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Sample records for arabidopsis cell cultures1w

  1. A Chimeric Arabinogalactan Protein Promotes Somatic Embryogenesis in Cotton Cell Culture1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Simon; Heath, Robyn Louise; Clarke, Adrienne Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are a family of extracellular plant proteoglycans implicated in many aspects of plant growth and development, including in vitro somatic embryogenesis (SE). We found that specific AGPs were produced by cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) calli undergoing SE and that when these AGPs were isolated and incorporated into tissue culture medium, cotton SE was promoted. When the AGPs were partly or fully deglycosylated, SE-promoting activity was not diminished. Testing of AGPs separated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that the SE-promoting activity resided in a hydrophobic fraction. We cloned a full-length complementary DNA (cotton PHYTOCYANIN-LIKE ARABINOGALACTAN-PROTEIN1 [GhPLA1]) that encoded the protein backbone of an AGP in the active fraction. It has a chimeric structure comprising an amino-terminal signal sequence, a phytocyanin-like domain, an AGP-like domain, and a hydrophobic carboxyl-terminal domain. Recombinant production of GhPLA1 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells enabled us to purify and analyze a single glycosylated AGP and to demonstrate that this chimeric AGP promotes cotton SE. Furthermore, the nonglycosylated phytocyanin-like domain from GhPLA1, which was bacterially produced, also promoted SE, indicating that the glycosylated AGP domain was unnecessary for in vitro activity. PMID:22858635

  2. Cinnamate:CoA Ligase Initiates the Biosynthesis of a Benzoate-Derived Xanthone Phytoalexin in Hypericum calycinum Cell Cultures1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Gaid, Mariam M.; Sircar, Debabrata; Müller, Andreas; Beuerle, Till; Liu, Benye; Ernst, Ludger; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2012-01-01

    Although a number of plant natural products are derived from benzoic acid, the biosynthesis of this structurally simple precursor is poorly understood. Hypericum calycinum cell cultures accumulate a benzoic acid-derived xanthone phytoalexin, hyperxanthone E, in response to elicitor treatment. Using a subtracted complementary DNA (cDNA) library and sequence information about conserved coenzyme A (CoA) ligase motifs, a cDNA encoding cinnamate:CoA ligase (CNL) was isolated. This enzyme channels metabolic flux from the general phenylpropanoid pathway into benzenoid metabolism. HcCNL preferred cinnamic acid as a substrate but failed to activate benzoic acid. Enzyme activity was strictly dependent on the presence of Mg2+ and K+ at optimum concentrations of 2.5 and 100 mm, respectively. Coordinated increases in the Phe ammonia-lyase and HcCNL transcript levels preceded the accumulation of hyperxanthone E in cell cultures of H. calycinum after the addition of the elicitor. HcCNL contained a carboxyl-terminal type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal made up by the tripeptide Ser-Arg-Leu, which directed an amino-terminal reporter fusion to the peroxisomes. Masking the targeting signal by carboxyl-terminal reporter fusion led to cytoplasmic localization. A phylogenetic tree consisted of two evolutionarily distinct clusters. One cluster was formed by CoA ligases related to benzenoid metabolism, including HcCNL. The other cluster comprised 4-coumarate:CoA ligases from spermatophytes, ferns, and mosses, indicating divergence of the two clades prior to the divergence of the higher plant lineages. PMID:22992510

  3. A Transcriptome-Based Characterization of Habituation in Plant Tissue Culture1[W

    PubMed Central

    Pischke, Melissa S.; Huttlin, Edward L.; Hegeman, Adrian D.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    For the last 50 years, scientists have recognized that varying ratios of the plant hormones cytokinin and auxin induce plant cells to form particular tissues: undifferentiated calli, shoot structures, root structures, or a whole plant. Proliferation of undifferentiated callus tissue, greening, and the formation of shoot structures are all cytokinin-dependent processes. Habituation refers to a naturally occurring phenomenon whereby callus cultures, upon continued passage, lose their requirement for cytokinin. Earlier studies of calli with a higher-than-normal cytokinin content indicate that overproduction of cytokinin by the culture tissues is a possible explanation for this acquired cytokinin independence. A transcriptome-based analysis of a well established habituated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell culture line was undertaken, to explore genome-wide expression changes underlying the phenomenon of habituation. Increased levels of expression of the cytokinin receptor CRE1, as well as altered levels of expression of several other genes involved in cytokinin signaling, indicated that naturally acquired deregulation of cytokinin-signaling components could play a previously unrecognized role in habituation. Up-regulation of several cytokinin oxidases, down-regulation of several known cytokinin-inducible genes, and a lack of regulation of the cytokinin synthases indicated that increases in hormone concentration may not be required for habituation. In addition, up-regulation of the homeodomain transcription factor FWA, transposon-related elements, and several DNA- and chromatin-modifying enzymes indicated that epigenetic changes contribute to the acquisition of cytokinin habituation. PMID:16489130

  4. The alc-GR System. A Modified alc Gene Switch Designed for Use in Plant Tissue Culture1[w

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Gethin R.; Garoosi, G. Ali; Koroleva, Olga; Ito, Masaki; Laufs, Patrick; Leader, David J.; Caddick, Mark X.; Doonan, John H.; Tomsett, A. Brian

    2005-01-01

    The ALCR/alcA (alc) two-component, ethanol-inducible gene expression system provides stringent control of transgene expression in genetically modified plants. ALCR is an ethanol-activated transcription factor that can drive expression from the ALCR-responsive promoter (alcA). However, the alc system has been shown to have constitutive expression when used in plant callus or cell suspension cultures, possibly resulting from endogenous inducer produced in response to lowered oxygen availability. To widen the use of the alc system in plant cell culture conditions, the receptor domain of the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was translationally fused to the C terminus of ALCR to produce ALCR-GR, which forms the basis of a glucocorticoid-inducible system (alc-GR). The alc-GR switch system was tested in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 suspension cells using a constitutively expressed ALCR-GR with four alternative alcA promoter-driven reporter genes: β-glucuronidase, endoplasmic reticulum-targeted green fluorescent protein, haemagglutinin, and green fluorescent protein-tagged Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Arath;CDKA;1 cyclin-dependent kinase. Gene expression was shown to be stringently dependent on the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone and, in cell suspensions, no longer required ethanol for induction. Thus, the alc-GR system allows tight control of alcA-driven genes in cell culture and complements the conventional ethanol switch used in whole plants. PMID:16010000

  5. The Arabidopsis Cell Division Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2009-01-01

    Plant cells have evolved a complex circuitry to regulate cell division. In many aspects, the plant cell cycle follows a basic strategy similar to other eukaryotes. However, several key issues are unique to plant cells. In this chapter, both the conserved and unique cellular and molecular properties of the plant cell cycle are reviewed. In addition to division of individual cells, the specific characteristic of plant organogenesis and development make that cell proliferation control is of primary importance during development. Therefore, special attention should be given to consider plant cell division control in a developmental context. Proper organogenesis depends on the formation of different cell types. In plants, many of the processes leading to cell differentiation rely on the occurrence of a different cycle, termed the endoreplication cycle, whereby cells undergo repeated full genome duplication events in the absence of mitosis and increase their ploidy. Recent findings are focusing on the relevance of changes in chromatin organization for a correct cell cycle progression and, conversely, in the relevance of a correct functioning of chromatin remodelling complexes to prevent alterations in both the cell cycle and the endocycle. PMID:22303246

  6. Polarized cytokinesis in vacuolate cells of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Sean R.; Ehrhardt, David W.

    2002-01-01

    The view of plant-cell cytokinesis commonly depicted in textbooks is of a symmetrical process, with the phragmoplast initiating in the center of the cell and growing outward to the parental cell membrane. In contrast to this picture, we observe that cell-plate development in Arabidopsis shoot cells is highly polarized along the plane of division. Three-dimensional live-cell imaging reveals that the mitotic spindle and phragmoplast are laterally displaced, and that the growing cell plate anchors on one side of the cell at an early stage of cytokinesis. Growth of phragmoplast across the cell creates a new partition in its wake, giving the visual effect of a curtain being pulled across the cell. Throughout this process, the advancing front of the phragmoplast is in intimate contact with the parental wall, suggesting that short-range interactions between the phragmoplast and plasma membrane may play important roles in guiding the cell plate throughout much of its development. Polarized cytokinesis was observed in a wide variety of vacuolate shoot cells and in some small root cells, implying that it is not solely a function of cell size. This mode of cytokinesis may provide a mechanically robust mechanism for cell-plate formation in large cells and suggests a simple explanation for the occurrence of cell wall stubs observed upon drug treatment or in cytokinetic mutants. PMID:11880633

  7. Metabolic profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Berit; Zöller, Daniela; Erban, Alexander; Fehrle, Ines; Hartmann, Jürgen; Niehl, Annette; Kopka, Joachim; Fisahn, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic phenotyping at cellular resolution may be considered one of the challenges in current plant physiology. A method is described which enables the cell type-specific metabolic analysis of epidermal cell types in Arabidopsis thaliana pavement, basal, and trichome cells. To achieve the required high spatial resolution, single cell sampling using microcapillaries was combined with routine gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) based metabolite profiling. The identification and relative quantification of 117 mostly primary metabolites has been demonstrated. The majority, namely 90 compounds, were accessible without analytical background correction. Analyses were performed using cell type-specific pools of 200 microsampled individual cells. Moreover, among these identified metabolites, 38 exhibited differential pool sizes in trichomes, basal or pavement cells. The application of an independent component analysis confirmed the cell type-specific metabolic phenotypes. Significant pool size changes between individual cells were detectable within several classes of metabolites, namely amino acids, fatty acids and alcohols, alkanes, lipids, N-compounds, organic acids and polyhydroxy acids, polyols, sugars, sugar conjugates and phenylpropanoids. It is demonstrated here that the combination of microsampling and GC-MS based metabolite profiling provides a method to investigate the cellular metabolism of fully differentiated plant cell types in vivo. PMID:20150518

  8. Genetic control of polar cell expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, J.; Ford, S. ); Somerville, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Certain plant cells, like root hairs and pollen tubes, exhibit polar cell growth, with expansion limited to the tip of the growing cell. In order to understand the mechanisms regulating polar cell expansion, we are studying the process of root hair elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana. By visually screening roots from 12,000 mutagenized Arabidopsis seedlings on Petri dishes, more than 40 root hair mutants have been identified. We have focused our attention on mutants that possess nuclear recessive mutations in three genes (RHD2, RHD3, and RDH4) that appear to be involved in controlling polar cell growth in root hairs. We are currently using cellular, genetic, and molecular approaches to understand these genes' normal roles in root hair elongation.

  9. Cell-cell interactions during patterning of the Arabidopsis anther.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoqi; Dickinson, Hugh G

    2010-04-01

    Key steps in the evolution of the angiosperm anther include the patterning of the concentrically organized microsporangium and the incorporation of four such microsporangia into a leaf-like structure. Mutant studies in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana are leading to an increasingly accurate picture of (i) the cell lineages culminating in the different cell types present in the microsporangium (the microsporocytes, the tapetum, and the middle and endothecial layers), and (ii) some of the genes responsible for specifying their fates. However, the processes that confer polarity on the developing anther and position the microsporangia within it remain unclear. Certainly, data from a range of experimental strategies suggest that hormones play a central role in establishing polarity and the patterning of the anther initial, and may be responsible for locating the microsporangia. But the fact that microsporangia were originally positioned externally suggests that their development is likely to be autonomous, perhaps with the reproductive cells generating signals controlling the growth and division of the investing anther epidermis. These possibilities are discussed in the context of the expression of genes which initiate and maintain male and female reproductive development, and in the perspective of our current views of anther evolution. PMID:20298223

  10. Ethylene Inhibits Cell Proliferation of the Arabidopsis Root Meristem.

    PubMed

    Street, Ian H; Aman, Sitwat; Zubo, Yan; Ramzan, Aleena; Wang, Xiaomin; Shakeel, Samina N; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2015-09-01

    The root system of plants plays a critical role in plant growth and survival, with root growth being dependent on both cell proliferation and cell elongation. Multiple phytohormones interact to control root growth, including ethylene, which is primarily known for its role in controlling root cell elongation. We find that ethylene also negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root meristem of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Genetic analysis indicates that the inhibition of cell proliferation involves two pathways operating downstream of the ethylene receptors. The major pathway is the canonical ethylene signal transduction pathway that incorporates CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2, and the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 family of transcription factors. The secondary pathway is a phosphorelay based on genetic analysis of receptor histidine kinase activity and mutants involving the type B response regulators. Analysis of ethylene-dependent gene expression and genetic analysis supports SHORT HYPOCOTYL2, a repressor of auxin signaling, as one mediator of the ethylene response and furthermore, indicates that SHORT HYPOCOTYL2 is a point of convergence for both ethylene and cytokinin in negatively regulating cell proliferation. Additional analysis indicates that ethylene signaling contributes but is not required for cytokinin to inhibit activity of the root meristem. These results identify key elements, along with points of cross talk with cytokinin and auxin, by which ethylene negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root apical meristem. PMID:26149574

  11. Does Arabidopsis thaliana DREAM of cell cycle control?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-08-01

    Strict temporal control of cell cycle gene expression is essential for all eukaryotes including animals and plants. DREAM complexes have been identified in worm, fly, and mammals, linking several distinct transcription factors to coordinate gene expression throughout the cell cycle. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Kobayashi et al (2015) identify distinct activator and repressor complexes for genes expressed during the G2 and M phases in Arabidopsis that can be temporarily separated during proliferating and post‐mitotic stages of development. The complexes incorporate specific activator and repressor MYB and E2F transcription factors and indicate the possibility of the existence of multiple DREAM complexes in plants. PMID:26089020

  12. An Arabidopsis Gene Regulatory Network for Secondary Cell Wall Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Teeples, M; Lin, L; de Lucas, M; Turco, G; Toal, TW; Gaudinier, A; Young, NF; Trabucco, GM; Veling, MT; Lamothe, R; Handakumbura, PP; Xiong, G; Wang, C; Corwin, J; Tsoukalas, A; Zhang, L; Ware, D; Pauly, M; Kliebenstein, DJ; Dehesh, K; Tagkopoulos, I; Breton, G; Pruneda-Paz, JL; Ahnert, SE; Kay, SA; Hazen, SP; Brady, SM

    2014-01-01

    Summary The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. Here, we present a protein-DNA network between Arabidopsis transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated by a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. These interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component. PMID:25533953

  13. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cell walls need to be modified and customized during plant development and in response to environmental cues, thus contributing to plant adaptation. CWPs play essential roles in all these physiological processes and particularly in the dynamics of cell walls, which requires organization and rearrangements of polysaccharides as well as cell-to-cell communication. In the last 10 years, plant cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to a wider knowledge of CWPs. This update will deal with (i) a survey of plant cell wall proteomics studies with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii) the main protein families identified and the still missing peptides; (iii) the persistent issue of the non-canonical CWPs; (iv) the present challenges to overcome technological bottlenecks; and (v) the perspectives beyond cell wall proteomics to understand CWP functions. PMID:23641247

  14. Comparative Transcriptomics of Arabidopsis thaliana Sperm Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In flowering plants the two sperm cells are embedded within the cytoplasm of the growing pollen tube and as such are passively transported to the embryo sac, wherein double fertilization occurs upon their release. Understanding the mechanisms and conditions by which male gametes mature and take part...

  15. Screening Stress Tolerance Traits in Arabidopsis Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Salamó, Imma; Boros, Bogáta; Szabados, László

    2016-01-01

    Screening for tolerance traits in plant cell cultures can combine the efficiency of microbial selection and plant genetics. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation can efficiently introduce cDNA library to cell suspension cultures generating population of randomly transformed microcolonies. Transformed cultures can subsequently be screened for tolerance to different stress conditions such as salinity, high osmotic, or oxidative stress conditions. cDNA inserts in tolerant cell lines can be easily identified by PCR amplification and homology search of the determined nucleotide sequences. The described methods have been tested and used to identify regulatory genes controlling salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. As cDNA libraries can be prepared from any plants, natural diversity can be explored by using extremophile plants as gene source. PMID:26867628

  16. The FRIABLE1 Gene Product Affects Cell Adhesion in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Neumetzler, Lutz; Humphrey, Tania; Lumba, Shelley; Snyder, Stephen; Yeats, Trevor H.; Usadel, Björn; Vasilevski, Aleksandar; Patel, Jignasha; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Persson, Staffan; Bonetta, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion in plants is mediated predominantly by pectins, a group of complex cell wall associated polysaccharides. An Arabidopsis mutant, friable1 (frb1), was identified through a screen of T-DNA insertion lines that exhibited defective cell adhesion. Interestingly, the frb1 plants displayed both cell and organ dissociations and also ectopic defects in organ separation. The FRB1 gene encodes a Golgi-localized, plant specific protein with only weak sequence similarities to known proteins (DUF246). Unlike other cell adhesion deficient mutants, frb1 mutants do not have reduced levels of adhesion related cell wall polymers, such as pectins. Instead, FRB1 affects the abundance of galactose- and arabinose-containing oligosaccharides in the Golgi. Furthermore, frb1 mutants displayed alteration in pectin methylesterification, cell wall associated extensins and xyloglucan microstructure. We propose that abnormal FRB1 action has pleiotropic consequences on wall architecture, affecting both the extensin and pectin matrices, with consequent changes to the biomechanical properties of the wall and middle lamella, thereby influencing cell-cell adhesion. PMID:22916179

  17. Does Arabidopsis thaliana DREAM of cell cycle control?

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martin; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-01-01

    Strict temporal control of cell cycle gene expression is essential for all eukaryotes including animals and plants. DREAM complexes have been identified in worm, fly, and mammals, linking several distinct transcription factors to coordinate gene expression throughout the cell cycle. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Kobayashi et al (2015) identify distinct activator and repressor complexes for genes expressed during the G2 and M phases in Arabidopsis that can be temporarily separated during proliferating and post-mitotic stages of development. The complexes incorporate specific activator and repressor MYB and E2F transcription factors and indicate the possibility of the existence of multiple DREAM complexes in plants. PMID:26089020

  18. Gibberellins accumulate in the elongating endodermal cells of Arabidopsis root

    PubMed Central

    Shani, Eilon; Weinstain, Roy; Zhang, Yi; Castillejo, Cristina; Kaiserli, Eirini; Chory, Joanne; Tsien, Roger Y.; Estelle, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Plant hormones are small-molecule signaling compounds that are collectively involved in all aspects of plant growth and development. Unlike animals, plants actively regulate the spatial distribution of several of their hormones. For example, auxin transport results in the formation of auxin maxima that have a key role in developmental patterning. However, the spatial distribution of the other plant hormones, including gibberellic acid (GA), is largely unknown. To address this, we generated two bioactive fluorescent GA compounds and studied their distribution in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. The labeled GAs specifically accumulated in the endodermal cells of the root elongation zone. Pharmacological studies, along with examination of mutants affected in endodermal specification, indicate that GA accumulation is an active and highly regulated process. Our results strongly suggest the presence of an active GA transport mechanism that would represent an additional level of GA regulation. PMID:23382232

  19. The Arabidopsis synaptotagmin SYTA regulates the cell-to-cell movement of diverse plant viruses.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Asako; Shimada-Beltran, Harumi; Levy, Amit; Zheng, Judy Y; Javia, Parth A; Lazarowitz, Sondra G

    2014-01-01

    Synaptotagmins are a large gene family in animals that have been extensively characterized due to their role as calcium sensors to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in neurons, and dense core vesicle exocytosis for hormone secretion from neuroendocrine cells. Thought to be exclusive to animals, synaptotagmins have recently been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which they comprise a five gene family. Using infectivity and leaf-based functional assays, we have shown that Arabidopsis SYTA regulates endocytosis and marks an endosomal vesicle recycling pathway to regulate movement protein-mediated trafficking of the Begomovirus Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV) and the Tobamovirus Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) through plasmodesmata (Lewis and Lazarowitz, 2010). To determine whether SYTA has a central role in regulating the cell-to-cell trafficking of a wider range of diverse plant viruses, we extended our studies here to examine the role of SYTA in the cell-to-cell movement of additional plant viruses that employ different modes of movement, namely the Potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), the Caulimovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and the Tobamovirus Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV), which in contrast to TMV does efficiently infect Arabidopsis. We found that both TuMV and TVCV systemic infection, and the cell-to-cell trafficking of the their movement proteins, were delayed in the Arabidopsis Col-0 syta-1 knockdown mutant. In contrast, CaMV systemic infection was not inhibited in syta-1. Our studies show that SYTA is a key regulator of plant virus intercellular movement, being necessary for the ability of diverse cell-to-cell movement proteins encoded by Begomoviruses (CaLCuV MP), Tobamoviruses (TVCV and TMV 30K protein) and Potyviruses (TuMV P3N-PIPO) to alter PD and thereby mediate virus cell-to-cell spread. PMID:25414709

  20. The Arabidopsis synaptotagmin SYTA regulates the cell-to-cell movement of diverse plant viruses

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Asako; Shimada-Beltran, Harumi; Levy, Amit; Zheng, Judy Y.; Javia, Parth A.; Lazarowitz, Sondra G.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptotagmins are a large gene family in animals that have been extensively characterized due to their role as calcium sensors to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in neurons, and dense core vesicle exocytosis for hormone secretion from neuroendocrine cells. Thought to be exclusive to animals, synaptotagmins have recently been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which they comprise a five gene family. Using infectivity and leaf-based functional assays, we have shown that Arabidopsis SYTA regulates endocytosis and marks an endosomal vesicle recycling pathway to regulate movement protein-mediated trafficking of the Begomovirus Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV) and the Tobamovirus Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) through plasmodesmata (Lewis and Lazarowitz, 2010). To determine whether SYTA has a central role in regulating the cell-to-cell trafficking of a wider range of diverse plant viruses, we extended our studies here to examine the role of SYTA in the cell-to-cell movement of additional plant viruses that employ different modes of movement, namely the Potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), the Caulimovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and the Tobamovirus Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV), which in contrast to TMV does efficiently infect Arabidopsis. We found that both TuMV and TVCV systemic infection, and the cell-to-cell trafficking of the their movement proteins, were delayed in the Arabidopsis Col-0 syta-1 knockdown mutant. In contrast, CaMV systemic infection was not inhibited in syta-1. Our studies show that SYTA is a key regulator of plant virus intercellular movement, being necessary for the ability of diverse cell-to-cell movement proteins encoded by Begomoviruses (CaLCuV MP), Tobamoviruses (TVCV and TMV 30K protein) and Potyviruses (TuMV P3N-PIPO) to alter PD and thereby mediate virus cell-to-cell spread. PMID:25414709

  1. Allyl isothiocyanate affects the cell cycle of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Åsberg, Signe E.; Bones, Atle M.; Øverby, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are degradation products of glucosinolates present in members of the Brassicaceae family acting as herbivore repellents and antimicrobial compounds. Recent results indicate that allyl ITC (AITC) has a role in defense responses such as glutathione depletion, ROS generation and stomatal closure. In this study we show that exposure to non-lethal concentrations of AITC causes a shift in the cell cycle distribution of Arabidopsis thaliana leading to accumulation of cells in S-phases and a reduced number of cells in non-replicating phases. Furthermore, transcriptional analysis revealed an AITC-induced up-regulation of the gene encoding cyclin-dependent kinase A while several genes encoding mitotic proteins were down-regulated, suggesting an inhibition of mitotic processes. Interestingly, visualization of DNA synthesis indicated that exposure to AITC reduced the rate of DNA replication. Taken together, these results indicate that non-lethal concentrations of AITC induce cells of A. thaliana to enter the cell cycle and accumulate in S-phases, presumably as a part of a defensive response. Thus, this study suggests that AITC has several roles in plant defense and add evidence to the growing data supporting a multifunctional role of glucosinolates and their degradation products in plants. PMID:26042144

  2. Tapetal cell fate, lineage and proliferation in the Arabidopsis anther.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoqi; Dickinson, Hugh G

    2010-07-01

    The four microsporangia of the flowering plant anther develop from archesporial cells in the L2 of the primordium. Within each microsporangium, developing microsporocytes are surrounded by concentric monolayers of tapetal, middle layer and endothecial cells. How this intricate array of tissues, each containing relatively few cells, is established in an organ possessing no formal meristems is poorly understood. We describe here the pivotal role of the LRR receptor kinase EXCESS MICROSPOROCYTES 1 (EMS1) in forming the monolayer of tapetal nurse cells in Arabidopsis. Unusually for plants, tapetal cells are specified very early in development, and are subsequently stimulated to proliferate by a receptor-like kinase (RLK) complex that includes EMS1. Mutations in members of this EMS1 signalling complex and its putative ligand result in male-sterile plants in which tapetal initials fail to proliferate. Surprisingly, these cells continue to develop, isolated at the locular periphery. Mutant and wild-type microsporangia expand at similar rates and the 'tapetal' space at the periphery of mutant locules becomes occupied by microsporocytes. However, induction of late expression of EMS1 in the few tapetal initials in ems1 plants results in their proliferation to generate a functional tapetum, and this proliferation suppresses microsporocyte number. Our experiments also show that integrity of the tapetal monolayer is crucial for the maintenance of the polarity of divisions within it. This unexpected autonomy of the tapetal 'lineage' is discussed in the context of tissue development in complex plant organs, where constancy in size, shape and cell number is crucial. PMID:20570940

  3. A DNA-damage-induced cell cycle checkpoint in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, S B; Britt, A B

    2003-01-01

    Although it is well established that plant seeds treated with high doses of gamma radiation arrest development as seedlings, the cause of this arrest is unknown. The uvh1 mutant of Arabidopsis is defective in a homolog of the human repair endonuclease XPF, and uvh1 mutants are sensitive to both the toxic effects of UV and the cytostatic effects of gamma radiation. Here we find that gamma irradiation of uvh1 plants specifically triggers a G(2)-phase cell cycle arrest. Mutants, termed suppressor of gamma (sog), that suppress this radiation-induced arrest and proceed through the cell cycle unimpeded were recovered in the uvh1 background; the resulting irradiated plants are genetically unstable. The sog mutations fall into two complementation groups. They are second-site suppressors of the uvh1 mutant's sensitivity to gamma radiation but do not affect the susceptibility of the plant to UV radiation. In addition to rendering the plants resistant to the growth inhibitory effects of gamma radiation, the sog1 mutation affects the proper development of the pollen tetrad, suggesting that SOG1 might also play a role in the regulation of cell cycle progression during meiosis. PMID:12750343

  4. Exploring Arabidopsis thaliana Root Endophytes via Single-Cell Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, Derek; Woyke, Tanja; Tringe, Susannah; Dangl, Jeff

    2014-03-19

    Land plants grow in association with microbial communities both on their surfaces and inside the plant (endophytes). The relationships between microbes and their host can vary from pathogenic to mutualistic. Colonization of the endophyte compartment occurs in the presence of a sophisticated plant immune system, implying finely tuned discrimination of pathogens from mutualists and commensals. Despite the importance of the microbiome to the plant, relatively little is known about the specific interactions between plants and microbes, especially in the case of endophytes. The vast majority of microbes have not been grown in the lab, and thus one of the few ways of studying them is by examining their DNA. Although metagenomics is a powerful tool for examining microbial communities, its application to endophyte samples is technically difficult due to the presence of large amounts of host plant DNA in the sample. One method to address these difficulties is single-cell genomics where a single microbial cell is isolated from a sample, lysed, and its genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) to produce enough DNA for genome sequencing. This produces a single-cell amplified genome (SAG). We have applied this technology to study the endophytic microbes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Extensive 16S gene profiling of the microbial communities in the roots of multiple inbred A. thaliana strains has identified 164 OTUs as being significantly enriched in all the root endophyte samples compared to their presence in bulk soil.

  5. Starting to gel: how Arabidopsis seed coat epidermal cells produce specialized secondary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Voiniciuc, Cătălin; Yang, Bo; Schmidt, Maximilian Heinrich-Wilhelm; Günl, Markus; Usadel, Björn

    2015-01-01

    For more than a decade, the Arabidopsis seed coat epidermis (SCE) has been used as a model system to study the synthesis, secretion and modification of cell wall polysaccharides, particularly pectin. Our detailed re-evaluation of available biochemical data highlights that Arabidopsis seed mucilage is more than just pectin. Typical secondary wall polymers such as xylans and heteromannans are also present in mucilage. Despite their low abundance, these components appear to play essential roles in controlling mucilage properties, and should be further investigated. We also provide a comprehensive community resource by re-assessing the mucilage phenotypes of almost 20 mutants using the same conditions. We conduct an in-depth functional evaluation of all the SCE genes described in the literature and propose a revised model for mucilage production. Further investigation of SCE cells will improve our understanding of plant cell walls. PMID:25658798

  6. Starting to Gel: How Arabidopsis Seed Coat Epidermal Cells Produce Specialized Secondary Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Voiniciuc, Cătălin; Yang, Bo; Schmidt, Maximilian Heinrich-Wilhelm; Günl, Markus; Usadel, Björn

    2015-01-01

    For more than a decade, the Arabidopsis seed coat epidermis (SCE) has been used as a model system to study the synthesis, secretion and modification of cell wall polysaccharides, particularly pectin. Our detailed re-evaluation of available biochemical data highlights that Arabidopsis seed mucilage is more than just pectin. Typical secondary wall polymers such as xylans and heteromannans are also present in mucilage. Despite their low abundance, these components appear to play essential roles in controlling mucilage properties, and should be further investigated. We also provide a comprehensive community resource by re-assessing the mucilage phenotypes of almost 20 mutants using the same conditions. We conduct an in-depth functional evaluation of all the SCE genes described in the literature and propose a revised model for mucilage production. Further investigation of SCE cells will improve our understanding of plant cell walls. PMID:25658798

  7. DCL2 is highly expressed in the egg cell in both rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Hideki; Ohnishi, Takayuki; Mogi, Mirai; Hirata, Yuto; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro

    2011-04-01

    Small RNAs are riboregulators that play critical roles in eukaryotic cells. They repress gene expression by acting either on DNA to guide sequence elimination and chromatin remodeling, or on RNA to guide cleavage and translation repression. Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa contain four and six DICER-LIKE (DCL) genes with specialized functions in small RNA biogenesis for RNA interference-related processes. We recently profiled genome-wide gene expression in egg and synergid cells in rice. In this article, we show that OsDCL2, OsDCL4, and OsHEN1 are preferentially expressed in the egg cell. In addition, we revealed that AtDCL2 is also preferentially expressed in the Arabidopsis egg cell. These findings suggest that small RNA pathways are activated in the egg cell in both rice and Arabidopsis. The activation of these pathways in the egg cell might be essential for egg cell maturation, fertilization, or embryogenesis.  PMID:21673515

  8. Ion channels in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh..

    PubMed

    Roelfsema, M R; Prins, H B

    1997-01-01

    Despite the availability of many mutants for signal transduction, Arabidopsis thaliana guard cells have so far not been used in electrophysiological research. Problems with the isolation of epidermal strips and the small size of A. thaliana guard cells were often prohibiting. In the present study these difficulties were overcome and guard cells were impaled with double-barreled microelectrodes. Membrane-potential recordings were often stable for over half an hour and voltage-clamp measurements could be conducted. The guard cells were found to exhibit two states. The majority of the guard cells had depolarized membrane potentials, which were largely dependent on external K+ concentrations. Other cells displayed spontaneous transitions to a more hyperpolarized state, at which the free-running membrane potential (Em) was not sensitive to the external K+ concentration. Two outward-rectifying conductances were identified in cells in the depolarized state. A slow outward-rectifying channel (s-ORC) had properties resembling the K(+)-selective ORC of Vicia faba guard cells (Blatt, 1988, J Membr Biol 102: 235-246). The activation and inactivation times and the activation potential, all depended on the reversal potential (Erev) of the s-ORC conductance. The s-ORC was blocked by Ba2+ (K1/2 = 0.3-1.3 mM) and verapamil (K1/2 = 15-20 microM). A second rapid outward-rectifying conductance (r-ORC) activated instantaneously upon stepping the voltage to positive values and was stimulated by Ba2+. Inward-rectifying channels (IRC) were only observed in cells in the hyperpolarized state. The activation time and activation potential of this channel were not sensitive to the external K+ concentration. The slow activation of the IRC (t1/2 approximately 0.5 s) and its negative activation potential (Vthreshold = -155 mV) resemble the values found for the KAT1 channel expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Bertl et al., 1995, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 92: 2701-2705). The results indicate that A

  9. Differentiation of Mucilage Secretory Cells of the Arabidopsis Seed Coat1

    PubMed Central

    Western, Tamara L.; Skinner, Debra J.; Haughn, George W.

    2000-01-01

    In some plant species, including Arabidopsis, fertilization induces the epidermal cells of the outer ovule integument to differentiate into a specialized seed coat cell type with a unique morphology and containing large quantities of polysaccharide mucilage (pectin). Such seed coat mucilage cells are necessary for neither viability nor germination under normal laboratory conditions. Thus, the Arabidopsis seed coat offers a unique system with which to use genetics to identify genes controlling cell morphogenesis and complex polysaccharide biosynthesis and secretion. As a first step in the application of this system, we have used microscopy to investigate the structure and differentiation of Arabidopsis seed coat mucilage cells, including cell morphogenesis and the synthesis, secretion, and extrusion of mucilage. During seed coat development in Arabidopsis, the epidermal cells of the outer ovule integument grow and differentiate into cells that produce large quantities of mucilage between the primary cell wall and plasma membrane. Concurrent with mucilage production, the cytoplasm is shaped into a column in the center of the cell. Following mucilage secretion the cytoplasmic column is surrounded by a secondary cell wall to form a structure known as the columella. Thus, differentiation of the seed coat mucilage cells involves a highly regulated series of events including growth, morphogenesis, mucilage biosynthesis and secretion, and secondary cell wall synthesis. PMID:10677428

  10. AtHSPR may function in salt-induced cell death and ER stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chongying

    2016-07-01

    Salt stress is a harmful and global abiotic stress to plants and has an adverse effect on all physiological processes of plants. Recently, we cloned and identified a novel AtHSPR (Arabidopsis thaliana Heat Shock Protein Related), which encodes a nuclear-localized protein with ATPase activity, participates in salt and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis. Transcript profiling analysis revealed a differential expression of genes involved in accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, stress response and photosynthesis between athspr mutant and WT under salt stress. Here, we provide further analysis of the data showing the regulation of salt-induced cell death and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in Arabidopsis and propose a hypothetical model for the role of AtHSPR in the regulation of the salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:27302034

  11. Early Gravitropic Events in Roots of Arabidopsis: Ca(2+)H(+) Fluxes in the Columella Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Lewis

    2003-01-01

    Despite the wealth of information derived from physiological approaches, molecular mechanisms for sensing and responding to gravity in plants remain largely uncharacterized. Roots of higher plants offer many advantages for studying the sensing and responding phases. In roots, gravisensing occurs in specialized cells, the columella cells in which earlier studies have indicated an involvement of the cytoskeleton, Ca(2+), H(+) and auxin in processing the gravity signal. The overall goal of this project was to characterize gravity-stimulated Ca(2+) and H(+) fluxes in the columella cells of a model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and to define their regulation. For this work we used intact Arabidopsis roots.

  12. RAD5a ubiquitin ligase is involved in ubiquitination of Arabidopsis thaliana proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, Wojciech; Bartnicki, Filip; Pels, Katarzyna; Jakubowska, Agata; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2013-02-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is post-translationally modified by ubiquitin in yeast and mammalian cells. It is widely accepted that in yeast mono- and polyubiquitinated PCNA is involved in distinct pathways of DNA postreplication repair. This study showed an interaction between plant ubiquitin and PCNA in the plant cell. Using different approaches, it was demonstrated that Arabidopsis RAD5a ubiquitin ligase is involved in the post-translational modification of plant PCNA. A detailed analysis of the properties of selected Arabidopsis ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (AtUBC) has shown that a plant homologue of yeast RAD6 (AtUBC2) is sufficient to monoubiquitinate AtPCNA in the absence of ubiquitin ligase. Using different combinations of selected AtUBC proteins together with AtRAD5a, it was demonstrated that plants have potential to use different pathways to ubiquitinate PCNA. The analysis of Arabidopsis PCNA1 and PCNA2 did not demonstrate substantial differences in the ubiquitination pattern between these two proteins. The major ubiquitination target of Arabidopsis PCNA, conserved in eukaryotes, is lysine 164. Taken together, the presented results clearly demonstrate the involvement of Arabidopsis UBC and RAD5a proteins in the ubiquitination of plant PCNA at lysine 164. The data show the complexity of the plant ubiquitination system and open new questions about its regulation in the plant cell. PMID:23314815

  13. Seed coat mucilage cells of Arabidopsis thaliana as a model for plant cell wall research.

    PubMed

    Arsovski, Andrej A; Haughn, George W; Western, Tamara L

    2010-07-01

    Plant cells are encased within a complex polysaccharide wall that strengthens the cell and has key roles in all aspects of plant cell growth, differentiation, and interaction with the environment. This dynamic structure is under continual modification during plant development, and its synthesis and modification require the activity of a myriad of enzymes. The mucilage secretory cells (MSCs) of the Arabidopsis thaliana seed coat provide a model for the discovery of novel genes involved in the synthesis, secretion and modification of cell wall components, particularly pectin. These cells synthesize copious amounts of pectinaceous mucilage during development and, upon hydration of the desiccated seed, the mucilage rapidly swells, bursts from the MSCs and surrounds the seed in a gelatinous capsule. Several genes affecting MSC differentiation, pectin synthesis, and mucilage release have been identified and additional genes involved in these and related processes including pectin secretion and the mechanical alteration of cell walls await to be discovered. PMID:20505351

  14. Rapid kinetic labeling of Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures: Implications for models of lipid export from plastids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    T-87 suspension cell cultures are increasingly used in Arabidopsis research, but there are no reports describing their lipid composition or biosynthesis. To evaluate if T-87 cell cultures as a model system for analysis of lipid metabolism, including tests of gene candidate functions, we have deter...

  15. Recombinant Arabidopsis HSP70 Sustains Cell Survival and Metastatic Potential of Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Alessandra; Mauro, Loredana; Giordano, Francesca; Panza, Salvatore; Iannacone, Rina; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria; Aquila, Saveria; De Amicis, Francesca; Cellini, Francesco; Indiveri, Cesare; Panno, Maria Luisa

    2016-05-01

    The chaperone HSP70 protein is widely present in many different tumors and its expression correlates with an increased cell survival, low differentiation, and poor therapeutic outcome in human breast cancer. The intracellular protein has prevalently a cytoprotective function, while the extracellular HSP70 mediates immunologic responses. Evolutionarily, HSPs are well conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, and human HSP70 shows a strong similarity to that of plant origin. In the current article, we have tested the potential effect of recombinant HSP70, from Arabidopsis thaliana, on cell survival and metastatic properties of breast cancer cells. Our data show that HSP70 sustains cell viability in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast tumoral cells and increases Cyclin D1 and Survivin expression. The extracellular HSP70 triggers cell migration and the activation of MMPs particularly in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, under UV-induced stress condition, the low levels of phospho-AKT were increased by exogenous HSP70, together with the upregulation of Cyclin D1, particularly in the tumoral cell phenotype. On the other hand, UV increased TP53 expression, and the coincubation of HSP70 lowers the TP53 levels similar to the control. These findings correlate with the cytoprotective and antiapoptotic role of HSPs, as reported in different cellular contexts. This is the first study on mammary cells that highlights how the heterologous HSP70 from Arabidopsis thaliana sustains cell survival prevalently in breast cancer cell types, thus maintaining their metastatic potential. Therefore, targeting HSP70 would be of clinical importance since HSP70 blocking selectively targets tumor cells, in which it supports cell growth and survival. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 1063-73. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26939699

  16. FAMA is an essential component for the differentiation of two distinct cell types, myrosin cells and guard cells, in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Makoto; Ueda, Haruko; Nagano, Atsushi J; Shimada, Tomoo; Kohchi, Takayuki; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2014-10-01

    Brassicales plants, including Arabidopsis thaliana, have an ingenious two-compartment defense system, which sequesters myrosinase from the substrate glucosinolate and produces a toxic compound when cells are damaged by herbivores. Myrosinase is stored in vacuoles of idioblast myrosin cells. The molecular mechanism that regulates myrosin cell development remains elusive. Here, we identify the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor FAMA as an essential component for myrosin cell development along Arabidopsis leaf veins. FAMA is known as a regulator of stomatal development. We detected FAMA expression in myrosin cell precursors in leaf primordia in addition to stomatal lineage cells. FAMA deficiency caused defects in myrosin cell development and in the biosynthesis of myrosinases THIOGLUCOSIDE GLUCOHYDROLASE1 (TGG1) and TGG2. Conversely, ectopic FAMA expression conferred myrosin cell characteristics to hypocotyl and root cells, both of which normally lack myrosin cells. The FAMA interactors ICE1/SCREAM and its closest paralog SCREAM2/ICE2 were essential for myrosin cell development. DNA microarray analysis identified 32 candidate genes involved in myrosin cell development under the control of FAMA. This study provides a common regulatory pathway that determines two distinct cell types in leaves: epidermal guard cells and inner-tissue myrosin cells. PMID:25304202

  17. Plastid distribution in columella cells of a starchless Arabidopsis mutant grown in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, E.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Brown, C. S.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Wild-type and starchless Arabidopsis thaliana mutant seedlings (TC7) were grown and fixed in the microgravity environment of a U.S. Space Shuttle spaceflight. Computer image analysis of longitudinal sections from columella cells suggest a different plastid positioning mechanism for mutant and wild-type in the absence of gravity.

  18. EXPRESSION AND ASSEMBLY OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE IN INSECT CELL CYTOPLASM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vector was constructed for expression of Arabidopsis thaliana mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) in the cytoplasm of Trichoplusia ni cells. The construct, pDDR101, comprises the mature-E1alpha coding sequence under control of the polh promoter, plus the mature-E1beta coding sequence under ...

  19. Cold Transiently Activates Calcium-Permeable Channels in Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells1[W

    PubMed Central

    Carpaneto, Armando; Ivashikina, Natalya; Levchenko, Victor; Krol, Elzbieta; Jeworutzki, Elena; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hedrich, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Living organisms are capable of discriminating thermal stimuli from noxious cold to noxious heat. For more than 30 years, it has been known that plant cells respond to cold with a large and transient depolarization. Recently, using transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing the calcium-sensitive protein aequorin, an increase in cytosolic calcium following cold treatment was observed. Applying the patch-clamp technique to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts, we could identify a transient plasma membrane conductance induced by rapid cooling. This cold-induced transient conductance was characterized as an outward rectifying 33 pS nonselective cation channel. The permeability ratio between calcium and cesium was 0.7, pointing to a permeation pore >3.34 Å (ø of cesium). Our experiments thus provide direct evidence for the predicted but not yet measured cold-activated calcium-permeable channel in plants. PMID:17114272

  20. Arabidopsis CSLD5 Functions in Cell Plate Formation in a Cell Cycle-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fangwei; Bringmann, Martin; Combs, Jonathon R; Yang, Jiyuan; Bergmann, Dominique C; Nielsen, Erik

    2016-07-01

    In plants, the presence of a load-bearing cell wall presents unique challenges during cell division. Unlike other eukaryotes, which undergo contractile cytokinesis upon completion of mitosis, plants instead synthesize and assemble a new dividing cell wall to separate newly formed daughter cells. Here, we mine transcriptome data from individual cell types in the Arabidopsis thaliana stomatal lineage and identify CSLD5, a member of the Cellulose Synthase Like-D family, as a cell wall biosynthesis enzyme uniquely enriched in rapidly dividing cell populations. We further show that CSLD5 is a direct target of SPEECHLESS, the master transcriptional regulator of these divisions during stomatal development. Using a combination of genetic analysis and in vivo localization of fluorescently tagged fusion proteins, we show that CSLD5 preferentially accumulates in dividing plant cells where it participates in the construction of newly forming cell plates. We show that CSLD5 is an unstable protein that is rapidly degraded upon completion of cell division and that the protein turnover characteristics of CSLD5 are altered in ccs52a2 mutants, indicating that CSLD5 turnover may be regulated by a cell cycle-associated E3-ubiquitin ligase, the anaphase-promoting complex. PMID:27354558

  1. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis.

  2. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hengguang; Hu, Shanglian; Huang, Peng; Song, Hua; Wang, Kan; Ruan, Jing; He, Rong; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-12-01

    Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis.

  3. Vascular Cell Induction Culture System Using Arabidopsis Leaves (VISUAL) Reveals the Sequential Differentiation of Sieve Element-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuki; Nurani, Alif Meem; Saito, Chieko; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Saito, Masato; Yamazaki, Kyoko; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2016-06-01

    Cell differentiation is a complex process involving multiple steps, from initial cell fate specification to final differentiation. Procambial/cambial cells, which act as vascular stem cells, differentiate into both xylem and phloem cells during vascular development. Recent studies have identified regulatory cascades for xylem differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism underlying phloem differentiation is largely unexplored due to technical challenges. Here, we established an ectopic induction system for phloem differentiation named Vascular Cell Induction Culture System Using Arabidopsis Leaves (VISUAL). Our results verified similarities between VISUAL-induced Arabidopsis thaliana phloem cells and in vivo sieve elements. We performed network analysis using transcriptome data with VISUAL to dissect the processes underlying phloem differentiation, eventually identifying a factor involved in the regulation of the master transcription factor gene APL Thus, our culture system opens up new avenues not only for genetic studies of phloem differentiation, but also for future investigations of multidirectional differentiation from vascular stem cells. PMID:27194709

  4. The quiescent center and the stem cell niche in the adventitious roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Della Rovere, Federica; Fattorini, Laura; Ronzan, Marilena; Falasca, Giuseppina; Altamura, Maria Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adventitious rooting is essential for the survival of numerous species from vascular cryptogams to monocots, and is required for successful micropropagation. The tissues involved in AR initiation may differ in planta and in in vitro systems. For example, in Arabidopsis thaliana, ARs originate from the hypocotyl pericycle in planta and the stem endodermis in in vitro cultured thin cell layers. The formation of adventitious roots (ARs) depends on numerous factors, among which the hormones, auxin, in particular. In both primary and lateral roots, growth depends on a functional stem cell niche in the apex, maintained by an active quiescent center (QC), and involving the expression of genes controlled by auxin and cytokinin. This review summarizes current knowledge about auxin and cytokinin control on genes involved in the definition and maintenance of QC, and stem cell niche, in the apex of Arabidopsis ARs in planta and in longitudinal thin cell layers. PMID:27089118

  5. The quiescent center and the stem cell niche in the adventitious roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Rovere, Federica Della; Fattorini, Laura; Ronzan, Marilena; Falasca, Giuseppina; Altamura, Maria Maddalena

    2016-05-01

    Adventitious rooting is essential for the survival of numerous species from vascular cryptogams to monocots, and is required for successful micropropagation. The tissues involved in AR initiation may differ in planta and in in vitro systems. For example, in Arabidopsis thaliana, ARs originate from the hypocotyl pericycle in planta and the stem endodermis in in vitro cultured thin cell layers. The formation of adventitious roots (ARs) depends on numerous factors, among which the hormones, auxin, in particular. In both primary and lateral roots, growth depends on a functional stem cell niche in the apex, maintained by an active quiescent center (QC), and involving the expression of genes controlled by auxin and cytokinin. This review summarizes current knowledge about auxin and cytokinin control on genes involved in the definition and maintenance of QC, and stem cell niche, in the apex of Arabidopsis ARs in planta and in longitudinal thin cell layers. PMID:27089118

  6. Intercellular communication in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen discovered via AHG3 transcript movement from the vegetative cell to sperm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An Arabidopsis pollen grain (male gametophyte) consists of three cells: the vegetative cell, which forms the pollen tube, and two sperm cells enclosed within the vegetative cell. It is still unclear if there is intercellular communication between the vegetative cell and the sperm cells. Here we show...

  7. ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 suppresses mitochondrial oxidative bursts and modulates cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayak, Gopal K.; Venkataramani, Sujatha; Hortensteiner, Stefan; Kunz, Lukas; Christ, Bastien; Moulin, Michael; Smith, Alison G.; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Sugishima, Masakazu; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH 2 (ACD2) protein protects cells from programmed cell death (PCD) caused by endogenous porphyrin-related molecules like red chlorophyll catabolite or exogenous protoporphyrin IX. We previously found that during bacterial infection, ACD2, a chlorophyll breakdown enzyme, localizes to both chloroplasts and mitochondria in leaves. Additionally, acd2 cells show mitochondrial dysfunctions. In plants with acd2 and ACD2+ sectors, ACD2 functions cell autonomously, implicating a pro-death ACD2 substrate as cell non-autonomous in promoting spreading PCD. ACD2 targeted solely to mitochondria can reduce the accumulation of an ACD2 substrate that originates in chloroplasts, indicating that ACD2 substrate molecules are likely mobile within cells. Two different light-dependent reactive oxygen bursts in mitochondria play prominent and causal roles in the acd2 PCD phenotype. Finally, ACD2 can complement acd2 when targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, respectively, as long as it is catalytically active; the ability to bind substrate is not sufficient for ACD2 to function in vitro or in vivo. Together the data suggest that ACD2 localizes dynamically during infection to protect cells from pro-death mobile substrate molecules, some of which may originate in chloroplasts, but have major effects on mitochondria. PMID:21988537

  8. Biochemical and Immunocytological Characterizations of Arabidopsis Pollen Tube Cell Wall1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Dardelle, Flavien; Lehner, Arnaud; Ramdani, Yasmina; Bardor, Muriel; Lerouge, Patrice; Driouich, Azeddine; Mollet, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    During plant sexual reproduction, pollen germination and tube growth require development under tight spatial and temporal control for the proper delivery of the sperm cells to the ovules. Pollen tubes are fast growing tip-polarized cells able to perceive multiple guiding signals emitted by the female organ. Adhesion of pollen tubes via cell wall molecules may be part of the battery of signals. In order to study these processes, we investigated the cell wall characteristics of in vitro-grown Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) pollen tubes using a combination of immunocytochemical and biochemical techniques. Results showed a well-defined localization of cell wall epitopes. Low esterified homogalacturonan epitopes were found mostly in the pollen tube wall back from the tip. Xyloglucan and arabinan from rhamnogalacturonan I epitopes were detected along the entire tube within the two wall layers and the outer wall layer, respectively. In contrast, highly esterified homogalacturonan and arabinogalactan protein epitopes were found associated predominantly with the tip region. Chemical analysis of the pollen tube cell wall revealed an important content of arabinosyl residues (43%) originating mostly from (1→5)-α-l-arabinan, the side chains of rhamnogalacturonan I. Finally, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of endo-glucanase-sensitive xyloglucan showed mass spectra with two dominant oligosaccharides (XLXG/XXLG and XXFG), both being mono O-acetylated, and accounting for over 68% of the total ion signals. These findings demonstrate that the Arabidopsis pollen tube wall has its own characteristics compared with other cell types in the Arabidopsis sporophyte. These structural features are discussed in terms of pollen tube cell wall biosynthesis and growth dynamics. PMID:20547702

  9. Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 Modulates Programmed Cell DeathW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nan; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2006-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast protein ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 (ACD2) modulates the amount of programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by Pseudomonas syringae and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) treatment. In vitro, ACD2 can reduce red chlorophyll catabolite, a chlorophyll derivative. We find that ACD2 shields root protoplasts that lack chlorophyll from light- and PPIX-induced PCD. Thus, chlorophyll catabolism is not obligatory for ACD2 anti-PCD function. Upon P. syringae infection, ACD2 levels and localization change in cells undergoing PCD and in their close neighbors. Thus, ACD2 shifts from being largely in chloroplasts to partitioning to chloroplasts, mitochondria, and, to a small extent, cytosol. ACD2 protects cells from PCD that requires the early mitochondrial oxidative burst. Later, the chloroplasts of dying cells generate NO, which only slightly affects cell viability. Finally, the mitochondria in dying cells have dramatically altered movements and cellular distribution. Overproduction of both ACD2 (localized to mitochondria and chloroplasts) and ascorbate peroxidase (localized to chloroplasts) greatly reduces P. syringae–induced PCD, suggesting a pro-PCD role for mitochondrial and chloroplast events. During infection, ACD2 may bind to and/or reduce PCD-inducing porphyrin-related molecules in mitochondria and possibly chloroplasts that generate reactive oxygen species, cause altered organelle behavior, and activate a cascade of PCD-inducing events. PMID:16387834

  10. The Arabidopsis exocyst complex is involved in cytokinesis and cell plate maturation.

    PubMed

    Fendrych, Matyás; Synek, Lukás; Pecenková, Tamara; Toupalová, Hana; Cole, Rex; Drdová, Edita; Nebesárová, Jana; Sedinová, Miroslava; Hála, Michal; Fowler, John E; Zársky, Viktor

    2010-09-01

    Cell reproduction is a complex process involving whole cell structures and machineries in space and time, resulting in regulated distribution of endomembranes, organelles, and genomes between daughter cells. Secretory pathways supported by the activity of the Golgi apparatus play a crucial role in cytokinesis in plants. From the onset of phragmoplast initiation to the maturation of the cell plate, delivery of secretory vesicles is necessary to sustain successful daughter cell separation. Tethering of secretory vesicles at the plasma membrane is mediated by the evolutionarily conserved octameric exocyst complex. Using proteomic and cytologic approaches, we show that EXO84b is a subunit of the plant exocyst. Arabidopsis thaliana mutants for EXO84b are severely dwarfed and have compromised leaf epidermal cell and guard cell division. During cytokinesis, green fluorescent protein-tagged exocyst subunits SEC6, SEC8, SEC15b, EXO70A1, and EXO84b exhibit distinctive localization maxima at cell plate initiation and cell plate maturation, stages with a high demand for vesicle fusion. Finally, we present data indicating a defect in cell plate assembly in the exo70A1 mutant. We conclude that the exocyst complex is involved in secretory processes during cytokinesis in Arabidopsis cells, notably in cell plate initiation, cell plate maturation, and formation of new primary cell wall. PMID:20870962

  11. CLV3 IS LOCALIZED TO THE EXTRACELLULAR SPACE, WHERE IT ACTIVATES THE ARABIDOPSIS CLAVATA STEM CELL SIGNALING PATHWAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant growth and development depends upon the activity of a continuously replenished pool of stem cells within the shoot apical meristem to supply cells for organogenesis. In Arabidopsis, the stem cell-specific protein CLAVATA3 (CLV3) acts cell nonautonomously to restrict the size of the stem cell p...

