truncated retaining a simple axisymmetric state and initial, one wave. A time independent Hadley circulation is obtained which is neutral to axisymmetric disturbances but unstable to wave like perturbations for intermediate values of the meridional temperature gradient, indicating the existence of both an upper and lower symmetric Hadley regime. An analytical solution for the steady Rossby circulation is determined for values of the meridional temperature gradient where the Hadley regime is unstable. Linear perturbation theory is used to show that within the steady Rossby regime two or more waves cannot exist simultaneously.

  10. The role of transients in weather regimes and transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, B.; Yang, Shuting )

    1993-05-01

    Transition of weather regimes is examined in a highly simplified model. Two completely distinct internal methods of transition are identified. The first is a synoptically triggered large-scale instability, while the second is an energy inconsistency between the large-scale and synoptic scales that does not allow the two scales to equilibrate. In the atmosphere, the first case appears as a sudden propagation and damping (or vice versa) of the large-scale pattern with no obvious warning, while the second is consistent with the synoptician's description of a regime being disrupted by a single catastrophic event such as explosive cyclogenesis. The first method is always fast (on a synoptic time scale), while the second does not have to be, though often is. By examining what causes the regimes to fail, one can better understand the role of the transients during all phases of weather regimes. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Plasma confinement regimes and collective modes characterizing them

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Zhou, T.

    2012-10-15

    A unified theory is presented for the modes that are excited at the edge of the plasma column and are important signatures of the advanced confinement regimes into which magnetically confined plasmas can be driven. In particular, the so-called EDA H-Regime, the Elmy H-Regime, and the I-Regime are considered. The modes that are identified theoretically have characteristics that are consistent with or have anticipated those of the modes observed experimentally for each of the investigated regimes. The phase velocities, the produced transport processes, the frequencies, the wavelengths, and the consistency with the direction of spontaneous rotation are the factors considered for comparison with the relevant experiments. The quasi-coherent mode [I. Cziegler, Ph.D. dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2011] that is present in the EDA H-Regime has a phase velocity in the direction of the ion diamagnetic velocity in the plasma reference frame. Consequently, this is identified as a ballooning mode near finite Larmor radius marginal stability involving the effects of transverse ion viscosity and other dissipative effects. In this regime, impurities are driven outward by the combined effects of the local temperature gradients of the impurities and their thermal conductivity, while in the Elmy H-Regime impurities are driven toward the center of the plasma column. In the I-Regimes, the excited 'Heavy Particle' modes [B. Coppi and T. Zhou, Phys. Plasmas 19, 012302 (2012); Phys. Lett. A 375, 2916 (2011)] are not of the ballooning kind and are shown to expel the impurities toward the plasma edge in the presence of significant fluctuations. These modes can have a finite frequency of oscillation with a phase velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic velocity or they can be nearly purely growing, explaining why there are I-Regimes where fluctuations are not observed. Instead, the modes considered for the Elmy H-Regime are of the ballooning

  12. Longitudinal dunes on Mars: Relation to current wind regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; Thomas, Peter C.

    1995-01-01

    Longitudinal dunes are extremely rare on Mars, but constitute a substantial fraction of terrestrial desert dunes. We report finding isolated examples of longitudinal dunes on Mars and relate their occurence to expected sand transport regimes. Terrestrial longitudinal dunes form in bimodal and multimodal transport regimes. General circulation models and streak data indicate that bimodal and multimodal transport of sand should be very rare on Mars. Thus the dearth of longitudinal dunes on Mars is consistant with their apparent formation conditions on Earth.

  13. Longitudinal dunes on Mars: Relation to current wind regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; Thomas, Peter C.

    1995-01-01

    Longitudinal dunes are extremely rare on Mars, but constitute a substantial fraction of terrestrial desert dunes. We report finding isolated examples of longitudinal dunes on Mars and relate their occurrence to expected sand transport regimes. Terrestrial longitudinal dunes form in bimodal and multimodal transport regimes. General circulation models and streak data indicate that bimodal and multimodal transport of sand should be very rare on Mars. Thus the dearth of longitudinal dunes on Mars is consistent with their apparent formation conditions on Earth.

  14. Laboratory experiment on boundaries of upper stage plane bed regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrostlík, Štěpán; Matoušek, Václav

    2016-04-01

    Results are discussed of laboratory experiments on criteria determining the transition between the regime of dunes and the upper stage plane bed (UPB) regime and the transition between the UPB regime and the regime of wavy flow. The experiments were carried for 3 fractions of plastic material and two fractions of glass beads in a broad range of flow conditions (different discharges of water and solids and longitudinal bed slopes) in a tilting flume. The experiments reveal that, contrary to expectations, a constant value of the Shields parameter is not an appropriate criterion for the transition between the dune regime and the UPB regime. Furthermore, the transition appears to be insensitive to the total discharge of solids and water. Instead, the criterion seems to be well represented by a constant value of the average transport concentration of sediment (the ratio of volumetric discharge of solids and volumetric discharge of mixture). The experimental results exhibit a very tight correlation between the transport concentration and the longitudinal bed slope. Hence, a constant value of the bed slope can be considered an appropriate criterion for the transition. The transition between the UPB regime and the wavy regime (significant waves develop but they are not always standing waves) is found at a constant value of Froude number, which is in agreement with literature, although it is found at a higher value than the literature usually suggests (Fr = 1.2 instead of 1.0). Hence, the transition occurs in the super-critical flow but it is not necessarily associated with the critical flow.

  15. Brownian colloids in underdamped and overdamped regimes with nonhomogeneous temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The motion of Brownian particles when temperature is spatially dependent is studied by stochastic simulations and theoretical analysis. Nonequilibrium steady probability distributions Ps t(z ,v ) for both underdamped and overdamped regimes are analyzed. The existence of local kinetic energy equipartition theorem is also discussed. The transition between both regimes is characterized by a dimensionless friction parameter. This study is applied to three physical systems of colloidal particles.

  16. Brownian colloids in underdamped and overdamped regimes with nonhomogeneous temperature.

    PubMed

    Sancho, J M

    2015-12-01

    The motion of Brownian particles when temperature is spatially dependent is studied by stochastic simulations and theoretical analysis. Nonequilibrium steady probability distributions P(st)(z,v) for both underdamped and overdamped regimes are analyzed. The existence of local kinetic energy equipartition theorem is also discussed. The transition between both regimes is characterized by a dimensionless friction parameter. This study is applied to three physical systems of colloidal particles. PMID:26764635

  17. Evaluation of interregional variability in MODIS cloud regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinonen, J. S.; Lebsock, M. D.; Oreopoulos, L.; Cho, N.

    2015-12-01

    Clustering techniques have been used in the last few decades to classify cloud types automatically from satellite observations, most commonly using cloud top pressure and cloud optical depth. The underlying assumption is that the resulting clusters, called "cloud regimes" or "weather states", represent some type of basic states of the atmosphere, and thus that their occurrence can be used as a proxy for related variables such as radiative balance or precipitation. We have examined the validity of these assumptions by using independent measurements from the CloudSat and CALIPSO satellites. The CloudSat radar yields a reflectivity product that is sensitive to many aspects of the physics of the clouds, while CloudSat together with the CALIPSO lidar can retrieve the vertical structure of the cloud column, including multi-layer clouds. These observations have been separated into groups according to the recently published cloud regimes based on data from the MODIS instrument, deployed on the Aqua satellite orbiting in the same constellation with CloudSat and CALIPSO. The distributions of these observations have been constructed both globally and in a number of regions in different parts of the Earth. By analyzing the differences in the distributions between these regions, we can evaluate the usefulness of the cloud regimes as a proxy for the measured variables. Some cloud regimes have been found to be rather stable between regions, while others display considerable variability. Moreover, some cloud regimes appear much more similar to each other in CloudSat observations than they do using the MODIS regimes. We analyze the implications of these differences for the usability of the cloud regimes as climate indicators. We also explore various filtering techniques and different clustering methods that can potentially be used to reduce these differences, and thus to improve the universality of the cloud regimes.

  18. Equatorial atmospheric weather regimes: Their structure and role

    SciTech Connect

    Connors, V.S.

    1991-01-01

    Infrared radiance measurements by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-6) from April 1986 through April 1987 are used to characterize and identify distinct regimes of persistent, large-scale cloudiness patterns over the Amazon Basin. These tropical weather regimes are responsible for the continental-scale atmospheric processes that transport air, trace gases, and heat from the Amazon Basin. The cloud patterns are represented by both scene-scale parameters, such as the cloud-free area and the value of the 'clear sky peak' in a histogram, and textural measures, such as contrast of cloudy area and homogeneity or cloudy area. Correlation analyses of the attribute arrays determined that only 9 of the original 15 cloud pattern descriptors are required for the cluster analyses. Seventy-six percent of the satellite images are classified into 1 of 14 weather regimes which persist for periods that range from 3 to 15 days each. The dominant weather regimes are described by the recurrence and duration of the events, by the rainfall produced and energy released to the tropical atmosphere, and by the composite kinematic and thermodynamic analyses. While the classification analyses identified a range of organized weather conditions in the Amazon Basin, two weather regimes, each occurring in separate seasons, dominate the year. The prominent dry season regime (A) occurs 11 times, persists for 25 percent of the year, produces 81 percent of the dry season rainfall, and 7 percent of the energy export necessary to balance the global heat budget. The prominent wet season regime (B) occurs 8 times, persists for 18 percent of the year, delivers about 30 percent of the wet season rainfall, and 16 percent of the energy export requirement. Because the dry season regime (A) draws nearly half of its water vapor supply from local sources, a vital link may exist between the rainforest ecosystem and the dry season rainfall.

  19. Synchronous marine pelagic regime shifts in the Northern Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Beaugrand, G.; Conversi, A.; Chiba, S.; Edwards, M.; Fonda-Umani, S.; Greene, C.; Mantua, N.; Otto, S. A.; Reid, P. C.; Stachura, M. M.; Stemmann, L.; Sugisaki, H.

    2015-01-01

    Regime shifts are characterized by sudden, substantial and temporally persistent changes in the state of an ecosystem. They involve major biological modifications and often have important implications for exploited living resources. In this study, we examine whether regime shifts observed in 11 marine systems from two oceans and three regional seas in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) are synchronous, applying the same methodology to all. We primarily infer marine pelagic regime shifts from abrupt shifts in zooplankton assemblages, with the exception of the East Pacific where ecosystem changes are inferred from fish. Our analyses provide evidence for quasi-synchronicity of marine pelagic regime shifts both within and between ocean basins, although these shifts lie embedded within considerable regional variability at both year-to-year and lower-frequency time scales. In particular, a regime shift was detected in the late 1980s in many studied marine regions, although the exact year of the observed shift varied somewhat from one basin to another. Another regime shift was also identified in the mid- to late 1970s but concerned less marine regions. We subsequently analyse the main biological signals in relation to changes in NH temperature and pressure anomalies. The results suggest that the main factor synchronizing regime shifts on large scales is NH temperature; however, changes in atmospheric circulation also appear important. We propose that this quasi-synchronous shift could represent the variably lagged biological response in each ecosystem to a large-scale, NH change of the climatic system, involving both an increase in NH temperature and a strongly positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. Further investigation is needed to determine the relative roles of changes in temperature and atmospheric pressure patterns and their resultant teleconnections in synchronizing regime shifts at large scales.

  20. Assessing the Institution of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, Christopher

    2010-05-14

    The nuclear nonproliferation regime is facing a crisis of effectiveness. During the Cold War, the regime was relatively effective in stemming the proliferation of nuclear weapons and building an institutional structure that could, under certain conditions, ensure continued success. However, in the evolving global context, the traditional approaches are becoming less appropriate. Globalization has introduced new sets of stresses on the nonproliferation regime, such as the rise of non-state actors, broadening extensity and intensity of supply chains, and the multipolarization of power. This evolving global context demands an analytical and political flexibility in order to meet future threats. Current institutional capabilities established during the Cold War are now insufficient to meet the nonproliferation regime’s current and future needs. The research was based on information gathered through interviews and reviews of the relevant literature, and two dominant themes emerged. First, that human security should be integrated into the regime to account for the rise of non-state actors and networked violence. Second, confidence in the regime’s overall effectiveness has eroded at a time where verification-based confidence is becoming more essential. The research postulates that a critical analysis of the regime that fully utilizes institutional theory, with its focus on rules, normative structures, and procedures will be essential to adapting the regime to the current global context, building mechanisms for generating trust, creating better enforcement, and providing flexibility for the future.

  1. Modeling of a Two-Regime Crystallization in a Multicomponent

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzanti, G.; Marangoni, A; Idziak, S

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of phase transitions of milk fat triacylglycerols, as model multicomponent lipid systems, were studied under shear in a Couette cell at 17 C, 17.5 C and 20 C under shear rates ranging from 0 to 2880s-1 using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Two-dimensional diffraction patterns were captured during the crystallization process. No effect of shear on onset time for phase a from the liquid was observed. Afterwards a two-regime crystallization process was observed. During the first regime, as observed in other systems, shear reduced the onset time of the phase transition from phase a to 2880s-. The model previously developed for palm oil (ODE model) worked well to describe this regime, confirming the general value of the proposed ODE model. However, the ODE model did not satisfactorily describe the second regime. We found that, as the system gets closer to equilibrium, the growth regime becomes controlled by diffusion, manifested by the kinetics following a {radical}t dependence. This regime was found to be consistent with a mechanism combining step growth at a kink with progressive selection of the crystallizing moieties. This mechanism is in agreement with the displacement of the diffraction peak positions, which revealed how increased shear rate promotes the crystallization of the higher melting fraction affecting the composition of the crystallites.

  2. Trends in the hydrologic regime of Alpine rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Antoine; Renard, Benjamin; Lang, Michel; Giuntoli, Ignazio; Korck, Jane; Koboltschnig, Gernot; Janža, Mitja; d'Amico, Michele; Volken, David

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a trend analysis performed on 177 streamflow time series collected over the Alps in Central Europe. The analysis covers several facets of the Alpine hydrologic regimes, including winter droughts and spring snowmelt flows, both in terms of severity and timing of occurrence. Statistical trend tests are applied at a local scale (i.e. on a site-by-site basis) and at a regional scale (seeking a common trend for sites within the same hydro-climatic region). The overall results indicate a trend toward less severe winter droughts, and consistent changes in the timing of snowmelt flows. However, a more in-depth analysis at the scale of hydro-climatic regimes reveals more contrasted changes. While most glacial- and snowmelt-dominated regimes show a decreasing trend in the severity of winter droughts, contrasted trends are found for mixed snowmelt-rainfall regimes in the Southeastern Alps. Changes in the timing of snowmelt flows (earlier start and increased duration of the snowmelt season) mostly affect glacial- and snowmelt-dominated regimes. Lastly, glacial regimes show an increase in the volume and the peak of snowmelt flows.

  3. Regimes of the magnetized Rayleigh{endash}Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.

    1996-11-01

    Hybrid simulations with kinetic ions and massless fluid electrons are used to investigate the linear and nonlinear behavior of the magnetized Rayleigh{endash}Taylor instability in slab geometry with the plasma subject to a constant gravity. Three regimes are found, which are determined by the magnitude of the complex frequency {omega}={omega}{sub {ital r}}+{ital i}{gamma}. For {vert_bar}{omega}{vert_bar}{lt}{Omega}{sub {ital i}}({Omega}{sub {ital i}}= ion gyrofrequency), one finds the typical behavior of the usual fluid regime, namely the development of {open_quote}{open_quote}mushroom-head{close_quote}{close_quote} spikes and bubbles in the density and a strongly convoluted boundary between the plasma and magnetic field, where the initial gradient is not relaxed much. A second regime, where {vert_bar}{omega}{vert_bar}{approximately}0.1{Omega}{sub {ital i}}, is characterized by the importance of the Hall term. Linearly, the developing flute modes are more finger-like and tilted along the interface; nonlinearly, clump-like structures form, leading to a significant broadening of the interface. The third regime is characterized by unmagnetized ion behavior, with {vert_bar}{omega}{vert_bar}{approximately}{Omega}{sub {ital i}}. Density clumps, rather than flutes, form in the linear stage, while nonlinearly, longer-wavelength modes that resemble those in fluid regime dominate. Finite Larmor radius stabilization of short-wavelength modes is observed in each regime. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Do family policy regimes matter for children's well-being?

    PubMed

    Engster, Daniel; Stensöta, Helena Olofsdotter

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have studied the impact of different welfare state regimes, and particularly family policy regimes, on gender equality. Very little research has been conducted, however, on the association between different family policy regimes and children's well-being. This article explores how the different family policy regimes of twenty OECD countries relate to children's well-being in the areas of child poverty, child mortality, and educational attainment and achievement. We focus specifically on three family policies: family cash and tax benefits, paid parenting leaves, and public child care support. Using panel data for the years 1995, 2000, and 2005, we test the association between these policies and child well-being while holding constant for a number of structural and policy variables. Our analysis shows that the dual-earner regimes, combining high levels of support for paid parenting leaves and public child care, are strongly associated with low levels of child poverty and child mortality. We find little long-term effect of family policies on educational achievement, but a significant positive correlation between high family policy support and higher educational attainment. We conclude that family policies have a significant impact on improving children's well-being, and that dual-earner regimes represent the best practice for promoting children's health and development. PMID:21692245

  5. Numerical simulation of transitions between back discharge regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jánský, Jaroslav; Bessières, Delphine; Paillol, Jean; Lemont, Florent

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations of transitions between back discharge regimes. Back discharge refers to any discharge initiated at or near a dielectric layer covering a passive electrode. In this work, a pinhole in a dielectric layer on a plane anode serves as a model for back discharge activity. We have studied transitions between back discharge regimes by varying the surface charge density on the dielectric layer and the electric field in front of the pinhole. From the variation of these two independent parameters, the back discharge regimes have been depicted as a mode diagram inspired by the experimental study of Masuda and Mizuno. The resulting diagram includes the different discharge regimes that are commonly observed in experiments. The propagation of a positive ionizing wave inside the pinhole toward its edge, and the resulting formation of a plasma zone at its exit constitute the onset stage of back discharge. From this stage, the transitions to volume discharge or surface discharge can occur. The volume discharge regime consists of the propagation of a discharge in space toward the cathode which can be superimposed with the propagation of a discharge above the dielectric layer surface. The diagram reveals the conditions for transitions between back discharge regimes.

  6. Sensitivity of streamflows to hydroclimatic fluctuations: resilience and regime shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, Gianluca; Basso, Stefano; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Landscape and climate alterations foreshadow global-scale shifts of river flow regimes. However, a theory that identifies the range of foreseen impacts on streamflows resulting from inhomogeneous forcings and sensitivity gradients across diverse regimes is lacking. In this contribution, we use a dimensionless index embedding simple climate and landscape attributes (the ratio of the mean interarrival of streamflow-producing rainfall events and the mean catchment response time) to discriminate erratic regimes with enhanced intra-seasonal streamflow variability from persistent regimes endowed with regular flow patterns. The proposed classification is successfully applied to 110 seasonal streamflow distributions observed in 44 catchments of the Alps and the United States, allowing the identification of emerging patterns in space and time. In the same framework, the impact of multi-scale fluctuations of the underlying climatic drivers (temperature, precipitation) on the streamflow distributions can be analyzed. Theoretical and empirical data show that erratic regimes, typical of rivers with low mean discharges, are highly resilient in that they hold a reduced sensitivity to variations in the external forcing. Specific temporal trajectories of streamflow distributions and flow regime shifts driven by land-cover change and rainfall patterns can be also evidenced. The approach developed offers an objective basis for the analysis and prediction of the impact of climate/landscape change on water resources.

  7. Triggered dynamics in a model of different fault creep regimes

    PubMed Central

    Kostić, Srđan; Franović, Igor; Perc, Matjaž; Vasović, Nebojša; Todorović, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The study is focused on the effect of transient external force induced by a passing seismic wave on fault motion in different creep regimes. Displacement along the fault is represented by the movement of a spring-block model, whereby the uniform and oscillatory motion correspond to the fault dynamics in post-seismic and inter-seismic creep regime, respectively. The effect of the external force is introduced as a change of block acceleration in the form of a sine wave scaled by an exponential pulse. Model dynamics is examined for variable parameters of the induced acceleration changes in reference to periodic oscillations of the unperturbed system above the supercritical Hopf bifurcation curve. The analysis indicates the occurrence of weak irregular oscillations if external force acts in the post-seismic creep regime. When fault motion is exposed to external force in the inter-seismic creep regime, one finds the transition to quasiperiodic- or chaos-like motion, which we attribute to the precursory creep regime and seismic motion, respectively. If the triggered acceleration changes are of longer duration, a reverse transition from inter-seismic to post-seismic creep regime is detected on a larger time scale. PMID:24954397

  8. Dynamic regime marginal structural mean models for estimation of optimal dynamic treatment regimes, Part II: proofs of results.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Liliana; Rotnitzky, Andrea; Robins, James M

    2010-01-01

    In this companion article to "Dynamic Regime Marginal Structural Mean Models for Estimation of Optimal Dynamic Treatment Regimes, Part I: Main Content" [Orellana, Rotnitzky and Robins (2010), IJB, Vol. 6, Iss. 2, Art. 7] we present (i) proofs of the claims in that paper, (ii) a proposal for the computation of a confidence set for the optimal index when this lies in a finite set, and (iii) an example to aid the interpretation of the positivity assumption. PMID:20405047

  9. North Sea wind climate in changing weather regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Ivonne; Rockel, Burkhardt

    2015-04-01

    Results from regional climate models (RCMs) are getting more and more important in future wind climate assessment. From RCMs often only the daily wind speed is available, but no information on prevailing wind direction of each day. Weather regime classification can close this gap and models ability of simulating surface wind speed can be analysed in detail. Several objective regime classifications have been investigated to be a sufficient diagnostic tool to evaluate the present wind climate at the German and Dutch coastal area of the North Sea. The classification by Jenkinson and Collison (1977) uses values for mean sea level pressure at 16 locations centered over the North Sea. Beside the predefined 8 prevailed wind directions and the two possibilities on cyclonic or anticyclonic turbulence, 2x8 hybrid weather types can be defined. In this way 27 different regimes can be distinguished including a class of non-classifiable cases. The 27 regimes could be reduced to a number of 11 by allotting the hybrid types to the directional or the centered types. As the classification is carried out for the North Sea based on ERA40 mean sea level pressure the different regimes clearly reflect the mean wind characteristics at the stations. Comparing the wind roses for the individual observations leads to the assumption that the regime classification described before fits the requirements to carry out the regime dependent evaluation of the RCMs with a focus on the German and Dutch coast. Trends in the occurrence of the regimes in the winter period of 1961 to 2000 show an increase of the regimes with Western and Southwestern wind directions and a decrease of wind events from Eastern directions in the North Sea. The trend is dominated by the strong positive phase of the NAO especially in the months January to March starting in the beginning of the 1980s. Due to the applied method ERA40 and the RCMs do not necessarily show the same regime at each day. The agreement among the RCM

  10. AN INDEX TO DETECT EXTERNALLY-FORCED DYNAMIC REGIME SHIFTS IN ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concept of dynamic regimes, and nonlinear shifts between regimes, has gained acceptance and importance in ecosystem research. Regimes in ecosystems are identified as states with characteristic species abundances and abiotic conditions. Ecosystems are maintained in particular ...

  11. USING FISHER INFORMATION TO DETECT GRADUAL AND RAPID ECOSYSTEM REGIME SHIFTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As ecosystems experience perturbations of varying regularity and intensity, they may either remain within the state space neighborhood of the current regime, or "flip" into the neighborhood of a regime with different characteristics. Although the possibility of such regime shifts...

  12. Dynamically strained ferroelastics: Statistical behavior in elastic and plastic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X.; Lookman, T.; Zhao, Z.; Saxena, A.; Sun, J.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2013-03-01

    The dynamic evolution in ferroelastic crystals under external shear is explored by computer simulation of a two-dimensional model. The characteristic geometrical patterns obtained during shear deformation include dynamic tweed in the elastic regime as well as interpenetrating needle domains in the plastic regime. As a result, the statistics of jerk energy differ in the elastic and plastic regimes. In the elastic regime the distributions of jerk energy are sensitive to temperature and initial configurations. However, in the plastic regime the jerk distributions are rather robust and do not depend much on the details of the configurations, although the geometrical pattern formed after yield is strongly influenced by the elastic constants of the materials and the configurations we used. Specifically, for all geometrical configurations we studied, the energy distribution of jerks shows a power-law noise pattern P(E)˜E-(γ-1)(γ-1=1.3-2) at low temperatures and a Vogel-Fulcher distribution P(E) ˜ exp-(E/E0) at high temperatures. More complex behavior occurs at the crossover between these two regimes where our simulated jerk distributions are very well described by a generalized Poisson distributions P(E)˜E-(γ-1) exp-(E/E0)n with n = 0.4-0.5 and γ-1 ≈ 0 (Kohlrausch law). The geometrical mechanisms for the evolution of the ferroelastic microstructure under strain deformation remain similar in all thermal regimes, whereas their thermodynamic behavior differs dramatically: on heating, from power-law statistics via the Kohlrausch law to a Vogel-Fulcher law. There is hence no simple way to predict the local evolution of the twin microstructure from just the observed statistical behavior of a ferroelastic crystal. It is shown that the Poisson distribution is a convenient way to describe the crossover behavior contained in all the experimental data without recourse to specific scaling functions or temperature-dependent cutoff lengths.

  13. Electronic structure in the crossover regimes in lower dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, R.; Dev, B. N.

    2014-11-01

    Modern growth and fabrication techniques can produce lower dimensional structures in the crossover regimes. Such structures in the crossover regimes can provide tunability of various properties of materials. For example, a zero-dimensional (0-D) structure (quantum dot) evolving towards a 3-D structure (bulk) shows electronic structure, which is neither 0-D-like, nor 3-D-like in the dimensional crossover regime. Within the crossover regime the electronic density of states (DOS) at Fermi level (Ef) keeps on changing as the size of the system changes. DOS at Ef determines many properties of materials, such as electronic specific heat, spin susceptibility, etc. Such properties can be tuned by controlling the size of the system in the crossover regimes. Keeping the importance of DOS at Ef in mind, we determine their values and other details of electronic structure of lower dimensional structures, in the 0-D to 1-D, 1-D to 2-D, 2-D to 3-D, 0-D to 2-D, 0-D to 3-D and 1-D to 3-D crossover regimes, in a simple free electron model. We compare our results with analytical theory and experimental results, wherever available. We also present some results obtained by scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements on Ag islands on Si(1 1 1) substrates evolving from a 0-D to a 2-D structure. This simple model is quite useful in understanding lower dimensional structures in the crossover regimes and, in general, in nanoscale science. Fabrication of such structures would provide control on materials properties.

  14. Transient response of Salix cuttings to changing water level regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorla, L.; Signarbieux, C.; Turberg, P.; Buttler, A.; Perona, P.

    2015-03-01

    Sustainable water management requires an understanding of the effects of flow regulation on riparian ecomorphological processes. We investigated the transient response of Salix viminalis by examining the effect of water-level regimes on its above-ground and below-ground biomass. Four sets of Salix cuttings, three juveniles (in the first growing season) and one mature (1 year old), were planted and initially grown under the same water-level regime for 1 month. We imposed three different water-level regime treatments representing natural variability, a seasonal trend with no peaks, and minimal flow (characteristic of hydropower) consisting of a constant water level and natural flood peaks. We measured sap flux, stem water potential, photosynthesis, growth parameters, and final root architecture. The mature cuttings were not affected by water table dynamics, but the juveniles displayed causal relationships between the changing water regime, plant growth, and root distribution during a 2 month transient period. For example, a 50% drop in mean sap flux corresponded with a -1.5 Mpa decrease in leaf water potential during the first day after the water regime was changed. In agreement with published field observations, the cuttings concentrated their roots close to the mean water table of the corresponding treatment, allowing survival under altered conditions and resilience to successive stress events. Juvenile development was strongly impacted by the minimum flow regime, leading to more than 60% reduction of both above-ground and below-ground biomass, with respect to the other treatments. Hence, we suggest avoiding minimum flow regimes where Salix restoration is prioritized.

  15. Stochastic Parametrisations and Regime Behaviour of Atmospheric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Hannah; Moroz, Irene; Palmer, Tim

    2013-04-01

    The presence of regimes is a characteristic of non-linear, chaotic systems (Lorenz, 2006). In the atmosphere, regimes emerge as familiar circulation patterns such as the El-Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Scandinavian Blocking events. In recent years there has been much interest in the problem of identifying and studying atmospheric regimes (Solomon et al, 2007). In particular, how do these regimes respond to an external forcing such as anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions? The importance of regimes in observed trends over the past 50-100 years indicates that in order to predict anthropogenic climate change, our climate models must be able to represent accurately natural circulation regimes, their statistics and variability. It is well established that representing model uncertainty as well as initial condition uncertainty is important for reliable weather forecasts (Palmer, 2001). In particular, stochastic parametrisation schemes have been shown to improve the skill of weather forecast models (e.g. Berner et al., 2009; Frenkel et al., 2012; Palmer et al., 2009). It is possible that including stochastic physics as a representation of model uncertainty could also be beneficial in climate modelling, enabling the simulator to explore larger regions of the climate attractor including other flow regimes. An alternative representation of model uncertainty is a perturbed parameter scheme, whereby physical parameters in subgrid parametrisation schemes are perturbed about their optimal value. Perturbing parameters gives a greater control over the ensemble than multi-model or multiparametrisation ensembles, and has been used as a representation of model uncertainty in climate prediction (Stainforth et al., 2005; Rougier et al., 2009). We investigate the effect of including representations of model uncertainty on the regime behaviour of a simulator. A simple chaotic model of the atmosphere, the Lorenz '96 system, is used to study

  16. Positron acceleration in doughnut wakefields in the blowout regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Jorge; Mendonca, Jose; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Most important plasma acceleration results were reached in the so called bubble or blowout regime. Although ideally suited for electron acceleration, it has been recognized that non-linear regimes are not adequate to accelerate positrons. New configurations enabling positron acceleration in non-linear regimes would therefore open new research paths for future plasma based collider configurations. In this work, we explore, analytically and through 3D OSIRIS simulations, a novel configuration for positron acceleration in strongly non-linear laser wakefield excitation regimes using Laguerre-Gaussian laser drivers to drive doughnut shaped wakefields with positron focusing and accelerating fields. We demonstrate that positron focusing-fields can be up to an order of magnitude larger than electron focusing in the spherical blowout regime. The amplitude of the accelerating fields is similar to the spherical blowout. Simulations demonstrate laser self-guiding and stable positron acceleration until the laser energy has been exhausted to the plasma. Other realisations of the scheme, using two Gaussian laser pulses, will also be explored. FCT Grant No EXPL/FIS-PLA/0834/2012 and European Research Council ERC-2010-AdG Grant No. 267841.

  17. Contrasting convective regimes over the Amazon: Implications for cloud electrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, E.; Rosenfeld, D.; Madden, N.; Gerlach, J.; Gears, N.; Atkinson, L.; Dunnemann, N.; Frostrom, G.; Antonio, M.; Biazon, B.; Camargo, R.; Franca, H.; Gomes, A.; Lima, M.; Machado, R.; Manhaes, S.; Nachtigall, L.; Piva, H.; Quintiliano, W.; Machado, L.; Artaxo, P.; Roberts, G.; Renno, N.; Blakeslee, R.; Bailey, J.; Boccippio, D.; Betts, A.; Wolff, D.; Roy, B.; Halverson, J.; Rickenbach, T.; Fuentes, J.; Avelino, E.

    2002-10-01

    Four distinct meteorological regimes in the Amazon basin have been examined to distinguish the contributions from boundary layer aerosol and convective available potential energy (CAPE) to continental cloud structure and electrification. The lack of distinction in the electrical parameters (peak flash rate, lightning yield per unit rainfall) between aerosol-rich October and aerosol-poor November in the premonsoon regime casts doubt on a primary role for the aerosol in enhancing cloud electrification. Evidence for a substantial role for the aerosol in suppressing warm rain coalescence is identified in the most highly polluted period in early October. The electrical activity in this stage is qualitatively peculiar. During the easterly and westerly wind regimes of the wet season, the lightning yield per unit of rainfall is positively correlated with the aerosol concentration, but the electrical parameters are also correlated with CAPE, with a similar degree of scatter. Here cause and effect are difficult to establish with available observations. This ambiguity extends to the "green ocean" westerly regime, a distinctly maritime regime over a major continent with minimum aerosol concentration, minimum CAPE, and little if any lightning.

  18. Are there multiple scaling regimes in Holocene temperature records?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, Tine; Rypdal, Kristoffer; Fredriksen, Hege-Beate

    2016-04-01

    The concept of multiple scaling regimes in temperature time series is examined, with emphasis on the question whether or not a monoscaling model with one single scaling regime can be rejected from observation data from the Holocene. A model for internal variability with only one regime is simpler and allows more certain predictions on timescales of centuries when combined with existing knowledge of radiative forcing. Our analysis of spectra from stable isotope ratios from Greenland and Antarctica ice cores shows that a scale break around centennial timescales is evident for the last glacial period, but not for the Holocene. Spectra from a number of late Holocene multiproxy temperature reconstructions, and one from the entire Holocene, have also been analysed, without identifying a significant scale break. Our results indicate that a single-regime scaling climate noise, with some non-scaling fluctuations on a millennial timescale superposed, cannot be rejected as a null model for the Holocene climate. The scale break observed from the glacial time ice-core records is likely caused by the influence of Dansgaard-Oeschger events and teleconnections to the Southern Hemisphere on centennial timescales. From our analysis we conclude that the two-regime model is not sufficiently justified for the Holocene to be used for temperature prediction on centennial timescales.

  19. Defining pyromes and global syndromes of fire regimes.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Sally; Lehmann, Caroline E R; Gómez-Dans, Jose L; Bradstock, Ross A

    2013-04-16

    Fire is a ubiquitous component of the Earth system that is poorly understood. To date, a global-scale understanding of fire is largely limited to the annual extent of burning as detected by satellites. This is problematic because fire is multidimensional, and focus on a single metric belies its complexity and importance within the Earth system. To address this, we identified five key characteristics of fire regimes--size, frequency, intensity, season, and extent--and combined new and existing global datasets to represent each. We assessed how these global fire regime characteristics are related to patterns of climate, vegetation (biomes), and human activity. Cross-correlations demonstrate that only certain combinations of fire characteristics are possible, reflecting fundamental constraints in the types of fire regimes that can exist. A Bayesian clustering algorithm identified five global syndromes of fire regimes, or pyromes. Four pyromes represent distinctions between crown, litter, and grass-fueled fires, and the relationship of these to biomes and climate are not deterministic. Pyromes were partially discriminated on the basis of available moisture and rainfall seasonality. Human impacts also affected pyromes and are globally apparent as the driver of a fifth and unique pyrome that represents human-engineered modifications to fire characteristics. Differing biomes and climates may be represented within the same pyrome, implying that pathways of change in future fire regimes in response to changes in climate and human activity may be difficult to predict. PMID:23559374

  20. THE IMPACT OF THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR SAFETY REGIME IN BRAZIL

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, C.

    2004-10-06

    A turning point of the world nuclear industry with respect to safety occurred due to the accident at Chernobyl, in 1986. A side from the tragic personal losses and the enormous financial damage, the Chernobyl accident has literally demonstrated that ''a nuclear accident anywhere is an accident everywhere''. The impact was felt immediately by the nuclear industry, with plant cancellations (e.g. Austria), elimination of national programs (e.g. Italy) and general construction delays. However, the reaction of the nuclear industry was equally immediate, which led to the proposal and establishment of a Global Nuclear Safety Regime. This regime is composed of biding international safety conventions, globally accepted safety standard, and a voluntary peer review system. In a previous work, the author has presented in detail the components of this Regime, and briefly discussed its impact in the Brazilian nuclear power organizations, including the Regulatory Body. This work, on the opposite, briefly reviews the Global Nuclear Safety Regime, and concentrates in detail in the discussion of its impact in Brazil, showing how it has produced some changes, and where the peer pressure regime has failed to produce real results.

  1. Early regimes of water capillary flow in slit silica nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Oyarzua, Elton; Walther, Jens H; Mejía, Andrés; Zambrano, Harvey A

    2015-06-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to investigate the initial stages of spontaneous imbibition of water in slit silica nanochannels surrounded by air. An analysis is performed for the effects of nanoscopic confinement, initial conditions of liquid uptake and air pressurization on the dynamics of capillary filling. The results indicate that the nanoscale imbibition process is divided into three main flow regimes: an initial regime where the capillary force is balanced only by the inertial drag and characterized by a constant velocity and a plug flow profile. In this regime, the meniscus formation process plays a central role in the imbibition rate. Thereafter, a transitional regime takes place, in which, the force balance has significant contributions from both inertia and viscous friction. Subsequently, a regime wherein viscous forces dominate the capillary force balance is attained. Flow velocity profiles identify the passage from an inviscid flow to a developing Poiseuille flow. Gas density profiles ahead of the capillary front indicate a transient accumulation of air on the advancing meniscus. Furthermore, slower capillary filling rates computed for higher air pressures reveal a significant retarding effect of the gas displaced by the advancing meniscus. PMID:25976034

  2. Ballooning filament growth in the intermediate nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, P.; Hegna, C. C.

    2008-09-15

    A theory is developed for the description of ballooning instability in the intermediate nonlinear regime for general magnetic configurations including toroidal systems such as tokamaks. The evolution equations for the plasma filament growth induced by the ballooning instability are derived accounting for the dominant nonlinear effects in an ideal magnetohydrodynamic description. The intermediate nonlinear regime of ballooning modes is defined by the ordering that the plasma filament displacement across the magnetic surface is comparable to the linear mode width in the same direction. In the tokamak case, this regime could become particularly relevant for a transport barrier as the width of the barrier (or pedestal) region approaches the mode width of the dominant ballooning mode. A remarkable feature of the nonlinear ballooning equations is that solutions of the associated local linear ballooning mode equations continue to be valid solutions into the intermediate nonlinear regime. The filament growth equations for the intermediate nonlinear ballooning regime may be applicable to the precursor and precollapse phase of edge localized modes observed in both simulations and experiments.

  3. Decoherence induced by a dynamic spin environment: The universal regime

    SciTech Connect

    Cormick, Cecilia; Paz, Juan Pablo

    2008-02-15

    This paper analyzes the decoherence induced on a single qubit by the interaction with a spin chain with nontrivial internal dynamics (XY-type interactions). The aim of the paper is to study the existence and properties of the so-called universal regime, in which the decoherence time scale becomes independent of the strength of the coupling with the environment. It is shown that, although such a regime does exist, as previously established by Cucchietti et al. [Phys. Rev. A 75, 032337 (2007)], it is not a clear signature of a quantum phase transition in the environment. In fact, this kind of universality also exists in the absence of quantum phase transitions. A universal regime can be related to the existence of an energy scale separation between the Hamiltonian of the environment and the one characterizing the system-environment interaction. The results presented also indicate that in the strong-coupling regime the quantum phase transition does not produce an enhancement of decoherence (as opposed to what happens in the weak-coupling regime)

  4. Aerodynamic Optimization of Supersonic Transport at Near-Sonic Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Wataru; Matsushima, Kisa; Obayashi, Shigeru; Nakahashi, Kazuhiro

    Recently, an airplane cruising at near-sonic regime is watched with keen interest. The Sonic-Cruiser, of which the Boeing Company has examined and challenged the development, is the most remarkable case. In this paper, motivated by this trend, aerodynamic performance optimization for an airplane cruising at near-sonic regime is discussed based on CFD simulations. NAL’s experimental supersonic airplane, called NEXST-1, was employed as the baseline model for optimization. Aerodynamic performance was evaluated by solving the Euler equations with the unstructured grid method. It was confirmed that the performance Euler simulation predicted was qualitatively correct. By the evaluation to select a baseline model for optimization, NEXST-1 was accepted as a candidate of sonic plane because of the existence of drag bucket at near-sonic regime. In the optimization, Genetic Algorithm was used with Euler simulations. The objective was to reduce drag keeping lift constant, at the flying speed of Mach 0.98. The optimized result showed L/D improvement not only for near-sonic regime but also for transonic regime. The mechanism of design to reduce drag force was found through the analysis and comparison of the geometries and aerodynamic phenomena about the baseline model and the optimized one.

  5. Burning plasma regime for Fussion-Fission Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    2010-11-01

    The basic aspects of burning plasma regimes of Fusion-Fission Research Facility (FFRF, R/a=4/1 m/m, Ipl=5 MA, Btor=4-6 T, P^DT=50-100 MW, P^fission=80-4000 MW, 1 m thick blanket), which is suggested as the next step device for Chinese fusion program, are presented. The mission of FFRF is to advance magnetic fusion to the level of a stationary neutron source and to create a technical, scientific, and technology basis for the utilization of high-energy fusion neutrons for the needs of nuclear energy and technology. FFRF will rely as much as possible on ITER design. Thus, the magnetic system, especially TFC, will take advantage of ITER experience. TFC will use the same superconductor as ITER. The plasma regimes will represent an extension of the stationary plasma regimes on HT-7 and EAST tokamaks at ASIPP. Both inductive discharges and stationary non-inductive Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) will be possible. FFRF strongly relies on new, Lithium Wall Fusion (LiWF) plasma regimes, the development of which will be done on NSTX, HT-7, EAST in parallel with the design work. This regime will eliminate a number of uncertainties, still remaining unresolved in the ITER project. Well controlled, hours long inductive current drive operation at P^DT=50-100 MW is predicted.

  6. Soil magnetic susceptibility reflects soil moisture regimes and the adaptability of tree species to these regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, J.-S.; Grimley, D.A.; Xu, C.; Dawson, J.O.

    2008-01-01

    Flooded, saturated or poorly drained soils are frequently anaerobic, leading to dissolution of the strongly magnetic minerals, magnetite and maghemite, and a corresponding decrease in soil magnetic susceptibility (MS). In this study of five temperate deciduous forests in east-central Illinois, USA, mean surface soil MS was significantly higher adjacent to upland tree species (31 ?? 10-5 SI) than adjacent to floodplain or lowland tree species (17 ?? 10-5 SI), when comparing regional soils with similar parent material of loessal silt. Although the sites differ in average soil MS for each tree species, the relative order of soil MS means for associated tree species at different locations is similar. Lowland tree species, Celtis occidentalis L., Ulmus americana L., Acer saccharinum L., Carya laciniosa (Michx. f.) Loud., and Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh. were associated with the lowest measured soil MS mean values overall and at each site. Tree species' flood tolerance rankings increased significantly, as soil MS values declined, the published rankings having significant correlations with soil MS values for the same species groups. The three published classifications of tree species' flood tolerance were significantly correlated with associated soil MS values at all sites, but most strongly at Allerton Park, the site with the widest range of soil drainage classes and MS values. Using soil MS measurements in forests with soil parent material containing similar initial levels of strongly magnetic minerals can provide a simple, rapid and quantitative method to classify soils according to hydric regimes, including dry conditions, and associated plant composition. Soil MS values thus have the capacity to quantify the continuum of hydric tolerances of tree species and guide tree species selection for reforestation. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Laser Wakefield Acceleration in the PetaWatt Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsouleas, Tom; Tsung, Frank; Mori, Warren

    2002-11-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration with multi-terawatt lasers has demonstrated impressive results in experiments around the world-- e.g., energy gains up to 200 MeV in mm-scale gas jets. With the prospects good for a number of petawatt class lasers in the near future, we examine with 2-D and 3-D PIC simulations the potential energy gain and new physics of laser wakefield acceleration in this regime. Prospects for producing GeV electron beams in underdense plasmas will be described. In addition, the differences in physics between terawatt and petawatt regimes will be explored. Preliminary results indicate that there are two acceleration stages in the petawatt regime -- with the early electrons dephasing due to elongation of the laser wake as the laser pump evolves. The later stage produces a long beam of electrons several times the initial plasma wake wavelength with a fairly defined energy in the GeV range.

  8. Coarsening foams robustly reach a self-similar growth regime.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jérôme; Mokso, Rajmund; Cantat, Isabelle; Cloetens, Peter; Glazier, James A; Graner, François; Delannay, Renaud

    2010-06-18

    Dry liquid foams coarsen like other diphasic systems governed by interfacial energy: gas slowly diffuses across liquid films, resulting in large bubbles growing at the expense of smaller ones which eventually shrink and disappear. A foam scatters light very effectively, preventing direct optical observation of bubble sizes and shapes in large foams. Using high speed x-ray tomography, we have produced 4D movies (i.e., 3D + time) of up to 30,000 bubbles. After a transient regime, the successive images look alike, except that the average bubble size increases as the square root of time: This scaling state is the long sought self-similar growth regime. The bubble size and face-number distributions in this regime are compared with experimental distributions for grains in crystals and with numerical simulations of foams. PMID:20867343

  9. Rough-wall turbulent boundary layers in the transition regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of turbulent boundary layers over two-dimensional spanwise groove and three-dimensional sandgrain roughnesses in the transition regime between hydraulically smooth and fully rough conditions is presented. It is found that a self-preserving state can be reached in boundary layers developing over both d-type groove and sandgrain roughnesses, and that the drag of a k-type rough wall can be reduced by lowering the spanwise aspect ratio of the roughness elements. The two roughness Reynolds numbers defining the boundaries of the transition regime of the k-type roughnesses are shown to decrease with increasing roughness-element spanwise aspect ratio, and the upper critical transition Reynolds number is shown to determine the roughness behavior in both the transition and fully rough regime.

  10. Gas flow through rough microchannels in the transition flow regime.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zilong; Chen, Yongping; Shao, Chenxi

    2016-01-01

    A multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model of Couette flow is developed to investigate the rarified gas flow through microchannels with roughness characterized by fractal geometry, especially to elucidate the coupled effects of roughness and rarefaction on microscale gas flow in the transition flow regime. The results indicate that the surface roughness effect on gas flow behavior becomes more significant in rarefied gas flow with the increase of Knudsen number. We find the gas flow behavior in the transition flow regime is more sensitive to roughness height than that in the slip flow regime. In particular, the influence of fractal dimension on rarefied gas flow behavior is less significant than roughness height. PMID:26871175

  11. Optimization of electrodynamic acceleration regimes for cylindrical conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalikhman, S. A.

    1985-11-01

    At the present time electromagnetic accelerators which use the action of an impulsive electromagnetic field on a current-carrying conductor appear to be promising devices for the study of high-speed collisions. In the regime using separate sources for the accelerating magnetic field and the current in the conductor being accelerated it is possible to bring cylindrical conductors up to velocities exceeding 12 km/sec [1]. Acceleration regimes have been calculated previously [2] assuming independence of the current density in the conductor from the accelerating magnetic field. However, as analysis of transient electromagnetic processes occurring in the interaction of an impulsive electromagnetic field with a cylindrical conductor shows [3], the maximum current density, limited by heating conditions, depends significantly on the induction of the accelerating magnetic field. In the present study we will analyze regimes for electrodynamic acceleration of cylindrical conductors with consideration of diffusion of both the intrinsic and the external impulsive magnetic field within the conductor.

  12. Shifts in fisheries management: adapting to regime shifts

    PubMed Central

    King, Jacquelynne R.; McFarlane, Gordon A.; Punt, André E.

    2015-01-01

    For many years, fisheries management was based on optimizing yield and maintaining a target biomass, with little regard given to low-frequency environmental forcing. However, this policy was often unsuccessful. In the last two to three decades, fisheries science and management have undergone a shift towards balancing sustainable yield with conservation, with the goal of including ecosystem considerations in decision-making frameworks. Scientific understanding of low-frequency climate–ocean variability, which is manifested as ecosystem regime shifts and states, has led to attempts to incorporate these shifts and states into fisheries assessment and management. To date, operationalizing these attempts to provide tactical advice has met with limited success. We review efforts to incorporate regime shifts and states into the assessment and management of fisheries resources, propose directions for future investigation and outline a potential framework to include regime shifts and changes in ecosystem states into fisheries management.

  13. Nonlinear-optical frequency-doubling metareflector: pulsed regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. K.; Myslivets, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of backward-wave second-harmonic metareflector operating in pulse regime are investigated. It is made of metamaterial which enables phase matching of contra-propagating fundamental and second-harmonic waves. References are given to the works that prove such a possibility. Physical principles underlying differences in the proposed and standard settings as well as between continuous-wave and pulsed regimes are discussed. Pulsed regime is more practicable and has a broader scope of applications. A set of partial differential equations which describe such a reflector with the account for losses are solved numerically. It is shown that unlike second-harmonic generation in standard settings, contra-propagating pulse of second harmonic may become much longer than the incident fundamental one and the difference grows with decrease in the input pulse length as compared to thickness of the metaslab. The revealed properties are important for applications and may manifest themselves beyond the optical wavelength range.

  14. Laser-nucleus interactions: The quasi-adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálffy, Adriana; Buss, Oliver; Hoefer, Axel; Weidenmüller, Hans A.

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between nuclei and a strong zeptosecond laser pulse with coherent MeV photons is investigated theoretically. We provide a first semiquantitative study of the quasi-adiabatic regime where the photon absorption rate is comparable to the nuclear equilibration rate. In that regime, multiple photon absorption leads to the formation of a compound nucleus in the so-far unexplored regime of excitation energies several hundred MeV above the yrast line. The temporal dynamics of the process is investigated by means of a set of master equations that account for dipole absorption, stimulated dipole emission, neutron decay, and induced fission in a chain of nuclei. That set is solved numerically by means of state-of-the-art matrix exponential methods also used in nuclear fuel burn-up and radioactivity transport calculations. Our quantitative estimates predict the excitation path and range of nuclei reached by neutron decay and provide relevant information for the layout of future experiments.

  15. Living dangerously on borrowed time during slow, unrecognized regime shifts.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Terry P; Linares, Cristina; Dakos, Vasilis; van de Leemput, Ingrid A; van Nes, Egbert H

    2013-03-01

    Regime shifts from one ecological state to another are often portrayed as sudden, dramatic, and difficult to reverse. Yet many regime shifts unfold slowly and imperceptibly after a tipping point has been exceeded, especially at regional and global scales. These long, smooth transitions between equilibrium states are easy to miss, ignore, or deny, confounding management and governance. However, slow responses by ecosystems after transgressing a dangerous threshold also affords borrowed time - a window of opportunity to return to safer conditions before the new state eventually locks in and equilibrates. In this context, the most important challenge is a social one: convincing enough people to confront business-as-usual before time runs out to reverse unwanted regime shifts even after they have already begun. PMID:22995893

  16. Theoretical study of the crossover into hydrodynamic regime in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Derek; Yudhistira, Indra; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Adam, Shaffique

    Experiments on graphene have recently succeeded in entering the hydrodynamic regime, as demonstrated by successful observations of strong violation of Wiedemann-Franz law, the Gurzhi effect and electronic Poiseuille flow. It is known that electronic systems enter the hydrodynamic regime when electron-electron scattering dominates over electron-impurity and electron-phonon scattering. However, a quantitative study of this transition from the Fermi liquid to hydrodynamic regime is still lacking. In view of this, we quantitatively analyze the electron-electron, electron-impurity and electron-phonon scattering rates as a function of temperature, charge doping and disorder (charge puddle) strength. This yields a quantitative understanding of the onset of hydrodynamic electronic behavior in graphene samples. This work is supported by the National Research Foundation of Singapore under its Fellowship program (NRF-NRFF2012-01) and by the Singapore Ministry of Education and Yale-NUS College through Grant No. R-607-265-01312.

  17. Rearrangements in Sheared Disordered Solids: Low and High Pressure Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijtmans, Sven; van Deen, Merlijn; van Hecke, Martin; Manning, M. Lisa

    We study contact changes and rearrangements in quasistatic shear of disordered jammed packings at a range of pressures. We distinguish rearrangements where particle positions are discontinuous, leading to energy and stress discontinuities, from more frequent network events where contacts change but particle positions remain continuous. Moreover, we introduce two distinct protocols to unambiguously distinguish line reversible, loop reversible and irreversible events. The prevalence and spatial extension of five distinct event types (there are no loop reversible network events) evidence two distinct regimes: a low pressure regime dominated by irreversible extended events and a high pressure regime dominated by reversible localized ones. These trends indicate a crossover in the qualitative nature of plastic behavior in disordered solids near and far from jamming.

  18. Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime, part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amet, Francois; Ke, Chung Ting; Borzenets, Ivan; Wang, Jiyingmei; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Deacon, Russel; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Bomze, Yuriy; Tarucha, Seigo; Finkelstein, Gleb

    A novel promising route for creating topological states and excitations is to combine superconductivity and the quantum Hall effect. Despite this potential, signatures of superconductivity in the quantum Hall regime remain scarce, and a superconducting current through a Landau-quantized two-dimensional electron gas has so far eluded experimental observation. High-mobility graphene/BN heterostructures exhibit the quantum Hall effect at relatively low field and are therefore particularly suitable to study the fate of the Josephson effect in that regime. Here, we report the observation of a superconducting current through graphene at fields as high as 2 Tesla. In that regime, the normal-state resistance is quantized but pockets of superconductivity still persist at small current bias. We will describe their bias and temperature dependence. Magnetic field interference patterns in the supercurrent inform on possible mechanisms mediating this supercurrent.

  19. The Isolated Bubble Regime in Pool Nucleate Boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Y. A.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Callaway, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We consider an isolated bubble boiling regime in which vapour bubbles are intermittently produced at a prearranged set of nucleation site on an upward facing overheated wall plane. In this boiling regime, the bubbles depart from the wall and move as separate entities. Except in the matter of rise velocity, the bubbles do not interfere and are independent of one another. However, the rise velocity is dependent on bubble volume concentration in the bulk. Heat transfer properties specific to this regime cannot be described without bubble detachment size, and we apply our previously developed dynamic theory of vapour bubble growth and detachment to determine this size. Bubble growth is presumed to be thermally controlled. Two limiting cases of bubble evolution are considered: the one in which buoyancy prevails in promoting bubble detachment and the one in which surface tension prevails. We prove termination of the isolated regime of pool nucleate boiling to result from one of the four possible causes, depending on relevant parameters values. The first cause consists in the fact that the upward flow of rising bubbles hampers the downward liquid flow, and under certain conditions, prevents the liquid from coming to the wall in an amount that would be sufficient to compensate for vapour removal from the wall. The second cause is due to the lateral coalescence of growing bubbles that are attached to their corresponding nucleation sites, with ensuing generation of larger bubbles and extended vapour patches near the wall. The other two causes involve longitudinal coalescence either 1) immediately in the wall vicinity, accompanied by the establishment of the multiple bubble boiling regime, or 2) in the bulk, with the formation of vapour columns. The longitudinal coalescence in the bulk is shown to be the most important cause. The critical wall temperature and the heat flux density associated with isolated bubble regime termination are found to be functions of the physical and

  20. Temporal evolution of flow regimes in urbanizing basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia, A.; Rossel, F.; Gironas, J. A.; Jovanovic, T.

    2014-12-01

    We characterize the temporal evolution of the flow regime of urbanizing basins. By urbanizing basins, we mean basins that have experienced urban growth during their observation period. To represent the flow regime, we use flow duration curves (FDCs). We compute the FDCs using a stochastic model of daily streamflow for urban basins. In this case, the model aids in discerning the influence of key factors (e.g., climate, land use change, stormwater managenment conditions, and the slow and fast properties of the hydrologic response) on streamflow. To implement the model, we first divide the complete observation period of a given urban basin into intervals of equal duration, e.g. 5 years. Subsequently, we apply the model to each interval and this is how we capture the influence of land use changes and climatic fluctuations on the flow regime. We apply this modeling framework to 14 urbanizing basins in the Baltimore-Washington DC region. Results from this application indicate consistent changes in the temporal evolution of the altered flow regimes, which can largely be explained by the progressive redistribution with urban growth of water from slow subsurface runoff and evapotranspiration to fast urban runoff. We also use the modeling framework to determine indicators of ecohydrological alteration for urbanizing basins. The application of these indicators to our study area suggests that the flow regime is sensitive to alterations up to a certain level of urbanization after which sensitivity seems to level off. The flow regime also seems to be relatively more resistant to alterations for both the smaller and larger levels of urbanization considered. In the future, we would like to extend the application of the proposed modeling framework to other metropolitan areas.

  1. Energy regimes and the development of the European Community

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjilambrinos, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    Energy policy has historically played an important role in the development of the European Community (EC). This study examines the reasons for the choice of coal and atomic energy as regimes of integration, analyzes their impact on the institutions and political traditions of the EC, and evaluates their consistency with the principles of democratic governance. Functionalist theory has provided the idealogical foundations for the European Coal and Steel Community and the European Atomic Energy Community. Functionalist theorists advocate technocracy as the means for overcoming the conflicts inherent in traditional political processes. Coal and atomic energy were chosen as regimes of integration because of their technocratic character and the importance attached to them as the dominant energy source of the time and the perceived source of energy abundance in the near future. Energy regimes could not be removed from the political context of national governance. Hard energy regimes, which include coal and atomic energy, are technocratic policies which exclude ordinary citizens from the exercise of power and intensify international conflict. An institutional analysis of the French and Danish electricity regimes demonstrates that their political characteristics are incompatible with the principles of democratic governance. It is also demonstrated that the characteristics of soft energy regimes (e.g., conservation and renewables) are compatible with these principles and are based on cooperation. An analysis of the EC's energy policy demonstrates that a soft energy path represents a concept of integration which distributes decision-making power among various levels of governance. A hard energy path would concentrate power in the hands of a technocratic elite. The pursuit of a soft energy path by the EC would enhance significantly the opportunities for political integration.

  2. Dynamic regimes of local homogeneous population model with time lag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neverova, Galina; Frisman, Efim

    2016-06-01

    We investigated Moran - Ricker model with time lag 1. It is made analytical and numerical study of the model. It is shown there is co-existence of various dynamic regimes under the same values of parameters. The model simultaneously possesses several different limit regimes: stable state, periodic fluctuations, and chaotic attractor. The research results show if present population size substantially depends on population number of previous year then it is observed quasi-periodic oscillations. Fluctuations with period 2 occur when the growth of population size is regulated by density dependence in the current year.

  3. Ocean Wave Energy Regimes of the Circumpolar Coastal Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    Ocean wave activity is a major enviromental forcing agent of the ice-rich sediments that comprise large sections of the arctic coastal margins. While it is instructive to possess information about the wind regimes in these regions, direct application to geomorphological and engineering needs requires knowledge of the resultant wave-energy regimes. Wave energy information has been calculated at the regional scale using adjusted reanalysis model windfield data. Calculations at this scale are not designed to account for local-scale coastline/bathymetric irregularities and variability. Results will be presented for the circumpolar zones specified by the Arctic Coastal Dynamics Project.

  4. Strong and moderate nonlinear El Niño regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ken; Dewitte, Boris

    2016-03-01

    It has been previously proposed that two El Niño (EN) regimes, strong and moderate, exist but the historical observational record is too short to establish this conclusively. Here, 1200 years of simulations with the GFDL CM2.1 model allowed us to demonstrate their existence in this model and, by showing that the relevant dynamics are also evident in observations, we present a stronger case for their existence in nature. In CM2.1, the robust bimodal probability distribution of equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) indices during EN peaks provides evidence for the existence of the regimes, which is also supported by a cluster analysis of these same indices. The observations agree with this distribution, with the EN of 1982-1983 and 1997-1998 corresponding to the strong EN regime and all the other observed EN to the moderate regime. The temporal evolution of various indices during the observed strong EN agrees very well with the events in CM2.1, providing further validation of this model as a proxy for nature. The two regimes differ strongly in the magnitude of the eastern Pacific warming but not much in the central Pacific. Observations and model agree in the existence of a finite positive threshold in the SST anomaly above which the zonal wind response to warming is strongly enhanced. Such nonlinearity in the Bjerknes feedback, which increases the growth rate of EN events if they reach sufficiently large amplitude, is very likely the essential mechanism that gives rise to the existence of the two EN regimes. Oceanic nonlinear advection does not appear essential for the onset of strong EN. The threshold nonlinearity could make the EN regimes very sensitive to stochastic forcing. Observations and model agree that the westerly wind stress anomaly in the central equatorial Pacific in late boreal summer has a substantial role determining the EN regime in the following winter and it is suggested that a stochastic component at this time was key for the

  5. Explicit mapping of acoustic regimes for wind instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missoum, Samy; Vergez, Christophe; Doc, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to map the various acoustic regimes of wind instruments. The maps can be generated in a multidimensional space consisting of design, control parameters, and initial conditions. The boundaries of the maps are obtained explicitly in terms of the parameters using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier as well as a dedicated adaptive sampling scheme. The approach is demonstrated on a simplified clarinet model for which several maps are generated based on different criteria. Examples of computation of the probability of occurrence of a specific acoustic regime are also provided. In addition, the approach is demonstrated on a design optimization example for optimal intonation.

  6. Phase contrast and operation regimes in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Sergio

    2014-04-07

    In amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy the attractive and the repulsive force regimes induce phase shifts above and below 90°, respectively. In the more recent multifrequency approach, however, multiple operation regimes have been reported and the theory should be revisited. Here, a theory of phase contrast in multifrequency atomic force microscopy is developed and discussed in terms of energy transfer between modes, energy dissipation and the kinetic energy and energy transfer associated with externally driven harmonics. The single frequency virial that controls the phase shift might undergo transitions in sign while the average force (modal virial) remains positive (negative)

  7. Using Clustering to Establish Climate Regimes from PCM Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Robert; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor); Hoffman, Forrest; Hargrove, W. W.; Erickson, D.

    2002-01-01

    A multivariate statistical clustering technique--based on the k-means algorithm of Hartigan has been used to extract patterns of climatological significance from 200 years of general circulation model (GCM) output. Originally developed and implemented on a Beowulf-style parallel computer constructed by Hoffman and Hargrove from surplus commodity desktop PCs, the high performance parallel clustering algorithm was previously applied to the derivation of ecoregions from map stacks of 9 and 25 geophysical conditions or variables for the conterminous U.S. at a resolution of 1 sq km. Now applied both across space and through time, the clustering technique yields temporally-varying climate regimes predicted by transient runs of the Parallel Climate Model (PCM). Using a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and clustering four fields of significance to the global water cycle (surface temperature, precipitation, soil moisture, and snow depth) from 1871 through 2098, the authors' analysis shows an increase in spatial area occupied by the cluster or climate regime which typifies desert regions (i.e., an increase in desertification) and a decrease in the spatial area occupied by the climate regime typifying winter-time high latitude perma-frost regions. The patterns of cluster changes have been analyzed to understand the predicted variability in the water cycle on global and continental scales. In addition, representative climate regimes were determined by taking three 10-year averages of the fields 100 years apart for northern hemisphere winter (December, January, and February) and summer (June, July, and August). The result is global maps of typical seasonal climate regimes for 100 years in the past, for the present, and for 100 years into the future. Using three-dimensional data or phase space representations of these climate regimes (i.e., the cluster centroids), the authors demonstrate the portion of this phase space occupied by the land surface at all points in space and time

  8. Terahertz Quantum Plasmonics of Nanoslot Antennas in Nonlinear Regime.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-Yeon; Kang, Bong Joo; Park, Joohyun; Bahk, Young-Mi; Kim, Won Tae; Rhie, Jiyeah; Jeon, Hyeongtag; Rotermund, Fabian; Kim, Dai-Sik

    2015-10-14

    Quantum tunneling in plasmonic nanostructures has presented an interesting aspect of incorporating quantum mechanics into classical optics. However, the study has been limited to the subnanometer gap regime. Here, we newly extend quantum plasmonics to gap widths well over 1 nm by taking advantage of the low-frequency terahertz regime. Enhanced electric fields of up to 5 V/nm induce tunneling of electrons in different arrays of ring-shaped nanoslot antennas of gap widths from 1.5 to 10 nm, which lead to a significant nonlinear transmission decrease. These observations are consistent with theoretical calculations considering terahertz-funneling-induced electron tunneling across the gap. PMID:26372787

  9. Simple bounds from the perturbative regime of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Leblond, Louis; Shandera, Sarah E-mail: sarah@phys.columbia.edu

    2008-08-15

    We examine the conditions under which a perturbative expansion around an inflating background is valid. When inflation is driven by a single field with a general sound speed, we find a lower limit on the sound speed related to the amplitude of the inflationary power spectrum. Generalizing the sound speed constraints to include scale dependence can limit the number of e-folds obtained in the perturbative regime and restrict otherwise apparently viable models. We also show that, for models with a low sound speed, eternal inflation cannot occur in the perturbative regime.

  10. Predictive mapping of the natural flow regimes of France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelder, Ton H.; Lamouroux, Nicolas; Leathwick, John R.; Pella, Hervé; Sauquet, Eric; Shankar, Ude

    2009-06-01

    SummaryHydrologic variability is important in sustaining a variety of ecological processes in streams and rivers. Natural flow regime classifications group streams and rivers that are relatively homogeneous with respect to flow variability and have been promoted as a method of defining units for management of river flows. Although there has been considerable interest in classifying natural flow regimes, there has been less emphasis given to developing accurate methods of extrapolating these classifications to locations without flow data. We developed a method of mapping flow regime classes using boosted regression trees (BRT) that automatically fits non-linear functions and interactions between explanatory variables of flow regimes, both of which can be expected when comparing responses between complex systems such as watersheds. A natural flow regimes classification of continental France was developed from cluster analysis of 157 hydrological indices derived from 763 gauging stations representing unmodified flows. BRT models were used to predict the likelihood of gauging stations belonging to each class based on the watershed characteristics. These models were used to extrapolate the natural flow regime classification to all segments of a national river network. The performance of the BRT models were compared with other methods of assigning locations to flow regime classes, including the use of geographically contiguous regions, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and classification and regression trees (CART). The "fitted" misclassification rate (associated with model fits) for assignment based on the BRT models was 13% whereas the fitted misclassification rates for geographically contiguous regions, LDA and CART were 52%, 44% and 39% respectively. A "predictive" misclassification rate (calculated for new cases) was estimated for assignments based on the BRT, LDA and CART models using cross validation analysis. For assignment based on the BRT models, the mean

  11. The transition between the niche and neutral regimes in ecology

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Charles K.; Mehta, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    An ongoing debate in ecology concerns the impacts of ecological drift and selection on community assembly. Here, we show that there is a transition in diverse ecological communities between a selection-dominated regime (the niche phase) and a drift-dominated regime (the neutral phase). Simulations and analytic arguments show that the niche phase is favored in communities with large population sizes and relatively constant environments, whereas the neutral phase is favored in communities with small population sizes and fluctuating environments. Our results demonstrate how apparently neutral populations may arise even in communities inhabited by species with varying traits. PMID:25157131

  12. Geothermal regimes at Clearlake California: A preliminary review

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.; Zyvoloski, G.

    1992-08-01

    Three distinct geothermal regimes are inferred in the vicinity of the city of Clearlake, California. The first is a conductive heat flow regime, the second is a fault-controlled hot spring flow of ``magmatic`` fluids, and the third is a resurgent flow of meteoric warm water. The conductive heat flow results in flat, horizontal isotherms. The hot spring generates a localized spike in the isotherms. The advective disturbance carries heat laterally to a fault-line resurgence, lowering the apparent heat flow at the surface.

  13. Ranking Regime and the Future of Vernacular Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishikawa, Mayumi

    2014-01-01

    World university rankings and their global popularity present a number of far-reaching impacts for vernacular scholarship. This article employs a multidimensional approach to analyze the ranking regime's threat to local scholarship and knowledge construction through a study of Japanese research universities. First, local conditions that have…

  14. PULSE ENERGIZATION IN THE TUFT CORONA REGIME OF NEGATIVE CORONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses pulse energization in the tuft corona regime of negative corona. Fabric filtration, with integral particle charging and collection in a combined electric and flow field, is sensitive to maldistribution of current among bags energized by one power source, espec...

  15. Political Regime and Human Capital: A Cross-Country Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klomp, Jeroen; de Haan, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    We examine the relationship between different dimensions of the political regime in place and human capital using a two-step structural equation model. In the first step, we employ factor analysis on 16 human capital indicators to construct two new human capital measures (basic and advanced human capital). In the second step, we estimate the…

  16. Defining pyromes and global syndromes of fire regimes

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, Sally; Lehmann, Caroline E. R.; Gómez-Dans, Jose L.; Bradstock, Ross A.

    2013-01-01

    Fire is a ubiquitous component of the Earth system that is poorly understood. To date, a global-scale understanding of fire is largely limited to the annual extent of burning as detected by satellites. This is problematic because fire is multidimensional, and focus on a single metric belies its complexity and importance within the Earth system. To address this, we identified five key characteristics of fire regimes—size, frequency, intensity, season, and extent—and combined new and existing global datasets to represent each. We assessed how these global fire regime characteristics are related to patterns of climate, vegetation (biomes), and human activity. Cross-correlations demonstrate that only certain combinations of fire characteristics are possible, reflecting fundamental constraints in the types of fire regimes that can exist. A Bayesian clustering algorithm identified five global syndromes of fire regimes, or pyromes. Four pyromes represent distinctions between crown, litter, and grass-fueled fires, and the relationship of these to biomes and climate are not deterministic. Pyromes were partially discriminated on the basis of available moisture and rainfall seasonality. Human impacts also affected pyromes and are globally apparent as the driver of a fifth and unique pyrome that represents human-engineered modifications to fire characteristics. Differing biomes and climates may be represented within the same pyrome, implying that pathways of change in future fire regimes in response to changes in climate and human activity may be difficult to predict. PMID:23559374

  17. Search Regimes and the Industrial Dynamics of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonaccorsi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The article addresses the issue of dynamics of science, in particular of new sciences born in twentieth century and developed after the Second World War (information science, materials science, life science). The article develops the notion of search regime as an abstract characterization of dynamic patterns, based on three dimensions: the rate of…

  18. Dynamic Financial Constraints: Distinguishing Mechanism Design from Exogenously Incomplete Regimes*

    PubMed Central

    Karaivanov, Alexander; Townsend, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    We formulate and solve a range of dynamic models of constrained credit/insurance that allow for moral hazard and limited commitment. We compare them to full insurance and exogenously incomplete financial regimes (autarky, saving only, borrowing and lending in a single asset). We develop computational methods based on mechanism design, linear programming, and maximum likelihood to estimate, compare, and statistically test these alternative dynamic models with financial/information constraints. Our methods can use both cross-sectional and panel data and allow for measurement error and unobserved heterogeneity. We estimate the models using data on Thai households running small businesses from two separate samples. We find that in the rural sample, the exogenously incomplete saving only and borrowing regimes provide the best fit using data on consumption, business assets, investment, and income. Family and other networks help consumption smoothing there, as in a moral hazard constrained regime. In contrast, in urban areas, we find mechanism design financial/information regimes that are decidedly less constrained, with the moral hazard model fitting best combined business and consumption data. We perform numerous robustness checks in both the Thai data and in Monte Carlo simulations and compare our maximum likelihood criterion with results from other metrics and data not used in the estimation. A prototypical counterfactual policy evaluation exercise using the estimation results is also featured. PMID:25246710

  19. Redox regime shifts in microbially mediated biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, T.; Butler, I. B.; Free, A.; Allen, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how the Earth's biogeochemical cycles respond to environmental change is a prerequisite for the prediction and mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic perturbations. Microbial populations mediate key steps in these cycles, yet they are often crudely represented in biogeochemical models. Here, we show that microbial population dynamics can qualitatively affect the response of biogeochemical cycles to environmental change. Using simple and generic mathematical models, we find that nutrient limitations on microbial population growth can lead to regime shifts, in which the redox state of a biogeochemical cycle changes dramatically as the availability of a redox-controlling species, such as oxygen or acetate, crosses a threshold (a "tipping point"). These redox regime shifts occur in parameter ranges that are relevant to the present-day sulfur cycle in the natural environment and the present-day nitrogen cycle in eutrophic terrestrial environments. These shifts may also have relevance to iron cycling in the iron-containing Proterozoic and Archean oceans. We show that redox regime shifts also occur in models with physically realistic modifications, such as additional terms, chemical states, or microbial populations. Our work reveals a possible new mechanism by which regime shifts can occur in nutrient-cycling ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles, and highlights the importance of considering microbial population dynamics in models of biogeochemical cycles.

  20. FISHER INFORMATION AND DYNAMIC REGIME CHANGES IN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fisher Information and Dynamic Regime Changes in Ecological Systems
    Abstract for the 3rd Conference of the International Society for Ecological Informatics
    Audrey L. Mayer, Christopher W. Pawlowski, and Heriberto Cabezas

    The sustainable nature of particular dynamic...

  1. Microgravity Flow Regime Data: Buoyancy and Mixing Apparatus Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, Adam; Best, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Zero-g two-phase flow data set qualification and flight experiment design have not been standardized and as a result, agreement among researchers has not been reached regarding what experimental conditions adequately approximate those of microgravity. The effects of buoyancy forces and mixing apparatus on the flow regime transitions are presented in this study. The gravity conditions onboard zero-g aircraft are at best 10-3 g which is used to approximate the 10-5 g conditions of microgravity, thus the buoyancy forces present on zero-g aircraft can become significantly large and unrepresentative of microgravity. When buoyancy forces approach those of surface tension forces, buoyancy induced coalescence occurs. When discussing flow regime transitions, these large buoyancy forces lead to flow regime transitions which otherwise would not occur. The buoyancy attributes of the two-phase flow data sets available in the literature are evaluated to determine which data sets exhibit buoyancy induced transitions. Upon comparison of the representative data sets, the affects of different mixing apparatus can be seen in the superficial velocity flow regime maps.

  2. Shear-driven Dynamo Waves in the Fully Nonlinear Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Nigro, G.; Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale dynamo action is well understood when the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) is small, but becomes problematic in the astrophysically relevant large Rm limit since the fluctuations may control the operation of the dynamo, obscuring the large-scale behavior. Recent works by Tobias & Cattaneo demonstrated numerically the existence of large-scale dynamo action in the form of dynamo waves driven by strongly helical turbulence and shear. Their calculations were carried out in the kinematic regime in which the back-reaction of the Lorentz force on the flow is neglected. Here, we have undertaken a systematic extension of their work to the fully nonlinear regime. Helical turbulence and large-scale shear are produced self-consistently by prescribing body forces that, in the kinematic regime, drive flows that resemble the original velocity used by Tobias & Cattaneo. We have found four different solution types in the nonlinear regime for various ratios of the fluctuating velocity to the shear and Reynolds numbers. Some of the solutions are in the form of propagating waves. Some solutions show large-scale helical magnetic structure. Both waves and structures are permanent only when the kinetic helicity is non-zero on average.

  3. Production regimes for Self-Interacting Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Nicolás; Chu, Xiaoyong; Garcia-Cely, Camilo; Hambye, Thomas; Zaldivar, Bryan

    2016-03-01

    In the context of Self-Interacting Dark Matter as a solution for the small-scale structure problems, we consider the possibility that Dark Matter could have been produced without being in thermal equilibrium with the Standard Model bath. We discuss one by one the following various dark matter production regimes of this kind: freeze-in, reannihilation and dark freeze-out. We exemplify how these mechanisms work in the context of the particularly simple Hidden Vector Dark Matter model. In contrast to scenarios where there is thermal equilibrium with the Standard Model bath, we find two regimes which can easily satisfy all the laboratory and cosmological constraints. These are dark freeze-out with 3-to-2 annihilations and freeze-in via a light mediator. In the first regime, different temperatures in the visible and the Dark Matter sectors allow us to avoid the constraints coming from cosmic structure formation as well as the use of non-perturbative couplings to reproduce the observed relic density. For the second regime, different couplings are responsible for Dark Matter relic density and self-interactions, permitting to surpass BBN, X-ray, CMB and direct detection constraints.

  4. Welfare Regimes and Educational Inequality: A Cross-National Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Tracey; Edgerton, Jason D.; Roberts, Lance W.

    2010-01-01

    Research on welfare state regimes and research on educational policy share a common concern for the reduction of social inequality. On one hand, welfare state research is typically designed within a comparative approach where scholars investigate similarities and differences in social institutions across selected countries. On the other hand, the…

  5. Transport processes in magnetically confined plasmas in the nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnino, Giorgio

    2006-06-15

    A field theory approach to transport phenomena in magnetically confined plasmas is presented. The thermodynamic field theory (TFT), previously developed for treating the generic thermodynamic system out of equilibrium, is applied to plasmas physics. Transport phenomena are treated here as the effect of the field linking the thermodynamic forces with their conjugate flows combined with statistical mechanics. In particular, the Classical and the Pfirsch-Schlueter regimes are analyzed by solving the thermodynamic field equations of the TFT in the weak-field approximation. We found that, the TFT does not correct the expressions of the ionic heat fluxes evaluated by the neoclassical theory in these two regimes. On the other hand, the fluxes of matter and electronic energy (heat flow) is further enhanced in the nonlinear Classical and Pfirsch-Schlueter regimes. These results seem to be in line with the experimental observations. The complete set of the electronic and ionic transport equations in the nonlinear Banana regime, is also reported. A paper showing the comparison between our theoretic results and the experimental observations in the JET machine is currently in preparation.

  6. Nonlinear transport processes in tokamak plasmas. I. The collisional regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnino, Giorgio; Peeters, Philippe

    2008-06-15

    An application of the thermodynamic field theory (TFT) to transport processes in L-mode tokamak plasmas is presented. The nonlinear corrections to the linear ('Onsager') transport coefficients in the collisional regimes are derived. A quite encouraging result is the appearance of an asymmetry between the Pfirsch-Schlueter (P-S) ion and electron transport coefficients: the latter presents a nonlinear correction, which is absent for the ions, and makes the radial electron coefficients much larger than the former. Explicit calculations and comparisons between the neoclassical results and the TFT predictions for Joint European Torus (JET) plasmas are also reported. It is found that the nonlinear electron P-S transport coefficients exceed the values provided by neoclassical theory by a factor that may be of the order 10{sup 2}. The nonlinear classical coefficients exceed the neoclassical ones by a factor that may be of order 2. For JET, the discrepancy between experimental and theoretical results for the electron losses is therefore significantly reduced by a factor 10{sup 2} when the nonlinear contributions are duly taken into account but, there is still a factor of 10{sup 2} to be explained. This is most likely due to turbulence. The expressions of the ion transport coefficients, determined by the neoclassical theory in these two regimes, remain unaltered. The low-collisional regimes, i.e., the plateau and the banana regimes, are analyzed in the second part of this work.

  7. Globalisation, the "Idea of a University" and Its Ethical Regimes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon

    2007-01-01

    This paper sketches the impact of globalisation and internationalisation on the terrain of values and ethics in higher education. The first part of the paper discusses values and ethics in higher education in relation to the "Idea of a University", and identifies the ethical regimes essential to the functioning of HEIs as knowledge-forming…

  8. The two-antidot system in the ballistic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachrajda, A. S.; Gould, C.; Kirczenow, G.; Johnson, B.; Feng, Y.; Kelly, P. J.; Delage, A.

    1998-01-01

    A tunable two-antidot device is studied in the cyclotron-trapping regime. Periodic quantum oscillations are found to be superimposed on the peaks reminiscent of those observed in antidot lattices. The results are compared to quantum and classical simulations and Feynman path integral analysis. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  9. Syria: The Consolidation of the Asad Regime, 1970-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Robert W.

    1982-01-01

    Up to 1975-76, Syria's Hafiz al-Asad was successful in consolidating his power, securing the maintenance of his regime, and broadening his base of political power. His system started weakening in 1975 due to increased opposition stemming from Syria's intervention in the Lebanese civil war. (AM)

  10. Towards an Orderly Exit Regime in English Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In a competitive market, the exit of those suppliers who cannot offer an attractive product at an attractive price is seen as desirable. However, the consequences for consumers when their own supplier leaves the market in an unplanned or disorderly way may be undesirable. Exit regimes exist in regulated markets to ensure that consumers are not…

  11. Accessing Imagined Communities and Reinscribing Regimes of Truth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Sherrie; Motha, Suhanthie; Price, Jeremy N.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we explore the complex and nebulous terrain between two theoretical concepts, imagined communities (Norton, 2000, 2001), that is, individuals' imagined affiliations with certain groups, and regimes of truth (Foucault, 1980), dominant images inscribed and reinscribed into individual consciousness until they become normative. Using…

  12. Local-field correction in the strong-coupling regime

    SciTech Connect

    Hien, Tran Minh; Dung, Ho Trung; Welsch, Dirk-Gunnar

    2011-04-15

    The influence of the local-field correction on the strong atom-field coupling regime are investigated using the real-cavity model. The atom is positioned at the center of a multilayer sphere. Three types of mirrors are considered: perfectly reflecting, Lorentz band gap, and Bragg-distributed ones, with special emphasis on experimental practicability. In particular, the influence of the local field on the spectral resonance lines, the Rabi oscillation frequency and decay rate, and the condition indicating the occurrence of the strong-coupling regime are studied in detail. It is shown that the local-field correction gives rise to a structureless plateau in the density of states of the electromagnetic field. The level of the plateau rises with increasing material density and/or absorption, which may eventually destroy the strong-coupling regime. The effect of the local field is especially pronounced at high-material densities due to direct energy transfer from the guest atom to the medium. At lower material density and/or absorption, variation of the material density does not seem to affect much the strong-coupling regime, except for a small shift in the resonance frequency.

  13. 31 CFR 576.305 - Former Iraqi regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Former Iraqi regime. 576.305 Section 576.305 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 576.305 Former...

  14. Electron Transport Dominated Regimes in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkolab, M.; Dorris, J.; Bonoli, P. T.; Ennever, P.; Fiore, C.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A.; Ma, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rost, J.; Tsujii, N.; Lin, L.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R.; Diamond, P.; Lee, C. J.

    2010-11-01

    In ohmically heated low density plasmas where τE ne, the so-called neo-Alcator regime, TRANSP results indicate that χi<< χe, while nonlinear gyrokinetic analysis for the measured profiles predicts the opposite inequality [1]. This regime is of great interest for transport studies since Ti < Te, and the electron and ion transport channels can be separated and studied separately. At the same time, measurements of turbulent fluctuations with Phase Contrast Imaging diagnostic (PCI) indicated reasonable agreement with GYRO predictions at frequencies 80-250 kHz, corresponding to core ITG turbulence. The turbulent spectrum at lower frequencies could not be identified since the PCI technique does not allow separation of the core plasma fluctuations from those at the edge. Here we present measurements and analysis from a more extensive set of plasma regimes than previously. Of particular current interest is the role of electron drift wave turbulence driven by ohmic electron drift, U [2], since in these low density regimes U/Cs <= 6, and experimentally we find that the global confinement τE Cs/U where Cs = (Te/mi)^1/2. [1] L. Lin, Invited talk, APS-DPP, 11, 2009, Atlanta, GA. [2] C.J. Lee, P. Diamond, M. Porkolab, presented at TTF workshop, 2010.

  15. Dynamics of liquid drops coalescing in the inertial regime.

    PubMed

    Sprittles, James E; Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D

    2014-06-01

    We examine the dynamics of two coalescing liquid drops in the "inertial regime," where the effects of viscosity are negligible and the propagation of the front of the bridge connecting the drops can be considered as "local." The solution fully computed in the framework of classical fluid mechanics allows this regime to be identified, and the accuracy of the approximating scaling laws proposed to describe the propagation of the bridge to be established. It is shown that the scaling law known for this regime has a very limited region of accuracy, and, as a result, in describing experimental data it has frequently been applied outside its limits of applicability. The origin of the scaling law's shortcoming appears to be the fact that it accounts for the capillary pressure due only to the longitudinal curvature of the free surface as the driving force for the process. To address this deficiency, the scaling law is extended to account for both the longitudinal and azimuthal curvatures at the bridge front, which, fortuitously, still results in an explicit analytic expression for the front's propagation speed. This expression is shown to offer an excellent approximation for both the fully computed solution and for experimental data from a range of flow configurations for a remarkably large proportion of the coalescence process. The derived formula allows one to predict the speed at which drops coalesce for the duration of the inertial regime, which should be useful for the analysis of experimental data. PMID:25019880

  16. Dynamics of liquid drops coalescing in the inertial regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprittles, James E.; Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D.