  12. The importance of Arabidopsis glutathione peroxidase 8 for protecting Arabidopsis plant and E. coli cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gaber, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (GPXs) are major family of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes. Recently, database analysis of the Arabidopsis genome revealed a new open-reading frame, thus increasing the total number of AtGPX gene family to eight (AtGPX1-8). The effect of plant hormones like; i. e. salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), abscisic acid (ABA), indoleacetic acid (IAA), and mannitol on the expression of the genes confirm that the AtGPX genes family is regulated by multiple signaling pathways. The survival rate of AtGPX8 knockout plants (KO8) was significantly decreased under heat stress compared with the wild type. Moreover, the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein oxidation was significantly increased in the KO8 plant cells under heat stress. Results indicating that the deficiency of AtGPX8 accelerates the progression of oxidative stress in KO8 plants. On the other hand, the overexpression of AtGPX8 in E. coli cells enhance the growth of the recombinant enzyme on media supplemented with 0.2 mM cumene hydroperoxide, 0.3 mM H 2O 2 or 600 mM NaCl. PMID:24217216

  13. High affinity RGD-binding sites at the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana links the cell wall.

    PubMed

    Canut, H; Carrasco, A; Galaud, J P; Cassan, C; Bouyssou, H; Vita, N; Ferrara, P; Pont-Lezica, R

    1998-10-01

    The heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD--the essential structure recognised by animal cells in substrate adhesion molecules) was tested on epidermal cells of onion and cultured cells of Arabidopsis upon plasmolysis. Dramatic changes were observed on both types of cells following treatment: on onion cells, Hechtian strands linking the cell wall to the membrane were lost, while Arabidopsis cells changed from concave to convex plasmolysis. A control heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Asp-Gly-Arg-Ser-Pro had no effect on the shape of plasmolysed cells. Protoplasts isolated from Arabidopsis cells agglutinate in the presence of ProNectinF, a genetically engineered protein of 72 kDa containing 13 RGD sequences: several protoplasts may adhere to a single molecule of ProNectinF. The addition of the RGD-heptapeptide disrupted the adhesion between the protoplasts. Purified plasma membrane from Arabidopsis cells exhibits specific binding sites for the iodinated RGD-heptapeptide. The binding is saturable, reversible, and two types of high affinity sites (Kd1 approximately 1 nM, and Kd2 approximately 40 nM) can be discerned. Competitive inhibition by several structurally related peptides and proteins noted the specific requirement for the RGD sequence. Thus, the RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis fulfils the adhesion features of integrins, i.e. peptide specificity, subcellular location, and involvement in plasma membrane-cell wall attachments. PMID:9807828

  14. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2014-04-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2-4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2-4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:24717634

  15. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2014-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2–4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2–4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone’s expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:24717634

  16. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2015-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2–4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2–4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:26042727

  17. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2015-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2-4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2-4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:26042727

  18. Altered cell shapes, hyperplasia, and secondary growth in Arabidopsis caused by beet curly top geminivirus infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongbum; Hwang, Hyunsik; Shim, Haekyung; Im, Kyunghoan; Auh, Chung-Kyoon; Lee, Sukchan; Davis, Keith R

    2004-02-29

    Arabidopsis Sei-O ecotype was found to be hypersusceptible to the BCTV-Logan strain in that it developed very severe symptoms, including severely deformed inflorescences with the callus-like structure, and accumulated high level of viral DNA. Microscopic studies of the BCTV-induced cell divisions demonstrated that the activation of cell divisions was preceded by the phloem disruption and the callus-like structure seemed to be originated from the cortex nearby disrupted phloem. We have further defined the callus-like structure formed by BCTV infection using molecular and histochemical analyses. Results indicate that BCTV infection causes the phloem disruption, following by cell enlargement and elongation in cortex and even epidermis. Finally, BCTV induced symptomatic secondary growth in cortex by de novo anticlinal and periclinal cell divisions. Expression of cdc2 and saur from BCTV-infected Arabidopsis correlates with symptom development. These results suggest a critical role of auxin in symptom development in the interactions between Arabidopsis and BCTV. PMID:15055537

  19. An exocyst complex functions in plant cell growth in Arabidopsis and tobacco.

    PubMed

    Hála, Michal; Cole, Rex; Synek, Lukás; Drdová, Edita; Pecenková, Tamara; Nordheim, Alfred; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Madlung, Johannes; Hochholdinger, Frank; Fowler, John E; Zárský, Viktor

    2008-05-01

    The exocyst, an octameric tethering complex and effector of Rho and Rab GTPases, facilitates polarized secretion in yeast and animals. Recent evidence implicates three plant homologs of exocyst subunits (SEC3, SEC8, and EXO70A1) in plant cell morphogenesis. Here, we provide genetic, cell biological, and biochemical evidence that these and other predicted subunits function together in vivo in Arabidopsis thaliana. Double mutants in exocyst subunits (sec5 exo70A1 and sec8 exo70A1) show a synergistic defect in etiolated hypocotyl elongation. Mutants in exocyst subunits SEC5, SEC6, SEC8, and SEC15a show defective pollen germination and pollen tube growth phenotypes. Using antibodies directed against SEC6, SEC8, and EXO70A1, we demonstrate colocalization of these proteins at the apex of growing tobacco pollen tubes. The SEC3, SEC5, SEC6, SEC8, SEC10, SEC15a, and EXO70 subunits copurify in a high molecular mass fraction of 900 kD after chromatographic fractionation of an Arabidopsis cell suspension extract. Blue native electrophoresis confirmed the presence of SEC3, SEC6, SEC8, and EXO70 in high molecular mass complexes. Finally, use of the yeast two-hybrid system revealed interaction of Arabidopsis SEC3a with EXO70A1, SEC10 with SEC15b, and SEC6 with SEC8. We conclude that the exocyst functions as a complex in plant cells, where it plays important roles in morphogenesis. PMID:18492870

  20. Dependence of stem cell fate in Arabidopsis on a feedback loop regulated by CLV3 activity.

    PubMed

    Brand, U; Fletcher, J C; Hobe, M; Meyerowitz, E M; Simon, R

    2000-07-28

    The fate of stem cells in plant meristems is governed by directional signaling systems that are regulated by negative feedback. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the CLAVATA (CLV) genes encode the essential components of a negative, stem cell-restricting pathway. We used transgenic plants overexpressing CLV3 to show that meristem cell accumulation and fate depends directly on the level of CLV3 activity and that CLV3 signaling occurs exclusively through a CLV1/CLV2 receptor kinase complex. We also demonstrate that the CLV pathway acts by repressing the activity of the transcription factor WUSCHEL, an element of the positive, stem cell-promoting pathway. PMID:10915624

  1. Real-Time Lineage Analysis to Study Cell Division Orientation in the Arabidopsis Shoot Meristem.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Cory J; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2016-01-01

    Cells in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem are small and divide frequently throughout the life-time of the organism making them good candidates for studying the mechanisms of cell division in plants. But tracking these cell divisions requires multiple images to be taken of the same specimen over time which means the specimen must stay alive throughout the process. This chapter provides details on how to prepare plants for live imaging, keep them alive and growing through multiple time points, and how to process the data to extract cell boundary coordinates from three-dimensional images. PMID:26659961

  2. Functional Analysis of Cellulose and Xyloglucan in the Walls of Stomatal Guard Cells of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rui, Yue; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-03-01

    Stomatal guard cells are pairs of specialized epidermal cells that control water and CO2 exchange between the plant and the environment. To fulfill the functions of stomatal opening and closure that are driven by changes in turgor pressure, guard cell walls must be both strong and flexible, but how the structure and dynamics of guard cell walls enable stomatal function remains poorly understood. To address this question, we applied cell biological and genetic analyses to investigate guard cell walls and their relationship to stomatal function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using live-cell spinning disk confocal microscopy, we measured the motility of cellulose synthase (CESA)-containing complexes labeled by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-CESA3 and observed a reduced proportion of GFP-CESA3 particles colocalizing with microtubules upon stomatal closure. Imaging cellulose organization in guard cells revealed a relatively uniform distribution of cellulose in the open state and a more fibrillar pattern in the closed state, indicating that cellulose microfibrils undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal movements. In cesa3(je5) mutants defective in cellulose synthesis and xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking the hemicellulose xyloglucan, stomatal apertures, changes in guard cell length, and cellulose reorganization were aberrant during fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening or abscisic acid-induced stomatal closure, indicating that sufficient cellulose and xyloglucan are required for normal guard cell dynamics. Together, these results provide new insights into how guard cell walls allow stomata to function as responsive mediators of gas exchange at the plant surface. PMID:26729799

  3. Calcium Dynamics in Root Cells of Arabidopsis thaliana Visualized with Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Alex; Candeo, Alessia; Fieramonti, Luca; Valentini, Gianluca; Bassi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM) is an imaging technique particularly suited for long term in-vivo analysis of transparent specimens, able to visualize small organs or entire organisms, at cellular and eventually even subcellular resolution. Here we report the application of SPIM in Calcium imaging based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the genetically encoded-FRET-based Ca2+ probe Cameleon, in the cytosol or nucleus, were used to demonstrate that SPIM enables ratiometric fluorescence imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, both at tissue and single cell level. The SPIM-FRET technique enabled us to follow nuclear and cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics in Arabidopsis root tip cells, deep inside the organ, in response to different stimuli. A relevant physiological phenomenon, namely Ca2+ signal percolation, predicted in previous studies, has been directly visualized. PMID:24146766

  4. A SCARECROW-RETINOBLASTOMA Protein Network Controls Protective Quiescence in the Arabidopsis Root Stem Cell Organizer

    PubMed Central

    Wachsman, Guy; Du, Yujuan; Arteága-Vázquez, Mario; Zhang, Hongtao; Benjamins, Rene; Blilou, Ikram; Neef, Anne B.; Chandler, Vicki; Scheres, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent long-term somatic stem cells reside in plant and animal stem cell niches. Within the Arabidopsis root stem cell population, the Quiescent Centre (QC), which contains slowly dividing cells, maintains surrounding short-term stem cells and may act as a long-term reservoir for stem cells. The RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED (RBR) protein cell-autonomously reinforces mitotic quiescence in the QC. RBR interacts with the stem cell transcription factor SCARECROW (SCR) through an LxCxE motif. Disruption of this interaction by point mutation in SCR or RBR promotes asymmetric divisions in the QC that renew short-term stem cells. Analysis of the in vivo role of quiescence in the root stem cell niche reveals that slow cycling within the QC is not needed for structural integrity of the niche but allows the growing root to cope with DNA damage. PMID:24302889

  5. Vacuolar processing enzyme is essential for mycotoxin-induced cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Miwa; Yamada, Kenji; Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Kondo, Maki; Nishimura, Mikio; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2005-09-23

    Some compatible pathogens secrete toxins to induce host cell death and promote their growth. The toxin-induced cell death is a pathogen strategy for infection. To clarify the executioner of the toxin-induced cell death, we examined a fungal toxin (fumonisin B1 (FB1))-induced cell death of Arabidopsis plants. FB1-induced cell death was accompanied with disruption of vacuolar membrane followed by lesion formation. The features of FB1-induced cell death were completely abolished in the Arabidopsis vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE)-null mutant, which lacks all four VPE genes of the genome. Interestingly, an inhibitor of caspase-1 abolished FB1-induced lesion formation, as did a VPE inhibitor. The VPE-null mutant had no detectable activities of caspase-1 or VPE in the FB1-treated leaves, although wild-type leaves had the caspase-1 and VPE activities, both of which were inhibited by a caspase-1 inhibitor. gammaVPE is the most essential among the four VPE homologues for FB1-induced cell death in Arabidopsis leaves. Recombinant gammaVPE recognized a VPE substrate with Km = 30.3 microm and a caspase-1 substrate with Km = 44.2 microm, which is comparable with the values for mammalian caspase-1. The gammaVPE precursor was self-catalytically converted into the mature form exhibiting caspase-1 activity. These in vivo and in vitro analyses demonstrate that gammaVPE is the proteinase that exhibits a caspase-1 activity. We show that VPE exhibiting a caspase-1 activity is a key molecule in toxin-induced cell death. Our findings suggest that a susceptible response of toxin-induced cell death is caused by the VPE-mediated vacuolar mechanism similar to a resistance response of hypersensitive cell death (Hatsugai, N., Kuroyanagi, M., Yamada, K., Meshi, T., Tsuda, S., Kondo, M., Nishimura, M., and Hara-Nishimura, I. (2004) Science 305, 855-858). PMID:16043487

  6. Knockin' on pollen's door: live cell imaging of early polarization events in germinating Arabidopsis pollen

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Frank; Konrad, Sebastian S. A.; Sprunck, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Pollen tubes are an excellent system for studying the cellular dynamics and complex signaling pathways that coordinate polarized tip growth. Although several signaling mechanisms acting in the tip-growing pollen tube have been described, our knowledge on the subcellular and molecular events during pollen germination and growth site selection at the pollen plasma membrane is rather scarce. To simultaneously track germinating pollen from up to 12 genetically different plants we developed an inexpensive and easy mounting technique, suitable for every standard microscope setup. We performed high magnification live-cell imaging during Arabidopsis pollen activation, germination, and the establishment of pollen tube tip growth by using fluorescent marker lines labeling either the pollen cytoplasm, vesicles, the actin cytoskeleton or the sperm cell nuclei and membranes. Our studies revealed distinctive vesicle and F-actin polarization during pollen activation and characteristic growth kinetics during pollen germination and pollen tube formation. Initially, the germinating Arabidopsis pollen tube grows slowly and forms a uniform roundish bulge, followed by a transition phase with vesicles heavily accumulating at the growth site before switching to rapid tip growth. Furthermore, we found the two sperm cells to be transported into the pollen tube after the phase of rapid tip growth has been initiated. The method presented here is suitable to quantitatively study subcellular events during Arabidopsis pollen germination and growth, and for the detailed analysis of pollen mutants with respect to pollen polarization, bulging, or growth site selection at the pollen plasma membrane. PMID:25954283

  7. Identification of transcription factors linked to cell cycle regulation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan Nayeri, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle is an essential process in growth and development of living organisms consists of the replication and mitotic phases separated by 2 gap phases; G1 and G2. It is tightly controlled at the molecular level and especially at the level of transcription. Precise regulation of the cell cycle is of central significance for plant growth and development and transcription factors are global regulators of gene expression playing essential roles in cell cycle regulation. This study has uncovered TFs that are involved in the control of cell cycle progression. With the aid of multi-parallel quantitative RT-PCR, the expression changes of 1880 TFs represented in the Arabidopsis TF platform was monitored in Arabidopsis synchronous MM2d cells during a 19 h period representing different time points corresponding to the 4 cell cycle phases after treatment of MM2d cells with Aphidicolin. Comparative TF expression analyses performed on synchronous cells resulted in the identification of 239 TFs differentially expressed during the cell cycle, while about one third of TFs were constitutively expressed through all time points. Phase-specific TFs were also identified. PMID:25482767

  8. RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED1 Regulates Asymmetric Cell Divisions in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Annika K.; Nowack, Moritz K.; Bouyer, Daniel; Zhao, Xin’Ai; Harashima, Hirofumi; Naseer, Sadaf; De Winter, Freya; Dissmeyer, Nico; Geldner, Niko; Schnittger, Arp

    2012-01-01

    Formative, also called asymmetric, cell divisions produce daughter cells with different identities. Like other divisions, formative divisions rely first of all on the cell cycle machinery with centrally acting cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their cyclin partners to control progression through the cell cycle. However, it is still largely obscure how developmental cues are translated at the cellular level to promote asymmetric divisions. Here, we show that formative divisions in the shoot and root of the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana are controlled by a common mechanism that relies on the activity level of the Cdk1 homolog CDKA;1, with medium levels being sufficient for symmetric divisions but high levels being required for formative divisions. We reveal that the function of CDKA;1 in asymmetric cell divisions operates through a transcriptional regulation system that is mediated by the Arabidopsis Retinoblastoma homolog RBR1. RBR1 regulates not only cell cycle genes, but also, independent of the cell cycle transcription factor E2F, genes required for formative divisions and cell fate acquisition, thus directly linking cell proliferation with differentiation. This mechanism allows the implementation of spatial information, in the form of high kinase activity, with intracellular gating of developmental decisions. PMID:23104828

  9. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  10. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  11. Spatially and temporally restricted expression of PtrMYB021 regulates secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Wei; Li, Eryang; Porth, Ilga; Chen, Jin-Gui; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Douglas, Carl J.; Wang, Shucai

    2016-02-02

    Among the R2R3 MYB transcription factors that involve in the regulation of secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis, MYB46 alone is sufficient to induce the entire secondary cell wall biosynthesis program. PtrMYB021, the poplar homolog of MYB46, has been reported to regulate secondary cell wall formation when expressed in Arabidopsis. We report here that spatially and temporally restricted expression of PtrMYB021 is critical for its function in regulating secondary cell wall formation. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that PtrMYB021 was expressed primarily in xylem tissues. When expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of PtrCesA8, but not the 35S promoter,more » PtrMYB021 increased secondary cell wall thickness, which is likely caused by increased lignification as well as changes in cell wall carbohydrate composition. Consistent with this, elevated expression of lignin and cellulose biosynthetic genes were observed in the transgenic plants. Finally, when expressed in Arabidopsis protoplasts as fusion proteins to the Gal4 DNA binding domain, PtrMYB021 activated the reporter gene Gal4-GUS. In summary, our results suggest that PtrMYB021 is a transcriptional activator, and spatially and temporally restricted expression of PtrMYB021 in Arabidopsis regulates secondary cell wall formation by activating a subset of secondary cell wall biosynthesis genes.« less

  12. GLABROUS1 overexpression and TRIPTYCHON alter the cell cycle and trichome cell fate in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, D B; Marks, M D

    1998-01-01

    Cellular competence, initiation cues, and inhibition signals control the distribution of trichomes on the Arabidopsis leaf. The GLABROUS1 (GL1) gene has a dual role in that it is required for trichome initiation, but GL1 overexpression reduces trichome number. We have found that a mutation in the TRIPTYCHON (TRY) gene partially suppresses the GL1 overexpression phenotype but not in a way that indicates that TRY directly controls an epidermal inhibition pathway. Surprisingly, cauliflower mosaic virus 35S::GL1 try plants contain a subclass of trichomes derived from the subepidermal layer. Altered cell cycle control was also detected in 35S::GL1 and try plants. A mutation in TRY led to increased epidermal and mesophyll cell number, a reduction in endoreduplication in the epidermis, and an increase in endoreduplication in trichomes. GL1 overexpression also reduced endoreduplication levels in both the epidermis and trichomes; however, in the presence of try, it synergistically enhanced trichome endoreduplication. Interactions with the COTYLEDON TRICHOME1 (COT1) gene indicate that GL1 and TRY control trichome development and may be involved in cell cycle control during leaf development. PMID:9836744

  13. Profilin-Dependent Nucleation and Assembly of Actin Filaments Controls Cell Elongation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingyan; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Actin filaments in plant cells are incredibly dynamic; they undergo incessant remodeling and assembly or disassembly within seconds. These dynamic events are choreographed by a plethora of actin-binding proteins, but the exact mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we dissect the contribution of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PROFILIN1 (PRF1), a conserved actin monomer-binding protein, to actin organization and single filament dynamics during axial cell expansion of living epidermal cells. We found that reduced PRF1 levels enhanced cell and organ growth. Surprisingly, we observed that the overall frequency of nucleation events in prf1 mutants was dramatically decreased and that a subpopulation of actin filaments that assemble at high rates was reduced. To test whether profilin cooperates with plant formin proteins to execute actin nucleation and rapid filament elongation in cells, we used a pharmacological approach. Here, we used Small Molecule Inhibitor of Formin FH2 (SMIFH2), after validating its mode of action on a plant formin in vitro, and observed a reduced nucleation frequency of actin filaments in live cells. Treatment of wild-type epidermal cells with SMIFH2 mimicked the phenotype of prf1 mutants, and the nucleation frequency in prf1-2 mutant was completely insensitive to these treatments. Our data provide compelling evidence that PRF1 coordinates the stochastic dynamic properties of actin filaments by modulating formin-mediated actin nucleation and assembly during plant cell expansion. PMID:26574597

  14. Arabidopsis  SABRE and CLASP interact to stabilize cell division plane orientation and planar polarity

    PubMed Central

    Pietra, Stefano; Gustavsson, Anna; Kiefer, Christian; Kalmbach, Lothar; Hörstedt, Per; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Stepanova, Anna N.; Alonso, Jose M.; Grebe, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The orientation of cell division and the coordination of cell polarity within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity) contribute to shape diverse multicellular organisms. The root of Arabidopsis thaliana displays regularly oriented cell divisions, cell elongation and planar polarity providing a plant model system to study these processes. Here we report that the SABRE protein, which shares similarity with proteins of unknown function throughout eukaryotes, has important roles in orienting cell division and planar polarity. SABRE localizes at the plasma membrane, endomembranes, mitotic spindle and cell plate. SABRE stabilizes the orientation of CLASP-labelled preprophase band microtubules predicting the cell division plane, and of cortical microtubules driving cell elongation. During planar polarity establishment, sabre is epistatic to clasp at directing polar membrane domains of Rho-of-plant GTPases. Our findings mechanistically link SABRE to CLASP-dependent microtubule organization, shedding new light on the function of SABRE-related proteins in eukaryotes. PMID:24240534

  15. Conserved Arabidopsis ECHIDNA protein mediates trans-Golgi-network trafficking and cell elongation.

    PubMed

    Gendre, Delphine; Oh, Jaesung; Boutté, Yohann; Best, Jacob G; Samuels, Lacey; Nilsson, Robert; Uemura, Tomohiro; Marchant, Alan; Bennett, Malcolm J; Grebe, Markus; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P

    2011-05-10

    Multiple steps of plant growth and development rely on rapid cell elongation during which secretory and endocytic trafficking via the trans-Golgi network (TGN) plays a central role. Here, we identify the ECHIDNA (ECH) protein from Arabidopsis thaliana as a TGN-localized component crucial for TGN function. ECH partially complements loss of budding yeast TVP23 function and a Populus ECH complements the Arabidopsis ech mutant, suggesting functional conservation of the genes. Compared with wild-type, the Arabidopsis ech mutant exhibits severely perturbed cell elongation as well as defects in TGN structure and function, manifested by the reduced association between Golgi bodies and TGN as well as mislocalization of several TGN-localized proteins including vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunit a1 (VHA-a1). Strikingly, ech is defective in secretory trafficking, whereas endocytosis appears unaffected in the mutant. Some aspects of the ech mutant phenotype can be phenocopied by treatment with a specific inhibitor of vacuolar H(+)-ATPases, concanamycin A, indicating that mislocalization of VHA-a1 may account for part of the defects in ech. Hence, ECH is an evolutionarily conserved component of the TGN with a central role in TGN structure and function. PMID:21512130

  16. Regulation of Cell Fate Determination by Single-Repeat R3 MYB Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jay

    2014-01-01

    MYB transcription factors regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. Among the large family of MYB transcription factors, single-repeat R3 MYB are characterized by their short sequence (<120 amino acids) consisting largely of the single MYB DNA-binding repeat. In the model plant Arabidopsis, R3 MYBs mediate lateral inhibition during epidermal patterning and are best characterized for their regulatory roles in trichome and root hair development. R3 MYBs act as negative regulators for trichome formation but as positive regulators for root hair development. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of R3 MYBs in the regulation of cell type specification in the model plant Arabidopsis.

  17. Identification of novel transcription factors regulating secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cassan-Wang, Hua; Goué, Nadia; Saidi, Mohammed N.; Legay, Sylvain; Sivadon, Pierre; Goffner, Deborah; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The presence of lignin in secondary cell walls (SCW) is a major factor preventing hydrolytic enzymes from gaining access to cellulose, thereby limiting the saccharification potential of plant biomass. To understand how lignification is regulated is a prerequisite for selecting plant biomass better adapted to bioethanol production. Because transcriptional regulation is a major mechanism controlling the expression of genes involved in lignin biosynthesis, our aim was to identify novel transcription factors (TFs) dictating lignin profiles in the model plant Arabidopsis. To this end, we have developed a post-genomic approach by combining four independent in-house SCW-related transcriptome datasets obtained from (1) the fiber cell wall-deficient wat1 Arabidopsis mutant, (2) Arabidopsis lines over-expressing either the master regulatory activator EgMYB2 or (3) the repressor EgMYB1 and finally (4) Arabidopsis orthologs of Eucalyptus xylem-expressed genes. This allowed us to identify 502 up- or down-regulated TFs. We preferentially selected those present in more than one dataset and further analyzed their in silico expression patterns as an additional selection criteria. This selection process led to 80 candidates. Notably, 16 of them were already proven to regulate SCW formation, thereby validating the overall strategy. Then, we phenotyped 43 corresponding mutant lines focusing on histological observations of xylem and interfascicular fibers. This phenotypic screen revealed six mutant lines exhibiting altered lignification patterns. Two of them [Bel-like HomeoBox6 (blh6) and a zinc finger TF] presented hypolignified SCW. Three others (myb52, myb-like TF, hb5) showed hyperlignified SCW whereas the last one (hb15) showed ectopic lignification. In addition, our meta-analyses highlighted a reservoir of new potential regulators adding to the gene network regulating SCW but also opening new avenues to ultimately improve SCW composition for biofuel production. PMID:23781226

  18. Cell-Type-Specific Cytokinin Distribution within the Arabidopsis Primary Root Apex[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Antoniadi, Ioanna; Plačková, Lenka; Simonovik, Biljana; Doležal, Karel; Turnbull, Colin; Ljung, Karin; Novák, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins (CKs) play a crucial role in many physiological and developmental processes at the levels of individual plant components (cells, tissues, and organs) and by coordinating activities across these parts. High-resolution measurements of intracellular CKs in different plant tissues can therefore provide insights into their metabolism and mode of action. Here, we applied fluorescence-activated cell sorting of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-marked cell types, combined with solid-phase microextraction and an ultra-high-sensitivity mass spectrometry (MS) method for analysis of CK biosynthesis and homeostasis at cellular resolution. This method was validated by series of control experiments, establishing that protoplast isolation and cell sorting procedures did not greatly alter endogenous CK levels. The MS-based method facilitated the quantification of all the well known CK isoprenoid metabolites in four different transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines expressing GFP in specific cell populations within the primary root apex. Our results revealed the presence of a CK gradient within the Arabidopsis root tip, with a concentration maximum in the lateral root cap, columella, columella initials, and quiescent center cells. This distribution, when compared with previously published auxin gradients, implies that the well known antagonistic interactions between the two hormone groups are cell type specific. PMID:26152699

  19. Cell-Type-Specific Cytokinin Distribution within the Arabidopsis Primary Root Apex.

    PubMed

    Antoniadi, Ioanna; Plačková, Lenka; Simonovik, Biljana; Doležal, Karel; Turnbull, Colin; Ljung, Karin; Novák, Ondřej

    2015-07-01

    Cytokinins (CKs) play a crucial role in many physiological and developmental processes at the levels of individual plant components (cells, tissues, and organs) and by coordinating activities across these parts. High-resolution measurements of intracellular CKs in different plant tissues can therefore provide insights into their metabolism and mode of action. Here, we applied fluorescence-activated cell sorting of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-marked cell types, combined with solid-phase microextraction and an ultra-high-sensitivity mass spectrometry (MS) method for analysis of CK biosynthesis and homeostasis at cellular resolution. This method was validated by series of control experiments, establishing that protoplast isolation and cell sorting procedures did not greatly alter endogenous CK levels. The MS-based method facilitated the quantification of all the well known CK isoprenoid metabolites in four different transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines expressing GFP in specific cell populations within the primary root apex. Our results revealed the presence of a CK gradient within the Arabidopsis root tip, with a concentration maximum in the lateral root cap, columella, columella initials, and quiescent center cells. This distribution, when compared with previously published auxin gradients, implies that the well known antagonistic interactions between the two hormone groups are cell type specific. PMID:26152699

  20. THE ARABIDOPSIS GENE TARDY ASYNCHRONOUS MEIOSIS IS REQUIRED FOR THE NORMAL PACE AND SYNCHRONY OF CELL DIVISION DURING MALE MEIOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male meiosis in higher organisms features synchronous cell divisions in a large number of cells. It is not clear how this synchrony is achieved, nor is it known whether the synchrony is linked to the regulation of cell cycle progression. Here, we describe an Arabidopsis mutant, named tardy asynchron...

  1. Stimulation of Cell Elongation by Tetraploidy in Hypocotyls of Dark-Grown Arabidopsis Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Narukawa, Hideki; Yokoyama, Ryusuke; Komaki, Shinichiro; Sugimoto, Keiko; Nishitani, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Plant size is largely determined by the size of individual cells. A number of studies showed a link between ploidy and cell size in land plants, but this link remains controversial. In this study, post-germination growth, which occurs entirely by cell elongation, was examined in diploid and autotetraploid hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Final hypocotyl length was longer in tetraploid plants than in diploid plants, particularly when seedlings were grown in the dark. The longer hypocotyl in the tetraploid seedlings developed as a result of enhanced cell elongation rather than by an increase in cell number. DNA microarray analysis showed that genes involved in the transport of cuticle precursors were downregulated in a defined region of the tetraploid hypocotyl when compared to the diploid hypocotyl. Cuticle permeability, as assessed by toluidine-blue staining, and cuticular structure, as visualized by electron microscopy, were altered in tetraploid plants. Taken together, these data indicate that promotion of cell elongation is responsible for ploidy-dependent size determination in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl, and that this process is directly or indirectly related to cuticular function. PMID:26244498

  2. Spatial dissection of the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptional response to downy mildew using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Coker, Timothy L. R.; Cevik, Volkan; Beynon, Jim L.; Gifford, Miriam L.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in gene expression form a crucial part of the plant response to infection. In the last decade, whole-leaf expression profiling has played a valuable role in identifying genes and processes that contribute to the interactions between the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and a diverse range of pathogens. However, with some pathogens such as downy mildew caused by the biotrophic oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa), whole-leaf profiling may fail to capture the complete Arabidopsis response encompassing responses of non-infected as well as infected cells within the leaf. Highly localized expression changes that occur in infected cells may be diluted by the comparative abundance of non-infected cells. Furthermore, local and systemic Hpa responses of a differing nature may become conflated. To address this we applied the technique of Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS), typically used for analyzing plant abiotic responses, to the study of plant-pathogen interactions. We isolated haustoriated (Hpa-proximal) and non-haustoriated (Hpa-distal) cells from infected seedling samples using FACS, and measured global gene expression. When compared with an uninfected control, 278 transcripts were identified as significantly differentially expressed, the vast majority of which were differentially expressed specifically in Hpa-proximal cells. By comparing our data to previous, whole organ studies, we discovered many highly locally regulated genes that can be implicated as novel in the Hpa response, and that were uncovered for the first time using our sensitive FACS technique. PMID:26217372

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Mutants Defective in Seed Coat Mucilage Secretory Cell Development in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Western, Tamara L.; Burn, Joanne; Tan, Wei Ling; Skinner, Debra J.; Martin-McCaffrey, Luke; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Haughn, George W.

    2001-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, fertilization induces the epidermal cells of the outer ovule integument to differentiate into a specialized seed coat cell type producing extracellular pectinaceous mucilage and a volcano-shaped secondary cell wall. Differentiation involves a regulated series of cytological events including growth, cytoplasmic rearrangement, mucilage synthesis, and secondary cell wall production. We have tested the potential of Arabidopsis seed coat epidermal cells as a model system for the genetic analysis of these processes. A screen for mutants defective in seed mucilage identified five novel genes (MUCILAGE-MODIFIED [MUM]1–5). The seed coat development of these mutants, and that of three previously identified ones (TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1, GLABRA2, and APETALA2) were characterized. Our results show that the genes identified define several events in seed coat differentiation. Although APETALA2 is needed for differentiation of both outer layers of the seed coat, TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1, GLABRA2, and MUM4 are required for complete mucilage synthesis and cytoplasmic rearrangement. MUM3 and MUM5 may be involved in the regulation of mucilage composition, whereas MUM1 and MUM2 appear to play novel roles in post-synthesis cell wall modifications necessary for mucilage extrusion. PMID:11706181

  4. AT14A mediates the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum in Arabidopsis thaliana cells.

    PubMed

    Lü, Bing; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Hongcheng; Liang, Jiansheng; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-06-01

    AT14A has a small domain that has sequence similarities to integrins from animals. Integrins serve as a transmembrane linker between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton, which play critical roles in a variety of biological processes. Because the function of AT14A is unknown, Arabidopsis thaliana AT14A, which is a transmembrane receptor for cell adhesion molecules and a middle member of the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum in plants, has been described. AT14A, co-expressed with green fluorescent protein (GFP), was found to localize mainly to the plasma membrane. The mutant Arabidopsis at14a-1 cells exhibit various phenotypes with cell shape, cell cluster size, thickness, and cellulose content of cell wall, the adhesion between cells, and the adhesion of plasma membrane to cell wall varied by plasmolysis. Using direct staining of filamentous actin and indirect immunofluorescence staining of microtubules, cortical actin filaments and microtubules arrays were significantly altered in cells, either where AT14A was absent or over-expressed. It is concluded that AT14A may be a substantial middle member of the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum and play an important role in the continuum by regulating cell wall and cortical cytoskeleton organization. PMID:22456678

  5. An arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptiona...

  6. Cameleon calcium indicator reports cytoplasmic calcium dynamics in Arabidopsis guard cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. J.; Kwak, J. M.; Chu, S. P.; Llopis, J.; Tsien, R. Y.; Harper, J. F.; Schroeder, J. I.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) acts as a stimulus-induced second messenger in plant cells and multiple signal transduction pathways regulate [Ca2+]cyt in stomatal guard cells. Measuring [Ca2+]cyt in guard cells has previously required loading of calcium-sensitive dyes using invasive and technically difficult micro-injection techniques. To circumvent these problems, we have constitutively expressed the pH-independent, green fluorescent protein-based calcium indicator yellow cameleon 2.1 in Arabidopsis thaliana (Miyawaki et al. 1999; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96, 2135-2140). This yellow cameleon calcium indicator was expressed in guard cells and accumulated predominantly in the cytoplasm. Fluorescence ratio imaging of yellow cameleon 2.1 allowed time-dependent measurements of [Ca2+]cyt in Arabidopsis guard cells. Application of extracellular calcium or the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients in guard cells. [Ca2+]cyt changes could be semi-quantitatively determined following correction of the calibration procedure for chloroplast autofluorescence. Extracellular calcium induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients with peak values of up to approximately 1.5 microM, whereas ABA-induced [Ca2+]cyt transients had peak values up to approximately 0.6 microM. These values are similar to stimulus-induced [Ca2+]cyt changes previously reported in plant cells using ratiometric dyes or aequorin. In some guard cells perfused with low extracellular KCl concentrations, spontaneous calcium transients were observed. As yellow cameleon 2.1 was expressed in all guard cells, [Ca2+]cyt was measured independently in the two guard cells of single stomates for the first time. ABA-induced, calcium-induced or spontaneous [Ca2+]cyt increases were not necessarily synchronized in the two guard cells. Overall, these data demonstrate that that GFP-based cameleon calcium indicators are suitable to measure [Ca2+]cyt changes in guard cells and enable the pattern of [Ca

  7. Roles of arabinogalactan proteins in cotyledon formation and cell wall deposition during embryo development of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jing; Ren, YuJun; Yu, Miao; Ma, TengFei; Zhang, XueLian; Zhao, Jie

    2011-07-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are a class of highly glycosylated, widely distributed proteins in higher plants. In the previous study, we found that the green fluorescence from JIM13-labeled AGPs was mainly distributed in embryo proper and the basal part of suspensor but gradually disappeared after the torpedo-stage embryos in Arabidopsis. And (β-D-Glc)(3) Yariv phenylglycoside (βGlcY), a synthetic reagent that specifically binds to AGPs, could inhibit embryo development. In this study, as a continuous work, we investigated the AGP functions in embryo germination, cotyledon formation, and cell wall deposition in Arabidopsis embryos by using immunofluorescent, immunoenzyme, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The results showed that 50 μM βGlcY caused inhibition of embryo germination, formation of abnormal cotyledon embryos, and disorder of cotyledon vasculature. Compared with the normal embryos in vitro and in vivo, the AGPs and pectin signals were quite weaker in the whole abnormal embryos, whereas the cellulose signal was stronger in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) of abnormal embryo by calcofluor white staining. The FTIR assay demonstrated that the cell wall of abnormal embryos was relatively poorer in pectins and richer in cellulose than those of normal embryos. By TEM observation, the SAM cells of the abnormal embryos had less cytoplasm, more plastid and starch grains, and larger vacuole than that of normal embryos. These results indicated that AGPs may play roles in embryo germination, cotyledon formation, cell wall cellulose and pectin deposition, and cell division potentiality during embryo development of Arabidopsis. PMID:20830495

  8. Single-cell telomere-length quantification couples telomere length to meristem activity and stem cell development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    González-García, Mary-Paz; Pavelescu, Irina; Canela, Andrés; Sevillano, Xavier; Leehy, Katherine A; Nelson, Andrew D L; Ibañes, Marta; Shippen, Dorothy E; Blasco, Maria A; Caño-Delgado, Ana I

    2015-05-12

    Telomeres are specialized nucleoprotein caps that protect chromosome ends assuring cell division. Single-cell telomere quantification in animals established a critical role for telomerase in stem cells, yet, in plants, telomere-length quantification has been reported only at the organ level. Here, a quantitative analysis of telomere length of single cells in Arabidopsis root apex uncovered a heterogeneous telomere-length distribution of different cell lineages showing the longest telomeres at the stem cells. The defects in meristem and stem cell renewal observed in tert mutants demonstrate that telomere lengthening by TERT sets a replicative limit in the root meristem. Conversely, the long telomeres of the columella cells and the premature stem cell differentiation plt1,2 mutants suggest that differentiation can prevent telomere erosion. Overall, our results indicate that telomere dynamics are coupled to meristem activity and continuous growth, disclosing a critical association between telomere length, stem cell function, and the extended lifespan of plants. PMID:25937286

  9. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors and epidermal cell fate determination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongtao; Li, Xia; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Cell fate determination is an important process in multicellular organisms. Plant epidermis is a readily-accessible, well-used model for the study of cell fate determination. Our knowledge of cell fate determination is growing steadily due to genetic and molecular analyses of root hairs, trichomes, and stomata, which are derived from the epidermal cells of roots and aerial tissues. Studies have shown that a large number of factors are involved in the establishment of these cell types, especially members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) superfamily, which is an important family of transcription factors. In this mini-review, we focus on the role of bHLH transcription factors in cell fate determination in Arabidopsis. PMID:23073001

  10. Visualization of cellulose synthases in Arabidopsis secondary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Meents, M J; McDonnell, L M; Barkwill, S; Sampathkumar, A; Cartwright, H N; Demura, T; Ehrhardt, D W; Samuels, A L; Mansfield, S D

    2015-10-01

    Cellulose biosynthesis in plant secondary cell walls forms the basis of vascular development in land plants, with xylem tissues constituting the vast majority of terrestrial biomass. We used plant lines that contained an inducible master transcription factor controlling xylem cell fate to quantitatively image fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase enzymes during cellulose deposition in living protoxylem cells. The formation of secondary cell wall thickenings was associated with a redistribution and enrichment of CESA7-containing cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs) into narrow membrane domains. The velocities of secondary cell wall-specific CSCs were faster than those of primary cell wall CSCs during abundant cellulose production. Dynamic intracellular of endomembranes, in combination with increased velocity and high density of CSCs, enables cellulose to be synthesized rapidly in secondary cell walls. PMID:26450210

  11. WVD2 and WDL1 modulate helical organ growth and anisotropic cell expansion in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, Christen Y L.; Pearlman, Rebecca S.; Silo-Suh, Laura; Hilson, Pierre; Carroll, Kathleen L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    Wild-type Arabidopsis roots develop a wavy pattern of growth on tilted agar surfaces. For many Arabidopsis ecotypes, roots also grow askew on such surfaces, typically slanting to the right of the gravity vector. We identified a mutant, wvd2-1, that displays suppressed root waving and leftward root slanting under these conditions. These phenotypes arise from transcriptional activation of the novel WAVE-DAMPENED2 (WVD2) gene by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in mutant plants. Seedlings overexpressing WVD2 exhibit constitutive right-handed helical growth in both roots and etiolated hypocotyls, whereas the petioles of WVD2-overexpressing rosette leaves exhibit left-handed twisting. Moreover, the anisotropic expansion of cells is impaired, resulting in the formation of shorter and stockier organs. In roots, the phenotype is accompanied by a change in the arrangement of cortical microtubules within peripheral cap cells and cells at the basal end of the elongation zone. WVD2 transcripts are detectable by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in multiple organs of wild-type plants. Its predicted gene product contains a conserved region named "KLEEK," which is found only in plant proteins. The Arabidopsis genome possesses seven other genes predicted to encode KLEEK-containing products. Overexpression of one of these genes, WVD2-LIKE 1, which encodes a protein with regions of similarity to WVD2 extending beyond the KLEEK domain, results in phenotypes that are highly similar to wvd2-1. Silencing of WVD2 and its paralogs results in enhanced root skewing in the wild-type direction. Our observations suggest that at least two members of this gene family may modulate both rotational polarity and anisotropic cell expansion during organ growth.

  12. Programmed cell death activated by Rose Bengal in Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures requires functional chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Jorge; González-Pérez, Sergio; García-García, Francisco; Daly, Cara T.; Lorenzo, Óscar; Revuelta, José L.; McCabe, Paul F.; Arellano, Juan B.

    2014-01-01

    Light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture (ACSC) were subjected to mild photooxidative damage with Rose Bengal (RB) with the aim of gaining a better understanding of singlet oxygen-mediated defence responses in plants. Additionally, ACSC were treated with H2O2 at concentrations that induced comparable levels of protein oxidation damage. Under low to medium light conditions, both RB and H2O2 treatments activated transcriptional defence responses and inhibited photosynthetic activity, but they differed in that programmed cell death (PCD) was only observed in cells treated with RB. When dark-grown ACSC were subjected to RB in the light, PCD was suppressed, indicating that the singlet oxygen-mediated signalling pathway in ACSC requires functional chloroplasts. Analysis of up-regulated transcripts in light-grown ACSC, treated with RB in the light, showed that both singlet oxygen-responsive transcripts and transcripts with a key role in hormone-activated PCD (i.e. ethylene and jasmonic acid) were present. A co-regulation analysis proved that ACSC treated with RB exhibited higher correlation with the conditional fluorescence (flu) mutant than with other singlet oxygen-producing mutants or wild-type plants subjected to high light. However, there was no evidence for the up-regulation of EDS1, suggesting that activation of PCD was not associated with the EXECUTER- and EDS1-dependent signalling pathway described in the flu mutant. Indigo Carmine and Methylene Violet, two photosensitizers unable to enter chloroplasts, did not activate transcriptional defence responses in ACSC; however, whether this was due to their location or to their inherently low singlet oxygen quantum efficiencies was not determined. PMID:24723397

  13. Quantitative trait loci analysis of primary cell wall composition in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mouille, Grégory; Witucka-Wall, Hanna; Bruyant, Marie-Pierre; Loudet, Olivier; Pelletier, Sandra; Rihouey, Christophe; Lerouxel, Olivier; Lerouge, Patrice; Höfte, Herman; Pauly, Markus

    2006-07-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was used to identify genes underlying natural variation in primary cell wall composition in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The cell walls of dark-grown seedlings of a Bay-0 x Shahdara recombinant inbred line population were analyzed using three miniaturized global cell wall fingerprinting techniques: monosaccharide composition analysis by gas chromatography, xyloglucan oligosaccharide mass profiling, and whole-wall Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy. Heritable variation and transgression were observed for the arabinose-rhamnose ratio, xyloglucan side-chain composition (including O-acetylation levels), and absorbance for a subset of Fourier-transform infrared wavenumbers. In total, 33 QTL, corresponding to at least 11 different loci controlling dark-grown hypocotyl length, pectin composition, and levels of xyloglucan fucosylation and O-acetylation, were identified. One major QTL, accounting for 51% of the variation in the arabinose-rhamnose ratio, affected the number of arabinan side chains presumably attached to the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan I, paving the way to positional cloning of the first gene underlying natural variation in pectin structure. Several QTL were found to be colocalized, which may have implications for the regulation of xyloglucan metabolism. These results demonstrate the feasibility of combining fingerprinting techniques, natural variation, and quantitative genetics to gain original insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the structure and metabolism of cell wall polysaccharides. PMID:16714406

  14. Pectin Biosynthesis Is Critical for Cell Wall Integrity and Immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bethke, Gerit; Thao, Amanda; Xiong, Guangyan; Li, Baohua; Soltis, Nicole E; Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Hillmer, Rachel A; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Pauly, Markus; Glazebrook, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Plant cell walls are important barriers against microbial pathogens. Cell walls of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves contain three major types of polysaccharides: cellulose, various hemicelluloses, and pectins. UDP-d-galacturonic acid, the key building block of pectins, is produced from the precursor UDP-d-glucuronic acid by the action of glucuronate 4-epimerases (GAEs). Pseudomonas syringae pv maculicola ES4326 (Pma ES4326) repressed expression of GAE1 and GAE6 in Arabidopsis, and immunity to Pma ES4326 was compromised in gae6 and gae1 gae6 mutant plants. These plants had brittle leaves and cell walls of leaves had less galacturonic acid. Resistance to specific Botrytis cinerea isolates was also compromised in gae1 gae6 double mutant plants. Although oligogalacturonide (OG)-induced immune signaling was unaltered in gae1 gae6 mutant plants, immune signaling induced by a commercial pectinase, macerozyme, was reduced. Macerozyme treatment or infection with B. cinerea released less soluble uronic acid, likely reflecting fewer OGs, from gae1 gae6 cell walls than from wild-type Col-0. Although both OGs and macerozyme-induced immunity to B. cinerea in Col-0, only OGs also induced immunity in gae1 gae6. Pectin is thus an important contributor to plant immunity, and this is due at least in part to the induction of immune responses by soluble pectin, likely OGs, that are released during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:26813622

  15. Molecular and Genetic Analysis of Hormone-Regulated Differential Cell Elongation in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, Joseph R.

    2005-09-15

    We have utilized the response of Arabidopsis seedlings to the plant hormone ethylene to identify new genes involved in the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis, perception, signal transduction and differential cell growth. In building a genetic framework for the action of these genes, we have developed a molecular model that has facilitated our understanding of the molecular requirements of ethylene for cell elongation processes. The ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis appears to be primarily linear and is defined by the genes: ETR1, ETR2, ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, CTR1, EIN2, EIN3, EIN5, EIN6, and EIN. Downstream branches identified by the HLS1, EIR1, and AUX1 genes involve interactions with other hormonal (auxin) signals in the process of differential cell elongation in the hypocotyl hook. Cloning and characterization of HLS1 (and three HLL genes) and ETO1 (and ETOL genes) in my laboratory has been supported under this award. HLS1 is required for differential elongation of cells in the hypocotyl and may act in the establishment of hormone gradients. Also during the previous period, we have identified and characterized a gene that genetically acts upstream of the ethylene receptors. ETO1 encodes negative regulators of ethylene biosynthesis.

  16. Expression of Arabidopsis Hexokinase in Citrus Guard Cells Controls Stomatal Aperture and Reduces Transpiration.

    PubMed

    Lugassi, Nitsan; Kelly, Gilor; Fidel, Lena; Yaniv, Yossi; Attia, Ziv; Levi, Asher; Alchanatis, Victor; Moshelion, Menachem; Raveh, Eran; Carmi, Nir; Granot, David

    2015-01-01

    Hexokinase (HXK) is a sugar-phosphorylating enzyme involved in sugar-sensing. It has recently been shown that HXK in guard cells mediates stomatal closure and coordinates photosynthesis with transpiration in the annual species tomato and Arabidopsis. To examine the role of HXK in the control of the stomatal movement of perennial plants, we generated citrus plants that express Arabidopsis HXK1 (AtHXK1) under KST1, a guard cell-specific promoter. The expression of KST1 in the guard cells of citrus plants has been verified using GFP as a reporter gene. The expression of AtHXK1 in the guard cells of citrus reduced stomatal conductance and transpiration with no negative effect on the rate of photosynthesis, leading to increased water-use efficiency. The effects of light intensity and humidity on stomatal behavior were examined in rooted leaves of the citrus plants. The optimal intensity of photosynthetically active radiation and lower humidity enhanced stomatal closure of AtHXK1-expressing leaves, supporting the role of sugar in the regulation of citrus stomata. These results suggest that HXK coordinates photosynthesis and transpiration and stimulates stomatal closure not only in annual species, but also in perennial species. PMID:26734024

  17. Molecular and Genetic Analysis of Hormone-Regulated Differential Cell Elongation in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, Joseph R.

    2002-12-03

    The authors have utilized the response of Arabidopsis seedlings to the plant hormone ethylene to identify new genes involved in the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis, perception, signal transduction and differential cell growth. In building a genetic framework for the action of these genes, they developed a molecular model that has facilitated the understanding of the molecular requirements of ethylene for cell elongation processes. The ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis appears to be primarily linear and is defined by the genes: ETR1, ETR2, ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, CTR1, EIN2, EIN3, EIN5 EIN6, and EIN. Downstream branches identified by the HLS1, EIR1, and AUX1 genes involve interactions with other hormonal (auxin) signals in the process of differential cell elongation in the hypocotyl hook. Cloning and characterization of HLS1 and three HLS1-LIKE genes in the laboratory has been supported under this award. HLS1 is required for differential elongation of cells in the hypocotyl and may act in the establishment of hormone gradients. Also during the award period, they have identified and begun preliminary characterization of two genes that genetically act upstream of the ethylene receptors. ETO1 and RAN1 encode negative regulators of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling respectively. Progress on the analysis of these genes along with HOOKLESS1 is described.

  18. Expression of Arabidopsis Hexokinase in Citrus Guard Cells Controls Stomatal Aperture and Reduces Transpiration

    PubMed Central

    Lugassi, Nitsan; Kelly, Gilor; Fidel, Lena; Yaniv, Yossi; Attia, Ziv; Levi, Asher; Alchanatis, Victor; Moshelion, Menachem; Raveh, Eran; Carmi, Nir; Granot, David

    2015-01-01

    Hexokinase (HXK) is a sugar-phosphorylating enzyme involved in sugar-sensing. It has recently been shown that HXK in guard cells mediates stomatal closure and coordinates photosynthesis with transpiration in the annual species tomato and Arabidopsis. To examine the role of HXK in the control of the stomatal movement of perennial plants, we generated citrus plants that express Arabidopsis HXK1 (AtHXK1) under KST1, a guard cell-specific promoter. The expression of KST1 in the guard cells of citrus plants has been verified using GFP as a reporter gene. The expression of AtHXK1 in the guard cells of citrus reduced stomatal conductance and transpiration with no negative effect on the rate of photosynthesis, leading to increased water-use efficiency. The effects of light intensity and humidity on stomatal behavior were examined in rooted leaves of the citrus plants. The optimal intensity of photosynthetically active radiation and lower humidity enhanced stomatal closure of AtHXK1-expressing leaves, supporting the role of sugar in the regulation of citrus stomata. These results suggest that HXK coordinates photosynthesis and transpiration and stimulates stomatal closure not only in annual species, but also in perennial species. PMID:26734024

  19. SIAMESE, a gene controlling the endoreduplication cell cycle in Arabidopsis thaliana trichomes.

    PubMed

    Walker, J D; Oppenheimer, D G; Concienne, J; Larkin, J C

    2000-09-01

    Cell differentiation is generally tightly coordinated with the cell cycle, typically resulting in a nondividing cell with a unique differentiated morphology. The unicellular trichomes of Arabidopsis are a well-established model for the study of plant cell differentiation. Here, we describe a new genetic locus, SIAMESE (SIM), required for coordinating cell division and cell differentiation during the development of Arabidopsis trichomes (epidermal hairs). A recessive mutation in the sim locus on chromosome 5 results in clusters of adjacent trichomes that appeared to be morphologically identical 'twins'. Upon closer inspection, the sim mutant was found to produce multicellular trichomes in contrast to the unicellular trichomes produced by wild-type (WT) plants. Mutant trichomes consisting of up to 15 cells have been observed. Scanning electron microscopy of developing sim trichomes suggests that the cell divisions occur very early in the development of mutant trichomes. WT trichome nuclei continue to replicate their DNA after mitosis and cytokinesis have ceased, and as a consequence have a DNA content much greater than 2C. This phenomenon is known as endoreduplication. Individual nuclei of sim trichomes have a reduced level of endoreduplication relative to WT trichome nuclei. Endoreduplication is also reduced in dark-grown sim hypocotyls relative to WT, but not in light-grown hypocotyls. Double mutants of sim with either of two other mutants affecting endoreduplication, triptychon (try) and glabra3 (gl3) are consistent with a function for SIM in endoreduplication. SIM may function as a repressor of mitosis in the endoreduplication cell cycle. Additionally, the relatively normal morphology of multicellular sim trichomes indicates that trichome morphogenesis can occur relatively normally even when the trichome precursor cell continues to divide. The sim mutant phenotype also has implications for the evolution of multicellular trichomes. PMID:10952891

  20. Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G-protein regulates cell wall defense and resistance to necrotrophic fungi.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Cerezo, Magdalena; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Escudero, Viviana; Miedes, Eva; Fernández, Paula Virginia; Jordá, Lucía; Hernández-Blanco, Camilo; Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; Bednarek, Pawel; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Somerville, Shauna; Estevez, José Manuel; Persson, Staffan; Molina, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G-protein controls defense responses to necrotrophic and vascular fungi. The agb1 mutant impaired in the Gβ subunit displays enhanced susceptibility to these pathogens. Gβ/AGB1 forms an obligate dimer with either one of the Arabidopsis Gγ subunits (γ1/AGG1 and γ2/AGG2). Accordingly, we now demonstrate that the agg1 agg2 double mutant is as susceptible as agb1 plants to the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina. To elucidate the molecular basis of heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated resistance, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of agb1-1 mutant and wild-type plants upon inoculation with P. cucumerina. This analysis, together with metabolomic studies, demonstrated that G-protein-mediated resistance was independent of defensive pathways required for resistance to necrotrophic fungi, such as the salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene, abscisic acid, and tryptophan-derived metabolites signaling, as these pathways were not impaired in agb1 and agg1 agg2 mutants. Notably, many mis-regulated genes in agb1 plants were related with cell wall functions, which was also the case in agg1 agg2 mutant. Biochemical analyses and Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy of cell walls from G-protein mutants revealed that the xylose content was lower in agb1 and agg1 agg2 mutants than in wild-type plants, and that mutant walls had similar FTIR spectratypes, which differed from that of wild-type plants. The data presented here suggest a canonical functionality of the Gβ and Gγ1/γ2 subunits in the control of Arabidopsis immune responses and the regulation of cell wall composition. PMID:21980142

  1. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Ceramide Synthases Differentially Affects Growth, Sphingolipid Metabolism, Programmed Cell Death, and Mycotoxin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Luttgeharm, Kyle D; Chen, Ming; Mehra, Amit; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Markham, Jonathan E; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-10-01

    Ceramide synthases catalyze an N-acyltransferase reaction using fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and long-chain base (LCB) substrates to form the sphingolipid ceramide backbone and are targets for inhibition by the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1). Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains three genes encoding ceramide synthases with distinct substrate specificities: LONGEVITY ASSURANCE GENE ONE HOMOLOG1 (LOH1; At3g25540)- and LOH3 (At1g19260)-encoded ceramide synthases use very-long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and trihydroxy LCB substrates, and LOH2 (At3g19260)-encoded ceramide synthase uses palmitoyl-CoA and dihydroxy LCB substrates. In this study, complementary DNAs for each gene were overexpressed to determine the role of individual isoforms in physiology and sphingolipid metabolism. Differences were observed in growth resulting from LOH1 and LOH3 overexpression compared with LOH2 overexpression. LOH1- and LOH3-overexpressing plants had enhanced biomass relative to wild-type plants, due in part to increased cell division, suggesting that enhanced synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acid/trihydroxy LCB ceramides promotes cell division and growth. Conversely, LOH2 overexpression resulted in dwarfing. LOH2 overexpression also resulted in the accumulation of sphingolipids with C16 fatty acid/dihydroxy LCB ceramides, constitutive induction of programmed cell death, and accumulation of salicylic acid, closely mimicking phenotypes observed previously in LCB C-4 hydroxylase mutants defective in trihydroxy LCB synthesis. In addition, LOH2- and LOH3-overexpressing plants acquired increased resistance to FB1, whereas LOH1-overexpressing plants showed no increase in FB1 resistance, compared with wild-type plants, indicating that LOH1 ceramide synthase is most strongly inhibited by FB1. Overall, the findings described here demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis ceramide synthases results in strongly divergent physiological and metabolic phenotypes, some of which have significance

  2. Regulation of Meristem Morphogenesis by Cell Wall Synthases in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weibing; Schuster, Christoph; Beahan, Cherie T; Charoensawan, Varodom; Peaucelle, Alexis; Bacic, Antony; Doblin, Monika S; Wightman, Raymond; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2016-06-01

    The cell walls of the shoot apical meristem (SAM), containing the stem cell niche that gives rise to the above-ground tissues, are crucially involved in regulating differentiation. It is currently unknown how these walls are built and refined or their role, if any, in influencing meristem developmental dynamics. We have combined polysaccharide linkage analysis, immuno-labeling, and transcriptome profiling of the SAM to provide a spatiotemporal plan of the walls of this dynamic structure. We find that meristematic cells express only a core subset of 152 genes encoding cell wall glycosyltransferases (GTs). Systemic localization of all these GT mRNAs by in situ hybridization reveals members with either enrichment in or specificity to apical subdomains such as emerging flower primordia, and a large class with high expression in dividing cells. The highly localized and coordinated expression of GTs in the SAM suggests distinct wall properties of meristematic cells and specific differences between newly forming walls and their mature descendants. Functional analysis demonstrates that a subset of CSLD genes is essential for proper meristem maintenance, confirming the key role of walls in developmental pathways. PMID:27212401

  3. The organization pattern of root border-like cells of Arabidopsis is dependent on cell wall homogalacturonan.

    PubMed

    Durand, Caroline; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Follet-Gueye, Marie Laure; Duponchel, Ludovic; Moreau, Myriam; Lerouge, Patrice; Driouich, Azeddine

    2009-07-01

    Border-like cells are released by Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root tips as organized layers of several cells that remain attached to each other rather than completely detached from each other, as is usually observed in border cells of many species. Unlike border cells, cell attachment between border-like cells is maintained after their release into the external environment. To investigate the role of cell wall polysaccharides in the attachment and organization of border-like cells, we have examined their release in several well-characterized mutants defective in the biosynthesis of xyloglucan, cellulose, or pectin. Our data show that among all mutants examined, only quasimodo mutants (qua1-1 and qua2-1), which have been characterized as producing less homogalacturonan, had an altered border-like cell phenotype as compared with the wild type. Border-like cells in both lines were released as isolated cells separated from each other, with the phenotype being much more pronounced in qua1-1 than in qua2-1. Further analysis of border-like cells in the qua1-1 mutant using immunocytochemistry and a set of anti-cell wall polysaccharide antibodies showed that the loss of the wild-type phenotype was accompanied by (1) a reduction in homogalacturonan-JIM5 epitope in the cell wall of border-like cells, confirmed by Fourier transform infrared microspectrometry, and (2) the secretion of an abundant mucilage that is enriched in xylogalacturonan and arabinogalactan-protein epitopes, in which the cells are trapped in the vicinity of the root tip. PMID:19448034

  4. Nitrated cyclic GMP modulates guard cell signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Joudoi, Takahiro; Shichiri, Yudai; Kamizono, Nobuto; Akaike, Takaaki; Sawa, Tomohiro; Yoshitake, Jun; Yamada, Naotaka; Iwai, Sumio

    2013-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in diverse physiological processes, including plant senescence and stomatal closure. The NO and cyclic GMP (cGMP) cascade is the main NO signaling pathway in animals, but whether this pathway operates in plant cells, and the mechanisms of its action, remain unclear. Here, we assessed the possibility that the nitrated cGMP derivative 8-nitro-cGMP functions in guard cell signaling. Mass spectrometry and immunocytochemical analyses showed that abscisic acid and NO induced the synthesis of 8-nitro-cGMP in guard cells in the presence of reactive oxygen species. 8-Nitro-cGMP triggered stomatal closure, but 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-bromo-cGMP), a membrane-permeating analog of cGMP, did not. However, in the dark, 8-bromo-cGMP induced stomatal opening but 8-nitro-cGMP did not. Thus, cGMP and its nitrated derivative play different roles in the signaling pathways that lead to stomatal opening and closure. Moreover, inhibitor and genetic studies showed that calcium, cyclic adenosine-5'-diphosphate-ribose, and SLOW ANION CHANNEL1 act downstream of 8-nitro-cGMP. This study therefore demonstrates that 8-nitro-cGMP acts as a guard cell signaling molecule and that a NO/8-nitro-cGMP signaling cascade operates in guard cells. PMID:23396828

  5. Small Signaling Peptides in Arabidopsis Development: How Cells Communicate Over a Short Distance

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Evan; Smith, Stephanie; De Smet, Ive

    2012-01-01

    To sustain plants’ postembryonic growth and development in a structure of cells fixed in cell walls, a tightly controlled short distance cell–cell communication is required. The focus on phytohormones, such as auxin, has historically overshadowed the importance of small peptide signals, but it is becoming clear that secreted peptide signals are important in cell–cell communication to coordinate and integrate cellular functions. However, of the more than 1000 potential secreted peptides, so far only very few have been functionally characterized or matched to a receptor. Here, we will describe our current knowledge on how small peptide signals can be identified, how they are modified and processed, which roles they play in Arabidopsis thaliana development, and through which receptors they act. PMID:22932676

  6. Sugar uptake analysis of suspension Arabidopsis, tobacco, and rice cells in various media using an FT-IR/ATR method.

    PubMed

    Suehara, Ken-ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu; Hashimoto, Atsushi

    2012-10-01

    The kinetic behavior of the sugar uptake phenomena of a suspension of Arabidopsis cells was investigated by mid-infrared spectroscopy using Fourier transform infrared spectrometers and attenuated total reflection techniques. The kinetic behavior of the cell growth was also studied and the growth and the sugar uptake behaviors were discussed for three typical plant cells (Arabidopsis, TBY-2, and rice cells). The cell growth rate and the lag period were influenced by not only the types of the plant cells, but also the sugar species used as the carbon source. The characteristics of the sugar uptake behavior were clarified based on the difference in the three types of plant cells. The cell growth and the sugar uptake progressed at approximately the same time in the TBY-2 cells. In the rice cells, the sugar uptake rate was relatively lower than that of the others. On the other hand, the sugar uptake of the Arabidopsis cells started before the cell growth. Furthermore, glucose as the carbon source of the Arabidopsis cell cultivation seems to significantly influence the sugar metabolism. Glucose had a significant influence on the sugar metabolism of the other sugar under the conditions for the mixture of glucose and the other sugar. The characteristics of the sugar uptake phenomena based on the cell growth stage was typical for each plant cell except for some sugars, such as galactose and trehalose, and the behavior of the total sugar uptake had not changed. These results suggested that the cell growth and the sugar uptake in the plant cell cultivation processes may be controlled by the combined supply of the sugar species as the carbon source. The detailed data for plant cell cultivation using each sugar obtained in this study would be useful for bioscience research and for cultivation process control using various sugars, for example, purified or sugar mixtures formed from biomass materials. PMID:22395819

  7. Open Stomata 1 (OST1) is limiting in abscisic acid responses of Arabidopsis guard cells.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Biswa R; Jeon, Byeong Wook; Zhang, Wei; Assmann, Sarah M

    2013-12-01

    Open Stomata 1 (OST1) (SnRK2.6 or SRK2E), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is a positive regulator in abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated stomatal response, but OST1-regulation of K(+) and Ca(2+) currents has not been studied directly in guard cells and it is unknown whether OST1 activity is limiting in ABA-mediated stomatal responses. We employed loss-of-function and gain-of-function approaches to study native ABA responses of Arabidopsis guard cells. We performed stomatal aperture bioassays, patch clamp analyses and reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements. ABA inhibition of inward K(+) channels and light-induced stomatal opening are reduced in ost1 mutants while transgenic plants overexpressing OST1 show ABA hypersensitivity in these responses. ost1 mutants are insensitive to ABA-induced stomatal closure, regulation of slow anion currents, Ca(2+) -permeable channel activation and ROS production while OST1 overexpressing lines are hypersensitive for these responses, resulting in accelerated stomatal closure in response to ABA. Overexpression of OST1 in planta in the absence of ABA application does not affect basal apertures or ion currents. Moreover, we demonstrate the physical interaction of OST1 with the inward K(+) channel KAT1, the anion channel SLAC1, and the NADPH oxidases AtrbohD and AtrbohF. Our findings support OST1 as a critical limiting component in ABA regulation of stomatal apertures, ion channels and NADPH oxidases in Arabidopsis guard cells. PMID:24033256

  8. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is facilitated by mutations in genes repressing meristematic cell divisions.