    2014-06-01

    We examine the dynamics of two coalescing liquid drops in the "inertial regime," where the effects of viscosity are negligible and the propagation of the front of the bridge connecting the drops can be considered as "local." The solution fully computed in the framework of classical fluid mechanics allows this regime to be identified, and the accuracy of the approximating scaling laws proposed to describe the propagation of the bridge to be established. It is shown that the scaling law known for this regime has a very limited region of accuracy, and, as a result, in describing experimental data it has frequently been applied outside its limits of applicability. The origin of the scaling law's shortcoming appears to be the fact that it accounts for the capillary pressure due only to the longitudinal curvature of the free surface as the driving force for the process. To address this deficiency, the scaling law is extended to account for both the longitudinal and azimuthal curvatures at the bridge front, which, fortuitously, still results in an explicit analytic expression for the front's propagation speed. This expression is shown to offer an excellent approximation for both the fully computed solution and for experimental data from a range of flow configurations for a remarkably large proportion of the coalescence process. The derived formula allows one to predict the speed at which drops coalesce for the duration of the inertial regime, which should be useful for the analysis of experimental data.

  17. Regimes of flow induced vibration for tandem, tethered cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gary; Stremler, Mark

    2015-11-01

    In the wake of a bluff body, there are a number of dynamic response regimes that exist for a trailing bluff body depending on spacing, structural restoring forces, and the mass-damping parameter m* ζ . For tandem cylinders with low values of m* ζ , two such regimes of motion are Gap Flow Switching and Wake Induced Vibration. In this study, we consider the dynamics of a single degree-of-freedom rigid cylinder in the wake of another in these regimes for a variety of center-to-center cylinder spacings (3-5 diameters) and Reynolds numbers (4,000-11,000). The system consists of a trailing cylinder constrained to a circular arc around a fixed leading cylinder, which, for small angle displacements, bears a close resemblance to the transversely oscillating cylinders found more commonly in existing literature. From experiments on this system, we compare and contrast the dynamic response within these two regimes. Our results show sustained oscillations in the absence of a structural restoring force in all cases, providing experimental support for the wake stiffness assumption, which is based on the mean lift toward the center line of flow.

  18. Two regimes in the regularity of sunspot number

    SciTech Connect

    Shapoval, A.; Shnirman, M.

    2013-12-20

    Sunspot numbers WN display quasi-periodical variations that undergo regime changes. These irregularities could indicate a chaotic system and be measured by Lyapunov exponents. We define a functional λ (an 'irregularity index') that is close to the (maximal) Lyapunov exponent for dynamical systems and well defined for series with a random component: this allows one to work with sunspot numbers. We compute λ for the daily WN from 1850 to 2012 within 4 yr sliding windows: λ exhibit sharp maxima at solar minima and secondary maxima at solar maxima. This pattern is reflected in the ratio R of the amplitudes of the main versus secondary peaks. Two regimes have alternated in the past 150 yr, R1 from 1850 to 1915 (large λ and R values) and R2 from 1935 to 2005 (shrinking difference between main and secondary maxima, R values between 1 and 2). We build an autoregressive model consisting of Poisson noise plus an 11 yr cycle and compute its irregularity index. The transition from R1 to R2 can be reproduced by strengthening the autocorrelation a of the model series. The features of the two regimes are stable for model and WN with respect to embedding dimension and delay. Near the time of the last solar minimum (∼2008), the irregularity index exhibits a peak similar to the peaks observed before 1915. This might signal a regime change back from R2 to R1 and the onset of a significant decrease of solar activity.

  19. Root response of Jerusalem artichoke genotypes to different water regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine effects of drought on selected root growth parameters and develop relationships between root parameters and tuber yield for selected Jerusalem artichoke (JA) genotypes. Three water regimes (Field capacity, 50% available water (AW) and 25% AW) and five JA...

  20. ECOLOGICALLY-RELEVANT QUANTIFICATION OF STREAMFLOW REGIMES IN WESTERN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the rationale for and application of a protocol for estimation of ecologically-relevant streamflow metrics that quantify streamflow regime for ungaged sites subject to a range of human impact. The analysis presented here is focused on sites sampled by the U....

  1. The Harrison Diffusion Kinetics Regimes in Solute Grain Boundary Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, Irina; Fiedler, T; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Murch, Prof. Graeme

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the limits of the principal Harrison kinetics regimes (Type-A, B and C) for grain boundary diffusion is very important for the correct analysis of the depth profiles in a tracer diffusion experiment. These regimes for self-diffusion have been extensively studied in the past by making use of the phenomenological Lattice Monte Carlo (LMC) method with the result that the limits are now well established. The relationship of those self-diffusion limits to the corresponding ones for solute diffusion in the presence of solute segregation to the grain boundaries remains unclear. In the present study, the influence of solute segregation on the limits is investigated with the LMC method for the well-known parallel grain boundary slab model by showing the equivalence of two diffusion models. It is shown which diffusion parameters are useful for identifying the limits of the Harrison kinetics regimes for solute grain boundary diffusion. It is also shown how the measured segregation factor from the diffusion experiment in the Harrison Type-B kinetics regime may differ from the global segregation factor.

  2. Welfare Attitudes and Social Expenditure: Do Regimes Shape Public Opinion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakobsen, Tor Georg

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the link between regime types, social expenditure, and welfare attitudes. By employing data on 19 countries taken from the World Values Survey, the main aim is to see to what degree the institutions of a country affect the attitudes of its citizens. According to Esping-Andersen ("The three worlds of welfare capitalism".…

  3. Connectivity, regime shifts and the resilience of coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmhirst, Toby; Connolly, Sean R.; Hughes, Terry P.

    2009-12-01

    Connectivity of larvae among metapopulations in open marine systems can be a double-edged sword, allowing for the colonization and replenishment of both desirable and undesirable elements of interacting species-rich assemblages. This article studies the effect of recruitment by coral and macroalgae on the resilience of grazed reef ecosystems. In particular, we focus on how larval connectivity affects regime shifts between alternative assemblages that are dominated either by corals or by macroalgae. Using a model with bistability dynamics, we show that recruitment of coral larvae erodes the resilience of a macroalgae-dominated ecosystem when grazing is high, but has negligible effect when grazing is low. Conversely, recruitment by macroalgae erodes the resilience of a coral-dominated ecosystem when grazing is low, leading to a regime shift to macroalgae. Thus, spillover of coral recruits from highly protected areas will not restore coral cover or prevent flips to macroalgae in the surrounding seascape if grazing levels in these areas are depleted, but may be pivotal for re-building coral populations if grazing is high. Fishing restrictions and the re-introduction of herbivores should therefore be a prime conservation objective for preventing undesirable regime shifts. Connectivity by some components of coral reef assemblages (e.g., macroalgae, pathogens, crown-of-thorns starfish) may be detrimental to sustaining reefs, especially where overfishing and other drivers have eroded their resilience, making them more vulnerable to a regime shift.

  4. Consequences of more extreme precipitation regimes for terrestrial ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amplification of the hydrological cycle, as a consequence of global warming, will be manifest not only by alterations in total annual precipitation, but also through more extreme precipitation regimes characterized by fewer, but larger rainfall events and more severe intervening drought periods. Ba...

  5. Civic Capacity in Educational Reform Efforts: Emerging and Established Regimes in Rust Belt Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitra, Dana L.; Frick, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Using urban regime theory, the article examines two Rust Belt cities that tried to break the cycle of social reproduction in their communities by reforming their schools. The article contributes to the development of urban regime theory by comparing an "emerging" regime to an "established" regime. The comparison highlights the interdependent…

  6. TRMM Observations of Convective Regimes in the Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, W. A.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Blakeslee, Robert J.; Hein, P.; Cifelli, R.; Rutledge, S. A.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study utilizes TRMM satellite precipitation radar, lightning imaging sensor, and passive microwave imager data together with ground-based lightning data to investigate the vertical structure, lightning, and rainfall characteristics of Amazonian and central South American convection for three separate wet-seasons. These characteristics are partitioned as a function of 850 mb zonal wind direction, motivated by observations collected during the six-week TRMM-LBA field campaign. The TRMM-LBA field campaign observations suggest that systematic variations in Amazonian convective vertical structure, lightning, and rainfall are all linked to bimodal variations in the low-level zonal wind (e.g., easterly and westerly regimes). The more spatially and temporally comprehensive TRMM dataset used in this study extends the TRMM-LBA observations by examining regime variability in Amazonian and South American convective structure over a continental scale domain. On a continental-scale, patterns of east and west regime 850 mb winds combined with LIS lightning flash densities suggest the presence of synoptic-scale controls (e.g., intrusion of extratropical frontal systems and interaction with the SACZ) on regional-scale variability in convective vertical structure. TRMM PR, TMI and ground-based lightning data suggest that regional variability in wet-season convective structure is most evident over the southern Amazon, Mato Grosso, Altiplano, southern Brazil, and eastern coastal regions of central and southern South America. Convective vertical structure, rain fall rates, and lightning activity are all more pronounced during easterly (westerly) regimes over the southern Amazon and Mato Grosso (Altiplano, and southern Brazil). Importantly, when considered with case-study results from TRMM-LBA, the systematic differences in convective structure that occur as a function of regime suggest that associated regime-differences may exist in the vertical distribution of diabatic heating

  7. Classification of river regimes: A context for hydroecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterkamp, W.R.; Friedman, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, ecologists have demostrated the importance of flow and temperature as primary variables in driving running water, riparian and floodplain ecosystems. As it is important to assess the size and timing of discharge variations in relation to those in temperature, a method is proposed that uses multivariate techniques to separately classify annual discharge and temperature regimes according to their 'shape' and 'magnitude', and which then combines the classifications. This paper: (i) describes a generally applicable method; (ii) tests the method by applying it to riparian systems on four British rivers using a 20-year record (1977-97) of flow and air temperature: (iii) proposes a hydroecological interpretation of the classification; (iv) considers the degree to which the methodology might provide information to support the design of ecologically acceptable flow regimes. 'Regimes' are defined for discharge and air temperature using monthly mean data. The results of applying the classification procedure to four British rivers indicates that the 'typical' regimes for each of the four catchments are composite features produced by a small number of clearly defined annual types that reflect interannual variability in hydroclimatological conditions. Annual discharge patterns are dominated by three 'shape' classes (accounting for 94% of the station years: class A, early (November) peak; class B, intermediate (December-January) peak; and class C, late (March) peak) and one 'magnitude' class (70% of the station years fall into class 3, intermediate), with two subordinate 'magnitude' classes: low-flow years (18%) and high flow years (12%). For air temperature, annual patterns are classified evenly into three 'shape' and four 'magnitude' classes. It is argued that this variety of flow-temperature patterns is important for sustaining ecosystem integrity and for establishing benchmark flow regimes and associated frequencies to aid river management. Copyright

  8. Towards a dynamical understanding of flood regime changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigão, Rui A. P.; Hall, Julia; Blöschl, Günter

    2014-05-01

    Flood regime changes can be analysed and statistically attributed by disentangling a whole network of driving processes and interactions, from ocean-atmospheric processes to land-related changes. However, such approaches do not provide dynamical dependence necessary to tackle changes in the process network itself, namely variations in the causal hierarchy. The present study addresses this issue by introducing a cross-platform mathematical framework aimed at the retrieval, analysis and modelling of dynamical features from hydrological datasets representing continuous and discrete physical processes of different nature. In doing so, a unified approach is devised for a more systematic and consistent analysis of hydrological processes and their interactions irrespective of whether they are governed by continuous, semi-discrete or fully discrete dynamical systems. The novel methodological developments are then used to investigate emerging behaviours in climate and hydrological regimes not resolved by any of the individual classes of dynamical systems. In the present study we are particularly interested in addressing flood regime changes, including seasonality changes and shifts between flood rich and flood poor periods. The new framework reveals that these changes may be associated to physical features emerging from nonlinear interactions in low-order dynamical models involving climate and land-related drivers. The spatiotemporal variability and nonlinear twists of the causal relationships are also investigated, noting that drivers of flood change have different impacts on different spatial and temporal scales. In this regard, multilateral interactions, feedbacks and structural causal changes are found among oceanic, atmospheric and land-related processes, and their combined influence is seen to explain flood change patterns that could not be explained by linear superposition of individual drivers or static causal hierarchies. In conclusion, investigating dynamical

  9. Detecting regime shifts in the ocean: Data considerations [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deYoung, B.; Harris, R.; Alheit, J.; Beaugrand, G.; Mantua, N.; Shannon, L.

    2004-02-01

    We review observational data sets that have been used to detect regime shifts in the ocean. Through exploration of data time series we develop a definition of a regime shift from a pragmatic perspective, in which a shift is considered as an abrupt change from a quantifiable ecosystem state. We conclude that such changes represent a restructuring of the ecosystem state in some substantial sense that persists for long enough that a new quasi-equilibrium state can be observed. The abruptness of the shift is relative to the life-scale or the reproductive time-scale of the higher predators that are influenced by the shift. In general, the event-forcing is external to the biological ecosystem, usually the physical climate system, but we also identify shifts that can be ascribed to anthropogenic forcing, in our examples fishing. This pragmatic definition allows for several different types of regime shift ranging from simple biogeographic shifts to non-linear state changes. In practice it is quite difficult to determine whether observed changes in an oceanic ecosystem are primarily spatial or temporally regulated. The determination of ecosystem state remains an unresolved, and imprecise, oceanographic problem. We review observations and interpretation from several different oceanic regions as examples to illustrate this pragmatic definition of a regime shift: the Northeast Pacific, the Northwest and Northeast Atlantic, and Eastern Boundary Currents. For each region, different types of data (biological and physical) are available for differing periods of time, and we conclude, with varying degrees of certainty, whether a regime shift is in fact detectable in the data.

  10. The human dimension of fire regimes on Earth.

    PubMed

    Bowman, David M J S; Balch, Jennifer; Artaxo, Paulo; Bond, William J; Cochrane, Mark A; D'Antonio, Carla M; Defries, Ruth; Johnston, Fay H; Keeley, Jon E; Krawchuk, Meg A; Kull, Christian A; Mack, Michelle; Moritz, Max A; Pyne, Stephen; Roos, Christopher I; Scott, Andrew C; Sodhi, Navjot S; Swetnam, Thomas W; Whittaker, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Humans and their ancestors are unique in being a fire-making species, but 'natural' (i.e. independent of humans) fires have an ancient, geological history on Earth. Natural fires have influenced biological evolution and global biogeochemical cycles, making fire integral to the functioning of some biomes. Globally, debate rages about the impact on ecosystems of prehistoric human-set fires, with views ranging from catastrophic to negligible. Understanding of the diversity of human fire regimes on Earth in the past, present and future remains rudimentary. It remains uncertain how humans have caused a departure from 'natural' background levels that vary with climate change. Available evidence shows that modern humans can increase or decrease background levels of natural fire activity by clearing forests, promoting grazing, dispersing plants, altering ignition patterns and actively suppressing fires, thereby causing substantial ecosystem changes and loss of biodiversity. Some of these contemporary fire regimes cause substantial economic disruptions owing to the destruction of infrastructure, degradation of ecosystem services, loss of life, and smoke-related health effects. These episodic disasters help frame negative public attitudes towards landscape fires, despite the need for burning to sustain some ecosystems. Greenhouse gas-induced warming and changes in the hydrological cycle may increase the occurrence of large, severe fires, with potentially significant feedbacks to the Earth system. Improved understanding of human fire regimes demands: (1) better data on past and current human influences on fire regimes to enable global comparative analyses, (2) a greater understanding of different cultural traditions of landscape burning and their positive and negative social, economic and ecological effects, and (3) more realistic representations of anthropogenic fire in global vegetation and climate change models. We provide an historical framework to promote understanding

  11. Early warning of atmospheric regime transitions using transfer operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantet, Alexis; Dijkstra, Henk

    2015-04-01

    The existence of persistent midlatitude atmospheric regimes, such as blocking events, with time scales larger than 5-10 days and indications of preferred transition paths between them motivates the development of early-warning indicators of regime transitions. Here, we use a barotropic model of the northern midlatitudes winter flow to study such meta-stable regimes. We look at estimates of transfer operators acting on densities evolving on a reduced phase space spanned by the first Empirical Orthogonal Functions of the streamfunction and develop an early-warning indicator of zonal to blocked flow transition. The study of the spectra of transfer operators estimated for different lags reveals a multi-level structure in the flow as well as the effect of memory on the reduced dynamics due to past interactions between the resolved and unresolved variables. The slowest motions in the reduced phase space are thereby found to have time scales larger than 8 days and to behave as Markovian for larger lags. These motions are associated with meta-stable regimes and their transitions and can be detected as almost-invariant sets of the transfer operator. The early-warning indicator is based on the action on an initial density of products of the transfer operators estimated for sufficiently long lags, making use of the semi-group property of these operators and shows relatively good Peirce skill score. From the energy budget of the model, we are able to explain the meta-stability of the regimes and the existence of preferred transition paths as the manifestation of barotropic instability. Finally, even though the model is highly simplified, the skill of the early warning indicator is promising, suggesting that the transfer operator approach can be used in parallel to an operational deterministic model for stochastic prediction or to assess forecast uncertainty.

  12. Quantifying Floods of a Flood Regime in Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipple, A. A.; Fleenor, W. E.; Viers, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Interaction between a flood hydrograph and floodplain topography results in spatially and temporally variable conditions important for ecosystem process and function. Individual floods whose frequency and dimensionality comprise a river's flood regime contribute to that variability and in aggregate are important drivers of floodplain ecosystems. Across the globe, water management actions, land use changes as well as hydroclimatic change associated with climate change have profoundly affected natural flood regimes and their expression within the floodplain landscape. Homogenization of riverscapes has degraded once highly diverse and productive ecosystems. Improved understanding of the range of flood conditions and spatial variability within floodplains, or hydrospatial conditions, is needed to improve water and land management and restoration activities to support the variable conditions under which species adapted. This research quantifies the flood regime of a floodplain site undergoing restoration through levee breaching along the lower Cosumnes River of California. One of the few lowland alluvial rivers of California with an unregulated hydrograph and regular floodplain connectivity, the Cosumnes River provides a useful test-bed for exploring river-floodplain interaction. Representative floods of the Cosumnes River are selected from previously-established flood types comprising the flood regime and applied within a 2D hydrodynamic model representing the floodplain restoration site. Model output is analyzed and synthesized to quantify and compare conditions in space and time, using metrics such as depth and velocity. This research establishes methods for quantifying a flood regime's floodplain inundation characteristics, illustrates the role of flow variability and landscape complexity in producing heterogeneous floodplain conditions, and suggests important implications for managing more ecologically functional floodplains.

  13. Image quality assessment in the low quality regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Guilherme O.; Hemami, Sheila S.

    2012-03-01

    Traditionally, image quality estimators have been designed and optimized to operate over the entire quality range of images in a database, from very low quality to visually lossless. However, if quality estimation is limited to a smaller quality range, their performances drop dramatically, and many image applications only operate over such a smaller range. This paper is concerned with one such range, the low-quality regime, which is defined as the interval of perceived quality scores where there exists a linear relationship between the perceived quality scores and the perceived utility scores and exists at the low-quality end of image databases. Using this definition, this paper describes a subjective experiment to determine the low-quality regime for databases of distorted images that include perceived quality scores but not perceived utility scores, such as CSIQ and LIVE. The performances of several image utility and quality estimators are evaluated in the low-quality regime, indicating that utility estimators can be successfully applied to estimate perceived quality in this regime. Omission of the lowestfrequency image content is shown to be crucial to the performances of both kinds of estimators. Additionally, this paper establishes an upper-bound for the performances of quality estimators in the LQR, using a family of quality estimators based on VIF. The resulting optimal quality estimator indicates that estimating quality in the low-quality regime is robust to exact frequency pooling weights, and that near-optimal performance can be achieved by a variety of estimators providing that they substantially emphasize the appropriate frequency content.

  14. Vegetation management with fire modifies peatland soil thermal regime.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lee E; Palmer, Sheila M; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Holden, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    Vegetation removal with fire can alter the thermal regime of the land surface, leading to significant changes in biogeochemistry (e.g. carbon cycling) and soil hydrology. In the UK, large expanses of carbon-rich upland environments are managed to encourage increased abundance of red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scotica) by rotational burning of shrub vegetation. To date, though, there has not been any consideration of whether prescribed vegetation burning on peatlands modifies the thermal regime of the soil mass in the years after fire. In this study thermal regime was monitored across 12 burned peatland soil plots over an 18-month period, with the aim of (i) quantifying thermal dynamics between burned plots of different ages (from <2 to 15 + years post burning), and (ii) developing statistical models to determine the magnitude of thermal change caused by vegetation management. Compared to plots burned 15 + years previously, plots recently burned (<2-4 years) showed higher mean, maximum and range of soil temperatures, and lower minima. Statistical models (generalised least square regression) were developed to predict daily mean and maximum soil temperature in plots burned 15 + years prior to the study. These models were then applied to predict temperatures of plots burned 2, 4 and 7 years previously, with significant deviations from predicted temperatures illustrating the magnitude of burn management effects. Temperatures measured in soil plots burned <2 years previously showed significant statistical disturbances from model predictions, reaching +6.2 °C for daily mean temperatures and +19.6 °C for daily maxima. Soil temperatures in plots burnt 7 years previously were most similar to plots burned 15 + years ago indicating the potential for soil temperatures to recover as vegetation regrows. Our findings that prescribed peatland vegetation burning alters soil thermal regime should provide an impetus for further research to understand the consequences of thermal regime

  15. The human dimension of fire regimes on Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowman, David M.J.S.; Balch, Jennifer; Artaxo, Paulo; Bond, William J.; Cochrane, Mark A.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; DeFries, Ruth; Johnston, Fay H.; Keeley, Jon E.; Krawchuk, Meg A.; Kull, Christian A.; Michelle, Mack; Moritz, Max A.; Pyne, Stephen; Roos, Christopher I.; Scott, Andrew C.; Sodhi, Navjot S.; Swetnam, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    Humans and their ancestors are unique in being a fire-making species, but 'natural' (i.e. independent of humans) fires have an ancient, geological history on Earth. Natural fires have influenced biological evolution and global biogeochemical cycles, making fire integral to the functioning of some biomes. Globally, debate rages about the impact on ecosystems of prehistoric human-set fires, with views ranging from catastrophic to negligible. Understanding of the diversity of human fire regimes on Earth in the past, present and future remains rudimentary. It remains uncertain how humans have caused a departure from 'natural' background levels that vary with climate change. Available evidence shows that modern humans can increase or decrease background levels of natural fire activity by clearing forests, promoting grazing, dispersing plants, altering ignition patterns and actively suppressing fires, thereby causing substantial ecosystem changes and loss of biodiversity. Some of these contemporary fire regimes cause substantial economic disruptions owing to the destruction of infrastructure, degradation of ecosystem services, loss of life, and smoke-related health effects. These episodic disasters help frame negative public attitudes towards landscape fires, despite the need for burning to sustain some ecosystems. Greenhouse gas-induced warming and changes in the hydrological cycle may increase the occurrence of large, severe fires, with potentially significant feedbacks to the Earth system. Improved understanding of human fire regimes demands: (1) better data on past and current human influences on fire regimes to enable global comparative analyses, (2) a greater understanding of different cultural traditions of landscape burning and their positive and negative social, economic and ecological effects, and (3) more realistic representations of anthropogenic fire in global vegetation and climate change models. We provide an historical framework to promote understanding

  16. Climate change and future fire regimes: Examples from California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, Jon E.; Syphard, Alexandra D.

    2016-01-01

    Climate and weather have long been noted as playing key roles in wildfire activity, and global warming is expected to exacerbate fire impacts on natural and urban ecosystems. Predicting future fire regimes requires an understanding of how temperature and precipitation interact to control fire activity. Inevitably this requires historical analyses that relate annual burning to climate variation. Fuel structure plays a critical role in determining which climatic parameters are most influential on fire activity, and here, by focusing on the diversity of ecosystems in California, we illustrate some principles that need to be recognized in predicting future fire regimes. Spatial scale of analysis is important in that large heterogeneous landscapes may not fully capture accurate relationships between climate and fires. Within climatically homogeneous subregions, montane forested landscapes show strong relationships between annual fluctuations in temperature and precipitation with area burned; however, this is strongly seasonal dependent; e.g., winter temperatures have very little or no effect but spring and summer temperatures are critical. Climate models that predict future seasonal temperature changes are needed to improve fire regime projections. Climate does not appear to be a major determinant of fire activity on all landscapes. Lower elevations and lower latitudes show little or no increase in fire activity with hotter and drier conditions. On these landscapes climate is not usually limiting to fires but these vegetation types are ignition-limited. Moreover, because they are closely juxtaposed with human habitations, fire regimes are more strongly controlled by other direct anthropogenic impacts. Predicting future fire regimes is not rocket science; it is far more complicated than that. Climate change is not relevant to some landscapes, but where climate is relevant, the relationship will change due to direct climate effects on vegetation trajectories, as well as

  17. Numerical simulation of flows from free molecular regime to continuum regime by a DVM with streaming and collision processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L. M.; Shu, C.; Wu, J.; Wang, Y.

    2016-02-01

    A discrete velocity method (DVM) with streaming and collision processes is presented in this work for simulation of flows from free molecular regime to continuum regime. The present scheme can be considered as a semi-Lagrangian like scheme. At first, we follow the conventional DVM to discretize the phase velocity space by a number of discrete velocities. Then, for each discrete velocity, the kinetic equation with BGK-Shakhov model is integrated in space and time within one time step. As a result, a simple algebraic formulation can be obtained, and its solution can be marched in time by the streaming and collision processes. However, differently from the conventional semi-Lagrangian scheme, the present scheme uses the MUSCL approach with van Albada limiter in the process of reconstructing the distribution function at the surrounding points of the cell center, and the transport distance is controlled in order to avoid extrapolation. This makes the present scheme be capable of simulating the hypersonic rarefied flows. In addition, as compared to the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS), the present scheme is simpler and easier for implementation. Thus, the computational efficiency can be improved accordingly. To validate the proposed numerical scheme, test examples from free molecular regime to continuum regime are simulated. Numerical results showed that the present scheme can predict the flow properties accurately even for hypersonic rarefied flows.

  18. Disorder-assisted quantum transport in suboptimal decoherence regimes

    PubMed Central

    Novo, Leonardo; Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser

    2016-01-01

    We investigate quantum transport in binary tree structures and in hypercubes for the disordered Frenkel-exciton Hamiltonian under pure dephasing noise. We compute the energy transport efficiency as a function of disorder and dephasing rates. We demonstrate that dephasing improves transport efficiency not only in the disordered case, but also in the ordered one. The maximal transport efficiency is obtained when the dephasing timescale matches the hopping timescale, which represent new examples of the Goldilocks principle at the quantum scale. Remarkably, we find that in weak dephasing regimes, away from optimal levels of environmental fluctuations, the average effect of increasing disorder is to improve the transport efficiency until an optimal value for disorder is reached. Our results suggest that rational design of the site energies statistical distributions could lead to better performances in transport systems at nanoscale when their natural environments are far from the optimal dephasing regime. PMID:26726133

  19. Couette flow regimes with heat transfer in rarefied gas

    SciTech Connect

    Abramov, A. A. Butkovskii, A. V.

    2013-06-15

    Based on numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation by direct statistic simulation, the Couette flow with heat transfer is studied in a broad range of ratios of plate temperatures and Mach numbers of a moving plate. Flow regime classification by the form of the dependences of the energy flux and friction stress on the Knudsen number Kn is proposed. These dependences can be simultaneously monotonic and nonmonotonic and have maxima. Situations are possible in which the dependence of the energy flux transferred to a plate on Kn has a minimum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic or even has a maximum. Also, regimes exist in which the dependence of the energy flux on Kn has a maximum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic, and vice versa.

  20. The single-channel regime of transport through random media

    PubMed Central

    Peña, A.; Girschik, A.; Libisch, F.; Rotter, S.; Chabanov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of light through samples with random inhomogeneities can be described by way of transmission eigenchannels, which connect incoming and outgoing external propagating modes. Although the detailed structure of a disordered sample can generally not be fully specified, these transmission eigenchannels can nonetheless be successfully controlled and used for focusing and imaging light through random media. Here we demonstrate that in deeply localized quasi-1D systems, the single dominant transmission eigenchannel is formed by an individual Anderson-localized mode or by a ‘necklace state’. In this single-channel regime, the disordered sample can be treated as an effective 1D system with a renormalized localization length, coupled through all the external modes to its surroundings. Using statistical criteria of the single-channel regime and pulsed excitations of the disordered samples allows us to identify long-lived localized modes and short-lived necklace states at long and short time delays, respectively. PMID:24663028

  1. Disorder-assisted quantum transport in suboptimal decoherence regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novo, Leonardo; Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser

    2016-01-01

    We investigate quantum transport in binary tree structures and in hypercubes for the disordered Frenkel-exciton Hamiltonian under pure dephasing noise. We compute the energy transport efficiency as a function of disorder and dephasing rates. We demonstrate that dephasing improves transport efficiency not only in the disordered case, but also in the ordered one. The maximal transport efficiency is obtained when the dephasing timescale matches the hopping timescale, which represent new examples of the Goldilocks principle at the quantum scale. Remarkably, we find that in weak dephasing regimes, away from optimal levels of environmental fluctuations, the average effect of increasing disorder is to improve the transport efficiency until an optimal value for disorder is reached. Our results suggest that rational design of the site energies statistical distributions could lead to better performances in transport systems at nanoscale when their natural environments are far from the optimal dephasing regime.

  2. Quarks with Twisted Boundary Conditions in the Epsilon Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mehen; Brian C. Tiburzi

    2005-05-01

    We study the effects of twisted boundary conditions on the quark fields in the epsilon regime of chiral perturbation theory. We consider the SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} chiral theory with non-degenerate quarks and the SU(3){sub L} x SU(3){sub R} chiral theory with massless up and down quarks and massive strange quarks. The partition function and condensate are derived for each theory. Because flavor-neutral Goldstone bosons are unaffected by twisted boundary conditions chiral symmetry is still restored in finite volumes. The dependence of the condensate on the twisting parameters can be used to extract the pion decay constant from simulations in the epsilon regime. The relative contribution to the partition function from sectors of different topological charge is numerically insensitive to twisted boundary conditions.

  3. Nondiffusive transport regimes for suprathermal ions in turbulent plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bovet, A; Fasoli, A; Ricci, P; Furno, I; Gustafson, K

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of the transport of suprathermal ions in the presence of turbulence is important for fusion plasmas in the burning regime that will characterize reactors, and for space plasmas to understand the physics of particle acceleration. Here, three-dimensional measurements of a suprathermal ion beam in the toroidal plasma device TORPEX are presented. These measurements demonstrate, in a turbulent plasma, the existence of subdiffusive and superdiffusive transport of suprathermal ions, depending on their energy. This result stems from the unprecedented combination of uniquely resolved measurements and first-principles numerical simulations that reveal the mechanisms responsible for the nondiffusive transport. The transport regime is determined by the interaction of the suprathermal ion orbits with the turbulent plasma dynamics, and is strongly affected by the ratio of the suprathermal ion energy to the background plasma temperature. PMID:25974432

  4. Mechanical surface treatment of steel-Optimization parameters of regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laouar, L.; Hamadache, H.; Saad, S.; Bouchelaghem, A.; Mekhilef, S.

    2009-11-01

    Mechanical treatment process by superficial plastic deformation is employed for finished mechanical part surface. It introduces structural modifications that offer to basic material new properties witch give a high quality of physical and geometrical on superficial layers. This study focuses on the application of burnishing treatment (ball burnishing) on XC48 steel and parameters optimisation of treatment regime. Three important parameters were considered: burnishing force ' Py', burnishing feed 'f' and ball radius 'r'. An empirical model has been developed to illustrate the relationship between these parameters and superficial layer characteristics defined by surface roughness ' Ra' and superficial hardness ' Hv'. A program was developed in order to determine the optimum treatment regimes for each characteristic.

  5. The case for regime-based water quality standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poole, Geoffrey C.; Dunham, J.B.; Keenan, D.M.; Sauter, S.T.; McCullough, D.A.; Mebane, Christopher; Lockwood, Jeffrey C.; Essig, Don A.; Hicks, Mark P.; Sturdevant, Debra J.; Materna, E.J.; Spalding, M.; Risley, John; Deppman, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    Conventional water quality standards have been successful in reducing the concentration of toxic substances in US waters. However, conventional standards are based on simple thresholds and are therefore poorly structured to address human-caused imbalances in dynamic, natural water quality parameters, such as nutrients, sediment, and temperature. A more applicable type of water quality standarda??a a??regime standarda??a??would describe desirable distributions of conditions over space and time within a stream network. By mandating the protection and restoration of the aquatic ecosystem dynamics that are required to support beneficial uses in streams, well-designed regime standards would facilitate more effective strategies for management of natural water quality parameters.

  6. Giant magnetoresistance in the variable-range hopping regime

    SciTech Connect

    Ioffe, L. B.; Spivak, B. Z.

    2013-09-15

    We predict the universal power-law dependence of the localization length on the magnetic field in the strongly localized regime. This effect is due to the orbital quantum interference. Physically, this dependence shows up in an anomalously large negative magnetoresistance in the hopping regime. The reason for the universality is that the problem of the electron tunneling in a random media belongs to the same universality class as the directed polymer problem even in the case of wave functions of random sign. We present numerical simulations that prove this conjecture. We discuss the existing experiments that show anomalously large magnetoresistance. We also discuss the role of localized spins in real materials and the spin polarizing effect of the magnetic field.

  7. Brittle failure mode plots for compressional and extensional tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    1998-05-01

    Equations governing different macroscopic modes of brittle rock failure (extensional fracturing, extensional-shear fracturing, compressional shear failure and reshear of existing faults) can be represented on plots of differential stress vs effective vertical stress for a set of material properties. Such plots can be constructed for different tectonic regimes and correlated to depth for particular fluid pressure conditions, allowing easy evaluation of the physical controls on brittle rock failure, and ready comparison of the fields occupied by the three failure modes in different tectonic settings. They emphasize the relative ease, in terms of differential stress and fluid-pressure levels, of deforming a rock mass by brittle fracturing and faulting in extensional regimes compared with compressional. Aside from their relevance to general structural mechanics, these generic failure plots have wide-ranging application to understanding the initial development and progressive evolution of fault-fracture systems, both in sedimentary basins and as hosting structures for hydrothermal mineralization in different tectonic settings.

  8. Critical Josephson current in the dynamical Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäck, Berthold; Eltschka, Matthias; Assig, Maximilian; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R.; Kern, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of a voltage-biased Josephson junction in the low conductance regime of an ultra-low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is dominated by sequential charge tunneling. Using P (E ) theory we show that the Josephson coupling energy, experimentally determined in this regime, is in good agreement with the critical current I0 calculated from the Ambegaokar-Baratoff formula. In this way, we can determine the critical current values of a Josephson junction in an STM. Furthermore, we experimentally determine a range of validity for P (E ) theory, which is in accordance with theoretical predictions. In this way, we establish an optimal parameter range, in which Josephson STM can be performed.

  9. Spectator effects during Leptogenesis in the strong washout regime

    SciTech Connect

    Garbrecht, Björn; Schwaller, Pedro E-mail: pedro.schwaller@cern.ch

    2014-10-01

    By including spectator fields into the Boltzmann equations for Leptogenesis, we show that partially equilibrated spectator interactions can have a significant impact on the freeze-out value of the asymmetry in the strong washout regime. The final asymmetry is typically increased, since partially equilibrated spectators ''hide'' a part of the asymmetry from washout. We study examples with leptonic and non-leptonic spectator processes, assuming thermal initial conditions, and find up to 50% enhanced asymmetries compared to the limit of fully equilibrated spectators. Together with a comprehensive overview of the equilibration temperatures for various Standard Model processes, the numerical results indicate the ranges when the limiting cases of either fully equilibrated or negligible spectator fields are applicable and when they are not. Our findings also indicate an increased sensitivity to initial conditions and finite density corrections even in the strong washout regime.

  10. Regimes of strong light-matter coupling under incoherent excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Valle, E. del; Laussy, F. P.

    2011-10-15

    We study a two-level system (atom, superconducting qubit, or quantum dot) strongly coupled to a single photonic mode of a cavity, in the presence of incoherent pumping and including detuning and dephasing. This system displays a striking quantum-to-classical transition. On the grounds of several approximations that reproduce to various degrees exact results obtained numerically, we separate five regimes of operations, that we term ''linear,''''quantum,''''lasing,''''quenching,'' and ''thermal.'' In the fully quantized picture, the lasing regime arises as a condensation of dressed states and manifests itself as a Mollow triplet structure in the direct emitter photoluminescence spectrum, which embeds fundamental features of the full-field quantization description of light-matter interaction.

  11. A new climate regime in northeast pacific ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, William T.; Schwing, Franklin B.

    2003-09-01

    Following a strong El Niño, the climate of the North Pacific underwent a rapid and striking transition in late 1998. Upwelling-favorable winds strengthened over the California Current (CC), and winds weakened in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). Coastal waters of the CC and GOA cooled by several degrees, and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) reversed sign and remained negative through summer 2002. Zooplankton biomass in the northern CC doubled and switched from warm to cold water species dominance, coho and chinook salmon stocks rebounded, and anchovy and osmeriids increased. Persistent changes in atmosphere and upper ocean fields and ecosystem structure suggest a climate regime shift has occurred, similar (opposite) to shifts observed in 1947 (1925 and 1976). If the 1998 regime shift in the northern CC is completely analogous to earlier shifts, then ecosystem structure should have changed in the GOA. Recent surveys indicate this ecosystem has transformed as well.

  12. A Cold-Strontium Laser in the Superradiant Crossover Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norcia, Matthew; Thompson, James

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate and study a laser based on the 7.5 kHz linewidth dipole forbidden 3 P1 to 1 S0 transition in laser-cooled and tightly confined 88 Sr. We can operate this laser in the bad-cavity or superradiant regime, where coherence is primarily stored in the atoms, or continuously tune to the more conventional good-cavity regime, where coherence is primarily stored in the light field. We show that the cold-atom gain medium can be repumped to achieve quasi steady-state lasing. We also demonstrate up to an order of magnitude suppression in the sensitivity of laser frequency to changes in cavity length, verifying a key feature of proposed narrow linewidth lasers based on dipole-forbidden transitions in alkaline earth atoms.

  13. Computer Language Choices in Arms Control and Nonproliferation Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    White, G K

    2005-06-10

    The U.S. and Russian Federation continue to make substantive progress in the arms control and nonproliferation transparency regimes. We are moving toward an implementation choice for creating radiation measurement systems that are transparent in both their design and in their implementation. In particular, the choice of a programming language to write software for such regimes can decrease or significantly increase the costs of authentication. In this paper, we compare procedural languages with object-oriented languages. In particular, we examine the C and C++ languages; we compare language features, code generation, implementation details, and executable size and demonstrate how these attributes aid or hinder authentication and backdoor threats. We show that programs in lower level, procedural languages are more easily authenticated than are object-oriented ones. Potential tools and methods for authentication are covered. Possible mitigations are suggested for using object-oriented programming languages.

  14. Biphoton spectroscopy in a strongly nondegenerate regime of SPDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalachev, A. A.; Kalashnikov, D. A.; Kalinkin, A. A.; Mitrofanova, T. G.; Shkalikov, A. V.; Samartsev, V. V.

    2008-08-01

    The absorption spectrum of Cr3+ ions in Al2O3 crystal in the range from 691 nm to 697 nm was measured at the room temperature using the biphoton light generated by nondegenerate spontaneous parametric down-conversion of the He-Cd laser radiation (325 nm) in the LiIO3 crystal. The spectrum of the sample was measured by counting the coincidences when signal photons go through the impurity crystal, whilst the wavelength of the idler photons is resolved by a monochromator. A strongly nondegenerate regime of SPDC, when the difference in frequencies of correlated photons exceeds significantly their spectral width, was used in the biphoton spectroscopy for the first time. Such a regime allows one to obtain an absorption spectrum by measuring the wavelength in a completely different spectral range.

  15. Giant magnetoresistance in the variable-range hopping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, L. B.; Spivak, B. Z.

    2013-09-01

    We predict the universal power-law dependence of the localization length on the magnetic field in the strongly localized regime. This effect is due to the orbital quantum interference. Physically, this dependence shows up in an anomalously large negative magnetoresistance in the hopping regime. The reason for the universality is that the problem of the electron tunneling in a random media belongs to the same universality class as the directed polymer problem even in the case of wave functions of random sign. We present numerical simulations that prove this conjecture. We discuss the existing experiments that show anomalously large magnetoresistance. We also discuss the role of localized spins in real materials and the spin polarizing effect of the magnetic field.

  16. The superradiant instability regime of the spinning Kerr black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-07-01

    Spinning Kerr black holes are known to be superradiantly unstable to massive scalar perturbations. We here prove that the instability regime of the composed Kerr-black-hole-massive-scalar-field system is bounded from above by the dimensionless inequality Mμ < m ṡ√{2 (1 + γ)/(1 -√1 -γ2 ) -γ2 4γ2 , where { μ , m } are respectively the proper mass and azimuthal harmonic index of the scalar field and γ ≡r- /r+ is the dimensionless ratio between the horizon radii of the black hole. It is further shown that this analytically derived upper bound on the superradiant instability regime of the spinning Kerr black hole agrees with recent numerical computations of the instability resonance spectrum.

  17. On the heat capacity of elements in WMD regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Sebatien

    2014-03-01

    Once thought to get simpler with increasing pressure, elemental systems have been discovered to exhibit complex structures and multiple phases at high pressure. For carbon, QMD/PIMC simulations have been performed and the results are guiding alternative modelling methodologies for constructing a carbon equation-of-state covering the warm dense matter regime. One of the main results of our new QMD/PIMC carbon equation of state is that the decay of the ion-thermal specific heat with temperature is much faster than previously expected. An important question is whether this is only found in carbon and not other element. In this presentation, based on QMD calculations for several elements, we explore trends in the transition from condensed matter to warm dense matter regime.

  18. Narrowband biphoton generation in the group delay regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Luwei; Su, Yumian; Du, Shengwang

    2016-03-01

    We study narrowband biphoton generation from spontaneous four-wave mixing with electromagnetically induced transparency in a laser-cooled atomic ensemble. We compare two formalisms in the interaction and Heisenberg pictures and find that they agree in the low-gain regime but disagree in the high-gain regime. We extend both formalisms to account for the nonuniformity of the atomic density and the driving laser fields. We find that for a fixed optical depth and a weak and far-detuned pump laser beam, the two-photon waveform is independent of the atomic density distribution. However, the spatial profiles of the two driving laser beams have significant effects on the biphoton temporal waveform. We predict that waveform shaping in the time domain can be achieved by controlling the spatial profiles of the driving laser fields.

  19. Modeling of drop breakup in the bag breakup regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Chang, S.; Wu, H.; Xu, J.

    2014-04-01

    Several analytic models for predicting the drop deformation and breakup have been developed over the last three decades, but modeling drop breakup in the bag-type regime is less reported. In this Letter, a breakup model has been proposed to predict the drop deformation length and breakup time in the bag-type breakup regime in a more accurate manner. In the present model, the drop deformation which is approximately as the displacement of the centre of mass (c. m.) along the axis located at the centre of the drop, and the movement of c. m. is obtained by solving the pressure balance equation. The effects of the drop deformation on the drop external aerodynamic force are considered in this model. Drop breakup occurs when the deformation length reaches the maximum value and the maximum deformation length is a function of Weber number. The performance and applicability of the proposed breakup model are tested against the published experimental data.

  20. A new plasma regime in the distant geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, D. A.; Hills, H. K.; Freeman, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Observations are reported of an extensive region of low-energy plasma particles (LEP) flowing antisunward along the ordered field lines in the lobes of the geomagnetic tail at lunar distances. The flow was detected by three suprathermal ion detectors deployed on the lunar surface during the Apollo 12, 14, and 15 missions. This particle regime is found to be similar to the 'boundary layer' and 'plasma mantle' observed at smaller geocentric distances and to an interior flow region parallel to the magnetopause in the dayside magnetosphere. It is located exterior to the plasma sheet across essentially the entire tail and adjacent to the magnetopause on both the dawn and dusk sides of the magnetosphere. Variations in the integral flux, temperature, and number density are described. It is suggested that this flow and the three similar regimes are simply connected along the inner surface of the magnetopause and are, in fact, the same phenomenon.

  1. Optically Pumped NMR in the Fractional Quantum Hall Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, S. E.; Kuzma, N. N.; Khandelwal, P.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    1998-03-01

    Optically Pumped Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements are a local probe of the electron spin degree of freedom in n-type GaAs quantum wells.(S.E.Barrett et al.,Phys.Rev.Lett.72),1368(1994).^, footnote S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 5112 (1995)^, footnote R. Tycko et al., Science 268, 1460 (1995). We have recently shown that this OPNMR technique can be carried out in fields up to B=12 Tesla and temperatures down to T=0.3 K, making this technique a viable new probe of the Fractional Quantum Hall regime. We will discuss our latest measurements in these conditions, and compare our new results with previous measurements and the existing theoretical models for this regime.

  2. When do jammed sphere packings have a valid linear regime?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Carl; Liu, Andrea; Nagel, Sidney

    2014-03-01

    The physics of jamming can be studied in its purest form in packings of soft spheres at zero temperature. One of the successes of this approach is that bulk material properties, such as the elastic moduli or density of normal modes, can be predicted solely from the distance of the system to the jamming transition. Such properties are both defined and measured in the linear-response regime. It is thus tacitly assumed that the harmonic approximation to the local energy landscape can capture the meaningful physics, and it is therefore essential to delineate when this assumption is valid. We will examine the regime of validity of the harmonic approximation in jammed sphere packings as a function of system size and density. We will also discuss the crossover from linear response of the zero-temperature jammed solid to thermal behavior at nonzero temperatures.

  3. Scalable quantum memory in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, T H; Felicetti, S; Romero, G; Solano, E; Kwek, L-C

    2015-01-01

    Circuit quantum electrodynamics, consisting of superconducting artificial atoms coupled to on-chip resonators, represents a prime candidate to implement the scalable quantum computing architecture because of the presence of good tunability and controllability. Furthermore, recent advances have pushed the technology towards the ultrastrong coupling regime of light-matter interaction, where the qubit-resonator coupling strength reaches a considerable fraction of the resonator frequency. Here, we propose a qubit-resonator system operating in that regime, as a quantum memory device and study the storage and retrieval of quantum information in and from the Z2 parity-protected quantum memory, within experimentally feasible schemes. We are also convinced that our proposal might pave a way to realize a scalable quantum random-access memory due to its fast storage and readout performances. PMID:25727251

  4. Soil Organic Matter Feedback to changes in soil moisture regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, N. J.; Strunk, R.

    2012-04-01

    The reaction of the soil organic matter (SOM) pool to climate change is largely assessed based on simple models linking temperature and soil moisture, in more sophisticated models also Net Primary Productivity (NPP), to Carbon (C) stocks. Experiments on the sensitivity of vegetation growth and soil properties also mostly consider only temperature as a driver for NPP and thus SOM turnover in soils, while keeping moisture either constant or not distinguishing between moisture and temperature effects. All approaches ignore the feedback of secondary soil properties such aggregation and pore size distribution, to changes in rainfall regime and litter input. In this study, we present an experiment which is designed specifically to identifying the long-term effects of contrasting soil moisture regimes on NPP, soil C stocks and secondary soil properties such as aggregate stability and porosity. In addition, soil respiration as well as SOM quantity and quality are analyzed.

  5. Investigations of the temperature regimes of the selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivel, Yu.

    2012-06-01

    The principles of measuring the surface temperature of powder bed in the focal spot of the laser radiation while scanning the surface using galvoscanner with F-teta lens have been elaborated. Investigation of the melting of overhang layers has been conducted under full temperature monitoring. Temperature regimes of the selective laser melting process of the 3D object from steel 316L powder have been investigated.

  6. Study of the Transition Flow Regime using Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, H. A.

    1999-01-01

    This NASA Cooperative Agreement presents a study of the Transition Flow Regime Using Monte Carlo Methods. The topics included in this final report are: 1) New Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) procedures; 2) The DS3W and DS2A Programs; 3) Papers presented; 4) Miscellaneous Applications and Program Modifications; 5) Solution of Transitional Wake Flows at Mach 10; and 6) Turbulence Modeling of Shock-Dominated Fows with a k-Enstrophy Formulation.

  7. Aerosol variability and weather regimes over the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabat, Pierre; Somot, Samuel; Mallet, Marc; Michou, Martine

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean region is characterized by the accumulation of aerosols from different sources: industrial and urban aerosols from Europe and North African towns, biomass burning, from Eastern Europe, dust aerosols from Africa, and marine particles from the sea. These aerosols show a strong spatio-temporal variability and a resulting large variety in aerosol optical properties over this basin. Maximal aerosol loads are observed in spring and summer, namely in the dry season favouring a longer residence time for atmospheric aerosols. Besides, dust outbreaks characterized by large plumes of Saharan desert dust particles, are more frequent in this season. This study realized in the framework of the ChArMEx initiative aims at explaining this aerosol variability and the relationship between aerosol loads and weather conditions. We consider here an approach based on weather regimes and regional modeling. From a multi-year (1979-2013) regional simulation carried out with the ALADIN-climate model (50 km resolution, ERA-Interim forcing) including an interactive aerosol scheme for the main species present in this region (desert dust, sea-salt, sulfates and carbonaceous particles), we have identified typical synoptic conditions that favour high aerosol loads over the Mediterranean, or on the contrary that are opposed to these high aerosol loads. These weather regimes are based on a statistical method of automated classification realized from surface pressure data. They are also related to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). In this work, we characterize the presence of the different aerosol types over the Mediterranean for each weather regime, as well as their effects on climate. Thus, anomalies in the occurrence of the regimes favourable to high aerosol loads could explain the frequent dust outbreaks observed during the ChArMEx campaigns in 2012 and 2013.

  8. Plasma regimes in high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Los Arcos, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    High Power Pulsed Magnetron Sputtering (HPPMS) is a relatively recent variation of magnetron sputtering where high power is applied to the magnetron in short pulses. The result is the formation of dense transient plasmas with a high fraction of ionized species, ideally leading to better control of film growth through substrate bias. However, the broad range of experimental conditions accessible in pulsed discharges results in bewildering variations in current and voltage pulse shapes, pulse power densities, etc, which represent different discharge behaviors, making it difficult to identify relevant deposition conditions. The complexity of the plasma dynamics is evident. Within each pulse, plasma characteristics such as plasma composition, density, gas rarefaction, spatial distribution, degree of self-sputtering, etc. vary with time. A recent development has been the discovery that the plasma emission can self-organize into well-defined regions of high and low plasma emissivity above the racetrack (spokes), which rotate in the direction given by the E ×B drift and that significantly influence the transport mechanisms in HPPMS. One seemingly universal characteristic of HPPMS plasmas is the existence of well defined plasma regimes for different power ranges. These regimes are clearly differentiated in terms of plasma conductivity, plasma composition and spatial plasma self-organization. We will discuss the global characteristics of these regimes in terms of current-voltage characteristics, energy-resolved QMS and OES analysis, and fast imaging. In particular we will discuss how the reorganization of the plasma emission into spokes is associated only to specific regimes of high plasma conductivity. We will also briefly discuss the role of the target in shaping the characteristics of the HPPMS plasma, since sputtering is a surface-driven process. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) within the framework of the SFB-TR87.

  9. Signature candidate of quantum chaos far from the semiclassical regime

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shang-Bin Xu, Zhengyuan

    2014-03-15

    We numerically investigated the entanglement product in the simplest coupled kicked top model with the spin j = 1. Different from the dynamical pattern of entanglement in the semiclassical regime, two similar initial states may have discordant entanglement oscillations. A candidate of the quantum signature of this classical chaotic system was proposed. The potential antimonotonic relation between the rank correlation coefficient qualifying the concordant of two entanglement evolutions and the stationary entanglement was preliminarily revealed.

  10. Predicting regime shifts in flow of the Colorado River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, S.; McCabe, G. J.; Brekke, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    The effects of continued global warming on water resources are a concern for water managers and stake holders. In the western United States, where the combined climatic demand and consumptive use of water is equal to or greater than the natural supply of water for some locations, there is growing concern regarding the sustainability of future water supplies. In addition to the adverse effects of warming on water supply, another issue for water managers is accounting for, and managing, the effects of natural climatic variability, particularly persistently dry and wet periods. Analyses of paleo-reconstructions of Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) flow demonstrate that severe sustained droughts, and persistent pluvial periods, are a recurring characteristic of hydroclimate in the Colorado River basin. Shifts between persistently dry and wet regimes (e.g. decadal to multi-decadal variability (D2M)) have important implications for water supply and water management. In this study paleo-reconstructions of UCRB flow are used to compute the risks of shifts between persistently wet and dry regimes given the length of time in a specific regime. Results indicate that low frequency variability of hydro-climatic conditions and the statistics that describe this low frequency variability can be useful to water managers by providing information about the risk of shifting from one hydrologic regime to another. Boxplot of risk outlooks in the Colorado River Basin from the nine flow reconstructions developed in Gangopadhyay et al. (2009). Gangopadhyay, S., B.L. Harding, B. Rajagopalan, J.J. Lukas, and T.J. Fulp, (2009) A non-parametric approach for paleohydrologic reconstruction of annual streamflow ensembles. Water Resour. Res., 45, W06417.

  11. Predicting regime shifts in flow of the Colorado River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Subhrendu; McCabe, Gregory J.

    2010-10-01

    The effects of continued global warming on water resources are a concern for water managers and stake holders. In the western United States, where the combined climatic demand and consumptive use of water is equal to or greater than the natural supply of water for some locations, there is growing concern regarding the sustainability of future water supplies. In addition to the adverse effects of warming on water supply, another issue for water managers is accounting for, and managing, the effects of natural climatic variability, particularly persistently dry and wet periods. Analyses of paleo-reconstructions of Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) flow demonstrate that severe sustained droughts, and persistent pluvial periods, are a recurring characteristic of hydroclimate in the Colorado River basin. Shifts between persistently dry and wet regimes (e.g., decadal to multi-decadal variability (D2M)) have important implications for water supply and water management. In this study paleo-reconstructions of UCRB flow are used to compute the risks of shifts between persistently wet and dry regimes given the length of time in a specific regime. Results indicate that low frequency variability of hydro-climatic conditions and the statistics that describe this low frequency variability can be useful to water managers by providing information about the risk of shifting from one hydrologic regime to another. To manage water resources in the future water managers will have to understand the joint hydrologic effects of natural climate variability and global warming. These joint effects may produce future hydrologic conditions that are unprecedented in both the instrumental and paleoclimatic records.

  12. 2D Melting of Plasma Crystals: Equilibrium and Nonequilibrium Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Ivlev, A. V.; Knapek, C. A.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-07-03

    Comprehensive experimental investigations of melting in two-dimensional complex plasmas were carried out. Different experiments were performed in steady and unsteady heating regimes. We demonstrate an Arrhenius dependence of the defect concentration on the kinetic temperature in steady-state experiments, and show the evidence of metastable quenching in unsteady experiments, where the defect concentration follows a power-law temperature scaling. In all experiments, independent indicators suggest a grain-boundary-induced melting scenario.

  13. Optimal Ranking Regime analysis of TreeFlow dendrohydrological reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauget, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The Optimal Ranking Regime (ORR) method was used to identify 6-100 year time windows containing significant ranking sequences in 55 western US streamflow reconstructions, and reconstructions of the level of the Great Salt Lake and San Francisco Bay salinity during 1500-2007. The method's ability to identify optimally significant and non-overlapping runs of low and high rankings allows it to re-express a reconstruction time series as a simplified sequence of regime segments marking intra- to multi-decadal (IMD) periods of low or high streamflow, lake level, or salinity. Those ORR sequences, referred to here as Z lines, can be plotted to identify consistent regime patterns in the analysis of numerous reconstructions. The Z lines for the 57 reconstructions evaluated here show a common pattern of IMD cycles of drought and pluvial periods during the late 16th and 17th centuries, a relatively dormant period during the 18th century, and the reappearance of alternating dry and wet IMD periods during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Although this pattern suggests the possibility of similarly active and inactive oceanic modes in the North Pacific and North Atlantic, such centennial-scale patterns are not evident in the ORR analyses of reconstructed Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), El Niño-Southern Oscillation, and North Atlantic seas-surface temperature variation. But given the inconsistency in the analyses of four PDO reconstructions the possible role of centennial-scale oceanic mechanisms is uncertain. In future research the ORR method might be applied to climate reconstructions around the Pacific Basin to try to resolve this uncertainty. Given its ability to compare regime patterns in climate reconstructions derived using different methods and proxies, the method may also be used in future research to evaluate long-term regional temperature reconstructions.

  14. Optimal ranking regime analysis of TreeFlow dendrohydrological reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauget, S. A.

    2015-08-01

    The optimal ranking regime (ORR) method was used to identify 6-100-year time windows containing significant ranking sequences in 55 western US streamflow reconstructions, and reconstructions of the level of the Great Salt Lake and San Francisco Bay salinity during 1500-2007. The method's ability to identify optimally significant and non-overlapping runs of low- and high-rankings allows it to re-express a reconstruction time series as a simplified sequence of regime segments marking intra- to multi-decadal (IMD) periods of low or high streamflow, lake level, and salinity. Those ORR sequences, referred to here as Z-lines, can be plotted to identify consistent regime patterns in the analysis of numerous reconstructions. The Z-lines for the 57 reconstructions evaluated here show a common pattern of IMD cycles of drought and pluvial periods during the late 16th and 17th centuries, a relatively dormant period during the 18th century, and the reappearance of alternating dry and wet IMD periods during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Although this pattern suggests the possibility of similarly active and inactive oceanic modes in the North Pacific and North Atlantic, such centennial-scale patterns are not evident in the ORR analyses of reconstructed Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), El Niño-Southern Oscillation, and North Atlantic sea-surface temperature variation. However, given the inconsistency in the analyses of four PDO reconstructions, the possible role of centennial-scale oceanic mechanisms is uncertain. In future research the ORR method might be applied to climate reconstructions around the Pacific Basin to try to resolve this uncertainty. Given its ability to compare regime patterns in climate reconstructions derived using different methods and proxies, the method may also be used in future research to evaluate long-term regional temperature reconstructions.

  15. Cosmological probes of modified gravity: the nonlinear regime.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Fabian

    2011-12-28

    We review the effects of modified gravity on large-scale structure in the nonlinear regime, focusing on f(R) gravity and the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model, for which full N-body simulations have been performed. In particular, we discuss the abundance of massive halos, the nonlinear matter power spectrum and the dynamics within clusters and galaxies, with particular emphasis on the screening mechanisms present in these models. PMID:22084294

  16. Analytic expression for poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M.

    2013-01-15

    The poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime is calculated by improving the l = 1 approximation for the Fokker-Planck collision operator [M. Taguchi, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 1897 (1988)]. The obtained analytic expression for this flow, which can be used for general axisymmetric toroidal plasmas, agrees quite well with the recently calculated numerical results by Parker and Catto [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 085011 (2012)] in the full range of aspect ratio.

  17. Dynamical overlap fermions in the epsilon-regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, Hidenori

    2006-12-01

    We report on the two-flavor QCD simulation in the ɛ-regime using the overlap fermion formu- lation. Sea quark mass is reduced to ˜ 2 MeV on a 163 × 32 lattice with the lattice spacing a 0.11 fm. Topological charge is fixed at Q = 0. We compare the eigenvalue distribution of the overlap-Dirac operator with the prediction of the chiral random matrix theory. Preliminary results on meson correlators are also reported.

  18. Quantum scattering in the strip: From ballistic to localized regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebarowski, R.; Šeba, P.; Życzkowski, K.; Zakrzewski, J.

    1998-11-01

    Quantum scattering is studied in a system consisting of randomly distributed point scatterers in the strip. The model is continuous yet exactly solvable. Varying the number of scatterers (the sample length) we investigate a transition between the ballistic and the localized regimes. By considering the cylinder geometry and introducing the magnetic flux we are able to study time reversal symmetry breaking in the system. Both macroscopic (conductance) and microscopic (eigenphases distribution, statistics of S-matrix elements) characteristics of the system are examined.

  19. Cascade frequency generation regime in an optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, D B; Dmitriev, Aleksandr K; Gorelik, P; Vong, Franko; Zondy, J J

    2009-05-31

    In a parametric oscillator of a special two-sectional design based on a lithium niobate periodic structure, a cascade frequency generation regime was observed in which a signal wave pumped a secondary parametric oscillator, producing secondary signal and idler waves. The secondary parametric oscillator can be tuned in a broad range of {approx}200 nm with respect to a fixed wavelength of the primary idler wave. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  20. Improving entanglement of two atoms in strong coupling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Yang, Qing; Yang, Ming; Cao, Zhuoliang

    2016-03-01

    We consider a model of two identical atoms coupled to a single-mode cavity. When in atom-field strong coupling regime, the entanglement of the two atoms with spontaneous emission should be investigated beyond rotating-wave approximation (RWA). In order to improve the entanglement of the two atoms, some typical feedback based on quantum-jump are attempted to impose on the atoms. The result of numerical simulations shows that an appropriate feedback control can improve the entanglement.

  1. MCNP/X TRANSPORT IN THE TABULAR REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    HUGHES, H. GRADY

    2007-01-08

    The authors review the transport capabilities of the MCNP and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes in the energy regimes in which tabular transport data are available. Giving special attention to neutron tables, they emphasize the measures taken to improve the treatment of a variety of difficult aspects of the transport problem, including unresolved resonances, thermal issues, and the availability of suitable cross sections sets. They also briefly touch on the current situation in regard to photon, electron, and proton transport tables.

  2. Steady state plasma operation in RF dominated regimes on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, C. D.; Liu, F. K.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N. Li, J. G.

    2015-12-10

    Significant progress has recently been made on EAST in the 2014 campaign, including the enhanced CW H&CD system over 20MW heating power (LHCD, ICRH and NBI), more than 70 diagnostics, ITER-like W-monoblock on upper divertor, two inner cryo-pumps and RMP coils, enabling EAST to investigate long pulse H mode operation with dominant electron heating and low torque to address the critical issues for ITER. H-mode plasmas were achieved by new H&CD system or 4.6GHz LHCD alone for the first time. Long pulse high performance H mode has been obtained by LHCD alone up to 28s at H{sub 98}∼1.2 or by combing of ICRH and LHCD, no or small ELM was found in RF plasmas, which is essential for steady state operation in the future Tokamak. Plasma operation in low collision regimes were implemented by new 4.6GHz LHCD with core Te∼4.5keV. The non-inductive scenarios with high performance at high bootstrap current fraction have been demonstrated in RF dominated regimes for long pulse operation. Near full non-inductive CD discharges have been achieved. In addition, effective heating and decoupling method under multi-transmitter for ICRF system were developed in this campaign, etc. EAST could be in operation with over 30MW CW heating and current drive power (LHCD ICRH NBI and ECRH), enhanced diagnostic capabilities and full actively-cooled metal wall from 2015. It will therefore allow to access new confinement regimes and to extend these regimes towards to steady state operation.

  3. Statistical instability of barrier microdischarges operating in townsend regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nagorny, V. P.

    2007-01-15

    The dynamics of barrier microdischarges operating in a Townsend regime is studied analytically and via kinetic particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that statistical fluctuations of the number of charged particles in the discharge gap strongly influence the dynamics of natural oscillations of the discharge current and may even lead to a disruption of the discharge. Analysis of the statistical effects based on a simple model is suggested. The role of external sources in stabilizing microdischarges is clarified.

  4. Non-gaussianity in the strong regime of warm inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Ian G.; Yeomans, Timothy E-mail: timothy.yeomans@ncl.ac.uk

    2011-08-01

    The bispectrum of scalar mode density perturbations is analysed for the strong regime of warm inflationary models. This analysis generalises previous results by allowing damping terms in the inflaton equation of motion that are dependent on temperature. A significant amount of non-gaussianity emerges with constant (or local) non-linearity parameter f{sub NL} ∼ 20, in addition to the terms with non-constant f{sub NL} which are characteristic of warm inflation.

  5. Characterization of diffusion processes: Normal and anomalous regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Samuel B.; de Oliveira, Gilson F.; de Oliveira, Luimar C.; Passerat de Silans, Thierry; Chevrollier, Martine; Oriá, Marcos; de S. Cavalcante, Hugo L. D.

    2016-04-01

    Many man-made and natural processes involve the diffusion of microscopic particles subject to random or chaotic, random-like movements. Besides the normal diffusion characterized by a Gaussian probability density function, whose variance increases linearly in time, so-called anomalous-diffusion regimes can also take place. They are characterized by a variance growing slower (subdiffusive) or faster (superdiffusive) than normal. In fact, many different underlying processes can lead to anomalous diffusion, with qualitative differences between mechanisms producing subdiffusion and mechanisms resulting in superdiffusion. Thus, a general description, encompassing all three regimes and where the specific mechanisms of each system are not explicit, is desirable. Here, our goal is to present a simple method of data analysis that enables one to characterize a model-less diffusion process from data observation, by observing the temporal evolution of the particle spread. To generate diffusive processes in different regimes, we use a Monte-Carlo routine in which both the step-size and the time-delay of the diffusing particles follow Pareto (inverse-power law) distributions, with either finite or diverging statistical momenta. We discuss on the application of this method to real systems.

  6. Laser Wakefield Acceleration in the PetaWatt Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Katsouleas, T.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2003-10-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration with multi-terawatt lasers has demonstrated impressive results in experiments around the world-- e.g., energy gains up to 700 MeV in mm-scale gas jets has recently been reported. With a number of petawatt class lasers planned for operation in the near future, we examine with 2-D and 3-D PIC simulations the potential energy gain and new physics of laser wakefield acceleration in this regime. These lasers will operated for a variety of pulse lengths. We consider both 35 fs and 600 fs pulses, but will emphasize the 35 fs results for this poster. Prospects for producing GeV electron beams in underdense plasmas will be described. In addition, the differences in physics between terawatt and petawatt regimes will be explored. Preliminary results for the 35 fs class lasers indicate that there are two acceleration stages in the petawatt regime -- with the early electrons dephasing due to elongation of the laser wake as the laser pump evolves. The later stage produces a long beam of electrons several times the initial plasma wake wavelength with a fairly defined energy in the GeV range. For the 600 fs class lasers, 2D simulations indicate that the acceleration process is much more complicated and it involves an interaction between the fields in the wake and the laser.

  7. Two regimes of self-consistent heating of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro

    2011-10-15

    An experimental illustration of the transition between two basic transport regimes for wave-particle interaction is reported. A striking feature is that chaos, although present in both regimes, does not need to be invoked to explain the observed behavior. This experimental realization for a theoretical paradigm opens the possibility to check the validity of basic models, as is normally required in physics. Indeed, among seemingly simple problems exhibiting complex behavior is the classical interaction of an electron with electrostatic waves. Launching a low-intensity electron beam in a Traveling Wave Tube (TWT) recently allowed observing the real-world consequences of the richness of the electron trajectory. Here we show that self-consistent effects are nevertheless acting on a modulated test electron beam through the collective excitation of beam modes. The transition between two different particle transport regimes (stochastic diffusion in a set of waves and slow chaos associated to a pulsating separatrix) is directly measured by increasing the amplitude of the excitation.

  8. Two regimes of self-consistent heating of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro

    2011-10-01

    An experimental illustration of the transition between two basic transport regimes for wave-particle interaction is reported. A striking feature is that chaos, although present in both regimes, does not need to be invoked to explain the observed behavior. This experimental realization for a theoretical paradigm opens the possibility to check the validity of basic models, as is normally required in physics. Indeed, among seemingly simple problems exhibiting complex behavior is the classical interaction of an electron with electrostatic waves. Launching a low-intensity electron beam in a Traveling Wave Tube (TWT) recently allowed observing the real-world consequences of the richness of the electron trajectory. Here we show that self-consistent effects are nevertheless acting on a modulated test electron beam through the collective excitation of beam modes. The transition between two different particle transport regimes (stochastic diffusion in a set of waves and slow chaos associated to a pulsating separatrix) is directly measured by increasing the amplitude of the excitation. PMID:22181220

  9. Regimes of miscible fluid thread formation in microfluidic focusing sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubaud, Thomas; Notaro, Sara

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally study the formation and stability of miscible fluid threads made of high-viscosity liquids using hydrodynamic focusing sections. Miscible core annular flows are useful for transporting viscous materials and can be destabilized for enhancing mass transfer. We delineate phase-diagrams of the generation of lubricated threads from low to large viscosity contrasts with various diffusion coefficients. Depending on fluid properties and flow rates of injection, stable microflows are classified into engulfment, thread, and tubing regimes. For low Péclet numbers, we examine thread dynamics when diffusive effects strongly alter basic flow structures and induce new flow configurations, including ultra-diffusive and diffusive instability regimes. Another unstable flow arrangement is investigated for moderate Reynolds numbers where small threads are rapidly destabilized in the inertial flow field of the sheath fluid near the fluid junction. This study provides an overview of stable and unstable flow regimes and their transitions during the formation of miscible viscous fluid filaments in square microchannels.

  10. Siberian Lena River hydrologic regime and recent change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Daqing; Kane, Douglas L.; Hinzman, Larry D.; Zhang, Xuebin; Zhang, Tingjun; Ye, Hengchun

    2002-12-01

    The long-term (1935-1999) monthly records of temperature, precipitation, stream flow, river ice thickness, and active layer depth have been analyzed in this study to examine Lena River hydrologic regime and recent change. Remarkable hydrologic changes have been identified in this study. During the cold season (October-April), significant increases (25-90%) in stream flow and decrease in river ice thickness have been found due to warming in Siberia. In the snowmelt period (May-June), strong warming in spring leads to an advance of snowmelt season into late May and results in a lower daily maximum discharge in June. During summer months (July-September) the changes in stream flow hydrology are less significant in comparison to those for winter and spring seasons. A slight stream flow increase is discovered for both July and August, mainly owing to precipitation increase in May and June. Discharge in September has a slight downward trend due to precipitation decrease and temperature increase in August. The magnitudes of changes in stream flow and river ice thickness identified in this study are large enough to alter the hydrologic regime. Investigation into the hydrologic response of the Lena River to climate change and variation reveals strong linkages of stream flow with temperature and precipitation. We therefore believe that Lena River hydrologic regime changes are mainly the consequence of recent climate warming over Siberia and also closely related to changes in permafrost condition.

  11. Biomimetic cilia arrays generate simultaneous pumping and mixing regimes

    PubMed Central

    Shields, A. R.; Fiser, B. L.; Evans, B. A.; Falvo, M. R.; Washburn, S.; Superfine, R.

    2010-01-01

    Living systems employ cilia to control and to sense the flow of fluids for many purposes, such as pumping, locomotion, feeding, and tissue morphogenesis. Beyond their use in biology, functional arrays of artificial cilia have been envisaged as a potential biomimetic strategy for inducing fluid flow and mixing in lab-on-a-chip devices. Here we report on fluid transport produced by magnetically actuated arrays of biomimetic cilia whose size approaches that of their biological counterparts, a scale at which advection and diffusion compete to determine mass transport. Our biomimetic cilia recreate the beat shape of embryonic nodal cilia, simultaneously generating two sharply segregated regimes of fluid flow: Above the cilia tips their motion causes directed, long-range fluid transport, whereas below the tips we show that the cilia beat generates an enhanced diffusivity capable of producing increased mixing rates. These two distinct types of flow occur simultaneously and are separated in space by less than 5 μm, approximately 20% of the biomimetic cilium length. While this suggests that our system may have applications as a versatile microfluidics device, we also focus on the biological implications of our findings. Our statistical analysis of particle transport identifying an enhanced diffusion regime provides novel evidence for the existence of mixing in ciliated systems, and we demonstrate that the directed transport regime is Poiseuille–Couette flow, the first analytical model consistent with biological measurements of fluid flow in the embryonic node. PMID:20798342

  12. Ecological forecasting in the presence of abrupt regime shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dippner, Joachim W.; Kröncke, Ingrid

    2015-10-01

    Regime shifts may cause an intrinsic decrease in the potential predictability of marine ecosystems. In such cases, forecasts of biological variables fail. To improve prediction of long-term variability in environmental variables, we constructed a multivariate climate index and applied it to forecast ecological time series. The concept is demonstrated herein using climate and macrozoobenthos data from the southern North Sea. Special emphasis is given to the influence of selection of length of fitting period to the quality of forecast skill especially in the presence of regime shifts. Our results indicate that the performance of multivariate predictors in biological forecasts is much better than that of single large-scale climate indices, especially in the presence of regime shifts. The approach used to develop the index is generally applicable to all geographical regions in the world and to all areas of marine biology, from the species level up to biodiversity. Such forecasts are of vital interest for practical aspects of the sustainable management of marine ecosystems and the conservation of ecosystem goods and services.

  13. Perspective: Single polymer mechanics across the force regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Omar A.

    2015-05-01

    I review theoretical and experimental results on the force-extension response of single polymers, with a focus on scaling pictures of low-force elastic regimes, and recent measurements of synthetic and biological chains that explore those regimes. The mechanical response of single polymers is an old theoretical problem whose exploration was instigated by the curious thermomechanical behavior of rubber. Up until the 1990s, the main utility of those calculations was to explain bulk material mechanics. However, in that decade, it became possible to directly test the calculations through high-precision single-chain stretching experiments (i.e., force spectroscopy). I present five major single-chain elasticity models, including scaling results based on blob-chain models, along with analytic results based on linear response theory, and those based on freely jointed chain or worm-like chain structure. Each model is discussed in terms of the regime of force for which it holds, along with the status of its rigorous assessment with experiment. Finally, I show how the experiments can provide new insight into polymer structure itself, with particular emphasis on polyelectrolytes.

  14. A quantitative comparison of Soil Development in four climatic regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, J.W.; Taylor, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    A new quantitative Soil Development Index based on field data has been applied to chronosequences formed under different climatic regimes. The four soil chronosequences, developed primarily on sandy deposits, have some numeric age control and are located in xeric-inland (Merced, Calif.), xeric-coastal (Ventura, Calif.), aridic (Las Cruces, N. Mex.), and udic (Susquehanna Valley, Pa.) soil-moisture regimes. To quantify field properties, points are assigned for developmental increases in soil properties in comparison to the parent material. Currently ten soil-field properties are quantified and normalized for each horizon in a given chronosequence, including two new properties for carbonate-rich soils in addition to the eight properties previously defined. When individual properties or the combined indexes are plotted as a function of numeric age, rates of soil development can be compared in different climates. The results demonstrate that (1) the Soil Development Index can be applied to very different soil types, (2) many field properties develop systematically in different climatic regimes, (3) certain properties appear to have similar rates of development in different climates, and (4) the Profile Index that combines different field properties increases significantly with age and appears to develop at similar rates in different climates. The Soil Development Index can serve as a preliminary guide to soil age where other age control is lacking and can be used to correlate deposits of different geographical and climatic regions. ?? 1983.

  15. Tearing instabilities in the banana-plateau collisionality regime

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, W.X.; Callen, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    Starting from a resistive MHD set of equations and adding neoclassical currents (bootstrap, enhanced polarization and pinch type), we derive the eigenmode equation and relevant dispersion relation for ''neoclassical MHD'' tearing modes in the banana-plateau collisionality regime. The ballooning mode representation and a multiple length scale approximation are utilized. Analysis of the dispersion relation shows that the neoclassical effects on tearing modes are quite strong for ..sqrt..epsilon ..beta../sub p/(1 + nu/sub *//sub e/)/sup -1/ > S/sup -2/5/ (epsilon is the inverse aspect ratio, ..beta../sub p/ is the poloidal beta value, nu/sub *//sub e/ is the electron collisionality factor and S is the neoclassical MHD Reynolds number). The growth rate ..gamma.. and singular layer width deltax are increased typically by more than one order of magnitude from the usual values for epsilon ..beta../sub p/ approx. = 1. For our model, the changes in the tearing modes from the banana-plateau collisionality regime to the usual Pfirsch-Schlueter regime are very clear and natural.

  16. He-accreting white dwarfs: accretion regimes and final outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersanti, L.; Tornambé, A.; Yungelson, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    The behaviour of carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs) subject to direct helium accretion is extensively studied. We aim to analyse the thermal response of an accreting WD to mass deposition at different timescales. The analysis has been performed for initial WD masses and accretion rates in the range 0.60-1.02 M⊙ and 10-9-10-5 M⊙ yr-1, respectively. Thermal regimes in the parameter space MWD-dot{M}_He leading to formation of red-giant-like structures, steady burning of He, and mild, strong and dynamical flashes have been identified and the transition between these regimes has been studied in detail. In particular, the physical properties of WDs experiencing the He-flash accretion regime have been investigated to determine the mass retention efficiency as a function of the accretor total mass and accretion rate. We also discuss to what extent the building up of a He-rich layer via H burning could be described according to the behaviour of models accreting He-rich matter directly. Polynomial fits to the obtained results are provided for use in binary population synthesis computations. Several applications for close binary systems with He-rich donors and CO WD accretors are considered and the relevance of the results for interpreting He novae is discussed.

  17. Unsustainable Groundwater Exploitation and Stochastic Regime Shifts: Converging Management Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Suresh; Park, Jeryang

    2014-05-01

    Increasing water security concerns arise from projected increases in competing freshwater demands, resulting from rapid urbanization, growing affluent population, and the need for increased production of food and bio-energy. These global trends in concert with the convergence of three groups of threats are likely to exacerbate freshwater security issues: (1) increasing dependency on effectively non-renewable groundwater ("peak water"); (2) increasing groundwater quality impairment("land-use intensification") from larger contaminant loads delivered from the vadose zone and surface water; and (3) increasing uncertainties in groundwater demand/supply from climate change ("stochastic risks"). Here, we present a conceptual framework for exploring water security threats, with a consideration of aquifers as complex hydrological systems with two stable states. Regime shifts in groundwater pumping -- from "sufficient" to "insufficient" -- result from changes in both internal system dynamics and external forcing from stochastic divers (non-stationary demands, hydro-climatic patterns). Examples from recent related work, in groundwater and surface water systems and ecosystems, are briefly reviewed as a prelude to presentation of model simulations of hypothetical scenarios of regime-shifts (tipping points) involving groundwater quantity and quality constraints. In addition to three types of widely recognized tipping points, we introduce a new type, stochastic tipping, that contributes to unexpected, undesirable regime shifts, resulting in inability to meet groundwater pumping needs, even when the perceived precariousness is small and the system is far from bifurcation point (deterministic tipping). Implications to sustainable groundwater management are discussed.

  18. Globalization, marine regime shifts and the Soviet Union

    PubMed Central

    Österblom, Henrik; Folke, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Regime shifts have been observed in marine ecosystems around the world, with climate and fishing suggested as major drivers of such shifts. The global and regional dynamics of the climate system have been studied in this context, and efforts to develop an analogous understanding of fishing activities are developing. Here, we investigate the timing of pelagic marine regime shifts in relation to the emergence of regional and global fishing activities of the Soviet Union. Our investigation of official catch statistics reflects that the Soviet Union was a major fishing actor in all large marine ecosystems where regime shifts have been documented, including in ecosystems where overfishing has been established as a key driver of these changes (in the Baltic and Black Seas and the Scotian Shelf). Globalization of Soviet Union fishing activities pushed exploitation to radically new levels and triggered regional and global governance responses for improved management. Since then, exploitation levels have remained and increased with new actors involved. Based on our exploratory work, we propose that a deeper understanding of the role of global fishing actors is central for improved management of marine ecosystems.

  19. Turbulent regimes in the tokamak scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mosetto, Annamaria; Halpern, Federico D.; Jolliet, Sébastien; Loizu, Joaquim; Ricci, Paolo

    2013-09-15

    The non-linear turbulent regimes in the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) are identified according to the linear instability responsible for the perpendicular transport. Four regions of the SOL operational parameters are determined where turbulence is driven by the inertial or resistive branches of the ballooning mode or of drift waves. The analysis, based on the linear electrostatic drift-reduced Braginskii equations, evaluates the pressure scale length self-consistently from the balance between plasma losses at the vessel and perpendicular turbulent transport. The latter is estimated by assuming that turbulence saturation occurs due to a local flattening of the plasma gradients and associated removal of the linear instability drive; it is also shown that transport is led by the mode that maximizes the ratio of the linear growth to the poloidal wavenumber. The methodology used to identify the turbulent regimes is confirmed by the results of non-linear simulations of SOL turbulence. The identification of the turbulent regimes, the predicted pressure scale length, and the poloidal wavenumber of the leading mode are in reasonable agreement with non-linear simulation results.

  20. Optical Anisotropy of Black Phosphorus in the Visible Regime.

    PubMed

    Mao, Nannan; Tang, Jingyi; Xie, Liming; Wu, Juanxia; Han, Bowen; Lin, Jingjing; Deng, Shibin; Ji, Wei; Xu, Hua; Liu, Kaihui; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-13

    The striking in-plane anisotropy remains one of the most intriguing properties for the newly rediscovered black phosphorus (BP) 2D crystals. However, because of its rather low-energy band gap, the optical anisotropy of few-layer BP has been primarily investigated in the near-infrared (NIR) regime. Moreover, the essential physics that determine the intrinsic anisotropic optical property of few-layer BP, which is of great importance for practical applications in optical and optoelectronic devices, are still in the fancy of theory. Herein, we report the direct observation of the optical anisotropy of few-layer BP in the visible regime simply by using polarized optical microscopy. On the basis of the Fresnel equation, the intrinsic anisotropic complex refractive indices (n-iκ) in the visible regime (480-650 nm) were experimentally obtained for the first time using the anisotropic optical contrast spectra. Our findings not only provide a convenient approach to measure the optical constants of 2D layered materials but also suggest a possibility to design novel BP-based photonic devices such as atom-thick light modulators, including linear polarizer, phase plate, and optical compensator in a broad spectral range extending to the visible window. PMID:26669826

  1. Regime-based forecast performance during WFIP 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, J. M.; Zack, J. W.; Manobianco, J.; Beaucage, P.; Rojowsky, K.

    2015-12-01

    The principal objectives of the first Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP 1) were to improve short-term (0 - 6 hr) wind power forecasts through the assimilation of targeted remote sensing and surface observations with an enhanced model ensemble forcast system. The WFIP 1 field deployment/modeling campaign in the Southern Study Area (SSA--encompassing most of central and western Texas) ran from August 2011 through Septembe 2012. This ensured observational data and model output for all representative weather regimes affecting the SSA. Cold and warm season regimes featured synoptic-scale, convective, and low-level jet (LLJ) phenomena that are responsible for the favorable wind resource in the SSA, and also posed a challenge for assigning specific explanations for the observed forecast improvements (e.g. additional observations, model improvements, or a combination of both). LLJs produced hourly capacity factors exceeding 80% in aggregated wind farm power production, while synoptic-scale systems were responsible for the largest ramp events observed during WFIP 1. Accurately forecasting convective phenomena (such as outflow boundaries) during WFIP 1 was at times problematic. Here, we present regime-based and phenomenological-related forecast performance results for WFIP 1. These performance metrics suggest future research pathways that will facilitate improvements in operational wind power forecasts.

  2. Global impacts of the 1980s regime shift.

    PubMed

    Reid, Philip C; Hari, Renata E; Beaugrand, Grégory; Livingstone, David M; Marty, Christoph; Straile, Dietmar; Barichivich, Jonathan; Goberville, Eric; Adrian, Rita; Aono, Yasuyuki; Brown, Ross; Foster, James; Groisman, Pavel; Hélaouët, Pierre; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung; Kirby, Richard; Knight, Jeff; Kraberg, Alexandra; Li, Jianping; Lo, Tzu-Ting; Myneni, Ranga B; North, Ryan P; Pounds, J Alan; Sparks, Tim; Stübi, René; Tian, Yongjun; Wiltshire, Karen H; Xiao, Dong; Zhu, Zaichun

    2016-02-01

    Despite evidence from a number of Earth systems that abrupt temporal changes known as regime shifts are important, their nature, scale and mechanisms remain poorly documented and understood. Applying principal component analysis, change-point analysis and a sequential t-test analysis of regime shifts to 72 time series, we confirm that the 1980s regime shift represented a major change in the Earth's biophysical systems from the upper atmosphere to the depths of the ocean and from the Arctic to the Antarctic, and occurred at slightly different times around the world. Using historical climate model simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and statistical modelling of historical temperatures, we then demonstrate that this event was triggered by rapid global warming from anthropogenic plus natural forcing, the latter associated with the recovery from the El Chichón volcanic eruption. The shift in temperature that occurred at this time is hypothesized as the main forcing for a cascade of abrupt environmental changes. Within the context of the last century or more, the 1980s event was unique in terms of its global scope and scale; our observed consequences imply that if unavoidable natural events such as major volcanic eruptions interact with anthropogenic warming unforeseen multiplier effects may occur. PMID:26598217

  3. Interannual variability of snow and fluvial regimes in Andorra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesado, Cristina; Riba, Sergi; Pons, Marc; Lopez-Moreno, Juan Ignacio

    2016-04-01

    Highlands in Andorra are snow-dominated areas during all the winter and most of the spring season. Interannual snow variability in these areas has a strong and straight influence on the amount and seasonality of river regimes at the bottom of the valley where most of the population and water requirements are concentrated. The present study analyzes the temporal and spatial variability of the fluvial regimes in Andorra and seeks to understand the interplay of different topographic and climatic variables on this variability. For example, in mountainous regions temperature determines the state of precipitation and this state can significantly affect runoff formation. The interannual temporal and spatial variability of temperatures, pluviometry and different snow indices such as snow heights and days with snow on the ground has been studied for the last decade and correlated with the fluvial dynamics and its variability using discharge measurements. This study focus especially in the assessment of the role of snow and its seasonality in the fluvial regime dynamics and the influence in the torrential flows and flood hazard. Flood hazard, force to take protection measures, which need information about flood frequency and magnitude. For this, flow instrumental series are used, but usually they do not consider phenomena like snowmelt. This study contributes intends to better understand the interplay between snow and fluvial dynamics and improve the assessment of the availability of water resources as well as the requirements in terms of protection measures.