    PubMed

    Mordhorst, A P; Voerman, K J; Hartog, M V; Meijer, E A; van Went, J; Koornneef, M; de Vries, S C

    1998-06-01

    Embryogenesis in plants can commence from cells other than the fertilized egg cell. Embryogenesis initiated from somatic cells in vitro is an attractive system for studying early embryonic stages when they are accessible to experimental manipulation. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis offers the additional advantage that many zygotic embryo mutants can be studied under in vitro conditions. Two systems are available. The first employs immature zygotic embryos as starting material, yielding continuously growing embryogenic cultures in liquid medium. This is possible in at least 11 ecotypes. A second, more efficient and reproducible system, employing the primordia timing mutant (pt allelic to hpt, cop2, and amp1), was established. A significant advantage of the pt mutant is that intact seeds, germinated in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 4-D) containing liquid medium, give rise to stable embryonic cell cultures, circumventing tedious hand dissection of immature zygotic embryos. pt zygotic embryos are first distinguishable from wild type at early heart stage by a broader embryonic shoot apical meristem (SAM). In culture, embryogenic clusters originate from the enlarged SAMs. pt somatic embryos had all characteristic embryo pattern elements seen in zygotic embryos, but with higher and more variable numbers of cells. Embryogenic cell cultures were also established from seedling, of other mutants with enlarged SAMs, such as clavata (clv). pt clv double mutants showed additive effects on SAM size and an even higher frequency of seedlings producing embryogenic cell lines. pt clv double mutant plants had very short fasciated inflorescence stems and additive effects on the number of rosette leaves. This suggests that the PT and CLV genes act in independent pathways that control SAM size. An increased population of noncommitted SAM cells may be responsible for facilitated establishment of somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:9611173

  9. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is facilitated by mutations in genes repressing meristematic cell divisions.

    PubMed Central

    Mordhorst, A P; Voerman, K J; Hartog, M V; Meijer, E A; van Went, J; Koornneef, M; de Vries, S C

    1998-01-01

    Embryogenesis in plants can commence from cells other than the fertilized egg cell. Embryogenesis initiated from somatic cells in vitro is an attractive system for studying early embryonic stages when they are accessible to experimental manipulation. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis offers the additional advantage that many zygotic embryo mutants can be studied under in vitro conditions. Two systems are available. The first employs immature zygotic embryos as starting material, yielding continuously growing embryogenic cultures in liquid medium. This is possible in at least 11 ecotypes. A second, more efficient and reproducible system, employing the primordia timing mutant (pt allelic to hpt, cop2, and amp1), was established. A significant advantage of the pt mutant is that intact seeds, germinated in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 4-D) containing liquid medium, give rise to stable embryonic cell cultures, circumventing tedious hand dissection of immature zygotic embryos. pt zygotic embryos are first distinguishable from wild type at early heart stage by a broader embryonic shoot apical meristem (SAM). In culture, embryogenic clusters originate from the enlarged SAMs. pt somatic embryos had all characteristic embryo pattern elements seen in zygotic embryos, but with higher and more variable numbers of cells. Embryogenic cell cultures were also established from seedling, of other mutants with enlarged SAMs, such as clavata (clv). pt clv double mutants showed additive effects on SAM size and an even higher frequency of seedlings producing embryogenic cell lines. pt clv double mutant plants had very short fasciated inflorescence stems and additive effects on the number of rosette leaves. This suggests that the PT and CLV genes act in independent pathways that control SAM size. An increased population of noncommitted SAM cells may be responsible for facilitated establishment of somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:9611173

  10. Genetic ablation of root cap cells in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsugeki, R.; Fedoroff, N. V.

    1999-01-01

    The root cap is increasingly appreciated as a complex and dynamic plant organ. Root caps sense and transmit environmental signals, synthesize and secrete small molecules and macromolecules, and in some species shed metabolically active cells. However, it is not known whether root caps are essential for normal shoot and root development. We report the identification of a root cap-specific promoter and describe its use to genetically ablate root caps by directing root cap-specific expression of a diphtheria toxin A-chain gene. Transgenic toxin-expressing plants are viable and have normal aerial parts but agravitropic roots, implying loss of root cap function. Several cell layers are missing from the transgenic root caps, and the remaining cells are abnormal. Although the radial organization of the roots is normal in toxin-expressing plants, the root tips have fewer cytoplasmically dense cells than do wild-type root tips, suggesting that root meristematic activity is lower in transgenic than in wild-type plants. The roots of transgenic plants have more lateral roots and these are, in turn, more highly branched than those of wild-type plants. Thus, root cap ablation alters root architecture both by inhibiting root meristematic activity and by stimulating lateral root initiation. These observations imply that the root caps contain essential components of the signaling system that determines root architecture.

  11. Investigating the Molecular Mechanism of TSO1 Function in Arabidopsis cell division and meristem development

    SciTech Connect

    Zhongchi Liu

    2004-10-01

    Unlike animals, plants are constantly exposed to environmental mutagens including ultraviolet light and reactive oxygen species. Further, plant cells are totipotent with highly plastic developmental programs. An understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of plants to monitor and repair its DNA and to eliminate damaged cells are of great importance. Previously we have identified two genes, TSO1 and TSO2, from a flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutations in these two genes cause callus-like flowers, fasciated shoot apical meristems, and abnormal cell division, indicating that TSO1 and TSO2 may encode important cell cycle regulators. Previous funding from DOE led to the molecular cloning of TSO1, which was shown to encode a novel nuclear protein with two CXC domains suspected to bind DNA. This DOE grant has allowed us to characterize and isolate TSO2 that encodes the small subunit of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). RNR comprises two large subunits (R1) an d two small subunits (R2), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA replication and repair. Previous studies in yeast and mammals indicated that defective RNR often led to cell cycle arrest, growth retardation and p53-dependent apoptosis while abnormally elevated RNR activities led to higher mutation rates. Subsequently, we identified two additional R2 genes, R2A and R2B in the Arabidopsis genome. Using reverse genetics, mutations in R2A and R2B were isolated, and double and triple mutants among the three R2 genes (TSO2, R2A and R2B) were constructed and analyzed. We showed that Arabidopsis tso2 mutants, with reduced dNTP levels, were more sensitive to UV-C. While r2a or r2b single mutants did not exhibit any phenotypes, tso2 r2b double mutants were embryonic lethal and tso2 r2a double mutants were seedling lethal indicating redundant functions among the three R2 genes. Furthermore, tso2 r2a double mutants exhibited increased DNA dam age

  12. The cell wall of the Arabidopsis pollen tube--spatial distribution, recycling, and network formation of polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chebli, Youssef; Kaneda, Minako; Zerzour, Rabah; Geitmann, Anja

    2012-12-01

    The pollen tube is a cellular protuberance formed by the pollen grain, or male gametophyte, in flowering plants. Its principal metabolic activity is the synthesis and assembly of cell wall material, which must be precisely coordinated to sustain the characteristic rapid growth rate and to ensure geometrically correct and efficient cellular morphogenesis. Unlike other model species, the cell wall of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) pollen tube has not been described in detail. We used immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis to provide a detailed profile of the spatial distribution of the major cell wall polymers composing the Arabidopsis pollen tube cell wall. Comparison with predictions made by a mechanical model for pollen tube growth revealed the importance of pectin deesterification in determining the cell diameter. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that cellulose microfibrils are oriented in near longitudinal orientation in the Arabidopsis pollen tube cell wall, consistent with a linear arrangement of cellulose synthase CESA6 in the plasma membrane. The cellulose label was also found inside cytoplasmic vesicles and might originate from an early activation of cellulose synthases prior to their insertion into the plasma membrane or from recycling of short cellulose polymers by endocytosis. A series of strategic enzymatic treatments also suggests that pectins, cellulose, and callose are highly cross linked to each other. PMID:23037507

  13. Cell Proliferation Analysis Using EdU Labeling in Whole Plant and Histological Samples of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kazda, Anita; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Watson, J Matthew; Riha, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The ability to analyze cell division in both spatial and temporal dimensions within an organism is a key requirement in developmental biology. Specialized cell types within individual organs, such as those within shoot and root apical meristems, have often been identified by differences in their rates of proliferation prior to the characterization of distinguishing molecular markers. Replication-dependent labeling of DNA is a widely used method for assaying cell proliferation. The earliest approaches used radioactive labeling with tritiated thymidine, which were later followed by immunodetection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). A major advance in DNA labeling came with the use of 5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine (EdU) which has proven to have multiple advantages over BrdU. Here we describe the methodology for analyzing EdU labeling and retention in whole plants and histological sections of Arabidopsis. PMID:26659962

  14. Cell-specific vacuolar calcium storage mediated by "CAX1" regulates apoplastic calcium concentration, gas exchange, and plant productivity in "Arabidopsis"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The physiological role and mechanism of nutrient storage within vacuoles of specific cell types is poorly understood. Transcript profiles from "Arabidopsis thaliana" leaf cells differing in calcium concentration ([Ca], epidermis 60 mM) were compared using a microarray screen...

  15. CYCD3 D-type cyclins regulate cambial cell proliferation and secondary growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Carl; Maruthi, N. M.; Jahn, Courtney E.

    2015-01-01

    A major proportion of plant biomass is derived from the activity of the cambium, a lateral meristem responsible for vascular tissue formation and radial organ enlargement in a process termed secondary growth. In contrast to our relatively good understanding of the regulation of primary meristems, remarkably little is known concerning the mechanisms controlling secondary growth, particularly how cambial cell divisions are regulated and integrated with vascular differentiation. A genetic loss-of-function approach was used here to reveal a rate-limiting role for the Arabidopsis CYCLIN D3 (CYCD3) subgroup of cell-cycle genes in the control of cambial cell proliferation and secondary growth, providing conclusive evidence of a direct link between the cell cycle and vascular development. It is shown that all three CYCD3 genes are specifically expressed in the cambium throughout vascular development. Analysis of a triple loss-of-function CYCD3 mutant revealed a requirement for CYCD3 in promoting the cambial cell cycle since mutant stems and hypocotyls showed a marked reduction in diameter linked to reduced mitotic activity in the cambium. Conversely, loss of CYCD3 provoked an increase in xylem cell size and the expression of differentiation markers, showing that CYCD3 is required to restrain the differentiation of xylem precursor cells. Together, our data show that tight control of cambial cell division through developmental- and cell type-specific regulation of CYCD3 is required for normal vascular development, constituting part of a novel mechanism controlling organ growth in higher plants. PMID:26022252

  16. The Arabidopsis CDC25 induces a short cell length when overexpressed in fission yeast: evidence for cell cycle function.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, D A; Chrimes, D; Dickinson, J R; Rogers, H J; Francis, D

    2005-02-01

    The putative mitotic inducer gene, Arath;CDC25 cloned in Arabidopsis thaliana, was screened for cell cycle function by overexpressing it in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast). The expression pattern of Arath;CDC25 was also examined in different tissues of A. thaliana. Fission yeast was transformed with plasmids pREP1 and pREP81 with the Arath;CDC25 gene under the control of the thiamine-repressible nmt promoter. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the expression of Arath;CDC25 was examined in seedlings, flower buds, mature leaves and stems of A. thaliana; actin (ACT2) was used as a control. In three independent transformants of fission yeast, cultured in the absence of thiamine (T), pREP1::Arath;CDC25 induced a highly significant reduction in mitotic cell length compared with wild type, pREP::Arath;CDC25 +T, and empty vector (pREP1 +/- T). The extent of cell shortening was greater using the stronger pREP1 compared with the weaker pREP81. However, Arath;CDC25 was expressed at low levels in all tissues examined. The data indicate that Arath;CDC25 can function as a mitotic accelerator in fission yeast. However, unlike other plant cell cycle genes, expression of Arath;CDC25 was not enhanced in rapidly dividing compared with non-proliferative Arabidopsis tissues. PMID:15720653

  17. Cis-Regulatory Elements Determine Germline Specificity and Expression Level of an Isopentenyltransferase Gene in Sperm Cells of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinghua; Yuan, Tong; Duan, Xiaomeng; Wei, Xiaoping; Shi, Tao; Li, Jia; Russell, Scott D; Gou, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    Flowering plant sperm cells transcribe a divergent and complex complement of genes. To examine promoter function, we chose an isopentenyltransferase gene known as PzIPT1. This gene is highly selectively transcribed in one sperm cell morphotype of Plumbago zeylanica, which preferentially fuses with the central cell during fertilization and is thus a founding cell of the primary endosperm. In transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), PzIPT1 promoter displays activity in both sperm cells and upon progressive promoter truncation from the 5'-end results in a progressive decrease in reporter production, consistent with occurrence of multiple enhancer sites. Cytokinin-dependent protein binding motifs are identified in the promoter sequence, which respond with stimulation by cytokinin. Expression of PzIPT1 promoter in sperm cells confers specificity independently of previously reported Germline Restrictive Silencer Factor binding sequence. Instead, a cis-acting regulatory region consisting of two duplicated 6-bp Male Gamete Selective Activation (MGSA) motifs occurs near the site of transcription initiation. Disruption of this sequence-specific site inactivates expression of a GFP reporter gene in sperm cells. Multiple copies of the MGSA motif fused with the minimal CaMV35S promoter elements confer reporter gene expression in sperm cells. Similar duplicated MGSA motifs are also identified from promoter sequences of sperm cell-expressed genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting selective activation is possibly a common mechanism for regulation of gene expression in sperm cells of flowering plants. PMID:26739233

  18. Xanthomonas campestris overcomes Arabidopsis stomatal innate immunity through a DSF cell-to-cell signal-regulated virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Torres, Pablo S; Vojnov, Adrián A

    2009-02-01

    Pathogen-induced stomatal closure is part of the plant innate immune response. Phytopathogens using stomata as a way of entry into the leaf must avoid the stomatal response of the host. In this article, we describe a factor secreted by the bacterial phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) capable of interfering with stomatal closure induced by bacteria or abscisic acid (ABA). We found that living Xcc, as well as ethyl acetate extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, are capable of reverting stomatal closure induced by bacteria, lipopolysaccharide, or ABA. Xcc ethyl acetate extracts also complemented the infectivity of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) mutants deficient in the production of the coronatine toxin, which is required to overcome stomatal defense. By contrast, the rpfF and rpfC mutant strains of Xcc, which are unable to respectively synthesize or perceive a diffusible molecule involved in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling, were incapable of reverting stomatal closure, indicating that suppression of stomatal response by Xcc requires an intact rpf/diffusible signal factor system. In addition, we found that guard cell-specific Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase3 (MPK3) antisense mutants were unresponsive to bacteria or lipopolysaccharide in promotion of stomatal closure, and also more sensitive to Pst coronatine-deficient mutants, showing that MPK3 is required for stomatal immune response. Additionally, we found that, unlike in wild-type Arabidopsis, ABA-induced stomatal closure in MPK3 antisense mutants is not affected by Xcc or by extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, suggesting that the Xcc factor might target some signaling component in the same pathway as MPK3. PMID:19091877

  19. Ethylene Upregulates Auxin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis Seedlings to Enhance Inhibition of Root Cell Elongation[W

    PubMed Central

    Swarup, Ranjan; Perry, Paula; Hagenbeek, Dik; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Beemster, Gerrit T.S.; Sandberg, Göran; Bhalerao, Rishikesh; Ljung, Karin; Bennett, Malcolm J.

    2007-01-01

    Ethylene represents an important regulatory signal for root development. Genetic studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have demonstrated that ethylene inhibition of root growth involves another hormone signal, auxin. This study investigated why auxin was required by ethylene to regulate root growth. We initially observed that ethylene positively controls auxin biosynthesis in the root apex. We subsequently demonstrated that ethylene-regulated root growth is dependent on (1) the transport of auxin from the root apex via the lateral root cap and (2) auxin responses occurring in multiple elongation zone tissues. Detailed growth studies revealed that the ability of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid to inhibit root cell elongation was significantly enhanced in the presence of auxin. We conclude that by upregulating auxin biosynthesis, ethylene facilitates its ability to inhibit root cell expansion. PMID:17630275

  20. Increase in pectin deposition by overexpression of an ERF gene in cultured cells of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshitsugu; Naito, Yuki; Kakegawa, Koich; Ohtsuki, Namie; Tsujimoto-Inui, Yayoi; Shinshi, Hideaki; Suzuki, Kaoru

    2012-04-01

    Ethylene-responsive transcription factor (ERF) family genes, which are involved in regulation of metabolic pathways and/or are useful for metabolic engineering, were investigated in the cultured cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. The pectin content in the gelatinous precipitates after the ethanol precipitation of extracts derived from calli of a transgenic cell line, A17, overexpressing an ERF gene (At1g44830), increased in comparison with the control. Expression of genes involved in pectin biosynthesis was up-regulated in the A17 calli. Overexpression of the ERF gene coordinately activates the pectin biosynthetic pathway genes and increases the content of pectin. These results therefore will be useful as a genetic resource for engineering pectin biosynthesis in plants. PMID:22160296

  1. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Turek, Ilona; Wheeler, Janet I; Gehring, Chris; Irving, Helen R; Marondedze, Claudius

    2015-09-01

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article "Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress" by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386. PMID:26217812

  2. Substitution of L-fucose by L-galactose in cell walls of arabidopsis mur1

    SciTech Connect

    Zablackis, E.; York, W.S.; Pauly, M.

    1996-06-21

    An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant (mur1) has less than 2 percent of the normal amounts of L-fucose in the primary cell walls of aerial portions of the plant. The survival of mur1 plants challenged the hypothesis that fucose is a required component of biologically active oligosaccharides derived from cell wall xyloglucan. However, the replacement of L-fucose (that is, 6-deoxyl-L-galactose) by L-galactose does not detectably alter the biological activity of the oligosaccharides derived from xyloglucan. Thus, essential structural and conformational features of xyloglucan and xyloglucan-derived oligosaccharides are retained when L-galactose replaces L-fucose. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Inducible Malondialdehyde Pools in Zones of Cell Proliferation and Developing Tissues in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Schmid-Siegert, Emanuel; Loscos, Jorge; Farmer, Edward E.

    2012-01-01

    Malondialdehyde (MDA) is a natural and widespread genotoxin. Given its potentially deleterious effects, it is of interest to establish the identities of the cell types containing this aldehyde. We used in situ chemical trapping with 2-thiobarbituric acid and mass spectrometry with a deuterated standard to characterize MDA pools in the vegetative phase in Arabidopsis thaliana. In leaves, MDA occurred predominantly in the intracellular compartment of mesophyll cells and was enriched in chloroplasts where it was derived primarily from triunsaturated fatty acids (TFAs). High levels of MDA (most of which was unbound) were found within dividing cells in the root tip cell proliferation zone. The bulk of this MDA did not originate from TFAs. We confirmed the localization of MDA in transversal root sections. In addition to MDA in proliferating cells near the root tip we found evidence for the presence of MDA in pericyle cells. Remodeling of non-TFA-derived MDA pools occurred when seedlings were infected with the fungus Botrytis cinerea. Treatment of uninfected seedlings with mediators of plant stress responses (jasmonic acid or salicylic acid) increased seedling MDA levels over 20-fold. In summary, major pools of MDA are associated with cell division foci containing stem cells. The aldehyde is pathogen-inducible in these regions and its levels are increased by cellular mediators that impact defense and growth. PMID:22298768

  4. Mapping the functional roles of cap cells in the response of Arabidopsis primary roots to gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Fasano, J. M.; Gilroy, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The cap is widely accepted to be the site of gravity sensing in roots because removal of the cap abolishes root curvature. Circumstantial evidence favors the columella cells as the gravisensory cells because amyloplasts (and often other cellular components) are polarized with respect to the gravity vector. However, there has been no functional confirmation of their role. To address this problem, we used laser ablation to remove defined cells in the cap of Arabidopsis primary roots and quantified the response of the roots to gravity using three parameters: time course of curvature, presentation time, and deviation from vertical growth. Ablation of the peripheral cap cells and tip cells did not alter root curvature. Ablation of the innermost columella cells caused the strongest inhibitory effect on root curvature without affecting growth rates. Many of these roots deviated significantly from vertical growth and had a presentation time 6-fold longer than the controls. Among the two inner columella stories, the central cells of story 2 contributed the most to root gravitropism. These cells also exhibited the largest amyloplast sedimentation velocities. Therefore, these results are consistent with the starch-statolith sedimentation hypothesis for gravity sensing.

  5. Arabidopsis FH1 Formin Affects Cotyledon Pavement Cell Shape by Modulating Cytoskeleton Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Amparo; Oulehlová, Denisa; Stillerová, Lenka; Schiebertová, Petra; Grunt, Michal; Žárský, Viktor; Cvrčková, Fatima

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis involves concerted rearrangements of microtubules and actin microfilaments. We previously reported that FH1, the main Arabidopsis thaliana housekeeping Class I membrane-anchored formin, contributes to actin dynamics and microtubule stability in rhizodermis cells. Here we examine the effects of mutations affecting FH1 (At3g25500) on cell morphogenesis and above-ground organ development in seedlings, as well as on cytoskeletal organization and dynamics, using a combination of confocal and variable angle epifluorescence microscopy with a pharmacological approach. Homozygous fh1 mutants exhibited cotyledon epinasty and had larger cotyledon pavement cells with more pronounced lobes than the wild type. The pavement cell shape alterations were enhanced by expression of the fluorescent microtubule marker GFP-microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4). Mutant cotyledon pavement cells exhibited reduced density and increased stability of microfilament bundles, as well as enhanced dynamics of microtubules. Analogous results were also obtained upon treatments with the formin inhibitor SMIFH2 (small molecule inhibitor of formin homology 2 domains). Pavement cell shape in wild-type (wt) and fh1 plants in some situations exhibited a differential response towards anti-cytoskeletal drugs, especially the microtubule disruptor oryzalin. Our observations indicate that FH1 participates in the control of microtubule dynamics, possibly via its effects on actin, subsequently influencing cell morphogenesis and macroscopic organ development. PMID:26738547

  6. Peroxidation due to cryoprotectant treatment is a vital factor for cell survival in Arabidopsis cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Li; Zhang, Di; Jiang, Xiang-Ning; Gai, Ying; Wang, Wei-Ming; Reed, Barbara M; Shen, Xiao-Hui

    2013-11-01

    Cryopreservation can be a safe and cost-effective tool for the long-term storage of plant germplasm. In Arabidopsis, the ability to recover from cryogenic treatment was lost as growth progressed. Growth could be restored in 48-h seedlings, whereas 72-h seedlings died after cryogenic treatment. Why seedling age and survival are negatively correlated is an interesting issue. A comparative transcriptomics was performed to screen differentially expressed genes between 48- and 72-h seedlings after exposure to cryoprotectant. Among differentially expressed genes, oxidative stress response genes played important roles in cryoprotectant treatment, and peroxidation was a key factor related to cell survival. Seedlings underwent more peroxidation at 72-h than at 48-h. A comprehensive analysis indicated that peroxidation injured membrane systems leading to photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation damage. Furthermore, the apoptosis-like events were found in cryogenic treatment of Arabidopsis seedlings. 48- and 72-h seedlings underwent different degrees of membrane lipid peroxidation during cryoprotectant treatment, and reducing the injury of oxidative stress was an important factor to successful cryopreservation. This study provided a novel insight of genetic regulatory mechanisms in cryopreservation, and established an excellent model to test and evaluate the effect of exogenous antioxidants and conventional cryoprotectants in plant cryopreservation. PMID:24094052

  7. FAMA Is an Essential Component for the Differentiation of Two Distinct Cell Types, Myrosin Cells and Guard Cells, in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Shirakawa, Makoto; Ueda, Haruko; Nagano, Atsushi J.; Shimada, Tomoo; Kohchi, Takayuki; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    Brassicales plants, including Arabidopsis thaliana, have an ingenious two-compartment defense system, which sequesters myrosinase from the substrate glucosinolate and produces a toxic compound when cells are damaged by herbivores. Myrosinase is stored in vacuoles of idioblast myrosin cells. The molecular mechanism that regulates myrosin cell development remains elusive. Here, we identify the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor FAMA as an essential component for myrosin cell development along Arabidopsis leaf veins. FAMA is known as a regulator of stomatal development. We detected FAMA expression in myrosin cell precursors in leaf primordia in addition to stomatal lineage cells. FAMA deficiency caused defects in myrosin cell development and in the biosynthesis of myrosinases THIOGLUCOSIDE GLUCOHYDROLASE1 (TGG1) and TGG2. Conversely, ectopic FAMA expression conferred myrosin cell characteristics to hypocotyl and root cells, both of which normally lack myrosin cells. The FAMA interactors ICE1/SCREAM and its closest paralog SCREAM2/ICE2 were essential for myrosin cell development. DNA microarray analysis identified 32 candidate genes involved in myrosin cell development under the control of FAMA. This study provides a common regulatory pathway that determines two distinct cell types in leaves: epidermal guard cells and inner-tissue myrosin cells. PMID:25304202

  8. Subcellular dynamics and role of Arabidopsis β-1,3-glucanases in cell-to-cell movement of tobamoviruses.

    PubMed

    Zavaliev, Raul; Levy, Amit; Gera, Abed; Epel, Bernard L

    2013-09-01

    β-1,3-Glucanases (BG) have been implicated in enhancing virus spread by degrading callose at plasmodesmata (Pd). Here, we investigate the role of Arabidopsis BG in tobamovirus spread. During Turnip vein clearing virus infection, the transcription of two pathogenesis-related (PR)-BG AtBG2 and AtBG3 increased but that of Pd-associated BG AtBG_pap did not change. In transgenic plants, AtBG2 was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network and was not secreted. As a stress response mediated by salicylic acid, AtBG2 was secreted and appeared as a free extracellular protein localized in the entire apoplast but did not accumulate at Pd sites. At the leading edge of Tobacco mosaic virus spread, AtBG2 co-localized with the viral movement protein in the ER-derived bodies, similarly to other ER proteins, but was not secreted to the cell wall. In atbg2 mutants, callose levels at Pd and virus spread were unaffected. Likewise, AtBG2 overexpression had no effect on virus spread. However, in atbg_pap mutants, callose at Pd was increased and virus spread was reduced. Our results demonstrate that the constitutive Pd-associated BG but not the stress-regulated extracellular PR-BG are directly involved in regulation of callose at Pd and cell-to-cell transport in Arabidopsis, including the spread of viruses. PMID:23656331

  9. Structure of cellulose-deficient secondary cell walls from the irx3 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ha, Marie-Ann; MacKinnon, Iain M; Sturcová, Adriana; Apperley, David C; McCann, Maureen C; Turner, Simon R; Jarvis, Michael C

    2002-09-01

    In the Arabidopsis mutant irx3, truncation of the AtCesA7 gene encoding a xylem-specific cellulose synthase results in reduced cellulose synthesis in the affected xylem cells and collapse of mature xylem vessels. Here we describe spectroscopic experiments to determine whether any cellulose, normal or abnormal, remained in the walls of these cells and whether there were consequent effects on other cell-wall polysaccharides. Xylem cell walls from irx3 and its wild-type were prepared by anatomically specific isolation and were examined by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and FTIR microscopy. The affected cell walls of irx3 contained low levels of crystalline cellulose, probably associated with primary cell walls. There was no evidence that crystalline cellulose was replaced by less ordered glucans. From the molecular mobility of xylans and lignin it was deduced that these non-cellulosic polymers were cross-linked together in both irx3 and the wild-type. The disorder previously observed in the spatial pattern of non-cellulosic polymer deposition in the secondary walls of irx3 xylem could not be explained by any alteration in the structure or cross-linking of these polymers and may be attributed directly to the absence of cellulose microfibrils which, in the wild-type, scaffold the organisation of the other polymers into a coherent secondary cell wall. PMID:12165296

  10. Subcellular and supracellular mechanical stress prescribes cytoskeleton behavior in Arabidopsis cotyledon pavement cells

    PubMed Central

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Krupinski, Pawel; Wightman, Raymond; Milani, Pascale; Berquand, Alexandre; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier; Jönsson, Henrik; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2014-01-01

    Although it is a central question in biology, how cell shape controls intracellular dynamics largely remains an open question. Here, we show that the shape of Arabidopsis pavement cells creates a stress pattern that controls microtubule orientation, which then guides cell wall reinforcement. Live-imaging, combined with modeling of cell mechanics, shows that microtubules align along the maximal tensile stress direction within the cells, and atomic force microscopy demonstrates that this leads to reinforcement of the cell wall parallel to the microtubules. This feedback loop is regulated: cell-shape derived stresses could be overridden by imposed tissue level stresses, showing how competition between subcellular and supracellular cues control microtubule behavior. Furthermore, at the microtubule level, we identified an amplification mechanism in which mechanical stress promotes the microtubule response to stress by increasing severing activity. These multiscale feedbacks likely contribute to the robustness of microtubule behavior in plant epidermis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01967.001 PMID:24740969

  11. Expression of Arabidopsis callose synthase 5 results in callose accumulation and cell wall permeability alteration.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bo; Deng, Yunfei; Kanaoka, Masahiro M; Okada, Kiyotaka; Hong, Zonglie

    2012-02-01

    Callose is the major polysaccharide present in the callose wall of developing microspores and the growing pollen tube wall. It is also an essential component of other specialized cell walls and its synthesis can be induced by pathogen infection, wounding and environmental cues. Among the 12 callose synthase genes (CalS) present in the Arabidopsis genome, CalS5 plays the predominant role in the synthesis of the callose wall, callose plugs and pollen tube wall. When expressed as a GFP-tagged protein in cultured tobacco BY-2 cells, CalS5 was found to be present in the plasma membrane and the Golgi-related endomembranes. Unlike the cell plate-specific CalS1 isozyme, CalS5 was not concentrated to the cell plate at cytokinesis. Expression of CalS5 resulted in callose accumulation only in the cell wall of BY-2 cells. The fact that no callose was found in the endomembranes suggests that CalS5 is not functional in that compartment. These cells exhibited a decreased plasmolysis rate in hypotonic solutions and an increased cytolysis rate in hypertonic conditions. This study demonstrates that an artificial callose wall could be synthesized by expressing a callose synthase enzyme. PMID:22195570

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of Arabidopsis developing stems: a close-up on cell wall genes

    PubMed Central

    Minic, Zoran; Jamet, Elisabeth; San-Clemente, Hélène; Pelletier, Sandra; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Rihouey, Christophe; Okinyo, Denis PO; Proux, Caroline; Lerouge, Patrice; Jouanin, Lise

    2009-01-01

    Background Different strategies (genetics, biochemistry, and proteomics) can be used to study proteins involved in cell biogenesis. The availability of the complete sequences of several plant genomes allowed the development of transcriptomic studies. Although the expression patterns of some Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in cell wall biogenesis were identified at different physiological stages, detailed microarray analysis of plant cell wall genes has not been performed on any plant tissues. Using transcriptomic and bioinformatic tools, we studied the regulation of cell wall genes in Arabidopsis stems, i.e. genes encoding proteins involved in cell wall biogenesis and genes encoding secreted proteins. Results Transcriptomic analyses of stems were performed at three different developmental stages, i.e., young stems, intermediate stage, and mature stems. Many genes involved in the synthesis of cell wall components such as polysaccharides and monolignols were identified. A total of 345 genes encoding predicted secreted proteins with moderate or high level of transcripts were analyzed in details. The encoded proteins were distributed into 8 classes, based on the presence of predicted functional domains. Proteins acting on carbohydrates and proteins of unknown function constituted the two most abundant classes. Other proteins were proteases, oxido-reductases, proteins with interacting domains, proteins involved in signalling, and structural proteins. Particularly high levels of expression were established for genes encoding pectin methylesterases, germin-like proteins, arabinogalactan proteins, fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins, and structural proteins. Finally, the results of this transcriptomic analyses were compared with those obtained through a cell wall proteomic analysis from the same material. Only a small proportion of genes identified by previous proteomic analyses were identified by transcriptomics. Conversely, only a few proteins encoded by genes

  13. Atkinesin-13A Modulates Cell-Wall Synthesis and Cell Expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana via the THESEUS1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, Ushio; Elsaesser, Lore; Breuninger, Holger; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Ivakov, Alexander; Laux, Thomas; Findlay, Kim; Persson, Staffan; Lenhard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Growth of plant organs relies on cell proliferation and expansion. While an increasingly detailed picture about the control of cell proliferation is emerging, our knowledge about the control of cell expansion remains more limited. We demonstrate here that the internal-motor kinesin AtKINESIN-13A (AtKIN13A) limits cell expansion and cell size in Arabidopsis thaliana, with loss-of-function atkin13a mutants forming larger petals with larger cells. The homolog, AtKINESIN-13B, also affects cell expansion and double mutants display growth, gametophytic and early embryonic defects, indicating a redundant role of the two genes. AtKIN13A is known to depolymerize microtubules and influence Golgi motility and distribution. Consistent with this function, AtKIN13A interacts genetically with ANGUSTIFOLIA, encoding a regulator of Golgi dynamics. Reduced AtKIN13A activity alters cell wall structure as assessed by Fourier-transformed infrared-spectroscopy and triggers signalling via the THESEUS1-dependent cell-wall integrity pathway, which in turn promotes the excess cell expansion in the atkin13a mutant. Thus, our results indicate that the intracellular activity of AtKIN13A regulates cell expansion and wall architecture via THESEUS1, providing a compelling case of interplay between cell wall integrity sensing and expansion. PMID:25232944

  14. Pinoresinol reductase 1 impacts lignin distribution during secondary cell wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiao; Zeng, Yining; Yin, Yanbin; Pu, Yunqiao; Jackson, Lisa A; Engle, Nancy L; Martin, Madhavi Z; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Dixon, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Pinoresinol reductase (PrR) catalyzes the conversion of the lignan (-)-pinoresinol to (-)-lariciresinol in Arabidopsis thaliana, where it is encoded by two genes, PrR1 and PrR2, that appear to act redundantly. PrR1 is highly expressed in lignified inflorescence stem tissue, whereas PrR2 expression is barely detectable in stems. Co-expression analysis has indicated that PrR1 is co-expressed with many characterized genes involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis, whereas PrR2 expression clusters with a different set of genes. The promoter of the PrR1 gene is regulated by the secondary cell wall related transcription factors SND1 and MYB46. The loss-of-function mutant of PrR1 shows, in addition to elevated levels of pinoresinol, significantly decreased lignin content and a slightly altered lignin structure with lower abundance of cinnamyl alcohol end groups. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy analysis indicated that the lignin content of the prr1-1 loss-of-function mutant is similar to that of wild-type plants in xylem cells, which exhibit a normal phenotype, but is reduced in the fiber cells. Together, these data suggest an association of the lignan biosynthetic enzyme encoded by PrR1 with secondary cell wall biosynthesis in fiber cells. PMID:25107662

  15. KOJAK encodes a cellulose synthase-like protein required for root hair cell morphogenesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Favery, Bruno; Ryan, Eoin; Foreman, Julia; Linstead, Paul; Boudonck, Kurt; Steer, Martin; Shaw, Peter; Dolan, Liam

    2001-01-01

    The cell wall is an important determinant of plant cell form. Here we define a class of Arabidopsis root hair mutants with defective cell walls. Plants homozygous for kojak (kjk) mutations initiate root hairs that rupture at their tip soon after initiation. The KJK gene was isolated by positional cloning, and its identity was confirmed by the molecular complementation of the Kjk− phenotype and the sequence of three kjk mutant alleles. KOJAK encodes a cellulose synthase-like protein, AtCSLD3. KOJAK/AtCSLD3 is the first member of this subfamily of proteins to be shown to have a function in cell growth. Subcellular localization of the KOJAK/AtCSLD3 protein using a GFP fusion shows that KOJAK/AtCSLD3 is located on the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating that KOJAK/AtCSLD3 is required for the synthesis of a noncellulosic wall polysaccharide. Consistent with the cell specific defect in the roots of kjk mutants, KOJAK/AtCSDL3 is preferentially expressed in hair cells of the epidermis. The Kjk− phenotype and the pattern of KOJAK/AtCSLD3 expression suggest that this gene acts early in the process of root hair outgrowth. These results suggest that KOJAK/AtCSLD3 is involved in the biosynthesis of β-glucan-containing polysaccharides that are required during root hair elongation. PMID:11156607

  16. Pinoresinol reductase 1 impacts lignin distribution during secondary cell wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, Qiao; Zeng, Yining; Yin, Yanbin; Pu, Yunqiao; Jackson, Lisa A.; Engle, Nancy L.; Martin, Madhavi Z.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; et al

    2014-08-05

    In this paper, pinoresinol reductase (PrR) catalyzes the conversion of the lignan (-)-pinoresinol to (-)-lariciresinol in Arabidopsis thaliana, where it is encoded by two genes, PrR1 and PrR2, that appear to act redundantly. PrR1 is highly expressed in lignified inflorescence stem tissue, whereas PrR2 expression is barely detectable in stems. Co-expression analysis has indicated that PrR1 is co-expressed with many characterized genes involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis, whereas PrR2 expression clusters with a different set of genes. The promoter of the PrR1 gene is regulated by the secondary cell wall related transcription factors SND1 and MYB46. The loss-of-function mutantmore » of PrR1 shows, in addition to elevated levels of pinoresinol, significantly decreased lignin content and a slightly altered lignin structure with lower abundance of cinnamyl alcohol end groups. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy analysis indicated that the lignin content of the prr1-1 loss-of-function mutant is similar to that of wild-type plants in xylem cells, which exhibit a normal phenotype, but is reduced in the fiber cells. Finally, together, these data suggest an association of the lignan biosynthetic enzyme encoded by PrR1 with secondary cell wall biosynthesis in fiber cells.« less

  17. Pinoresinol reductase 1 impacts lignin distribution during secondary cell wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Qiao; Zeng, Yining; Yin, Yanbin; Pu, Yunqiao; Jackson, Lisa A.; Engle, Nancy L.; Martin, Madhavi Z.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2014-08-05

    In this paper, pinoresinol reductase (PrR) catalyzes the conversion of the lignan (-)-pinoresinol to (-)-lariciresinol in Arabidopsis thaliana, where it is encoded by two genes, PrR1 and PrR2, that appear to act redundantly. PrR1 is highly expressed in lignified inflorescence stem tissue, whereas PrR2 expression is barely detectable in stems. Co-expression analysis has indicated that PrR1 is co-expressed with many characterized genes involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis, whereas PrR2 expression clusters with a different set of genes. The promoter of the PrR1 gene is regulated by the secondary cell wall related transcription factors SND1 and MYB46. The loss-of-function mutant of PrR1 shows, in addition to elevated levels of pinoresinol, significantly decreased lignin content and a slightly altered lignin structure with lower abundance of cinnamyl alcohol end groups. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy analysis indicated that the lignin content of the prr1-1 loss-of-function mutant is similar to that of wild-type plants in xylem cells, which exhibit a normal phenotype, but is reduced in the fiber cells. Finally, together, these data suggest an association of the lignan biosynthetic enzyme encoded by PrR1 with secondary cell wall biosynthesis in fiber cells.

  18. Major changes in the cell wall during silique development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Louvet, Romain; Rayon, Catherine; Domon, Jean-Marc; Rusterucci, Christine; Fournet, Françoise; Leaustic, Antoine; Crépeau, Marie-Jeanne; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Rihouey, Christophe; Bardor, Muriel; Lerouge, Patrice; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme

    2011-01-01

    Fruit development is a highly complex process, which involves major changes in plant metabolism leading to cell growth and differentiation. Changes in cell wall composition and structure play a major role in modulating cell growth. We investigated the changes in cell wall composition and the activities of associated enzymes during the dry fruit development of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Silique development is characterized by several specific phases leading to fruit dehiscence and seed dispersal. We showed that early phases of silique growth were characterized by specific changes in non-cellulosic sugar content (rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, galactose and galacturonic acid). Xyloglucan oligosaccharide mass profiling further showed a strong increase in O-acetylated xyloglucans over the course of silique development, which could suggest a decreased capacity of xyloglucans to be associated with each other or to cellulose. The degree of methylesterification, mediated by the activity of pectin methylesterases (PMEs), decreased over the course of silique growth and dehiscence. The major changes in cell wall composition revealed by our analysis suggest that it could be major determinants in modulating cell wall rheology leading to growth or growth arrest. PMID:21051061

  19. Progressive Transverse Microtubule Array Organization in Hormone-Induced Arabidopsis Hypocotyl Cells[W

    PubMed Central

    Vineyard, Laura; Elliott, Andrew; Dhingra, Sonia; Lucas, Jessica R.; Shaw, Sidney L.

    2013-01-01

    The acentriolar cortical microtubule arrays in dark-grown hypocotyl cells organize into a transverse coaligned pattern that is critical for axial plant growth. In light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, the cortical array on the outer (periclinal) cell face creates a variety of array patterns with a significant bias (>3:1) for microtubules polymerizing edge-ward and into the side (anticlinal) faces of the cell. To study the mechanisms required for creating the transverse coalignment, we developed a dual-hormone protocol that synchronously induces ∼80% of the light-grown hypocotyl cells to form transverse arrays over a 2-h period. Repatterning occurred in two phases, beginning with an initial 30 to 40% decrease in polymerizing plus ends prior to visible changes in the array pattern. Transverse organization initiated at the cell’s midzone by 45 min after induction and progressed bidirectionally toward the apical and basal ends of the cell. Reorganization corrected the edge-ward bias in polymerization and proceeded without transiting through an obligate intermediate pattern. Quantitative comparisons of uninduced and induced microtubule arrays showed a limited deconstruction of the initial periclinal array followed by a progressive array reorganization to transverse coordinated between the anticlinal and periclinal cell faces. PMID:23444330

  20. Light-dependent intracellular positioning of mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll cells.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Sayeedul; Niwa, Yasuo; Takagi, Shingo

    2009-06-01

    Mitochondria, the power house of the cell, are one of the most dynamic cell organelles. Although there are several reports on actin- or microtubule-dependent movement of mitochondria in plant cells, intracellular positioning and motility of mitochondria under different light conditions remain open questions. Mitochondria were visualized in living Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells using green fluorescent protein fused to a mitochondrion-targeting signal. In darkness, mitochondria were distributed randomly in palisade cells. In contrast, mitochondria accumulated along the periclinal walls, similar to the accumulation response of chloroplasts, when treated with weak blue light (470 nm, 4 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). Under strong blue light (100 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), mitochondria occupied the anticlinal positions similar to the avoidance response of chloroplasts and nuclei. While strong red light (660 nm, 100 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) induced the accumulation of mitochondria along the inner periclinal walls, green light exhibited little effect on the distribution of mitochondria. In addition, the mode of movement of individual mitochondria along the outer periclinal walls under different light conditions was precisely analyzed by time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. A gradual increase in the number of static mitochondria located in the vicinity of chloroplasts with a time period of blue light illumination clearly demonstrated the accumulation response of mitochondria. Light-induced co-localization of mitochondria with chloroplasts strongly suggested their mutual metabolic interactions. This is the first characterization of the light-dependent redistribution of mitochondria in plant cells. PMID:19380350

  1. Dynamics of vegetative cytoplasm during generative cell formation and pollen maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, A.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes of pollen cytoplasm during generative cell formation and pollen maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. The pollen cytoplasm develops a complicated ultrastructure and changes dramatically during these stages. Lipid droplets increase after generative cell formation and their organization and distribution change with the developmental stage. Starch grains in amyloplasts increase in number and size during generative and sperm cell formation and decrease at pollen maturity. The shape and membrane system of mitochondria change only slightly. Dictyosomes become very prominent, and numerous associated vesicles are observed during and after sperm cell formation. Endoplasmic reticulum appears extensively as stacks during sperm cell formation. Free and polyribosomes are abundant in the cytoplasm at all developmental stages although they appear denser at certain stages and in some areas. In mature pollen, all organelles are randomly distributed throughout the vegetative cytoplasm and numerous small particles appear. Organization and distribution of storage substances and appearance of these small particles during generative and sperm cell formation and pollen maturation are discussed.

  2. Guard Cell Chloroplasts Are Essential for Blue Light-Dependent Stomatal Opening in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Takami, Tsuneaki; Ebisu, Yuuta; Watanabe, Harutaka; Iiboshi, Chihoko; Doi, Michio; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening through the activation of H+-ATPases with subsequent ion accumulation in guard cells. In most plant species, red light (RL) enhances BL-dependent stomatal opening. This RL effect is attributable to the chloroplasts of guard cell, the only cells in the epidermis possessing this organelle. To clarify the role of chloroplasts in stomatal regulation, we investigated the effects of RL on BL-dependent stomatal opening in isolated epidermis, guard cell protoplasts, and intact leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. In isolated epidermal tissues and intact leaves, weak BL superimposed on RL enhanced stomatal opening while BL alone was less effective. In guard cell protoplasts, RL enhanced BL-dependent H+-pumping and DCMU, a photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor, eliminated this effect. RL enhanced phosphorylation levels of the H+-ATPase in response to BL, but this RL effect was not suppressed by DCMU. Furthermore, DCMU inhibited both RL-induced and BL-dependent stomatal opening in intact leaves. The photosynthetic rate in leaves correlated positively with BL-dependent stomatal opening in the presence of DCMU. We conclude that guard cell chloroplasts provide ATP and/or reducing equivalents that fuel BL-dependent stomatal opening, and that they indirectly monitor photosynthetic CO2 fixation in mesophyll chloroplasts by absorbing PAR in the epidermis. PMID:25250952

  3. Guard cell chloroplasts are essential for blue light-dependent stomatal opening in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Takami, Tsuneaki; Ebisu, Yuuta; Watanabe, Harutaka; Iiboshi, Chihoko; Doi, Michio; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening through the activation of H+-ATPases with subsequent ion accumulation in guard cells. In most plant species, red light (RL) enhances BL-dependent stomatal opening. This RL effect is attributable to the chloroplasts of guard cell, the only cells in the epidermis possessing this organelle. To clarify the role of chloroplasts in stomatal regulation, we investigated the effects of RL on BL-dependent stomatal opening in isolated epidermis, guard cell protoplasts, and intact leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. In isolated epidermal tissues and intact leaves, weak BL superimposed on RL enhanced stomatal opening while BL alone was less effective. In guard cell protoplasts, RL enhanced BL-dependent H+-pumping and DCMU, a photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor, eliminated this effect. RL enhanced phosphorylation levels of the H+-ATPase in response to BL, but this RL effect was not suppressed by DCMU. Furthermore, DCMU inhibited both RL-induced and BL-dependent stomatal opening in intact leaves. The photosynthetic rate in leaves correlated positively with BL-dependent stomatal opening in the presence of DCMU. We conclude that guard cell chloroplasts provide ATP and/or reducing equivalents that fuel BL-dependent stomatal opening, and that they indirectly monitor photosynthetic CO2 fixation in mesophyll chloroplasts by absorbing PAR in the epidermis. PMID:25250952

  4. Arabidopsis CSLD5 Functions in Cell Plate Formation in a Cell Cycle-Dependent Manner[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the presence of a load-bearing cell wall presents unique challenges during cell division. Unlike other eukaryotes, which undergo contractile cytokinesis upon completion of mitosis, plants instead synthesize and assemble a new dividing cell wall to separate newly formed daughter cells. Here, we mine transcriptome data from individual cell types in the Arabidopsis thaliana stomatal lineage and identify CSLD5, a member of the Cellulose Synthase Like-D family, as a cell wall biosynthesis enzyme uniquely enriched in rapidly dividing cell populations. We further show that CSLD5 is a direct target of SPEECHLESS, the master transcriptional regulator of these divisions during stomatal development. Using a combination of genetic analysis and in vivo localization of fluorescently tagged fusion proteins, we show that CSLD5 preferentially accumulates in dividing plant cells where it participates in the construction of newly forming cell plates. We show that CSLD5 is an unstable protein that is rapidly degraded upon completion of cell division and that the protein turnover characteristics of CSLD5 are altered in ccs52a2 mutants, indicating that CSLD5 turnover may be regulated by a cell cycle-associated E3-ubiquitin ligase, the anaphase-promoting complex. PMID:27354558

  5. Cell wall maturation of Arabidopsis trichomes is dependent on exocyst subunit EXO70H4 and involves callose deposition.

    PubMed

    Kulich, Ivan; Vojtíková, Zdeňka; Glanc, Matouš; Ortmannová, Jitka; Rasmann, Sergio; Žárský, Viktor

    2015-05-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf trichomes are single-cell structures with a well-studied development, but little is understood about their function. Developmental studies focused mainly on the early shaping stages, and little attention has been paid to the maturation stage. We focused on the EXO70H4 exocyst subunit, one of the most up-regulated genes in the mature trichome. We uncovered EXO70H4-dependent development of the secondary cell wall layer, highly autofluorescent and callose rich, deposited only in the upper part of the trichome. The boundary is formed between the apical and the basal parts of mature trichome by a callose ring that is also deposited in an EXO70H4-dependent manner. We call this structure the Ortmannian ring (OR). Both the secondary cell wall layer and the OR are absent in the exo70H4 mutants. Ecophysiological aspects of the trichome cell wall thickening include interference with antiherbivore defense and heavy metal accumulation. Ultraviolet B light induces EXO70H4 transcription in a CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1-dependent way, resulting in stimulation of trichome cell wall thickening and the OR biogenesis. EXO70H4-dependent trichome cell wall hardening is a unique phenomenon, which may be conserved among a variety of the land plants. Our analyses support a concept that Arabidopsis trichome is an excellent model to study molecular mechanisms of secondary cell wall deposition. PMID:25767057

  6. The t-SNARE AtVAM3p resides on the prevacuolar compartment in Arabidopsis root cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderfoot, A.A.; Kovaleva, V.; Zheng, H.; Raikhel, N.V.

    1999-11-01

    Protein cargo is trafficked between the organelles of the endomembrane system inside transport vesicles, a process mediated by integral membrane proteins called SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) that reside on the surface of the vesicle (v-SNAREs) and target membrane (t-SNAREs). In examining transport of cargo between the trans-Golgi network and the vacuole in Arabidopsis, the authors have previously characterized AtPEP12p as a t-SNARE residing on the prevacuolar compartment and AtVTl1a as a v-SNARE that interacts with AtPEP12p. Recently, they have begun to characterize AtVAM3p, another Arabidopsis t-SNARE that shows high sequence homology to AtPEP12p. They have found that AtVTl1a also interacts with AtVAM3p, suggesting a role for this t-SNARE in post-Golgi trafficking. AtVAM3p has been suggested to localize to the vacuolar membrane in Arabidopsis cells; however, using specific antisera and expression of epitope-tagged versions of each t-SNARE, the authors have discovered that AtVAM3p is found on the same prevacuolar structure as AtPEP12p in Arabidopsis root cells.

  7. Live-cell imaging of microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) play fundamental roles in plant growth and morphogenesis. The ability to observe microtubules and MAPs in living cells using fluorescent protein fusions has propelled plant scientists forward and given them the opportunity to answer longstanding biological questions. In combination with the genetic resources available in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, our mechanistic understanding of how the microtubule cytoskeleton affects plant life has dramatically increased. It is a simple process to construct transgenic A. thaliana plants that express fluorescent protein fusions by using the disarmed plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Several screening steps are necessary to ensure that the fusion protein accurately mimics the native protein because transgenes are inserted randomly into the A. thaliana genome. To image the fluorescent proteins in planta, confocal microscopy is used to alleviate issues caused by specimen thickness and autofluorescence. PMID:23973076

  8. Linking pattern recognition and salicylic acid responses in Arabidopsis through ACCELERATED CELL DEATH6 and receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tateda, Chika; Zhang, Zhongqin; Greenberg, Jean T

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis membrane protein ACCELERATED CELL DEATH 6 (ACD6) and the defense signal salicylic acid (SA) are part of a positive feedback loop that regulates the levels of at least 2 pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP) receptors, including FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 (FLS2) and CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR (LYSM domain receptor-like kinase 1, CERK1). ACD6- and SA-mediated regulation of these receptors results in potentiation of responses to FLS2 and CERK1 ligands (e.g. flg22 and chitin, respectively). ACD6, FLS2 and CERK1 are also important for callose induction in response to an SA agonist even in the absence of PAMPs. Here, we report that another receptor, EF-Tu RECEPTOR (EFR) is also part of the ACD6/SA signaling network, similar to FLS2 and CERK1. PMID:26442718

  9. METACASPASE9 modulates autophagy to confine cell death to the target cells during Arabidopsis vascular xylem differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Escamez, Sacha; André, Domenique; Zhang, Bo; Bollhöner, Benjamin; Pesquet, Edouard; Tuominen, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We uncovered that the level of autophagy in plant cells undergoing programmed cell death determines the fate of the surrounding cells. Our approach consisted of using Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures capable of differentiating into two different cell types: vascular tracheary elements (TEs) that undergo programmed cell death (PCD) and protoplast autolysis, and parenchymatic non-TEs that remain alive. The TE cell type displayed higher levels of autophagy when expression of the TE-specific METACASPASE9 (MC9) was reduced using RNAi (MC9-RNAi). Misregulation of autophagy in the MC9-RNAi TEs coincided with ectopic death of the non-TEs, implying the existence of an autophagy-dependent intercellular signalling from within the TEs towards the non-TEs. Viability of the non-TEs was restored when AUTOPHAGY2 (ATG2) was downregulated specifically in MC9-RNAi TEs, demonstrating the importance of autophagy in the spatial confinement of cell death. Our results suggest that other eukaryotic cells undergoing PCD might also need to tightly regulate their level of autophagy to avoid detrimental consequences for the surrounding cells. PMID:26740571

  10. Identification of the arabidopsis RAM/MOR signalling network: adding new regulatory players in plant stem cell maintenance and cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zermiani, Monica; Begheldo, Maura; Nonis, Alessandro; Palme, Klaus; Mizzi, Luca; Morandini, Piero; Nonis, Alberto; Ruperti, Benedetto

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The RAM/MOR signalling network of eukaryotes is a conserved regulatory module involved in co-ordination of stem cell maintenance, cell differentiation and polarity establishment. To date, no such signalling network has been identified in plants. Methods Genes encoding the bona fide core components of the RAM/MOR pathway were identified in Arabidopsis thaliana (arabidopsis) by sequence similarity searches conducted with the known components from other species. The transcriptional network(s) of the arabidopsis RAM/MOR signalling pathway were identified by running in-depth in silico analyses for genes co-regulated with the core components. In situ hybridization was used to confirm tissue-specific expression of selected RAM/MOR genes. Key Results Co-expression data suggested that the arabidopsis RAM/MOR pathway may include genes involved in floral transition, by co-operating with chromatin remodelling and mRNA processing/post-transcriptional gene silencing factors, and genes involved in the regulation of pollen tube polar growth. The RAM/MOR pathway may act upstream of the ROP1 machinery, affecting pollen tube polar growth, based on the co-expression of its components with ROP-GEFs. In silico tissue-specific co-expression data and in situ hybridization experiments suggest that different components of the arabidopsis RAM/MOR are expressed in the shoot apical meristem and inflorescence meristem and may be involved in the fine-tuning of stem cell maintenance and cell differentiation. Conclusions The arabidopsis RAM/MOR pathway may be part of the signalling cascade that converges in pollen tube polarized growth and in fine-tuning stem cell maintenance, differentiation and organ polarity. PMID:26078466

  11. Peroxisomes contribute to reactive oxygen species homeostasis and cell division induction in Arabidopsis protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Tiew, Terence W.-Y.; Sheahan, Michael B.; Rose, Ray J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to induce Arabidopsis protoplasts to dedifferentiate and divide provides a convenient system to analyze organelle dynamics in plant cells acquiring totipotency. Using peroxisome-targeted fluorescent proteins, we show that during protoplast culture, peroxisomes undergo massive proliferation and disperse uniformly around the cell before cell division. Peroxisome dispersion is influenced by the cytoskeleton, ensuring unbiased segregation during cell division. Considering their role in oxidative metabolism, we also investigated how peroxisomes influence homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Protoplast isolation induces an oxidative burst, with mitochondria the likely major ROS producers. Subsequently ROS levels in protoplast cultures decline, correlating with the increase in peroxisomes, suggesting that peroxisome proliferation may also aid restoration of ROS homeostasis. Transcriptional profiling showed up-regulation of several peroxisome-localized antioxidant enzymes, most notably catalase (CAT). Analysis of antioxidant levels, CAT activity and CAT isoform 3 mutants (cat3) indicate that peroxisome-localized CAT plays a major role in restoring ROS homeostasis. Furthermore, protoplast cultures of pex11a, a peroxisome division mutant, and cat3 mutants show reduced induction of cell division. Taken together, the data indicate that peroxisome proliferation and CAT contribute to ROS homeostasis and subsequent protoplast division induction. PMID:26379686

  12. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Proteins Are Required for Cell Wall Synthesis and Morphogenesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gillmor, C. Stewart; Lukowitz, Wolfgang; Brininstool, Ginger; Sedbrook, John C.; Hamann, Thorsten; Poindexter, Patricia; Somerville, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Mutations at five loci named PEANUT1-5 (PNT) were identified in a genetic screen for radially swollen embryo mutants. pnt1 cell walls showed decreased crystalline cellulose, increased pectins, and irregular and ectopic deposition of pectins, xyloglucans, and callose. Furthermore, pnt1 pollen is less viable than the wild type, and pnt1 embryos were delayed in morphogenesis and showed defects in shoot and root meristems. The PNT1 gene encodes the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of mammalian PIG-M, an endoplasmic reticulum–localized mannosyltransferase that is required for synthesis of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. All five pnt mutants showed strongly reduced accumulation of GPI-anchored proteins, suggesting that they all have defects in GPI anchor synthesis. Although the mutants are seedling lethal, pnt1 cells are able to proliferate for a limited time as undifferentiated callus and do not show the massive deposition of ectopic cell wall material seen in pnt1 embryos. The different phenotype of pnt1 cells in embryos and callus suggest a differential requirement for GPI-anchored proteins in cell wall synthesis in these two tissues and points to the importance of GPI anchoring in coordinated multicellular growth. PMID:15772281

  13. In silico analyses of pericycle cell populations reinforce their relation with associated vasculature in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Parizot, Boris; Roberts, Ianto; Raes, Jeroen; Beeckman, Tom; De Smet, Ive

    2012-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, lateral root initiation occurs in a subset of pericycle cells at the xylem pole that will divide asymmetrically to give rise to a new lateral root organ. While lateral roots never develop at the phloem pole, it is unclear how the interaction with xylem and phloem poles determines the distinct pericycle identities with different competences. Nevertheless, pericycle cells at these poles are marked by differences in size, by ultrastructural features and by specific proteins and gene expression. Here, we provide transcriptional evidence that pericycle cells are intimately associated with their vascular tissue instead of being a separate concentric layer. This has implications for the identification of cell- and tissue-specific promoters that are necessary to drive and/or alter gene expression locally, avoiding pleiotropic effects. We were able to identify a small set of genes that display specific expression in the phloem or xylem pole pericycle cells, and we were able to identify motifs that are likely to drive expression in either one of those tissues. PMID:22527390

  14. Cell Cycle Modulation in the Response of the Primary Root of Arabidopsis to Salt Stress1

    PubMed Central

    West, Gerrit; Inzé, Dirk; Beemster, Gerrit T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Salt stress inhibits plant growth and development. We investigated the importance of cell cycle regulation in mediating the primary root growth response of Arabidopsis to salt stress. When seedlings were transferred to media with increasing concentrations of NaCl, root growth rate was progressively reduced. At day 3 after transfer of seedlings to growth medium containing 0.5% NaCl the primary roots grew at a constant rate well below that prior to the transfer, whereas those transferred to control medium kept accelerating. Kinematic analysis revealed that the growth reduction of the stressed roots was due to a decrease in cell production and a smaller mature cell length. Surprisingly, average cell cycle duration was not affected. Hence, the reduced cell production was due to a smaller number of dividing cells, i.e. a meristem size reduction. To analyze the mechanism of meristem size adaptation prior to day 3, we investigated the short-term cell cycle events following transfer to saline medium. Directly after transfer cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity and CYCB1;2 promoter activity were transiently reduced. Because protein levels of both CDKA;1 and CDKB1;1 were not affected, the temporary inhibition of mitotic activity that allows adaptation to the stress condition is most likely mediated by posttranslational control of CDK activity. Thus, the adaptation to salt stress involves two phases: first, a rapid transient inhibition of the cell cycle that results in fewer cells remaining in the meristem. When the meristem reaches the appropriate size for the given conditions, cell cycle duration returns to its default. PMID:15181207

  15. Arabidopsis NMD3 Is Required for Nuclear Export of 60S Ribosomal Subunits and Affects Secondary Cell Wall Thickening

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Qin; Zhang, Ai-Hong; Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Bao-Cai; Nan, Jie; Li, Xia; Liu, Na; Qu, Hong; Lu, Cong-Ming; Sudmorgen; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Bai, Shu-Nong

    2012-01-01

    NMD3 is required for nuclear export of the 60S ribosomal subunit in yeast and vertebrate cells, but no corresponding function of NMD3 has been reported in plants. Here we report that Arabidopsis thaliana NMD3 (AtNMD3) showed a similar function in the nuclear export of the 60S ribosomal subunit. Interference with AtNMD3 function by overexpressing a truncated dominant negative form of the protein lacking the nuclear export signal sequence caused retainment of the 60S ribosomal subunits in the nuclei. More interestingly, the transgenic Arabidopsis with dominant negative interference of AtNMD3 function showed a striking failure of secondary cell wall thickening, consistent with the altered expression of related genes and composition of cell wall components. Observation of a significant decrease of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) in the differentiating interfascicular fiber cells of the transgenic plant stems suggested a link between the defective nuclear export of 60S ribosomal subunits and the abnormal formation of the secondary cell wall. These findings not only clarified the evolutionary conservation of NMD3 functions in the nuclear export of 60S ribosomal subunits in yeast, animals and plants, but also revealed a new facet of the regulatory mechanism underlying secondary cell wall thickening in Arabidopsis. This new facet is that the nuclear export of 60S ribosomal subunits and the formation of RER may play regulatory roles in coordinating protein synthesis in cytoplasm and transcription in nuclei. PMID:22558264

  16. Differential Roles of Two Homologous Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Genes in Regulating Cell Cycle and Innate Immunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hamdoun, Safae; Zhang, Chong; Gill, Manroop; Kumar, Narender; Churchman, Michelle; Larkin, John C; Kwon, Ashley; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Precise cell-cycle control is critical for plant development and responses to pathogen invasion. Two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes, SIAMESE (SIM) and SIM-RELATED 1 (SMR1), were recently shown to regulate Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) defense based on phenotypes conferred by a sim smr1 double mutant. However, whether these two genes play differential roles in cell-cycle and defense control is unknown. In this report, we show that while acting synergistically to promote endoreplication, SIM and SMR1 play different roles in affecting the ploidy of trichome and leaf cells, respectively. In addition, we found that the smr1-1 mutant, but not sim-1, was more susceptible to a virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain, and this susceptibility could be rescued by activating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defense. Consistent with these results, smr1-1 partially suppressed the dwarfism, high SA levels, and cell death phenotypes in acd6-1, a mutant used to gauge the change of defense levels. Thus, SMR1 functions partly through SA in defense control. The differential roles of SIM and SMR1 are due to differences in temporal and spatial expression of these two genes in Arabidopsis tissues and in response to P. syringae infection. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis of plants with altered SA signaling revealed that SA is necessary, but not sufficient, to change cell-cycle progression. We further found that a mutant with three CYCD3 genes disrupted also compromised disease resistance to P. syringae. Together, this study reveals differential roles of two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in regulating cell-cycle progression and innate immunity in Arabidopsis and provides insights into the importance of cell-cycle control during host-pathogen interactions. PMID:26561564

  17. Plasmodesmata formation and cell-to-cell transport are reduced in decreased size exclusion limit 1 during embryogenesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min; Cho, Euna; Burch-Smith, Tessa M.; Zambryski, Patricia C.

    2012-01-01

    In plants, plasmodesmata (PD) serve as channels for micromolecular and macromolecular cell-to-cell transport. Based on structure, PD in immature tissues are classified into two types, simple and branched (X- and Y-shaped) or twinned. The maximum size of molecules capable of PD transport defines PD aperture, known as the PD size exclusion limit. Here we report an Arabidopsis mutation, decreased size exclusion limit1 (dse1), that exhibits reduced cell-to-cell transport of the small (524 Da) fluorescent tracer 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid at the midtorpedo stage of embryogenesis. Correspondingly, the fraction of X- and Y-shaped and twinned PD was reduced in dse1 embryos compared with WT embryos at this stage, suggesting that the frequency of PD is related to transport capability. dse1 is caused by a point mutation in At4g29860 (previously termed TANMEI) at the last donor splice site of its transcript, resulting in alternative splicing in both the first intron and the last intron. AtDSE1 is a conserved eukaryotic 386-aa WD-repeat protein critical for Arabidopsis morphogenesis and reproduction. Similar to its homologs in mouse, null mutants are embryo-lethal. The weak loss-of-function mutant dse1 exhibits pleiotropic phenotypes, including retarded vegetative growth, delayed flowering time, dysfunctional male and female organs, and delayed senescence. Finally, silencing of DSE1 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves leads to reduced movement of GFP fused to tobacco mosaic virus movement protein. Thus, DSE1 is important for regulating PD transport between plant cells. PMID:22411811

  18. Dynamics of Defense Responses and Cell Fate Change during Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas syringae Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hamdoun, Safae; Liu, Zhe; Gill, Manroop; Yao, Nan; Lu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Plant-pathogen interactions involve sophisticated action and counteraction strategies from both parties. Plants can recognize pathogen derived molecules, such as conserved pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and effector proteins, and subsequently activate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI), respectively. However, pathogens can evade such recognitions and suppress host immunity with effectors, causing effector-triggered susceptibility (ETS). The differences among PTI, ETS, and ETI have not been completely understood. Toward a better understanding of PTI, ETS, and ETI, we systematically examined various defense-related phenotypes of Arabidopsis infected with different Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326 strains, using the virulence strain DG3 to induce ETS, the avirulence strain DG34 that expresses avrRpm1 (recognized by the resistance protein RPM1) to induce ETI, and HrcC- that lacks the type three secretion system to activate PTI. We found that plants infected with different strains displayed dynamic differences in the accumulation of the defense signaling molecule salicylic acid, expression of the defense marker gene PR1, cell death formation, and accumulation/localization of the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. The differences between PTI, ETS, and ETI are dependent on the doses of the strains used. These data support the quantitative nature of PTI, ETS, and ETI and they also reveal qualitative differences between PTI, ETS, and ETI. Interestingly, we observed the induction of large cells in the infected leaves, most obviously with HrcC- at later infection stages. The enlarged cells have increased DNA content, suggesting a possible activation of endoreplication. Consistent with strong induction of abnormal cell growth by HrcC-, we found that the PTI elicitor flg22 also activates abnormal cell growth, depending on a functional flg22-receptor FLS2. Thus, our study has revealed a comprehensive picture of dynamic

  19. Meristematic cell proliferation and ribosome biogenesis are decoupled in diamagnetically levitated Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell growth and cell proliferation are intimately linked in the presence of Earth’s gravity, but are decoupled under the microgravity conditions present in orbiting spacecraft. New technologies to simulate microgravity conditions for long-duration experiments, with stable environmental conditions, in Earth-based laboratories are required to further our understanding of the effect of extraterrestrial conditions on the growth, development and health of living matter. Results We studied the response of transgenic seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana, containing either the CycB1-GUS proliferation marker or the DR5-GUS auxin-mediated growth marker, to diamagnetic levitation in the bore of a superconducting solenoid magnet. As a control, a second set of seedlings were exposed to a strong magnetic field, but not to levitation forces. A third set was exposed to a strong field and simulated hypergravity (2 g). Cell proliferation and cell growth cytological parameters were measured for each set of seedlings. Nucleolin immunodetection was used as a marker of cell growth. Collectively, the data indicate that these two fundamental cellular processes are decoupled in root meristems, as in microgravity: cell proliferation was enhanced whereas cell growth markers were depleted. These results also demonstrated delocalisation of auxin signalling in the root tip despite the fact that levitation of the seedling as a whole does not prevent the sedimentation of statoliths in the root cells. Conclusions In our model system, we found that diamagnetic levitation led to changes that are very similar to those caused by real- [e.g. on board the International Space Station (ISS)] or mechanically-simulated microgravity [e.g. using a Random Positioning Machine (RPM)]. These changes decoupled meristematic cell proliferation from ribosome biogenesis, and altered auxin polar transport. PMID:24006876

  20. Analysis of Block of cell proliferation 1 (BOP1) activity in strawberry and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Sofia D; Chatterjee, Mithu; Coleman, Lauren; Clancy, Maureen A; Folta, Kevin M

    2016-04-01

    Block of cell proliferation (BOP) proteins are conserved among eukaryotes, and studies in mammals and yeast have described their role in ribosome biogenesis and cell cycle regulation. A BOP1 orthologue was identified in plants, and loss-of-function analyses in tobacco cells confirmed similar activities. This report characterizes a role for BOP1 activity in planta. Two transgenic plant species were used: the diploid strawberry (Fragaria vesca) and Arabidopsis thaliana. FvBOP1 silencing showed changes in pre-rRNA processing, and demonstrated FvBOP1's role in growth and physiology throughout different stages of plant development. In the strawberry, repression of FvBOP1 activity decreased plant fitness prior to flowering, followed by plant death after the reproductive transition, indicating that BOP1 activity is required for transition back to vegetative growth after flowering. A T-DNA null allele of the AtBOP1 gene is lethal, and a 50% decrease in transcript accumulation is sufficient to cause severe developmental defects linked to defective cell division. The conserved protein BOP1 is essential for viability. Lower transcript levels result in defects in rRNA processing and developmental abnormalities that are consistent with its predicted role in ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26940494

  1. Cell surface- and Rho GTPase-based auxin signaling controls cellular interdigitation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tongda; Wen, Mingzhang; Nagawa, Shingo; Fu, Ying; Chen, Jin-Gui; Wu, Ming-Jing; Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine; Friml, Jiří; Jones, Alan M.; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2010-01-01

    Summary Auxin is a multi-functional hormone essential for plant development and pattern formation. A nuclear auxin signaling system controlling auxin-induced gene expression is well established, but cytoplasmic auxin signaling as in its coordination of cell polarization is unexplored. We found a cytoplasmic auxin signaling mechanism that modulates the interdigitated growth of Arabidopsis leaf epidermal pavement cells (PCs), which develop interdigitated lobes and indentations to form a puzzle-piece shape in a two-dimensional plane. PC interdigitation is compromised in leaves deficient in either auxin biosynthesis or its export mediated by PINFORMED 1 localized at the lobe tip. Auxin coordinately activates two Rho GTPases, ROP2 and ROP6, which promote the formation of complementary lobes and indentations, respectively. Activation of these ROPs by auxin occurs within 30 seconds and depends on AUXIN-BINDING PROTEIN 1. These findings reveal Rho GTPase-based novel auxin signaling mechanisms, which modulate the spatial coordination of cell expansion across a field of cells. PMID:20887895

  2. Lectin Receptor Kinases Participate in Protein-Protein Interactions to Mediate Plasma Membrane-Cell Wall Adhesions in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces. PMID:16361528

  3. Cell Fate Determination and the Switch from Diffuse Growth to Planar Polarity in Arabidopsis Root Epidermal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balcerowicz, Daria; Schoenaers, Sébastjen; Vissenberg, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Plant roots fulfill important functions as they serve in water and nutrient uptake, provide anchorage of the plant body in the soil and in some species form the site of symbiotic interactions with soil-living biota. Root hairs, tubular-shaped outgrowths of specific epidermal cells, significantly increase the root’s surface area and aid in these processes. In this review we focus on the molecular mechanisms that determine the hair and non-hair cell fate of epidermal cells and that define the site on the epidermal cell where the root hair will be initiated (=planar polarity determination). In the model plant Arabidopsis, trichoblast and atrichoblast cell fate results from intra- and intercellular position-dependent signaling and from complex feedback loops that ultimately regulate GL2 expressing and non-expressing cells. When epidermal cells reach the end of the root expansion zone, root hair promoting transcription factors dictate the establishment of polarity within epidermal cells followed by the selection of the root hair initiation site at the more basal part of the trichoblast. Molecular players in the abovementioned processes as well as the role of phytohormones are discussed, and open areas for future experiments are identified. PMID:26779192

  4. Cell-wall structure and anisotropy in procuste, a cellulose synthase mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Iain M; Sturcová, Adriana; Sugimoto-Shirasu, Keiko; His, Isabelle; McCann, Maureen C; Jarvis, Michael C

    2006-07-01

    In dark-grown hypocotyls of the Arabidopsis procuste mutant, a mutation in the CesA6 gene encoding a cellulose synthase reduces cellulose synthesis and severely inhibits elongation growth. Previous studies had left it uncertain why growth was inhibited, because cellulose synthesis was affected before, not during, the main phase of elongation. We characterised the quantity, structure and orientation of the cellulose remaining in the walls of affected cells. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy and infrared microscopy showed that the residual cellulose did not differ in structure from that of the wild type, but the cellulose content of the prc-1 cell walls was reduced by 28%. The total mass of cell-wall polymers per hypocotyl was reduced in prc-1 by about 20%. Therefore, the fourfold inhibition of elongation growth in prc-1 does not result from aberrant cellulose structure, nor from uniform reduction in the dimensions of the cell-wall network due to reduced cellulose or cell-wall mass. Cellulose orientation was quantified by two quantitative methods. First, the orientation of newly synthesised microfibrils was measured in field-emission scanning electron micrographs of the cytoplasmic face of the inner epidermal cell wall. The ordered transverse orientation of microfibrils at the inner face of the cell wall was severely disrupted in prc-1 hypocotyls, particularly in the early growth phase. Second, cellulose orientation distributions across the whole cell-wall thickness, measured by polarised infrared microscopy, were much broader. Analysis of the microfibril orientations according to the theory of composite materials showed that during the initial growth phase, their anisotropy at the plasma membrane was sufficient to explain the anisotropy of subsequent growth. PMID:16404578

  5. A Dynamic Gene Regulatory Network Model That Recovers the Cyclic Behavior of Arabidopsis thaliana Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Elizabeth; García-Cruz, Karla; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Castillo, Aaron; Sánchez, María de la Paz; Álvarez-Buylla, Elena R.

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle control is fundamental in eukaryotic development. Several modeling efforts have been used to integrate the complex network of interacting molecular components involved in cell cycle dynamics. In this paper, we aimed at recovering the regulatory logic upstream of previously known components of cell cycle control, with the aim of understanding the mechanisms underlying the emergence of the cyclic behavior of such components. We focus on Arabidopsis thaliana, but given that many components of cell cycle regulation are conserved among eukaryotes, when experimental data for this system was not available, we considered experimental results from yeast and animal systems. We are proposing a Boolean gene regulatory network (GRN) that converges into only one robust limit cycle attractor that closely resembles the cyclic behavior of the key cell-cycle molecular components and other regulators considered here. We validate the model by comparing our in silico configurations with data from loss- and gain-of-function mutants, where the endocyclic behavior also was recovered. Additionally, we approximate a continuous model and recovered the temporal periodic expression profiles of the cell-cycle molecular components involved, thus suggesting that the single limit cycle attractor recovered with the Boolean model is not an artifact of its discrete and synchronous nature, but rather an emergent consequence of the inherent characteristics of the regulatory logic proposed here. This dynamical model, hence provides a novel theoretical framework to address cell cycle regulation in plants, and it can also be used to propose novel predictions regarding cell cycle regulation in other eukaryotes. PMID:26340681

  6. A Dynamic Gene Regulatory Network Model That Recovers the Cyclic Behavior of Arabidopsis thaliana Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Elizabeth; García-Cruz, Karla; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Castillo, Aaron; Sánchez, María de la Paz; Álvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2015-09-01

    Cell cycle control is fundamental in eukaryotic development. Several modeling efforts have been used to integrate the complex network of interacting molecular components involved in cell cycle dynamics. In this paper, we aimed at recovering the regulatory logic upstream of previously known components of cell cycle control, with the aim of understanding the mechanisms underlying the emergence of the cyclic behavior of such components. We focus on Arabidopsis thaliana, but given that many components of cell cycle regulation are conserved among eukaryotes, when experimental data for this system was not available, we considered experimental results from yeast and animal systems. We are proposing a Boolean gene regulatory network (GRN) that converges into only one robust limit cycle attractor that closely resembles the cyclic behavior of the key cell-cycle molecular components and other regulators considered here. We validate the model by comparing our in silico configurations with data from loss- and gain-of-function mutants, where the endocyclic behavior also was recovered. Additionally, we approximate a continuous model and recovered the temporal periodic expression profiles of the cell-cycle molecular components involved, thus suggesting that the single limit cycle attractor recovered with the Boolean model is not an artifact of its discrete and synchronous nature, but rather an emergent consequence of the inherent characteristics of the regulatory logic proposed here. This dynamical model, hence provides a novel theoretical framework to address cell cycle regulation in plants, and it can also be used to propose novel predictions regarding cell cycle regulation in other eukaryotes. PMID:26340681

  7. Gene family analysis of the Arabidopsis pollen transcriptome reveals biological implications for cell growth, division control, and gene expression regulation.

    PubMed

    Pina, Cristina; Pinto, Francisco; Feijó, José A; Becker, Jörg D

    2005-06-01

    Upon germination, pollen forms a tube that elongates dramatically through female tissues to reach and fertilize ovules. While essential for the life cycle of higher plants, the genetic basis underlying most of the process is not well understood. We previously used a combination of flow cytometry sorting of viable hydrated pollen grains and GeneChip array analysis of one-third of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome to define a first overview of the pollen transcriptome. We now extend that study to approximately 80% of the genome of Arabidopsis by using Affymetrix Arabidopsis ATH1 arrays and perform comparative analysis of gene family and gene ontology representation in the transcriptome of pollen and vegetative tissues. Pollen grains have a smaller and overall unique transcriptome (6,587 genes expressed) with greater proportions of selectively expressed (11%) and enriched (26%) genes than any vegetative tissue. Relative gene ontology category representations in pollen and vegetative tissues reveal a functional skew of the pollen transcriptome toward signaling, vesicle transport, and the cytoskeleton, suggestive of a commitment to germination and tube growth. Cell cycle analysis reveals an accumulation of G2/M-associated factors that may play a role in the first mitotic division of the zygote. Despite the relative underrepresentation of transcription-associated transcripts, nonclassical MADS box genes emerge as a class with putative unique roles in pollen. The singularity of gene expression control in mature pollen grains is further highlighted by the apparent absence of small RNA pathway components. PMID:15908605

  8. The TCP4 transcription factor of Arabidopsis blocks cell division in yeast at G1 {yields} S transition

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Pooja; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Bhat, Abhay; Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Sadhale, Parag P.; Nath, Utpal

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} TCP4 is a class II TCP transcription factor, that represses cell division in Arabidopsis. {yields} TCP4 expression in yeast retards cell division by blocking G1 {yields} S transition. {yields} Genome-wide expression studies and Western analysis reveals stabilization of cell cycle inhibitor Sic1, as possible mechanism. -- Abstract: The TCP transcription factors control important aspects of plant development. Members of class I TCP proteins promote cell cycle by regulating genes directly involved in cell proliferation. In contrast, members of class II TCP proteins repress cell division. While it has been postulated that class II proteins induce differentiation signal, their exact role on cell cycle has not been studied. Here, we report that TCP4, a class II TCP protein from Arabidopsis that repress cell proliferation in developing leaves, inhibits cell division by blocking G1 {yields} S transition in budding yeast. Cells expressing TCP4 protein with increased transcriptional activity fail to progress beyond G1 phase. By analyzing global transcriptional status of these cells, we show that expression of a number of cell cycle genes is altered. The possible mechanism of G1 {yields} S arrest is discussed.

  9. Intercellular communication in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen discovered via AHG3 transcript movement from the vegetative cell to sperm

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Yi, Jun; Boavida, Leonor C.; Chen, Yuan; Becker, Jörg D.; Köhler, Claudia; McCormick, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    An Arabidopsis pollen grain (male gametophyte) consists of three cells: the vegetative cell, which forms the pollen tube, and two sperm cells enclosed within the vegetative cell. It is still unclear if there is intercellular communication between the vegetative cell and the sperm cells. Here we show that ABA-hypersensitive germination3 (AHG3), encoding a protein phosphatase, is specifically transcribed in the vegetative cell but predominantly translated in sperm cells. We used a series of deletion constructs and promoter exchanges to document transport of AHG3 transcripts from the vegetative cell to sperm and showed that their transport requires sequences in both the 5′ UTR and the coding region. Thus, in addition its known role in transporting sperm during pollen tube growth, the vegetative cell also contributes transcripts to the sperm cells. PMID:26466609

  10. Live Imaging of Companion Cells and Sieve Elements in Arabidopsis Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Cayla, Thibaud; Batailler, Brigitte; Le Hir, Rozenn; Revers, Frédéric; Anstead, James A.; Thompson, Gary A.; Grandjean, Olivier; Dinant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The phloem is a complex tissue composed of highly specialized cells with unique subcellular structures and a compact organization that is challenging to study in vivo at cellular resolution. We used confocal scanning laser microscopy and subcellular fluorescent markers in companion cells and sieve elements, for live imaging of the phloem in Arabidopsis leaves. This approach provided a simple framework for identifying phloem cell types unambiguously. It highlighted the compactness of the meshed network of organelles within companion cells. By contrast, within the sieve elements, unknown bodies were observed in association with the PP2-A1:GFP, GFP:RTM1 and RTM2:GFP markers at the cell periphery. The phloem lectin PP2-A1:GFP marker was found in the parietal ground matrix. Its location differed from that of the P-protein filaments, which were visualized with SEOR1:GFP and SEOR2:GFP. PP2-A1:GFP surrounded two types of bodies, one of which was identified as mitochondria. This location suggested that it was embedded within the sieve element clamps, specific structures that may fix the organelles to each another or to the plasma membrane in the sieve tubes. GFP:RTM1 was associated with a class of larger bodies, potentially corresponding to plastids. PP2-A1:GFP was soluble in the cytosol of immature sieve elements. The changes in its subcellular localization during differentiation provide an in vivo blueprint for monitoring this process. The subcellular features obtained with these companion cell and sieve element markers can be used as landmarks for exploring the organization and dynamics of phloem cells in vivo. PMID:25714357

  11. LIPS database with LIPService: a microscopic image database of intracellular structures in Arabidopsis guard cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intracellular configuration is an important feature of cell status. Recent advances in microscopic imaging techniques allow us to easily obtain a large number of microscopic images of intracellular structures. In this circumstance, automated microscopic image recognition techniques are of extreme importance to future phenomics/visible screening approaches. However, there was no benchmark microscopic image dataset for intracellular organelles in a specified plant cell type. We previously established the Live Images of Plant Stomata (LIPS) database, a publicly available collection of optical-section images of various intracellular structures of plant guard cells, as a model system of environmental signal perception and transduction. Here we report recent updates to the LIPS database and the establishment of a database table, LIPService. Description We updated the LIPS dataset and established a new interface named LIPService to promote efficient inspection of intracellular structure configurations. Cell nuclei, microtubules, actin microfilaments, mitochondria, chloroplasts, endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi bodies, and vacuoles can be filtered using probe names or morphometric parameters such as stomatal aperture. In addition to the serial optical sectional images of the original LIPS database, new volume-rendering data for easy web browsing of three-dimensional intracellular structures have been released to allow easy inspection of their configurations or relationships with cell status/morphology. We also demonstrated the utility of the new LIPS image database for automated organelle recognition of images from another plant cell image database with image clustering analyses. Conclusions The updated LIPS database provides a benchmark image dataset for representative intracellular structures in Arabidopsis guard cells. The newly released LIPService allows users to inspect the relationship between organellar three-dimensional configurations

  12. The Histidine Kinase AHK5 Integrates Endogenous and Environmental Signals in Arabidopsis Guard Cells

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Radhika; Horák, Jakub; Chaban, Christina; Mira-Rodado, Virtudes; Witthöft, Janika; Elgass, Kirstin; Grefen, Christopher; Cheung, Man-Kim; Meixner, Alfred J.; Hooley, Richard; Neill, Steven John; Hancock, John Travers; Harter, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Background Stomatal guard cells monitor and respond to environmental and endogenous signals such that the stomatal aperture is continually optimised for water use efficiency. A key signalling molecule produced in guard cells in response to plant hormones, light, carbon dioxide and pathogen-derived signals is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The mechanisms by which H2O2 integrates multiple signals via specific signalling pathways leading to stomatal closure is not known. Principal Findings Here, we identify a pathway by which H2O2, derived from endogenous and environmental stimuli, is sensed and transduced to effect stomatal closure. Histidine kinases (HK) are part of two-component signal transduction systems that act to integrate environmental stimuli into a cellular response via a phosphotransfer relay mechanism. There is little known about the function of the HK AHK5 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we report that in addition to the predicted cytoplasmic localisation of this protein, AHK5 also appears to co-localise to the plasma membrane. Although AHK5 is expressed at low levels in guard cells, we identify a unique role for AHK5 in stomatal signalling. Arabidopsis mutants lacking AHK5 show reduced stomatal closure in response to H2O2, which is reversed by complementation with the wild type gene. Over-expression of AHK5 results in constitutively less stomatal closure. Abiotic stimuli that generate endogenous H2O2, such as darkness, nitric oxide and the phytohormone ethylene, also show reduced stomatal closure in the ahk5 mutants. However, ABA caused closure, dark adaptation induced H2O2 production and H2O2 induced NO synthesis in mutants. Treatment with the bacterial pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) flagellin, but not elf peptide, also exhibited reduced stomatal closure and H2O2 generation in ahk5 mutants. Significance Our findings identify an integral signalling function for AHK5 that acts to integrate multiple signals via H2O2 homeostasis and is independent

  13. The tarani mutation alters surface curvature in Arabidopsis leaves by perturbing the patterns of surface expansion and cell division

    PubMed Central

    Karidas, Premananda; Challa, Krishna Reddy; Nath, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    The leaf surface usually stays flat, maintained by coordinated growth. Growth perturbation can introduce overall surface curvature, which can be negative, giving a saddle-shaped leaf, or positive, giving a cup-like leaf. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that underlie leaf flatness, primarily because only a few mutants with altered surface curvature have been isolated and studied. Characterization of mutants of the CINCINNATA-like TCP genes in Antirrhinum and Arabidopsis have revealed that their products help maintain flatness by balancing the pattern of cell proliferation and surface expansion between the margin and the central zone during leaf morphogenesis. On the other hand, deletion of two homologous PEAPOD genes causes cup-shaped leaves in Arabidopsis due to excess division of dispersed meristemoid cells. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of an Arabidopsis mutant, tarani (tni), with enlarged, cup-shaped leaves. Morphometric analyses showed that the positive curvature of the tni leaf is linked to excess growth at the centre compared to the margin. By monitoring the dynamic pattern of CYCLIN D3;2 expression, we show that the shape of the primary arrest front is strongly convex in growing tni leaves, leading to excess mitotic expansion synchronized with excess cell proliferation at the centre. Reduction of cell proliferation and of endogenous gibberellic acid levels rescued the tni phenotype. Genetic interactions demonstrated that TNI maintains leaf flatness independent of TCPs and PEAPODs. PMID:25711708

  14. Cytosolic Ca(2+) Signals Enhance the Vacuolar Ion Conductivity of Bulging Arabidopsis Root Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Dindas, Julian; Rienmüller, Florian; Krebs, Melanie; Waadt, Rainer; Schumacher, Karin; Wu, Wei-Hua; Hedrich, Rainer; Roelfsema, M Rob G

    2015-11-01

    Plant cell expansion depends on the uptake of solutes across the plasma membrane and their storage within the vacuole. In contrast to the well-studied plasma membrane, little is known about the regulation of ion transport at the vacuolar membrane. We therefore established an experimental approach to study vacuolar ion transport in intact Arabidopsis root cells, with multi-barreled microelectrodes. The subcellular position of electrodes was detected by imaging current-injected fluorescent dyes. Comparison of measurements with electrodes in the cytosol and vacuole revealed an average vacuolar membrane potential of -31 mV. Voltage clamp recordings of single vacuoles resolved the activity of voltage-independent and slowly deactivating channels. In bulging root hairs that express the Ca(2+) sensor R-GECO1, rapid elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration was observed, after impalement with microelectrodes, or injection of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA. Elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level stimulated the activity of voltage-independent channels in the vacuolar membrane. Likewise, the vacuolar ion conductance was enhanced during a sudden increase of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level in cells injected with fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator FURA-2. These data thus show that cytosolic Ca(2+) signals can rapidly activate vacuolar ion channels, which may prevent rupture of the vacuolar membrane, when facing mechanical forces. PMID:26232520

  15. The Arabidopsis peptide kiss of death is an inducer of programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Blanvillain, Robert; Young, Bennett; Cai, Yao-min; Hecht, Valérie; Varoquaux, Fabrice; Delorme, Valérie; Lancelin, Jean-Marc; Delseny, Michel; Gallois, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has a key role in defence and development of all multicellular organisms. In plants, there is a large gap in our knowledge of the molecular machinery involved at the various stages of PCD, especially the early steps. Here, we identify kiss of death (KOD) encoding a 25-amino-acid peptide that activates a PCD pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. Two mutant alleles of KOD exhibited a reduced PCD of the suspensor, a single file of cells that support embryo development, and a reduced PCD of root hairs after a 55°C heat shock. KOD expression was found to be inducible by biotic and abiotic stresses. Furthermore, KOD expression was sufficient to cause death in leaves or seedlings and to activate caspase-like activities. In addition, KOD-induced PCD required light in leaves and was repressed by the PCD-suppressor genes AtBax inhibitor 1 and p35. KOD expression resulted in depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, placing KOD above mitochondria dysfunction, an early step in plant PCD. A KOD∷GFP fusion, however, localized in the cytosol of cells and not mitochondria. PMID:21326210

  16. Overproduction of stomatal lineage cells in Arabidopsis mutants defective in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamuro, Chizuko; Miki, Daisuke; Zheng, Zhimin; Ma, Jun; Wang, Jing; Yang, Zhenbiao; Dong, Juan; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a reversible epigenetic mark regulating genome stability and function in many eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, active DNA demethylation depends on the function of the ROS1 subfamily of genes that encode 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases/lyases. ROS1-mediated DNA demethylation plays a critical role in the regulation of transgenes, transposable elements and some endogenous genes, but there have been no reports of clear developmental phenotypes in ros1 mutant plants. Here we report that, in the ros1 mutant, the promoter region of the peptide ligand gene EPF2 is hypermethylated, which greatly reduces EPF2 expression and thereby leads to a phenotype of overproduction of stomatal lineage cells. EPF2 gene expression in ros1 is restored and the defective epidermal cell patterning is suppressed by mutations in genes in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway. Our results show that active DNA demethylation combats the activity of RNA-directed DNA methylation to influence the initiation of stomatal lineage cells. PMID:24898766

  17. Inhibition of cathepsin B by caspase-3 inhibitors blocks programmed cell death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Y; Cai, Y-M; Bonneau, L; Rotari, V; Danon, A; McKenzie, E A; McLellan, H; Mach, L; Gallois, P

    2016-09-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is used by plants for development and survival to biotic and abiotic stresses. The role of caspases in PCD is well established in animal cells. Over the past 15 years, the importance of caspase-3-like enzymatic activity for plant PCD completion has been widely documented despite the absence of caspase orthologues. In particular, caspase-3 inhibitors blocked nearly all plant PCD tested. Here, we affinity-purified a plant caspase-3-like activity using a biotin-labelled caspase-3 inhibitor and identified Arabidopsis thaliana cathepsin B3 (AtCathB3) by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Consistent with this, recombinant AtCathB3 was found to have caspase-3-like activity and to be inhibited by caspase-3 inhibitors. AtCathepsin B triple-mutant lines showed reduced caspase-3-like enzymatic activity and reduced labelling with activity-based caspase-3 probes. Importantly, AtCathepsin B triple mutants showed a strong reduction in the PCD induced by ultraviolet (UV), oxidative stress (H2O2, methyl viologen) or endoplasmic reticulum stress. Our observations contribute to explain why caspase-3 inhibitors inhibit plant PCD and provide new tools to further plant PCD research. The fact that cathepsin B does regulate PCD in both animal and plant cells suggests that this protease may be part of an ancestral PCD pathway pre-existing the plant/animal divergence that needs further characterisation. PMID:27058316

  18. Involvement of Arabidopsis Hexokinase1 in Cell Death Mediated by Myo-Inositol Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Bruggeman, Quentin; Prunier, Florence; Mazubert, Christelle; de Bont, Linda; Garmier, Marie; Lugan, Raphaël; Benhamed, Moussa; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile; Delarue, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for several aspects of plant life, including development and stress responses. We recently identified the mips1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which is deficient for the enzyme catalyzing the limiting step of myo-inositol (MI) synthesis. One of the most striking features of mips1 is the light-dependent formation of lesions on leaves due to salicylic acid (SA)-dependent PCD. Here, we identified a suppressor of PCD by screening for mutations that abolish the mips1 cell death phenotype. Our screen identified the hxk1 mutant, mutated in the gene encoding the hexokinase1 (HXK1) enzyme that catalyzes sugar phosphorylation and acts as a genuine glucose sensor. We show that HXK1 is required for lesion formation in mips1 due to alterations in MI content, via SA-dependant signaling. Using two catalytically inactive HXK1 mutants, we also show that hexokinase catalytic activity is necessary for the establishment of lesions in mips1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses revealed a restoration of the MI content in mips1 hxk1 that it is due to the activity of the MIPS2 isoform, while MIPS3 is not involved. Our work defines a pathway of HXK1-mediated cell death in plants and demonstrates that two MIPS enzymes act cooperatively under a particular metabolic status, highlighting a novel checkpoint of MI homeostasis in plants. PMID:26048869

  19. Functional Analysis of Cellulose and Xyloglucan in the Walls of Stomatal Guard Cells of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Yue; Anderson, Charles T.

    2016-01-01

    Stomatal guard cells are pairs of specialized epidermal cells that control water and CO2 exchange between the plant and the environment. To fulfill the functions of stomatal opening and closure that are driven by changes in turgor pressure, guard cell walls must be both strong and flexible, but how the structure and dynamics of guard cell walls enable stomatal function remains poorly understood. To address this question, we applied cell biological and genetic analyses to investigate guard cell walls and their relationship to stomatal function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using live-cell spinning disk confocal microscopy, we measured the motility of cellulose synthase (CESA)-containing complexes labeled by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-CESA3 and observed a reduced proportion of GFP-CESA3 particles colocalizing with microtubules upon stomatal closure. Imaging cellulose organization in guard cells revealed a relatively uniform distribution of cellulose in the open state and a more fibrillar pattern in the closed state, indicating that cellulose microfibrils undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal movements. In cesa3je5 mutants defective in cellulose synthesis and xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking the hemicellulose xyloglucan, stomatal apertures, changes in guard cell length, and cellulose reorganization were aberrant during fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening or abscisic acid-induced stomatal closure, indicating that sufficient cellulose and xyloglucan are required for normal guard cell dynamics. Together, these results provide new insights into how guard cell walls allow stomata to function as responsive mediators of gas exchange at the plant surface. PMID:26729799

  20. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Root Hair Patterning Genes by WRKY75 in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Rishmawi, Louai; Pesch, Martina; Juengst, Christian; Schauss, Astrid C.; Schrader, Andrea; Hülskamp, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), root hairs are formed in cell files over the cleft of underlying cortex cells. This pattern is established by a well-known gene regulatory network of transcription factors. In this study, we show that WRKY75 suppresses root hair development in nonroot hair files and that it represses the expression of TRIPTYCHON and CAPRICE. The WRKY75 protein binds to the CAPRICE promoter in a yeast one-hybrid assay. Binding to the promoter fragment requires an intact WRKY protein-binding motif, the W box. A comparison of the spatial expression of WRKY75 and the localization of the WRKY75 protein revealed that WRKY75 is expressed in the pericycle and vascular tissue and that the WRKY75 RNA or protein moves into the epidermis. PMID:24676857

  1. Cell division plane orientation based on tensile stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Louveaux, Marion; Julien, Jean-Daniel; Mirabet, Vincent; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2016-07-26

    Cell geometry has long been proposed to play a key role in the orientation of symmetric cell division planes. In particular, the recently proposed Besson-Dumais rule generalizes Errera's rule and predicts that cells divide along one of the local minima of plane area. However, this rule has been tested only on tissues with rather local spherical shape and homogeneous growth. Here, we tested the application of the Besson-Dumais rule to the divisions occurring in the Arabidopsis shoot apex, which contains domains with anisotropic curvature and differential growth. We found that the Besson-Dumais rule works well in the central part of the apex, but fails to account for cell division planes in the saddle-shaped boundary region. Because curvature anisotropy and differential growth prescribe directional tensile stress in that region, we tested the putative contribution of anisotropic stress fields to cell division plane orientation at the shoot apex. To do so, we compared two division rules: geometrical (new plane along the shortest path) and mechanical (new plane along maximal tension). The mechanical division rule reproduced the enrichment of long planes observed in the boundary region. Experimental perturbation of mechanical stress pattern further supported a contribution of anisotropic tensile stress in division plane orientation. Importantly, simulations of tissues growing in an isotropic stress field, and dividing along maximal tension, provided division plane distributions comparable to those obtained with the geometrical rule. We thus propose that division plane orientation by tensile stress offers a general rule for symmetric cell division in plants. PMID:27436908

  2. Cell division plane orientation based on tensile stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Louveaux, Marion; Julien, Jean-Daniel; Mirabet, Vincent; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cell geometry has long been proposed to play a key role in the orientation of symmetric cell division planes. In particular, the recently proposed Besson–Dumais rule generalizes Errera’s rule and predicts that cells divide along one of the local minima of plane area. However, this rule has been tested only on tissues with rather local spherical shape and homogeneous growth. Here, we tested the application of the Besson–Dumais rule to the divisions occurring in the Arabidopsis shoot apex, which contains domains with anisotropic curvature and differential growth. We found that the Besson–Dumais rule works well in the central part of the apex, but fails to account for cell division planes in the saddle-shaped boundary region. Because curvature anisotropy and differential growth prescribe directional tensile stress in that region, we tested the putative contribution of anisotropic stress fields to cell division plane orientation at the shoot apex. To do so, we compared two division rules: geometrical (new plane along the shortest path) and mechanical (new plane along maximal tension). The mechanical division rule reproduced the enrichment of long planes observed in the boundary region. Experimental perturbation of mechanical stress pattern further supported a contribution of anisotropic tensile stress in division plane orientation. Importantly, simulations of tissues growing in an isotropic stress field, and dividing along maximal tension, provided division plane distributions comparable to those obtained with the geometrical rule. We thus propose that division plane orientation by tensile stress offers a general rule for symmetric cell division in plants. PMID:27436908

  3. Regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana red pap1-D cells metabolically programmed by auxins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong; Shi, Ming-Zhu; Xie, De-Yu

    2014-04-01

    Red pap1-D cells of Arabidopsis thaliana have been cloned from production of anthocyanin pigmentation 1-Dominant (pap1-D) plants. The red cells are metabolically programmed to produce high levels of anthocyanins by a WD40-bHLH-MYB complex that is composed of the TTG1, TT8/GL3 and PAP1 transcription factors. Here, we report that indole 3-acetic acid (IAA), naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) regulate anthocyanin biosynthesis in these red cells. Seven concentrations (0, 0.2, 0.4, 2.2, 9, 18 and 27 μM) were tested for the three auxins. IAA and 2,4-D at 2.2-27 μM reduced anthocyanin levels. NAA at 0-0.2 μM or above 9 μM also decreased anthocyanin levels, but from 0.4 to 9 μM, it increased them. HPLC-ESI-MS analysis identified seven cyanin molecules that were produced in red pap1-D cells, and their levels were affected by auxins. The expression levels of ten genes, including six transcription factors (TTG1, EGL3, MYBL2, TT8, GL3 and PAP1) and four pathway genes (PAL1, CHS, DFR and ANS) involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis were analyzed upon various auxin treatments. The resulting data showed that 2,4-D, NAA and IAA control anthocyanin biosynthesis by regulating the expression of TT8, GL3 and PAP1 as well as genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway, such as DFR and ANS. In addition, the expression of MYBL2, PAL1 and CHS in red pap1-D and wild-type cells differentially respond to the three auxins. Our data demonstrate that the three auxins regulate anthocyanin biosynthesis in metabolically programmed red cells via altering the expression of transcription factor genes and pathway genes. PMID:24370633

  4. Live cell imaging of FM4-64, a tool for tracing the endocytic pathways in Arabidopsis root cells.

    PubMed

    Rigal, Adeline; Doyle, Siamsa M; Robert, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Confocal live imaging of the amphiphilic styryl dye FM4-64 is a valuable technique to monitor organelle dynamics and in particular endocytic pathways. After application in plants, FM4-64 immediately stains the plasma membrane and is then integrated on vesicles following endomembrane system-dependent internalization processes. Over time, FM4-64 becomes distributed throughout the full vesicular network from the plasma membrane to the vacuole, including the components of the secretory pathways. Here we provide succinct examples of the many important developmental processes in plants that rely on endocytosis and describe two suitable methods to trace the endocytic pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana root cells based on the uptake of FM4-64. PMID:25408447

  5. Boron deficiency inhibits root cell elongation via an ethylene/auxin/ROS-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan J.; Martín-Rejano, Esperanza M.; Herrera-Rodríguez, M. Begoña; Navarro-Gochicoa, M. Teresa; Rexach, Jesús; González-Fontes, Agustín

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest symptoms of boron (B) deficiency is the inhibition of root elongation which can reasonably be attributed to the damaging effects of B deprivation on cell wall integrity. It is shown here that exposure of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to B deficiency for 4h led to a drastic inhibition of root cell length in the transition between the elongation and differentiation zones. To investigate the possible mediation of ethylene, auxin, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the effect of B deficiency on root cell elongation, B deficiency was applied together with aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, a chemical inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis), silver ions (Ag+, an antagonist of ethylene perception), α-(phenylethyl-2‐oxo)‐indoleacetic acid (PEO-IAA, a synthetic antagonist of TIR1 receptor function), and diphenylene iodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of ROS production). Interestingly, all these chemicals partially or fully restored cell elongation in B-deficient roots. To further explore the possible role of ethylene and auxin in the inhibition of root cell elongation under B deficiency, a genetic approach was performed by using Arabidopsis mutants defective in the ethylene (ein2‐1) or auxin (eir1-4 and aux1-22) response. Root cell elongation in these mutants was less sensitive to B-deficient treatment than that in wild-type plants. Altogether, these results demonstrated that a signalling pathway involving ethylene, auxin, and ROS participates in the reduction of root cell elongation when Arabidopsis seedlings are subjected to B deficiency. A similar signalling process has been described to reduce root elongation rapidly under various types of cell wall stress which supports the idea that this signalling pathway is triggered by the impaired cell wall integrity caused by B deficiency. PMID:25922480

  6. A Golgi and tonoplast localized S-acyl transferase is involved in cell expansion, cell division, vascular patterning and fertility in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Baoxiu; Doughty, James; Hooley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    S-acylation of eukaryotic proteins is the reversible attachment of palmitic or stearic acid to cysteine residues, catalysed by protein S-acyl transferases that share an Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif. Previous evidence suggests that in Arabidopsis S-acylation is involved in the control of cell size, polarity and the growth of pollen tubes and root hairs. Using a combination of yeast genetics, biochemistry, cell biology and loss of function genetics the roles of a member of the protein S-acyl transferase PAT family, AtPAT10 (At3g51390), have been explored. In keeping with its role as a PAT, AtPAT10 auto-S-acylates, and partially complements the yeast akr1 PAT mutant, and this requires Cys192 of the DHHC motif. In Arabidopsis AtPAT10 is localized in the Golgi stack, trans-Golgi network/early endosome and tonoplast. Loss-of-function mutants have a pleiotropic phenotype involving cell expansion and division, vascular patterning, and fertility that is rescued by wild-type AtPAT10 but not by catalytically inactive AtPAT10C192A. This supports the hypothesis that AtPAT10 is functionally independent of the other Arabidopsis PATs. Our findings demonstrate a growing importance of protein S-acylation in plants, and reveal a Golgi and tonoplast located S-acylation mechanism that affects a range of events during growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:23795888

  7. The role of Arabidopsis SCAR genes in ARP2-ARP3-dependent cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, Joachim F; Mutondo, Moola; Zimmermann, Ilona; Deeks, Michael J; Machesky, Laura M; Thomas, Philipp; Uhrig, Silke; Rambke, Claudia; Hussey, Patrick J; Hülskamp, Martin

    2007-03-01

    The actin-nucleating ARP2-ARP3 complex controls cell shape in plants in many different cell types. Its activity is controlled by a multimeric complex containing BRK1 (also known as HSPC300), NAP1, SRA1, ABI and SCAR/WAVE. In this study, we focus on the function of the five putative SCAR homologues in Arabidopsis and we provide biochemical evidence that AtSCAR2 can activate the ARP2-ARP3 complex in vitro. Among the single mutants, mutations in only AtSCAR2 result in a subtle or weak phenotype similar to ARP2, ARP3 and other ;distorted' mutants. Double-mutant analysis revealed a redundancy with AtSCAR4. Systematic application of the yeast two-hybrid system and Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) revealed a complex protein-interaction network between the ARP2-ARP3 complex and its genetically defined regulators. In addition to protein interactions known in other systems, we identified several new interactions, suggesting that SPIKE1 may be an integral component of the SCAR/WAVE complex and that SCAR proteins in plants might act as direct effectors of ROP GTPases. PMID:17267444

  8. Cell-free translation and purification of Arabidopsis thaliana regulator of G signaling 1 protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Makino, Shin-Ichi; Beebe, Emily T; Urano, Daisuke; Aceti, David J; Misenheimer, Tina M; Peters, Jonathan; Fox, Brian G; Jones, Alan M

    2016-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana Regulator of G protein Signalling 1 (AtRGS1) is a protein with a predicted N-terminal 7-transmembrane (7TM) domain and a C-terminal cytosolic RGS1 box domain. The RGS1 box domain exerts GTPase activation (GAP) activity on Gα (AtGPA1), a component of heterotrimeric G protein signaling in plants. AtRGS1 may perceive an exogenous agonist to regulate the steady-state levels of the active form of AtGPA1. It is uncertain if the full-length AtRGS1 protein exerts any atypical effects on Gα, nor has it been established exactly how AtRGS1 contributes to perception of an extracellular signal and transmits this response to a G-protein dependent signaling cascade. Further studies on full-length AtRGS1 have been inhibited due to the extreme low abundance of the endogenous AtRGS1 protein in plants and lack of a suitable heterologous system to express AtRGS1. Here, we describe methods to produce full-length AtRGS1 by cell-free synthesis into unilamellar liposomes and nanodiscs. The cell-free synthesized AtRGS1 exhibits GTPase activating activity on Gα and can be purified to a level suitable for biochemical analyses. PMID:27164033

  9. Trichome cell growth in Arabidopsis thaliana can be derepressed by mutations in at least five genes.

    PubMed Central

    Perazza, D; Herzog, M; Hülskamp, M; Brown, S; Dorne, A M; Bonneville, J M

    1999-01-01

    Leaf trichomes in Arabidopsis are unicellular epidermal hairs with a branched morphology. They undergo successive endoreduplication rounds early during cell morphogenesis. Mutations affecting trichome nuclear DNA content, such as triptychon or glabra3, alter trichome branching. We isolated new mutants with supernumerary trichome branches, which fall into three unlinked complementation groups: KAKTUS and the novel loci, POLYCHOME and RASTAFARI. They map to chromosomes IV, II, and V, respectively. The trichomes of these mutants presented an increased DNA content, although to a variable extent. The spindly-5 mutant, which displays a constitutive gibberellin response, also produces overbranched trichomes containing more nuclear DNA. We analyzed genetic interactions using double mutants and propose that two independent pathways, defined by SPINDLY and TRIPTYCHON, act to limit trichome growth. KAKTUS and POLYCHOME might have redundant actions mediating gibberellin control via SPINDLY. The overall leaf polysomaty was not notably affected by these mutations, suggesting that they affect the control of DNA synthesis in a tissue- or cell type-specific manner. Wild-type tetraploids also produce overbranched trichomes; they displayed a shifted polysomaty in trichomes and in the whole leaf, suggesting a developmental program controlling DNA increases via the counting of endoreduplication rounds. PMID:10224275

  10. Trichome cell growth in Arabidopsis thaliana can be derepressed by mutations in at least five genes.

    PubMed

    Perazza, D; Herzog, M; Hülskamp, M; Brown, S; Dorne, A M; Bonneville, J M

    1999-05-01

    Leaf trichomes in Arabidopsis are unicellular epidermal hairs with a branched morphology. They undergo successive endoreduplication rounds early during cell morphogenesis. Mutations affecting trichome nuclear DNA content, such as triptychon or glabra3, alter trichome branching. We isolated new mutants with supernumerary trichome branches, which fall into three unlinked complementation groups: KAKTUS and the novel loci, POLYCHOME and RASTAFARI. They map to chromosomes IV, II, and V, respectively. The trichomes of these mutants presented an increased DNA content, although to a variable extent. The spindly-5 mutant, which displays a constitutive gibberellin response, also produces overbranched trichomes containing more nuclear DNA. We analyzed genetic interactions using double mutants and propose that two independent pathways, defined by SPINDLY and TRIPTYCHON, act to limit trichome growth. KAKTUS and POLYCHOME might have redundant actions mediating gibberellin control via SPINDLY. The overall leaf polysomaty was not notably affected by these mutations, suggesting that they affect the control of DNA synthesis in a tissue- or cell type-specific manner. Wild-type tetraploids also produce overbranched trichomes; they displayed a shifted polysomaty in trichomes and in the whole leaf, suggesting a developmental program controlling DNA increases via the counting of endoreduplication rounds. PMID:10224275

  11. Host-induced bacterial cell wall decomposition mediates pattern-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaokun; Grabherr, Heini M; Willmann, Roland; Kolb, Dagmar; Brunner, Frédéric; Bertsche, Ute; Kühner, Daniel; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Amin, Bushra; Felix, Georg; Ongena, Marc; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Gust, Andrea A