  4. Identifying Biologically Relevant Cues in the Hydrologic Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovellford, R. M.; Flitcroft, R.; Santelmann, M. V.; Grant, G. E.; Safeeq, M.; Lewis, S.

    2012-12-01

    Seasonal variation in hydrologic discharge and temperature defines the availability, connectivity, and quality of lentic habitats. Native aquatic species are adapted to local hydrologic regimes , eg. magnitudes and rates of change . In recent decades, biologically relevant hydrologic conditions have been identified that are necessary to maintain habitat conditions for aquatic obligate species. Another element of hydrologic regimes important to aquatic species are the cues that inform individuals of seasonal changes that precipitate important physiological or behavioral alterations. There is a need for hydrologists, biologists, and ecologists, to define biologically significant cues within the hydrologic regime. Coho salmon (Onchorhynchus kisutch), an anadromous species of Pacific salmon, offers an example of sensitivity to environmental cues. Examinations of the run-timing of mature adult coho salmon on the North Umpqua River, OR, indicate that migration timing coincides with decreasing fall water temperatures prior to increasing winter discharge. For this species, adults leave the ocean ready to spawn. Adults need to spawn in small headwater streams prior to the onset of intense storm conditions that prohibit effective deposition or fertilization of eggs in redds (salmon nests).Therefore, the timing of spawning must be carefully executed. Understanding the cues that trigger specific behaviors gives insight to the processes that provide ecosystem stability and flexibility over time. Improved understanding of these cues may help us protect freshwater ecosystems and improve management for endangered species.

  5. Perspective: Single polymer mechanics across the force regimes [corrected].

    PubMed

    Saleh, Omar A

    2015-05-21

    I review theoretical and experimental results on the force-extension response of single polymers, with a focus on scaling pictures of low-force elastic regimes, and recent measurements of synthetic and biological chains that explore those regimes. The mechanical response of single polymers is an old theoretical problem whose exploration was instigated by the curious thermomechanical behavior of rubber. Up until the 1990s, the main utility of those calculations was to explain bulk material mechanics. However, in that decade, it became possible to directly test the calculations through high-precision single-chain stretching experiments (i.e., force spectroscopy). I present five major single-chain elasticity models, including scaling results based on blob-chain models, along with analytic results based on linear response theory, and those based on freely jointed chain or worm-like chain structure. Each model is discussed in terms of the regime of force for which it holds, along with the status of its rigorous assessment with experiment. Finally, I show how the experiments can provide new insight into polymer structure itself, with particular emphasis on polyelectrolytes. PMID:26001479

  6. Sustainability of Transient Kinetic Regimes and Origins of Death

    PubMed Central

    Zubarev, Dmitry Yu.; Pachón, Leonardo A.

    2016-01-01

    It is generally recognized that a distinguishing feature of life is its peculiar capability to avoid equilibration. The origin of this capability and its evolution along the timeline of abiogenesis is not yet understood. We propose to study an analog of this phenomenon that could emerge in non-biological systems. To this end, we introduce the concept of sustainability of transient kinetic regimes. This concept is illustrated via investigation of cooperative effects in an extended system of compartmentalized chemical oscillators under batch and semi-batch conditions. The computational study of a model system shows robust enhancement of lifetimes of the decaying oscillations which translates into the evolution of the survival function of the transient non-equilibrium regime. This model does not rely on any form of replication. Rather, it explores the role of a structured effective environment as a contributor to the system-bath interactions that define non-equilibrium regimes. We implicate the noise produced by the effective environment of a compartmentalized oscillator as the cause of the lifetime extension. PMID:26853459

  7. Sustainability of Transient Kinetic Regimes and Origins of Death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubarev, Dmitry Yu.; Pachón, Leonardo A.

    2016-02-01

    It is generally recognized that a distinguishing feature of life is its peculiar capability to avoid equilibration. The origin of this capability and its evolution along the timeline of abiogenesis is not yet understood. We propose to study an analog of this phenomenon that could emerge in non-biological systems. To this end, we introduce the concept of sustainability of transient kinetic regimes. This concept is illustrated via investigation of cooperative effects in an extended system of compartmentalized chemical oscillators under batch and semi-batch conditions. The computational study of a model system shows robust enhancement of lifetimes of the decaying oscillations which translates into the evolution of the survival function of the transient non-equilibrium regime. This model does not rely on any form of replication. Rather, it explores the role of a structured effective environment as a contributor to the system-bath interactions that define non-equilibrium regimes. We implicate the noise produced by the effective environment of a compartmentalized oscillator as the cause of the lifetime extension.

  8. Sustainability of Transient Kinetic Regimes and Origins of Death.

    PubMed

    Zubarev, Dmitry Yu; Pachón, Leonardo A

    2016-01-01

    It is generally recognized that a distinguishing feature of life is its peculiar capability to avoid equilibration. The origin of this capability and its evolution along the timeline of abiogenesis is not yet understood. We propose to study an analog of this phenomenon that could emerge in non-biological systems. To this end, we introduce the concept of sustainability of transient kinetic regimes. This concept is illustrated via investigation of cooperative effects in an extended system of compartmentalized chemical oscillators under batch and semi-batch conditions. The computational study of a model system shows robust enhancement of lifetimes of the decaying oscillations which translates into the evolution of the survival function of the transient non-equilibrium regime. This model does not rely on any form of replication. Rather, it explores the role of a structured effective environment as a contributor to the system-bath interactions that define non-equilibrium regimes. We implicate the noise produced by the effective environment of a compartmentalized oscillator as the cause of the lifetime extension. PMID:26853459

  9. Intermittency of rheological regimes in uniform liquid-granular flows.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Aronne; Larcher, Michele; Fraccarollo, Luigi

    2009-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a free surface-saturated liquid-granular mixture flowing over a static loose bed of grains, where the coexistence of layers dominated by collisional and frictional interactions among particles was observed. Kinetic theory was applied to the flow described above and it proved suitable for describing a realistic behavior of the collisional layers, although it failed to interpret the regions of the flow domain dominated by the frictional contacts. The paper provides a conceptual scheme with which to overcome this problem by focusing on the mechanisms governing the transition from the frictional to the collisional regime. In particular we observed that in highly concentrated flows the transition layer exhibits a typical intermittency of the dominating rheological regime, switching alternately from the frictional to the collisional one. By filtering the velocity signal, we introduced an intermittency function that made it possible to extend the validity of the equations derived from dense gas analogy, typical of the collisional regimes, also in the intermittent phase of the flow. Owing to the small values of the Stokes number, in the application of the kinetic theory we accounted for the possible variation of the elastic restitution coefficient along the flow depth. PMID:19518448

  10. Socioecological regime shifts in the setting of complex social interactions.

    PubMed

    Sugiarto, Hendrik Santoso; Chung, Ning Ning; Lai, Choy Heng; Chew, Lock Yue

    2015-06-01

    The coupling between social and ecological system has become more ubiquitous and predominant in the current era. The strong interaction between these systems can bring about regime shifts which in the extreme can lead to the collapse of social cooperation and the extinction of ecological resources. In this paper, we study the occurrence of such regime shifts in the context of a coupled social-ecological system where social cooperation is established by means of sanction that punishes local selfish act and promotes norms that prescribe nonexcessive resource extraction. In particular, we investigate the role of social networks on social-ecological regimes shift and the corresponding hysteresis effects caused by the local ostracism mechanism under different social and ecological parameters. Our results show that a lowering of network degree reduces the hysteresis effect and also alters the tipping point, which is duly verified by our numerical results and analytical estimation. Interestingly, the hysteresis effect is found to be stronger in scale-free network in comparison with random network even when both networks have the same average degree. These results provide deeper insights into the resilience of these systems, and can have important implications on the management of coupled social-ecological systems with complex social interactions. PMID:26172751

  11. Socioecological regime shifts in the setting of complex social interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiarto, Hendrik Santoso; Chung, Ning Ning; Lai, Choy Heng; Chew, Lock Yue

    2015-06-01

    The coupling between social and ecological system has become more ubiquitous and predominant in the current era. The strong interaction between these systems can bring about regime shifts which in the extreme can lead to the collapse of social cooperation and the extinction of ecological resources. In this paper, we study the occurrence of such regime shifts in the context of a coupled social-ecological system where social cooperation is established by means of sanction that punishes local selfish act and promotes norms that prescribe nonexcessive resource extraction. In particular, we investigate the role of social networks on social-ecological regimes shift and the corresponding hysteresis effects caused by the local ostracism mechanism under different social and ecological parameters. Our results show that a lowering of network degree reduces the hysteresis effect and also alters the tipping point, which is duly verified by our numerical results and analytical estimation. Interestingly, the hysteresis effect is found to be stronger in scale-free network in comparison with random network even when both networks have the same average degree. These results provide deeper insights into the resilience of these systems, and can have important implications on the management of coupled social-ecological systems with complex social interactions.

  12. Can global hydrological models reproduce large scale river flood regimes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, Stephanie; Flörke, Martina

    2013-04-01

    River flooding remains one of the most severe natural hazards. On the one hand, major flood events pose a serious threat to human well-being, causing deaths and considerable economic damage. On the other hand, the periodic occurrence of flood pulses is crucial to maintain the functioning of riverine floodplains and wetlands, and to preserve the ecosystem services the latter provide. In many regions, river floods reveal a distinct seasonality, i.e. they occur at a particular time during the year. This seasonality is related to regionally dominant flood generating processes which can be expressed in river flood types. While in data-rich regions (esp. Europe and North America) the analysis of flood regimes can be based on observed river discharge time series, this data is sparse or lacking in many other regions of the world. This gap of knowledge can be filled by global modeling approaches. However, to date most global modeling studies have focused on mean annual or monthly water availability and their change over time while simulating discharge extremes, both floods and droughts, still remains a challenge for large scale hydrological models. This study will explore the ability of the global hydrological model WaterGAP3 to simulate the large scale patterns of river flood regimes, represented by seasonal pattern and the dominant flood type. WaterGAP3 simulates the global terrestrial water balance on a 5 arc minute spatial grid (excluding Greenland and Antarctica) at a daily time step. The model accounts for human interference on river flow, i.e. water abstraction for various purposes, e.g. irrigation, and flow regulation by large dams and reservoirs. Our analysis will provide insight in the general ability of global hydrological models to reproduce river flood regimes and thus will promote the creation of a global map of river flood regimes to provide a spatially inclusive and comprehensive picture. Understanding present-day flood regimes can support both flood risk

  13. The human dimension of fire regimes on Earth

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, David M J S; Balch, Jennifer; Artaxo, Paulo; Bond, William J; Cochrane, Mark A; D'Antonio, Carla M; DeFries, Ruth; Johnston, Fay H; Keeley, Jon E; Krawchuk, Meg A; Kull, Christian A; Mack, Michelle; Moritz, Max A; Pyne, Stephen; Roos, Christopher I; Scott, Andrew C; Sodhi, Navjot S; Swetnam, Thomas W; Whittaker, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Humans and their ancestors are unique in being a fire-making species, but ‘natural’ (i.e. independent of humans) fires have an ancient, geological history on Earth. Natural fires have influenced biological evolution and global biogeochemical cycles, making fire integral to the functioning of some biomes. Globally, debate rages about the impact on ecosystems of prehistoric human-set fires, with views ranging from catastrophic to negligible. Understanding of the diversity of human fire regimes on Earth in the past, present and future remains rudimentary. It remains uncertain how humans have caused a departure from ‘natural’ background levels that vary with climate change. Available evidence shows that modern humans can increase or decrease background levels of natural fire activity by clearing forests, promoting grazing, dispersing plants, altering ignition patterns and actively suppressing fires, thereby causing substantial ecosystem changes and loss of biodiversity. Some of these contemporary fire regimes cause substantial economic disruptions owing to the destruction of infrastructure, degradation of ecosystem services, loss of life, and smoke-related health effects. These episodic disasters help frame negative public attitudes towards landscape fires, despite the need for burning to sustain some ecosystems. Greenhouse gas-induced warming and changes in the hydrological cycle may increase the occurrence of large, severe fires, with potentially significant feedbacks to the Earth system. Improved understanding of human fire regimes demands: (1) better data on past and current human influences on fire regimes to enable global comparative analyses, (2) a greater understanding of different cultural traditions of landscape burning and their positive and negative social, economic and ecological effects, and (3) more realistic representations of anthropogenic fire in global vegetation and climate change models. We provide an historical framework to promote

  14. Fire regimes of quaking aspen in the Mountain West

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinneman, Douglas J.; Baker, William L.; Rogers, Paul C.; Kulakowski, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is the most widespread tree species in North America, and it is found throughout much of the Mountain West (MW) across a broad range of bioclimatic regions. Aspen typically regenerates asexually and prolifically after fire, and due to its seral status in many western conifer forests, aspen is often considered dependent upon disturbance for persistence. In many landscapes, historical evidence for post-fire aspen establishment is clear, and following extended fire-free periods senescing or declining aspen overstories sometimes lack adequate regeneration and are succeeding to conifers. However, aspen also forms relatively stable stands that contain little or no evidence of historical fire. In fact, aspen woodlands range from highly fire-dependent, seral communities to relatively stable, self-replacing, non-seral communities that do not require fire for persistence. Given the broad geographic distribution of aspen, fire regimes in these forests likely co-vary spatially with changing community composition, landscape setting, and climate, and temporally with land use and climate – but relatively few studies have explicitly focused on these important spatiotemporal variations. Here we reviewed the literature to summarize aspen fire regimes in the western US and highlight knowledge gaps. We found that only about one-fourth of the 46 research papers assessed for this review could be considered fire history studies (in which mean fire intervals were calculated), and all but one of these were based primarily on data from fire-scarred conifers. Nearly half of the studies reported at least some evidence of persistent aspen in the absence of fire. We also found that large portions of the MW have had little or no aspen fire history research. As a result of this review, we put forth a classification framework for aspen that is defined by key fire regime parameters (fire severity and probability), and that reflects underlying biophysical

  15. INTERFACIAL AREA TRANSPORT AND REGIME TRANSITION IN COMBINATORIAL CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Seugjin Kim

    2011-01-28

    . This study investigates the geometric effects of 90-degree vertical elbows and flow configurations in two-phase flow. The study shows that the elbows make a significant effect on the transport characteristics of two-phase flow, which includes the changes in interfacial structures, bubble interaction mechanisms and flow regime transition. The effect of the elbows is characterized for global and local two-phase flow parameters. The global two-phase flow parameters include two-phase pressure, interfacial structures and flow regime transition. In order to characterize the frictional pressure drop and minor loss across the vertical elbows, pressure measurements are obtained across the test section over a wide range of flow conditions in both single-phase and two-phase flow conditions. A two-phase pressure drop correlation analogous to Lockhart-Martinelli correlation is proposed to predict the minor loss across the elbows. A high speed camera is employed to perform extensive flow visualization studies across the elbows in vertical upward, horizontal and vertical downward sections and modified flow regime maps are proposed. It is found that modified flow regime maps immediately downstream of the vertical upward elbow deviate significantly from the conventional flow regime map. A qualitative assessment of the counter-current flow limitation characteristics specific to the current experimental facility is performed. A multi-sensor conductivity probe is used to measure local two-phase flow parameters such as: void fraction, bubble velocity, interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency. The local measurements are obtained for six different flow conditions at ten measurement locations along axial direction of the test section. Both the vertical-upward and vertical-downward elbows have a significant impact on bubble distribution, resulting in, a bimodal distribution along the horizontal radius of the tube cross-section and migration of bubbles towards the inside of the

  16. Experimental floods cause ecosystem regime shift in a regulated river.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Christopher T; Uehlinger, Urs

    2008-03-01

    Reservoirs have altered the flow regime of most rivers on the globe. To simulate the natural flow regime, experimental floods are being implemented on regulated rivers throughout the world to improve their ecological integrity. As a large-scale disturbance, the long-term sequential use of floods provides an excellent empirical approach to examine ecosystem regime shifts in rivers. This study evaluated the long-term effects of floods (15 floods over eight years) on a regulated river. We hypothesized that sequential floods over time would cause a regime shift in the ecosystem. The floods resulted in little change in the physicochemistry of the river, although particulate organic carbon and particulate phosphorus were lower after the floods. The floods eliminated moss cover on bed sediments within the first year of flooding and maintained low periphyton biomass and benthic organic matter after the third year of flooding. Organic matter in transport was reduced after the third year of flooding, although peaks were still observed during rain events due to tributary inputs and side slopes. The floods reduced macroinvertebrate richness and biomass after the first year of floods, but density was not reduced until the third year. The individual mass of invertebrates decreased by about one-half after the floods. Specific taxa displayed either a loss in abundance, or an increase in abundance, or an increase followed by a loss after the third year. The first three flood years were periods of nonequilibrium with coefficients of variation in all measured parameters increasing two to five times from those before the floods. Coefficients of variation decreased after the third year, although they were still higher than before the floods. Analysis of concordance using Kendall's W confirmed the temporal changes observed in macroinvertebrate assemblage structure. An assessment of individual flood effects showed that later floods had approximately 30% less effect on macroinvertebrates

  17. Hydrological regime modifications induced by climate change in Mediterranean area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumo, Dario; Caracciolo, Domenico; Viola, Francesco; Valerio Noto, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge of river flow regimes has a capital importance for a variety of practical applications, in water resource management, including optimal and sustainable use. Hydrological regime is highly dependent on climatic factors, among which the most important is surely the precipitation, in terms of frequency, seasonal distribution and intensity of rainfall events. The streamflow frequency regime of river basins are often summarized by flow duration curves (FDCs), that offer a simple and comprehensive graphical view of the overall historical variability associated with streamflow, and characterize the ability of the basin to provide flows of various magnitudes. Climate change is likely to lead shifts in the hydrological regime, and, consequently, in the FDCs. Staring from this premise, the primary objective of the present study is to explore the effects of potential climate changes on the hydrological regime of some small Mediterranean basins. To this aim it is here used a recent hydrological model, the ModABa model (MODel for Annual flow duration curves assessment in ephemeral small BAsins), for the probabilistic characterization of the daily streamflows in small catchments. The model has been calibrated and successively validated in a unique small catchment, where it has shown a satisfactory accuracy in reproducing the empirical FDC starting from easily derivable parameters arising from basic ecohydrological knowledge of the basin and commonly available climatic data such as daily precipitation and temperatures. Thus, this work also represents a first attempt to apply the ModABa to basins different from that used for its preliminary design in order to testing its generality. Different case studies are selected within the Sicily region; the model is first calibrated at the sites and then forced by future climatic scenarios, highlighting the principal differences emerging from the current scenario and future FDCs. The future climate scenarios are generated using

  18. Human impacts on river ice regime in the Carpathian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, Katalin; Nagy, Balázs; Kern, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    River ice is a very important component of the cryosphere, and is especially sensitive to climatic variability. Historical records of appearance or disappearance and timing of ice phenomena are useful indicators for past climatic variations (Williams, 1970). Long-term observations of river ice freeze-up and break-up dates are available for many rivers in the temperate or cold region to detect and analyze the effects of climate change on river ice regime. The ice regime of natural rivers is influenced by climatic, hydrological and morphological factors. Regular ice phenomena observation mostly dates back to the 19th century. During this long-term observation period, the human interventions affecting the hydrological and morphological factors have become more and more intensive (Beltaos and Prowse, 2009). The anthropogenic effects, such as river regulation, hydropower use or water pollution causes different changes in river ice regime (Ashton, 1986). To decrease the occurrence of floods and control the water discharge, nowadays most of the rivers are regulated. River regulation changes the morphological parameters of the river bed: the aim is to create solid and equable bed size and stream gradient to prevent river ice congestion. For the satisfaction of increasing water demands hydropower is also used. River damming results a condition like a lake upstream to the barrage; the flow velocity and the turbulence are low, so this might be favourable for river ice appearance and freeze-up (Starosolsky, 1990). Water pollution affects ice regime in two ways; certain water contaminants change the physical characteristics of the water, e.g. lessens the freezing point of the water. Moreover the thermal stress effect of industrial cooling water and communal wastewater is also important; in winter these water sources are usually warmer, than the water body of the river. These interventions result different changes in the characteristic features of river ice regime. Selected

  19. Extending the collisional fluid equations into the long mean-free-path regime in toroidal plasmas. IV. Banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.

    2007-11-15

    In Part I [Phys. Fluids B 2, 1190 (1990)] and Part II [Phys. Plasmas 12, 082508 (2005)], it was emphasized that the equilibrium plasma viscous forces when applied for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes are only rigorously valid at the mode rational surface where m-nq=0. Here, m is the poloidal mode number, n is the toroidal mode number, and q is the safety factor. This important fact has been demonstrated explicitly by calculating the viscous forces in the plateau regime in Parts I and II. Here, the effective viscous forces in the banana regime are calculated for MHD modes by solving the linear drift kinetic equation that is driven by the plasma flows first derived in Part I. At the mode rational surface, the equilibrium plasma viscous forces are reproduced. However, it is found that away from the mode rational surface, the viscous forces for MHD modes decrease, a behavior similar to that observed in the viscous forces for the plateau regime. The proper form of the momentum equation that is appropriate for the modeling of the MHD modes is also discussed.

  20. North Atlantic weather regimes: A synoptic study of phase space. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orrhede, Anna Karin

    1990-01-01

    In the phase space of weather, low frequency variability (LFV) of the atmosphere can be captured in a large scale subspace, where a trajectory connects consecutive large scale weather maps, thus revealing flow changes and recurrences. Using this approach, Vautard applied the trajectory speed minimization method (Vautard and Legras) to atmospheric data. From 37 winters of 700 mb geopotential height anomalies over the North Atlantic and the adjacent land masses, four persistent and recurrent weather patterns, interpreted as weather regimes, were discernable: a blocking regime, a zonal regime, a Greenland anticyclone regime, and an Atlantic regime. These regimes are studied further in terms of maintenance and transitions. A regime survey unveils preferences regarding event durations and precursors for the onset or break of an event. The transition frequencies between regimes vary, and together with the transition times, suggest the existence of easier transition routes. These matters are more systematically studied using complete synoptic map sequences from a number of events.

  1. Film thickness for different regimes of fluid-film lubrication. [elliptical contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Mathematical formulas are presented which express the dimensionless minimum film thickness for the four lubrication regimes found in elliptical contacts: isoviscous-rigid regime; piezoviscous-rigid regime; isoviscous-elastic regime; and piezoviscous-elastic regime. The relative importance of pressure on elastic distortion and lubricant viscosity is the factor that distinguishes these regimes for a given conjunction geometry. In addition, these equations were used to develop maps of the lubrication regimes by plotting film thickness contours on a log-log grid of the dimensionless viscosity and elasticity parameters for three values of the ellipticity parameter. These results present a complete theoretical film thickness parameter solution for elliptical constants in the four lubrication regimes. The results are particularly useful in initial investigations of many practical lubrication problems involving elliptical conjunctions.

  2. Characteristics of Whipple Shield Performance in the Shatter Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Bjorkman, Michael; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    Between the onset of projectile fragmentation and the assumption of rear wall failure due to an impulsive load, multi-wall ballistic limit equations are linearly interpolated to provide reasonable yet conservative predictions of perforation thresholds with conveniently simple mathematics. Although low velocity and hypervelocity regime predictions are based on analytical expressions, there is no such scientific foundation for predictions in the intermediate (or shatter) regime. As the debris flux in low earth orbit (LEO) becomes increasingly dominated by manmade pollution, the profile of micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) risk shifts continually towards lower velocities. For the International Space Station (ISS), encounter velocities below 7 km/s now constitute approximately 50% of the penetration risk. Considering that the transition velocity from shatter to hypervelocity impact regimes described by common ballistic limit equations (e.g. new non-optimum Whipple shield equation [1]) occurs at 7 km/s, 50% of station risk is now calculated based on failure limit equations with little analytical foundation. To investigate projectile and shield behavior for impact conditions leading to projectile fragmentation and melt, a series of hypervelocity impact tests have been performed on aluminum Whipple shields. In the experiments projectile diameter, bumper thickness, and shield spacing were kept constant, while rear wall thickness was adjusted to determine spallation and perforation limits at various impact velocities and angles. The results, shown in Figure 1 for normal and 45 impacts, demonstrated behavior that was not sufficiently described by the simplified linear interpolation of the NNO equation (also shown in Figure 1). Hopkins et al. [2] investigated the performance of a nominally-identical aluminum Whipple shield, identifying the effects of phase change in the shatter regime. The results (conceptually represented in Figure 2) were found to agree well with

  3. Misanthropy without borders: the international children's rights regime.

    PubMed

    Pupavac, V

    2001-06-01

    The issue of children's rights has become key to human rights-based international security strategies. The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989) is being operationalised in complex political emergencies. Children's rights now inform humanitarian principles. Universal concern for children is viewed as transcending political and social divides and able to mobilise societies to confront social problems and prevent war. The operationalisation of child rights is accompanied by the development of psycho-social programmes to rehabilitate the child victim. Critically analysing the implications of the children's rights regime for the right to self-determination, the paper unpacks the assumptions underlying children's rights and psycho-social intervention. The paper begins by examining the conceptualisation of the rights-holding subject universalised under the UN Convention and then goes on to consider Article 39 on the right to psycho-social intervention. Equally important as the novel conceptualisation of childhood and children's rights under the international children's rights regime is the (unspoken) mistrust of adulthood and political rights that informs the imperative to institutionalise children's rights as higher law. Moreover while the rights-based approach consciously sought to move away from the earlier moralising child-salvation model, psycho-social rehabilitation reveals a similar preoccupation with deviancy, but conducted through the paradigm of psychological functionalism. Rather than representing a trend towards more humane international relations, the paper suggests that the elevation of children's rights is premised on a profound disenchantment with humanity. The logical implication of the international children's rights regime is to challenge both the moral and political capacity of individuals and their right to self-determination and to institutionalise a more unequal international system. PMID:11434237

  4. Hydrological regime of Lake Adygine, Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falátková, Kristýna; Šobr, Miroslav; Kocum, Jan; Janský, Bohumír

    2014-05-01

    Glacier retreat in high mountain areas around the world is considered one of the major geosciences research topics of last decades. This process may result in formation and further development of glacial lakes that are often unstable and pose a threat to downstream valleys. The studied area is situated at the end of a tributary valley on the northern side of Kyrgyz range, about 40 km south of the capital - Bishkek. Glaciers of Central Tien Shan are considered very sensitive indicators of climate change. The studied lake is part of a system of young lakes situated near the front of a retreating glacier therefore it ranks among potentially dangerous ones. The area is closely observed, terrain research including bathymetric, geophysical, geodetic measurements was carried out during last ten years. The lake level and its dependence on the changing climatic conditions in the area have been monitored in detail at this location since August 2007. Data from two meteorological stations are used to explain lake water level fluctuations, especially during ablation season when the lake is drained by a surface channel. The hydrological regime of the lake is compared with a regime of glacial streams, individual factors that affect it are described and possible trends and uncertainties that arise from it are analysed. The lake is also drained by subsurface channels, and as the water level declines over the cold part of a year, their capacity is studied and compared among years. The main aim of the study is to explain any deviations or changes found in the hydrological regime of the lake and to decide whether their cause could mean a decreased stability of the lake dam. Part of the dam is made up of moraine with buried ice and as the lake is drained by subsurface channels, their capacity can be changed due to moraine subsidence when the ice melts. This may lead either to sudden enlargement of channels' capacity or to their blockage, both of which could cause lake outburst.

  5. Evolution of human-driven fire regimes in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, Sally; Staver, A. Carla; Levin, Simon A.

    2012-01-01

    Human ability to manipulate fire and the landscape has increased over evolutionary time, but the impact of this on fire regimes and consequences for biodiversity and biogeochemistry are hotly debated. Reconstructing historical changes in human-derived fire regimes empirically is challenging, but information is available on the timing of key human innovations and on current human impacts on fire; here we incorporate this knowledge into a spatially explicit fire propagation model. We explore how changes in population density, the ability to create fire, and the expansion of agropastoralism altered the extent and seasonal distribution of fire as modern humans arose and spread through Africa. Much emphasis has been placed on the positive effect of population density on ignition frequency, but our model suggests this is less important than changes in fire spread and connectivity that would have occurred as humans learned to light fires in the dry season and to transform the landscape through grazing and cultivation. Different landscapes show different limitations; we show that substantial human impacts on burned area would only have started ∼4,000 B.P. in open landscapes, whereas they could have altered fire regimes in closed/dissected landscapes by ∼40,000 B.P. Dry season fires have been the norm for the past 200–300 ky across all landscapes. The annual area burned in Africa probably peaked between 4 and 40 kya. These results agree with recent paleocarbon studies that suggest that the biomass burned today is less than in the recent past in subtropical countries. PMID:22184249

  6. Environmental controls on food web regimes: A fluvial perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Mary E.

    2006-02-01

    Because food web regimes control the biomass of primary producers (e.g., plants or algae), intermediate consumers (e.g., invertebrates), and large top predators (tuna, killer whales), they are of societal as well as academic interest. Some controls over food web regimes may be internal, but many are mediated by conditions or fluxes over large spatial scales. To understand locally observed changes in food webs, we must learn more about how environmental gradients and boundaries affect the fluxes of energy, materials, or organisms through landscapes or seascapes that influence local species interactions. Marine biologists and oceanographers have overcome formidable challenges of fieldwork on the high seas to make remarkable progress towards this goal. In river drainage networks, we have opportunities to address similar questions at smaller spatial scales, in ecosystems with clear physical structure and organization. Despite these advantages, we still have much to learn about linkages between fluxes from watershed landscapes and local food webs in river networks. Longitudinal (downstream) gradients in productivity, disturbance regimes, and habitat structure exert strong effects on the organisms and energy sources of river food webs, but their effects on species interactions are just beginning to be explored. In fluid ecosystems with less obvious physical structure, like the open ocean, discerning features that control the movement of organisms and affect food web dynamics is even more challenging. In both habitats, new sensing, tracing and mapping technologies have revealed how landscape or seascape features (e.g., watershed divides, ocean fronts or circulation cells) channel, contain or concentrate organisms, energy and materials. Field experiments and direct in situ observations of basic natural history, however, remain as vital as ever in interpreting the responses of biota to these features. We need field data that quantify the many spatial and temporal scales of

  7. Characteristics of Whipple Shield Performance in the Shatter Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, S.; Bjorkman, M.; Christiansen, E. L.

    2010-01-01

    Ballistic limit equations define the failure of metallic Whipple shields in three parts: low velocity, shatter, and hypervelocity. Failure limits in the shatter regime are based on a linear interpolation between the onset of projectile fragmentation, and impulsive rupture of the shield rear wall. A series of hypervelocity impact tests have been performed on aluminum alloy Whipple shields to investigate failure mechanisms and performance limits in the shatter regime. Test results demonstrated a more rapid increase in performance than predicted by the latest iteration of the JSC Whipple shield BLE following the onset of projectile fragmentation. This increase in performance was found to level out between 4.0-5.0 km/s, with a subsequent decrease in performance for velocities up to 6.0 km/s. For a detached spall failure criterion, the failure limit was found to continually decrease up to a velocity of 7.0 km/s, substantially varying from the BLE, while for perforation-based failure an increase in performance was observed. An existing phenomenological ballistic limit curve was found to provide a more accurate reproduction of shield behavior that the BLE, however a number of underlying assumptions such as the occurrence of complete projectile fragmentation and the effect on performance of incipient projectile melt were found to be inaccurate. A cratering relationship based on the largest residual fragment size has been derived for application at velocities between 3.0-4.0 km/s, and was shown to accurately reproduce the trends of the experimental data. Further investigation is required to allow a full analytical description of shatter regime performance for metallic Whipple shields.

  8. Investigating Satellite Microwave observations of Precipitation in Different Climate Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, N.; Ferraro, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Microwave satellite remote sensing of precipitation over land is a challenging problem due to the highly variable land surface emissivity, which, if not properly accounted for, can be much greater than the precipitation signal itself, especially in light rain/snow conditions. Additionally, surfaces such as arid land, deserts and snow cover have brightness temperature characteristics similar to precipitation Ongoing work by GPM microwave radiometer team is constructing databases through a variety of means, however, there is much uncertainty as to what is the optimal information needed for the wide array of sensors in the GPM constellation, including examination of regional conditions. The original data sets will focus on stratification by emissivity class, surface temperature and total perceptible water. We'll perform sensitivity studies to determine the potential role of ancillary data (e.g., land surface temperature, snow cover/water equivalent, etc.) to improve precipitation estimation over land in different climate regimes, including rain and snow. In other words, what information outside of the radiances can help describe the background and subsequent departures from it that are active precipitating regions? It is likely that this information will be a function of the various precipitation regimes. Statistical methods such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) will be utilized in this task. Databases from a variety of sources are being constructed. They include existing satellite microwave measurements of precipitating and non-precipitating conditions, ground radar precipitation rate estimates, surface emissivity climatology from satellites, surface temperature and TPW from NWP reanalysis. Results from the analysis of these databases with respect to the microwave precipitation sensitivity to the variety of environmental conditions in different climate regimes will be discussed.

  9. A Safety-Case Regime for Commercial Human Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgobba, T.; Trujillo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Currently the commercial human spaceflight community seems to be embracing the obsolete design principles of "fly-fix-fly", and betting on public acceptance of risks comparable to those of the early times of aviation industry. The nascent space tourism industry maintains that early safety regulations (apart public safety) would kill industry and that such regulations could be developed only later when substantial operational experience is gained. Truly, most of current commercial aviation safety regulations are based on prescriptive requirements (i.e. explicitly required design solution for an implicit goal), which have been incrementally developed over more than a half century of mass transportation by air, and cannot be in general directly applied to innovative systems. However modern complex safety-critical systems cannot risk catastrophic failures while their operational experience is being accumulated, for such reason they are developed through the so called safety-case regime. ESA is currently drafting a safety standard for its future human rated transportation systems that is based on such regime. Such standard can be easily tailored with few modifications and applied to the development of a sub-orbital commercial space vehicle. In any case, because the safety-case regime makes extensive use of generically formulated requirements, the support of skilled safety engineers fully integrated into the design team is required since the very beginning. Furthermore the safety certification team needs also to be experienced in the review of safety-case based designs. Finally a quantitative safety target needs to be included and verified as the ultimate "prove of goodness" of system design.

  10. Petrologic Regime Diagrams: Parameterizing Kinetic Controls on Vesiculation and Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.

    2014-12-01

    Regime diagrams are commonly employed in geophysical fluid dynamics to classify experimental results and, ideally, to define non-dimensional parameters that allow those results to be applied to natural systems. Petrologic experiments, in contrast, are typically run to mimic a specific natural system, and to infer conditions of magma storage, cooling or decompression. This approach has produced important insight into specific volcanoes, but the results are difficult to generalize. Additionally, very few experimental studies evaluate the vesiculation, crystallization and degassing histories of the same sample suite, an omission that is understandable given the time-consuming nature of the experiments and analysis, but which leaves important gaps in our general understanding of the interplay between gas exsolution, crystal formation and eruption dynamics. One way to bridge these gaps is to construct a regime diagram for conditions of vesiculation and crystallization. As both are controlled by the effective supercooling experienced by the magma during cooling or decompression, one key parameter is supersaturation, although in practice, decompression rate (cooling rate) are commonly used as proxies for supersaturation. Vesiculation and crystallization are also modulated by diffusion (dependent on individual species and melt viscosity), which can be simply approximated by melt composition. Using these parameters and published data for water-saturated decompression experiments, the following fields can be (partially) defined: (1) non-equilibrium volatile exsolution, (2) equilibrium volatile exsolution, and (3) exsolution accompanied by crystallization. Melt compositions, volatile contents and crystal textures of natural samples can be measured, and thus related (crudely) to the regime diagram. Additional information required for fully linking experiments and volcanic pyroclasts includes phase proportions (crystallization efficiency), pyroclast textures (phase change

  11. Effects of disturbance regime on carbohydrate reserves in meadow plants

    PubMed Central

    Janeček, Štěpán; Bartušková, Alena; Bartoš, Michael; Altman, Jan; de Bello, Francesco; Doležal, Jiří; Latzel, Vít; Lanta, Vojtěch; Lepš, Jan; Klimešová, Jitka

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate storage enables plants to tolerate both seasonally unfavourable conditions and recover from disturbance. Although short-term changes in storage levels due to disturbance are fairly well known, less is known about long-term changes in storage levels, especially in response to cessation of repeated disturbance. Additionally, whereas it is presumably the total amount (pool) of storage carbohydrate reserves that is of importance, typically carbohydrate concentrations are measured instead, as a proxy. We assessed changes in carbohydrate concentrations and pools in storage organs and changes in above- versus belowground biomass in response to mowing cessation in nine herbs from two meadows (dry and wet) at the (June) peak of vegetation development and the (October) growing season end 1 and 3 years after the change in the disturbance regime. We tested three hypotheses: (1) storage will increase with abandonment of mowing only in the first year after disturbance cessation, but not further increase subsequently, as high storage would hinder competitive ability; (2) storage will increase towards the end of the season in both disturbed and undisturbed plants; and (3) changes in carbohydrate concentrations are accurate predictors of changes in pools. Although species-specific changes in carbohydrate reserves occurred in the wet meadow, more general trends appeared in the dry meadow. There, plants accumulated higher carbohydrate reserves at the end of the season, especially in unmown plots. However, the reserves for plants in both disturbance regimes were the same at the growing season peak (June) in both examined years. The increase in storage of carbohydrates on unmown plots in October was manifested by increases of both storage organ biomass and carbohydrate concentration, whereas in mown plots, it was due only to increased carbohydrate concentration. Although concentrations and pools represent different aspects of plant carbohydrate economy, concentrations will

  12. Are there two regimes in strongly rotating turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baqui, Yasir Bin; Davidson, P. A.; Ranjan, Avishek

    2016-04-01

    We describe numerical experiments of freely decaying, rapidly rotating turbulence in which the Rossby number varies from Ro = O(1) down to Ro ˜ 0.02. Our central premise is that there exists two distinct dynamical regimes; one for Ro > 0.3 → 0.4, which is typical of most laboratory experiments, and another corresponding to Ro < 0.3, which covers most previous numerical studies. The case of Ro > 0.3 → 0.4 is reported in Baqui and Davidson ["A phenomenological theory of rotating turbulence," Phys. Fluids 27, 025107 (2015)] and is characterised by: (i) a growth of the parallel integral scale according to l|| ˜ l⊥Ωt; (ii) a dissipation law which is quite different from that predicted by weak-turbulence theories, specifically ɛ = βu3/l|| where the pre-factor β is a constant of order unity; and (iii) an inertial-range energy spectrum for both the parallel and perpendicular wavenumbers which scales as k-5/3, a scaling that has nothing to do with Kolmogorov's law in non-rotating turbulence. (Here, l|| is the integral length-scale parallel to the rotation vector Ω, l⊥ the integral length-scale perpendicular to Ω, u the integral scale velocity, and ɛ the viscous dissipation rate per unit mass.) By contrast, in the low-Ro regime, we find that l|| ˜ l⊥Ωt is replaced by l|| ˜ ut and there is no power-law scaling of the inertial range energy spectrum. While the dissipation law ɛ = βu3/l|| continues to hold at low Ro, at least approximately, the value of β now depends on Ro. It appears, therefore, that the dynamics of these two regimes are very different, and this may help explain why experimentalists and theoreticians sometimes present rather different interpretations of rotating turbulence.

  13. Climate-driven regime shift of a temperate marine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Wernberg, Thomas; Bennett, Scott; Babcock, Russell C; de Bettignies, Thibaut; Cure, Katherine; Depczynski, Martial; Dufois, Francois; Fromont, Jane; Fulton, Christopher J; Hovey, Renae K; Harvey, Euan S; Holmes, Thomas H; Kendrick, Gary A; Radford, Ben; Santana-Garcon, Julia; Saunders, Benjamin J; Smale, Dan A; Thomsen, Mads S; Tuckett, Chenae A; Tuya, Fernando; Vanderklift, Mathew A; Wilson, Shaun

    2016-07-01

    Ecosystem reconfigurations arising from climate-driven changes in species distributions are expected to have profound ecological, social, and economic implications. Here we reveal a rapid climate-driven regime shift of Australian temperate reef communities, which lost their defining kelp forests and became dominated by persistent seaweed turfs. After decades of ocean warming, extreme marine heat waves forced a 100-kilometer range contraction of extensive kelp forests and saw temperate species replaced by seaweeds, invertebrates, corals, and fishes characteristic of subtropical and tropical waters. This community-wide tropicalization fundamentally altered key ecological processes, suppressing the recovery of kelp forests. PMID:27387951

  14. Aerothermodynamic Characteristics in the Hypersonic Continuum-Rarefied Transitional Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher, E.; Moss, James N.

    2001-01-01

    Stagnation pressure and heating for cylinders and spheres representative of wing leading edges and nose sections for small-scale space transportation vehicles are presented for various Knudsen numbers at Earth entry conditions that bridge from the free molecular to continuum regimes. CFD, DSMC, and collisionless DSMC are used to span Knudsen numbers from 0.001 to 100 with the CFD/DSMC overlap at a Knudsen number of 0.01 and the DSMC/collisionless DSMC overlap at 10. The present results include density contours, density and temperature along the stagnation streamline for all cases, and stagnation pressure and heat transfer coefficient as a function of Knudsen number.