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycans (PGNs) are immunogenic bacterial surface patterns that trigger immune activation in metazoans and plants. It is generally unknown how complex bacterial structures such as PGNs are perceived by plant pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and whether host hydrolytic activities facilitate decomposition of bacterial matrices and generation of soluble PRR ligands. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana, upon bacterial infection or exposure to microbial patterns, produces a metazoan lysozyme-like hydrolase (lysozyme 1, LYS1). LYS1 activity releases soluble PGN fragments from insoluble bacterial cell walls and cleavage products are able to trigger responses typically associated with plant immunity. Importantly, LYS1 mutant genotypes exhibit super-susceptibility to bacterial infections similar to that observed on PGN receptor mutants. We propose that plants employ hydrolytic activities for the decomposition of complex bacterial structures, and that soluble pattern generation might aid PRR-mediated immune activation in cell layers adjacent to infection sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01990.001 PMID:24957336

  12. Arabidopsis synaptotagmin 1 is required for the maintenance of plasma membrane integrity and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Schapire, Arnaldo L; Voigt, Boris; Jasik, Jan; Rosado, Abel; Lopez-Cobollo, Rosa; Menzel, Diedrik; Salinas, Julio; Mancuso, Stefano; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Baluska, Frantisek; Botella, Miguel A

    2008-12-01

    Plasma membrane repair in animal cells uses synaptotagmin 7, a Ca(2+)-activated membrane fusion protein that mediates delivery of intracellular membranes to wound sites by a mechanism resembling neuronal Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis. Here, we show that loss of function of the homologous Arabidopsis thaliana Synaptotagmin 1 protein (SYT1) reduces the viability of cells as a consequence of a decrease in the integrity of the plasma membrane. This reduced integrity is enhanced in the syt1-2 null mutant in conditions of osmotic stress likely caused by a defective plasma membrane repair. Consistent with a role in plasma membrane repair, SYT1 is ubiquitously expressed, is located at the plasma membrane, and shares all domains characteristic of animal synaptotagmins (i.e., an N terminus-transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic region containing two C2 domains with phospholipid binding activities). Our analyses support that membrane trafficking mediated by SYT1 is important for plasma membrane integrity and plant fitness. PMID:19088329

  13. A subgroup of MATE transporter genes regulates hypocotyl cell elongation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Xiayan; Liang, Shuang; Ge, Qing; Li, Yuanfeng; Shao, Jingxia; Qi, Yafei; An, Lijun; Yu, Fei

    2015-10-01

    The growth of higher plants is under complex regulation to ensure the elaboration of developmental programmes under a changing environment. To dissect these regulatory circuits, we carried out genetic screens for Arabidopsis abnormal shoot (abs) mutants with altered shoot development. Here, we report the isolation of two dominant mutants, abs3-1D and abs4-1D, through activation tagging. Both mutants showed a 'bushy' loss of apical dominance phenotype. ABS3 and ABS4 code for two closely related putative Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) family of efflux transporters, respectively. ABS3 and ABS4, as well as two related MATE genes, ABS3-Like1 (ABS3L1) and ABS3L2, showed diverse tissue expression profiles but their gene products all localized to the late endosome/prevacuole (LE/PVC) compartment. The over-expression of these four genes individually led to the inhibition of hypocotyl cell elongation in the light. On the other hand, the quadruple knockout mutant (mateq) showed the opposite phenotype of an enhanced hypocotyl cell elongation in the light. Hypocotyl cell elongation and de-etiolation processes in the dark were also affected by the mutations of these genes. Exogenously applied sucrose attenuated the inhibition of hypocotyl elongation caused by abs3-1D and abs4-1D in the dark, and enhanced the hypocotyl elongation of mateq under prolonged dark treatment. We determined that ABS3 genetically interacts with the photoreceptor gene PHYTOCHROME B (PHYB). Our results demonstrate that ABS3 and related MATE family transporters are potential negative regulators of hypocotyl cell elongation and support a functional link between the endomembrane system, particularly the LE/PVC, and the regulation of plant cell elongation. PMID:26160579

  14. Arabidopsis thaliana RALF1 opposes brassinosteroid effects on root cell elongation and lateral root formation

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid alkalinization factor (RALF) is a peptide signal that plays a basic role in cell biology and most likely regulates cell expansion. In this study, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines with high and low levels of AtRALF1 transcripts were used to investigate this peptide’s mechanism of action. Overexpression of the root-specific isoform AtRALF1 resulted in reduced cell size. Conversely, AtRALF1 silencing increased root length by increasing the size of root cells. AtRALF1-silenced plants also showed an increase in the number of lateral roots, whereas AtRALF1 overexpression produced the opposite effect. In addition, four AtRALF1-inducible genes were identified: two genes encoding proline-rich proteins (AtPRP1 and AtPRP3), one encoding a hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (AtHRPG2), and one encoding a xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (TCH4). These genes were expressed in roots and involved in cell-wall rearrangement, and their induction was concentration dependent. Furthermore, AtRALF1-overexpressing plants were less sensitive to exogenous brassinolide (BL); upon BL treatment, the plants showed no increase in root length and a compromised increase in hypocotyl elongation. In addition, the treatment had no effect on the number of emerged lateral roots. AtRALF1 also induces two brassinosteroid (BR)-downregulated genes involved in the BR biosynthetic pathway: the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHISM AND DWARFISM (CPD) and DWARF4 (DWF4). Simultaneous treatment with both AtRALF1 and BL caused a reduction in AtRALF1-inducible gene expression levels, suggesting that these signals may compete for components shared by both pathways. Taken together, these results indicate an opposing effect of AtRALF1 and BL, and suggest that RALF’s mechanism of action could be to interfere with the BR signalling pathway. PMID:24620000

  15. The Arabidopsis Receptor Kinase ZAR1 Is Required for Zygote Asymmetric Division and Its Daughter Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian-Ying; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Jia, Peng-Fei; Tang, Jun; Li, Hong-Ju; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2016-03-01

    Asymmetric division of zygote is critical for pattern formation during early embryogenesis in plants and animals. It requires integration of the intrinsic and extrinsic cues prior to and/or after fertilization. How these cues are translated into developmental signals is poorly understood. Here through genetic screen for mutations affecting early embryogenesis, we identified an Arabidopsis mutant, zygotic arrest 1 (zar1), in which zygote asymmetric division and the cell fate of its daughter cells were impaired. ZAR1 encodes a member of the RLK/Pelle kinase family. We demonstrated that ZAR1 physically interacts with Calmodulin and the heterotrimeric G protein Gβ, and ZAR1 kinase is activated by their binding as well. ZAR1 is specifically expressed micropylarly in the embryo sac at eight-nucleate stage and then in central cell, egg cell and synergids in the mature embryo sac. After fertilization, ZAR1 is accumulated in zygote and endosperm. The disruption of ZAR1 and AGB1 results in short basal cell and an apical cell with basal cell fate. These data suggest that ZAR1 functions as a membrane integrator for extrinsic cues, Ca2+ signal and G protein signaling to regulate the division of zygote and the cell fate of its daughter cells in Arabidopsis. PMID:27014878

  16. The Arabidopsis Receptor Kinase ZAR1 Is Required for Zygote Asymmetric Division and Its Daughter Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Peng-Fei; Tang, Jun; Li, Hong-Ju; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric division of zygote is critical for pattern formation during early embryogenesis in plants and animals. It requires integration of the intrinsic and extrinsic cues prior to and/or after fertilization. How these cues are translated into developmental signals is poorly understood. Here through genetic screen for mutations affecting early embryogenesis, we identified an Arabidopsis mutant, zygotic arrest 1 (zar1), in which zygote asymmetric division and the cell fate of its daughter cells were impaired. ZAR1 encodes a member of the RLK/Pelle kinase family. We demonstrated that ZAR1 physically interacts with Calmodulin and the heterotrimeric G protein Gβ, and ZAR1 kinase is activated by their binding as well. ZAR1 is specifically expressed micropylarly in the embryo sac at eight-nucleate stage and then in central cell, egg cell and synergids in the mature embryo sac. After fertilization, ZAR1 is accumulated in zygote and endosperm. The disruption of ZAR1 and AGB1 results in short basal cell and an apical cell with basal cell fate. These data suggest that ZAR1 functions as a membrane integrator for extrinsic cues, Ca2+ signal and G protein signaling to regulate the division of zygote and the cell fate of its daughter cells in Arabidopsis. PMID:27014878

  17. Demethylesterification of Cell Wall Pectins in Arabidopsis Plays a Role in Seed Germination1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Kerstin; Levesque-Tremblay, Gabriel; Bartels, Sebastian; Weitbrecht, Karin; Wormit, Alexandra; Usadel, Bjoern; Haughn, George; Kermode, Allison R.

    2013-01-01

    The methylesterification status of cell wall homogalacturonans, mediated through the action of pectin methylesterases (PMEs), influences the biophysical properties of plant cell walls such as elasticity and porosity, important parameters for cell elongation and water uptake. The completion of seed germination requires cell wall extensibility changes in both the radicle itself and in the micropylar tissues surrounding the radicle. In wild-type seeds of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), PME activities peaked around the time of testa rupture but declined just before the completion of germination (endosperm weakening and rupture). We overexpressed an Arabidopsis PME inhibitor to investigate PME involvement in seed germination. Seeds of the resultant lines showed a denser methylesterification status of their cell wall homogalacturonans, but there were no changes in the neutral sugar and uronic acid composition of the cell walls. As compared with wild-type seeds, the PME activities of the overexpressing lines were greatly reduced throughout germination, and the low steady-state levels neither increased nor decreased. The most striking phenotype was a significantly faster rate of germination, which was not connected to altered testa rupture morphology but to alterations of the micropylar endosperm cells, evident by environmental scanning electron microscopy. The transgenic seeds also exhibited an apparent reduced sensitivity to abscisic acid with respect to its inhibitory effects on germination. We speculate that PME activity contributes to the temporal regulation of radicle emergence in endospermic seeds by altering the mechanical properties of the cell walls and thereby the balance between the two opposing forces of radicle elongation and mechanical resistance of the endosperm. PMID:23129203

  18. Identification of nuclear target proteins for S-nitrosylation in pathogen-treated Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Mounira; Shekariesfahlan, Azam; Ageeva, Alexandra; Mengel, Alexander; von Toerne, Christine; Durner, Jörg; Lindermayr, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a significant signalling molecule involved in the regulation of many different physiological processes in plants. One of the most imperative regulatory modes of action of NO is protein S-nitrosylation--the covalent attachment of an NO group to the sulfur atom of cysteine residues. In this study, we focus on S-nitrosylation of Arabidopsis nuclear proteins after pathogen infection. After treatment of Arabidopsis suspension cell cultures with pathogens, nuclear proteins were extracted and treated with the S-nitrosylating agent S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). A biotin switch assay was performed and biotin-labelled proteins were purified by neutravidin affinity chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. A total of 135 proteins were identified, whereas nuclear localization has been described for 122 proteins of them. 117 of these proteins contain at least one cysteine residue. Most of the S-nitrosylated candidates were involved in protein and RNA metabolism, stress response, and cell organization and division. Interestingly, two plant-specific histone deacetylases were identified suggesting that nitric oxide regulated epigenetic processes in plants. In sum, this work provides a new collection of targets for protein S-nitrosylation in Arabidopsis and gives insight into the regulatory function of NO in the nucleus during plant defense response. Moreover, our data extend the knowledge on the regulatory function of NO in events located in the nucleus. PMID:26259180

  19. Glycoside Hydrolase Activities in Cell Walls of Sclerenchyma Cells in the Inflorescence Stems of Arabidopsis thaliana Visualized in Situ.

    PubMed

    Banasiak, Alicja; Ibatullin, Farid M; Brumer, Harry; Mellerowicz, Ewa J

    2014-01-01

    Techniques for in situ localization of gene products provide indispensable information for understanding biological function. In the case of enzymes, biological function is directly related to activity, and therefore, knowledge of activity patterns is central to understanding the molecular controls of plant development. We have previously developed a novel type of fluorogenic substrate for revealing glycoside hydrolase activity in planta, based on resorufin β-glycosides Here, we explore a wider range of such substrates to visualize glycoside hydrolase activities in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems in real time, especially highlighting distinct distribution patterns of these activities in the secondary cell walls of sclerenchyma cells. The results demonstrate that β-1,4-glucosidase, β-1,4-glucanase and β-1,4-galactosidase activities accompany secondary wall deposition. In contrast, xyloglucanase activity follows a different pattern, with the highest signal observed in mature cells, concentrated in the middle lamella. These data further the understanding of the process of cell wall deposition and function in sclerenchymatic tissues of plants. PMID:27135517

  20. A Genetic Screen for Mutations Affecting Cell Division in the Arabidopsis thaliana Embryo Identifies Seven Loci Required for Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Gillmor, C. Stewart; Roeder, Adrienne H. K.; Sieber, Patrick; Somerville, Chris; Lukowitz, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in plants involves the formation of unique cellular structures such as the phragmoplast and the cell plate, both of which are required to divide the cell after nuclear division. In order to isolate genes that are involved in de novo cell wall formation, we performed a large-scale, microscope-based screen for Arabidopsis mutants that severely impair cytokinesis in the embryo. We recovered 35 mutations that form abnormally enlarged cells with multiple, often polyploid nuclei and incomplete cell walls. These mutants represent seven genes, four of which have previously been implicated in phragmoplast or cell plate function. Mutations in two loci show strongly reduced transmission through the haploid gametophytic generation. Molecular cloning of both corresponding genes reveals that one is represented by hypomorphic alleles of the kinesin-5 gene RADIALLY SWOLLEN 7 (homologous to tobacco kinesin-related protein TKRP125), and that the other gene corresponds to the Arabidopsis FUSED ortholog TWO-IN-ONE (originally identified based on its function in pollen development). No mutations that completely abolish the formation of cross walls in diploid cells were found. Our results support the idea that cytokinesis in the diploid and haploid generations involve similar mechanisms. PMID:26745275

  1. The Control of Arabidopsis thaliana Growth by Cell Proliferation and Endoreplication Requires the F-Box Protein FBL17[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Marrocco, Katia; Masoud, Kinda; Thomann, Alexis; Gusti, Andi; Bitrian, Marta; Schnittger, Arp; Genschik, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    A key step of the cell cycle is the entry into the DNA replication phase that typically commits cells to divide. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating this transition in plants. Here, we investigated the function of FBL17 (F BOX-LIKE17), an Arabidopsis thaliana F-box protein previously shown to govern the progression through the second mitosis during pollen development. Our work reveals that FBL17 function is not restricted to gametogenesis. FBL17 transcripts accumulate in both proliferating and postmitotic cell types of Arabidopsis plants. Loss of FBL17 function drastically reduces plant growth by altering cell division activity in both shoot and root apical meristems. In fbl17 mutant plants, DNA replication is severely impaired and endoreplication is fully suppressed. At the molecular level, lack of FBL17 increases the stability of the CDK (CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE) inhibitor KIP-RELATED PROTEIN2 known to switch off CDKA;1 kinase activity. Despite the strong inhibition of cell proliferation in fbl17, some cells are still able to enter S phase and eventually to divide, but they exhibit a strong DNA damage response and often missegregate chromosomes. Altogether, these data indicate that the F-box protein FBL17 acts as a master cell cycle regulator during the diploid sporophyte phase of the plant. PMID:25944099

  2. Polarized localization and borate-dependent degradation of the Arabidopsis borate transporter BOR1 in tobacco BY-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In Arabidopsis the borate transporter BOR1, which is located in the plasma membrane, is degraded in the presence of excess boron by an endocytosis-mediated mechanism. A similar mechanism was suggested in rice as excess boron decreased rice borate transporter levels, although in this case whether the decrease was dependent on an increase in degradation or a decrease in protein synthesis was not elucidated. To address whether the borate-dependent degradation mechanism is conserved among plant cells, we analyzed the fate of GFP-tagged BOR1 (BOR1-GFP) in transformed tobacco BY-2 cells. Cells expressing BOR1-GFP displayed GFP fluorescence at the plasma membrane, especially at the membrane between two attached cells. The plasma membrane signal was abolished when cells were incubated in medium with a high concentration of borate (3 to 5 mM). This decrease in BOR1-GFP signal was mediated by a specific degradation of the protein after internalization by endocytosis from the plasma membrane. Pharmacological analysis indicated that the decrease in BOR1-GFP largely depends on the increase in degradation rate and that the degradation was mediated by a tyrosine-motif and the actin cytoskeleton. Tyr mutants of BOR1-GFP, which has been shown to inhibit borate-dependent degradation in Arabidopsis root cells, did not show borate-dependent endocytosis in tobacco BY-2 cells. These findings indicate that the borate-dependent degradation machinery of the borate transporter is conserved among plant species. PMID:24715955

  3. N(6)-Methyladenosine RNA Modification Regulates Shoot Stem Cell Fate in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lisha; Liang, Zhe; Gu, Xiaofeng; Chen, Ying; Teo, Zhi Wei Norman; Hou, Xingliang; Cai, Weiling Maggie; Dedon, Peter C; Liu, Lu; Yu, Hao

    2016-07-25

    N(6)-Methyladenosine (m(6)A) represents the most prevalent internal modification on mRNA and requires a multicomponent m(6)A methyltransferase complex in mammals. How their plant counterparts determine the global m(6)A modification landscape and its molecular link to plant development remain unknown. Here we show that FKBP12 INTERACTING PROTEIN 37 KD (FIP37) is a core component of the m(6)A methyltransferase complex, which underlies control of shoot stem cell fate in Arabidopsis. The mutants lacking FIP37 exhibit massive overproliferation of shoot meristems and a transcriptome-wide loss of m(6)A RNA modifications. We further demonstrate that FIP37 mediates m(6)A RNA modification on key shoot meristem genes inversely correlated with their mRNA stability, thus confining their transcript levels to prevent shoot meristem overproliferation. Our results suggest an indispensable role of FIP37 in mediating m(6)A mRNA modification, which is required for maintaining the shoot meristem as a renewable source for continuously producing all aerial organs in plants. PMID:27396363

  4. The Arabidopsis EDR1 Protein Kinase Negatively Regulates the ATL1 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase to Suppress Cell Death[W

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Irene; Gu, Yangnan; Qi, Dong; Dubiella, Ullrich

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis thaliana ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1) gene confer enhanced programmed cell death under a variety of abiotic and biotic stress conditions. All edr1 mutant phenotypes can be suppressed by missense mutations in the KEEP ON GOING gene, which encodes a trans-Golgi network/early endosome (TGN/EE)-localized E3 ubiquitin ligase. Here, we report that EDR1 interacts with a second E3 ubiquitin ligase, ARABIDOPSIS TOXICOS EN LEVADURA1 (ATL1), and negatively regulates its activity. Overexpression of ATL1 in transgenic Arabidopsis induced severe growth inhibition and patches of cell death, while transient overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves induced cell death and tissue collapse. The E3 ligase activity of ATL1 was required for both of these processes. Importantly, we found that ATL1 interacts with EDR1 on TGN/EE vesicles and that EDR1 suppresses ATL1-mediated cell death in N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis. Lastly, knockdown of ATL1 expression suppressed cell death phenotypes associated with the edr1 mutant and made Arabidopsis hypersusceptible to powdery mildew infection. Taken together, our data indicate that ATL1 is a positive regulator of programmed cell death and EDR1 negatively regulates ATL1 activity at the TGN/EE and thus controls stress responses initiated by ATL1-mediated ubiquitination events. PMID:25398498

  5. Verticillium longisporum infection affects the leaf apoplastic proteome, metabolome, and cell wall properties in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Floerl, Saskia; Majcherczyk, Andrzej; Possienke, Mareike; Feussner, Kirstin; Tappe, Hella; Gatz, Christiane; Feussner, Ivo; Kües, Ursula; Polle, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Verticillium longisporum (VL) is one of the most devastating diseases in important oil crops from the family of Brassicaceae. The fungus resides for much time of its life cycle in the extracellular fluid of the vascular system, where it cannot be controlled by conventional fungicides. To obtain insights into the biology of VL-plant interaction in the apoplast, the secretome consisting of the extracellular proteome and metabolome as well as cell wall properties were studied in the model Brassicaceae, Arabidopsis thaliana. VL infection resulted in increased production of cell wall material with an altered composition of carbohydrate polymers and increased lignification. The abundance of several hundred soluble metabolites changed in the apoplast of VL-infected plants including signalling and defence compounds such as glycosides of salicylic acid, lignans and dihydroxybenzoic acid as well as oxylipins. The extracellular proteome of healthy leaves was enriched in antifungal proteins. VL caused specific increases in six apoplast proteins (three peroxidases PRX52, PRX34, P37, serine carboxypeptidase SCPL20, α-galactosidase AGAL2 and a germin-like protein GLP3), which have functions in defence and cell wall modification. The abundance of a lectin-like, chitin-inducible protein (CILLP) was reduced. Since the transcript levels of most of the induced proteins were not elevated until late infection time points (>20 dpi), whereas those of CILLP and GLP3 were reduced at earlier time points, our results may suggest that VL enhances its virulence by rapid down-regulation and delay of induction of plant defence genes. PMID:22363647

  6. Allocation of Heme Is Differentially Regulated by Ferrochelatase Isoforms in Arabidopsis Cells

    PubMed Central

    Espinas, Nino A.; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sato, Yasushi; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Takahashi, Kaori; Tanaka, Ryouichi; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2016-01-01

    Heme is involved in various biological processes as a cofactor of hemoproteins located in various organelles. In plant cells, heme is synthesized by two isoforms of plastid-localized ferrochelatase, FC1 and FC2. In this study, by characterizing Arabidopsis T-DNA insertional mutants, we showed that the allocation of heme is differentially regulated by ferrochelatase isoforms in plant cells. Analyses of weak (fc1-1) and null (fc1-2) mutants suggest that FC1-producing heme is required for initial growth of seedling development. In contrast, weak (fc2-1) and null (fc2-2) mutants of FC2 showed pale green leaves and retarded growth, indicating that FC2-producing heme is necessary for chloroplast development. During the initial growth stage, FC2 deficiency caused reduction of plastid cytochromes. In addition, although FC2 deficiency marginally affected the assembly of photosynthetic reaction center complexes, it caused relatively larger but insufficient light-harvesting antenna to reaction centers, resulting in lower efficiency of photosynthesis. In the later vegetative growth, however, fc2-2 recovered photosynthetic growth, showing that FC1-producing heme may complement the FC2 deficiency. On the other hand, reduced level of cytochromes in microsomal fraction was discovered in fc1-1, suggesting that FC1-producing heme is mainly allocated to extraplastidic organelles. Furthermore, the expression of FC1 is induced by the treatment of an elicitor flg22 while that of FC2 was reduced, and fc1-1 abolished the flg22-dependent induction of FC1 expression and peroxidase activity. Consequently, our results clarified that FC2 produces heme for the photosynthetic machinery in the chloroplast, while FC1 is the housekeeping enzyme providing heme cofactor to the entire cell. In addition, FC1 can partly complement FC2 deficiency and is also involved in defense against stressful conditions.

  7. Verticillium longisporum Infection Affects the Leaf Apoplastic Proteome, Metabolome, and Cell Wall Properties in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Floerl, Saskia; Majcherczyk, Andrzej; Possienke, Mareike; Feussner, Kirstin; Tappe, Hella; Gatz, Christiane; Feussner, Ivo; Kües, Ursula; Polle, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Verticillium longisporum (VL) is one of the most devastating diseases in important oil crops from the family of Brassicaceae. The fungus resides for much time of its life cycle in the extracellular fluid of the vascular system, where it cannot be controlled by conventional fungicides. To obtain insights into the biology of VL-plant interaction in the apoplast, the secretome consisting of the extracellular proteome and metabolome as well as cell wall properties were studied in the model Brassicaceae, Arabidopsis thaliana. VL infection resulted in increased production of cell wall material with an altered composition of carbohydrate polymers and increased lignification. The abundance of several hundred soluble metabolites changed in the apoplast of VL-infected plants including signalling and defence compounds such as glycosides of salicylic acid, lignans and dihydroxybenzoic acid as well as oxylipins. The extracellular proteome of healthy leaves was enriched in antifungal proteins. VL caused specific increases in six apoplast proteins (three peroxidases PRX52, PRX34, P37, serine carboxypeptidase SCPL20, α-galactosidase AGAL2 and a germin-like protein GLP3), which have functions in defence and cell wall modification. The abundance of a lectin-like, chitin-inducible protein (CILLP) was reduced. Since the transcript levels of most of the induced proteins were not elevated until late infection time points (>20 dpi), whereas those of CILLP and GLP3 were reduced at earlier time points, our results may suggest that VL enhances its virulence by rapid down-regulation and delay of induction of plant defence genes. PMID:22363647

  8. Expression analysis of Arabidopsis vacuolar sorting receptor 3 reveals a putative function in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Avila, Emily L; Brown, Michelle; Pan, Songqin; Desikan, Radhika; Neill, Steven J; Girke, Thomas; Surpin, Marci; Raikhel, Natasha V

    2008-01-01

    Vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) are responsible for the proper targeting of soluble cargo proteins to their destination compartments. The Arabidopsis genome encodes seven VSRs. In this work, the spatio-temporal expression of one of the members of this gene family, AtVSR3, was determined by RT-PCR and promoter::reporter gene fusions. AtVSR3 was expressed specifically in guard cells. Consequently, a reverse genetics approach was taken to determine the function of AtVSR3 by using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Plants expressing little or no AtVSR3 transcript had a compressed life cycle, bolting approximately 1 week earlier and senescing up to 2 weeks earlier than the wild-type parent line. While the development and distribution of stomata in AtVSR3 RNAi plants appeared normal, stomatal function was altered. The guard cells of mutant plants did not close in response to abscisic acid treatment, and the mean leaf temperatures of the RNAi plants were on average 0.8 degrees C lower than both wild type and another vacuolar sorting receptor mutant, atvsr1-1. Furthermore, the loss of AtVSR3 protein caused the accumulation of nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide, signalling molecules implicated in the regulation of stomatal opening and closing. Finally, proteomics and western blot analyses of cellular proteins isolated from wild-type and AtVSR3 RNAi leaves showed that phospholipase Dgamma, which may play a role in abscisic acid signalling, accumulated to higher levels in AtVSR3 RNAi guard cells. Thus, AtVSR3 may play an important role in responses to plant stress. PMID:18436547

  9. Analysis of Cell Division and Elongation Underlying the Developmental Acceleration of Root Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Beemster, Gerrit T.S.; Baskin, Tobias I.

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the relation between cell division and expansion in the regulation of organ growth rate, we used Arabidopsis thaliana primary roots grown vertically at 20°C with an elongation rate that increased steadily during the first 14 d after germination. We measured spatial profiles of longitudinal velocity and cell length and calculated parameters of cell expansion and division, including rates of local cell production (cells mm−1 h−1) and cell division (cells cell−1 h−1). Data were obtained for the root cortex and also for the two types of epidermal cell, trichoblasts and atrichoblasts. Accelerating root elongation was caused by an increasingly longer growth zone, while maximal strain rates remained unchanged. The enlargement of the growth zone and, hence, the accelerating root elongation rate, were accompanied by a nearly proportionally increased cell production. This increased production was caused by increasingly numerous dividing cells, whereas their rates of division remained approximately constant. Additionally, the spatial profile of cell division rate was essentially constant. The meristem was longer than generally assumed, extending well into the region where cells elongated rapidly. In the two epidermal cell types, meristem length and cell division rate were both very similar to that of cortical cells, and differences in cell length between the two epidermal cell types originated at the apex of the meristem. These results highlight the importance of controlling the number of dividing cells, both to generate tissues with different cell lengths and to regulate the rate of organ enlargement. PMID:9536070

  10. Analysis of leaf development in fugu mutants of Arabidopsis reveals three compensation modes that modulate cell expansion in determinate organs.

    PubMed

    Ferjani, Ali; Horiguchi, Gorou; Yano, Satoshi; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2007-06-01

    In multicellular organisms, the coordination of cell proliferation and expansion is fundamental for proper organogenesis, yet the molecular mechanisms involved in this coordination are largely unexplored. In plant leaves, the existence of this coordination is suggested by compensation, in which a decrease in cell number triggers an increase in mature cell size. To elucidate the mechanisms of compensation, we isolated five new Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants (fugu1-fugu5) that exhibit compensation. These mutants were characterized together with angustifolia3 (an3), erecta (er), and a KIP-RELATED PROTEIN2 (KRP2) overexpressor, which were previously reported to exhibit compensation. Time-course analyses of leaf development revealed that enhanced cell expansion in fugu2-1, fugu5-1, an3-4, and er-102 mutants is induced postmitotically, indicating that cell enlargement is not caused by the uncoupling of cell division from cell growth. In each of the mutants, either the rate or duration of cell expansion was selectively enhanced. In contrast, we found that enhanced cell expansion in KRP2 overexpressor occurs during cell proliferation. We further demonstrated that enhanced cell expansion occurs in cotyledons with dynamics similar to that in leaves. In contrast, cell expansion was not enhanced in roots even though they exhibit decreased cell numbers. Thus, compensation was confirmed to occur preferentially in determinate organs. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that increases in ploidy level are not always required to trigger compensation, suggesting that compensation is only partially mediated by ploidy-dependent processes. Our results suggest that compensation reflects an organ-wide coordination of cell proliferation and expansion in determinate organs, and involves at least three different expansion pathways. PMID:17468216

  11. Cell-to-Cell Movement of Two Interacting AT-Hook Factors in Arabidopsis Root Vascular Tissue Patterning[W

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Wang, Xu; Lee, Jung-Youn; Lee, Ji-Young

    2013-01-01

    The xylem and phloem, major conducting and supporting tissues in vascular plants, are established by cell division and cell-type specification in the procambium/cambium. The organization of the xylem, phloem, and procambium/cambium is tightly controlled. However, the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we report the discovery of two transcription factors, AT-HOOK MOTIF NUCLEAR LOCALIZED PROTEIN 3 (AHL3) and AHL4, which regulate vascular tissue boundaries in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. In either of the knockout mutants of AHL3 and AHL4, encoding closely related AT-hook transcription factors, a misspecification of tissue boundaries between the xylem and procambium occurred and ectopic xylem developed in the procambium domain. In plants, specific types of transcription factors can serve as direct intercellular signals by moving from one cell to another, playing crucial roles in tissue patterning. Adding to this paradigm, AHL4 moves actively from the procambium to xylem in the root meristem to regulate the tissue boundaries. When the intercellular movement of AHL4 was impaired, AHL4 could not complement the xylem phenotype in the ahl4. Furthermore, AHL4 revealed unique characteristics in that it interacts with AHL3 in vivo and that this interaction facilitates their intercellular trafficking. Taken together, this study uncovered a novel mechanism in vascular tissue patterning that requires the intercellular trafficking of two interacting transcription factors. PMID:23335615

  12. Molecular Characterization of Arabidopsis GAL4/UAS Enhancer Trap Lines Identifies Novel Cell-Type-Specific Promoters1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Radoeva, Tatyana; Saiga, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    Cell-type-specific gene expression is essential to distinguish between the numerous cell types of multicellular organism. Therefore, cell-type-specific gene expression is tightly regulated and for most genes RNA transcription is the central point of control. Thus, transcriptional reporters are broadly used markers for cell identity. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a recognized standard for cell identities is a collection of GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines. Yet, while greatly used, very few of them have been molecularly characterized. Here, we have selected a set of 21 frequently used GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines for detailed characterization of expression pattern and genomic insertion position. We studied their embryonic and postembryonic expression domains and grouped them into three groups (early embryo development, late embryo development, and embryonic root apical meristem lines) based on their dominant expression. We show that some of the analyzed lines are expressed in a domain often broader than the one that is reported. Additionally, we present an overview of the location of the T-DNA inserts of all lines, with one exception. Finally, we demonstrate how the obtained information can be used for generating novel cell-type-specific marker lines and for genotyping enhancer trap lines. The knowledge could therefore support the extensive use of these valuable lines. PMID:27208300

  13. Nitric Oxide Is Involved in Cadmium-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis Suspension Cultures1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    De Michele, Roberto; Vurro, Emanuela; Rigo, Chiara; Costa, Alex; Elviri, Lisa; Di Valentin, Marilena; Careri, Maria; Zottini, Michela; Sanità di Toppi, Luigi; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to cadmium (Cd2+) can result in cell death, but the molecular mechanisms of Cd2+ cytotoxicity in plants are not fully understood. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell suspension cultures underwent a process of programmed cell death when exposed to 100 and 150 μm CdCl2 and that this process resembled an accelerated senescence, as suggested by the expression of the marker senescence-associated gene12 (SAG12). CdCl2 treatment was accompanied by a rapid increase in nitric oxide (NO) and phytochelatin synthesis, which continued to be high as long as cells remained viable. Hydrogen peroxide production was a later event and preceded the rise of cell death by about 24 h. Inhibition of NO synthesis by NG-monomethyl-arginine monoacetate resulted in partial prevention of hydrogen peroxide increase, SAG12 expression, and mortality, indicating that NO is actually required for Cd2+-induced cell death. NO also modulated the extent of phytochelatin content, and possibly their function, by S-nitrosylation. These results shed light on the signaling events controlling Cd2+ cytotoxicity in plants. PMID:19261736

  14. Xyloglucan Metabolism Differentially Impacts the Cell Wall Characteristics of the Endosperm and Embryo during Arabidopsis Seed Germination.

    PubMed

    Sechet, Julien; Frey, Anne; Effroy-Cuzzi, Delphine; Berger, Adeline; Perreau, François; Cueff, Gwendal; Charif, Delphine; Rajjou, Loïc; Mouille, Grégory; North, Helen M; Marion-Poll, Annie

    2016-03-01

    Cell wall remodeling is an essential mechanism for the regulation of plant growth and architecture, and xyloglucans (XyGs), the major hemicellulose, are often considered as spacers of cellulose microfibrils during growth. In the seed, the activity of cell wall enzymes plays a critical role in germination by enabling embryo cell expansion leading to radicle protrusion, as well as endosperm weakening prior to its rupture. A screen for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants affected in the hormonal control of germination identified a mutant, xyl1, able to germinate on paclobutrazol, an inhibitor of gibberellin biosynthesis. This mutant also exhibited reduced dormancy and increased resistance to high temperature. The XYL1 locus encodes an α-xylosidase required for XyG maturation through the trimming of Xyl. The xyl1 mutant phenotypes were associated with modifications to endosperm cell wall composition that likely impact on its resistance, as further demonstrated by the restoration of normal germination characteristics by endosperm-specific XYL1 expression. The absence of phenotypes in mutants defective for other glycosidases, which trim Gal or Fuc, suggests that XYL1 plays the major role in this process. Finally, the decreased XyG abundance in hypocotyl longitudinal cell walls of germinating embryos indicates a potential role in cell wall loosening and anisotropic growth together with pectin de-methylesterification. PMID:26826221

  15. Molecular Characterization of Arabidopsis GAL4/UAS Enhancer Trap Lines Identifies Novel Cell-Type-Specific Promoters.

    PubMed

    Radoeva, Tatyana; Ten Hove, Colette A; Saiga, Shunsuke; Weijers, Dolf

    2016-06-01

    Cell-type-specific gene expression is essential to distinguish between the numerous cell types of multicellular organism. Therefore, cell-type-specific gene expression is tightly regulated and for most genes RNA transcription is the central point of control. Thus, transcriptional reporters are broadly used markers for cell identity. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a recognized standard for cell identities is a collection of GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines. Yet, while greatly used, very few of them have been molecularly characterized. Here, we have selected a set of 21 frequently used GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines for detailed characterization of expression pattern and genomic insertion position. We studied their embryonic and postembryonic expression domains and grouped them into three groups (early embryo development, late embryo development, and embryonic root apical meristem lines) based on their dominant expression. We show that some of the analyzed lines are expressed in a domain often broader than the one that is reported. Additionally, we present an overview of the location of the T-DNA inserts of all lines, with one exception. Finally, we demonstrate how the obtained information can be used for generating novel cell-type-specific marker lines and for genotyping enhancer trap lines. The knowledge could therefore support the extensive use of these valuable lines. PMID:27208300

  16. AtPDCD5 Plays a Role in Programmed Cell Death after UV-B Exposure in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Falcone Ferreyra, María Lorena; D’Andrea, Lucio; AbdElgawad, Hamada

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage responses have evolved to sense and react to DNA damage; the induction of DNA repair mechanisms can lead to genomic restoration or, if the damaged DNA cannot be adequately repaired, to the execution of a cell death program. In this work, we investigated the role of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protein, AtPDCD5, which is highly similar to the human PDCD5 protein; it is induced by ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation and participates in programmed cell death in the UV-B DNA damage response. Transgenic plants expressing AtPDCD5 fused to GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN indicate that AtPDCD5 is localized both in the nucleus and the cytosol. By use of pdcd5 mutants, we here demonstrate that these plants have an altered antioxidant metabolism and accumulate higher levels of DNA damage after UV-B exposure, similar to levels in ham1ham2 RNA interference transgenic lines with decreased expression of acetyltransferases from the MYST family. By coimmunoprecipitation and pull-down assays, we provide evidence that AtPDCD5 interacts with HAM proteins, suggesting that both proteins participate in the same pathway of DNA damage responses. Plants overexpressing AtPDCD5 show less DNA damage but more cell death in root tips upon UV-B exposure. Finally, we here show that AtPDCD5 also participates in age-induced programmed cell death. Together, the data presented here demonstrate that AtPDCD5 plays an important role during DNA damage responses induced by UV-B radiation in Arabidopsis and also participates in programmed cell death programs. PMID:26884483

  17. Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase Activation Is an Early Response to Salicylic Acid in Arabidopsis Suspension Cells1[W

    PubMed Central

    Krinke, Ondřej; Ruelland, Eric; Valentová, Olga; Vergnolle, Chantal; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Taconnat, Ludivine; Flemr, Matyáš; Burketová, Lenka; Zachowski, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has a central role in defense against pathogen attack. In addition, its role in such diverse processes as germination, flowering, senescence, and thermotolerance acquisition has been documented. However, little is known about the early signaling events triggered by SA. Using Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) suspension cells as a model, it was possible to show by in vivo metabolic phospholipid labeling with 33Pi that SA addition induced a rapid and early (in few minutes) decrease in a pool of phosphatidylinositol (PI). This decrease paralleled an increase in PI 4-phosphate and PI 4,5-bisphosphate. These changes could be inhibited by two different inhibitors of type III PI 4-kinases, phenylarsine oxide and 30 μm wortmannin; no inhibitory effect was seen with 1 μm wortmannin, a concentration inhibiting PI 3-kinases but not PI 4-kinases. We therefore undertook a study of the effects of wortmannin on SA-responsive transcriptomes. Using the Complete Arabidopsis Transcriptome MicroArray chip, we could identify 774 genes differentially expressed upon SA treatment. Strikingly, among these genes, the response to SA of 112 of them was inhibited by 30 μm wortmannin, but not by 1 μm wortmannin. PMID:17496105

  18. Glucosylceramides are critical for cell-type differentiation and organogenesis, but not for cell viability in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Msanne, Joseph; Chen, Ming; Luttgeharm, Kyle D; Bradley, Amanda M; Mays, Elizabeth S; Paper, Janet M; Boyle, Daniel L; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Schrick, Kathrin; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-10-01

    Glucosylceramides (GlcCer), glucose-conjugated sphingolipids, are major components of the endomembrane system and plasma membrane in most eukaryotic cells. Yet the quantitative significance and cellular functions of GlcCer are not well characterized in plants and other multi-organ eukaryotes. To address this, we examined Arabidopsis lines that were lacking or deficient in GlcCer by insertional disruption or by RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of the single gene for GlcCer synthase (GCS, At2g19880), the enzyme that catalyzes GlcCer synthesis. Null mutants for GCS (designated 'gcs-1') were viable as seedlings, albeit strongly reduced in size, and failed to develop beyond the seedling stage. Heterozygous plants harboring the insertion allele exhibited reduced transmission through the male gametophyte. Undifferentiated calli generated from gcs-1 seedlings and lacking GlcCer proliferated in a manner similar to calli from wild-type plants. However, gcs-1 calli, in contrast to wild-type calli, were unable to develop organs on differentiation media. Consistent with a role for GlcCer in organ-specific cell differentiation, calli from gcs-1 mutants formed roots and leaves on media supplemented with the glucosylated sphingosine glucopsychosine, which was readily converted to GlcCer independent of GCS. Underlying these phenotypes, gcs-1 cells had altered Golgi morphology and fewer cisternae per Golgi apparatus relative to wild-type cells, indicative of protein trafficking defects. Despite seedling lethality in the null mutant, GCS RNAi suppression lines with ≤2% of wild-type GlcCer levels were viable and fertile. Collectively, these results indicate that GlcCer are essential for cell-type differentiation and organogenesis, and plant cells produce amounts of GlcCer in excess of that required for normal development. PMID:26313010

  19. Possible pathways linking ploidy level to cell elongation and cuticular function in hypocotyls of dark-grown Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Narukawa, Hideki; Yokoyama, Ryusuke; Nishitani, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    abstract The mechanisms underlying correlations between ploidy level and cell size in eukaryotes remain unclear. Recently, we showed that cell length was higher in tetraploid than in diploid dark-grown Arabidopsis hypocotyls. Cuticular function was aberrant, and expression of genes of cuticle formation was reduced. Here, the links between cell elongation, cuticular function, and ploidy level in the etiolated hypocotyl were examined. Seedlings defective in cuticle formation exhibited shorter hypocotyls. This was due to inhibition of cell elongation rather than cell proliferation, indicating that the reduced cuticular function was a consequence of tetraploidy-induced cell elongation rather than its cause. Inhibition of hypocotyl elongation by impaired cuticles was lower in tetraploid than diploid, indicating that tetraploid hypocotyls were less sensitive to cuticular damage. PMID:26618780

  20. Early Transcriptional Defense Responses in Arabidopsis Cell Suspension Culture under High-Light Conditions1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    González-Pérez, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Jorge; García-García, Francisco; Osuna, Daniel; Dopazo, Joaquín; Lorenzo, Óscar; Revuelta, José L.; Arellano, Juan B.

    2011-01-01

    The early transcriptional defense responses and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell suspension culture (ACSC), containing functional chloroplasts, were examined at high light (HL). The transcriptional analysis revealed that most of the ROS markers identified among the 449 transcripts with significant differential expression were transcripts specifically up-regulated by singlet oxygen (1O2). On the contrary, minimal correlation was established with transcripts specifically up-regulated by superoxide radical or hydrogen peroxide. The transcriptional analysis was supported by fluorescence microscopy experiments. The incubation of ACSC with the 1O2 sensor green reagent and 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate showed that the 30-min-HL-treated cultures emitted fluorescence that corresponded with the production of 1O2 but not of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, the in vivo photodamage of the D1 protein of photosystem II indicated that the photogeneration of 1O2 took place within the photosystem II reaction center. Functional enrichment analyses identified transcripts that are key components of the ROS signaling transduction pathway in plants as well as others encoding transcription factors that regulate both ROS scavenging and water deficit stress. A meta-analysis examining the transcriptional profiles of mutants and hormone treatments in Arabidopsis showed a high correlation between ACSC at HL and the fluorescent mutant family of Arabidopsis, a producer of 1O2 in plastids. Intriguingly, a high correlation was also observed with ABA deficient1 and more axillary growth4, two mutants with defects in the biosynthesis pathways of two key (apo)carotenoid-derived plant hormones (i.e. abscisic acid and strigolactones, respectively). ACSC has proven to be a valuable system for studying early transcriptional responses to HL stress. PMID:21531897

  1. Extracting tissue and cell outlines of Arabidopsis seeds using refraction contrast X-ray CT at the SPring-8 facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Hayami, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio; Karahara, Ichirou; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2012-07-01

    How biological form is determined is one of the important questions in developmental biology. Physical forces are thought to be the primary determinants of the biological forms, and several theories for this were proposed nearly a century ago. To evaluate how physical forces can influence biological forms, precise determination of cell and tissue shapes and their geometries is necessary. Computed tomography (CT) is useful for visualizing three-dimensional structures without destroying a sample. Because recent progress in micro-CT has enabled visualizing cells and tissues at the sub-micron level, we investigated if we could extract cell and tissue outlines of seeds using refraction contrast X-ray CT available at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. We used Arabidopsis seeds because Arabidopsis is a well-known model plant and its seed size is small enough to obtain whole images using the X-ray CT experimental system. We could trace the outlines of tissues in dry seeds using beamline BL20B2 (10 keV, 2.4µm.pixel-1). Although we could also detect the outlines of some cell types, the image resolution was not adequate to extract whole cell edges. To detect the edges of cells in the epidermis and cortex, we obtained CT images using beamline BL20XU (8 keV, 0.5 µm.pixel-1). With these CT images, we could extract the facets and edges of each cell and determine cell vertices. This method enabled us to compare the numbers of cell facets among various cell types. We could also describe cell geometry as a set of points that showed these cell vertices.

  2. Cell Geometry Guides the Dynamic Targeting of Apoplastic GPI-Linked Lipid Transfer Protein to Cell Wall Elements and Cell Borders in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wasteneys, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    During cellular morphogenesis, changes in cell shape and cell junction topology are fundamental to normal tissue and organ development. Here we show that apoplastic Glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored Lipid Transfer Protein (LTPG) is excluded from cell junctions and flat wall regions, and passively accumulates around their borders in the epidermal cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. Beginning with intense accumulation beneath highly curved cell junction borders, this enrichment is gradually lost as cells become more bulbous during their differentiation. In fully mature epidermal cells, YFP-LTPG often shows a fibrous cellulose microfibril-like pattern within the bulging outer faces. Physical contact between a flat glass surface and bulbous cell surface induces rapid and reversible evacuation from contact sites and accumulation to the curved wall regions surrounding the contact borders. Thus, LTPG distribution is dynamic, responding to changes in cell shape and wall curvature during cell growth and differentiation. We hypothesize that this geometry-based mechanism guides wax-carrying LTPG to functional sites, where it may act to “seal” the vulnerable border surrounding cell-cell junctions and assist in cell wall fortification and cuticular wax deposition. PMID:24260561

  3. PP2A-3 interacts with ACR4 and regulates formative cell division in the Arabidopsis root

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Kun; Sandal, Priyanka; Williams, Elisabeth L.; Murphy, Evan; Stes, Elisabeth; Nikonorova, Natalia; Ramakrishna, Priya; Czyzewicz, Nathan; Montero-Morales, Laura; Kumpf, Robert; Lin, Zhefeng; van de Cotte, Brigitte; Iqbal, Mudassar; Van Bel, Michiel; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Meyer, Matthew R.; Gadeyne, Astrid; Zipfel, Cyril; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Montagu, Marc; Van Damme, Daniël; Gevaert, Kris; Rao, A. Gururaj; Beeckman, Tom; De Smet, Ive

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the generation of new cell types and tissues depends on coordinated and oriented formative cell divisions. The plasma membrane-localized receptor kinase ARABIDOPSIS CRINKLY 4 (ACR4) is part of a mechanism controlling formative cell divisions in the Arabidopsis root. Despite its important role in plant development, very little is known about the molecular mechanism with which ACR4 is affiliated and its network of interactions. Here, we used various complementary proteomic approaches to identify ACR4-interacting protein candidates that are likely regulators of formative cell divisions and that could pave the way to unraveling the molecular basis behind ACR4-mediated signaling. We identified PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A-3 (PP2A-3), a catalytic subunit of PP2A holoenzymes, as a previously unidentified regulator of formative cell divisions and as one of the first described substrates of ACR4. Our in vitro data argue for the existence of a tight posttranslational regulation in the associated biochemical network through reciprocal regulation between ACR4 and PP2A-3 at the phosphorylation level. PMID:26792519

  4. PP2A-3 interacts with ACR4 and regulates formative cell division in the Arabidopsis root.

    PubMed

    Yue, Kun; Sandal, Priyanka; Williams, Elisabeth L; Murphy, Evan; Stes, Elisabeth; Nikonorova, Natalia; Ramakrishna, Priya; Czyzewicz, Nathan; Montero-Morales, Laura; Kumpf, Robert; Lin, Zhefeng; van de Cotte, Brigitte; Iqbal, Mudassar; Van Bel, Michiel; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Meyer, Matthew R; Gadeyne, Astrid; Zipfel, Cyril; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Montagu, Marc; Van Damme, Daniël; Gevaert, Kris; Rao, A Gururaj; Beeckman, Tom; De Smet, Ive

    2016-02-01

    In plants, the generation of new cell types and tissues depends on coordinated and oriented formative cell divisions. The plasma membrane-localized receptor kinase ARABIDOPSIS CRINKLY 4 (ACR4) is part of a mechanism controlling formative cell divisions in the Arabidopsis root. Despite its important role in plant development, very little is known about the molecular mechanism with which ACR4 is affiliated and its network of interactions. Here, we used various complementary proteomic approaches to identify ACR4-interacting protein candidates that are likely regulators of formative cell divisions and that could pave the way to unraveling the molecular basis behind ACR4-mediated signaling. We identified PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A-3 (PP2A-3), a catalytic subunit of PP2A holoenzymes, as a previously unidentified regulator of formative cell divisions and as one of the first described substrates of ACR4. Our in vitro data argue for the existence of a tight posttranslational regulation in the associated biochemical network through reciprocal regulation between ACR4 and PP2A-3 at the phosphorylation level. PMID:26792519

  5. The MADS domain protein DIANA acts together with AGAMOUS-LIKE80 to specify the central cell in Arabidopsis ovules.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Angenent, Gerco C

    2008-08-01

    MADS box genes in plants consist of MIKC-type and type I genes. While MIKC-type genes have been studied extensively, the functions of type I genes are still poorly understood. Evidence suggests that type I MADS box genes are involved in embryo sac and seed development. We investigated two independent T-DNA insertion alleles of the Arabidopsis thaliana type I MADS box gene AGAMOUS-LIKE61 (AGL61) and showed that in agl61 mutant ovules, the polar nuclei do not fuse and central cell morphology is aberrant. Furthermore, the central cell begins to degenerate before fertilization takes place. Although pollen tubes are attracted and perceived by the mutant ovules, neither endosperm development nor zygote formation occurs. AGL61 is expressed in the central cell during the final stages of embryo sac development. An AGL61:green fluorescent protein-beta-glucoronidase fusion protein localizes exclusively to the polar nuclei and the secondary nucleus of the central cell. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that AGL61 can form a heterodimer with AGL80 and that the nuclear localization of AGL61 is lost in the agl80 mutant. Thus, AGL61 and AGL80 appear to function together to differentiate the central cell in Arabidopsis. We renamed AGL61 DIANA, after the virginal Roman goddess of the hunt. PMID:18713950

  6. Xyloglucan Deficiency Disrupts Microtubule Stability and Cellulose Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, Altering Cell Growth and Morphogenesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chaowen; Zhang, Tian; Zheng, Yunzhen

    2016-01-01

    Xyloglucan constitutes most of the hemicellulose in eudicot primary cell walls and functions in cell wall structure and mechanics. Although Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking detectable xyloglucan are viable, they display growth defects that are suggestive of alterations in wall integrity. To probe the mechanisms underlying these defects, we analyzed cellulose arrangement, microtubule patterning and dynamics, microtubule- and wall-integrity-related gene expression, and cellulose biosynthesis in xxt1 xxt2 plants. We found that cellulose is highly aligned in xxt1 xxt2 cell walls, that its three-dimensional distribution is altered, and that microtubule patterning and stability are aberrant in etiolated xxt1 xxt2 hypocotyls. We also found that the expression levels of microtubule-associated genes, such as MAP70-5 and CLASP, and receptor genes, such as HERK1 and WAK1, were changed in xxt1 xxt2 plants and that cellulose synthase motility is reduced in xxt1 xxt2 cells, corresponding with a reduction in cellulose content. Our results indicate that loss of xyloglucan affects both the stability of the microtubule cytoskeleton and the production and patterning of cellulose in primary cell walls. These findings establish, to our knowledge, new links between wall integrity, cytoskeletal dynamics, and wall synthesis in the regulation of plant morphogenesis. PMID:26527657

  7. Novel nuclear protein ALC-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 is expressed in vascular and mesocarp cells in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2008-07-01

    Pod shattering is an agronomical trait that is a result of the coordinated action of cell differentiation and separation. In Arabidopsis, pod shattering is controlled by a complex genetic network in which ALCATRAZ (ALC), a member of the basic helix-loop-helix family, is critical for cell separation during fruit dehiscence. Herein, we report the identification of ALC-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 (ACI1) via the yeast two-hybrid screen. ACI1 encodes a nuclear protein with a lysine-rich domain and a C-terminal serine-rich domain. ACI1 is mainly expressed in the vascular system throughout the plant and mesocarp of the valve in siliques. Our data showed that ACI1 interacts strongly with the N-terminal portion of ALC in yeast cells and in plant cells in the nucleus as demonstrated by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. Both ACI1 and ALC share an overlapping expression pattern, suggesting that they likely function together in planta. However, no detectable phenotype was found in plants with reduced ACI1 expression by RNA interference technology, suggesting that ACI1 may be redundant. Taken together, these data indicate that ALC may interact with ACI1 and its homologs to control cell separation during fruit dehiscence in Arabidopsis. PMID:18713402

  8. Deciphering the Responses of Root Border-Like Cells of Arabidopsis and Flax to Pathogen-Derived Elicitors1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Plancot, Barbara; Santaella, Catherine; Jaber, Rim; Kiefer-Meyer, Marie Christine; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure; Leprince, Jérôme; Gattin, Isabelle; Souc, Céline; Driouich, Azeddine; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté

    2013-01-01

    Plant pathogens including fungi and bacteria cause many of the most serious crop diseases. The plant innate immune response is triggered upon recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) such as flagellin22 and peptidoglycan. To date, very little is known of MAMP-mediated responses in roots. Root border cells are cells that originate from root caps and are released individually into the rhizosphere. Root tips of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and flax (Linum usitatissimum) release cells known as “border-like cells.” Whereas root border cells of pea (Pisum sativum) are clearly involved in defense against fungal pathogens, the function of border-like cells remains to be established. In this study, we have investigated the responses of root border-like cells of Arabidopsis and flax to flagellin22 and peptidoglycan. We found that both MAMPs triggered a rapid oxidative burst in root border-like cells of both species. The production of reactive oxygen species was accompanied by modifications in the cell wall distribution of extensin epitopes. Extensins are hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins that can be cross linked by hydrogen peroxide to enhance the mechanical strength of the cell wall. In addition, both MAMPs also caused deposition of callose, a well-known marker of MAMP-elicited defense. Furthermore, flagellin22 induced the overexpression of genes involved in the plant immune response in root border-like cells of Arabidopsis. Our findings demonstrate that root border-like cells of flax and Arabidopsis are able to perceive an elicitation and activate defense responses. We also show that cell wall extensin is involved in the innate immunity response of root border-like cells. PMID:24130195

  9. Putrescine Alleviates Iron Deficiency via NO-Dependent Reutilization of Root Cell-Wall Fe in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Wang, Bin; Song, Wen Feng; Zheng, Shao Jian; Shen, Ren Fang

    2016-01-01

    Plants challenged with abiotic stress show enhanced polyamines levels. Here, we show that the polyamine putrescine (Put) plays an important role to alleviate Fe deficiency. The adc2-1 mutant, which is defective in Put biosynthesis, was hypersensitive to Fe deficiency compared with wild type (Col-1 of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]). Exogenous Put decreased the Fe bound to root cell wall, especially to hemicellulose, and increased root and shoot soluble Fe content, thus alleviating the Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis. Intriguingly, exogenous Put induced the accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) under both Fe-sufficient (+Fe) and Fe-deficient (-Fe) conditions, although the ferric-chelate reductase (FCR) activity and the expression of genes related to Fe uptake were induced only under -Fe treatment. The alleviation of Fe deficiency by Put was diminished in the hemicellulose-level decreased mutant-xth31 and in the noa1 and nia1nia2 mutants, in which the endogenous NO levels are reduced, indicating that both NO and hemicellulose are involved in Put-mediated alleviation of Fe deficiency. However, the FCR activity and the expression of genes related to Fe uptake were still up-regulated under -Fe+Put treatment compared with -Fe treatment in xth31, and Put-induced cell wall Fe remobilization was abolished in noa1 and nia1nia2, indicating that Put-regulated cell wall Fe reutilization is dependent on NO. From our results, we conclude that Put is involved in the remobilization of Fe from root cell wall hemicellulose in a process dependent on NO accumulation under Fe-deficient condition in Arabidopsis. PMID:26578707

  10. AtDOF5.4/OBP4, a DOF Transcription Factor Gene that Negatively Regulates Cell Cycle Progression and Cell Expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peipei; Chen, Haiying; Ying, Lu; Cai, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to animals, plant development involves continuous organ formation, which requires strict regulation of cell proliferation. The core cell cycle machinery is conserved across plants and animals, but plants have developed new mechanisms that precisely regulate cell proliferation in response to internal and external stimuli. Here, we report that the DOF transcription factor OBP4 negatively regulates cell proliferation and expansion. OBP4 is a nuclear protein. Constitutive and inducible overexpression of OBP4 reduced the cell size and number, resulting in dwarf plants. Inducible overexpression of OBP4 in Arabidopsis also promoted early endocycle onset and inhibited cell expansion, while inducible overexpression of OBP4 fused to the VP16 activation domain in Arabidopsis delayed endocycle onset and promoted plant growth. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that cell cycle regulators and cell wall expansion factors were largely down-regulated in the OBP4 overexpression lines. Short-term inducible analysis coupled with in vivo ChIP assays indicated that OBP4 targets the CyclinB1;1, CDKB1;1 and XTH genes. These results strongly suggest that OBP4 is a negative regulator of cell cycle progression and cell growth. These findings increase our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle in plants. PMID:27297966

  11. AtDOF5.4/OBP4, a DOF Transcription Factor Gene that Negatively Regulates Cell Cycle Progression and Cell Expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peipei; Chen, Haiying; Ying, Lu; Cai, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to animals, plant development involves continuous organ formation, which requires strict regulation of cell proliferation. The core cell cycle machinery is conserved across plants and animals, but plants have developed new mechanisms that precisely regulate cell proliferation in response to internal and external stimuli. Here, we report that the DOF transcription factor OBP4 negatively regulates cell proliferation and expansion. OBP4 is a nuclear protein. Constitutive and inducible overexpression of OBP4 reduced the cell size and number, resulting in dwarf plants. Inducible overexpression of OBP4 in Arabidopsis also promoted early endocycle onset and inhibited cell expansion, while inducible overexpression of OBP4 fused to the VP16 activation domain in Arabidopsis delayed endocycle onset and promoted plant growth. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that cell cycle regulators and cell wall expansion factors were largely down-regulated in the OBP4 overexpression lines. Short-term inducible analysis coupled with in vivo ChIP assays indicated that OBP4 targets the CyclinB1;1, CDKB1;1 and XTH genes. These results strongly suggest that OBP4 is a negative regulator of cell cycle progression and cell growth. These findings increase our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle in plants. PMID:27297966

  12. The TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 S-Acyl Transferase Regulates Plant Cell Growth in ArabidopsisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hemsley, Piers A.; Kemp, Alison C.; Grierson, Claire S.