  15. The new regime for managing US—Mexican water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumme, Stephen P.

    1995-11-01

    United States-Mexican transboundary water resources management is presently experiencing significant reform resulting from long-term demographic processes in the border region and greater economic integration. The recently concluded North American Free Trade Agreement and supplementary environmental accord modify existing agreements and provide old institution with new mandates. Particularly affected is the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC), long the lead agency in binational water management. This essay reviews the development of the new water management regime against the two preceding phases of management reform and considers its implications for improved water management in the border region.

  16. Nonclassical radiation from thermal cavities in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

    PubMed

    Ridolfo, A; Savasta, S; Hartmann, M J

    2013-04-19

    Thermal or chaotic light sources emit radiation characterized by a slightly enhanced probability of emitting photons in bunches, described by a zero-delay second-order correlation function g((2))(0)=2. Here we explore photon-coincidence counting statistics of thermal cavities in the ultrastrong coupling regime, where the atom-cavity coupling rate becomes comparable to the cavity resonance frequency. We find that, depending on the system temperature and coupling rate, thermal photons escaping the cavity can display very different statistical behaviors, characterized by second-order correlation functions approaching zero or greatly exceeding two. PMID:23679600

  17. Canada on course to introduce permissive assisted dying regime.

    PubMed

    Schuklenk, Udo

    2016-08-01

    Canada's Supreme Court decided in February 2015 that the criminalisation of assisted dying in the country violates the country's citizens and residents constitutional rights. This paper reviews policy recommendations produced by a special expert advisory panel appointed by Canada's provinces and territories, where the responsibility for the provision of health care lies. It also reviews a similar document produced by a special federal parliamentary committee. Based on the review of these two milestone documents it is argued that a Canadian consensus seems to emerge that foreshadows a permissive regulatory regime in that country. PMID:27009981

  18. Arrest of Domain Coarsening via Antiperiodic Regimes in Delay Systems.

    PubMed

    Javaloyes, J; Ackemann, T; Hurtado, A

    2015-11-13

    Motionless domain walls representing connecting temporal or spatial orbits typically exist only for very specific parameters, around the so-called Maxwell point. This report introduces a novel mechanism for stabilizing temporal domain walls away from this peculiar equilibrium, opening up new possibilities to encode information in dynamical systems. It is based on antiperiodic regimes in a delayed system close to a bistable situation, leading to a cancellation of the average drift velocity. The results are demonstrated in a normal form model and experimentally in a laser with optical injection and delayed feedback. PMID:26613439

  19. The efficiency of Raman amplification in the wavebreaking regime

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Matthew R. Mikhailova, Julia M.; Toroker, Zeev; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2015-07-15

    We compare previous analytic predictions, Vlasov-Maxwell simulations, and particle-in-cell results with a new set of comprehensive one and two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in an effort to clarify apparent discrepancies between the predictions of different models for the efficiency of Raman amplification in the wavebreaking regime. We find reasonable agreement between our particle-in-cell simulations and previous results from Vlasov-Maxwell simulations and analytic work, suggesting a monotonic decrease in conversion efficiency for increased pump intensities past the wavebreaking threshold.

  20. Space-charge-limited flow in quantum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Lay Kee

    2005-10-01

    Space-charge-limited (SCL) flow has been an area of active research in the development of non-neutral plasma physics, high current diodes, high power microwave sources, vacuum microelectronics and sheath physics. According to the classical Child-Langmuir (CL) law for the planar diodes, the current density scales as 3/2's power of gap voltage and to the inverse squared power of gap spacing. In the past decade, there have been renewed interests in extending the classical CL law to multi-dimensional models both numerically and analytically. The study of SCL flow in quantum regime has also attracted considerable interests in the past 3 years [1-3]. With the recent advances in nanotechnology, electron beam with very high current density may be transported in a nano-scale gap with a relatively low gap voltage. In this new operating regime, where the electron wavelength is comparable or larger than the gap spacing, the quantum effects become important. In this talk, the quantum theory of CL law will be introduced to reveal that the classical CL law is enhanced by a large factor due to electron tunneling and exchange-correlation effects, and there is a new quantum scaling for the current density, which is proportional to the 1/2's power of gap voltage, and to the inverse fourth-power of gap spacing [1-2]. Quasi-2D and 3D models with finite emission area will be shown [3]. We will also show that the classical properties of the SCL flow such as bipolar flow, beam-loaded capacitance, transit time and noise will require a complete revision in the quantum regime. The implications of the emission law of Fowler-Nordheim in the presence of intense space charge over the nanometer scale will be discussed.[1] L. K. Ang, T. J. T. Kwan, and Y. Y. Lau, ``New Scaling of Child-Langmuir Law in the Quantum Regime,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 208303 (2003). [2] L. K. Ang, Y. Y. Lau, and T. J. T. Kwan, ``Simple Derivation of Quantum Scaling in Child-Langmuir law,'' IEEE Trans Plasma Sci. 32, 410

  1. Fast Magnetic Reconnection in the Plasmoid-Dominated Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Uzdensky, D. A.; Loureiro, N. F.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2010-12-03

    A conceptual model of resistive magnetic reconnection via a stochastic plasmoid chain is proposed. The global reconnection rate is shown to be independent of the Lundquist number. The distribution of fluxes in the plasmoids is shown to be an inverse-square law. It is argued that there is a finite probability of emergence of abnormally large plasmoids, which can disrupt the chain (and may be responsible for observable large abrupt events in solar flares and sawtooth crashes). A criterion for the transition from the resistive magnetohydrodynamic to the collisionless regime is provided.

  2. A Quasispecies Continuous Contact Model in a Critical Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratiev, Yuri; Pirogov, Sergey; Zhizhina, Elena

    2016-04-01

    We study a new non-equilibrium dynamical model: a marked continuous contact model in d-dimensional space (d ge 3). We prove that for certain values of rates (the critical regime) this system has the one-parameter family of invariant measures labelled by the spatial density of particles. Then we prove that the process starting from the marked Poisson measure converges to one of these invariant measures. In contrast with the continuous contact model studied earlier in Kondratiev (Infin Dimens Anal Quantum Probab Relat Top 11(2):231-258, 2008), now the spatial particle density is not a conserved quantity.

  3. Weather Regimes in the Pacific from a GCM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, K.; Hannachi, A.

    1995-07-01

    Weather regimes have been sought by examining the 500-mb streamfunction of the UGAMP GCM run for 10 yr at T42 resolution with perpetual January forcing. Five-day low-pass EOFs provide a low-order phase space in which to study dynamical aspects of the variability. The PNA pattern shows up as the first EOF over the Northern Hemisphere representing 12% of the variance, rising to 18.5% for Pacific-area-only EOFs.Within the phase space of three to five EOFs, two local minima of the area-averaged tendency (based on rotational velocity advection) are found. These two flow patterns both have a smaller implied tendency than the climatology and lie in the ±PNA regions of the phase space. It is suggested that these patterns may be acting as `fixed points' within the atmospheric attractor, encouraging persistent flows and the formation of weather regimes. These dynamical attracting points are compared with a more conventional means of identifying weather regimes using a statistical maximum likelihood analysis of all model states during the 10-yr GCM run. This analysis also indicates two preferred classes, separate from the climatology, in the ±PNA regions of phase space. These classes tend to be nearer the climatology than the dynamical states but have similar appearance otherwise.Finally the role of low-frequency transients are examined to improve the dynamical interpretation of the regime centers. The method is first demonstrated for the extended Lorenz model of Molteni et al. The fixed points of the GCM attractor are assumed to be steady solutions to the 500-mb vorticity equation in the absence of contributions from transient eddies. The eddy contributions to the climatological vorticity budget are first determined, and then the deviations from the climatology that could provide similar contributions to the budget are found. Again two states in the ±PNA regions of phase space are found to satisfy the above conditions. The authors speculate that the attractors themselves

  4. Efficient Attosecond Phenomena in the Relativistic {lambda}3 Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Naumova, Natalia; Mourou, Gerard; Nees, John

    2006-04-07

    Particle-in-cell simulations of relativistically strong laser pulses interacting with overdense plasma targets predict that coherent motion of electrons leads to the efficient generation of strong attosecond electromagnetic pulses and dense attosecond electron bunches. The optimal conditions for these attosecond phenomena are achieved in the {lambda}3 regime, when few-cycle laser pulses are focused to a wavelength-limited spot, producing maximal intensity and maximal gradients with a given energy. The natural synchronism of these attosecond phenomena should enable a kind of relativistic attosecond optoelectronics.

  5. Waveguide coupling in the few-cycle regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Hervé; Terniche, Said

    2016-04-01

    We consider the coupling of two optical waveguides in the few-cycle regime. The analysis is performed in the frame of a generalized Kadomtsev-Petviashvili model. A set of two coupled modified Korteweg-de Vries equations is derived, and it is shown that three types of coupling can occur, involving the linear index, the dispersion, or the nonlinearity. The linear nondispersive coupling is investigated numerically, showing the formation of vector solitons. Separate pulses may be trapped together if they have not initially the same location, size, or phase, and even if their initial frequencies differ.

  6. Fast magnetic reconnection in the plasmoid-dominated regime.

    PubMed

    Uzdensky, D A; Loureiro, N F; Schekochihin, A A

    2010-12-01

    A conceptual model of resistive magnetic reconnection via a stochastic plasmoid chain is proposed. The global reconnection rate is shown to be independent of the Lundquist number. The distribution of fluxes in the plasmoids is shown to be an inverse-square law. It is argued that there is a finite probability of emergence of abnormally large plasmoids, which can disrupt the chain (and may be responsible for observable large abrupt events in solar flares and sawtooth crashes). A criterion for the transition from the resistive magnetohydrodynamic to the collisionless regime is provided. PMID:21231473

  7. Metastable and scaling regimes of one-dimensional Kawasaki dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarracín, F. A. Gómez; Rosales, H. D.; Grynberg, M. D.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the large-time scaling regimes arising from a variety of metastable structures in a chain of Ising spins with both first- and second-neighbor couplings while subject to Kawasaki dynamics. Depending on the ratio and sign of these former, different dynamic exponents are suggested by finite-size scaling analyses of relaxation times. At low but nonzero temperatures these are calculated via exact diagonalizations of the evolution operator in finite chains under several activation barriers. In the absence of metastability the dynamics is always diffusive.

  8. Rapidity gap survival in the black-disk regime

    SciTech Connect

    Leonid Frankfurt; Charles Hyde; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-04-16

    We summarize how the approach to the black-disk regime (BDR) of strong interactions at TeV energies influences rapidity gap survival in exclusive hard diffraction pp -> p + H + p (H = dijet, Qbar Q, Higgs). Employing a recently developed partonic description of such processes, we discuss (a) the suppression of diffraction at small impact parameters by soft spectator interactions in the BDR; (b) further suppression by inelastic interactions of hard spectator partons in the BDR; (c) correlations between hard and soft interactions. Hard spectator interactions substantially reduce the rapidity gap survival probability at LHC energies compared to previously reported estimates.

  9. Experimental Bullard-von Karman dynamo: MHD saturated regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, Sophie; Plihon, Nicolas; Pinton, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    The dynamo instability, converting kinetic energy into magnetic energy, creates the magnetic fields of many astrophysical bodies for which the flows are highly turbulent. Those turbulent fluctuations restricts the range of parameters of numerical and theoretical predictions. As laboratory experiments are closer from natural parameters, this approach is favored in this work. In the past decades, dynamo action has been observed in experiments involving laminar flows [1] or fully turbulent flows [2] in liquid sodium. Nevertheless, the saturation of the velocity field by the Lorentz force due to the dynamo magnetic field is weak in those experiment because the control parameter is always close to the threshold of the instability (which is not the case in astrophysical situations). The details of the mechanism of the back reaction of Lorentz force on the flow are not known. We present here an experimental semi-synthetic dynamo, for which a fluid turbulent induction mechanism ('omega' effect) is associated to an external amplification applying a current into a pair of coils. The flow, called von-Karman, is produced by the counter rotation of two coaxial propellers in a cylindrical tank filled with liquid gallium. The resulting flow is highly turbulent (Re > 10 ^ 5). The amplification, mimicking a turbulent 'alpha' effect, allow to observe the dynamo instability at low magnetic Reynolds number (Rm ~ 2), far below the threshold of natural homogeneous dynamo. This experiment reaches non linear regimes, for which the saturation is a MHD process, at control parameter several times the critical value. The instability grows through an on-off intermittent regime evolving into a full MHD saturated regime for which the Lorentz force is in balance with the inertial one. The power budget is strongly modified by the dynamo magnetic field and we give an insight of the estimated rate of conversion of kinetic energy into magnetic one from experimental data. Very rich regimes such as

  10. Dispersion of doppleron-phonon modes in strong coupling regime.

    PubMed

    Gudkov, V V; Zhevstovskikh, I V

    2004-04-01

    The dispersion equation for doppleron-phonon modes was constructed and solved analytically in the strong coupling regime. The Fermi surface model proposed previously for calculating the doppleron spectrum in an indium crystal was used. It was shown that in the vicinity of doppleron-phonon resonance, the dispersion curves of coupled modes form a gap qualitatively different from the one observed under helicon-phonon resonance: there is a frequency interval forbidden for existence of waves of definite circular polarization depending upon direction of the external DC magnetic field. The physical reason for it is interaction of the waves which have oppositely directed group velocities. PMID:15047286

  11. Femtosecond nonlinear fiber optics in the ionization regime.

    PubMed

    Hölzer, P; Chang, W; Travers, J C; Nazarkin, A; Nold, J; Joly, N Y; Saleh, M F; Biancalana, F; Russell, P St J

    2011-11-11

    By using a gas-filled kagome-style photonic crystal fiber, nonlinear fiber optics is studied in the regime of optically induced ionization. The fiber offers low anomalous dispersion over a broad bandwidth and low loss. Sequences of blueshifted pulses are emitted when 65 fs, few-microjoule pulses, corresponding to high-order solitons, are launched into the fiber and undergo self-compression. The experimental results are confirmed by numerical simulations which suggest that free-electron densities of ∼10(17) cm(-3) are achieved at peak intensities of 10(14) W/cm(2) over length scales of several centimeters. PMID:22181732

  12. Star Mode - The improved operating regime of a Fusor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilley, Matthew; Niasse, Nicolas

    2013-10-01

    It was found in 1997, by G. H. Miley, that Fusors can operate in a regime where the effective transparency of the accelerating grid is greatly enhanced over the value one would traditionally expect from considering the fraction of area taken up by the grid wires. This ``Star Mode'' reduces the heating of the grid wires and so should in principle allow smaller devices to be constructed. At present there is no satisfactory explanation for this Star Mode. In this presentation we revisit some of the basic ideas and offer some new insights into the problem by considering how the discrete symmetry of the system affects the stability of the individual particle orbits.

  13. Non-equilibrium steady state in the hydro regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourhasan, Razieh

    2016-02-01

    We study the existence and properties of the non-equilibrium steady state which arises by putting two copies of systems at different temperatures into a thermal contact. We solve the problem for the relativistic systems that are described by the energy-momentum of a perfect hydro with general equation of state (EOS). In particular, we examine several simple examples: a hydro with a linear EOS, a holographic CFT perturbed by a relevant operator and a barotropic fluid, i.e., P=P({E}) . Our studies suggest that the formation of steady state is a universal result of the hydro regime regardless of the kind of fluid.

  14. Oscillatory regimes of the thermomagnetic instability in superconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestgârden, J. I.; Galperin, Y. M.; Johansen, T. H.

    2016-05-01

    The stability of superconducting films with respect to oscillatory precursor modes for thermomagnetic avalanches is investigated theoretically. The results for the onset threshold show that previous treatments of nonoscillatory modes have predicted much higher thresholds. Thus, in film superconductors, oscillatory modes are far more likely to cause thermomagnetic breakdown. This explains the experimental fact that flux avalanches in film superconductors can occur even at very small ramping rates of the applied magnetic field. Closed expressions for the threshold magnetic field and temperature, as well oscillation frequency, are derived for different regimes of the oscillatory thermomagnetic instability.

  15. Regime shifts in the Humboldt Current ecosystem [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alheit, Jürgen; Niquen, Miguel

    2004-02-01

    Of the four major eastern boundary currents, the Humboldt Current (HC) stands out because it is extremely productive, dominated by anchovy dynamics and subject to frequent direct environmental perturbations of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The long-term dynamics of the HC ecosystem are controlled by shifts between alternating anchovy and sardine regimes that restructure the entire ecosystem from phytoplankton to the top predators. These regime shifts are caused by lasting periods of warm or cold temperature anomalies related to the approach or retreat of warm subtropical oceanic waters to the coast of Peru and Chile. Phases with mainly negative temperature anomalies parallel anchovy regimes (1950-1970; 1985 to the present) and the rather warm period from 1970 to 1985 was characterized by sardine dominance. The transition periods (turning points) from one regime to the other were 1968-1970 and 1984-1986. Like an El Nino, the warm periods drastically change trophic relationships in the entire HC ecosystem, exposing the Peruvian anchovy to a multitude of adverse conditions. Positive temperature anomalies off Peru drive the anchovy population close to the coast as the coastal upwelling cells usually offer the coolest environment, thereby substantially decreasing the extent of the areas of anchovy distribution and spawning. This enhances the effects of negative density-dependent processes such as egg and larval cannibalism and dramatically increases its catchability. Increased spatial overlap between anchovies and the warmer water preferring sardines intensifies anchovy egg mortality further as sardines feed heavily on anchovy eggs. Food sources for juvenile and adult anchovies which prey on a mixed diet of phyto- and zooplankton are drastically reduced because of decreased plankton production due to restricted upwelling in warm years, as demonstrated by lower zooplankton and phytoplankton volumes and the diminution of the fraction of large copepods, their

  16. Margination Regimes and Drainage Transition in Confined Multicomponent Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henríquez Rivera, Rafael G.; Sinha, Kushal; Graham, Michael D.

    2015-05-01

    A mechanistic theory is developed to describe segregation in confined multicomponent suspensions such as blood. It incorporates the two key phenomena arising in these systems at low Reynolds number: hydrodynamic pair collisions and wall-induced migration. In simple shear flow, several regimes of segregation arise, depending on the value of a "margination parameter" M . Most importantly, there is a critical value of M below which a sharp "drainage transition" occurs: one component is completely depleted from the bulk flow to the vicinity of the walls. Direct simulations also exhibit this transition as the size or flexibility ratio of the components changes.

  17. Terahertz phase microscopy in the sub-wavelength regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Minwoo; Lee, Kanghee; Song, Jin-Dong; Ahn, Jaewook

    2012-04-01

    Gouy phase shift is a well-known behavior that occurs when a propagating light is focused, but its behavior in the sub-wavelength confinement is not yet known. Here, we report the theoretical and experimental study of the aperture-size dependency of the Gouy phase shift in the sub-wavelength diffraction regime. In experiments carried out with laser-induced terahertz (THz) wave emission from various semiconductor apertures, we demonstrate the use of Guoy phase shit for sub-wavelength THz microscopy.

  18. Conduction regime in innovative carbon nanotube via interconnect architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coiffic, J. C.; Fayolle, M.; Maitrejean, S.; Foa Torres, L. E. F.; Le Poche, H.

    2007-12-01

    We report on the electrical properties of multiwall carbon nanotube based via interconnects over a broad range of temperature and bias voltage. By using innovating processing techniques, high density nanotube vias have been fabricated from single damascene and double damascene via architectures with diameters down to 140nm. For single damascene structures, resistances as low as 20Ω have been achieved for 300nm via size. Further measurements show that the conductance increases with temperature following an exponential law, which can be interpreted in terms of a disordered quasi-one dimensional conduction regime.

  19. A second-order impact model for forest fire regimes.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Stefano; Rinaldi, Sergio

    2006-09-01

    We present a very simple "impact" model for the description of forest fires and show that it can mimic the known characteristics of wild fire regimes in savannas, boreal forests, and Mediterranean forests. Moreover, the distribution of burned biomasses in model generated fires resemble those of burned areas in numerous large forests around the world. The model has also the merits of being the first second-order model for forest fires and the first example of the use of impact models in the study of ecosystems. PMID:16723147

  20. Dynamics of aircraft exhaust plumes in the jet-regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärcher, B.; Fabian, P.

    1994-10-01

    A computational model describing the two-dimensional, turbulent mixing of a single jet of exhaust gas from aircraft engines with the ambient atmosphere is presented. The underlying assumptions and governing equations are examined and supplemented by a discussion of analytical solutions. As an application, the jet dynamics of a B747-400 aircraft engine in cruise and its dependence on key parameters is investigated in detail. The computer code for this dynamical model is computationally fast and can easily be coupled to complex chemical and microphysical models in order to perform comprehensive studies of atmospheric effects from aircraft exhaust emissions in the jet regime.

  1. Laser ablation dynamics in metals: The thermal regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzapesa, F. P.; Brambilla, M.; Dabbicco, M.; Scamarcio, G.; Columbo, L. L.; Ancona, A.; Sibillano, T.

    2012-07-02

    We studied the laser ablation dynamics of steel in the thermal regime both experimentally and theoretically. The real-time monitoring of the process shows that the ablation rate depends on laser energy density and ambient pressure during the exposure time. We demonstrated that the ablation efficiency can be enhanced when the pressure is reduced with respect to the atmospheric pressure for a given laser fluence, reaching an upper limit despite of high-vacuum conditions. An analytical model based on the Hertz-Knudsen law reproduces all the experimental results.

  2. M = 1 internal kink mode in the plateau and banana regimes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A.B.; Tsypin, V.S.

    1983-01-01

    A theory is derived for the m = 1 internal kink mode of a tokamak in the plateau and banana regimes. The growth rate for this mode in the plateau regime is shown to be smaller by a factor of a/R than the MHD prediction (a and R are the minor and major radii of the torus). The growth rate in the banana regime is higher than in the plateau regime and approaches the standard MHD value.

  3. Optimal ranking regime analysis of U.S. climate variablility. Part II: Precipitation and streamflow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a preceding companion paper the Optimal Ranking Regime (ORR) method was used to identify intra- to multi-decadal (IMD) regimes in U.S. climate division temperature data during 1896-2012. Here, the method is used to test for annual and seasonal precipitation regimes during that same period. In add...

  4. Higher Education Policy in Authoritarian Regimes: Comparative Perspectives on the Chilean Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Daniel

    A Chilean case study of higher education under an authoritarian regime is presented. The study restricts itself to the most prevalent sub-type of the authoritarian regime which is "bureaucratic-authoritarianism" (BA). The BA designation refers to regimes which exert considerable repressive control over societies that have undergone substantial…

  5. Funding Diversity: Performance-Based Funding Regimes as Drivers of Differentiation in Higher Education Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorlin, Sverker

    2007-01-01

    In most countries higher education institutions used to receive large portions of their funding by direct state allocation. For the past couple of decades this trust-based funding regime has been replaced by performance-based regimes. The article rests on the empirical observation that new funding regimes are increasingly becoming a policy…

  6. Loop Quantum Gravity and the Planck Regime of Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    The very early universe provides the best arena we currently have to test quantum gravity theories. The success of the inflationary paradigm in accounting for the observed inhomogeneities in the cosmic microwave background already illustrates this point to a certain extent because the paradigm is based on quantum field theory on the curved cosmological space-times. However, this analysis excludes the Planck era because the background space-time satisfies Einstein's equations all the way back to the big bang singularity. Using techniques from loop quantum gravity, the paradigm has now been extended to a self-consistent theory from the Planck regime to the onset of inflation, covering some 11 orders of magnitude in curvature. In addition, for a narrow window of initial conditions, there are departures from the standard paradigm, with novel effects, such as a modification of the consistency relation involving the scalar and tensor power spectra and a new source for non-Gaussianities. The genesis of the large scale structure of the universe can be traced back to quantum gravity fluctuations in the Planck regime. This report provides a bird's eye view of these developments for the general relativity community.

  7. Geothermal regime and thermal history of the Llanos Basin, Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Bachu, S.; Underschultz, J.R.; Ramon, J.C.; Villegas, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Llanos basin is a siliciclastic foreland sub-Andean sedimentary basin located in Columbia between the Cordillera Oriental and the Guyana Precambrian shield. Data on bottom-hole temperature, lithology, porosity, and vitrinite reflectance from all 318 wells drilled in the central and southern parts of the basin were used to analyze its geothermal regime and thermal history. Average geothermal gradients in the Llanos basin decrease generally with depth and westward toward the fold and thrust belt. The geothermal regime is controlled by a moderate, generally westward-decreasing basement heat flow, by depositional and compaction factors, and, in places, by advection by formation waters. Compaction leads to increased thermal conductivity with depth, whereas westward downdip flow in deep sandstone formations may exert a cooling effect in the central-western part of the basin. Vitrinite reflectance variation with depth shows a major discontinuity at the pre-Cretaceous unconformity. Areally, vitrinite reflectance increases southwestward in Paleozoic strata and northwestward in post-Paleozoic strata. These patterns indicate that the thermal history of the basin probably includes three thermal events that led to peaks in oil generation: a Paleozoic event in the southwest, a failed Cretaceous rifting event in the west, and an early Tertiary back-arc event in the west. Rapid cooling since the last thermal event is possibly caused by subhorizontal subduction of cold oceanic lithospheric plate.

  8. Intermittent flow regimes near the convection threshold in ferromagnetic nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauzina, Marina T.; Bozhko, Alexandra A.; Putin, Gennady F.; Suslov, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    The onset and decay of convection in a spherical cavity filled with ferromagnetic nanofluid and heated from below are investigated experimentally. It is found that, unlike in a single-component Newtonian fluid where stationary convection sets in as a result of supercritical bifurcation and where convection intensity increases continuously with the degree of supercriticality, convection in a multicomponent ferromagnetic nanofluid starts abruptly and has an oscillatory nature. The hysteresis is observed in the transition between conduction and convection states. In moderately supercritical regimes, the arising fluid motion observed at a fixed temperature difference intermittently transitions from quasiharmonic to essentially irregular oscillations that are followed by periods of a quasistationary convection. The observed oscillations are shown to result from the precession of the axis of a convection vortex in the equatorial plane. When the vertical temperature difference exceeds the convection onset value by a factor of 2.5, the initially oscillatory convection settles to a steady-state regime with no intermittent behavior detected afterward. The performed wavelet and Fourier analyses of thermocouple readings indicate the presence of various oscillatory modes with characteristic periods ranging from one hour to several days.

  9. Numerical simulation of dip-coating in the evaporative regime.

    PubMed

    Dey, Mohar; Doumenc, Frédéric; Guerrier, Béatrice

    2016-02-01

    A hydrodynamic model is used for numerical simulations of a polymer solution in a dip-coating-like experiment. We focus on the regime of small capillary numbers where the liquid flow is driven by evaporation, in contrast to the well-known Landau-Levich regime dominated by viscous forces. Lubrication approximation is used to describe the flow in the liquid phase. Evaporation in stagnant air is considered (diffusion-limited evaporation), which results in a coupling between liquid and gas phases. Self-patterning due to the solutal Marangoni effect is observed for some ranges of the control parameters. We first investigate the effect of evaporation rate on the deposit morphology. Then the role of the spatial variations in the evaporative flux on the wavelength and mean thickness of the dried deposit is ascertained, by comparing the 2D and 1D diffusion models for the gas phase. Finally, for the very low substrate velocities, we discuss the relative importance of diffusive and advective components of the polymer flux, and consequences on the choice of the boundary conditions. PMID:26920522

  10. Two-fluid MHD Regime of Drift Wave Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shang-Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Xie, Jin-Lin; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Drift wave instabilities contribute to the formation of edge turbulence and zonal flows, and thus are believed to play essential roles in the anomalous transport processes in tokamaks. Whereas drift waves are generally assumed to be local and electrostatic, experiments have often found regimes where the spatial scales and the magnetic components of drift waves approach those of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes. In this work we study such a drift wave regime in a cylindrical magnetized plasma using a full two-fluid MHD model implemented in the NIMROD code. The linear dependency of growth rates on resistivity and the dispersion relation found in the NIMROD calculations qualitatively agree with theoretical analysis. As the azimuthal mode number increases, the drift modes become highly localized radially; however, unlike the conventional local approximation, the radial profile of the drift mode tends to shift toward the edge away from the center of the density gradient slope, suggesting the inhomogeneity of two-fluid effects. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 11275200 and National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant 2014GB124002.

  11. Confined polymers in the extended de Gennes regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlig, Bernhard

    In the ''extended de Gennes regime'' the problem of describing the conformations of a semiflexible polymer confined to a channel can be mapped onto the weakly self-avoiding random-walk model. For large contour lengths the asymptotically exact solution of this model predicts how the conformational fluctuations of the confined polymer depend upon the channel dimensions and upon the physical properties of the polymer, its effective width and persistence length. The extended de Gennes regime (where the polymer is neither weakly nor strongly confined) has recently been studied intensively experimentally and by means of computer simulations of worm-like chain models. In this talk I explain the mapping, summarise the predictions derived from the exact solution, and compare the predictions to results of computer simulations [Dorfman et al.] and experiments [Westerlund et al.] of DNA molecules confined to nanochannels. I conclude by summarising open questions. This talk is mainly based on joint work with E. Werner [Phys Rev. E 90 (2014) 062602].

  12. Oscillations in the bistable regime of neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxin, Alex; Compte, Albert

    2016-07-01

    Bistability between attracting fixed points in neuronal networks has been hypothesized to underlie persistent activity observed in several cortical areas during working memory tasks. In network models this kind of bistability arises due to strong recurrent excitation, sufficient to generate a state of high activity created in a saddle-node (SN) bifurcation. On the other hand, canonical network models of excitatory and inhibitory neurons (E-I networks) robustly produce oscillatory states via a Hopf (H) bifurcation due to the E-I loop. This mechanism for generating oscillations has been invoked to explain the emergence of brain rhythms in the β to γ bands. Although both bistability and oscillatory activity have been intensively studied in network models, there has not been much focus on the coincidence of the two. Here we show that when oscillations emerge in E-I networks in the bistable regime, their phenomenology can be explained to a large extent by considering coincident SN and H bifurcations, known as a codimension two Takens-Bogdanov bifurcation. In particular, we find that such oscillations are not composed of a stable limit cycle, but rather are due to noise-driven oscillatory fluctuations. Furthermore, oscillations in the bistable regime can, in principle, have arbitrarily low frequency.

  13. Hydroperiod regime controls the organization of plant species in wetlands.

    PubMed

    Foti, Romano; del Jesus, Manuel; Rinaldo, Andrea; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2012-11-27

    With urban, agricultural, and industrial needs growing throughout the past decades, wetland ecosystems have experienced profound changes. Most critically, the biodiversity of wetlands is intimately linked to its hydrologic dynamics, which in turn are being drastically altered by ongoing climate changes. Hydroperiod regimes, e.g., percentage of time a site is inundated, exert critical control in the creation of niches for different plant species in wetlands. However, the spatial signatures of the organization of plant species in wetlands and how the different drivers interact to yield such signatures are unknown. Focusing on Everglades National Park (ENP) in Florida, we show here that cluster sizes of each species follow a power law probability distribution and that such clusters have well-defined fractal characteristics. Moreover, we individuate and model those signatures via the interplay between global forcings arising from the hydroperiod regime and local controls exerted by neighboring vegetation. With power law clustering often associated with systems near critical transitions, our findings are highly relevant for the management of wetland ecosystems. In addition, our results show that changes in climate and land management have a quantifiable predictable impact on the type of vegetation and its spatial organization in wetlands. PMID:23150589

  14. Oscillations in the bistable regime of neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Roxin, Alex; Compte, Albert

    2016-07-01

    Bistability between attracting fixed points in neuronal networks has been hypothesized to underlie persistent activity observed in several cortical areas during working memory tasks. In network models this kind of bistability arises due to strong recurrent excitation, sufficient to generate a state of high activity created in a saddle-node (SN) bifurcation. On the other hand, canonical network models of excitatory and inhibitory neurons (E-I networks) robustly produce oscillatory states via a Hopf (H) bifurcation due to the E-I loop. This mechanism for generating oscillations has been invoked to explain the emergence of brain rhythms in the β to γ bands. Although both bistability and oscillatory activity have been intensively studied in network models, there has not been much focus on the coincidence of the two. Here we show that when oscillations emerge in E-I networks in the bistable regime, their phenomenology can be explained to a large extent by considering coincident SN and H bifurcations, known as a codimension two Takens-Bogdanov bifurcation. In particular, we find that such oscillations are not composed of a stable limit cycle, but rather are due to noise-driven oscillatory fluctuations. Furthermore, oscillations in the bistable regime can, in principle, have arbitrarily low frequency. PMID:27575167

  15. Impurity accumulation in plasma regimes with high energy confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, L. B.; Roberts, D. E.; Yang, H. R.; Dodel, G.; Gentle, K.; Von Goeler, S.; Holzhauer, E.; Hübner, K.; Keilhacker, M.; Korotkov, A.; Luce, T. C.; Miura, Y.; Tsois, N.; Würz, H.; Fussmann, G.; Hofmann, J.; Janeschitz, G.; Krieger, K.; Müller, E. R.; Nolte, R.; Röhr, H.; Steuer, K. H.; Becker, G.; Bomba, B.; Bruhns, H.; Büchl, K.; Carlson, A.; Eberhagen, A.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Giannone, L.; Von Gierke, G.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Herrmann, H.; Kaesdorf, S.; Karger, F.; Kaufmann, M.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lang, R.; Lee, P.; Lisitano, G.; Mast, F.; Mayer, H. M.; McCormick, K.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Murmann, H.; Neuhauser, J.; Niedermeyer, H.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Poschenrieder, W.; Preis, R.; Rapp, H.; Rudyj, A.; Sandmann, W.; Schneider, F.; Schnider, U.; Siller, G.; Simmet, E.; Speth, E.; Söldner, F.; Stäbler, A.; Steinmetz, K.; Stroth, U.; Vollmer, O.; Zasche, D.

    1989-04-01

    Investigations of impurity accumulation phenomena in ASDEX are reviewed. There are four different operating regimes where pronounced accumulation is observed and these regimes are also characterized by improved energy confinement. In particular, medium-Z metallic ions are involved in accumulation processes whereas low-Z ions appear almost unaffected. The rapid accumulation observed in the case of metallic ions may be explained by neoclassical inward drifts if we assume that the anomalous diffusion is sufficiently suppressed, some indication of this being found from laser blow-off studies. The present results, however, can only be partly explained by neoclassical theory, according to which accumulation of low-Z impurities should also occur. The temporal behaviour of accumulation and the retarding effect of proton dilution for collision dominated transport are also discussed. Finally, we conclude that the full benefits of improved energy confinement can be achieved only if the impurity influxes are kept to a sufficiently low level. Expressed in terms of concentrations under low confinement conditions we have to postulate, for ASDEX, concentrations ≲ 10 -4 for metals and ≲ 2% for all light impurities.

  16. Cold-Strontium Laser in the Superradiant Crossover Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norcia, Matthew A.; Thompson, James K.

    2016-01-01

    Today's narrowest linewidth lasers are limited by mirror motion in the reference optical resonator used to stabilize the laser's frequency. Recent proposals suggest that superradiant lasers based on narrow dipole-forbidden transitions in cold alkaline earth atoms could offer a way around this limitation. Such lasers operating on transitions with linewidth of order mHz are predicted to achieve output spectra orders of magnitude narrower than any currently existing laser. As a step towards this goal, we demonstrate and study a laser based on the 7.5-kHz linewidth dipole-forbidden 3P1 to 1S0 1 transition in laser-cooled and tightly confined 88Sr. We can operate this laser in the bad-cavity or superradiant regime, where coherence is primarily stored in the atoms, or continuously tune to the more conventional good-cavity regime, where coherence is primarily stored in the light field. We show that the cold-atom gain medium can be repumped to achieve quasi-steady-state lasing. We also demonstrate up to an order of magnitude suppression in the sensitivity of laser frequency to changes in cavity length, verifying a key feature of the proposed narrow linewidth lasers.

  17. Climate-driven regime shifts in Arctic marine benthos.

    PubMed

    Kortsch, Susanne; Primicerio, Raul; Beuchel, Frank; Renaud, Paul E; Rodrigues, João; Lønne, Ole Jørgen; Gulliksen, Bjørn

    2012-08-28

    Climate warming can trigger abrupt ecosystem changes in the Arctic. Despite the considerable interest in characterizing and understanding the ecological impact of rapid climate warming in the Arctic, few long time series exist that allow addressing these research goals. During a 30-y period (1980-2010) of gradually increasing seawater temperature and decreasing sea ice cover in Svalbard, we document rapid and extensive structural changes in the rocky-bottom communities of two Arctic fjords. The most striking component of the benthic reorganization was an abrupt fivefold increase in macroalgal cover in 1995 in Kongsfjord and an eightfold increase in 2000 in Smeerenburgfjord. Simultaneous changes in the abundance of benthic invertebrates suggest that the macroalgae played a key structuring role in these communities. The abrupt, substantial, and persistent nature of the changes observed is indicative of a climate-driven ecological regime shift. The ecological processes thought to drive the observed regime shifts are likely to promote the borealization of these Arctic marine communities in the coming years. PMID:22891319

  18. Phonon wave propagation in ballistic-diffusive regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dao-Sheng; Hua, Yu-Chao; Nie, Ben-Dian; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2016-03-01

    Wide applications of ultra-short pulse laser technique in micromachining and thermophysical properties' measurements make the study on ultrafast transient thermal transport necessarily essential. When the characteristic time is comparable to the phonon relaxation time, phonons propagate in ballistic-diffusive regime and thermal wave occurs. Here, ultrafast transient phonon transport is systematically investigated based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, the Cattaneo-Vernotte (C-V) model, and the phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). It is found that remarkable differences exist between the C-V model and the MC simulations when describing the evolution of the thermal wave excited by the ultra-short heat pulse. The C-V model predicts a non-dispersive dissipative thermal wave, while the MC simulation with Lambert emission predicts a dispersive dissipative thermal wave. Besides, different phonon emissions can significantly influence the evolution of the thermal wave in the MC simulations. A modified C-V model with a time- and position-dependent effective thermal conductivity is derived based on the phonon BTE to characterize the evolution of the transport regime from ballistic to diffusive. The integrations on moments of the distribution function cause the loss of the information of the phonon distribution in wave vector space, making the macroscopic quantities incomplete when describing the ballistic transport processes and corresponding boundary conditions. Possible boundary conditions for the phonon BTE in practice are also discussed on different heating methods.

  19. Wind regime and sand transport in China's Badain Jaran Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengcai; Dong, Zhibao; Li, Chunxiao

    2015-06-01

    Wind controls the formation and development of aeolian dunes, therefore understanding the wind environment is necessary in aeolian dune research. In recent years, climate has changed in and around the Badain Jaran Desert, and the factors that control aeolian dune development have changed with it. In this paper, we analyzed characteristics of the desert's wind regime based on data from seven weather stations in and around the desert. The temporal and spatial variation in the wind regime's characteristics have different effects on dune formation and development. The annual mean wind velocity, maximum wind velocity, and the proportion of the time the wind exceeded the sand-entrainment threshold are largest at the northern margin of the desert, and these values decrease from north to south and from east to west. The dominant winds are from the northwest, northeast, and southwest. The drift potential (DP) in the desert decreases from north to south, and can be divided into three regions: high in the north, intermediate in the central region, and low in the south. The effects of climate change on the calculated DP will be complex; although DP increased with increasing mean wind velocity and temperature, there was little or no relationship with precipitation and relative humidity.

  20. Making pore choices: repeated regime shifts in stomatal ratio.

    PubMed

    Muir, Christopher D

    2015-08-22

    Ecologically important traits do not evolve without limits. Instead, evolution is constrained by the set of available and viable phenotypes. In particular, natural selection may only favour a narrow range of adaptive optima constrained within selective regimes. Here, I integrate data with theory to test whether selection explains phenotypic constraint. A global database of 599 plant species from 94 families shows that stomatal ratio, a trait affecting photosynthesis and defence against pathogens, is highly constrained. Most plants have their stomata on the lower leaf surface (hypostomy), but species with half their stomata on each surface (amphistomy) form a distinct mode in the trait distribution. A model based on a trade-off between maximizing photosynthesis and a fitness cost of upper stomata predicts a limited number of adaptive solutions, leading to a multimodal trait distribution. Phylogenetic comparisons show that amphistomy is the most common among fast-growing species, supporting the view that CO2 diffusion is under strong selection. These results indicate that selective optima stay within a relatively stable set of selective regimes over macroevolutionary time. PMID:26269502

  1. Evolution and resilience of the nuclear nonproliferation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Pregenzer, Arian L.

    2014-05-09

    This paper introduces the concept of systems resilience as a new framework for thinking about the future of the nonproliferation regime. Resilience refers to the ability of a system to maintain its vital functions in the face of continuous and unpredictable change. First, I make the case that the nonproliferation regime can be viewed as a complex system. Next, I discuss key themes from the literature on systems resilience and apply them to the nonproliferation system: the difference between resilience and stability; the need for evolution to maintain function; the importance of functional diversity; and the concept of the adaptive cycle. I show that most existing nonproliferation strategies are aimed at stability rather than resilience and that the current nonproliferation system may be over-constrained by the cumulative evolution of strategies. According to the literature on systems resilience, this increases its vulnerability to collapse. I argue that the resilience of the nonproliferation system can be enhanced by increasing international participation in setting the nonproliferation agenda, developing general international response capabilities, focusing on non-coercive approaches to decreasing demand, and applying systems thinking more rigorously to nonproliferation.

  2. Evolution and resilience of the nuclear nonproliferation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pregenzer, Arian L.

    2014-05-01

    This paper introduces the concept of systems resilience as a new framework for thinking about the future of the nonproliferation regime. Resilience refers to the ability of a system to maintain its vital functions in the face of continuous and unpredictable change. First, I make the case that the nonproliferation regime can be viewed as a complex system. Next, I discuss key themes from the literature on systems resilience and apply them to the nonproliferation system: the difference between resilience and stability; the need for evolution to maintain function; the importance of functional diversity; and the concept of the adaptive cycle. I show that most existing nonproliferation strategies are aimed at stability rather than resilience and that the current nonproliferation system may be over-constrained by the cumulative evolution of strategies. According to the literature on systems resilience, this increases its vulnerability to collapse. I argue that the resilience of the nonproliferation system can be enhanced by increasing international participation in setting the nonproliferation agenda, developing general international response capabilities, focusing on non-coercive approaches to decreasing demand, and applying systems thinking more rigorously to nonproliferation.

  3. Modeling viscosity and diffusion of plasma mixtures across coupling regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Viscosity and diffusion of plasma for pure elements and multicomponent mixtures are modeled from the high-temperature low-density weakly coupled regime to the low-temperature high-density strongly coupled regime. Thanks to an atom in jellium modeling, the effect of electron screening on the ion-ion interaction is incorporated through a self-consistent definition of the ionization. This defines an effective One Component Plasma, or an effective Binary Ionic Mixture, that is representative of the strength of the interaction. For the viscosity and the interdiffusion of mixtures, approximate kinetic expressions are supplemented by mixing laws applied to the excess viscosity and self-diffusion of pure elements. The comparisons with classical and quantum molecular dynamics results reveal deviations in the range 20--40% on average with almost no predictions further than a factor of 2 over many decades of variation. Applications in the inertial confinement fusion context could help in predicting the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  4. Available Climate Regimes Drive Niche Diversification during Range Expansion.

    PubMed

    Wüest, Rafael O; Antonelli, Alexandre; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Linder, H Peter

    2015-05-01

    Climate is a main predictor of biodiversity on a global scale, yet how climate availability affects niche evolution remains poorly explored. Here we assess how intercontinental climate differences may affect the evolution of climate niches and suggest three possible processes: niche truncation along major environmental gradients, intercontinental differences in available climate causing differences in selective regimes, and niche shifts associated with long-distance dispersals leading to a pattern of punctuated evolution. Using the globally distributed danthonioid grasses, we show significant niche differentiation among continents and several instances of niche truncation. The comparison of inferred selective regimes with differences in available climatic space among continents demonstrates adaptation resulting from opportunistic evolution toward available climatic space. Our results suggest that niche evolution in this clade is punctuated, consistent with accelerated niche evolution after long-distance dispersal events. Finally, we discuss how intrinsic constraints (genetic, developmental, or functional) and biotic interactions could have interacted with these three processes during range expansion. Integrating these mechanisms could improve predictions for invasive taxa and long-term evolutionary responses of expanding clades to climate change. PMID:25905507

  5. Fano-Andreev effect in Quantum Dots in Kondo regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Pedro; Calle, Ana Maria; Pacheco, Monica; Apel, Victor

    In the present work, we investigate the transport through a T-shaped double quantum dot system coupled to two normal leads and to a superconducting lead. We study the role of the superconducting lead in the quantum interferometric features of the double quantum dot and by means of a slave boson mean field approximation at low temperature regime. We inquire into the influence of intradot interactions in the electronic properties of the system as well. Our results show that Fano resonances due to Andreev bound states are exhibited in the transmission from normal to normal lead as a consequence of quantum interference and proximity effect. This Fano effect produced by Andreev bound states in a side quantum dot was called Fano-Andreev effect, which remains valid even if the electron-electron interaction are taken into account, that is, the Fano-Andreev effect is robust against e-e interactions even in Kondo regime. We acknowledge the financial support from FONDECYT program Grants No. 3140053 and 11400571.

  6. Hydroperiod regime controls the organization of plant species in wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Romano; del Jesus, Manuel; Rinaldo, Andrea; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    With urban, agricultural, and industrial needs growing throughout the past decades, wetland ecosystems have experienced profound changes. Most critically, the biodiversity of wetlands is intimately linked to its hydrologic dynamics, which in turn are being drastically altered by ongoing climate changes. Hydroperiod regimes, e.g., percentage of time a site is inundated, exert critical control in the creation of niches for different plant species in wetlands. However, the spatial signatures of the organization of plant species in wetlands and how the different drivers interact to yield such signatures are unknown. Focusing on Everglades National Park (ENP) in Florida, we show here that cluster sizes of each species follow a power law probability distribution and that such clusters have well-defined fractal characteristics. Moreover, we individuate and model those signatures via the interplay between global forcings arising from the hydroperiod regime and local controls exerted by neighboring vegetation. With power law clustering often associated with systems near critical transitions, our findings are highly relevant for the management of wetland ecosystems. In addition, our results show that changes in climate and land management have a quantifiable predictable impact on the type of vegetation and its spatial organization in wetlands. PMID:23150589

  7. Transition boiling heat transfer and the film transition regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramilison, J. M.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    The Berenson (1960) flat-plate transition-boiling experiment has been recreated with a reduced thermal resistance in the heater, and an improved access to those portions of the transition boiling regime that have a steep negative slope. Tests have been made in Freon-113, acetone, benzene, and n-pentane boiling on horizontal flat copper heaters that have been mirror-polished, 'roughened', or teflon-coated. The resulting data reproduce and clarify certain features observed by Berenson: the modest surface finish dependence of boiling burnout, and the influence of surface chemistry on both the minimum heat flux and the mode of transition boiling, for example. A rational scheme of correlation yields a prediction of the heat flux in what Witte and Lienhard (1982) previously identified as the 'film-transition boiling' region. It is also shown how to calculate the heat flux at the boundary between the pure-film, and the film-transition, boiling regimes, as a function of the advancing contact angle.

  8. Testing QCD in the non-perturbative regime

    SciTech Connect

    A.W. Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This is an exciting time for strong interaction physics. We have a candidate for a fundamental theory, namely QCD, which has passed all the tests thrown at it in the perturbative regime. In the non-perturbative regime it has also produced some promising results and recently a few triumphs but the next decade will see enormous progress in our ability to unambiguously calculate the consequences of non-perturbative QCD and to test those predictions experimentally. Amongst the new experimental facilities being constructed, the hadronic machines at JPARC and GSI-FAIR and the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab, the major new electromagnetic facility worldwide, present a beautifully complementary network aimed at producing precise new measurements which will advance our knowledge of nuclear systems and push our ability to calculate the consequences of QCD to the limit. We will first outline the plans at Jefferson Lab for doubling the energy of CEBAF. The new facility presents some wonderful opportunities for discovery in strong interaction physics, as well as beyond the standard model. Then we turn to the theoretical developments aimed at extracting precise results for physical hadron properties from lattice QCD simulations. This discussion will begin with classical examples, such as the mass of the nucleon and ?, before dealing with a very recent and spectacular success involving information extracted from modern parity violating electron scattering.

  9. Approaches to defining reference regimes for river restoration planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechie, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Reference conditions or reference regimes can be defined using three general approaches, historical analysis, contemporary reference sites, and theoretical or empirical models. For large features (e.g., floodplain channels and ponds) historical data and maps are generally reliable. For smaller features (e.g., pools and riffles in small tributaries), field data from contemporary reference sites are a reasonable surrogate for historical data. Models are generally used for features that have no historical information or present day reference sites (e.g., beaver pond habitat). Each of these approaches contributes to a watershed-wide understanding of current biophysical conditions relative to potential conditions, which helps create not only a guiding vision for restoration, but also helps quantify and locate the largest or most important restoration opportunities. Common uses of geomorphic and biological reference conditions include identifying key areas for habitat protection or restoration, and informing the choice of restoration targets. Examples of use of each of these three approaches to define reference regimes in western USA illustrate how historical information and current research highlight key restoration opportunities, focus restoration effort in areas that can produce the largest ecological benefit, and contribute to estimating restoration potential and assessing likelihood of achieving restoration goals.

  10. Flood regimes in a changing world: What do we know?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloeschl, G.

    2015-12-01

    There has been a surprisingly large number of major floods in the last years around the world which suggests that floods may have increased and will continue to increase in the next decades. However, the realism of such changes is still hotly discussed in the literature. In this presentation I will argue that a fresh look is needed at the flood change problem in terms of the causal factors including river training, land use changes and climate variability. Analysing spatial patterns of dynamic flood characteristics helps learn form the rich diversity of flood processes across the landscape. I will present a number of examples across Europe to illustrate the range of flood generation processes and the causal factors of changes in the flood regime. On the basis of these examples, I will demonstrate how comparative hydrology can assist in learning from the differences of flood characteristics between catchments both for present and future conditions. Focus on the interactions of the natural and human water system will be instrumental in making meaningful statements about future floods in a changing world. References Hall et al. (2014) Understanding Flood Regime Changes in Europe: A state of the art assessment. Hydrol. Earth Sys. Sc., 18, 2735-2772. Blöschl et al. (2015) Increasing river floods: fiction or reality? Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water. doi: 10.1002/wat2.1079

  11. Climate-driven regime shifts in Arctic marine benthos

    PubMed Central

    Kortsch, Susanne; Primicerio, Raul; Beuchel, Frank; Renaud, Paul E.; Rodrigues, João; Lønne, Ole Jørgen; Gulliksen, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Climate warming can trigger abrupt ecosystem changes in the Arctic. Despite the considerable interest in characterizing and understanding the ecological impact of rapid climate warming in the Arctic, few long time series exist that allow addressing these research goals. During a 30-y period (1980–2010) of gradually increasing seawater temperature and decreasing sea ice cover in Svalbard, we document rapid and extensive structural changes in the rocky-bottom communities of two Arctic fjords. The most striking component of the benthic reorganization was an abrupt fivefold increase in macroalgal cover in 1995 in Kongsfjord and an eightfold increase in 2000 in Smeerenburgfjord. Simultaneous changes in the abundance of benthic invertebrates suggest that the macroalgae played a key structuring role in these communities. The abrupt, substantial, and persistent nature of the changes observed is indicative of a climate-driven ecological regime shift. The ecological processes thought to drive the observed regime shifts are likely to promote the borealization of these Arctic marine communities in the coming years. PMID:22891319

  12. Crossing regimes of temperature dependence in animal movement.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Jean P; Chelini, Marie-Claire; Rosenthal, Malcolm F; DeLong, John P

    2016-05-01

    A pressing challenge in ecology is to understand the effects of changing global temperatures on food web structure and dynamics. The stability of these complex ecological networks largely depends on how predator-prey interactions may respond to temperature changes. Because predators and prey rely on their velocities to catch food or avoid being eaten, understanding how temperatures may affect animal movement is central to this quest. Despite our efforts, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of how the effect of temperature on metabolic processes scales up to animal movement and beyond. Here, we merge a biomechanical approach, the Metabolic Theory of Ecology and empirical data to show that animal movement displays multiple regimes of temperature dependence. We also show that crossing these regimes has important consequences for population dynamics and stability, which depend on the parameters controlling predator-prey interactions. We argue that this dependence upon interaction parameters may help explain why experimental work on the temperature dependence of interaction strengths has so far yielded conflicting results. More importantly, these changes in the temperature dependence of animal movement can have consequences that go well beyond ecological interactions and affect, for example, animal communication, mating, sensory detection, and any behavioral modality dependent on the movement of limbs. Finally, by not taking into account the changes in temperature dependence reported here we might not be able to properly forecast the impact of global warming on ecological processes and propose appropriate mitigation action when needed. PMID:26854767

  13. Intermittent flow regimes near the convection threshold in ferromagnetic nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Krauzina, Marina T; Bozhko, Alexandra A; Putin, Gennady F; Suslov, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    The onset and decay of convection in a spherical cavity filled with ferromagnetic nanofluid and heated from below are investigated experimentally. It is found that, unlike in a single-component Newtonian fluid where stationary convection sets in as a result of supercritical bifurcation and where convection intensity increases continuously with the degree of supercriticality, convection in a multicomponent ferromagnetic nanofluid starts abruptly and has an oscillatory nature. The hysteresis is observed in the transition between conduction and convection states. In moderately supercritical regimes, the arising fluid motion observed at a fixed temperature difference intermittently transitions from quasiharmonic to essentially irregular oscillations that are followed by periods of a quasistationary convection. The observed oscillations are shown to result from the precession of the axis of a convection vortex in the equatorial plane. When the vertical temperature difference exceeds the convection onset value by a factor of 2.5, the initially oscillatory convection settles to a steady-state regime with no intermittent behavior detected afterward. The performed wavelet and Fourier analyses of thermocouple readings indicate the presence of various oscillatory modes with characteristic periods ranging from one hour to several days. PMID:25679711

  14. No-boundary measure in the regime of eternal inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartle, James; Hawking, S. W.; Hertog, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The no-boundary wave function (NBWF) specifies a measure for prediction in cosmology that selects inflationary histories and remains well behaved for spatially large or infinite universes. This paper explores the predictions of the NBWF for linear scalar fluctuations about homogeneous and isotropic backgrounds in models with a single scalar field moving in a quadratic potential. We treat both the spacetime geometry of the universe and the observers inhabiting it quantum mechanically. We evaluate top-down probabilities for local observations that are conditioned on the NBWF and on part of our data as observers of the universe. For models where the most probable histories do not have a regime of eternal inflation, the NBWF predicts homogeneity on large scales, a spectrum of observable fluctuations with a small non-Gaussian component, and a small amount of inflation in our past. By contrast, for models where the dominant histories have a regime of eternal inflation, the NBWF predicts significant inhomogeneity on scales much larger than the present horizon, a Gaussian spectrum of observable fluctuations, and a long period of inflation in our past. The absence or presence of non-Gaussianity in our observable universe therefore provides information about its global structure, assuming the NBWF.

  15. Managing Disagreement: A Defense of “Regime Bias”

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Stein Ringen’s theory of democratic purpose cannot do the work expected of it. Ringen’s own criteria oscillate between being too vague to be useful (i.e. “freedom”) or, when specified more fully, conflicting, so that almost all democracies will seem to be potentially at cross-purposes with themselves rather than their purposes or sub-purposes being mutually reinforcing. This reflects a bigger and more theoretical problem. Disagreement about the purpose of democracy is built into democracy itself. The whole point of many (perhaps all) of our democratic institutions is to arrive at conditionally legitimate decisions in spite of such disagreement. So-called regime bias, i.e. the tendency to assess democracies according to the form and stability of their institutions rather than their results or their ability to serve certain purposes, does not in fact arise from bias. It arises on the contrary from a determination to avoid the bias inherent in giving some—inevitably partisan—ideals of what democracies should do pride of place over others in a scheme of measurement or evaluation. And even a regime-based definition of democracy must itself make simplifying assumptions that elide possible normative controversies over how the democratic game is best played. Vindicating one’s preferred set of democratic ideals against alternatives is a completely legitimate enterprise and lends richness to debates within and across democracies. But it is an inherently ideological and political enterprise, not a neutral or scholarly one. PMID:21258438

  16. Intense electron-beam transport in the ion-focused regime through the collision-dominated regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Welch, D.R.; Mock, R.C.

    1993-12-31

    This paper reviews the transport of the 19-MeV, 700-kA, 25-ns Hermes-III electron beam in long gas cells filled with N{sub 2} gas spanning six decades in pressure from 10{sup 3} to {approximately}10{sup 3} Torr. We show through measurements and theoretical analyses that the beam has two windows of stable transport: a low-pressure window (between {approximately}1 and {approximately}100 mTorr) that is dominated by propagation in the semi-collisionless IFR (ion-focused regime), and a high-pressure window (between {approximately}1 and {approximately}100 Torr) that is dominated by propagation in the resistive CDR (collision-dominated regime). In the CDR, 79{plus_minus}1.5% of the beam energy is transported over 11 m at 20 Torr. In the IFR, we show that intense radiation fields with controllable rise times and pulse widths can be generated on axis at a bremsstrahlung target. In summary, the measurements and analyses presented here provide a quantitative description of the Hermes-III beam transport over six decades in pressure.

  17. Turning back from the brink: Detecting an impending regime shift in time to avert it

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Reinette; Carpenter, Stephen R.; Brock, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Ecological regime shifts are large, abrupt, long-lasting changes in ecosystems that often have considerable impacts on human economies and societies. Avoiding unintentional regime shifts is widely regarded as desirable, but prediction of ecological regime shifts is notoriously difficult. Recent research indicates that changes in ecological time series (e.g., increased variability and autocorrelation) could potentially serve as early warning indicators of impending shifts. A critical question, however, is whether such indicators provide sufficient warning to adapt management to avert regime shifts. We examine this question using a fisheries model, with regime shifts driven by angling (amenable to rapid reduction) or shoreline development (only gradual restoration is possible). The model represents key features of a broad class of ecological regime shifts. We find that if drivers can only be manipulated gradually management action is needed substantially before a regime shift to avert it; if drivers can be rapidly altered aversive action may be delayed until a shift is underway. Large increases in the indicators only occur once a regime shift is initiated, often too late for management to avert a shift. To improve usefulness in averting regime shifts, we suggest that research focus on defining critical indicator levels rather than detecting change in the indicators. Ideally, critical indicator levels should be related to switches in ecosystem attractors; we present a new spectral density ratio indicator to this end. Averting ecological regime shifts is also dependent on developing policy processes that enable society to respond more rapidly to information about impending regime shifts. PMID:19124774

  18. Study on Turbulent Premixed Flame Regimes with Ignition Using a Reactor Assisted Turbulent Slot Burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Sang Hee; Reuter, Christopher; Windom, Bret; Ju, Yiguang

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent premixed flames of n-heptane/air and toluene/air mixtures affected by ignition have been experimentally investigated by using a reactor-assisted turbulent slot (RATS) burner at two burner temperatures, 450 K and 700 K. Turbulent burning velocities (ST) and flame structures have been measured by the simultaneous OH and CH2O planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging at various equivalence ratios and turbulent Reynolds numbers. Three distinct turbulent premixed flame regimes are identified for n-heptane/air mixture; chemical frozen (CF) regime at low temperature, low temperature ignition (LTI) regime, and high temperature ignition (HTI) regime for respectively lean and rich conditions at 700 K. For CF regime, the measured turbulent burning velocities of n-heptane and toluene at 450 K follow a conventional correlation of turbulent intensity (defined as u'/SL). In LTI regime, substantial changes in chemical composition alter the laminar flame speed and transport property, leading to rapid increase of turbulent burning velocity. In HTI regime, it is found that the turbulent premixed flame structure is significantly modified by the appearance of volumetric ignition kernel structures associated with the transition from LTI to HTI. The turbulent premixed flame regime in HTI is no longer represented by the thin reaction zone regime. The measured turbulent burning velocities in HTI regime increase substantially as increasing ignition Damkőhler number over those in LTI regime.

  19. Historical thermal regimes define limits to coral acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Howells, Emily J; Berkelmans, Ray; van Oppen, Madeleine J H; Willis, Bette L; Bay, Line K

    2013-05-01

    Knowledge of the degree to which corals undergo physiological acclimatization or genetic adaptation in response to changes in their thermal environment is crucial to the success of coral reef conservation strategies. The potential of corals to acclimatize to temperatures exceeding historical thermal regimes was investigated by reciprocal transplantation of Acropora millepora colonies between the warm central and cool southern regions of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) for a duration of 14 months. Colony fragments retained at native sites remained healthy, whereas transplanted fragments, although healthy over initial months when temperatures remained within native thermal regimes, subsequently bleached and suffered mortality during seasonal temperature extremes. Corals hosting Symbiodinium D transplanted to the southern GBR bleached in winter and the majority suffered whole (40%; n=20 colonies) or partial (50%) mortality at temperatures 1.1 degrees C below their 15-year native minimum. In contrast, corals hosting Symbiodinium C2 transplanted to the central GBR bleached in summer and suffered whole (50%; n=10 colonies) or partial (42%) mortality at temperatures 2.5 degrees C above their 15-year native maximum. During summer bleaching, the dominant Symbiodinium type changed from C2 to D within corals transplanted to the central GBR. Corals transplanted to the cooler, southern GBR grew 74-80% slower than corals at their native site, and only 50% of surviving colonies reproduced, at least partially because of cold water bleaching of transplants. Despite the absence of any visual signs of stress, corals transplanted to the warmer, central GBR grew 52-59% more slowly than corals at their native site before the summer bleaching (i.e., from autumn to spring). Allocation of energy to initial acclimatization or reproduction may explain this pattern, as the majority (65%) of transplants reproduced one month earlier than portions of the same colonies retained at the southern

  20. On the Dynamical Regimes of Pattern-Accelerated Electroconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Scott M.; Wessling, Matthias; Mani, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Recent research has established that electroconvection can enhance ion transport at polarized surfaces such as membranes and electrodes where it would otherwise be limited by diffusion. The onset of such overlimiting transport can be influenced by the surface topology of the ion selective membranes as well as inhomogeneities in their electrochemical properties. However, there is little knowledge regarding the mechanisms through which these surface variations promote transport. We use high-resolution direct numerical simulations to develop a comprehensive analysis of electroconvective flows generated by geometric patterns of impermeable stripes and investigate their potential to regularize electrokinetic instabilities. Counterintuitively, we find that reducing the permeable area of an ion exchange membrane, with appropriate patterning, increases the overall ion transport rate by up to 80%. In addition, we present analysis of nonpatterned membranes, and find a novel regime of electroconvection where a multivalued current is possible due to the coexistence of multiple convective states.

  1. Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: magnetotelluric constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Hermance, J.F.

    1987-11-13

    The focus of activity at this laboratory is on applying natural electromagnetic methods along with other geophysical techniques to studying the dynamical processes and thermal regimes associated with centers of major volcanic activity. We are presently emphasizing studies of the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex, the Cascades Volcanic Belt, and the Valles Caldera. This work addresses questions regarding geothermal energy, chemical transport of minerals in the crust, emplacement of economic ore deposits, and optimal siting of drill-holes for scientific purposes. In addition, since much of our work is performed in the intermontane sedimentary basins of the western US (along with testing our field-system in some of the graben structures in the Northeast), there is an application of these studies to developing exploration and interpretational strategies for detecting and delineating structures associated with hydrocarbon reserves.

  2. Fluid mobility over corrugated surfaces in the Stokes regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, S. R.; Smith, J. D.; Hibbins, A. P.; Sambles, J. R.; Horsley, S. A. R.

    2016-08-01

    An exact solution is found for laminar fluid flow along the grooves of a family of surfaces whose shape is given by the Lambert W-function. This simple solution allows for the slip length in the direction parallel to the grooves to be calculated exactly. With this analytical model, we establish the regime of validity for a previously untested perturbation theory intended for calculating the surface mobility tensor of arbitrary periodic surfaces, finding that it compares well to the exact expression for nearly all choices of parameters of the conformal map. To test this perturbation theory further, the mobility tensor is evaluated for a simple sinusoidal surface for flow both parallel and perpendicular to the grooves, finding that the perturbation theory is less accurate in the latter of these two cases.

  3. Effect of thermal noise on random lasers in diffusion regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini-Farzad, Mahmood; Montakhab, Afshin

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of thermal noise on the time evolution of a weak light pulse (probe) in the presence of a strong light pulse (pump) within a gain medium which includes random scatterer particles. Suitable thermal noise term is added to a set of four coupled equations including three diffusion equations for energy densities and a rate equation for the upper level population in a four-level gain medium. These equations have been solved simultaneously by Crank-Nicholson numerical method. The main result is that the back-scattered output probe light is increased as the thermal noise strength is increased and simultaneously, with the same rate, the amplified spontaneous emission is decreased. Therefore, the amplified response of the random laser in diffusion regime for the input probe pulse is enhanced due to effect of the thermal noise.

  4. Newly discovered landscape traps produce regime shifts in wet forests

    PubMed Central

    Lindenmayer, David B.; Hobbs, Richard J.; Likens, Gene E.; Krebs, Charles J.; Banks, Samuel C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the “landscape trap” concept, whereby entire landscapes are shifted into, and then maintained (trapped) in, a highly compromised structural and functional state as the result of multiple temporal and spatial feedbacks between human and natural disturbance regimes. The landscape trap concept builds on ideas like stable alternative states and other relevant concepts, but it substantively expands the conceptual thinking in a number of unique ways. In this paper, we (i) review the literature to develop the concept of landscape traps, including their general features; (ii) provide a case study as an example of a landscape trap from the mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans) forests of southeastern Australia; (iii) suggest how landscape traps can be detected before they are irrevocably established; and (iv) present evidence of the generality of landscape traps in different ecosystems worldwide. PMID:21876151

  5. Weak interference in the high-signal regime.

    PubMed

    Torres, Juan P; Puentes, Graciana; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Salazar-Serrano, Luis Jose

    2012-08-13

    Weak amplification is a signal enhancement technique which is used to measure tiny changes that otherwise cannot be determined because of technical limitations. It is based on: a) the existence of a weak interaction which couples a property of a system (the system) with a separate degree of freedom (the pointer), and b) the measurement of an anomalously large mean value of the pointer state (weak mean value), after appropriate pre-and post-selection of the state of the system. Unfortunately, the weak amplification process is generally accompanied by severe losses of the detected signal, which limits its applicability. However, we will show here that since weak amplification is essentially the result of an interference phenomena, it should be possible to use the degree of interference (weak interference) to get relevant information about the physical system under study in a more general scenario, where the signal is not severely depleted (high-signal regime). PMID:23038526

  6. Information Causality in the Quantum and Post-Quantum Regime

    PubMed Central

    Ringbauer, Martin; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Berry, Dominic W.; White, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum correlations can be stronger than anything achieved by classical systems, yet they are not reaching the limit imposed by relativity. The principle of information causality offers a possible explanation for why the world is quantum and why there appear to be no even stronger correlations. Generalizing the no-signaling condition it suggests that the amount of accessible information must not be larger than the amount of transmitted information. Here we study this principle experimentally in the classical, quantum and post-quantum regimes. We simulate correlations that are stronger than allowed by quantum mechanics by exploiting the effect of polarization-dependent loss in a photonic Bell-test experiment. Our method also applies to other fundamental principles and our results highlight the special importance of anisotropic regions of the no-signalling polytope in the study of fundamental principles. PMID:25378182

  7. Nanowire-based thermoelectric ratchet in the hopping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosisio, Riccardo; Fleury, Geneviève; Pichard, Jean-Louis; Gorini, Cosimo

    2016-04-01

    We study a thermoelectric ratchet consisting of an array of disordered nanowires arranged in parallel on top of an insulating substrate and contacted asymmetrically to two electrodes. Transport is investigated in the Mott hopping regime, when localized electrons can propagate through the nanowires via thermally assisted hops. When the electronic temperature in the nanowires is different from the phononic one in the substrate, we show that a finite electrical current is generated even in the absence of driving forces between the electrodes. We discuss the device performance both as an energy harvester, when an excess heat from the substrate is converted into useful power, and as a refrigerator, when an external power is supplied to cool down the substrate.

  8. Inhomogeneous transport and derivative relations in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Steven H.

    1998-12-01

    Several derivative relations have been observed in the quantum Hall regime including a relation between elements of the macroscopic resistivity tensor Rxx= αB(d Rxy/d B), a relation between elements of the macroscopic thermopower tensor Syx= αB(d Sxx/d B), as well as a similar relation observed in acoustoelectric experiments (here B is the magnetic field and α is a constant). It has been proposed in a number of recent works by the author and collaborators that these relations can be explained with a model of classical transport in an inhomogeneous medium. We review these works and briefly discuss to what extent the models which predict these derivative relations are appropriate for describing the experimental systems.

  9. Numerical modeling of thermal refraction inliquids in the transient regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovsh, Dmitriy I.; Hagan, David J.; van Stryland, Eric W.

    1999-04-01

    We present the results of modeling of nanosecond pulse propagation in optically absorbing liquid media. Acoustic and electromagnetic wave equations must be solved simultaneously to model refractive index changes due to thermal expansion and/or electrostriction, which are highly transient phenomena on a nanosecond time scale. Although we consider situations with cylindrical symmetry and where the paraxial approximation is valid, this is still a computation-intensive problem, as beam propagation through optically thick media must be modeled. We compare the full solution of the acoustic wave equation with the approximation of instantaneous expansion (steady-state solution) and hence determine the regimes of validity of this approximation. We also find that the refractive index change obtained from the photo-acoustic equation overshoots its steady-state value once the ratio between the pulsewidth and the acoustic transit time exceeds a factor of unity.

  10. Accessing the new collisionless reconnection regime in laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Joseph; Egedal, Jan; Greess, Samuel; Wallace, John; Clark, Michael; Forest, Cary

    2015-11-01

    The Terrestrial Reconnection Experiment (TREX), the largest dedicated reconnection experiment to date, is currently in operation at the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory (WiPAL). In its inaugural run, TREX demonstrated its ability to operate in what has traditionally been called the collisionless reconnection regime by observing the out-of-plane magnetic field characteristic of Hall reconnection. Additionally, TREX is projected to access even more collisionless parameters in which electron pressure anisotropy develops, greatly influencing the dynamics of the reconnection process beyond two fluid effects. For example, spacecraft observations and kinetic simulations show that large-scale current layers are driven by this pressure anisotropy. In the last year, TREX has undergone upgrades to its plasma heating, reconnection drive, and diagnostic suite in order to study these features exclusive to truly collisionless reconnection. Preliminary results from the newly optimized experimental runs will be presented. Supported in part by DoE grant DE-SC0010463.

  11. Time-domain diagnostics in the picosecond regime

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1995-12-31

    The measurement of bunch length and longitudinal profile for microbunches of electrons and positrons in the ps and sub-ps regime will be a critical part of validating performance of proposed facilities. Data will be presented showing single-sweep streak camera results at {sigma}{sub res} {approximately} 68 fs and projected synchroscan sweep resolution at {sigma} {approximately} 600 fs. Additionally, an rf cavity operating in a transverse magnetic mode has recently been shown to produce {sigma}{sub res} {approximately} 280 fs when used with a low-emittance beam. The potential for dual-sweep streak work with {sigma}{sub res} < 1 ps on the fast axis is also described.

  12. Dyakonov-like surface waves in the THz regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardakani, Abbas Ghasempour; Naserpour, Mahin; Zapata-Rodríguez, Carlos J.

    2016-07-01

    Here we examine Dyakonov-like surface waves (DSWs) in the THz regime traveling along the plane interface between a non-conducting isotropic medium and a low-loss graphene-based uniaxial metamaterial with the optic axis (OA) oriented along with the interface. New insights concerning the propagation characteristics of DSWs are given by analyzing the dispersion relation in such configuration, that is evaluated using the effective medium theory. The range of angles with respect to the OA which is determined for the in-plane wave vector can be conveniently tuned with extremely flexibility in opposition with DSWs excited in natural anisotropic media. The properties discussed here are of relevance in applications reaching ultra-compact electromagnetic waveguides and bio- and chemo-sensing.

  13. Energy transfer in a molecular motor in the Kramers regime.

    PubMed

    Challis, K J; Jack, Michael W

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical treatment of energy transfer in a molecular motor described in terms of overdamped Brownian motion on a multidimensional tilted periodic potential. The tilt represents a thermodynamic force driving the system out of equilibrium and, for nonseparable potentials, energy transfer occurs between degrees of freedom. For deep potential wells, the continuous theory transforms to a discrete master equation that is tractable analytically. We use this master equation to derive formal expressions for the hopping rates, drift and diffusion, and the efficiency and rate of energy transfer in terms of the thermodynamic force. These results span both strong and weak coupling between degrees of freedom, describe the near and far from equilibrium regimes, and are consistent with generalized detailed balance and the Onsager relations. We thereby derive a number of diverse results for molecular motors within a single theoretical framework. PMID:24229123

  14. On the Dynamical Regimes of Pattern-Accelerated Electroconvection

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Scott M.; Wessling, Matthias; Mani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has established that electroconvection can enhance ion transport at polarized surfaces such as membranes and electrodes where it would otherwise be limited by diffusion. The onset of such overlimiting transport can be influenced by the surface topology of the ion selective membranes as well as inhomogeneities in their electrochemical properties. However, there is little knowledge regarding the mechanisms through which these surface variations promote transport. We use high-resolution direct numerical simulations to develop a comprehensive analysis of electroconvective flows generated by geometric patterns of impermeable stripes and investigate their potential to regularize electrokinetic instabilities. Counterintuitively, we find that reducing the permeable area of an ion exchange membrane, with appropriate patterning, increases the overall ion transport rate by up to 80%. In addition, we present analysis of nonpatterned membranes, and find a novel regime of electroconvection where a multivalued current is possible due to the coexistence of multiple convective states. PMID:26935925

  15. Equilibrating dynamics in quenched Bose gases: Characterizing multiple time regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rançon, A.; Levin, K.

    2014-08-01

    We address the physics of equilibration in ultracold atomic gases following a quench of the interaction parameter. Our work is based on a bath model which generates damping of the bosonic excitations. We illustrate this dissipative behavior through the momentum distribution of the excitations nk, observing that larger k modes have shorter relaxation times τ (k); they will equilibrate faster, as has been claimed in recent experimental work. We identify three time regimes. At short times nk exhibits oscillations; these are damped out at intermediate times where the system appears to be in a false or slowly converging equilibrium. Finally, at longer times, full equilibration occurs. This false equilibrium is, importantly, associated with the k dependence in τ (k) and has implications for experiment.

  16. Banana regime pressure anisotropy in a bumpy cylinder magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Perciante, A.L.; Callen, J.D.; Shaing, K.C.; Hegna, C.C.

    2006-01-15

    The pressure anisotropy is calculated for a plasma in a bumpy cylindrical magnetic field in the low collisionality (banana) regime for small magnetic-field modulations ({epsilon}{identical_to}{delta}B/2B<<1). Solutions are obtained by integrating the drift-kinetic equation along field lines in steady state. A closure for the local value of the parallel viscous force B{center_dot}{nabla}{center_dot}{pi}{sub parallel} is then calculated and is shown to exceed the flux-surface-averaged parallel viscous force by a factor of O(1/{epsilon}). A high-frequency limit ({omega}>>{nu}) for the pressure anisotropy is also determined and the calculation is then extended to include the full frequency dependence by using an expansion in Cordey eigenfunctions.

  17. Babinet's principle in the Fresnel regime studied using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitachi, Akira; Takata, Momo

    2010-07-01

    The diffraction of ultrasound by a circular disk and an aperture of the same size has been investigated as a demonstration of Babinet's principle in the Fresnel regime. The amplitude and the phase of the diffracted ultrasonic waves are measured and a graphical treatment of the results is performed by drawing vectors in the complex plane. The results verify Babinet's principle. It is also found that the incident wave is π /2 behind the phase of the wave passing through on the central axis of a circular aperture. Because both waves travel the same path and the same distance, they should be in phase. This paradox has previously been regarded as a defect of Fresnel's theory.

  18. Ethnic-Based Nuptial Regimes and Marriage Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Buttenheim, Alison M.; Nobles, Jenna

    2009-01-01

    What role do cultural norms play in shaping individual behaviour and how does this relationship change with rapid socioeconomic development? While modernization and convergence theories predict a weakened relationship between culture and behaviour as individuals rely less on family and community members for economic opportunities, recent research suggests that such norms can persist and continue to influence behaviour. We explored this question in the context of Indonesia, asking whether cultural norms for age at marriage and post-marriage residence—as articulated by local ethnic-based laws and customs known as ‘adat’—influence actual marriage behaviour. We demonstrate that adat norms are strong predictors of marriage behaviours, both over time and net of large increases in educational attainment. Our results suggest more generally that ethnic-based nuptial regimes can be critical and persistent determinants of marriage behaviours even as societies rapidly develop. PMID:19851937

  19. Chiral Effective Field Theory Beyond the Power-Counting Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Jonathan M. M.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Young, Ross D.

    2011-05-24

    Novel techniques are presented, which identify the chiral power-counting regime (PCR), and realize the existence of an intrinsic energy scale embedded in lattice QCD results that extend outside the PCR. The nucleon mass is considered as a benchmark for illustrating this new approach. Using finite-range regularization, an optimal regularization scale can be extracted from lattice simulation results by analyzing the renormalization of the low energy coefficients. The optimal scale allows a description of lattice simulation results that extend beyond the PCR by quantifying and thus handling any scheme-dependence. Preliminary results for the nucleon magnetic moment are also examined, and a consistent optimal regularization scale is obtained. This indicates the existence of an intrinsic scale corresponding to the finite size of the source of the pion cloud.

  20. Impacts of Climate Change and Climate Variability on Hydrological Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, Jan C.

    2003-10-01

    Water is going to be one of the key, if not the most critical, environmental issues in the twenty-first century because of the escalation in socio-economic pressures on the environment in general. Any future climate change or climate variability will only accentuate such pressures. This volume initially follows the perspective of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to infer possible changes in hydrological regimes and water quality based on the outputs from various scenarios of General Circulation Models (GCMs). In subsequent chapters, the possible effects of climate change on the hydrology of each of the continents is examined. The book concludes with an overview of hydrological models for use in the evaluation of the impacts of climate change. It will provide a valuable guide for environmental planners and policy-makers, and will also be of use to all students and researchers interested in the possible effects of climate change.

  1. U.K. offshore safety regime raises new challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Baily, M.

    1996-08-19

    In November 1995, UK operators completed implementation of the offshore safety case regime, which resulted from Lord Cullen`s inquiry into the Piper Alpha explosion of 1988. Since then a number of significant milestones have been achieved, but there are continuing challenges both for the operators of offshore installations and the regulator, the Offshore Safety Division (OSD) of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Recommendations from Lord Cullen`s report on the Piper Alpha disaster were far-reaching and included proposals for an extensive legislative review. They included a requirement for the submission and acceptance of a safety case document for each offshore installation, in advance of operations and underpinning goal-setting regulations covering arrangements for prevention and mitigation of fire and explosion, emergency response, offshore management, and design and construction, and for verification of integrity. The paper discusses safety cases, benefits and costs, work in progress, challenges, appraisal, and compliance.

  2. Regimes of oscillation and reed vibrations in lingual organ pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Eric; Rossing, Thomas D.

    2002-05-01

    We compare the sound generation in six lingual organ pipes including two trompette pipes, two oboes pipes, a krummhorn, and a rankett, the latter two of which were described in a previous paper [Cox and Rossing, paper 2aMU8, 142nd ASA meeting]. With the resonator attached, each pipe sounds in distinct regimes of oscillation, separated by discontinuities. The nominal frequencies of the pipes are generally slightly lower than the resonance frequency of the resonator but slightly higher than the natural frequency of the reed. The air mass loading of both the resonator and shallot lowers the reed frequency. Changing the blowing pressure has little effect on the sounding frequency but a modest effect on sound level.

  3. Flow regimes and heat transfer in vertical narrow annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Ulke, A.; Goldberg, I.

    1993-11-01

    In shell side boiling heat exchangers narrow crevices that are formed between the tubes and the tube support structure provide areas for local thermal-hydraulic conditions which differ significantly from bulk fluid conditions. Understanding of the processes of boiling and dryout in flow restricted crevices can help in designing of tube support geometries to minimize the likelihood of tube support plate and tube corrosion observed in commercial power plant steam generators. This paper describes a one dimensional thermal-hydraulic model of a vertical crevice between a tube and a support plate with cylindrical holes. The annulus formed by the support plate hole and an eccentrically located tube has been represented by vertical strips. The formation, growth and collapse of a steam bubble in each strip has been determined. Based on the bubble history, and flow regimes characterized by ``isolated`` bubbles, ``coalesced`` bubbles and liquid deficient regions have been defined.

  4. Information causality in the quantum and post-quantum regime.

    PubMed

    Ringbauer, Martin; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Berry, Dominic W; White, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Quantum correlations can be stronger than anything achieved by classical systems, yet they are not reaching the limit imposed by relativity. The principle of information causality offers a possible explanation for why the world is quantum and why there appear to be no even stronger correlations. Generalizing the no-signaling condition it suggests that the amount of accessible information must not be larger than the amount of transmitted information. Here we study this principle experimentally in the classical, quantum and post-quantum regimes. We simulate correlations that are stronger than allowed by quantum mechanics by exploiting the effect of polarization-dependent loss in a photonic Bell-test experiment. Our method also applies to other fundamental principles and our results highlight the special importance of anisotropic regions of the no-signalling polytope in the study of fundamental principles. PMID:25378182

  5. Nozzle Free Jet Flows Within the Strong Curved Shock Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tso-Shin

    1975-01-01

    A study based on inviscid analysis was conducted to examine the flow field produced from a convergent-divergent nozzle when a strong curved shock occurs. It was found that a certain constraint is imposed on the flow solution of the problem which is the unique feature of the flow within this flow regime, and provides the reason why the inverse method of calculation cannot be employed for these problems. An approximate method was developed to calculate the flow field, and results were obtained for two-dimensional flows. Analysis and calculations were performed for flows with axial symmetry. It is shown that under certain conditions, the vorticity generated at the jet boundary may become infinite and the viscous effect becomes important. Under other conditions, the asymptotic free jet height as well as the corresponding shock geometry were determined.

  6. Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime: part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Chung-Ting; Amet, Francois; Borzenets, Ivan; Wang, Jiyingmei; Watanabe, Keji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Deacon, Russell; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Bomze, Yuriy; Tarucha, Seigo; Finkelstein, Gleb

    The remarkable electronic quality of graphene/boron nitride heterostructures makes them an ideal medium to study induced superconductivity. Our Josephson junctions are made of encapsulated graphene demonstrate ballistic superconducting transport at the micron scale. In the hole-doped regime, a Fabry-Perot resonator is formed by PN junctions close to superconducting contacts, which causes quantum interference of the critical current. We study variations of the Fraunhofer pattern (I_C vs. B) thought the gate voltage range. At higher magnetic fields, superconducting transport across the junctions becomes profoundly non-periodic. Despite demonstrating strong fluctuations as a function of density and magnetic field, we find that supercurrent persists in a wide range of parameters.

  7. The new patent regime and disease priorities in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Indrani; Guin, Pradeep; Trivedi, Mayur

    2013-01-01

    The World Trade Organization (WTO) and Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), which made product patents compulsory for countries to follow, meant that the entire market for generic drugs was out of bounds for manufacturing till the time the products went off-patent. The TRIPS has generated widespread discussions and debates around the costs and benefits of new patent regimes on countries such as India. This article analyses whether the post-WTO system was consistent with, and conducive to, improved public health in India. It is a first-of-its-kind effort in which the data on pharmaceutical patents applications were collected, collated, cleaned and classified according to IPC codes, to enable preliminary understanding of the nature and type of the applications. The patent applications that are filed in India are not found to be consistent with the disease burden of the country. PMID:22845021

  8. First principles electron transport simulations in the Kondo regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rungger, Ivan; Radonjic, Milos; Appelt, Wilhelm; Chioncel, Liviu; Droghetti, Andrea

    When magnetic atoms, molecules or thin films are brought into contact with metals the electron-electron interaction leads to the appearance of the correlated Kondo state at low temperatures. In this talk we will present results for the electronic structure and conductance in the Kondo regime of recent STM and break junction experiments for stable radical molecules, which correspond to spin half molecular magnets. We will outline the methodological approach to evaluate the conductance of such systems from first principles, as implemented in the Smeagol electron transport code. The method combines the density functional theory (DFT) with Anderson impurity solvers within the continuum time quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC) and numerical renormalization group (NRG) approaches.