    2005-01-01

    TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 (TIP1) of Arabidopsis thaliana affects cell growth throughout the plant and has a particularly strong effect on root hair growth. We have identified TIP1 by map-based cloning and complementation of the mutant phenotype. TIP1 encodes an ankyrin repeat protein with a DHHC Cys-rich domain that is expressed in roots, leaves, inflorescence stems, and floral tissue. Two homologues of TIP1 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human (Homo sapiens) have been shown to have S-acyl transferase (also known as palmitoyl transferase) activity. S-acylation is a reversible hydrophobic protein modification that offers swift, flexible control of protein hydrophobicity and affects protein association with membranes, signal transduction, and vesicle trafficking within cells. We show that TIP1 binds the acyl group palmitate, that it can rescue the morphological, temperature sensitivity, and yeast casein kinase2 localization defects of the yeast S-acyl transferase mutant akr1Δ, and that inhibition of acylation in wild-type Arabidopsis roots reproduces the Tip1− mutant phenotype. Our results demonstrate that S-acylation is essential for normal plant cell growth and identify a plant S-acyl transferase, an essential research tool if we are to understand how this important, reversible lipid modification operates in plant cells. PMID:16100337

  13. The Trihelix Transcription Factor GTL1 Regulates Ploidy-Dependent Cell Growth in the Arabidopsis Trichome[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Christian; Kawamura, Ayako; Ichikawa, Takanari; Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Wada, Takuji; Kondou, Youichi; Muto, Shu; Matsui, Minami; Sugimoto, Keiko

    2009-01-01

    Leaf trichomes in Arabidopsis thaliana develop through several distinct cellular processes, such as patterning, differentiation, and growth. Although recent studies have identified several key transcription factors as regulating early patterning and differentiation steps, it is still largely unknown how these regulatory proteins mediate subsequent trichome development, which is accompanied by rapid cell growth and branching. Here, we report a novel trichome mutation in Arabidopsis, which in contrast with previously identified mutants, increases trichome cell size without altering its overall patterning or branching. We show that the corresponding gene encodes a GT-2-LIKE1 (GTL1) protein, a member of the trihelix transcription factor family. GTL1 is present within the nucleus during the postbranching stages of trichome development, and its loss of function leads to an increase in the nuclear DNA content only in trichomes that have completed branching. Our data further demonstrate that the gtl1 mutation modifies the expression of several cell cycle genes and partially rescues the ploidy defects in the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor mutant siamese. Taken together, this study provides the genetic evidence for the requirement of transcriptional regulation in the repression of ploidy-dependent plant cell growth as well as for an involvement of GTL trihelix proteins in this regulation. PMID:19717615

  14. Cell-specific vacuolar calcium storage mediated by "CAX1" regulates apoplastic calcium concentration, gas exchange, and plant productivity in "Arabidopsis"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The physiological role and mechanism of nutrient storage within vacuoles of specific cell types is poorly understood. Transcript profiles from "Arabidopsis thaliana" leaf cells differing in calcium concentration ([Ca], epidermis <10 mM versus mesophyll >60 mM) were compared using a microarray screen...

  15. CELLULOSE SYNTHASE9 Serves a Nonredundant Role in Secondary Cell Wall Synthesis in Arabidopsis Epidermal Testa Cells1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Jozsef; Harris, Darby; Griffiths, Jonathan; Williams, Brian; Beisson, Fred; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Mendu, Venugopal; Haughn, George; DeBolt, Seth

    2010-01-01

    Herein, we sought to explore the contribution of cellulose biosynthesis to the shape and morphogenesis of hexagonal seed coat cells in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Consistent with seed preferential expression of CELLULOSE SYNTHASE9 (CESA9), null mutations in CESA9 caused no change in cellulose content in leaves or stems, but caused a 25% reduction in seeds. Compositional studies of cesa9 seeds uncovered substantial proportional increases in cell wall neutral sugars and in several monomers of cell wall-associated polyesters. Despite these metabolic compensations, cesa9 seeds were permeable to tetrazolium salt, implying that cellulose biosynthesis, via CESA9, is required for correct barrier function of the seed coat. A syndrome of depleted radial wall, altered seed coat cell size, shape, and internal angle uniformity was quantified using scanning electron micrographs in cesa9 epidermal cells. By contrast, morphological defects were absent in cesa9 embryos, visually inspected from torpedo to bent cotyledon, consistent with no reduction in postgermination radical or hypocotyl elongation. These data implied that CESA9 was seed coat specific or functionally redundant in other tissues. Assessment of sections from glutaraldehyde fixed wild-type and cesa9 mature seeds supported results of scanning electron micrographs and quantitatively showed depletion of secondary cell wall synthesis in the radial cell wall. Herein, we show a nonredundant role for CESA9 in secondary cell wall biosynthesis in radial cell walls of epidermal seed coats and document its importance for cell morphogenesis and barrier function of the seed coat. PMID:20335403

  16. Cotton GhMYB7 is predominantly expressed in developing fibers and regulates secondary cell wall biosynthesis in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junfeng; Chen, Feng; Wu, Siyu; Li, Juan; Xu, Wenliang

    2016-02-01

    The secondary cell wall in mature cotton fibers contains over 90% cellulose with low quantities of xylan and lignin. However, little is known regarding the regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis in cotton fibers. In this study, we characterized an R2R3-MYB transcription factor, GhMYB7, in cotton. GhMYB7 is expressed at a high level in developing fibers and encodes a MYB protein that is targeted to the cell nucleus and has transcriptional activation activity. Ectopic expression of GhMYB7 in Arabidopsis resulted in small, curled, dark green leaves and also led to shorter inflorescence stems. A cross-sectional assay of basal stems revealed that cell wall thickness of vessels and interfascicular fibers was higher in transgenic lines overexpressing GhMYB7 than in the wild type. Constitutive expression of GhMYB7 in Arabidopsis activated the expression of a suite of secondary cell wall biosynthesis-related genes (including some secondary cell wall-associated transcription factors), leading to the ectopic deposition of cellulose and lignin. The ectopic deposition of secondary cell walls may have been initiated before the cessation of cell expansion. Moreover, GhMYB7 was capable of binding to the promoter regions of AtSND1 and AtCesA4, suggesting that GhMYB7 may function upstream of NAC transcription factors. Collectively, these findings suggest that GhMYB7 is a potential transcriptional activator, which may participate in regulating secondary cell wall biosynthesis of cotton fibers. PMID:26803299

  17. Rapid and dynamic subcellular reorganization following mechanical stimulation of Arabidopsis epidermal cells mimics responses to fungal and oomycete attack

    PubMed Central

    Hardham, Adrienne R; Takemoto, Daigo; White, Rosemary G

    2008-01-01

    Background Plant cells respond to the presence of potential fungal or oomycete pathogens by mounting a basal defence response that involves aggregation of cytoplasm, reorganization of cytoskeletal, endomembrane and other cell components and development of cell wall appositions beneath the infection site. This response is induced by non-adapted, avirulent and virulent pathogens alike, and in the majority of cases achieves penetration resistance against the microorganism on the plant surface. To explore the nature of signals that trigger this subcellular response and to determine the timing of its induction, we have monitored the reorganization of GFP-tagged actin, microtubules, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and peroxisomes in Arabidopsis plants – after touching the epidermal surface with a microneedle. Results Within 3 to 5 minutes of touching the surface of Arabidopsis cotyledon epidermal cells with fine glass or tungsten needles, actin microfilaments, ER and peroxisomes began to accumulate beneath the point of contact with the needle. Formation of a dense patch of actin was followed by focusing of actin cables on the site of contact. Touching the cell surface induced localized depolymerization of microtubules to form a microtubule-depleted zone surrounding a dense patch of GFP-tubulin beneath the needle tip. The concentration of actin, GFP-tubulin, ER and peroxisomes remained focused on the contact site as the needle moved across the cell surface and quickly dispersed when the needle was removed. Conclusion Our results show that plant cells can detect the gentle pressure of a microneedle on the epidermal cell surface and respond by reorganizing subcellular components in a manner similar to that induced during attack by potential fungal or oomycete pathogens. The results of our study indicate that during plant-pathogen interactions, the basal defence response may be induced by the plant's perception of the physical force exerted by the pathogen as it attempts to

  18. A versatile Multisite Gateway-compatible promoter and transgenic line collection for cell type-specific functional genomics in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Marquès-Bueno, Maria Mar; Morao, Ana K; Cayrel, Anne; Platre, Matthieu P; Barberon, Marie; Caillieux, Erwann; Colot, Vincent; Jaillais, Yvon; Roudier, François; Vert, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms are composed of many cell types that acquire their specific fate through a precisely controlled pattern of gene expression in time and space dictated in part by cell type-specific promoter activity. Understanding the contribution of highly specialized cell types in the development of a whole organism requires the ability to isolate or analyze different cell types separately. We have characterized and validated a large collection of root cell type-specific promoters and have generated cell type-specific marker lines. These benchmarked promoters can be readily used to evaluate cell type-specific complementation of mutant phenotypes, or to knockdown gene expression using targeted expression of artificial miRNA. We also generated vectors and characterized transgenic lines for cell type-specific induction of gene expression and cell type-specific isolation of nuclei for RNA and chromatin profiling. Vectors and seeds from transgenic Arabidopsis plants will be freely available, and will promote rapid progress in cell type-specific functional genomics. We demonstrate the power of this promoter set for analysis of complex biological processes by investigating the contribution of root cell types in the IRT1-dependent root iron uptake. Our findings revealed the complex spatial expression pattern of IRT1 in both root epidermis and phloem companion cells and the requirement for IRT1 to be expressed in both cell types for proper iron homeostasis. PMID:26662936

  19. Salt stress response triggers activation of the jasmonate signaling pathway leading to inhibition of cell elongation in Arabidopsis primary root.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Camilo E; Acevedo-Acevedo, Orlando; Miranda, Giovanna S; Vergara-Barros, Pablo; Holuigue, Loreto; Figueroa, Carlos R; Figueroa, Pablo M

    2016-07-01

    Salinity is a severe abiotic stress that affects irrigated croplands. Jasmonate (JA) is an essential hormone involved in plant defense against herbivory and in responses to abiotic stress. However, the relationship between the salt stress response and the JA pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana is not well understood at molecular and cellular levels. In this work we investigated the activation of JA signaling by NaCl and its effect on primary root growth. We found that JA-responsive JAZ genes were up-regulated by salt stress in a COI1-dependent manner in the roots. Using a JA-Ile sensor we demonstrated that activation of JA signaling by salt stress occurs in the meristematic zone and stele of the differentiation zone and that this activation was dependent on JAR1 and proteasome functions. Another finding is that the elongation zone (EZ) and its cortical cells were significantly longer in JA-related mutants (AOS, COI1, JAZ3 and MYC2/3/4 genes) compared with wild-type plants under salt stress, revealing the participation of the canonical JA signaling pathway. Noteworthy, osmotic stress - a component of salt stress - inhibited cell elongation in the EZ in a COI1-dependent manner. We propose that salt stress triggers activation of the JA signaling pathway followed by inhibition of cell elongation in the EZ. We have shown that salt-inhibited root growth partially involves the jasmonate signaling pathway in Arabidopsis. PMID:27217545

  20. The Arabidopsis CORI3 promoter contains two cis-acting regulatory regions required for transcriptional activity in companion cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuwamoto, Ryo; Harada, Takeo

    2011-09-01

    Companion cells are metabolically active and functionally specialized cells that behave as terminals for the transport of materials between phloem and the surrounding tissue. Although previous research has clarified the distinct function of companion cells, it is still largely unknown how plants establish and maintain the special identity of these cells. To shed further light on this issue, we carried out expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis. To minimize the difficulty of dissociating and gathering intact companion cells, vascular strings with an abundant content of companion cells were excised from the petioles of Brassica napus. By random sequencing with a string-specific cDNA library derived by suppression subtractive hybridization between the string itself and the petiole from which it had been removed, we identified 377 ESTs and assembled them into 247 EST groups. The most frequent EST was ExBdl-102 (15 of 377 ESTs), which showed the highest sequence similarity to the Arabidopsis CORI3 (CORONATINE INDUCED 3) gene. The CORI3 promoter:GUS showed predominant expression in the vascular tissue of Arabidopsis. Through transient expression assay using Brassica vasculature and gene-gun-mediated transient assay, we found two integrated cis-regulatory regions of the CORI3 promoter. This work has provided not only string-specific EST information and shown that two novel cis-regulatory regions sustain transcriptional activity in companion cells, but also a series of procedures for efficiently examining the transcriptional framework of companion cells by exploiting the histochemical advantage of B. napus as an experimental material. PMID:21559970

  1. Differential Responsiveness of Cortical Microtubule Orientation to Suppression of Cell Expansion among the Developmental Zones of Arabidopsis thaliana Root Apex

    PubMed Central

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S.; Daras, Gerasimos; Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis; Rigas, Stamatis

    2013-01-01

    Τhe bidirectional relationship between cortical microtubule orientation and cell wall structure has been extensively studied in elongating cells. Nevertheless, the possible interplay between microtubules and cell wall elements in meristematic cells still remains elusive. Herein, the impact of cellulose synthesis inhibition and suppressed cell elongation on cortical microtubule orientation was assessed throughout the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex by whole-mount tubulin immunolabeling and confocal microscopy. Apart from the wild-type, thanatos and pom2-4 mutants of Cellulose SynthaseA3 and Cellulose Synthase Interacting1, respectively, were studied. Pharmacological and mechanical approaches inhibiting cell expansion were also applied. Cortical microtubules of untreated wild-type roots were predominantly transverse in the meristematic, transition and elongation root zones. Cellulose-deficient mutants, chemical inhibition of cell expansion, or growth in soil resulted in microtubule reorientation in the elongation zone, wherein cell length was significantly decreased. Combinatorial genetic and chemical suppression of cell expansion extended microtubule reorientation to the transition zone. According to the results, transverse cortical microtubule orientation is established in the meristematic root zone, persisting upon inhibition of cell expansion. Microtubule reorientation in the elongation zone could be attributed to conditional suppression of cell elongation. The differential responsiveness of microtubule orientation to genetic and environmental cues is most likely associated with distinct biophysical traits of the cells among each developmental root zone. PMID:24324790

  2. Differential responsiveness of cortical microtubule orientation to suppression of cell expansion among the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex.

    PubMed

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis; Rigas, Stamatis

    2013-01-01

    Τhe bidirectional relationship between cortical microtubule orientation and cell wall structure has been extensively studied in elongating cells. Nevertheless, the possible interplay between microtubules and cell wall elements in meristematic cells still remains elusive. Herein, the impact of cellulose synthesis inhibition and suppressed cell elongation on cortical microtubule orientation was assessed throughout the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex by whole-mount tubulin immunolabeling and confocal microscopy. Apart from the wild-type, thanatos and pom2-4 mutants of Cellulose SynthaseA3 and Cellulose Synthase Interacting1, respectively, were studied. Pharmacological and mechanical approaches inhibiting cell expansion were also applied. Cortical microtubules of untreated wild-type roots were predominantly transverse in the meristematic, transition and elongation root zones. Cellulose-deficient mutants, chemical inhibition of cell expansion, or growth in soil resulted in microtubule reorientation in the elongation zone, wherein cell length was significantly decreased. Combinatorial genetic and chemical suppression of cell expansion extended microtubule reorientation to the transition zone. According to the results, transverse cortical microtubule orientation is established in the meristematic root zone, persisting upon inhibition of cell expansion. Microtubule reorientation in the elongation zone could be attributed to conditional suppression of cell elongation. The differential responsiveness of microtubule orientation to genetic and environmental cues is most likely associated with distinct biophysical traits of the cells among each developmental root zone. PMID:24324790

  3. Peroxidation due to cryoprotectant treatment is a vital factor for cell survival in Arabidopsis cryopreservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryopreservation is a safe and cost-effective tool for the long-term storage of plant germplasm, but damage to plant tissues and death of plants sometimes occurs. Determining the causes of this damage is vital to improving plant recovery from cryopreservation. When Arabidopsis germinating seeds were...

  4. miR396-targeted AtGRF transcription factors are required for coordination of cell division and differentiation during leaf development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Gu, Xiaolu; Xu, Deyang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Hua; Zeng, Minhuan; Chang, Zhaoyang; Huang, Hai; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    In plants, cell proliferation and polarized cell differentiation along the adaxial–abaxial axis in the primordium is critical for leaf morphogenesis, while the temporal–spatial relationships between these two processes remain largely unexplored. Here, it is reported that microRNA396 (miR396)-targeted Arabidopsis growth-regulating factors (AtGRFs) are required for leaf adaxial–abaxial polarity in Arabidopsis. Reduction of the expression of AtGRF genes by transgenic miR396 overexpression in leaf polarity mutants asymmetric leaves1 (as1) and as2 resulted in plants with enhanced leaf adaxial–abaxial defects, as a consequence of reduced cell proliferation. Moreover, transgenic miR396 overexpression markedly decreased the cell division activity and the expression of cell cycle-related genes, but resulted in an increased percentage of leaf cells with a higher ploidy level, indicating that miR396 negatively regulates cell proliferation by controlling entry into the mitotic cell cycle. miR396 is mainly expressed in the leaf cells arrested for cell division, coinciding with its roles in cell cycle regulation. These results together suggest that cell division activity mediated by miR396-targeted AtGRFs is important for polarized cell differentiation along the adaxial–abaxial axis during leaf morphogenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:21036927

  5. The age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an Arabidopsis T87 cell suspension culture during long-term cultivation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Zebrowski, Jacek; Oklejewicz, Bernadetta; Czarnik, Justyna; Halibart-Puzio, Joanna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • A decrease in proliferation rate during long-term cultivation of Arabidopsis cells. • Age-dependent increase in senescence-associated gene expression in Arabidopsis cells. • Age-related increase in DNA methylation, H3K9me2, and H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis cells. • High potential of photosynthetic efficiency of long-term cultured Arabidopsis cells. - Abstract: Plant cell suspension cultures represent good model systems applicable for both basic research and biotechnological purposes. Nevertheless, it is widely known that a prolonged in vitro cultivation of plant cells is associated with genetic and epigenetic instabilities, which may limit the usefulness of plant lines. In this study, the age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an asynchronous Arabidopsis T87 cell culture were examined. A prolonged cultivation period was found to be correlated with a decrease in the proliferation rate and a simultaneous increase in the expression of senescence-associated genes, indicating that the aging process started at the late growth phase of the culture. In addition, increases in the heterochromatin-specific epigenetic markers, i.e., global DNA methylation, H3K9 dimethylation, and H3K27 trimethylation, were observed, suggesting the onset of chromatin condensation, a hallmark of the early stages of plant senescence. Although the number of live cells decreased with an increase in the age of the culture, the remaining viable cells retained a high potential to efficiently perform photosynthesis and did not exhibit any symptoms of photosystem II damage.

  6. AtPGL3 is an Arabidopsis BURP domain protein that is localized to the cell wall and promotes cell enlargement

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jiyoung; Cui, Yong; Kang, Byung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The BURP domain is a plant-specific domain that has been identified in secretory proteins, and some of these are involved in cell wall modification. The tomato polygalacturonase I complex involved in pectin degradation in ripening fruits has a non-catalytic subunit that has a BURP domain. This protein is called polygalacturonase 1 beta (PG1β) and the Arabidopsis genome encodes three proteins that exhibit strong amino acid similarities with PG1β? We generated Arabidopsis lines in which expression levels of AtPGLs are altered in order to investigate the biological roles of the Arabidopsis PG1β-like proteins (AtPGLs). Among the three AtPGLs (AtPGL1-3), AtPGL3 exhibited the highest transcriptional activity throughout all developmental stages. AtPGL triple mutant plants have smaller rosette leaves than those of wild type plants because the leaf cells are smaller in the mutant plants. Interestingly, when we overexpressed AtPGL3 using a 35S promoter, leaf cells in transgenic plants grew larger than those of the wild type. A C-terminal GFP fusion protein of AtPGL3 complemented phenotypes of the triple mutant plants and it localized to the cell wall. A truncated AtPGL3-GFP fusion protein lacking the BURP domain failed to rescue the mutant phenotypes even though the GFP protein was targeted to the cell wall, indicating that the BURP domain is required for the protein's effect on cell expansion. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses indicated that the α-expansin 6 gene is up-regulated in the overexpressor plants. Taken together, these results indicate that AtPGL3 is an apoplastic BURP domain protein playing a role in cell expansion. PMID:26106400

  7. AtPGL3 is an Arabidopsis BURP domain protein that is localized to the cell wall and promotes cell enlargement.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Cui, Yong; Kang, Byung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The BURP domain is a plant-specific domain that has been identified in secretory proteins, and some of these are involved in cell wall modification. The tomato polygalacturonase I complex involved in pectin degradation in ripening fruits has a non-catalytic subunit that has a BURP domain. This protein is called polygalacturonase 1 beta (PG1β) and the Arabidopsis genome encodes three proteins that exhibit strong amino acid similarities with PG1β? We generated Arabidopsis lines in which expression levels of AtPGLs are altered in order to investigate the biological roles of the Arabidopsis PG1β-like proteins (AtPGLs). Among the three AtPGLs (AtPGL1-3), AtPGL3 exhibited the highest transcriptional activity throughout all developmental stages. AtPGL triple mutant plants have smaller rosette leaves than those of wild type plants because the leaf cells are smaller in the mutant plants. Interestingly, when we overexpressed AtPGL3 using a 35S promoter, leaf cells in transgenic plants grew larger than those of the wild type. A C-terminal GFP fusion protein of AtPGL3 complemented phenotypes of the triple mutant plants and it localized to the cell wall. A truncated AtPGL3-GFP fusion protein lacking the BURP domain failed to rescue the mutant phenotypes even though the GFP protein was targeted to the cell wall, indicating that the BURP domain is required for the protein's effect on cell expansion. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses indicated that the α-expansin 6 gene is up-regulated in the overexpressor plants. Taken together, these results indicate that AtPGL3 is an apoplastic BURP domain protein playing a role in cell expansion. PMID:26106400

  8. Mediation of Clathrin-Dependent Trafficking during Cytokinesis and Cell Expansion by Arabidopsis STOMATAL CYTOKINESIS DEFECTIVE Proteins[W

    PubMed Central

    McMichael, Colleen M.; Reynolds, Gregory D.; Koch, Lisa M.; Wang, Chao; Jiang, Nan; Nadeau, Jeanette; Sack, Fred D.; Gelderman, Max B.; Pan, Jianwei; Bednarek, Sebastian Y.

    2013-01-01

    STOMATAL CYTOKINESIS DEFECTIVE1 (SCD1) encodes a putative Rab guanine nucleotide exchange factor that functions in membrane trafficking and is required for cytokinesis and cell expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we show that the loss of SCD2 function disrupts cytokinesis and cell expansion and impairs fertility, phenotypes similar to those observed for scd1 mutants. Genetic and biochemical analyses showed that SCD1 function is dependent upon SCD2 and that together these proteins are required for plasma membrane internalization. Further specifying the role of these proteins in membrane trafficking, SCD1 and SCD2 proteins were found to be associated with isolated clathrin-coated vesicles and to colocalize with clathrin light chain at putative sites of endocytosis at the plasma membrane. Together, these data suggest that SCD1 and SCD2 function in clathrin-mediated membrane transport, including plasma membrane endocytosis, required for cytokinesis and cell expansion. PMID:24179130

  9. The Cell Wall Arabinose-Deficient Arabidopsis thaliana Mutant murus5 Encodes a Defective Allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2.

    PubMed

    Dugard, Christopher K; Mertz, Rachel A; Rayon, Catherine; Mercadante, Davide; Hart, Christopher; Benatti, Matheus R; Olek, Anna T; SanMiguel, Phillip J; Cooper, Bruce R; Reiter, Wolf-Dieter; McCann, Maureen C; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2016-07-01

    Traditional marker-based mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to determine that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) low cell wall arabinose mutant murus5 (mur5) encodes a defective allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2 (RGP2). Marker analysis of 13 F2 confirmed mutant progeny from a recombinant mapping population gave a rough map position on the upper arm of chromosome 5, and deep sequencing of DNA from these 13 lines gave five candidate genes with G→A (C→T) transitions predicted to result in amino acid changes. Of these five, only insertional mutant alleles of RGP2, a gene that encodes a UDP-arabinose mutase that interconverts UDP-arabinopyranose and UDP-arabinofuranose, exhibited the low cell wall arabinose phenotype. The identities of mur5 and two SALK insertional alleles were confirmed by allelism tests and overexpression of wild-type RGP2 complementary DNA placed under the control of the 35S promoter in the three alleles. The mur5 mutation results in the conversion of cysteine-257 to tyrosine-257 within a conserved hydrophobic cluster predicted to be distal to the active site and essential for protein stability and possible heterodimerization with other isoforms of RGP. PMID:27217494

  10. Transmission Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy allows simultaneous assessment of cutin and cell-wall polysaccharides of Arabidopsis petals.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Sylwester; Mucciolo, Antonio; Humbel, Bruno M; Nawrath, Christiane

    2013-06-01

    A procedure for the simultaneous analysis of cell-wall polysaccharides, amides and aliphatic polyesters by transmission Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) has been established for Arabidopsis petals. The combination of FTIR imaging with spectra derivatization revealed that petals, in contrast to other organs, have a characteristic chemical zoning with high amount of aliphatic compounds and esters in the lamina and of polysaccharides in the stalk of the petal. The hinge region of petals was particular rich in amides as well as in vibrations potentially associated with hemicellulose. In addition, a number of other distribution patterns have been identified. Analyses of mutants in cutin deposition confirmed that vibrations of aliphatic compounds and esters present in the lamina were largely associated with the cuticular polyester. Calculation of spectrotypes, including the standard deviation of intensities, allowed detailed comparison of the spectral features of various mutants. The spectrotypes not only revealed differences in the amount of polyesters in cutin mutants, but also changes in other compound classes. For example, in addition to the expected strong deficiencies in polyester content, the long-chain acyl CoA synthase 2 mutant showed increased intensities of vibrations in a wavelength range that is typical for polysaccharides. Identical spectral features were observed in quasimodo2, a cell-wall mutant of Arabidopsis with a defect in pectin formation that exhibits increased cellulose synthase activity. FTIR thus proved to be a convenient method for the identification and characterization of mutants affected in the deposition of cutin in petals. PMID:23461282

  11. Co-localisation studies of Arabidopsis SR splicing factors reveal different types of speckles in plant cell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Lorkovic, Zdravko J.; Barta, Andrea

    2008-10-15

    SR proteins are multidomain splicing factors which are important for spliceosome assembly and for regulation of alternative splicing. In mammalian nuclei these proteins localise to speckles from where they are recruited to transcription sites. By using fluorescent protein fusion technology and different experimental approaches it has been shown that Arabidopsis SR proteins, in addition to diffuse nucleoplasmic staining, localise into an irregular nucleoplasmic network resembling speckles in mammalian cells. As Arabidopsis SR proteins fall into seven conserved sub-families we investigated co-localisation of members of the different sub-families in transiently transformed tobacco protoplast. Here we demonstrate the new finding that members of different SR protein sub-families localise into distinct populations of nuclear speckles with no, partial or complete co-localisation. This is particularly interesting as we also show that these proteins do interact in a yeast two-hybrid assay as well as in pull-down and in co-immunopreciptiation assays. Our data raise the interesting possibility that SR proteins are partitioned into distinct populations of nuclear speckles to allow a more specific recruitment to the transcription/pre-mRNA processing sites of particular genes depending on cell type and developmental stage.

  12. Blue light-dependent changes in loosely bound calcium in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells: an X-ray microanalysis study

    PubMed Central

    Łabuz, Justyna; Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Hermanowicz, Paweł; Wyroba, Elżbieta; Pilarska, Maria; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Calcium is involved in the signal transduction pathway from phototropins, the blue light photoreceptor kinases which mediate chloroplast movements. The chloroplast accumulation response in low light is controlled by both phot1 and phot2, while only phot2 is involved in avoidance movement induced by strong light. Phototropins elevate cytosolic Ca2+ after activation by blue light. In higher plants, both types of chloroplast responses depend on Ca2+, and internal calcium stores seem to be crucial for these processes. Yet, the calcium signatures generated after the perception of blue light by phototropins are not well understood. To characterize the localization of calcium in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells, loosely bound (exchangeable) Ca2+ was precipitated with potassium pyroantimonate and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy followed by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. In dark-adapted wild-type Arabidopsis leaves, calcium precipitates were observed at the cell wall, where they formed spherical structures. After strong blue light irradiation, calcium at the apoplast prevailed, and bigger, multilayer precipitates were found. Spherical calcium precipitates were also detected at the tonoplast. After red light treatment as a control, the precipitates at the cell wall were smaller and less numerous. In the phot2 and phot1phot2 mutants, calcium patterns were different from those of wild-type plants. In both mutants, no elevation of calcium after blue light treatment was observed at the cell periphery (including the cell wall and a fragment of cytoplasm). This result confirms the involvement of phototropin2 in the regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis in mesophyll cells. PMID:26957564

  13. Cell wall pectic (1-->4)-beta-d-galactan marks the acceleration of cell elongation in the Arabidopsis seedling root meristem.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Lesley; Steele-King, Clare G; Jordan, Emillie; Knox, J Paul

    2003-02-01

    Here we demonstrate that the pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I-associated LM5 (1-->4)-beta-d-galactan epitope occurs in a restricted manner at the root surface of intact Arabidopsis seedlings. The root surface occurrence of (1-->4)-beta-d-galactan marks the transition zone at or near the onset of rapid cell elongation and the epitope is similarly restricted in occurrence in epidermal, cortical and endodermal cell walls. The extent of surface (1-->4)-beta-d-galactan occurrence is reduced in response to genetic mutations (stp-1, ctr-1) and hormone applications that reduce root cell elongation. In contrast, the application of the arabinogalactan-protein (AGP) binding beta-glucosyl Yariv reagent (betaGlcY) that disrupts cell elongation results in the persistence of (1-->4)-beta-d-galactan at the root surface and in epidermal, cortical and endodermal cell walls. This latter observation indicates that modulation of pectic (1-->4)-beta-d-galactan may be an event downstream of AGP function during cell expansion in the Arabidopsis seedling root. PMID:12581303

  14. Myrosin Cell Development Is Regulated by Endocytosis Machinery and PIN1 Polarity in Leaf Primordia of Arabidopsis thaliana[W

    PubMed Central

    Shirakawa, Makoto; Ueda, Haruko; Shimada, Tomoo; Kohchi, Takayuki; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    Myrosin cells, which accumulate myrosinase to produce toxic compounds when they are ruptured by herbivores, form specifically along leaf veins in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the mechanism underlying this pattern formation is unknown. Here, we show that myrosin cell development requires the endocytosis-mediated polar localization of the auxin-efflux carrier PIN1 in leaf primordia. Defects in the endocytic/vacuolar SNAREs (syp22 and syp22 vti11) enhanced myrosin cell development. The syp22 phenotype was rescued by expressing SYP22 under the control of the PIN1 promoter. Additionally, myrosin cell development was enhanced either by lacking the activator of endocytic/vacuolar RAB5 GTPase (VPS9A) or by PIN1 promoter-driven expression of a dominant-negative form of RAB5 GTPase (ARA7). By contrast, myrosin cell development was not affected by deficiencies of vacuolar trafficking factors, including the vacuolar sorting receptor VSR1 and the retromer components VPS29 and VPS35, suggesting that endocytic pathway rather than vacuolar trafficking pathway is important for myrosin cell development. The phosphomimic PIN1 variant (PIN1-Asp), which is unable to be polarized, caused myrosin cells to form not only along leaf vein but also in the intervein leaf area. We propose that Brassicales plants might arrange myrosin cells near vascular cells in order to protect the flux of nutrients and water via polar PIN1 localization. PMID:25428982

  15. MAPK Phosphatase AP2C3 Induces Ectopic Proliferation of Epidermal Cells Leading to Stomata Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kazanaviciute, Vaiva; Magyar, Zoltan; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Unterwurzacher, Verena; Choopayak, Chonnanit; Boniecka, Justyna; Murray, James A. H.; Bogre, Laszlo; Meskiene, Irute

    2010-01-01

    In plant post-embryonic epidermis mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling promotes differentiation of pavement cells and inhibits initiation of stomata. Stomata are cells specialized to modulate gas exchange and water loss. Arabidopsis MAPKs MPK3 and MPK6 are at the core of the signaling cascade; however, it is not well understood how the activity of these pleiotropic MAPKs is constrained spatially so that pavement cell differentiation is promoted only outside the stomata lineage. Here we identified a PP2C-type phosphatase termed AP2C3 (Arabidopsis protein phosphatase 2C) that is expressed distinctively during stomata development as well as interacts and inactivates MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6. AP2C3 co-localizes with MAPKs within the nucleus and this localization depends on its N-terminal extension. We show that other closely related phosphatases AP2C2 and AP2C4 are also MAPK phosphatases acting on MPK6, but have a distinct expression pattern from AP2C3. In accordance with this, only AP2C3 ectopic expression is able to stimulate cell proliferation leading to excess stomata development. This function of AP2C3 relies on the domains required for MAPK docking and intracellular localization. Concomitantly, the constitutive and inducible AP2C3 expression deregulates E2F-RB pathway, promotes the abundance and activity of CDKA, as well as changes of CDKB1;1 forms. We suggest that AP2C3 downregulates the MAPK signaling activity to help maintain the balance between differentiation of stomata and pavement cells. PMID:21203456

  16. Multiple Domain Associations within the Arabidopsis Immune Receptor RPP1 Regulate the Activation of Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Karl J.; Bentham, Adam; Williams, Simon J.; Kobe, Bostjan; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Upon recognition of pathogen virulence effectors, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins induce defense responses including localized host cell death. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms leading to this response, we examined the Arabidopsis thaliana NLR protein RECOGNITION OF PERONOSPORA PARASITICA1 (RPP1), which recognizes the Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis effector ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA RECOGNIZED1 (ATR1). Expression of the N-terminus of RPP1, including the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (“N-TIR”), elicited an effector-independent cell death response, and we used allelic variation in TIR domain sequences to define the key residues that contribute to this phenotype. Further biochemical characterization indicated that cell death induction was correlated with N-TIR domain self-association. In addition, we demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding (NB)-ARC1 region of RPP1 self-associates and plays a critical role in cell death activation, likely by facilitating TIR:TIR interactions. Structural homology modeling of the NB subdomain allowed us to identify a putative oligomerization interface that was shown to influence NB-ARC1 self-association. Significantly, full-length RPP1 exhibited effector-dependent oligomerization and, although mutations at the NB-ARC1 oligomerization interface eliminated cell death induction, RPP1 self-association was unaffected, suggesting that additional regions contribute to oligomerization. Indeed, the leucine-rich repeat domain of RPP1 also self-associates, indicating that multiple interaction interfaces exist within activated RPP1 oligomers. Finally, we observed numerous intramolecular interactions that likely function to negatively regulate RPP1, and present a model describing the transition to an active NLR protein. PMID:27427964

  17. Analysis of promoter activity of members of the PECTATE LYASE-LIKE (PLL) gene family in cell separation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pectate lyases depolymerize pectins by catalyzing the eliminative cleavage of α-1,4-linked galacturonic acid. Pectate lyase-like (PLL) genes make up among the largest and most complex families in plants, but their cellular and organismal roles have not been well characterized, and the activity of these genes has been assessed only at the level of entire organs or plant parts, potentially obscuring important sub-organ or cell-type-specific activities. As a first step to understand the potential functional diversity of PLL genes in plants and specificity of individual genes, we utilized a reporter gene approach to document the spatial and temporal promoter activity for 23 of the 26 members of the Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) PLL gene family throughout development, focusing on processes involving cell separation. Results Numerous PLL promoters directed activity in localized domains programmed for cell separation, such as the abscission zones of the sepal, petal, stamen, and seed, as well as the fruit dehiscence zone. Several drove activity in cell types expected to facilitate separation, including the style and root endodermal and cortical layers during lateral root emergence. However, PLL promoters were active in domains not obviously programmed for separation, including the stipule, hydathode and root axis. Nearly all PLL promoters showed extensive overlap of activity in most of the regions analyzed. Conclusions Our results document potential for involvement of PLL genes in numerous aspects of growth and development both dependent and independent of cell separation. Although the complexity of the PLL gene family allows for enormous potential for gene specialization through spatial or temporal regulation, the high degree of overlap of activity among the PLL promoters suggests extensive redundancy. Alternatively, functional specialization might be determined at the post-transcriptional or protein level. PMID:20649977

  18. Arabidopsis Tetraspanins Are Confined to Discrete Expression Domains and Cell Types in Reproductive Tissues and Form Homo- and Heterodimers When Expressed in Yeast1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Boavida, Leonor C.; Qin, Peng; Broz, Miranda; Becker, Jörg D.; McCormick, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Tetraspanins are evolutionary conserved transmembrane proteins present in all multicellular organisms. In animals, they are known to act as central organizers of membrane complexes and thought to facilitate diverse biological processes, such as cell proliferation, movement, adhesion, and fusion. The genome of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) encodes 17 members of the tetraspanin family; however, little is known about their functions in plant development. Here, we analyzed their phylogeny, protein topology, and domain structure and surveyed their expression and localization patterns in reproductive tissues. We show that, despite their low sequence identity with metazoan tetraspanins, plant tetraspanins display the typical structural topology and most signature features of tetraspanins in other multicellular organisms. Arabidopsis tetraspanins are expressed in diverse tissue domains or cell types in reproductive tissues, and some accumulate at the highest levels in response to pollination in the transmitting tract and stigma, male and female gametophytes and gametes. Arabidopsis tetraspanins are preferentially targeted to the plasma membrane, and they variously associate with specialized membrane domains, in a polarized fashion, to intercellular contacts or plasmodesmata. A membrane-based yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid system established that tetraspanins can physically interact, forming homo- and heterodimer complexes. These results, together with a likely genetic redundancy, suggest that, similar to their metazoan counterparts, plant tetraspanins might be involved in facilitating intercellular communication, whose functions might be determined by the composition of tetraspanin complexes and their binding partners at the cell surface of specific cell types. PMID:23946353

  19. Cis-Regulatory Elements Determine Germline Specificity and Expression Level of an Isopentenyltransferase Gene in Sperm Cells of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Tong; Duan, Xiaomeng; Wei, Xiaoping; Li, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Flowering plant sperm cells transcribe a divergent and complex complement of genes. To examine promoter function, we chose an isopentenyltransferase gene known as PzIPT1. This gene is highly selectively transcribed in one sperm cell morphotype of Plumbago zeylanica, which preferentially fuses with the central cell during fertilization and is thus a founding cell of the primary endosperm. In transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), PzIPT1 promoter displays activity in both sperm cells and upon progressive promoter truncation from the 5′-end results in a progressive decrease in reporter production, consistent with occurrence of multiple enhancer sites. Cytokinin-dependent protein binding motifs are identified in the promoter sequence, which respond with stimulation by cytokinin. Expression of PzIPT1 promoter in sperm cells confers specificity independently of previously reported Germline Restrictive Silencer Factor binding sequence. Instead, a cis-acting regulatory region consisting of two duplicated 6-bp Male Gamete Selective Activation (MGSA) motifs occurs near the site of transcription initiation. Disruption of this sequence-specific site inactivates expression of a GFP reporter gene in sperm cells. Multiple copies of the MGSA motif fused with the minimal CaMV35S promoter elements confer reporter gene expression in sperm cells. Similar duplicated MGSA motifs are also identified from promoter sequences of sperm cell-expressed genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting selective activation is possibly a common mechanism for regulation of gene expression in sperm cells of flowering plants. PMID:26739233

  20. Early effects of altered gravity environments on plant cell growth and cell proliferation: Characterization of morphofunctional nucleolar types in an Arabidopsis cell culture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano, Ana Isabel; Herranz, Raul; Manzano, Aránzazu; Van Loon, Jack; Medina, Francisco Javier

    2016-02-01

    Changes in the cell growth rate of an in vitro cellular system in Arabidopsis thaliana induced by short exposure to an altered gravity environment have been estimated by a novel approach. The method consisted of defining three structural nucleolar types which are easy and reliable indicators of the ribosome biogenesis activity and, consequently, of protein biosynthesis, a parameter strictly correlated to cell growth in this cellular system. The relative abundance of each nucleolar type was statistically assessed in different conditions of gravity. Samples exposed to simulated microgravity for 200 min showed a significant decrease in nucleolar activity compared to 1g controls, whereas samples exposed to hypergravity (2g) for the same period showed nucleolar activity slightly increased,. These effects could be considered as an early cellular response to the environmental alteration, given the short duration of the treatment. The functional significance of the structural data was validated by a combination of several different well-known parameters, using microscopical, flow cytometry, qPCR and proteomic approaches, which showed that the decreased cell growth rate was decoupled from an increased cell proliferation rate under simulated microgravity, and the opposite trend was observed under hypergravity. Actually, not all parameters tested showed the same quantitative changes, indicating that the response to the environmental alteration is time-dependent. These results are in agreement with previous observations in root meristematic cells and they show the ability of plant cells to produce a response to gravity changes, independently of their integration into plant organs.

  1. Joint European Partial-G Parabolic Flight Campaign-Calcium Analysis in Arabidopsis Thaliana Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neef, Maren; Fengler, Svenja; Ecke, Margret; Hausmann, Niklas; Hampp, Rudiger

    2013-02-01

    Callus cells derived from stem tissue suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) were exposed to parabolic flights on board of an Airbus A300 (Novespace). The cells were either wild type or expressed a fluorescent probe for the quantification of cytosolic calcium (green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based Cameleon). The wild type cells were used for both, fluorescence background control, and the analysis of gene expression. With respect to fluorescence measurements, changes in the amounts of Ca2+, an important component of signalling chains, could be assayed in vivo in real time. The technique used takes advantage of a shift in fluorescence from 480 to 535 nm with increasing Ca2+ content. During the experiment, fluorescence data were monitored at Mars, Moon and micro gravity producing flight profiles, each at 1g, pull up (1.8g), about 20 to 26 s of mars (0.36g), moon (0.16g) or micro gravity, and pull out (1.8g) for 12/12/6 consecutive parabolas at different days. Transition from hypergravity to microgravity resulted in a typical increase in cytosolic Ca2+. The flight profile “Moon” (0.16g) exhibited a very similar behaviour as microgravity, whereas simulation of “Mars” gravitation (0.36) resulted in a weaker signal. This can also be deduced from minimal/maximal values of the ratio between hyper-g and onset of reduced g. Obviously, the threshold gravitation for a Ca2+ response is above 0.36g. Increasing gravity by centrifugation, in contrast, induced a decrease in cytosolic calcium. Here, a threshold in response was obvious between 3 and 4g. In order to assay changes in gene expression, we additionally quenched parabolic flight samples by the injection of RNAlater. A microarray analysis of these samples showed a clear impact of the different profiles. Both Moon and Mars profiles exhibited less response than the μg profile. However, the latter responded also less compared to previous “μg only” flights. In those we had much higher numbers of

  2. Solid-State 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Cellulose in the Cell Walls of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, R. H.; Davies, L. M.; Harris, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance was used to characterize the molecular ordering of cellulose in a cell-wall preparation containing mostly primary walls obtained from the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. Proton and 13C spin relaxation time constants showed that the cellulose was in a crystalline rather than a paracrystalline state or amorphous state. Cellulose chains were distributed between the interiors (40%) and surfaces (60%) of crystallites, which is consistent with crystallite cross-sectional dimensions of about 3 nm. Digital resolution enhancement revealed signals indicative of triclinic and monoclinic crystalline forms of cellulose mixed in similar proportions. Of the five nuclear spin relaxation processes used, proton rotating-frame relaxation provided the clearest distinction between cellulose and other cell-wall components for purposes of editing solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. PMID:12226303

  3. A MAPK cascade downstream of ERECTA receptor-like protein kinase regulates Arabidopsis inflorescence architecture by promoting localized cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangzong; Wang, Huachun; He, Yunxia; Liu, Yidong; Walker, John C; Torii, Keiko U; Zhang, Shuqun

    2012-12-01

    Spatiotemporal-specific cell proliferation and cell differentiation are critical to the formation of normal tissues, organs, and organisms. The highly coordinated cell differentiation and proliferation events illustrate the importance of cell-cell communication during growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ERECTA (ER), a receptor-like protein kinase, plays important roles in promoting localized cell proliferation, which determines inflorescence architecture, organ shape, and size. However, the downstream signaling components remain unidentified. Here, we report a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK; or MPK) cascade that functions downstream of ER in regulating localized cell proliferation. Similar to an er mutant, loss of function of MPK3/MPK6 or their upstream MAPK kinases (MAPKKs; or MKKs), MKK4/MKK5, resulted in shortened pedicels and clustered inflorescences. Epistasis analysis demonstrated that the gain of function of MKK4 and MKK5 transgenes could rescue the loss-of-function er mutant phenotype at both morphological and cellular levels, suggesting that the MPK3/MPK6 cascade functions downstream of the ER receptor. Furthermore, YODA (YDA), a MAPKK kinase, was shown to be upstream of MKK4/MKK5 and downstream of ER in regulating inflorescence architecture based on both gain- and loss-of-function data. Taken together, these results suggest that the YDA-MKK4/MKK5-MPK3/MPK6 cascade functions downstream of the ER receptor in regulating localized cell proliferation, which further shapes the morphology of plant organs. PMID:23263767

  4. Light-harvesting complexes in photosystem II regulate glutathione-induced sensitivity of Arabidopsis guard cells to abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Md Sarwar; Nozulaidi, Mohd; Khairi, Mohd; Mat, Nashriyah

    2016-05-20

    Light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) in photosystem II (PSII) regulate glutathione (GSH) functions in plants. To investigate whether LHCs control GSH biosynthesis that modifies guard cell abscisic acid (ABA) sensitivity, we evaluated GSH content, stomatal aperture, reactive oxygen species (ROS), weight loss and plant growth using a ch1-1 mutant that was defective of LHCs and compared this with wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Glutathione monoethyl ester (GSHmee) increased but 1-chloro-2,4 dinitrobenzene (CDNB) decreased the GSH content in the guard cells. The guard cells of the ch1-1 mutants accumulated significantly less GSH than the WT plants. The guard cells of the ch1-1 mutants also showed higher sensitivity to ABA than the WT plants. The CDNB treatment increased but the GSHmee treatment decreased the ABA sensitivity of the guard cells without affecting ABA-induced ROS production. Dark and light treatments altered the GSH content and stomatal aperture of the guard cells of ch1-1 and WT plants, irrespective of CDNB and GSHmee. The ch1-1 mutant contained fewer guard cells and displayed poor growth, late flowering and stumpy weight loss compared with the WT plants. This study suggests that defective LHCs reduced the GSH content in the guard cells and increased sensitivity to ABA, resulting in stomatal closure. PMID:26970687

  5. The role of the plant-specific ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 protein in Arabidopsis cell wall polysaccharide O-acetylation.

    PubMed

    Schultink, Alex; Naylor, Dan; Dama, Murali; Pauly, Markus

    2015-04-01

    A mutation in the ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 (AXY9) gene was found to be causative for the decreased xyloglucan acetylation phenotype of the axy9.1 mutant, which was identified in a forward genetic screen for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants. The axy9.1 mutant also exhibits decreased O-acetylation of xylan, implying that the AXY9 protein has a broad role in polysaccharide acetylation. An axy9 insertional mutant exhibits severe growth defects and collapsed xylem, demonstrating the importance of wall polysaccharide O-acetylation for normal plant growth and development. Localization and topological experiments indicate that the active site of the AXY9 protein resides within the Golgi lumen. The AXY9 protein appears to be a component of the plant cell wall polysaccharide acetylation pathway, which also includes the REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION and TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins. The AXY9 protein is distinct from the TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins, reported to be polysaccharide acetyltransferases, but does share homology with them and other acetyltransferases, suggesting that the AXY9 protein may act to produce an acetylated intermediate that is part of the O-acetylation pathway. PMID:25681330

  6. Interplay between ABA and GA Modulates the Timing of Asymmetric Cell Divisions in the Arabidopsis Root Ground Tissue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin Ae; Jang, Sejeong; Yoon, Eun Kyung; Heo, Jung-Ok; Chang, Kwang Suk; Choi, Ji Won; Dhar, Souvik; Kim, Gyuree; Choe, Jeong-Eun; Heo, Jae Bok; Kwon, Chian; Ko, Jae-Heung; Hwang, Yong-Sic; Lim, Jun

    2016-06-01

    In multicellular organisms, controlling the timing and extent of asymmetric cell divisions (ACDs) is crucial for correct patterning. During post-embryonic root development in Arabidopsis thaliana, ground tissue (GT) maturation involves an additional ACD of the endodermis, which generates two different tissues: the endodermis (inner) and the middle cortex (outer). It has been reported that the abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA) pathways are involved in middle cortex (MC) formation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between ABA and GA during GT maturation remain largely unknown. Through transcriptome analyses, we identified a previously uncharacterized C2H2-type zinc finger gene, whose expression is regulated by GA and ABA, thus named GAZ (GA- AND ABA-RESPONSIVE ZINC FINGER). Seedlings ectopically overexpressing GAZ (GAZ-OX) were sensitive to ABA and GA during MC formation, whereas GAZ-SRDX and RNAi seedlings displayed opposite phenotypes. In addition, our results indicated that GAZ was involved in the transcriptional regulation of ABA and GA homeostasis. In agreement with previous studies that ABA and GA coordinate to control the timing of MC formation, we also confirmed the unique interplay between ABA and GA and identified factors and regulatory networks bridging the two hormone pathways during GT maturation of the Arabidopsis root. PMID:26970019

  7. CUE1: A Mesophyll Cell-Specific Positive Regulator of Light-Controlled Gene Expression in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hm.; Culligan, K.; Dixon, R. A.; Chory, J.