  9. Mixed confinement regimes during equilibrium confinement spectroscopy of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Damini; Sheats, Julian; Muralidhar, Abhiram; Miller, Jeremy J.; Huang, Derek E.; Mahshid, Sara; Dorfman, Kevin D.; Reisner, Walter

    2014-01-01

    We have used a combination of fluorescence microscopy experiments and Pruned Enriched Rosenbluth Method simulations of a discrete wormlike chain model to measure the mean extension and the variance in the mean extension of λ-DNA in 100 nm deep nanochannels with widths ranging from 100 nm to 1000 nm in discrete 100 nm steps. The mean extension is only weakly affected by the channel aspect ratio. In contrast, the fluctuations of the chain extension qualitatively differ between rectangular channels and square channels with the same cross-sectional area, owing to the “mixing” of different confinement regimes in the rectangular channels. The agreement between experiment and simulation is very good, using the extension due to intercalation as the only adjustable parameter. PMID:24908035

  10. Gravity-driven soap film dynamics in subcritical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auliel, M. I.; Castro, F.; Sosa, R.; Artana, G.

    2015-10-01

    We undertake the analysis of soap-film dynamics with the classical approach of asymptotic expansions. We focus our analysis in vertical soap film tunnels operating in subcritical regimes with elastic Mach numbers Me=O(10-1) . Considering the associated set of nondimensional numbers that characterize this flow, we show that the flow behaves as a two-dimensional (2D) divergence free flow with variable mass density. When the soap film dynamics agrees with that of a 2D and almost constant mass density flow, the regions where the second invariant of the velocity gradient is non-null correspond to regions where the rate of change of film thickness is non-negligible.

  11. Detector noise statistics in the non-linear regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shopbell, P. L.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    1992-01-01

    The statistical behavior of an idealized linear detector in the presence of threshold and saturation levels is examined. It is assumed that the noise is governed by the statistical fluctuations in the number of photons emitted by the source during an exposure. Since physical detectors cannot have infinite dynamic range, our model illustrates that all devices have non-linear regimes, particularly at high count rates. The primary effect is a decrease in the statistical variance about the mean signal due to a portion of the expected noise distribution being removed via clipping. Higher order statistical moments are also examined, in particular, skewness and kurtosis. In principle, the expected distortion in the detector noise characteristics can be calibrated using flatfield observations with count rates matched to the observations. For this purpose, some basic statistical methods that utilize Fourier analysis techniques are described.

  12. Transition from linear- to nonlinear-focusing regime in filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Laser filamentation in gases is often carried out in the laboratory with focusing optics to better stabilize the filament, whereas real-world applications of filaments frequently involve collimated or near-collimated beams. It is well documented that geometrical focusing can alter the properties of laser filaments and, consequently, a transition between a collimated and a strongly focused filament is expected. Nevertheless, this transition point has not been identified. Here, we propose an analytical method to determine the transition, and show that it corresponds to an actual shift in the balance of physical mechanisms governing filamentation. In high-NA conditions, filamentation is primarily governed by geometrical focusing and plasma effects, while the Kerr nonlinearity plays a more significant role as NA decreases. We find the transition between the two regimes to be relatively insensitive to the intrinsic laser parameters, and our analysis agrees well with a wide range of parameters found in published literature. PMID:25434678

  13. Conductance through a proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, Bernard; Lutchyn, Roman; Glazman, Leonid

    Motivated by recent experiments of the Copenhagen group on InAs nanowires with epitaxial Al, we investigate the two-terminal conductance of a strongly proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime. We identify the leading electron transport processes at zero applied magnetic field B as well as at finite fields, suppressing the induced gap Δind (B) . In the conventional superconducting phase, the conductance is controlled by the sequential Cooper pair tunneling if Δind (B) exceeds the charging energy Ec, and by the elastic single-electron processes if Δind (B)

  14. Operational Regimes and Physics Present in Optoelectronic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Justin K.; Jamshidi, Arash; Ohta, Aaron T.; Hsu, Hsan-Yin; Wu, Ming C.

    2008-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) are a powerful light-based technique for the manipulation of micro- and nanoscopic particles. In addition to an optically patterned dielectrophoresis (DEP) force, other light-induced electrokinetic and thermal effects occur in the OET device. In this paper, we present a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of various fluidic, optical, and electrical effects present during OET operation. These effects include DEP, light-induced ac electroosmosis, electrothermal flow, and buoyancy-driven flow. We present finite-element modeling of these effects to establish the dominant mode for a given set of device parameters and bias conditions. These results are confirmed experimentally and present a comprehensive outline of the operational regimes of the OET device. PMID:19079767

  15. Ionization with low-frequency fields in the tunneling regime

    PubMed Central

    Dura, J.; Camus, N.; Thai, A.; Britz, A.; Hemmer, M.; Baudisch, M.; Senftleben, A.; Schröter, C. D.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Biegert, J.

    2013-01-01

    Strong-field ionisation surprises with richness beyond current understanding despite decade long investigations. Ionisation with mid-IR light has promptly revealed unexpected kinetic energy structures that seem related to unanticipated quantum trajectories of the electrons. We measure first 3D momentum distributions in the deep tunneling regime (γ = 0.3) and observe surprising new electron dynamics of near-zero momentum electrons and extremely low momentum structures, below the eV, despite very high quiver energies of 95 eV. Such level of high-precision measurements at only 1 meV above the threshold, despite 5 orders higher ponderomotive energies, has now become possible with a specifically developed ultrafast mid-IR light source in combination with a reaction microscope, thereby permitting a new level of investigations into mid-IR recollision physics. PMID:24043222

  16. Two competing species in super-diffusive dynamical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cognata, A.; Valenti, D.; Spagnolo, B.; Dubkov, A. A.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamics of two competing species within the framework of the generalized Lotka-Volterra equations, in the presence of multiplicative α-stable Lévy noise sources and a random time dependent interaction parameter, is studied. The species dynamics is characterized by two different dynamical regimes, exclusion of one species and coexistence of both, depending on the values of the interaction parameter, which obeys a Langevin equation with a periodically fluctuating bistable potential and an additive α-stable Lévy noise. The stochastic resonance phenomenon is analyzed for noise sources asymmetrically distributed. Finally, the effects of statistical dependence between multiplicative noise and additive noise on the dynamics of the two species are studied.

  17. Insulating States in the Integer Quantum Hall Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knighton, Talbot; Serafin, Alessandro; Wu, Zhe; Tarquini, Vinicio; Xia, J. F.; Sullivan, Neil; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Huang, Jian

    Quantum Hall measurements are performed at temperatures 20-300 mK in high quality p-type GaAs quantum well systems having mobility μ = 4 ×106 cm2/V .s for density 5 ×1010 cm-2. We report a series of insulating phases appearing at or near integer filling factors ν >= 1 . The DC resistance demonstrates a maximum of 25M Ω, much larger than the quantum resistance h /e2 , with threshold transport behavior at low currents around 10 pA at low temperatures. The threshold diminishes upon heating up to 200 mK, consistent with a finite temperature melting of bubble phases or Wigner crystal. Additionally, these peaks have a complex electrical impedance for AC signals, with large phase shifts down to 1Hz. In this regime, the ac impedance of the two chiral edges show distinct correlated characteristics. NSF DMR-1410302.

  18. Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J H; Flowers, D L; Buchholz, B A; Dibble, R W

    2006-02-14

    Interest in the use of alternative fuels and combustion regimes is increasing as the price of petroleum climbs. The inherently higher efficiency of Diesel engines has led to increased adoption of Diesels in Europe, capturing approximately 40% of the new passenger car market. Unfortunately, lower CO{sub 2} emissions are countered with higher nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions, and higher noise. Noise and PM have traditionally been the obstacles toward consumer acceptance of Diesel passenger cars in North America, while NOx (a key component in photochemical smog) has been more of an engineering challenge. Diesels are lean burning (combustion with excess oxygen) and reducing NOx to N2 in an oxygen rich environment is difficult. Adding oxygenated compounds to the fuel helps reduce PM emissions, but relying on fuel alone to reduce PM is unrealistic. Keeping peak combustion temperature below 1700 K prevents NOx formation. Altering the combustion regime to burn at temperatures below the NOx threshold and accept a wide variety of fuels seems like a promising alternative for future engines. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is a possible solution. Fuel and air are well mixed prior to intake into a cylinder (homogeneous charge) and ignition occurs by compression of the fuel-air mixture by the piston. HCCI is rapid and relatively cool, producing little NOx and PM. Unfortunately, it is hard to control since HCCI is initiated by temperature and pressure instead of a spark or direct fuel injection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use intrinsically labeled biofuels as tracers of HCCI combustion. Data from tracer experiments are used to validate combustion modeling.

  19. Snowmelt Runoff Regime Shifts Across Western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritze, H. H.; Stewart-Frey, I. T.; Pebesma, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    Snowmelt runoff serves as a climatic indicator and is of great importance for water resources across Western North America. A changing climate affects streamflow and changes its intra-annual contribution. Previous studies have found changes in snowmelt runoff towards earlier in the year through the 2000 period. The goals of this study were to a) determine whether streamflow timing trends have accelerated most recently (including the water year 2008), b) evaluate whether and where streams have experienced snowmelt runoff regime shifts, and c) develop an efficient and accessible interface to display stream hydrographs, stream details, and streamflow timing measures. Streamflow timing trends, seasonal redistribution, and correlation with climatic indices were determined by statistical analysis. Based on the ratio of years with and without snowmelt pulses this study also developed a measure of snowmelt domination and classified the streams into four categories. These categories were used to compare groups of streams with similar runoff characteristics and to quantify shifts in snowmelt domination regimes. Results show that shifts in streamflow timing have generally increased when considering the period through 2008. In addition, 15-20% of the 362 gauges included in this study have undergone a snowmelt category shift over the last decades. These category shifts are almost exclusively in the direction towards greater rain domination. The most vulnerable watersheds have changed from clearly snowmelt dominated to mostly rain dominated. Last but not least, the data and measures were interactively visualized on a virtual globe using Nasa World Wind Java and are publicly accessible from a Santa Clara University website.

  20. On Fire regime modelling using satellite TM time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddi, F.; . Ghermandi, L.; Lanorte, A.; Lasaponara, R.

    2009-04-01

    Wildfires can cause an environment deterioration modifying vegetation dynamics because they have the capacity of changing vegetation diversity and physiognomy. In semiarid regions, like the northwestern Patagonia, fire disturbance is also important because it could impact on the potential productivity of the ecosystem. There is reduction plant biomass and with that reducing the animal carrying capacity and/or the forest site quality with negative economics implications. Therefore knowledge of the fires regime in a region is of great importance to understand and predict the responses of vegetation and its possible effect on the regional economy. Studies of this type at a landscape level can be addressed using GIS tools. Satellite imagery allows detect burned areas and through a temporary analysis can be determined to fire regime and detecting changes at landscape scale. The study area of work is located on the east of the city of Bariloche including the San Ramon Ranch (22,000 ha) and its environs in the ecotone formed by the sub Antarctic forest and the patagonian steppe. We worked with multiespectral Landsat TM images and Landsat ETM + 30m spatial resolution obtained at different times. For the spatial analysis we used the software Erdas Imagine 9.0 and ArcView 3.3. A discrimination of vegetation types has made and was determined areas affected by fires in different years. We determined the level of change on vegetation induced by fire. In the future the use of high spatial resolution images combined with higher spectral resolution will allows distinguish burned areas with greater precision on study area. Also the use of digital terrain models derived from satellite imagery associated with climatic variables will allows model the relationship between them and the dynamics of vegetation.

  1. Landscape-scale forest disturbance regimes in southern Peruvian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Doreen S; Hill, Ross A; Hopkinson, Chris; Baker, Timothy R

    2013-10-01

    Landscape-scale gap-size frequency distributions in tropical forests are a poorly studied but key ecological variable. Currently, a scale gap currently exists between local-scale field-based studies and those employing regional-scale medium-resolution satellite data. Data at landscape scales but of fine resolution would, however, facilitate investigation into a range of ecological questions relating to gap dynamics. These include whether canopy disturbances captured in permanent sample plots (PSPs) are representative of those in their surrounding landscape, and whether disturbance regimes vary with forest type. Here, therefore, we employ airborne LiDAR data captured over 142.5 km2 of mature, swamp, and regenerating forests in southeast Peru to assess the landscape-scale disturbance at a sampling resolution of up to 2 m. We find that this landscape is characterized by large numbers of small gaps; large disturbance events are insignificant and infrequent. Of the total number of gaps that are 2 m2 or larger in area, just 0.45% were larger than 100 m2, with a power-law exponent (alpha) value of the gap-size frequency distribution of 2.22. However, differences in disturbance regimes are seen among different forest types, with a significant difference in the alpha value of the gap-size frequency distribution observed for the swamp/regenerating forests compared with the mature forests at higher elevations. Although a relatively small area of the total forest of this region was investigated here, this study presents an unprecedented assessment of this landscape with respect to its gap dynamics. This is particularly pertinent given the range of forest types present in the landscape and the differences observed. The coupling of detailed insights into forest properties and growth provided by PSPs with the broader statistics of disturbance events using remote sensing is recommended as a strong basis for scaling-up estimates of landscape and regional-scale carbon balance. PMID

  2. Thermal Evolution and Crystallisation Regimes of the Martian Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. J.; Pommier, A.

    2015-12-01

    Though it is accepted that Mars has a sulfur-rich metallic core, its chemical and physical state as well as its time-evolution are still unconstrained and debated. Several lines of evidence indicate that an internal magnetic field was once generated on Mars and that this field decayed around 3.7-4.0 Gyrs ago. The standard model assumes that this field was produced by a thermal (and perhaps chemical) dynamo operating in the Martian core. We use this information to construct parameterized models of the Martian dynamo in order to place constraints on the thermochemical evolution of the Martian core, with particular focus on its crystallization regime. Considered compositions are in the FeS system, with S content ranging from ~10 and 16 wt%. Core radius, density and CMB pressure are varied within the errors provided by recent internal structure models that satisfy the available geodetic constraints (planetary mass, moment of inertia and tidal Love number). We also vary the melting curve and adiabat, CMB heat flow and thermal conductivity. Successful models are those that match the dynamo cessation time and fall within the bounds on present-day CMB temperature. The resulting suite of over 500 models suggest three possible crystallization regimes: growth of a solid inner core starting at the center of the planet; freezing and precipitation of solid iron (Fe- snow) from the core-mantle boundary (CMB); and freezing that begins midway through the core. Our analysis focuses on the effects of core properties that are expected to be constrained during the forthcoming Insight mission.

  3. Regimes of Pulsar Pair Formation and Particle Energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.; Zhang, Bing; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the conditions required for the production of electron-positron pairs above a pulsar polar cap (PC) and the influence of pair production on the energetics of the primary particle acceleration. Assuming space-charge limited flow acceleration including the inertial frame-dragging effect, we allow both one-photon and two-photon pair production by either curvature radiation (CR) photons or photons resulting from inverse-Compton scattering of thermal photons from the PC by primary electrons. We find that,, while only the younger pulsars can produce pairs through CR, nearly all known radio pulsars are capable of producing pairs through non-resonant inverse-Compton scatterings. The effect of the neutron star equations of state on the pair death lines is explored. We show that pair production is facilitated in more compact stars and more a massive stars. Therefore accretion of mass by pulsars in binary systems may allow pair production in most of the millisecond purser population. We also find that two-photon pair production may be important in millisecond pursers if their surface temperatures are above approx. or equal to three million degrees K. Pursers that produce pairs through CRT wilt have their primary acceleration limited by the effect of screening of the electric field. In this regime, the high-energy luminosity should follow a L(sub HE) proportional to dot-E(sup 1/2, sub rot) dependence. The acceleration voltage drop in pursers that produce pairs only through inverse-Compton emission will not be limited by electric field screening. In this regime, the high-energy luminosity should follow a L(sub HE) proportional to dot-E(sub rot) dependence. Thus, older pursers will have significantly lower gamma-ray luminosity.

  4. Managing the human component of fire regimes: lessons from Africa.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Sally

    2016-06-01

    Human impacts on fire regimes accumulated slowly with the evolution of modern humans able to ignite fires and manipulate landscapes. Today, myriad voices aim to influence fire in grassy ecosystems to different ends, and this is complicated by a colonial past focused on suppressing fire and preventing human ignitions. Here, I review available evidence on the impacts of people on various fire characteristics such as the number and size of fires, fire intensity, fire frequency and seasonality of fire in African grassy ecosystems, with the intention of focusing the debate and identifying areas of uncertainty. Humans alter seasonal patterns of fire in grassy systems but tend to decrease total fire emissions: livestock have replaced fire as the dominant consumer in many parts of Africa, and fragmented landscapes reduce area burned. Humans alter the season and time of day when fires occur, with important implications for fire intensity, tree-grass dynamics and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Late season fires are more common when fire is banned or illegal: these later fires are far more intense but emit fewer GHGs. The types of fires which preserve human livelihoods and biodiversity are not always aligned with the goal of reducing GHG concentrations. Current fire management challenges therefore involve balancing the needs of a large rural population against national and global perspectives on the desirability of different types of fire, but this cannot happen unless the interests of all parties are equally represented. In the future, Africa is expected to urbanize and land use to intensify, which will imply different trajectories for the continent's fire regimes.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind. PMID:27216516

  5. Fire Regime and Stability of the West African Tropical Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwomoh, F. K.; Wimberly, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ecological discussions concerning alternative stable states theory suggest that tropical forest ecosystems could shift to qualitatively different alternative states upon catastrophic disturbances which exceed forest resilience. In this regard, it is expected that changes in the fire regime facilitated by climate and land use alterations could lead to rapid forest cover loss, creating conditions likely to push tropical forests to tipping points, beyond which forest resilience is lost. However, there is a dearth of empirical examples of fire-driven alternative stable states involving tropical forests. Key among the constraints for this scarcity are the requirements for large scale disturbances and long-term data, both of which are scarce. However, in the West African tropical forest (referred to as the Upper Guinean forest, UGF) a number of protected areas were impacted by large fire events during the 1980s El Niño-driven droughts, providing an opportunity for testing hypotheses concerning alternative stable states in tropical forest ecosystems. This paper aims to demonstrate fire-driven alternative stable states in the deciduous forest zone of the UGF by analyzing fire activity and forest recovery in fire-impacted forest reserves. We analyzed historical Landsat and MODIS imagery to map and quantify vegetation cover change, fire frequency and fire severity patterns. Our analyses suggest that the historic fires in the 1980s were catastrophic enough to remove forest canopy, thereby triggering a landscape-scale alternative stable states. Forest cover declined substantially becoming replaced by a novel ecosystem with low tree density. Our results also indicate the establishment of a positive fire-vegetation feedback effect, such that the new vegetation which displaced severely burned forests is more pyrogenic and maintained through frequent burns. This study expands our knowledge on the vulnerability of tropical forest ecosystems to state transitions in response to fire

  6. Free-Tropospheric Moisture Convergence and Tropical Convective Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunaga, H.

    2014-12-01

    It is known that quiescent periods with only shallow cumuli prevalent are frequently observed even in the deep Tropics, which is considered from the climatological perspectives as an area harboring vigorous deep convection. It is argued in this work that the free-tropospheric (FT) moisture convergence is a crucial factor for separating the stable maintenance of isolated shallow cumuli in the quiescent periods from the self-sustaining growth of organized convective systems in the dynamic periods over tropical oceans. The analysis is based on a variety of satellite measurements including Aqua AIRS T and q soundings and QuikSCAT surface wind, composited with reference to the time before or after the occurrence of precipitating clouds detected by TRMM PR. The FT moisture convergence and updraft moisture flux at cloud base are then derived from this dataset under large-scale moisture budget constraint (see Figure). Free-tropospheric precipitation efficiency (FTPE), or the ratio of precipitation to updraft moisture flux at cloud base, is introduced as a measure of convective intensity (rather than the population) over the large-scale domain. The following hypothesis is discussed in light of the analysis results. Isolated shallow cumuli would stay shallow when large-scale FT moisture is diverging (although moisture is weakly converging when integrated over the whole troposphere) since an increase in cumulus population would be counteracted by an additional moisture divergence in the FT. When large-scale FT convergence is positive, in contrast, developing clouds would induce a more moisture input and allow an unstable growth to a highly organized convective system. Zero FT moisture convergence may serve as the neutrality separating the negative feedback acting in the quiescent regime from the positive feedback instrumental for the dynamic regime.

  7. Transport in the plateau regime in a tokamak pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, J.; Shaing, K. C.

    2012-07-15

    In a tokamak H-mode, a strong E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear is generated during the L-H transition. Turbulence in a pedestal is suppressed significantly by this E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear. In this case, neoclassical transport may become important. The neoclassical fluxes are calculated in the plateau regime with the parallel plasma flow using their kinetic definitions. In an axisymmetric tokamak, the neoclassical particles fluxes can be decomposed into the banana-plateau flux and the Pfirsch-Schlueter flux. The banana-plateau particle flux is driven by the parallel viscous force and the Pfirsch-Schlueter flux by the poloidal variation of the friction force. The combined quantity of the radial electric field and the parallel flow is determined by the flux surface averaged parallel momentum balance equation rather than requiring the ambipolarity of the total particle fluxes. In this process, the Pfirsch-Schlueter flux does not appear in the flux surface averaged parallel momentum equation. Only the banana-plateau flux is used to determine the parallel flow in the form of the flux surface averaged parallel viscosity. The heat flux, obtained using the solution of the parallel momentum balance equation, decreases exponentially in the presence of sonic M{sub p} without any enhancement over that in the standard neoclassical theory. Here, M{sub p} is a combination of the poloidal E Multiplication-Sign B flow and the parallel mass flow. The neoclassical bootstrap current in the plateau regime is presented. It indicates that the neoclassical bootstrap current also is related only to the banana-plateau fluxes. Finally, transport fluxes are calculated when M{sub p} is large enough to make the parallel electron viscosity comparable with the parallel ion viscosity. It is found that the bootstrap current has a finite value regardless of the magnitude of M{sub p}.

  8. The rainfall regime in Lisbon in the last 150 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutiel, H.; Trigo, R. M.

    2014-11-01

    The first decades of the rainfall series of Lisbon have been digitized recently allowing a long-term assessment of the rainfall regime for 150 years of uninterrupted, i.e., the first assessment for the longest continuous precipitation time series in western Iberia. This data has been monitored continuously at the D. Luís observatory having started to be published in 1864 in the Observatory's log books (Annals). We use an approach based on different characteristics of rain spells that has been proved to be satisfactory for the analysis of the different parameters related to the rainfall regime in that part of the world. Thus, a rain spell is defined as a series of consecutive days with a measured daily rainfall equal or higher than 1.0 mm. Each rain spell is preceded and followed by at least one dry day. For each rain spell, its duration, its yield (RSY), and its average intensity (RSI) was calculated. Additionally, the total number of rain spells in each year was also considered. Dryness was analyzed using the dry days since last rain approach. Besides the evaluation over the entire 150-year period available, we have also looked into three equally spaced sub-periods. Lisbon reveals large inter-annual and intra-annual variability and both have increased considerably in the last decades. The large intra-annual variability is demonstrated by both; a very large range of annual rainfall percentage accumulated at any given date and by a very large range of dates on which a certain rainfall percentage was accumulated. Again, both metrics increased in the last decades. Parallel to the increase in the uncertainty, a very significant net increase is noticed in the annual totals since the 1960s compared to the first half of the previous century. The increase is mainly due to more intense events which are reflected by higher RSY and RSI values in the last 50 years.

  9. Smith-Purcell radiation in the highly relativistic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J.E.; Woods, K.J.; Kirk, H.G.

    1995-12-31

    An electron moving over the surface of a diffraction grating will transfer a part of its kinetic energy to radiation via a velocity synchronous coupling with a slow space harmonic component of the field. Since the phase velocity of a slow space harmonic is less than the speed of light, the slow components decay exponentially, or evanesce, with distance above the grating and the evanescence scale is determined by the product of the relative velocity, {beta}, the relative energy, {gamma}, and the wavelength {lambda}. Thus, in the relativistic regime, good electron - grating coupling can be maintained at beam heights that are greater than the emitted wavelength. In order to explore this regime a series of experiments have been carried out with moderately energetic beams and an experiment with the 70-MeV beam at the Accelerator Test Facility is in the planning stage. The work has two basic goals: the first is to explore the characteristics of the spontaneous emission produced by the beam as it moves over the grating, and the second is to evaluate the potential of grating-coupled or Smith-Purcell free electron lasers. The spontaneous emission is of direct interest. It appears on the basis of work to date that the broad spectral distribution produced by a relativistic electron beam moving over a grating is potentially an alternative source for experiments of the type now carried out on synchrotron infrared beam lines. The grating, or a system of gratings, are also a potential alternative to the magnetic undulator and thus another basic approach to free electron laser design. The presentation will include a summary of the design of the experiment which is to be carried out on the 70-MeV A.T.F. beam line and a review of the theory of Smith-Purcell radiation in the high energy limit. Gain calculations and the role of beam quality in establishing performance limits will be discussed.

  10. Probing of polymer surfaces in the viscoelastic regime.

    PubMed

    Chyasnavichyus, Marius; Young, Seth L; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2014-09-01

    In this Feature Article, we discussed the experimental and modeling methods and analyzed the limitations of the surface probing of nanomechanical properties of polymeric and biological materials in static and dynamic regimes with atomic force microscopy (AFM), which are widely utilized currently. To facilitate such measurements with minimized ambiguities, in this study we present a combined method to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of compliant polymeric materials. We collected force-distance data in the static regime for a benchmark polymer material (poly(n-butyl methacrylate)) with an easily accessible glass-transition temperature (about 25 °C) at different loading rates and different temperatures across the glassy state, glass-transition region, and rubbery state. For this analysis, we exploited a Johnson-modified Sneddon's approach in a combination with the standard linear solid model. Critical experimental steps suggested for robust probing are (i) the use of a tip with a well-characterized parabolic shape, (ii) probing in a liquid environment in order to reduce jump-in phenomenon, and (iii) minute indentations to ensure the absence of plastic deformation. Whereas the standard Sneddon's model generates quantitatively adequate elastic modulus values below and above the glass transition, this traditional approach can significantly underestimate actual modulus values in the vicinity of the glass-transition region (15 °C above or below Tg), with major deviations occurring at the loss tangent peak. The analysis of the experimental data with Sneddon's model for the elastic region (glassy and rubbery states) and Johnson's model for the viscoelastic region allowed for the restoration of the universal master curve and the evaluation of the storage modulus, loss modulus, loss tangent, relaxation times, and activation energies of the polymer surface across the glass-transition region and at relevant loading rates. PMID:24512573

  11. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Wang, M.; Ghan, S. J.; Ding, A.; Wang, H.; Zhang, K.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Takeamura, T.; Gettelman, A.; Morrison, H.; Lee, Y. H.; Shindell, D. T.; Partridge, D. G.; Stier, P.; Kipling, Z.; Fu, C.

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (ω500), lower-tropospheric stability (LTS) and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs), with a focus on liquid water path (LWP) response to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The LWP sensitivity to aerosol perturbation within dynamic regimes is found to exhibit a large spread among these GCMs. It is in regimes of strong large-scale ascend (ω500 < -25 hPa d-1) and low clouds (stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus) where the models differ most. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing is also found to differ significantly among different regimes. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing in ascending regimes is as large as that in stratocumulus regimes, which indicates that regimes with strong large-scale ascend are as important as stratocumulus regimes in studying AIE. It is further shown that shortwave aerosol indirect forcing over regions with high monthly large-scale surface precipitation rate (> 0.1 mm d-1) contributes the most to the total aerosol indirect forcing (from 64 to nearly 100 %). Results show that the uncertainty in AIE is even larger within specific dynamical regimes than that globally, pointing to the need to reduce the uncertainty in AIE in different dynamical regimes.

  12. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shipeng; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Ding, Aijun; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai; Neubauer, David; Lohmann, Ulrike; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Takeamura, Toshihiko; Gettelman, Andrew; Morrison, Hugh; Lee, Yunha; Shindell, Drew T.; Partridge, Daniel G.; Stier, Philip; Kipling, Zak; Fu, Congbin

    2016-03-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (ω500), lower-tropospheric stability (LTS) and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs), with a focus on liquid water path (LWP) response to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The LWP sensitivity to aerosol perturbation within dynamic regimes is found to exhibit a large spread among these GCMs. It is in regimes of strong large-scale ascent (ω500 < -25 hPa day-1) and low clouds (stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus) where the models differ most. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing is also found to differ significantly among different regimes. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing in ascending regimes is close to that in subsidence regimes, which indicates that regimes with strong large-scale ascent are as important as stratocumulus regimes in studying AIE. It is further shown that shortwave aerosol indirect forcing over regions with high monthly large-scale surface precipitation rate (> 0.1 mm day-1) contributes the most to the total aerosol indirect forcing (from 64 to nearly 100 %). Results show that the uncertainty in AIE is even larger within specific dynamical regimes compared to the uncertainty in its global mean values, pointing to the need to reduce the uncertainty in AIE in different dynamical regimes.

  13. A climatology of low level wind regimes over Central America using a weather type classification approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáenz, Fernán; Durán-Quesada, Ana María

    2015-04-01

    Based on the potential of the weather types classification method to study synoptic features, this study proposes the application of such methodology for the identification of the main large scale patterns related with weather in Central America. Using ERA Interim low-level winds in a domain that encompasses the intra-Americas sea, the eastern tropical Pacific, southern North America, Central America and northern South America; the K-means clustering algorithm was applied to find recurrent regimes of low-level winds. Eleven regimes were identified and good coherency between the results and known features of regional circulation was found. It was determined that the main large scale patterns can be either locally forced or a response to tropical-extratropical interactions. Moreover, the local forcing dominates the summer regimes whereas mid latitude interactions lead winter regimes. The study of the relationship between the large scale patterns and regional precipitation shows that winter regimes are related with the Caribbean-Pacific precipitation seesaw. Summer regimes, on the other hand, enhance the Caribbean-Pacific precipitation contrasting distribution as a function of the dominant regimes. A strong influence of ENSO on the frequency and duration of the regimes was found. It was determined that the specific effect of ENSO on the regimes depends on whether the circulation is locally forced or lead by the interaction between the tropics and the mid-latitudes. The study of the cold surges using the information of the identified regimes revealed that three regimes are linkable with the occurrence of cold surges that affect Central America and its precipitation. As the winter regimes are largely dependent of mid-latitude interaction with the tropics, the effect that ENSO has on the Jet Stream is reflected in the winter regimes. An automated analysis of large scale conditions based on reanalysis and/or model data seems useful for both dynamical studies and as a tool

  14. Robustness and uncertainties in future hydrological regimes of Swiss catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addor, N.; Roessler, O.; Koeplin, N.; Bernhard, L.; Weingartner, R.; Seibert, J.

    2013-12-01

    Projections of discharge under future climate are impaired by uncertainties arising from different sources: the emission scenarios, the climate models and internal climate variability, the post-processing and sampling of the climate projections, and the hydrological models structure and parameterization. This study aims to investigate the contribution of these sources to the final uncertainty of discharge projections. To this end we performed analyses of variance (ANOVA) in six catchments expected to react differently to climate change and representative of the typical Swiss discharge regimes. We used climate projections of the CH2011 dataset obtained from the Center for Climate Systems Modeling (C2SM). This dataset consists of two types of projections, both relying on the delta change technique. The delta coefficients were determined either in a deterministic way by spectral smoothing of 10 GCM-RCM chains or in a probabilistic way by a Bayesian multi-model approach combining 20 runs until 2050, and then 14 runs until 2099. In addition to the climate projections for emission scenario A1B chosen for the ENSEMBLES project, the CH2011 team generated simulations for the scenarios A2 and RCP3PD using pattern scaling. This enabled us to address the influence of the uncertainty in greenhouse gas emissions on discharge projections. We ran hydrological simulations using three conceptual models: HBV, PREVAH and WaSiM. HBV and PREVAH rely on a similar reservoir structure, while WaSiM uses the more process-oriented Richards-equation approach. PREVAH and WaSiM rely on a higher level of spatial discretization than the lumped HBV model. The use of the three different models allowed evaluation of the sensitivity of discharge projections to the hydrological model complexity and structure. Further, we compared two ways to determine PREVAH parameter values: via calibration and via regionalization. Simulations were run for the periods 2020-2049, 2045-2074 and 2070-2099 to assess the

  15. Analysis of weather condition influencing fire regime in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciu, Valentina; Masala, Francesco; Salis, Michele; Sirca, Costantino; Spano, Donatella

    2014-05-01

    Fires have a crucial role within Mediterranean ecosystems, with both negative and positive impacts on all biosphere components and with reverberations on different scales. Fire determines the landscape structure and plant composition, but it is also the cause of enormous economic and ecological damages, beside the loss of human life. In addition, several authors are in agreement suggesting that, during the past decades, changes on fire patterns have occurred, especially in terms of fire-prone areas expansion and fire season lengthening. Climate and weather are two of the main controlling agents, directly and indirectly, of fire regime influencing vegetation productivity, causing water stress, igniting fires through lightning, or modulating fire behavior through wind. On the other hand, these relationships could be not warranted in areas where most ignitions are caused by people (Moreno et al. 2009). Specific analyses of the driving forces of fire regime across countries and scales are thus still required in order to better anticipate fire seasons and also to advance our knowledge of future fire regimes. The objective of this work was to improve our knowledge of the relative effects of several weather variables on forest fires in Italy for the period 1985-2008. Meteorological data were obtained through the MARS (Monitoring Agricultural Resources) database, interpolated at 25x25 km scale. Fire data were provided by the JRC (Join Research Center) and the CFVA (Corpo Forestale e di Vigilanza Ambientale, Sardinia). A hierarchical cluster analysis, based on fire and weather data, allowed the identification of six homogeneous areas in terms of fire occurrence and climate (pyro-climatic areas). Two statistical techniques (linear and non-parametric models) were applied in order to assess if inter-annual variability in weather pattern and fire events had a significant trend. Then, through correlation analysis and multi-linear regression modeling, we investigated the

  16. An Interface between Law and Science: The Climate Change Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshov, Y.; Grandbois, M.; Kaniaha, S.

    2012-04-01

    Law and Science are jointly building the international climate change regime. Up to date, international law and climate science have been unable to take into consideration both regional law and Pacific climate science in this process. Under the International Climate Change Adaptation Initiative (the Australian Government Initiative to assist with high priority climate adaptation needs in vulnerable countries in the Asia-Pacific region) significant efforts were dedicated to improve understanding of climate in the Pacific through the Pacific Climate Change Science Program (PCCSP) and through the Pacific Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program (PASAP). The first comprehensive PCCSP scientific report on the South Pacific climate has been published in 2011. Under the PASAP, web-based information tools for seasonal climate prediction have been developed and now outputs from dynamical climate model are used in 15 countries of the North-West and South Pacific for enhanced prediction of rainfall, air and sea surface temperatures which reduces countries' vulnerability to climate variability in the context of a changing climate. On a regional scale, the Meteorological and Geohazards Department of Vanuatu is preparing a full report on Climate change impacts on the country. These scientific reports and tools could lead to a better understanding of climate change in the South Pacific and to a better understanding of climate change science, for lawyers and policy-makers. The International climate change regime develops itself according to science findings, and at the pace of the four scientific reports issued by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). In return, Law is a contributing factor to climate change, a structural data in the development and perception of environmental issues and it exerts an influence on Science. Because of the dependency of law on science, the PCCSP and PASAP outcomes will also stimulate and orientate developments in law of the Pacific

  17. Weather regimes and orographic circulation around New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Jérôme; Marchesiello, Patrick; Jourdain, Nicolas C; Menkes, Christophe; Leroy, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The local climate and island-scale circulation around New Caledonia is investigated using a 4-km resolution mesoscale atmospheric model in concert with QuikSCAT scatterometer winds at 12.5-km resolution. The mesoscale atmospheric weather regimes are first examined through an objective classification applied to the remote sensed winds for nine warm seasons from 1999 to 2008. Four main weather types are identified. Their corresponding synoptic-scale circulation reveals that they are strongly discernable through the position and intensity of the South Pacific Convergence zone (SPCZ), the mid-latitude systems, and the subtropical jet stream. The link between the mesoscale weather types and the two dominant large-scale modes of variability, namely the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), is also described in terms of their influence on the occurrence of each weather type. It shows that their occurrence is significantly controlled by both MJO and ENSO, through modulation of the SPCZ. The large-scale modes of variability are scaled down to island-scale circulation through synoptic and mesoscale regimes, and are eventually modulated by orographic and thermal control. The island-scale circulation is inferred in this study by applying the compositing method to both observed and simulated winds. Their comparison clearly shows the ability of the mesoscale model to capture the local circulation and its spatial and temporal variability. A scaling analysis conducted from the simulated atmospheric parameters shows that the mountain range of New Caledonia is hydrodynamically steep. As a result of trade-wind obstruction by the mountainous island, the flow is shaped by coastally trapped mesoscale responses, i.e., blocking, flow splitting and corner winds, with a spatial scale of about 150 km. Two main obstacles, Mont Panié and Mont Humboldt play a significant role on the dynamical behavior of the low-level flow, while the diurnal heating

  18. Laboratory modeling of pulsed regimes of electron cyclotron instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, S. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Viktorov, M. E.; Izotov, I. V.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Demekhov, A. G.; Shalashov, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    One of the most interesting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) manifestations is the generation of bursts of electromagnetic radiation that are related to the explosive growth of cyclotron instabilities of the magnetoactive plasma confined in magnetic traps of various kinds and that are accompanied by particle precipitations from the trap. Such phenomena are observed in a wide range of plasma parameters under various conditions: in the magnetospheres of the Earth and planets, in solar coronal loops, and in laboratory magnetic traps. We demonstrate the use of a laboratory setup based on a magnetic mirror trap with plasma sustained by a gyrotron radiation under ECR conditions for investigation of the cyclotron instabilities similar to the ones which take place in space plasmas. Two regimes of the cyclotron instability are studied. In the first place, quasi-periodic pulsed precipitation of energetic electrons from the trap, accompanied by microwave bursts at frequencies below the electron gyrofrequency in the center of the trap, is detected. The study of the microwave plasma emission and the energetic electrons precipitated from the trap shows that the precipitation is related to the excitation of whistlers propagating nearly parallel to the trap axis. The observed instability has much in common with phenomena in space magnetic traps, such as radiation belts of magnetized planets and solar coronal loops. Such regimes have much in common with the quasi-periodic VLF radiation in the Earth's inner magnetosphere (with periods of T ~ 100 s) and can also be met in solar flaring loops and at other space objects. In the second place, we have detected and investigated quasi-periodic series of pulsed energetic electron precipitations in the decaying plasma of a pulsed ECR discharge in a mirror axisymmetric magnetic trap. The observed particle ejections from the trap are interpreted as the result of resonant interaction between energetic electrons and a slow extraordinary wave

  19. Changes in precipitation regime in Tuscany Region (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, Enrica; Manetti, Simona; Chiarello, Valentina; Fatichi, Simone

    2014-05-01

    Changes in the rainfall patterns cause relevant effects on ecosystems, on water resource availability and on human activities. In the last decades, research on precipitation trend analysis has become a topic of particular interest to guide water resources planning and management, as well as a signal of climate change. The first step of the analysis is the accurate validation and quality control procedure of the available rainfall data, recorded from 1916 to 2010, by rain gauges with at least 30 years of measurements, located in the Tuscany Region, over an area of about 23.000 km2, in Central Italy. The time series of annual daily rainfall maxima recorded in 348 stations and of annual rainfall maxima of short duration (i.e. 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 hours) recorded in 149 stations are analyzed. In order to assess changes and possible presence of a trend in the precipitation patterns, three different statistical tests (Mann-Kendall, Spearman Rho and Cox-Stuart) for three different confidence levels (α=0.1, 0.05, 0.01) are applied. The analysis on the whole 1916-2010 period is carried out. However, with the aim to estimate whether trends appear mainly critical during a particular time interval, rainfall time series are also subdivided and analyzed over three partially overlapping 35-years periods: 1916-1950, 1945-1980 and 1975-2010. The proposed statistical analysis does not show strong evidence of nonstationarity, a slight trend appears in a certain number of stations and only few stations show a significant trend. Particularly, there is a prevalence of trends absence in the precipitation regime in Tuscany Region for the period 1916-2010 and during the 35 years overlapping sub-periods, except in the period 1945-1980 where the presence of a slight higher percent of "significant negative trend" is observed. Afterward, in order to investigate the presence of geographic patterns or correlation with topography or other morphologic characteristics, the trends over the whole study

  20. Evolution of the rainfall regime in the United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouarda, T. B. M. J.; Charron, C.; Niranjan Kumar, K.; Marpu, P. R.; Ghedira, H.; Molini, A.; Khayal, I.

    2014-06-01

    Arid and semiarid climates occupy more than 1/4 of the land surface of our planet, and are characterized by a strongly intermittent hydrologic regime, posing a major threat to the development of these regions. Despite this fact, a limited number of studies have focused on the climatic dynamics of precipitation in desert environments, assuming the rainfall input - and their temporal trends - as marginal compared with the evaporative component. Rainfall series at four meteorological stations in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) were analyzed for assessment of trends and detection of change points. The considered variables were total annual, seasonal and monthly rainfall; annual, seasonal and monthly maximum rainfall; and the number of rainy days per year, season and month. For the assessment of the significance of trends, the modified Mann-Kendall test and Theil-Sen’s test were applied. Results show that most annual series present decreasing trends, although not statistically significant at the 5% level. The analysis of monthly time series reveals strong decreasing trends mainly occurring in February and March. Many trends for these months are statistically significant at the 10% level and some trends are significant at the 5% level. These two months account for most of the total annual rainfall in the UAE. To investigate the presence of sudden changes in rainfall time-series, the cumulative sum method and a Bayesian multiple change point detection procedure were applied to annual rainfall series. Results indicate that a change point happened around 1999 at all stations. Analyses were performed to evaluate the evolution of characteristics before and after 1999. Student’s t-test and Levene’s test were applied to determine if a change in the mean and/or in the variance occurred at the change point. Results show that a decreasing shift in the mean has occurred in the total annual rainfall and the number of rainy days at all four stations, and that the variance has