    1995-01-01

    Light plays a key role in the development and physiology of plants. One of the most profound effects of light on plant development is the derepression of expression of an array of light-responsive genes, including the genes encoding the chlorophyll a/b binding proteins (CAB) of photosystem II. To understand the mechanism by which light signals nuclear gene expression, we developed a genetic selection to identify mutants with reduced CAB transcription. Here, we describe a new Arabidopsis locus, CUE1 (for CAB underexpressed). Mutations at this locus result in defects in expression of several light-regulated genes, specifically in mesophyll but not in bundle-associated or epidermis cells. Reduced accumulation of CAB and other photosynthesis-related mRNAs in the mesophyll was correlated with defects in chloroplast development in these cells, resulting in a reticulate pattern with veins greener than the interveinal regions of leaves. Moreover, chalcone synthase mRNA, although known to be regulated by both phytochrome and a blue light receptor, accumulated normally in the leaf epidermis. Dark basal levels of CAB expression were unaffected in etiolated cue1 seedlings; however, induction of CAB transcription by pulses of red and blue light was reduced, suggesting that CUE1 acts downstream from both phytochrome and blue light photoreceptors. CUE1 appears to play a role in the primary derepression of mesophyll-specific gene expression in response to light, because cue1 mutants are severely deficient at establishing photoautotrophic growth. Based on this characterization, we propose that CUE1 is a cell-specific positive regulator linking light and intrinsic developmental programs in Arabidopsis leaf mesophyll cells. PMID:12242356

  8. NEVERSHED and INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION are differentially required for cell expansion and cell separation during floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Butenko, Melinka A; Shi, Chun-Lin; Bolivar, Jenny L; Winge, Per; Stenvik, Grethe-Elisabeth; Vie, Ane Kjersti; Leslie, Michelle E; Brembu, Tore; Kristiansen, Wenche; Bones, Atle M; Patterson, Sara E; Liljegren, Sarah J; Aalen, Reidunn B

    2013-12-01

    Floral organ shedding is a cell separation event preceded by cell-wall loosening and generally accompanied by cell expansion. Mutations in NEVERSHED (NEV) or INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA) block floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis thaliana. NEV encodes an ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein, and cells of nev mutant flowers display membrane-trafficking defects. IDA encodes a secreted peptide that signals through the receptor-like kinases HAESA (HAE) and HAESA-LIKE2 (HSL2). Analyses of single and double mutants revealed unique features of the nev and ida phenotypes. Cell-wall loosening was delayed in ida flowers. In contrast, nev and nev ida mutants displayed ectopic enlargement of abscission zone (AZ) cells, indicating that cell expansion alone is not sufficient to trigger organ loss. These results suggest that NEV initially prevents precocious cell expansion but is later integral for cell separation. IDA is involved primarily in the final cell separation step. A mutation in KNOTTED-LIKE FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA1 (KNAT1), a suppressor of the ida mutant, could not rescue the abscission defects of nev mutant flowers, indicating that NEV-dependent activity downstream of KNAT1 is required. Transcriptional profiling of mutant AZs identified gene clusters regulated by IDA-HAE/HSL2. Several genes were more strongly downregulated in nev-7 compared with ida and hae hsl2 mutants, consistent with the rapid inhibition of organ loosening in nev mutants, and the overlapping roles of NEV and IDA in cell separation. A model of the crosstalk between the IDA signalling pathway and NEV-mediated membrane traffic during floral organ abscission is presented. PMID:23963677

  9. Trichome morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, B; Folkers, U; Ilgenfritz, H; Hülskamp, M

    2000-01-01

    Trichomes (plant hairs) in Arabidopsis thaliana are large non-secreting epidermal cells with a characteristic three-dimensional architecture. Because trichomes are easily accessible to a combination of genetic, cell biological and molecular methods they have become an ideal model system to study various aspects of plant cell morphogenesis. In this review we will summarize recent progress in the understanding of trichome morphogenesis. PMID:11128981

  10. Truncated Cotton Subtilase Promoter Directs Guard Cell-Specific Expression of Foreign Genes in Tobacco and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lei; Han, Ya-Nan; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2013-01-01

    A 993-bp regulatory region upstream of the translation start codon of subtilisin-like serine protease gene was isolated from Gossypium barbadense. This (T/A)AAAG-rich region, GbSLSP, and its 5′- and 3′-truncated versions were transferred into tobacco and Arabidopsis after fusing with GUS or GFP. Histochemical and quantitative GUS analysis and confocal GFP fluorescence scanning in the transgenic plants showed that the GbSLSP-driven GUS and GFP expressed preferentially in guard cells, whereas driven by GbSLSPF2 to GbSLSPF4, the 5′-truncated GbSLSP versions with progressively reduced Dof1 elements, both GUS and GFP expressed exclusively in guard cells, and the expression strength declined with (T/A)AAAG copy decrement. Deletion of 5′-untranslated region from GbSLSP markedly weakened the activity of GUS and GFP, while deletion from the strongest guard cell-specific promoter, GbSLSPF2, not only significantly decreased the expression strength, but also completely abolished the guard cell specificity. These results suggested both guard cell specificity and expression strength of the promoters be coordinately controlled by 5′-untranslated region and a cluster of at least 3 (T/A)AAAG elements within a region of about 100 bp relative to transcription start site. Our guard cell-specific promoters will enrich tools to manipulate gene expression in guard cells for scientific research and crop improvement. PMID:23555786

  11. Arabidopsis CBP1 Is a Novel Regulator of Transcription Initiation in Central Cell-Mediated Pollen Tube Guidance[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Ju; Zhu, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Meng-Xia; Wang, Tong; Xue, Yong; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    In flowering plants, sperm cells are delivered to the embryo sac by a pollen tube guided by female signals. Both the gametic and synergid cells contribute to pollen tube attraction. Synergids secrete peptide signals that lure the tube, while the role of the gametic cells is unknown. Previously, we showed that CENTRAL CELL GUIDANCE (CCG) is essential for pollen tube attraction in Arabidopsis thaliana, but the molecular mechanism is unclear. Here, we identified CCG BINDING PROTEIN1 (CBP1) and demonstrated that it interacts with CCG, Mediator subunits, RNA polymerase II (Pol II), and central cell-specific AGAMOUS-like transcription factors. In addition, CCG interacts with TATA-box Binding Protein 1 and Pol II as a TFIIB-like transcription factor. CBP1-knockdown ovules are defective in pollen tube attraction. Expression profiling revealed that cysteine-rich peptide (CRP) transcripts were downregulated in ccg ovules. CCG and CBP1 coregulate a subset of CRPs in the central cell and the synergids, including the attractant LURE1. CBP1 is extensively expressed in multiple vegetative tissues and specifically in the central cell in reproductive growth. We propose that CBP1, via interaction with CCG and the Mediator complex, connects transcription factors and the Pol II machinery to regulate pollen tube attraction. PMID:26462908

  12. The irregular xylem 2 mutant is an allele of korrigan that affects the secondary cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Szyjanowicz, Pio M J; McKinnon, Iain; Taylor, Neil G; Gardiner, John; Jarvis, Mike C; Turner, Simon R

    2004-03-01

    The irregular xylem 2 (irx2) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibits a cellulose deficiency in the secondary cell wall, which is brought about by a point mutation in the KORRIGAN (KOR) beta,1-4 endoglucanase (beta,1-4 EGase) gene. Measurement of the total crystalline cellulose in the inflorescence stem indicates that the irx2 mutant contains approximately 30% of the level present in the wild type (WT). Fourier-Transform Infra Red (FTIR) analysis, however, indicates that there is no decrease in cellulose in primary cell walls of the cortical and epidermal cells of the stem. KOR expression is correlated with cellulose synthesis and is highly expressed in cells synthesising a secondary cell wall. Co-precipitation experiments, using either an epitope-tagged form of KOR or IRX3 (AtCesA7), suggest that KOR is not an integral part of the cellulose synthase complex. These data are supported by immunolocalisation of KOR that suggests that KOR does not localise to sites of secondary cell wall deposition in the developing xylem. The defect in irx2 plant is consistent with a role for KOR in the later stages of secondary cell wall formation, suggesting a role in processing of the growing microfibrils or release of the cellulose synthase complex. PMID:14871312

  13. MicroRNA miR396 Regulates the Switch between Stem Cells and Transit-Amplifying Cells in Arabidopsis Roots.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Ramiro E; Ercoli, María Florencia; Debernardi, Juan Manuel; Breakfield, Natalie W; Mecchia, Martin A; Sabatini, Martin; Cools, Toon; De Veylder, Lieven; Benfey, Philip N; Palatnik, Javier F

    2015-12-01

    To ensure an adequate organ mass, the daughters of stem cells progress through a transit-amplifying phase displaying rapid cell division cycles before differentiating. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana microRNA miR396 regulates the transition of root stem cells into transit-amplifying cells by interacting with GROWTH-REGULATING FACTORs (GRFs). The GRFs are expressed in transit-amplifying cells but are excluded from the stem cells through inhibition by miR396. Inactivation of the GRFs increases the meristem size and induces periclinal formative divisions in transit-amplifying cells. The GRFs repress PLETHORA (PLT) genes, regulating their spatial expression gradient. Conversely, PLT activates MIR396 in the stem cells to repress the GRFs. We identified a pathway regulated by GRF transcription factors that represses stem cell-promoting genes in actively proliferating cells, which is essential for the progression of the cell cycle and the orientation of the cell division plane. If unchecked, the expression of the GRFs in the stem cell niche suppresses formative cell divisions and distorts the organization of the quiescent center. We propose that the interactions identified here between miR396 and GRF and PLT transcription factors are necessary to establish the boundary between the stem cell niche and the transit-amplifying region. PMID:26645252

  14. Endodermal cell–cell contact is required for the spatial control of Casparian band development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Martinka, Michal; Dolan, Liam; Pernas, Monica; Abe, Jun; Lux, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Apoplasmic barriers in plants fulfil important roles such as the control of apoplasmic movement of substances and the protection against invasion of pathogens. The aim of this study was to describe the development of apoplasmic barriers (Casparian bands and suberin lamellae) in endodermal cells of Arabidopsis thaliana primary root and during lateral root initiation. Methods Modifications of the endodermal cell walls in roots of wild-type Landsberg erecta (Ler) and mutants with defective endodermal development – scarecrow-3 (scr-3) and shortroot (shr) – of A. thaliana plants were characterized by light, fluorescent, confocal laser scanning, transmission and cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Key Results In wild-type plant roots Casparian bands initiate at approx. 1600 µm from the root cap junction and suberin lamellae first appear on the inner primary cell walls at approx. 7000–8000 µm from the root apex in the region of developing lateral root primordia. When a single cell replaces a pair of endodermal and cortical cells in the scr-3 mutant, Casparian band-like material is deposited ectopically at the junction between this ‘cortical’ cell and adjacent pericycle cells. Shr mutant roots with an undeveloped endodermis deposit Casparian band-like material in patches in the middle lamellae of cells of the vascular cylinder. Endodermal cells in the vicinity of developing lateral root primordia develop suberin lamellae earlier, and these are thicker, compared wih the neighbouring endodermal cells. Protruding primordia are protected by an endodermal pocket covered by suberin lamellae. Conclusions The data suggest that endodermal cell–cell contact is required for the spatial control of Casparian band development. Additionally, the endodermal cells form a collet (collar) of short cells covered by a thick suberin layer at the base of lateral root, which may serve as a barrier constituting a ‘safety zone’ protecting the vascular cylinder

  15. An ARID Domain-Containing Protein within Nuclear Bodies Is Required for Sperm Cell Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Binglian; He, Hui; Zheng, Yanhua; Wu, Wenye; McCormick, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    In plants, each male meiotic product undergoes mitosis, and then one of the resulting cells divides again, yielding a three-celled pollen grain comprised of a vegetative cell and two sperm cells. Several genes have been found to act in this process, and DUO1 (DUO POLLEN 1), a transcription factor, plays a key role in sperm cell formation by activating expression of several germline genes. But how DUO1 itself is activated and how sperm cell formation is initiated remain unknown. To expand our understanding of sperm cell formation, we characterized an ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain)-containing protein, ARID1, that is specifically required for sperm cell formation in Arabidopsis. ARID1 localizes within nuclear bodies that are transiently present in the generative cell from which sperm cells arise, coincident with the timing of DUO1 activation. An arid1 mutant and antisense arid1 plants had an increased incidence of pollen with only a single sperm-like cell and exhibited reduced fertility as well as reduced expression of DUO1. In vitro and in vivo evidence showed that ARID1 binds to the DUO1 promoter. Lastly, we found that ARID1 physically associates with histone deacetylase 8 and that histone acetylation, which in wild type is evident only in sperm, expanded to the vegetative cell nucleus in the arid1 mutant. This study identifies a novel component required for sperm cell formation in plants and uncovers a direct positive regulatory role of ARID1 on DUO1 through association with histone acetylation. PMID:25057814

  16. Xanthomonas campestris Overcomes Arabidopsis Stomatal Innate Immunity through a DSF Cell-to-Cell Signal-Regulated Virulence Factor1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E.; Torres, Pablo S.; Vojnov, Adrián A.

    2009-01-01

    Pathogen-induced stomatal closure is part of the plant innate immune response. Phytopathogens using stomata as a way of entry into the leaf must avoid the stomatal response of the host. In this article, we describe a factor secreted by the bacterial phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) capable of interfering with stomatal closure induced by bacteria or abscisic acid (ABA). We found that living Xcc, as well as ethyl acetate extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, are capable of reverting stomatal closure induced by bacteria, lipopolysaccharide, or ABA. Xcc ethyl acetate extracts also complemented the infectivity of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) mutants deficient in the production of the coronatine toxin, which is required to overcome stomatal defense. By contrast, the rpfF and rpfC mutant strains of Xcc, which are unable to respectively synthesize or perceive a diffusible molecule involved in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling, were incapable of reverting stomatal closure, indicating that suppression of stomatal response by Xcc requires an intact rpf/diffusible signal factor system. In addition, we found that guard cell-specific Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase3 (MPK3) antisense mutants were unresponsive to bacteria or lipopolysaccharide in promotion of stomatal closure, and also more sensitive to Pst coronatine-deficient mutants, showing that MPK3 is required for stomatal immune response. Additionally, we found that, unlike in wild-type Arabidopsis, ABA-induced stomatal closure in MPK3 antisense mutants is not affected by Xcc or by extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, suggesting that the Xcc factor might target some signaling component in the same pathway as MPK3. PMID:19091877

  17. Classification and identification of Arabidopsis cell wall mutants using Fourier-Transform InfraRed (FT-IR) microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mouille, Grégory; Robin, Stéphane; Lecomte, Mannaïg; Pagant, Silvère; Höfte, Herman

    2003-08-01

    We have developed a novel procedure for the rapid classification and identification of Arabidopsis mutants with altered cell wall architecture based on Fourier-Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy. FT-IR transmission spectra were sampled from native 4-day-old dark-grown hypocotyls of 46 mutants and the wild type treated with various drugs. The Mahalanobis distance between mutants, calculated from the spectral information after compression with the Discriminant Variables Selection procedure, was used for alpha hierarchical cluster analysis. Despite the completely unsupervised nature of the classification procedure, we show that all mutants with cellulose defects appeared in the same cluster. In addition, mutant alleles of similar strength for several unrelated loci were also clustered, which demonstrates the sensitivity of the method to detect a wide array of cell wall defects. Comparing the cellulose-deficient cluster with the cluster that contained wild-type controls led to the identification of wave numbers that were diagnostic for altered cellulose content in the context of an intact cell wall. The results show that FT-IR spectra can be used to identify different classes of mutants and to characterize cell wall changes at a microscopic level in unknown mutants. This procedure significantly accelerates the identification and classification of cell wall mutants, which makes cell wall polysaccharides more accessible to functional genomics approaches. PMID:12887590

  18. The histone deacetylase HDA19 controls root cell elongation and modulates a subset of phosphate starvation responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Ying; Wu, Keqiang; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The length of root epidermal cells and their patterning into files of hair-bearing and non-hair cells are genetically determined but respond with high plasticity to environmental cues. Limited phyto-availability of the essential mineral nutrient phosphate (Pi) increases the number of root hairs by longitudinal shortening of epidermal cells and by reprogramming the fate of cells in positions normally occupied by non-hair cells. Through analysis of the root morphology and transcriptional profiles from transgenic Arabidopsis lines with altered expression of the histone deacetylase HDA19, we show that in an intricate interplay of Pi availability and intrinsic factors, HDA19 controls the epidermal cell length, probably by altering the positional bias that dictates epidermal patterning. In addition, HDA19 regulates several Pi-responsive genes that encode proteins with important regulatory or metabolic roles in the acclimation to Pi deficiency. In particular, HDA19 affects genes encoding SPX (SYG1/Pho81/XPR) domain-containing proteins and genes involved in membrane lipid remodeling, a key response to Pi starvation that increases the free Pi in plants. Our data add a novel, non-transcriptionally regulated component of the Pi signaling network and emphasize the importance of reversible post-translational histone modification for the integration of external signals into intrinsic developmental and metabolic programs. PMID:26508133

  19. A correlative microscopy approach relates microtubule behaviour, local organ geometry, and cell growth at the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem

    PubMed Central

    Burian, Agata; Uyttewaal, Magalie

    2013-01-01

    Cortical microtubules (CMTs) are often aligned in a particular direction in individual cells or even in groups of cells and play a central role in the definition of growth anisotropy. How the CMTs themselves are aligned is not well known, but two hypotheses have been proposed. According to the first hypothesis, CMTs align perpendicular to the maximal growth direction, and, according to the second, CMTs align parallel to the maximal stress direction. Since both hypotheses were formulated on the basis of mainly qualitative assessments, the link between CMT organization, organ geometry, and cell growth is revisited using a quantitative approach. For this purpose, CMT orientation, local curvature, and growth parameters for each cell were measured in the growing shoot apical meristem (SAM) of Arabidopsis thaliana. Using this approach, it has been shown that stable CMTs tend to be perpendicular to the direction of maximal growth in cells at the SAM periphery, but parallel in the cells at the boundary domain. When examining the local curvature of the SAM surface, no strict correlation between curvature and CMT arrangement was found, which implies that SAM geometry, and presumed geometry-derived stress distribution, is not sufficient to prescribe the CMT orientation. However, a better match between stress and CMTs was found when mechanical stress derived from differential growth was also considered. PMID:24153420

  20. SQUINT promotes stem cell homeostasis and floral meristem termination in Arabidopsis through APETALA2 and CLAVATA signalling.

    PubMed

    Prunet, Nathanaël; Morel, Patrice; Champelovier, Priscilla; Thierry, Anne-Marie; Negrutiu, Ioan; Jack, Thomas; Trehin, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Plant meristems harbour stem cells, which allow for the continuous production of new organs. Here, an analysis of the role of SQUINT (SQN) in stem cell dynamics in Arabidopsis is reported. A close examination of sqn mutants reveals defects that are very similar to that of weak clavata (clv) mutants, both in the flower meristem (increased number of floral organs, occasional delay in stem cell termination) and in the shoot apical meristem (meristem and central zone enlargement, occasional fasciation). sqn has a very mild effect in a clv mutant background, suggesting that SQN and the CLV genes act in the same genetic pathway. Accordingly, a loss-of-function allele of SQN strongly rescues the meristem abortion phenotype of plants that overexpress CLV3. Altogether, these data suggest that SQN is necessary for proper CLV signalling. SQN was shown to be required for normal accumulation of various miRNAs, including miR172. One of the targets of miR172, APETALA2 (AP2), antagonizes CLV signalling. The ap2-2 mutation strongly suppresses the meristem phenotypes of sqn, indicating that the effect of SQN on stem cell dynamics is largely, but not fully, mediated by the miR172/AP2 tandem. This study refines understanding of the intricate genetic networks that control both stem cell homeostasis and floral stem cell termination, two processes that are critical for the proper development and fertility of the plant. PMID:26269626

  1. Cell Wall Maturation of Arabidopsis Trichomes Is Dependent on Exocyst Subunit EXO70H4 and Involves Callose Deposition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kulich, Ivan; Vojtíková, Zdeňka; Glanc, Matouš; Ortmannová, Jitka; Rasmann, Sergio; Žárský, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf trichomes are single-cell structures with a well-studied development, but little is understood about their function. Developmental studies focused mainly on the early shaping stages, and little attention has been paid to the maturation stage. We focused on the EXO70H4 exocyst subunit, one of the most up-regulated genes in the mature trichome. We uncovered EXO70H4-dependent development of the secondary cell wall layer, highly autofluorescent and callose rich, deposited only in the upper part of the trichome. The boundary is formed between the apical and the basal parts of mature trichome by a callose ring that is also deposited in an EXO70H4-dependent manner. We call this structure the Ortmannian ring (OR). Both the secondary cell wall layer and the OR are absent in the exo70H4 mutants. Ecophysiological aspects of the trichome cell wall thickening include interference with antiherbivore defense and heavy metal accumulation. Ultraviolet B light induces EXO70H4 transcription in a CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1-dependent way, resulting in stimulation of trichome cell wall thickening and the OR biogenesis. EXO70H4-dependent trichome cell wall hardening is a unique phenomenon, which may be conserved among a variety of the land plants. Our analyses support a concept that Arabidopsis trichome is an excellent model to study molecular mechanisms of secondary cell wall deposition. PMID:25767057

  2. The Arabidopsis Class III Peroxidase AtPRX71 Negatively Regulates Growth under Physiological Conditions and in Response to Cell Wall Damage1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Raggi, Sara; Ranocha, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the cell wall has a major impact on plant growth and development, and alteration of cell wall structural components is often detrimental to biomass production. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these negative effects are largely unknown. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with altered pectin composition because of either the expression of the Aspergillus niger polygalacturonase II (AnPGII; 35S:AnPGII plants) or a mutation in the QUASIMODO2 (QUA2) gene that encodes a putative pectin methyltransferase (qua2-1 plants), display severe growth defects. Here, we show that expression of Arabidopsis PEROXIDASE71 (AtPRX71), encoding a class III peroxidase, strongly increases in 35S:AnPGII and qua2-1 plants as well as in response to treatments with the cellulose synthase inhibitor isoxaben, which also impairs cell wall integrity. Analysis of atprx71 loss-of-function mutants and plants overexpressing AtPRX71 indicates that this gene negatively influences Arabidopsis growth at different stages of development, likely limiting cell expansion. The atprx71-1 mutation partially suppresses the dwarf phenotype of qua2-1, suggesting that AtPRX71 contributes to the growth defects observed in plants undergoing cell wall damage. Furthermore, AtPRX71 seems to promote the production of reactive oxygen species in qua2-1 plants as well as plants treated with isoxaben. We propose that AtPRX71 contributes to strengthen cell walls, therefore restricting cell expansion, during normal growth and in response to cell wall damage. PMID:26468518

  3. The Arabidopsis Class III Peroxidase AtPRX71 Negatively Regulates Growth under Physiological Conditions and in Response to Cell Wall Damage.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Sara; Ferrarini, Alberto; Delledonne, Massimo; Dunand, Christophe; Ranocha, Philippe; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Cervone, Felice; Ferrari, Simone

    2015-12-01

    The structure of the cell wall has a major impact on plant growth and development, and alteration of cell wall structural components is often detrimental to biomass production. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these negative effects are largely unknown. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with altered pectin composition because of either the expression of the Aspergillus niger polygalacturonase II (AnPGII; 35S:AnPGII plants) or a mutation in the QUASIMODO2 (QUA2) gene that encodes a putative pectin methyltransferase (qua2-1 plants), display severe growth defects. Here, we show that expression of Arabidopsis PEROXIDASE71 (AtPRX71), encoding a class III peroxidase, strongly increases in 35S:AnPGII and qua2-1 plants as well as in response to treatments with the cellulose synthase inhibitor isoxaben, which also impairs cell wall integrity. Analysis of atprx71 loss-of-function mutants and plants overexpressing AtPRX71 indicates that this gene negatively influences Arabidopsis growth at different stages of development, likely limiting cell expansion. The atprx71-1 mutation partially suppresses the dwarf phenotype of qua2-1, suggesting that AtPRX71 contributes to the growth defects observed in plants undergoing cell wall damage. Furthermore, AtPRX71 seems to promote the production of reactive oxygen species in qua2-1 plants as well as plants treated with isoxaben. We propose that AtPRX71 contributes to strengthen cell walls, therefore restricting cell expansion, during normal growth and in response to cell wall damage. PMID:26468518

  4. Salicylic acid modulates levels of phosphoinositide dependent-phospholipase C substrates and products to remodel the Arabidopsis suspension cell transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Ruelland, Eric; Pokotylo, Igor; Djafi, Nabila; Cantrel, Catherine; Repellin, Anne; Zachowski, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Basal phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activity controls gene expression in Arabidopsis suspension cells and seedlings. PI-PLC catalyzes the production of phosphorylated inositol and diacylglycerol (DAG) from phosphoinositides. It is not known how PI-PLC regulates the transcriptome although the action of DAG-kinase (DGK) on DAG immediately downstream from PI-PLC is responsible for some of the regulation. We previously established a list of genes whose expression is affected in the presence of PI-PLC inhibitors. Here this list of genes was used as a signature in similarity searches of curated plant hormone response transcriptome data. The strongest correlations obtained with the inhibited PI-PLC signature were with salicylic acid (SA) treatments. We confirm here that in Arabidopsis suspension cells SA treatment leads to an increase in phosphoinositides, then demonstrate that SA leads to a significant 20% decrease in phosphatidic acid, indicative of a decrease in PI-PLC products. Previous sets of microarray data were re-assessed. The SA response of one set of genes was dependent on phosphoinositides. Alterations in the levels of a second set of genes, mostly SA-repressed genes, could be related to decreases in PI-PLC products that occur in response to SA action. Together, the two groups of genes comprise at least 40% of all SA-responsive genes. Overall these two groups of genes are distinct in the functional categories of the proteins they encode, their promoter cis-elements and their regulation by DGK or phospholipase D. SA-regulated genes dependent on phosphoinositides are typical SA response genes while those with an SA response that is possibly dependent on PI-PLC products are less SA-specific. We propose a model in which SA inhibits PI-PLC activity and alters levels of PI-PLC products and substrates, thereby regulating gene expression divergently. PMID:25426125

  5. Plastid position in Arabidopsis columella cells is similar in microgravity and on a random-positioning machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, T. F.; van Loon, J. J.; Kiss, J. Z.

    2000-01-01

    In order to study gravity effects on plant structure and function, it may become necessary to remove the g-stimulus. On Earth, various instruments such as clinostats have been used by biologists in an attempt to neutralize the effects of gravity. In this study, the position of amyloplasts was assayed in columella cells in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. seedlings grown in the following conditions: on Earth, on a two-dimensional clinostat at 1 rpm, on a three-dimensional clinostat (also called a random-positioning machine, or an RPM), and in space (true microgravity). In addition, the effects of these gravity treatments on columella cell area and plastid area also were measured. In terms of the parameters measured, only amyloplast position was affected by the gravity treatments. Plastid position was not significantly different between spaceflight and RPM conditions but was significantly different between spaceflight and the classical two-dimensional clinostat treatments. Flanking columella cells showed a greater susceptibility to changes in gravity compared to the central columella cells. In addition, columella cells of seedlings that were grown on the RPM did not exhibit deleterious effects in terms of their ultrastructure as has been reported previously for seedlings grown on a two-dimensional clinostat. This study supports the hypothesis that the RPM provides a useful simulation of weightlessness.

  6. YUCCA-mediated auxin biogenesis is required for cell fate transition occurring during de novo root organogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lyuqin; Tong, Jianhua; Xiao, Langtao; Ruan, Ying; Liu, Jingchun; Zeng, Minhuan; Huang, Hai; Wang, Jia-Wei; Xu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Many plant organs have the ability to regenerate a new plant after detachment or wounding via de novo organogenesis. During de novo root organogenesis from Arabidopsis thaliana leaf explants, endogenic auxin is essential for the fate transition of regeneration-competent cells to become root founder cells via activation of WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 11 (WOX11). However, the molecular events from leaf explant detachment to auxin-mediated cell fate transition are poorly understood. In this study, we used an assay to determine the concentration of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to provide direct evidence that auxin is produced after leaf explant detachment, a process that involves YUCCA (YUC)-mediated auxin biogenesis. Inhibition of YUC prevents expression of WOX11 and fate transition of competent cells, resulting in the blocking of rooting. Further analysis showed that YUC1 and YUC4 act quickly (within 4 hours) in response to wounding after detachment in both light and dark conditions and promote auxin biogenesis in both mesophyll and competent cells, whereas YUC5, YUC8, and YUC9 primarily respond in dark conditions. In addition, YUC2 and YUC6 contribute to rooting by providing a basal auxin level in the leaf. Overall, our study indicates that YUC genes exhibit a division of labour during de novo root organogenesis from leaf explants in response to multiple signals. PMID:27255928

  7. SCI1 is a component of the auxin-dependent control of cell proliferation in Arabidopsis upper pistil.

    PubMed

    DePaoli, Henrique Cestari; Dornelas, Marcelo Carnier; Goldman, Maria Helena S

    2014-12-01

    To characterize the recently described SCI1 (stigma/style cell cycle inhibitor 1) gene relationship with the auxin pathway, we have taken the advantage of the Arabidopsis model system and its available tools. At first, we have analyzed the At1g79200 T-DNA insertion mutants and constructed various transgenic plants. The loss- and gain-of-function plants displayed cell number alterations in upper pistils that were controlled by the amino-terminal domain of the protein. These data also confirmed that this locus holds the functional homolog (AtSCI1) of the Nicotiana tabacum SCI1 gene. Then, we have provided some evidences the auxin synthesis/signaling pathways are required for downstream proper AtSCI1 control of cell number: (a) its expression is downregulated in yuc2yuc6 and npy1 auxin-deficient mutants, (b) triple (yuc2yuc6sci1) and double (npy1sci1) mutants mimicked the auxin-deficient phenotypes, with no synergistic interactions, and (c) the increased upper pistil phenotype in these last mutants, which is a consequence of an increased cell number, was able to be complemented by AtSCI1 overexpression. Taken together, our data strongly suggests SCI1 as a component of the auxin signaling transduction pathway to control cell proliferation/differentiation in stigma/style, representing a molecular effector of this hormone on pistil development. PMID:25443839

  8. Statolith sedimentation kinetics and force transduction to the cortical endoplasmic reticulum in gravity-sensing Arabidopsis columella cells.

    PubMed

    Leitz, Guenther; Kang, Byung-Ho; Schoenwaelder, Monica E A; Staehelin, L Andrew

    2009-03-01

    The starch statolith hypothesis of gravity sensing in plants postulates that the sedimentation of statoliths in specialized statocytes (columella cells) provides the means for converting the gravitational potential energy into a biochemical signal. We have analyzed the sedimentation kinetics of statoliths in the central S2 columella cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. The statoliths can form compact aggregates with gap sizes between statoliths approaching <30 nm. Significant intra-aggregate sliding motions of individual statoliths suggest a contribution of hydrodynamic forces to the motion of statoliths. The reorientation of the columella cells accelerates the statoliths toward the central cytoplasm within <1 s of reorientation. During the subsequent sedimentation phase, the statoliths tend to move at a distance to the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) boundary and interact only transiently with the ER. Statoliths moved by laser tweezers against the ER boundary experience an elastic lift force upon release from the optical trap. High-resolution electron tomography analysis of statolith-to-ER contact sites indicate that the weight of statoliths is sufficient to locally deform the ER membranes that can potentially activate mechanosensitive ion channels. We suggest that in root columella cells, the transduction of the kinetic energy of sedimenting statoliths into a biochemical signal involves a combination of statolith-driven motion of the cytosol, statolith-induced deformation of the ER membranes, and a rapid release of kinetic energy from the ER during reorientation to activate mechanosensitive sites within the central columella cells. PMID:19276442

  9. High Resolution Quantification of Crystalline Cellulose Accumulation in Arabidopsis Roots to Monitor Tissue-specific Cell Wall Modifications.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Yulia; Holland, Neta; Elbaum, Rivka; Savaldi-Goldstein, Sigal

    2016-01-01

    Plant cells are surrounded by a cell wall, the composition of which determines their final size and shape. The cell wall is composed of a complex matrix containing polysaccharides that include cellulose microfibrils that form both crystalline structures and cellulose chains of amorphous organization. The orientation of the cellulose fibers and their concentrations dictate the mechanical properties of the cell. Several methods are used to determine the levels of crystalline cellulose, each bringing both advantages and limitations. Some can distinguish the proportion of crystalline regions within the total cellulose. However, they are limited to whole-organ analyses that are deficient in spatiotemporal information. Others relying on live imaging, are limited by the use of imprecise dyes. Here, we report a sensitive polarized light-based system for specific quantification of relative light retardance, representing crystalline cellulose accumulation in cross sections of Arabidopsis thaliana roots. In this method, the cellular resolution and anatomical data are maintained, enabling direct comparisons between the different tissues composing the growing root. This approach opens a new analytical dimension, shedding light on the link between cell wall composition, cellular behavior and whole-organ growth. PMID:27214583

  10. The WD40 repeat protein NEDD1 functions in microtubule organization during cell division in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zeng, C J Tracy; Lee, Y-R Julie; Liu, Bo

    2009-04-01

    Although cells of flowering plants lack a structurally defined microtubule-organizing center like the centrosome, organization of the spindles and phragmoplasts in mitosis is known to involve the evolutionarily conserved gamma-tubulin complex. We have investigated the function of Arabidopsis thaliana NEDD1, a WD40 repeat protein related to the animal NEDD1/GCP-WD protein, which interacts with the gamma-tubulin complex. The NEDD1 protein decorates spindle microtubules (MTs) preferentially toward spindle poles and phragmoplast MTs toward their minus ends. A T-DNA insertional allele of the single NEDD1 gene was isolated and maintained in heterozygous sporophytes, and NEDD1's function in cell division was analyzed in haploid microspores produced by the heterozygote. In approximately half of the dividing microspores exhibiting aberrant MT organization, spindles were no longer restricted to the cell periphery and became abnormally elongated. After mitosis, MTs aggregated between reforming nuclei but failed to appear in a bipolar configuration. Consequently, defective microspores did not form a continuous cell plate, and two identical nuclei were produced with no differentiation into generative and vegetative cells. Our results support the notion that the plant NEDD1 homolog plays a critical role in MT organization during mitosis, and its function is likely linked to that of the gamma-tubulin complex. PMID:19383896

  11. ARABIDOPSIS HOMOLOG of TRITHORAX1 (ATX1) is required for cell production, patterning, and morphogenesis in root development

    PubMed Central

    Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Alvarez-Venegas, Raúl; Shishkova, Svetlana; Dubrovsky, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    ARABIDOPSIS HOMOLOG of TRITHORAX1 (ATX1/SDG27), a known regulator of flower development, encodes a H3K4histone methyltransferase that maintains a number of genes in an active state. In this study, the role of ATX1 in root development was evaluated. The loss-of-function mutant atx1-1 was impaired in primary root growth. The data suggest that ATX1 controls root growth by regulating cell cycle duration, cell production, and the transition from cell proliferation in the root apical meristem (RAM) to cell elongation. In atx1-1, the quiescent centre (QC) cells were irregular in shape and more expanded than those of the wild type. This feature, together with the atypical distribution of T-divisions, the presence of oblique divisions, and the abnormal cell patterning in the RAM, suggests a lack of coordination between cell division and cell growth in the mutant. The expression domain of QC-specific markers was expanded both in the primary RAM and in the developing lateral root primordia of atx1-1 plants. These abnormalities were independent of auxin-response gradients. ATX1 was also found to be required for lateral root initiation, morphogenesis, and emergence. The time from lateral root initiation to emergence was significantly extended in the atx1-1 mutant. Overall, these data suggest that ATX1 is involved in the timing of root development, stem cell niche maintenance, and cell patterning during primary and lateral root development. Thus, ATX1 emerges as an important player in root system architecture. PMID:25205583

  12. Overexpression of AT14A confers tolerance to drought stress-induced oxidative damage in suspension cultured cells of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; He, Jie; Ding, Haidong; Liu, Hui; Lü, Bing; Liang, Jiansheng; Wang, L; He, J; Ding, H D; Liu, H; Lü, B; Liang, J S

    2015-07-01

    Drought stress can affect interaction between plant cell plasma membrane and cell wall. Arabidopsis AT14A, an integrin-like protein, mediates the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum (WMC continuum). To gain further insight into the function of AT14A, the role of AT14A in response to drought stress simulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG-6000) in Arabidopsis suspension cultures was investigated. The expression of this gene was induced by PEG-6000 resulting from reverse transcription-PCR, which was further confirmed by the expression data from publically available microarray datasets. Compared to the wild-type cells, overexpression of AT14A (AT14A-OE) in Arabidopsis cultures exhibited a greater ability to adapt to water deficit, as evidenced by higher biomass accumulation and cell survival rate. Furthermore, AT14A-OE cells showed a higher tolerance to PEG-induced oxidative damage, as reflected by less H2O2 content, lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) content), and ion leakage, which was further verified by maintaining high levels of activities of antioxidant defense enzymes such as ascorbate peroxidase and guaiacol peroxidase and soluble protein. Taken together, our results suggest that overexpression of AT14A improves drought stress tolerance and that AT14A is involved in suppressing oxidative damage under drought stress in part via regulation of antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:25500719

  13. Differential Roles of Two Homologous Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Genes in Regulating Cell Cycle and Innate Immunity in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hamdoun, Safae; Zhang, Chong; Gill, Manroop; Churchman, Michelle; Larkin, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Precise cell-cycle control is critical for plant development and responses to pathogen invasion. Two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes, SIAMESE (SIM) and SIM-RELATED 1 (SMR1), were recently shown to regulate Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) defense based on phenotypes conferred by a sim smr1 double mutant. However, whether these two genes play differential roles in cell-cycle and defense control is unknown. In this report, we show that while acting synergistically to promote endoreplication, SIM and SMR1 play different roles in affecting the ploidy of trichome and leaf cells, respectively. In addition, we found that the smr1-1 mutant, but not sim-1, was more susceptible to a virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain, and this susceptibility could be rescued by activating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defense. Consistent with these results, smr1-1 partially suppressed the dwarfism, high SA levels, and cell death phenotypes in acd6-1, a mutant used to gauge the change of defense levels. Thus, SMR1 functions partly through SA in defense control. The differential roles of SIM and SMR1 are due to differences in temporal and spatial expression of these two genes in Arabidopsis tissues and in response to P. syringae infection. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis of plants with altered SA signaling revealed that SA is necessary, but not sufficient, to change cell-cycle progression. We further found that a mutant with three CYCD3 genes disrupted also compromised disease resistance to P. syringae. Together, this study reveals differential roles of two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in regulating cell-cycle progression and innate immunity in Arabidopsis and provides insights into the importance of cell-cycle control during host-pathogen interactions. PMID:26561564

  14. Enhanced homologous recombination is induced by alpha-particle radiation in somatic cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Po; Liu, Ping; Wu, Yuejin

    Almost 9 percent of cosmic rays which strike the earth's atmosphere are alpha particles. As one of the ionizing radiations (IR), its biological effects have been widely studied. However, the plant genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation was not largely known. In this research, the Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic for GUS recombination substrate was used to evaluate the genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation (3.3MeV). The pronounced effects of systemic exposure to alpha-particle radiation on the somatic homologous recombination frequency (HRF) were found at different doses. The 10Gy dose of radiation induced the maximal HRF which was 1.9-fold higher than the control. The local radiation of alpha-particle (10Gy) on root also resulted in a 2.5-fold increase of somatic HRF in non-radiated aerial plant, indicating that the signal(s) of genomic instability was transferred to non-radiated parts and initiated their genomic instability. Concurrent treatment of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana with alpha-particle and DMSO(ROS scavenger) both in systemic and local radiation signifi- cantly suppressed the somatic HR, indicating that the free radicals produced by alpha-particle radiation took part in the production of signal of genomic instability rather than the signal transfer. Key words: alpha-particle radiation, somatic homologous recombination, genomic instability

  15. Desaturase mutants reveal that membrane rigidification acts as a cold perception mechanism upstream of the diacylglycerol kinase pathway in Arabidopsis cells.

    PubMed

    Vaultier, Marie-Noëlle; Cantrel, Catherine; Vergnolle, Chantal; Justin, Anne-Marie; Demandre, Chantal; Benhassaine-Kesri, Ghouziel; Ciçek, Dominique; Zachowski, Alain; Ruelland, Eric

    2006-07-24

    Membrane rigidification could be the first step of cold perception in poikilotherms. We have investigated its implication in diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) activation by cold stress in suspension cells from Arabidopsis mutants altered in desaturase activities. By lateral diffusion assay, we showed that plasma membrane rigidification with temperature decrease was steeper in cells deficient in oleate desaturase than in wild type cells and in cells overexpressing linoleate desaturase. The threshold for the activation of the DAGK pathway in each type of cells correlated with this order of rigidification rate, suggesting that cold induced-membrane rigidification is upstream of DAGK pathway activation. PMID:16839551

  16. Overexpression of the carbohydrate binding module of strawberry expansin2 in Arabidopsis thaliana modifies plant growth and cell wall metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Cristina F; Villarreal, Natalia M; Rossi, Franco R; Martínez, Santiago; Martínez, Gustavo A; Civello, Pedro M

    2015-05-01

    Several cell wall enzymes are carbohydrate active enzymes that contain a putative Carbohydrate Binding Module (CBM) in their structures. The main function of these non-catalitic modules is to facilitate the interaction between the enzyme and its substrate. Expansins are non-hydrolytic proteins present in the cell wall, and their structure includes a CBM in the C-terminal that bind to cell wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins. We studied the ability of the Expansin2 CBM (CBMFaEXP2) from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, Duch) to modify the cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants overexpressing CBMFaEXP2 were characterized phenotypically and biochemically. Transgenic plants were taller than wild type, possibly owing to a faster growth of the main stem. Cell walls of CBMFaEXP2-expressing plants were thicker and contained higher amount of pectins. Lower activity of a set of enzymes involved in cell wall degradation (PG, β-Gal, β-Xyl) was found, and the expression of the corresponding genes (AtPG, Atβ-Gal, Atβ-Xyl5) was reduced also. In addition, a decrease in the expression of two A. thaliana Expansin genes (AtEXP5 and AtEXP8) was observed. Transgenic plants were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea infection than wild type, possibly as a consequence of higher cell wall integrity. Our results support the hypothesis that the overexpression of a putative CBM is able to modify plant cell wall structure leading to modulation of wall loosening and plant growth. These findings might offer a tool to controlling physiological processes where cell wall disassembly is relevant, such as fruit softening. PMID:25837738

  17. TONNEAU2/FASS Regulates the Geometry of Microtubule Nucleation and Cortical Array Organization in Interphase Arabidopsis Cells[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kirik, Angela; Ehrhardt, David W.; Kirik, Viktor

    2012-01-01

    Organization of microtubules into ordered arrays involves spatial and temporal regulation of microtubule nucleation. Here, we show that acentrosomal microtubule nucleation in plant cells involves a previously unknown regulatory step that determines the geometry of microtubule nucleation. Dynamic imaging of interphase cortical microtubules revealed that the ratio of branching to in-bundle microtubule nucleation on cortical microtubules is regulated by the Arabidopsis thaliana B′′ subunit of protein phosphatase 2A, which is encoded by the TONNEAU2/FASS (TON2) gene. The probability of nucleation from γ-tubulin complexes localized at the cell cortex was not affected by a loss of TON2 function, suggesting a specific role of TON2 in regulating the nucleation geometry. Both loss of TON2 function and ectopic targeting of TON2 to the plasma membrane resulted in defects in cell shape, suggesting the importance of TON2-mediated regulation of the microtubule cytoskeleton in cell morphogenesis. Loss of TON2 function also resulted in an inability for cortical arrays to reorient in response to light stimulus, suggesting an essential role for TON2 and microtubule branching nucleation in reorganization of microtubule arrays. Our data establish TON2 as a regulator of interphase microtubule nucleation and provide experimental evidence for a novel regulatory step in the process of microtubule-dependent nucleation. PMID:22395485

  18. A Multidirectional Non-Cell Autonomous Control and a Genetic Interaction Restricting Tobacco Etch Virus Susceptibility in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gopalan, Suresh

    2007-01-01

    Background Viruses constitute a major class of pathogens that infect a variety of hosts. Understanding the intricacies of signaling during host-virus interactions should aid in designing disease prevention strategies and in understanding mechanistic aspects of host and pathogen signaling machinery. Methodology/Principal Findings An Arabidopsis mutant, B149, impaired in susceptibility to Tobacco etch virus (TEV), a positive strand RNA virus of picoRNA family, was identified using a high-throughput genetic screen and a counterselection scheme. The defects include initiation of infection foci, rate of cell-to-cell movement and long distance movement. Conclusions/Significance The defect in infectivity is conferred by a recessive locus. Molecular genetic analysis and complementation analysis with three alleles of a previously published mutant lsp1 (loss of susceptibility to potyviruses) indicate a genetic interaction conferring haploinsufficiency between the B149 locus and certain alleles of lsp1 resulting in impaired host susceptibility. The pattern of restriction of TEV foci on leaves at or near the boundaries of certain cell types and leaf boundaries suggest dysregulation of a multidirectional non-cell autonomous regulatory mechanism. Understanding the nature of this multidirectional signal and the molecular genetic mechanism conferring it should potentially reveal a novel arsenal in the cellular machinery. PMID:17912362

  19. Transcriptome profiling in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems grown under hypergravity in terms of cell walls and plant hormones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaoki, D.; Karahara, I.; Nishiuchi, T.; De Oliveira, S.; Schreiber, L.; Wakasugi, T.; Yamada, K.; Yamaguchi, K.; Kamisaka, S.

    2009-07-01

    Land plants rely on lignified secondary cell walls in supporting their body weight on the Earth. Although gravity influences the formation of the secondary cell walls, the regulatory mechanism of their formation by gravity is not yet understood. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of gene expression in inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana L. using microarray (22 K) to identify genes whose expression is modulated under hypergravity condition (300 g). Total RNA was isolated from the basal region of inflorescence stems of plants grown for 24 h at 300 g or 1 g. Microarray analysis showed that hypergravity up-regulated the expression of 403 genes to more than 2-fold. Hypergravity up-regulated the genes responsible for the biosynthesis or modification of cell wall components such as lignin, xyloglucan, pectin and structural proteins. In addition, hypergravity altered the expression of genes related to the biosynthesis of plant hormones such as auxin and ethylene and that of genes encoding hormone-responsive proteins. Our transcriptome profiling indicates that hypergravity influences the formation of secondary cell walls by modulating the pattern of gene expression, and that auxin and/or ethylene play an important role in signaling hypergravity stimulus.

  20. ß-amylase1 mutant Arabidopsis plants show improved drought tolerance due to reduced starch breakdown in guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Prasch, Christian Maximilian; Ott, Kirsten Verena; Bauer, Hubert; Ache, Peter; Hedrich, Rainer; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    In plants, drought stress is a major growth limiting factor causing cell water loss through open stomata. In this study, guard cell-specific transcripts from drought-stressed Arabidopsis plants were analysed and a down-regulation of β-amylase 1 (BAM1) was found. In previous studies, BAM1 was shown to be involved in stomatal starch degradation under ambient conditions. Impaired starch breakdown of bam1 mutant plants was accompanied by decreased stomatal opening. Here, it is shown that drought tolerance of bam1 mutant plants is improved as compared with wild-type controls. Microarray analysis of stomata-specific transcripts from bam1 mutant plants revealed a significant down-regulation of genes encoding aquaporins, auxin- and ethylene-responsive factors, and cell-wall modifying enzymes. This expression pattern suggests that reduced water uptake and limited cell wall extension are associated with the closed state of stomata of bam1 mutant plants. Together these data suggest that regulation of stomata-specific starch turnover is important for adapting stomata opening to environmental needs and its breeding manipulation may result in drought tolerant crop plants. PMID:26139825

  1. POLYGALACTURONASE INVOLVED IN EXPANSION1 Functions in Cell Elongation and Flower Development in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chaowen; Somerville, Chris; Anderson, Charles T.

    2014-01-01

    Pectins are acidic carbohydrates that comprise a significant fraction of the primary walls of eudicotyledonous plant cells. They influence wall porosity and extensibility, thus controlling cell and organ growth during plant development. The regulated degradation of pectins is required for many cell separation events in plants, but the role of pectin degradation in cell expansion is poorly defined. Using an activation tag screen designed to isolate genes involved in wall expansion, we identified a gene encoding a putative polygalacturonase that, when overexpressed, resulted in enhanced hypocotyl elongation in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. We named this gene POLYGALACTURONASE INVOLVED IN EXPANSION1 (PGX1). Plants lacking PGX1 display reduced hypocotyl elongation that is complemented by transgenic PGX1 expression. PGX1 is expressed in expanding tissues throughout development, including seedlings, roots, leaves, and flowers. PGX1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) localizes to the apoplast, and heterologously expressed PGX1 displays in vitro polygalacturonase activity, supporting a function for this protein in apoplastic pectin degradation. Plants either overexpressing or lacking PGX1 display alterations in total polygalacturonase activity, pectin molecular mass, and wall composition and also display higher proportions of flowers with extra petals, suggesting PGX1’s involvement in floral organ patterning. These results reveal new roles for polygalacturonases in plant development. PMID:24681615

  2. ß-amylase1 mutant Arabidopsis plants show improved drought tolerance due to reduced starch breakdown in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Prasch, Christian Maximilian; Ott, Kirsten Verena; Bauer, Hubert; Ache, Peter; Hedrich, Rainer; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    In plants, drought stress is a major growth limiting factor causing cell water loss through open stomata. In this study, guard cell-specific transcripts from drought-stressed Arabidopsis plants were analysed and a down-regulation of β-amylase 1 (BAM1) was found. In previous studies, BAM1 was shown to be involved in stomatal starch degradation under ambient conditions. Impaired starch breakdown of bam1 mutant plants was accompanied by decreased stomatal opening. Here, it is shown that drought tolerance of bam1 mutant plants is improved as compared with wild-type controls. Microarray analysis of stomata-specific transcripts from bam1 mutant plants revealed a significant down-regulation of genes encoding aquaporins, auxin- and ethylene-responsive factors, and cell-wall modifying enzymes. This expression pattern suggests that reduced water uptake and limited cell wall extension are associated with the closed state of stomata of bam1 mutant plants. Together these data suggest that regulation of stomata-specific starch turnover is important for adapting stomata opening to environmental needs and its breeding manipulation may result in drought tolerant crop plants. PMID:26139825

  3. The reorganization of actin filaments is required for vacuolar fusion of guard cells during stomatal opening in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Juan; Ren, Fei; Gao, Xin-Qi; Wei, Peng-Cheng; Wang, Xue-Chen

    2013-02-01

    The reorganization of actin filaments (AFs) and vacuoles in guard cells is involved in the regulation of stomatal movement. However, it remains unclear whether there is any interaction between the reorganization of AFs and vacuolar changes during stomatal movement. Here, we report the relationship between the reorganization of AFs and vacuolar fusion revealed in pharmacological experiments, and characterizing stomatal opening in actin-related protein 2 (arp2) and arp3 mutants. Our results show that cytochalasin-D-induced depolymerization or phalloidin-induced stabilization of AFs leads to an increase in small unfused vacuoles during stomatal opening in wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis plants. Light-induced stomatal opening is retarded and vacuolar fusion in guard cells is impaired in the mutants, in which the reorganization and the dynamic parameters of AFs are aberrant compared with those of the WT. In WT, AFs tightly surround the small separated vacuoles, forming a ring that encircles the boundary membranes of vacuoles partly fused during stomatal opening. In contrast, in the mutants, most AFs and actin patches accumulate abnormally around the nuclei of the guard cells, which probably further impair vacuolar fusion and retard stomatal opening. Our results suggest that the reorganization of AFs regulates vacuolar fusion in guard cells during stomatal opening. PMID:22891733

  4. The observation research of the differences in cell death and reactive oxygen species in the process of infecting Arabidopsis with avirulent strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, HuaBin; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Objective: To observe the differences of cell death and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the process of infecting Arabidopsis with avirulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (avrB, avrRps4), it will be of great importance to research the role of plant disease resistance and defense response. Methods: Using WT, AtrbohD and AtrbohF mutant as experimental materials, we discuss the impact of cell death and ROS on the leaves of Arabidopsis infected with avirulent Pst DC3000 (avrB, avrRps4), observed by spectral analysis and visualized by DAB and trypan blue stain. Results: When infected with avirulent Pst DC3000, both WT and AtrbohF mutant line behaved resistance that exhibited burst of ROS and HR occur, limit senescence and pathogen induced chlorotic cell death. Paradoxically, AtrbohD mutant behaved susceptible characters that exhibited a small quantity of ROS accumulated and enhanced cell death. Conclusion: After infection of Arabidopsis with avirulent Pst DC3000, WT exhibited more ROS accumulation than AtrbohF, and AtrbohD eliminated the majority of total ROS production. Although both WT and AtrbohF mutant exhibited HR occur, enhanced cell death in AtrbohD mutant.

  5. A Novel Function for Arabidopsis CYCLASE1 in Programmed Cell Death Revealed by Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) Analysis of Extracellular Matrix Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sarah J.; Kroon, Johan T. M.; Simon, William J.; Slabas, Antoni R.; Chivasa, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death is essential for plant development and stress adaptation. A detailed understanding of the signal transduction pathways that regulate plant programmed cell death requires identification of the underpinning protein networks. Here, we have used a protagonist and antagonist of programmed cell death triggered by fumonisin B1 as probes to identify key cell death regulatory proteins in Arabidopsis. Our hypothesis was that changes in the abundance of cell death-regulatory proteins induced by the protagonist should be blocked or attenuated by concurrent treatment with the antagonist. We focused on proteins present in the mobile phase of the extracellular matrix on the basis that they are important for cell–cell communications during growth and stress-adaptive responses. Salicylic acid, a plant hormone that promotes programmed cell death, and exogenous ATP, which can block fumonisin B1-induced cell death, were used to treat Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures prior to isobaric-tagged relative and absolute quantitation analysis of secreted proteins. A total of 33 proteins, whose response to salicylic acid was suppressed by ATP, were identified as putative cell death-regulatory proteins. Among these was CYCLASE1, which was selected for further analysis using reverse genetics. Plants in which CYCLASE1 gene expression was knocked out by insertion of a transfer-DNA sequence manifested dramatically increased cell death when exposed to fumonisin B1 or a bacterial pathogen that triggers the defensive hypersensitive cell death. Although pathogen inoculation altered CYCLASE1 gene expression, multiplication of bacterial pathogens was indistinguishable between wild type and CYCLASE1 knockout plants. However, remarkably severe chlorosis symptoms developed on gene knockout plants in response to inoculation with either a virulent bacterial pathogen or a disabled mutant that is incapable of causing disease in wild type plants. These results show that CYCLASE1, which

  6. Transcript and protein profiling analysis of OTA-induced cell death reveals the regulation of the toxicity response process in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Peng, Xiaoli; Xu, Wentao; Luo, YunBo; Zhao, Weiwei; Hao, Junran; Liang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a toxic isocoumarin derivative produced by various species of mould which mainly grow on grain, coffee, and nuts. Recent studies have suggested that OTA induces cell death in plants. To investigate possible mechanisms of OTA phytotoxicity, both digital gene expression (DGE) transcriptomic and two-dimensional electrophoresis proteomic analyses were used, through which 3118 genes and 23 proteins were identified as being up- or down-regulated at least 2-fold in Arabidopsis leaf in response to OTA treatment. First, exposure of excised Arabidopsis thaliana leaves to OTA rapidly causes the hypersensitive reponse, significantly accelerates the increase of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and enhances antioxidant enzyme defence responses and xenobiotic detoxification. Secondly, OTA stimulation causes dynamic changes in transcription factors and activates the membrane transport system dramatically. Thirdly, a concomitant persistence of compromised photosynthesis and photorespiration is indicative of a metabolic shift from a highly active to a weak state. Finally, the data revealed that ethylene, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling molecules mediate the process of toxicity caused by OTA. Profiling analyses on Arabidopsis in response to OTA will provide new insights into signalling transduction that modulates the OTA phytotoxicity mechanism, facilitate mapping of regulatory networks, and extend the ability to improve OTA tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:22207617

  7. Transcript and protein profiling analysis of OTA-induced cell death reveals the regulation of the toxicity response process in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Peng, Xiaoli; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Zhao, Weiwei; Hao, Junran; Liang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-03-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a toxic isocoumarin derivative produced by various species of mould which mainly grow on grain, coffee, and nuts. Recent studies have suggested that OTA induces cell death in plants. To investigate possible mechanisms of OTA phytotoxicity, both digital gene expression (DGE) transcriptomic and two-dimensional electrophoresis proteomic analyses were used, through which 3118 genes and 23 proteins were identified as being up- or down-regulated at least 2-fold in Arabidopsis leaf in response to OTA treatment. First, exposure of excised Arabidopsis thaliana leaves to OTA rapidly causes the hypersensitive reponse, significantly accelerates the increase of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and enhances antioxidant enzyme defence responses and xenobiotic detoxification. Secondly, OTA stimulation causes dynamic changes in transcription factors and activates the membrane transport system dramatically. Thirdly, a concomitant persistence of compromised photosynthesis and photorespiration is indicative of a metabolic shift from a highly active to a weak state. Finally, the data revealed that ethylene, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling molecules mediate the process of toxicity caused by OTA. Profiling analyses on Arabidopsis in response to OTA will provide new insights into signalling transduction that modulates the OTA phytotoxicity mechanism, facilitate mapping of regulatory networks, and extend the ability to improve OTA tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:22207617

  8. Effects of mutations in the Arabidopsis Cold Shock Domain Protein 3 (AtCSP3) gene on leaf cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongil; Karlson, Dale

    2012-08-01

    The cold shock domain is among the most evolutionarily conserved nucleic acid binding domains from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes, including plants. Although eukaryotic cold shock domain proteins have been extensively studied as transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators during various developmental processes, their functional roles in plants remains poorly understood. In this study, AtCSP3 (At2g17870), which is one of four Arabidopsis thaliana c old s hock domain proteins (AtCSPs), was functionally characterized. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed high expression of AtCSP3 in reproductive and meristematic tissues. A homozygous atcsp3 loss-of-function mutant exhibits an overall reduced seedling size, stunted and orbicular rosette leaves, reduced petiole length, and curled leaf blades. Palisade mesophyll cells are smaller and more circular in atcsp3 leaves. Cell size analysis indicated that the reduced size of the circular mesophyll cells appears to be generated by a reduction of cell length along the leaf-length axis, resulting in an orbicular leaf shape. It was also determined that leaf cell expansion is impaired for lateral leaf development in the atcsp3 loss-of-function mutant, but leaf cell proliferation is not affected. AtCSP3 loss-of-function resulted in a dramatic reduction of LNG1 transcript, a gene that is involved in two-dimensional leaf polarity regulation. Transient subcellular localization of AtCSP3 in onion epidermal cells confirmed a nucleocytoplasmic localization pattern. Collectively, these data suggest that AtCSP3 is functionally linked to the regulation of leaf length by affecting LNG1 transcript accumulation during leaf development. A putative function of AtCSP3 as an RNA binding protein is also discussed in relation to leaf development. PMID:22888122

  9. Atomic force microscopy stiffness tomography on living Arabidopsis thaliana cells reveals the mechanical properties of surface and deep cell-wall layers during growth.

    PubMed

    Radotić, Ksenija; Roduit, Charles; Simonović, Jasna; Hornitschek, Patricia; Fankhauser, Christian; Mutavdžić, Dragosav; Steinbach, Gabor; Dietler, Giovanni; Kasas, Sandor

    2012-08-01

    Cell-wall mechanical properties play a key role in the growth and the protection of plants. However, little is known about genuine wall mechanical properties and their growth-related dynamics at subcellular resolution and in living cells. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) stiffness tomography to explore stiffness distribution in the cell wall of suspension-cultured Arabidopsis thaliana as a model of primary, growing cell wall. For the first time that we know of, this new imaging technique was performed on living single cells of a higher plant, permitting monitoring of the stiffness distribution in cell-wall layers as a function of the depth and its evolution during the different growth phases. The mechanical measurements were correlated with changes in the composition of the cell wall, which were revealed by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In the beginning and end of cell growth, the average stiffness of the cell wall was low and the wall was mechanically homogenous, whereas in the exponential growth phase, the average wall stiffness increased, with increasing heterogeneity. In this phase, the difference between the superficial and deep wall stiffness was highest. FTIR spectra revealed a relative increase in the polysaccharide/lignin content. PMID:22947854

  10. Turgor Regulation in Osmotically Stressed Arabidopsis Epidermal Root Cells. Direct Support for the Role of Inorganic Ion Uptake as Revealed by Concurrent Flux and Cell Turgor Measurements1

    PubMed Central

    Shabala, Sergey N.; Lew, Roger R.

    2002-01-01

    Hyperosmotic stress is known to significantly enhance net uptake of inorganic ions into plant cells. Direct evidence for cell turgor recovery via such a mechanism, however, is still lacking. In the present study, we performed concurrent measurements of net ion fluxes (with the noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique) and cell turgor changes (with the pressure-probe technique) to provide direct evidence that inorganic ion uptake regulates turgor in osmotically stressed Arabidopsis epidermal root cells. Immediately after onset of hyperosmotic stress (100/100 mm mannitol/sorbitol treatment), the cell turgor dropped from 0.65 to about 0.25 MPa. Turgor recovery started within 2 to 10 min after the treatment and was accompanied by a significant (30–80 nmol m−2 s−1) increase in uptake of K+, Cl−, and Na+ by root cells. In most cells, almost complete (>90% of initial values) recovery of the cell turgor was observed within 40 to 50 min after stress onset. In another set of experiments, we combined the voltage-clamp and the microelectrode ion flux estimation techniques to show that this process is, in part, mediated by voltage-gated K+ transporters at the cell plasma membrane. The possible physiological significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:12011359

  11. Plastidial Glycolytic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Is an Important Determinant in the Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism of Heterotrophic Cells in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Anoman, Armand D; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Rosa-Téllez, Sara; Flores-Tornero, María; Serrano, Ramón; Bueso, Eduardo; Fernie, Alisdair R; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2015-11-01

    This study functionally characterizes the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plastidial glycolytic isoforms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells. We expressed the enzyme in gapcp double mutants (gapcp1gapcp2) under the control of photosynthetic (Rubisco small subunit RBCS2B [RBCS]) or heterotrophic (phosphate transporter PHT1.2 [PHT]) cell-specific promoters. Expression of GAPCp1 under the control of RBCS in gapcp1gapcp2 had no significant effect on the metabolite profile or growth in the aerial part (AP). GAPCp1 expression under the control of the PHT promoter clearly affected Arabidopsis development by increasing the number of lateral roots and having a major effect on AP growth and metabolite profile. Our results indicate that GAPCp1 is not functionally important in photosynthetic cells but plays a fundamental role in roots and in heterotrophic cells of the AP. Specifically, GAPCp activity may be required in root meristems and the root cap for normal primary root growth. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses indicate that the lack of GAPCp activity affects nitrogen and carbon metabolism as well as mineral nutrition and that glycerate and glutamine are the main metabolites responding to GAPCp activity. Thus, GAPCp could be an important metabolic connector of glycolysis with other pathways, such as the phosphorylated pathway of serine biosynthesis, the ammonium assimilation pathway, or the metabolism of γ-aminobutyrate, which in turn affect plant development. PMID:26134167

  12. Regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis by poplar R2R3 MYB transcription factor PtrMYB152 in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Li, Eryang; Porth, Ilga; Chen, Jin-Gui; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Douglas, Carl

    2014-05-23

    Poplar has 192 annotated R2R3 MYB genes, of which only three have been shown to play a role in the regulation of secondary cell wall formation. Here we report the characterization of PtrMYB152, a poplar homolog of the Arabidopsis R2R3 MYB transcription factor AtMYB43, in the regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis. The expression of PtrMYB152 in secondary xylem is about 18 times of that in phloem. When expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of either 35S or PtrCesA8 promoters, PtrMYB152 increased secondary cell wall thickness, which is likely caused by increased lignification. Accordingly, elevated expression of genes encoding sets of enzymes in secondary wall biosynthesis were observed in transgenic plants expressing PtrMYB152. Arabidopsis protoplast transfection assays suggested that PtrMYB152 functions as a transcriptional activator. Taken together, our results suggest that PtrMYB152 may be part of a regulatory network activating expression of discrete sets of secondary cell wall biosynthesis genes.

  13. FACKEL is a sterol C-14 reductase required for organized cell division and expansion in Arabidopsis embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schrick, Kathrin; Mayer, Ulrike; Horrichs, Andrea; Kuhnt, Christine; Bellini, Catherine; Dangl, Jeff; Schmidt, Jürgen; Jürgens, Gerd

    2000-01-01

    In flowering plants, the developing embryo consists of growing populations of cells whose fates are determined in a position-dependent manner to form the adult organism. Mutations in the FACKEL (FK) gene affect body organization of the Arabidopsis seedling. We report that FK is required for cell division and expansion and is involved in proper organization of the embryo. We isolated FK by positional cloning. Expression analysis in embryos revealed that FK mRNA becomes localized to meristematic zones. FK encodes a predicted integral membrane protein related to the vertebrate lamin B receptor and sterol reductases across species, including yeast sterol C-14 reductase ERG24. We provide functional evidence that FK encodes a sterol C-14 reductase by complementation of erg24. GC/MS analysis confirmed that fk mutations lead to accumulation of intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway preceding the C-14 reductase step. Although fk represents a sterol biosynthetic mutant, the phenotype was not rescued by feeding with brassinosteroids (BRs), the only plant sterol signaling molecules known so far. We propose that synthesis of sterol signals in addition to BRs is important in mediating regulated cell growth and organization during embryonic development. Our results indicate a novel role for sterols in the embryogenesis of plants. PMID:10859166

  14. Phloem parenchyma transfer cells in Arabidopsis – an experimental system to identify transcriptional regulators of wall ingrowth formation

    PubMed Central

    Arun Chinnappa, Kiruba S.; Nguyen, Thi Thu S.; Hou, Jiexi; Wu, Yuzhou; McCurdy, David W.

    2013-01-01

    In species performing apoplasmic loading, phloem cells adjacent to sieve elements often develop into transfer cells (TCs) with wall ingrowths. The highly invaginated wall ingrowths serve to amplify plasma membrane surface area to achieve increased rates of apoplasmic transport, and may also serve as physical barriers to deter pathogen invasion. Wall ingrowth formation in TCs therefore plays an important role in phloem biology, however, the transcriptional switches regulating the deposition of this unique example of highly localized wall building remain unknown. Phloem parenchyma (PP) TCs in Arabidopsis veins provide an experimental system to identify such switches. The extent of ingrowth deposition responds to various abiotic and applied stresses, enabling bioinformatics to identify candidate regulatory genes. Furthermore, simple fluorescence staining of PP TCs in leaves enables phenotypic analysis of relevant mutants. Combining these approaches resulted in the identification of GIGANTEA as a regulatory component in the pathway controlling wall ingrowth development in PP TCs. Further utilization of this approach has identified two NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2 and CUC2)-domain and two MYB-related genes as putative transcriptional switches regulating wall ingrowth deposition in these cells. PMID:23630536

  15. Arabidopsis IRT2 cooperates with the high-affinity iron uptake system to maintain iron homeostasis in root epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Vert, Grégory; Barberon, Marie; Zelazny, Enric; Séguéla, Mathilde; Briat, Jean-François; Curie, Catherine

    2009-05-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all organisms but toxic when present in excess. Consequently, plants carefully regulate their iron uptake, dependent on the FRO2 ferric reductase and the IRT1 transporter, to control its homeostasis. Arabidopsis IRT2 gene, whose expression is induced in root epidermis upon iron deprivation, was shown to encode a functional iron/zinc transporter in yeast, and proposed to function in iron acquisition from the soil. In this study, we demonstrate that, unlike its close homolog IRT1, IRT2 is not involved in iron absorption from the soil since overexpression of IRT2 does not rescue the iron uptake defect of irt1-1 mutant and since a null irt2 mutant shows no chlorosis in low iron. Consistently, an IRT2-green fluorescent fusion protein, transiently expressed in culture cells, localizes to intracellular vesicles. However, IRT2 appears strictly co-regulated with FRO2 and IRT1, supporting the view that IRT2 is an integral component of the root response to iron deficiency in root epidermal cells. We propose a model where IRT2 likely prevents toxicity from IRT1-dependent iron fluxes in epidermal cells, through compartmentalization. PMID:19252923

  16. Intraspecific variability of cadmium tolerance and accumulation, and cadmium-induced cell wall modifications in the metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Claire-Lise; Juraniec, Michal; Huguet, Stéphanie; Chaves-Rodriguez, Elena; Salis, Pietro; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Certain molecular mechanisms of Cd tolerance and accumulation have been identified in the model species Arabidopsis halleri, while intraspecific variability of these traits and the mechanisms of shoot detoxification were little addressed. The Cd tolerance and accumulation of metallicolous and non-metallicolous A. halleri populations from different genetic units were tested in controlled conditions. In addition, changes in shoot cell wall composition were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Indeed, recent works on A. halleri suggest Cd sequestration both inside cells and in the cell wall/apoplast. All A. halleri populations tested were hypertolerant to Cd, and the metallicolous populations were on average the most tolerant. Accumulation was highly variable between and within populations, and populations that were non-accumulators of Cd were identified. The effect of Cd on the cell wall composition was quite similar in the sensitive species A. lyrata and in A. halleri individuals; the pectin/polysaccharide content of cell walls seems to increase after Cd treatment. Nevertheless, the changes induced by Cd were more pronounced in the less tolerant individuals, leading to a correlation between the level of tolerance and the extent of modifications. This work demonstrated that Cd tolerance and accumulation are highly variable traits in A. halleri, suggesting adaptation at the local scale and involvement of various molecular mechanisms. While in non-metallicolous populations drastic modifications of the cell wall occur due to higher Cd toxicity and/or Cd immobilization in this compartment, the increased tolerance of metallicolous populations probably involves other mechanisms such as vacuolar sequestration. PMID:25873677

  17. Intraspecific variability of cadmium tolerance and accumulation, and cadmium-induced cell wall modifications in the metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Claire-Lise; Juraniec, Michal; Huguet, Stéphanie; Chaves-Rodriguez, Elena; Salis, Pietro; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2015-06-01

    Certain molecular mechanisms of Cd tolerance and accumulation have been identified in the model species Arabidopsis halleri, while intraspecific variability of these traits and the mechanisms of shoot detoxification were little addressed. The Cd tolerance and accumulation of metallicolous and non-metallicolous A. halleri populations from different genetic units were tested in controlled conditions. In addition, changes in shoot cell wall composition were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Indeed, recent works on A. halleri suggest Cd sequestration both inside cells and in the cell wall/apoplast. All A. halleri populations tested were hypertolerant to Cd, and the metallicolous populations were on average the most tolerant. Accumulation was highly variable between and within populations, and populations that were non-accumulators of Cd were identified. The effect of Cd on the cell wall composition was quite similar in the sensitive species A. lyrata and in A. halleri individuals; the pectin/polysaccharide content of cell walls seems to increase after Cd treatment. Nevertheless, the changes induced by Cd were more pronounced in the less tolerant individuals, leading to a correlation between the level of tolerance and the extent of modifications. This work demonstrated that Cd tolerance and accumulation are highly variable traits in A. halleri, suggesting adaptation at the local scale and involvement of various molecular mechanisms. While in non-metallicolous populations drastic modifications of the cell wall occur due to higher Cd toxicity and/or Cd immobilization in this compartment, the increased tolerance of metallicolous populations probably involves other mechanisms such as vacuolar sequestration. PMID:25873677

  18. Mechanical properties of epidermal cells of whole living roots of Arabidopsis thaliana: An atomic force microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Anwesha N.; Chen, Xinyong; Scotchford, Colin A.; Walker, James; Wells, Darren M.; Roberts, Clive J.; Everitt, Nicola M.

    2012-02-01

    The knowledge of mechanical properties of root cell walls is vital to understand how these properties interact with relevant genetic and physiological processes to bring about growth. Expansion of cell walls is an essential component of growth, and the regulation of cell wall expansion is one of the ways in which the mechanics of growth is controlled, managed and directed. In this study, the inherent surface mechanical properties of living Arabidopsis thaliana whole-root epidermal cells were studied at the nanoscale using the technique of atomic force microscopy (AFM). A novel methodology was successfully developed to adapt AFM to live plant roots. Force-Indentation (F-I) experiments were conducted to investigate the mechanical properties along the length of the root. F-I curves for epidermal cells of roots were also generated by varying turgor pressure. The F-I curves displayed a variety of features due to the heterogeneity of the surface. Hysteresis is observed. Application of conventional models to living biological systems such as cell walls in nanometer regimes tends to increase error margins to a large extent. Hence information from the F-I curves were used in a preliminary semiquantitative analysis to infer material properties and calculate two parameters. The work done in the loading and unloading phases (hysteresis) of the force measurements were determined separately and were expressed in terms of “Index of Plasticity” (η), which characterized the elasticity properties of roots as a viscoelastic response. Scaling approaches were used to find the ratio of hardness to reduced modulus ((H)/(E*)).

  19. Transcriptome Analysis of the Arabidopsis Megaspore Mother Cell Uncovers the Importance of RNA Helicases for Plant Germline Development

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Anja; Wuest, Samuel E.; Vijverberg, Kitty; Baroux, Célia; Kleen, Daniela; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2011-01-01

    Germ line specification is a crucial step in the life cycle of all organisms. For sexual plant reproduction, the megaspore mother cell (MMC) is of crucial importance: it marks the first cell of the plant “germline” lineage that gets committed to undergo meiosis. One of the meiotic products, the functional megaspore, subsequently gives rise to the haploid, multicellular female gametophyte that harbours the female gametes. The MMC is formed by selection and differentiation of a single somatic, sub-epidermal cell in the ovule. The transcriptional network underlying MMC specification and differentiation is largely unknown. We provide the first transcriptome analysis of an MMC using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana with a combination of laser-assisted microdissection and microarray hybridizations. Statistical analyses identified an over-representation of translational regulation control pathways and a significant enrichment of DEAD/DEAH-box helicases in the MMC transcriptome, paralleling important features of the animal germline. Analysis of two independent T-DNA insertion lines suggests an important role of an enriched helicase, MNEME (MEM), in MMC differentiation and the restriction of the germline fate to only one cell per ovule primordium. In heterozygous mem mutants, additional enlarged MMC-like cells, which sometimes initiate female gametophyte development, were observed at higher frequencies than in the wild type. This closely resembles the phenotype of mutants affected in the small RNA and DNA-methylation pathways important for epigenetic regulation. Importantly, the mem phenotype shows features of apospory, as female gametophytes initiate from two non-sister cells in these mutants. Moreover, in mem gametophytic nuclei, both higher order chromatin structure and the distribution of LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 were affected, indicating epigenetic perturbations. In summary, the MMC transcriptome sets the stage for future functional characterization as

  20. Tunicamycin-induced inhibition of protein secretion into culture medium of Arabidopsis T87 suspension cells through mRNA degradation on the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yuji; Hayashi, Noriko; Tabara, Kazuki; Mishiba, Kei-Ichiro; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2016-06-01

    The N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress response and inhibits efficient protein secretion in eukaryotes. Using Arabidopsis suspension cells, we showed that the reduced secretion of mannose-binding lectin 1 (MBL1) protein by tunicamycin is accompanied by a significant decrease in MBL1 mRNA, suggesting that mRNA destabilization is the major cause of the inhibition of protein secretion in plants. PMID:26923805

  1. Arabidopsis Synaptotagmin 1 Is Required for the Maintenance of Plasma Membrane Integrity and Cell Viability[W

    PubMed Central

    Schapire, Arnaldo L.; Voigt, Boris; Jasik, Jan; Rosado, Abel; Lopez-Cobollo, Rosa; Menzel, Diedrik; Salinas, Julio; Mancuso, Stefano; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Baluska, Frantisek; Botella, Miguel A.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma membrane repair in animal cells uses synaptotagmin 7, a Ca2+-activated membrane fusion protein that mediates delivery of intracellular membranes to wound sites by a mechanism resembling neuronal Ca2+-regulated exocytosis. Here, we show that loss of function of the homologous Arabidopsis thaliana Synaptotagmin 1 protein (SYT1) reduces the viability of cells as a consequence of a decrease in the integrity of the plasma membrane. This reduced integrity is enhanced in the syt1-2 null mutant in conditions of osmotic stress likely caused by a defective plasma membrane repair. Consistent with a role in plasma membrane repair, SYT1 is ubiquitously expressed, is located at the plasma membrane, and shares all domains characteristic of animal synaptotagmins (i.e., an N terminus-transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic region containing two C2 domains with phospholipid binding activities). Our analyses support that membrane trafficking mediated by SYT1 is important for plasma membrane integrity and plant fitness. PMID:19088329

  2. Antisense expression of Gossypium hirsutum UDP-glucuronate decarboxylase in Arabidopsis leads to changes in cell wall components.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D M; Pan, Y X; Zhang, Y; Li, Z K; Wu, L Q; Liu, H W; Zhang, G Y; Wang, X F; Ma, Z Y

    2016-01-01

    UDP-glucuronate decarboxylase (UDP-xylose synthase; UXS, EC 4.1.1.35) is an essential enzyme of the non-cellulosic polysaccharide biosynthetic pathway. In the present study, using transient expression of fluorescently labeled Gossypium hirsutum UXS (GhUXS3) protein in onion epidermal cells, we observed that this protein was distributed in the cytoplasm. The GhUXS3 cDNA of cotton was expressed in an antisense orientation in Arabidopsis thaliana by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Homozygous plants showing down-regulation of UXS were analyzed with northern blots. Compared to the untransformed control, transgenic plant showed shorter roots, earlier blossom formation, and delayed senescence. Biochemical analysis indicated that levels of rhamnose, mannose, galactose, glucose, xylose, and cellulose were reduced in some of the down-regulated antisense plants. These results suggest that GhUXS3 regulates the conversion of non-cellulosic polysaccharides and modulates their composition in plant cell walls. We also discuss a possible cellular function for GhUXS in determining the quality of cotton fibers. PMID:26909959

  3. MYB58 and MYB63 are transcriptional activators of the lignin biosynthetic pathway during secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianli; Lee, Chanhui; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2009-01-01

    It has previously been shown that SECONDARY WALL-ASSOCIATED NAC DOMAIN PROTEIN1 (SND1) is a key transcription factor regulating secondary cell wall formation, including the biosynthesis of cellulose, xylan, and lignin. In this study, we show that two closely related SND1-regulated MYB transcription factors, MYB58 and MYB63, are transcriptional regulators specifically activating lignin biosynthetic genes during secondary wall formation in Arabidopsis thaliana. MYB58 and MYB63 are phylogenetically distinct from previously characterized MYBs shown to be associated with secondary wall formation or phenylpropanoid metabolism. Expression studies showed that MYB58 and MYB63 are specifically expressed in fibers and vessels undergoing secondary wall thickening. Dominant repression of their functions led to a reduction in secondary wall thickening and lignin content. Overexpression of MYB58 and MYB63 resulted in specific activation of lignin biosynthetic genes and concomitant ectopic deposition of lignin in cells that are normally unlignified. MYB58 was able to activate directly the expression of lignin biosynthetic genes and a secondary wall-associated laccase (LAC4) gene. Furthermore, the expression of MYB58 and MYB63 was shown to be regulated by the SND1 close homologs NST1, NST2, VND6, and VND7 and their downstream target MYB46. Together, our results indicate that MYB58 and MYB63 are specific transcriptional activators of lignin biosynthesis in the SND1-mediated transcriptional network regulating secondary wall formation. PMID:19122102

  4. Shared and distinct functions of the pseudokinase CORYNE (CRN) in shoot and root stem cell maintenance of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Somssich, Marc; Bleckmann, Andrea; Simon, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell maintenance in plants depends on the activity of small secreted signaling peptides of the CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION (CLE) family, which, in the shoot, act through at least three kinds of receptor complexes, CLAVATA1 (CLV1) homomers, CLAVATA2 (CLV2) / CORYNE (CRN) heteromers, and CLV1/CLV2/CRN multimers. In the root, the CLV2/CRN receptor complexes function in the proximal meristem to transmit signals from the CLE peptide CLE40. While CLV1 consists of an extracellular receptor domain and an intracellular kinase domain, CLV2, a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor-like protein, and CRN, a protein kinase, have to interact to form a receptor–kinase complex. The kinase domain of CRN has been reported to be catalytically inactive, and it is not yet known how the CLV2/CRN complex can relay the perceived signal into the cells, and whether the kinase domain is necessary for signal transduction at all. In this study we show that the kinase domain of CRN is actively involved in CLV3 signal transduction in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis, but it is dispensable for CRN protein function in root meristem maintenance. Hence, we provide an example of a catalytically inactive pseudokinase that is involved in two homologous pathways, but functions in distinctively different ways in each of them. PMID:27229734

  5. Atomic Force Microscopy of Photosystem II and Its Unit Cell Clustering Quantitatively Delineate the Mesoscale Variability in Arabidopsis Thylakoids

    PubMed Central

    Onoa, Bibiana; Schneider, Anna R.; Brooks, Matthew D.; Grob, Patricia; Nogales, Eva; Geissler, Phillip L.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Photoautotrophic organisms efficiently regulate absorption of light energy to sustain photochemistry while promoting photoprotection. Photoprotection is achieved in part by triggering a series of dissipative processes termed non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), which depend on the re-organization of photosystem (PS) II supercomplexes in thylakoid membranes. Using atomic force microscopy, we characterized the structural attributes of grana thylakoids from Arabidopsis thaliana to correlate differences in PSII organization with the role of SOQ1, a recently discovered thylakoid protein that prevents formation of a slowly reversible NPQ state. We developed a statistical image analysis suite to discriminate disordered from crystalline particles and classify crystalline arrays according to their unit cell properties. Through detailed analysis of the local organization of PSII supercomplexes in ordered and disordered phases, we found evidence that interactions among light-harvesting antenna complexes are weakened in the absence of SOQ1, inducing protein rearrangements that favor larger separations between PSII complexes in the majority (disordered) phase and reshaping the PSII crystallization landscape. The features we observe are distinct from known protein rearrangements associated with NPQ, providing further support for a role of SOQ1 in a novel NPQ pathway. The particle clustering and unit cell methodology developed here is generalizable to multiple types of microscopy and will enable unbiased analysis and comparison of large data sets. PMID:25007326

  6. Arabidopsis Cell Division Cycle 20.1 Is Required for Normal Meiotic Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Baixiao; Wang, Liudan; Ren, Ding; Ren, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Cell division requires proper spindle assembly; a surveillance pathway, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), monitors whether the spindle is normal and correctly attached to kinetochores. The SAC proteins regulate mitotic chromosome segregation by affecting CDC20 (Cell Division Cycle 20) function. However, it is unclear whether CDC20 regulates meiotic spindle assembly and proper homolog segregation. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana CDC20.1 gene is indispensable for meiosis and male fertility. We demonstrate that cdc20.1 meiotic chromosomes align asynchronously and segregate unequally and the metaphase I spindle has aberrant morphology. Comparison of the distribution of meiotic stages at different time points between the wild type and cdc20.1 reveals a delay of meiotic progression from diakinesis to anaphase I. Furthermore, cdc20.1 meiocytes exhibit an abnormal distribution of a histone H3 phosphorylation mark mediated by the Aurora kinase, providing evidence that CDC20.1 regulates Aurora localization for meiotic chromosome segregation. Further evidence that CDC20.1 and Aurora are functionally related was provided by meiosis-specific knockdown of At-Aurora1 expression, resulting in meiotic chromosome segregation defects similar to those of cdc20.1. Taken together, these results suggest a critical role for CDC20.1 in SAC-dependent meiotic chromosome segregation. PMID:26672070

  7. The influence of microgravity and spaceflight on columella cell ultrastructure in starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guisinger, M. M.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    The ultrastructure of root cap columella cells was studied by morphometric analysis in wild-type, a reduced-starch mutant, and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis grown in microgravity (F-microgravity) and compared to ground 1g (G-1g) and flight 1g (F-1g) controls. Seedlings of the wild-type and reduced-starch mutant that developed during an experiment on the Space Shuttle (both the F-microgravity samples and the F-lg control) exhibited a decreased starch content in comparison to the G-1g control. These results suggest that some factor associated with spaceflight (and not microgravity per se) affects starch metabolism. Elevated levels of ethylene were found during the experiments on the Space Shuttle, and analysis of ground controls with added ethylene demonstrated that this gas was responsible for decreased starch levels in the columella cells. This is the first study to use an on-board centrifuge as a control when quantifying starch in spaceflight-grown plants. Furthermore, our results show that ethylene levels must be carefully considered and controlled when designing experiments with plants for the International Space Station.

  8. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelko, Gennady V.; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A.; Rodermel, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-to-nucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. We conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27050746

  9. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pogorelko, Gennady V.; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A.; Rodermel, Steven R.

    2016-04-06

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplificationmore » of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-tonucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. Lastly, we conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and hostpathogen interactions.« less

  10. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Pogorelko, Gennady V; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A; Rodermel, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-to-nucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. We conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27050746

  11. Aluminum-induced gene expression and protein localization of a cell wall-associated receptor kinase in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Ezaki, Bunichi; He, Zheng-Hui; Tong, Hongyun; Osawa, Hiroki; Baluska, Frantisek; Volkmann, Dieter; Matsumoto, Hideaki

    2003-08-01

    Here, we report the aluminum (Al)-induced organ-specific expression of a WAK1 (cell wall-associated receptor kinase 1) gene and cell type-specific localization of WAK proteins in Arabidopsis. WAK1-specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed an Al-induced WAK1 gene expression in roots. Short- and long-term analysis of gene expression in root fractions showed a typical "on" and "off" pattern with a first peak at 3 h of Al exposure followed by a sharp decline at 6 h and a complete disappearance after 9 h of Al exposure, suggesting the WAK1 is a further representative of Al-induced early genes. In shoots, upon root Al exposure, an increased but stable WAK1 expression was observed. Using confocal microscopy, we visualized Al-induced closure of leaf stomata, consistent with previous suggestions that the Al stress primarily experienced in roots associated with the transfer of root-shoot signals. Elevated levels of WAK protein in root cells were observed through western blots after 6 h of Al exposure, indicating a lag time between the Al-induced WAK transcription and translation. WAK proteins are localized abundantly to peripheries of cortex cells within the elongation zone of the root apex. In these root cells, disintegration of cortical microtubules was observed after Al treatment but not after the Al analog lanthanum treatments. Tip-growing control root hairs, stem stomata, and leaf stomatal pores are characterized with high amounts of WAKs, suggesting WAKs are accumulating at plasma membrane domains, which suffer from mechanical stress and lack dense arrays of supporting cortical microtubules. Further, transgenic plants overexpressing WAK1 showed an enhanced Al tolerance in terms of root growth when compared with the wild-type plants, making the WAK1 one of the important candidates for plant defense against Al toxicity. PMID:12913180

  12. TPR5 is involved in directional cell division and is essential for the maintenance of meristem cell organization in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sotta, Naoyuki; Shantikumar, Lukram; Sakamoto, Takuya; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Fujiwara, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Root growth in plants is achieved through the co-ordination of cell division and expansion. In higher plants, the radial structure of the roots is formed during embryogenesis and maintained thereafter throughout development. Here we show that the tetratricopeptide repeat domain protein TPR5 is necessary for maintaining radial structure and growth rates in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. We isolated an A. thaliana mutant with reduced root growth and determined that TPR5 was the gene responsible for the phenotype. The root growth rate of the tpr5-1 mutant was reduced to ~60% of that in wild-type plants. The radial structure was disturbed by the occurrence of occasional extra periclinal cell divisions. While the number of meristematic cells was reduced in the tpr5 mutants, the cell length in the mature portion of the root did not differ from that of the wild type, suggesting that TPR5 is required for proper cell division but dispensable for cell elongation. Expression of the TPR5–GFP fusion protein driven by the TPR5 promoter displayed fluorescence in the cytoplasm of root meristems, but not in mature root regions. DNA staining revealed that frequencies of micronuclei were increased in root meristems of tpr5 mutants. From this study, we concluded that TPR5 is involved in preventing the formation of micronuclei and is necessary for both the activity and directionality of cell division in root meristems. PMID:26889009

  13. Global Analysis of Arabidopsis Gene Expression Uncovers a Complex Array of Changes Impacting Pathogen Response and Cell Cycle during Geminivirus Infection1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ascencio-Ibáñez, José Trinidad; Sozzani, Rosangela; Lee, Tae-Jin; Chu, Tzu-Ming; Wolfinger, Russell D.; Cella, Rino; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Geminiviruses are small DNA viruses that use plant replication machinery to amplify their genomes. Microarray analysis of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transcriptome in response to cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV) infection uncovered 5,365 genes (false discovery rate <0.005) differentially expressed in infected rosette leaves at 12 d postinoculation. Data mining revealed that CaLCuV triggers a pathogen response via the salicylic acid pathway and induces expression of genes involved in programmed cell death, genotoxic stress, and DNA repair. CaLCuV also altered expression of cell cycle-associated genes, preferentially activating genes expressed during S and G2 and inhibiting genes active in G1 and M. A limited set of core cell cycle genes associated with cell cycle reentry, late G1, S, and early G2 had increased RNA levels, while core cell cycle genes linked to early G1 and late G2 had reduced transcripts. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of nuclei from infected leaves revealed a depletion of the 4C population and an increase in 8C, 16C, and 32C nuclei. Infectivity studies of transgenic Arabidopsis showed that overexpression of CYCD3;1 or E2FB, both of which promote the mitotic cell cycle, strongly impaired CaLCuV infection. In contrast, overexpression of E2FA or E2FC, which can facilitate the endocycle, had no apparent effect. These results showed that geminiviruses and RNA viruses interface with the host pathogen response via a common mechanism, and that geminiviruses modulate plant cell cycle status by differentially impacting the CYCD/retinoblastoma-related protein/E2F regulatory network and facilitating progression into the endocycle. PMID:18650403

  14. Ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis transcriptional activator Athb-1 alters leaf cell fate in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, T; Dong, C H; Wu, Y; Carabelli, M; Sessa, G; Ruberti, I; Morelli, G; Chua, N H

    1995-11-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana Athb-1 is a homeobox gene of unknown function. By analogy with homeobox genes of other organisms, its gene product, Athb-1, is most likely a transcription factor involved in developmental processes. We constructed a series of Athb-1-derived genes to examine the roles of Athb-1 in transcriptional regulation and plant development. Athb-1 was found to transactivate a promoter linked to a specific DNA binding site by transient expression assays. In transgenic tobacco plants, overexpression of Athb-1 or its chimeric derivatives with heterologous transactivating domains of the yeast transcription factor GAL4 or herpes simplex virus transcription factor VP16 conferred deetiolated phenotypes in the dark, including cotyledon expansion, true leaf development, and an inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Expression of Athb-1 or the two chimeric derivatives also affected the development of palisade parenchyma under normal growth conditions, resulting in light green sectors in leaves and cotyledons, whereas other organs in the transgenic plants remained normal. Both developmental phenotypes were induced by glucocorticoid in transgenic plants expressing a chimeric transcription factor comprising the Athb-1 DNA binding domain, the VP16 transactivating domain, and the glucocorticoid receptor domain. Plants with severe inducible phenotypes showed additional abnormality in cotyledon expansion. Our results suggest that Athb-1 is a transcription activator involved in leaf development. PMID:8535134

  15. Ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis transcriptional activator Athb-1 alters leaf cell fate in tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, T; Dong, C H; Wu, Y; Carabelli, M; Sessa, G; Ruberti, I; Morelli, G; Chua, N H

    1995-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana Athb-1 is a homeobox gene of unknown function. By analogy with homeobox genes of other organisms, its gene product, Athb-1, is most likely a transcription factor involved in developmental processes. We constructed a series of Athb-1-derived genes to examine the roles of Athb-1 in transcriptional regulation and plant development. Athb-1 was found to transactivate a promoter linked to a specific DNA binding site by transient expression assays. In transgenic tobacco plants, overexpression of Athb-1 or its chimeric derivatives with heterologous transactivating domains of the yeast transcription factor GAL4 or herpes simplex virus transcription factor VP16 conferred deetiolated phenotypes in the dark, including cotyledon expansion, true leaf development, and an inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Expression of Athb-1 or the two chimeric derivatives also affected the development of palisade parenchyma under normal growth conditions, resulting in light green sectors in leaves and cotyledons, whereas other organs in the transgenic plants remained normal. Both developmental phenotypes were induced by glucocorticoid in transgenic plants expressing a chimeric transcription factor comprising the Athb-1 DNA binding domain, the VP16 transactivating domain, and the glucocorticoid receptor domain. Plants with severe inducible phenotypes showed additional abnormality in cotyledon expansion. Our results suggest that Athb-1 is a transcription activator involved in leaf development. PMID:8535134

  16. PIN2 Turnover in Arabidopsis Root Epidermal Cells Explored by the Photoconvertible Protein Dendra2

    PubMed Central

    Jásik, Ján; Boggetti, Barbara; Baluška, František; Volkmann, Dieter; Gensch, Thomas; Rutten, Twan; Altmann, Thomas; Schmelzer, Elmon

    2013-01-01

    The steady state level of integral membrane proteins is dependent on a strictly controlled delivery and removal. Here we show that Dendra2, a green-to-red photoconvertible fluorescent protein, is a suitable tool to study protein turnover in plants. We characterized the fluorescence properties of Dendra2 expressed either as a free protein or as a tag in Arabidopsis thaliana roots and optimized photoconversion settings to study protein turnover. Dendra2 was fused to the PIN2 protein, an auxin transporter in the root tip, and by time-lapse imaging and assessment of red and green signal intensities in the membrane after photoconversion we quantified directly and simultaneously the rate of PIN2 delivery of the newly synthesized protein into the plasma membrane as well as the disappearance of the protein from the plasma membrane due to degradation. Additionally we have verified several factors which are expected to affect PIN2 protein turnover and therefore potentially regulate root growth. PMID:23637828

  17. Members of the GCN5 histone acetyltransferase complex regulate PLETHORA-mediated root stem cell niche maintenance and transit amplifying cell proliferation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kornet, Noortje; Scheres, Ben

    2009-04-01

    The PLETHORA (PLT) stem cell transcription factors form a developmentally instructive protein gradient in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Histone acetylation is known to facilitate gene transcription and plays an important role in developmental processes. Here, we show that histone acetyltransferase GCN5 (for general control nonderepressible 5) attenuates the PLT gradient. Based on genetic evidence, we establish that GCN5 is essential for root stem cell niche maintenance and acts in the PLT pathway. The GCN5-associated factor ADA2b (for alteration/deficiency in activation 2b) is also positioned in the PLT pathway and regulates PLT expression, similar to GCN5. Both GCN5 and ADA2b mediate proliferation of the transit amplifying cells, but ADA2b does not affect stem cell niche maintenance. Overexpression of PLT2 rescues the stem cell niche defect of gcn5 mutants, indicating that GCN5 regulation of PLT expression is essential for maintenance of the root stem cell niche. We conclude that histone acetylation complexes play an important role in shaping a developmentally instructive gradient in the root. PMID:19376933

  18. Members of the GCN5 Histone Acetyltransferase Complex Regulate PLETHORA-Mediated Root Stem Cell Niche Maintenance and Transit Amplifying Cell Proliferation in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Kornet, Noortje; Scheres, Ben

    2009-01-01

    The PLETHORA (PLT) stem cell transcription factors form a developmentally instructive protein gradient in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Histone acetylation is known to facilitate gene transcription and plays an important role in developmental processes. Here, we show that histone acetyltransferase GCN5 (for general control nonderepressible 5) attenuates the PLT gradient. Based on genetic evidence, we establish that GCN5 is essential for root stem cell niche maintenance and acts in the PLT pathway. The GCN5-associated factor ADA2b (for alteration/deficiency in activation 2b) is also positioned in the PLT pathway and regulates PLT expression, similar to GCN5. Both GCN5 and ADA2b mediate proliferation of the transit amplifying cells, but ADA2b does not affect stem cell niche maintenance. Overexpression of PLT2 rescues the stem cell niche defect of gcn5 mutants, indicating that GCN5 regulation of PLT expression is essential for maintenance of the root stem cell niche. We conclude that histone acetylation complexes play an important role in shaping a developmentally instructive gradient in the root. PMID:19376933

  19. Auxin Import and Local Auxin Biosynthesis Are Required for Mitotic Divisions, Cell Expansion and Cell Specification during Female Gametophyte Development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Panoli, Aneesh; Martin, Maria Victoria; Alandete-Saez, Monica; Simon, Marissa; Neff, Christina; Swarup, Ranjan; Bellido, Andrés; Yuan, Li; Pagnussat, Gabriela C.; Sundaresan, Venkatesan

    2015-01-01

    The female gametophyte of flowering plants, called the embryo sac, develops from a haploid cell named the functional megaspore, which is specified after meiosis by the diploid sporophyte. In Arabidopsis, the functional megaspore undergoes three syncitial mitotic divisions followed by cellularization to form seven cells of four cell types including two female gametes. The plant hormone auxin is important for sporophytic developmental processes, and auxin levels are known to be regulated by biosynthesis and transport. Here, we investigated the role of auxin biosynthetic genes and auxin influx carriers in embryo sac development. We find that genes from the YUCCA/TAA pathway (YUC1, YUC2, YUC8, TAA1, TAR2) are expressed asymmetrically in the developing ovule and embryo sac from the two-nuclear syncitial stage until cellularization. Mutants for YUC1 and YUC2 exhibited defects in cell specification, whereas mutations in YUC8, as well as mutations in TAA1 and TAR2, caused defects in nuclear proliferation, vacuole formation and anisotropic growth of the embryo sac. Additionally, expression of the auxin influx carriers AUX1 and LAX1 were observed at the micropylar pole of the embryo sac and in the adjacent cells of the ovule, and the aux1 lax1 lax2 triple mutant shows multiple gametophyte defects. These results indicate that both localized auxin biosynthesis and auxin import, are required for mitotic divisions, cell expansion and patterning during embryo sac development. PMID:25970627

  20. A P-Loop NTPase Regulates Quiescent Center Cell Division and Distal Stem Cell Identity through the Regulation of ROS Homeostasis in Arabidopsis Root.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qianqian; Tian, Huiyu; Yue, Kun; Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Bing; Li, Xugang; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized as important regulators of cell division and differentiation. The Arabidopsis thaliana P-loop NTPase encoded by APP1 affects root stem cell niche identity through its control of local ROS homeostasis. The disruption of APP1 is accompanied by a reduction in ROS level, a rise in the rate of cell division in the quiescent center (QC) and the promotion of root distal stem cell (DSC) differentiation. Both the higher level of ROS induced in the app1 mutant by exposure to methyl viologen (MV), and treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) rescued the mutant phenotype, implying that both the increased rate of cell division in the QC and the enhancement in root DSC differentiation can be attributed to a low level of ROS. APP1 is expressed in the root apical meristem cell mitochondria, and its product is associated with ATP hydrolase activity. The key transcription factors, which are defining root distal stem niche, such as SCARECROW (SCR) and SHORT ROOT (SHR) are both significantly down-regulated at both the transcriptional and protein level in the app1 mutant, indicating that SHR and SCR are important downstream targets of APP1-regulated ROS signaling to control the identity of root QC and DSCs. PMID:27583367

  1. Auxin Import and Local Auxin Biosynthesis Are Required for Mitotic Divisions, Cell Expansion and Cell Specification during Female Gametophyte Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Panoli, Aneesh; Martin, Maria Victoria; Alandete-Saez, Monica; Simon, Marissa; Neff, Christina; Swarup, Ranjan; Bellido, Andrés; Yuan, Li; Pagnussat, Gabriela C; Sundaresan, Venkatesan

    2015-01-01

    The female gametophyte of flowering plants, called the embryo sac, develops from a haploid cell named the functional megaspore, which is specified after meiosis by the diploid sporophyte. In Arabidopsis, the functional megaspore undergoes three syncitial mitotic divisions followed by cellularization to form seven cells of four cell types including two female gametes. The plant hormone auxin is important for sporophytic developmental processes, and auxin levels are known to be regulated by biosynthesis and transport. Here, we investigated the role of auxin biosynthetic genes and auxin influx carriers in embryo sac development. We find that genes from the YUCCA/TAA pathway (YUC1, YUC2, YUC8, TAA1, TAR2) are expressed asymmetrically in the developing ovule and embryo sac from the two-nuclear syncitial stage until cellularization. Mutants for YUC1 and YUC2 exhibited defects in cell specification, whereas mutations in YUC8, as well as mutations in TAA1 and TAR2, caused defects in nuclear proliferation, vacuole formation and anisotropic growth of the embryo sac. Additionally, expression of the auxin influx carriers AUX1 and LAX1 were observed at the micropylar pole of the embryo sac and in the adjacent cells of the ovule, and the aux1 lax1 lax2 triple mutant shows multiple gametophyte defects. These results indicate that both localized auxin biosynthesis and auxin import, are required for mitotic divisions, cell expansion and patterning during embryo sac development. PMID:25970627

  2. Arabidopsis CROOKED encodes for the smallest subunit of the ARP2/3 complex and controls cell shape by region specific fine F-actin formation.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Jaideep; Mathur, Neeta; Kirik, Victor; Kernebeck, Birgit; Srinivas, Bhylahalli Purushottam; Hülskamp, Martin

    2003-07-01

    The generation of a specific cell shape requires differential growth, whereby specific regions of the cell expand more relative to others. The Arabidopsis crooked mutant exhibits aberrant cell shapes that develop because of mis-directed expansion, especially during a rapid growth phase. GFP-aided visualization of the F-actin cytoskeleton and the behavior of subcellular organelles in different cell-types in crooked and wild-type Arabidopsis revealed that localized expansion is promoted in cellular regions with fine F-actin arrays but is restricted in areas that maintain dense F-actin. This suggested that a spatiotemporal distinction between fine versus dense F-actin in a growing cell could determine the final shape of the cell. CROOKED was molecularly identified as the plant homolog of ARPC5, the smallest sub-unit of the ARP2/3 complex that in other organisms is renowned for its role in creating dendritic arrays of fine F-actin. Rescue of crooked phenotype by the human ortholog provides the first molecular evidence for the presence and functional conservation of the complex in higher plants. Our cell-biological and molecular characterization of CROOKED suggests a general actin-based mechanism for regulating differential growth and generating cell shape diversity. PMID:12783786

  3. Arabidopsis Tyrosylprotein Sulfotransferase Acts in the Auxin/PLETHORA Pathway in Regulating Postembryonic Maintenance of the Root Stem Cell Niche[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenkun; Wei, Lirong; Xu, Jian; Zhai, Qingzhe; Jiang, Hongling; Chen, Rong; Chen, Qian; Sun, Jiaqiang; Chu, Jinfang; Zhu, Lihuang; Liu, Chun-Ming; Li, Chuanyou

    2010-01-01

    Recent identification of the Arabidopsis thaliana tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST) and a group of Tyr-sulfated peptides known as root meristem growth factors (RGFs) highlights the importance of protein Tyr sulfation in plant growth and development. Here, we report the action mechanism of TPST in maintenance of the root stem cell niche, which in the Arabidopsis root meristem is an area of four mitotically inactive quiescent cells plus the surrounding mitotically active stem cells. Mutation of TPST leads to defective maintenance of the root stem cell niche, decreased meristematic activity, and stunted root growth. We show that TPST expression is positively regulated by auxin and that mutation of this gene affects auxin distribution by reducing local expression levels of several PIN genes and auxin biosynthetic genes in the stem cell niche region. We also show that mutation of TPST impairs basal- and auxin-induced expression of the PLETHORA (PLT) stem cell transcription factor genes and that overexpression of PLT2 rescues the root meristem defects of the loss-of-function mutant of TPST. Together, these results support that TPST acts to maintain root stem cell niche by regulating basal- and auxin-induced expression of PLT1 and PLT2. TPST-dependent sulfation of RGFs provides a link between auxin and PLTs in regulating root stem cell niche maintenance. PMID:21045165

  4. Arabidopsis Actin Depolymerizing Factor4 Modulates the Stochastic Dynamic Behavior of Actin Filaments in the Cortical Array of Epidermal Cells[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Henty, Jessica L.; Bledsoe, Samuel W.; Khurana, Parul; Meagher, Richard B.; Day, Brad; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Actin filament arrays are constantly remodeled as the needs of cells change as well as during responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli. Previous studies demonstrate that many single actin filaments in the cortical array of living Arabidopsis thaliana epidermal cells undergo stochastic dynamics, a combination of rapid growth balanced by disassembly from prolific severing activity. Filament turnover and dynamics are well understood from in vitro biochemical analyses and simple reconstituted systems. However, the identification in living cells of the molecular players involved in controlling actin dynamics awaits the use of model systems, especially ones where the power of genetics can be combined with imaging of individual actin filaments at high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we test the hypothesis that actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin contributes to stochastic filament severing and facilitates actin turnover. A knockout mutant for Arabidopsis ADF4 has longer hypocotyls and epidermal cells when compared with wild-type seedlings. This correlates with a change in actin filament architecture; cytoskeletal arrays in adf4 cells are significantly more bundled and less dense than in wild-type cells. Several parameters of single actin filament turnover are also altered. Notably, adf4 mutant cells have a 2.5-fold reduced severing frequency as well as significantly increased actin filament lengths and lifetimes. Thus, we provide evidence that ADF4 contributes to the stochastic dynamic turnover of actin filaments in plant cells. PMID:22010035

  5. SHORT-ROOT Deficiency Alleviates the Cell Death Phenotype of the Arabidopsis catalase2 Mutant under Photorespiration-Promoting Conditions.

    PubMed

    Waszczak, Cezary; Kerchev, Pavel I; Mühlenbock, Per; Hoeberichts, Frank A; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Mhamdi, Amna; Willems, Patrick; Denecker, Jordi; Kumpf, Robert P; Noctor, Graham; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can act as a signaling molecule that influences various aspects of plant growth and development, including stress signaling and cell death. To analyze molecular mechanisms that regulate the response to increased H2O2 levels in plant cells, we focused on the photorespiration-dependent peroxisomal H2O2 production in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking CATALASE2 (CAT2) activity (cat2-2). By screening for second-site mutations that attenuate the PSII maximum efficiency (Fv'/Fm') decrease and lesion formation linked to the cat2-2 phenotype, we discovered that a mutation in SHORT-ROOT (SHR) rescued the cell death phenotype of cat2-2 plants under photorespiration-promoting conditions. SHR deficiency attenuated H2O2-dependent gene expression, oxidation of the glutathione pool, and ascorbate depletion in a cat2-2 genetic background upon exposure to photorespiratory stress. Decreased glycolate oxidase and catalase activities together with accumulation of glycolate further implied that SHR deficiency impacts the cellular redox homeostasis by limiting peroxisomal H2O2 production. The photorespiratory phenotype of cat2-2 mutants did not depend on the SHR functional interactor SCARECROW and the sugar signaling component ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE4, despite the requirement for exogenous sucrose for cell death attenuation in cat2-2 shr-6 double mutants. Our findings reveal a link between SHR and photorespiratory H2O2 production that has implications for the integration of developmental and stress responses. PMID:27432873

  6. TYPE-ONE PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE4 Regulates Pavement Cell Interdigitation by Modulating PIN-FORMED1 Polarity and Trafficking in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaola; Qin, Qianqian; Yan, Jia; Niu, Yali; Huang, Bingyao; Guan, Liping; Li, Yuan; Ren, Dongtao; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2015-01-01

    In plants, cell morphogenesis is dependent on intercellular auxin accumulation. The polar subcellular localization of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein is crucial for this process. Previous studies have shown that the protein kinase PINOID (PID) and protein phosphatase6-type phosphatase holoenzyme regulate the phosphorylation status of PIN1 in root tips and shoot apices. Here, we show that a type-one protein phosphatase, TOPP4, is essential for the formation of interdigitated pavement cell (PC) pattern in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf. The dominant-negative mutant topp4-1 showed severely inhibited interdigitated PC growth. Expression of topp4-1 gene in wild-type plants recapitulated the PC defects in the mutant. Genetic analyses suggested that TOPP4 and PIN1 likely function in the same pathway to regulate PC morphogenesis. Furthermore, colocalization, in vitro and in vivo protein interaction studies, and dephosphorylation assays revealed that TOPP4 mediated PIN1 polar localization and endocytic trafficking in PCs by acting antagonistically with PID to modulate the phosphorylation status of PIN1. In addition, TOPP4 affects the cytoskeleton pattern through the Rho of Plant GTPase-dependent auxin-signaling pathway. Therefore, we conclude that TOPP4-regulated PIN1 polar targeting through direct dephosphorylation is crucial for PC morphogenesis in the Arabidopsis leaf. PMID:25560878

  7. New Arabidopsis thaliana Cytochrome c Partners: A Look Into the Elusive Role of Cytochrome c in Programmed Cell Death in Plants*

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fábregas, Jonathan; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Janocha, Simon; Navarro, José A.; Hervás, Manuel; Bernhardt, Rita; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; De la Rosa, Miguel Á.

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death is an event displayed by many different organisms along the evolutionary scale. In plants, programmed cell death is necessary for development and the hypersensitive response to stress or pathogenic infection. A common feature in programmed cell death across organisms is the translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytosol. To better understand the role of cytochrome c in the onset of programmed cell death in plants, a proteomic approach was developed based on affinity chromatography and using Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c as bait. Using this approach, ten putative new cytochrome c partners were identified. Of these putative partners and as indicated by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, nine of them bind the heme protein in plant protoplasts and human cells as a heterologous system. The in vitro interaction between cytochrome c and such soluble cytochrome c-targets was further corroborated using surface plasmon resonance. Taken together, the results obtained in the study indicate that Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c interacts with several distinct proteins involved in protein folding, translational regulation, cell death, oxidative stress, DNA damage, energetic metabolism, and mRNA metabolism. Interestingly, some of these novel Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c-targets are closely related to those for Homo sapiens cytochrome c (Martínez-Fábregas et al., unpublished). These results indicate that the evolutionarily well-conserved cytosolic cytochrome c, appearing in organisms from plants to mammals, interacts with a wide range of targets on programmed cell death. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000280. PMID:24019145

  8. Dissecting stimulus-specific Ca2+ signals in amyloplasts and chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sello, Simone; Perotto, Jennifer; Carraretto, Luca; Szabò, Ildikò; Vothknecht, Ute C.; Navazio, Lorella

    2016-01-01

    Calcium is used by plants as an intracellular messenger in the detection of and response to a plethora of environmental stimuli and contributes to a fine-tuned internal regulation. Interest in the role of different subcellular compartments in Ca2+ homeostasis and signalling has been growing in recent years. This work has evaluated the potential participation of non-green plastids and chloroplasts in the plant Ca2+ signalling network using heterotrophic and autotrophic cell suspension cultures from Arabidopsis thaliana plant lines stably expressing the bioluminescent Ca2+ reporter aequorin targeted to the plastid stroma. Our results indicate that both amyloplasts and chloroplasts are involved in transient Ca2+ increases in the plastid stroma induced by several environmental stimuli, suggesting that these two functional types of plastids are endowed with similar mechanisms for handling Ca2+. A comparison of the Ca2+ trace kinetics recorded in parallel in the plastid stroma, the surface of the outer membrane of the plastid envelope, and the cytosol indicated that plastids play an essential role in switching off different cytosolic Ca2+ signals. Interestingly, a transient stromal Ca2+ signal in response to the light-to-dark transition was observed in chloroplasts, but not amyloplasts. Moreover, significant differences in the amplitude of specific plastidial Ca2+ changes emerged when the photosynthetic metabolism of chloroplasts was reactivated by light. In summary, our work highlights differences between non-green plastids and chloroplasts in terms of Ca2+ dynamics in response to environmental stimuli. PMID:26893493

  9. Yeast cell wall extract induces disease resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crop.

    PubMed

    Narusaka, Mari; Minami, Taichi; Iwabuchi, Chikako; Hamasaki, Takashi; Takasaki, Satoko; Kawamura, Kimito; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Housaku Monogatari (HM) is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA) pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods. PMID:25565273

  10. Yeast Cell Wall Extract Induces Disease Resistance against Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica Crop

    PubMed Central

    Narusaka, Mari; Minami, Taichi; Iwabuchi, Chikako; Hamasaki, Takashi; Takasaki, Satoko; Kawamura, Kimito; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Housaku Monogatari (HM) is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA) pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods. PMID:25565273

  11. Multiple abiotic stress tolerance of the transformants yeast cells and the transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a novel durum wheat catalase.

    PubMed

    Feki, Kaouthar; Kamoun, Yosra; Ben Mahmoud, Rihem; Farhat-Khemakhem, Ameny; Gargouri, Ali; Brini, Faiçal

    2015-12-01

    Catalases are reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes involved in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. In this study, we described the isolation and functional characterization of a novel catalase from durum wheat, designed TdCAT1. Molecular Phylogeny analyses showed that wheat TdCAT1 exhibited high amino acids sequence identity to other plant catalases. Sequence homology analysis showed that TdCAT1 protein contained the putative calmodulin binding domain and a putative conserved internal peroxisomal targeting signal PTS1 motif around its C-terminus. Predicted three-dimensional structural model revealed the presence of four putative distinct structural regions which are the N-terminal arm, the β-barrel, the wrapping and the α-helical domains. TdCAT1 protein had the heme pocket that was composed by five essential residues. TdCAT1 gene expression analysis showed that this gene was induced by various abiotic stresses in durum wheat. The expression of TdCAT1 in yeast cells and Arabidopsis plants conferred tolerance to several abiotic stresses. Compared with the non-transformed plants, the transgenic lines maintained their growth and accumulated more proline under stress treatments. Furthermore, the amount of H2O2 was lower in transgenic lines, which was due to the high CAT and POD activities. Taken together, these data provide the evidence for the involvement of durum wheat catalase TdCAT1 in tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in crop plants. PMID:26555900

  12. Water-polysaccharide interactions in the primary cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana from polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water (1)H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide (13)C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water-pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water-cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water-polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water-pectin spin diffusion precedes water-cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins. PMID:24984197

  13. An R2R3-type transcription factor gene AtMYB59 regulates root growth and cell cycle progression in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mu, Rui-Ling; Cao, Yang-Rong; Liu, Yun-Feng; Lei, Gang; Zou, Hong-Feng; Liao, Yong; Wang, Hui-Wen; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Ma, Biao; Du, Ji-Zhou; Yuan, Ming; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2009-11-01

    MYB proteins play important roles in eukaryotic organisms. In plants, the R1R2R3-type MYB proteins function in cell cycle control. However, whether the R2R3-type MYB protein is also involved in the cell division process remains unknown. Here, we report that an R2R3-type transcription factor gene, AtMYB59, is involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression and root growth. The AtMYB59 protein is localized in the nuclei of onion epidermal cells and has transactivation activity. Expression of AtMYB59 in yeast cells suppresses cell proliferation, and the transformants have more nuclei and higher aneuploid DNA content with longer cells. Mutation in the conserved domain of AtMYB59 abolishes its effects on yeast cell growth. In synchronized Arabidopsis cell suspensions, the AtMYB59 gene is specifically expressed in the S phase during cell cycle progression. Expression and promoter-GUS analysis reveals that the AtMYB59 gene is abundantly expressed in roots. Transgenic plants overexpressing AtMYB59 have shorter roots compared with wild-type plants (Arabidopsis accession Col-0), and around half of the mitotic cells in root tips are at metaphase. Conversely, the null mutant myb59-1 has longer roots and fewer mitotic cells at metaphase than Col, suggesting that AtMYB59 may inhibit root growth by extending the metaphase of mitotic cells. AtMYB59 regulates many downstream genes, including the CYCB1;1 gene, probably through binding to MYB-responsive elements. These results support a role for AtMYB59 in cell cycle regulation and plant root growth. PMID:19581938

  14. Re-induction of the cell cycle in the Arabidopsis post-embryonic root meristem is ABA-insensitive, GA-dependent and repressed by KRP6

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwland, Jeroen; Stamm, Petra; Wen, Bo; Randall, Ricardo S.; Murray, James A. H.; Bassel, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Seeding establishment following seed germination requires activation of the root meristem for primary root growth. We investigated the hormonal and genetic regulation of root meristem activation during Arabidopsis seed germination. In optimal conditions, radicle cell divisions occur only after the completion of germination and require de novo GA synthesis. When the completion of germination is blocked by ABA, radicle elongation and cell divisions occurred in these non-germinating seeds. Conversely under GA-limiting conditions, ABA-insensitive mutants complete germination in the absence of radicle meristem activation and growth. Radicle meristem activation and extension can therefore occur independently of completion of the developmental transition of germination. The cell cycle regulator KRP6 partially represses GA-dependent activation of the cell cycle. Germination of krp6 mutant seeds occurs more rapidly, is slightly insensitive to ABA in dose-response assays, but also hypersensitive to the GA synthesis inhibitor PAC. These conflicting phenotypes suggest the cell cycle uncouples GA and ABA responses in germinating Arabidopsis seeds, and that KRP6 acts downstream of GA to inhibit mitotic cell cycle activation during germination. PMID:27021201

  15. COBRA-LIKE2, a member of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored COBRA-LIKE family, plays a role in cellulose deposition in arabidopsis seed coat mucilage secretory cells.

    PubMed

    Ben-Tov, Daniela; Abraham, Yael; Stav, Shira; Thompson, Kevin; Loraine, Ann; Elbaum, Rivka; de Souza, Amancio; Pauly, Markus; Kieber, Joseph J; Harpaz-Saad, Smadar

    2015-03-01

    Differentiation of the maternally derived seed coat epidermal cells into mucilage secretory cells is a common adaptation in angiosperms. Recent studies identified cellulose as an important component of seed mucilage in various species. Cellulose is deposited as a set of rays that radiate from the seed upon mucilage extrusion, serving to anchor the pectic component of seed mucilage to the seed surface. Using transcriptome data encompassing the course of seed development, we identified COBRA-LIKE2 (COBL2), a member of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored COBRA-LIKE gene family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), as coexpressed with other genes involved in cellulose deposition in mucilage secretory cells. Disruption of the COBL2 gene results in substantial reduction in the rays of cellulose present in seed mucilage, along with an increased solubility of the pectic component of the mucilage. Light birefringence demonstrates a substantial decrease in crystalline cellulose deposition into the cellulosic rays of the cobl2 mutants. Moreover, crystalline cellulose deposition into the radial cell walls and the columella appears substantially compromised, as demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy and in situ quantification of light birefringence. Overall, the cobl2 mutants display about 40% reduction in whole-seed crystalline cellulose content compared with the wild type. These data establish that COBL2 plays a role in the deposition of crystalline cellulose into various secondary cell wall structures during seed coat epidermal cell differentiation. PMID:25583925

  16. Reduced Wall Acetylation Proteins Play Vital and Distinct Roles in Cell Wall O-Acetylation in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Yuzuki; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Gille, Sascha; Harholt, Jesper; Chong, Sun-Li; Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.; Tenkanen, Maija; Cheng, Kun; Pauly, Markus; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2013-01-01

    The Reduced Wall Acetylation (RWA) proteins are involved in cell wall acetylation in plants. Previously, we described a single mutant, rwa2, which has about 20% lower level of O-acetylation in leaf cell walls and no obvious growth or developmental phenotype. In this study, we generated double, triple, and quadruple loss-of-function mutants of all four members of the RWA family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In contrast to rwa2, the triple and quadruple rwa mutants display severe growth phenotypes revealing the importance of wall acetylation for plant growth and development. The quadruple rwa mutant can be completely complemented with the RWA2 protein expressed under 35S promoter, indicating the functional redundancy of the RWA proteins. Nevertheless, the degree of acetylation of xylan, (gluco)mannan, and xyloglucan as well as overall cell wall acetylation is affected differently in different combinations of triple mutants, suggesting their diversity in substrate preference. The overall degree of wall acetylation in the rwa quadruple mutant was reduced by 63% compared with the wild type, and histochemical analysis of the rwa quadruple mutant stem indicates defects in cell differentiation of cell types with secondary cell walls. PMID:24019426

  17. Arabidopsis MSL10 Has a Regulated Cell Death Signaling Activity That Is Separable from Its Mechanosensitive Ion Channel Activity[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Veley, Kira M.; Maksaev, Grigory; Frick, Elizabeth M.; January, Emma; Kloepper, Sarah C.; Haswell, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the MscS superfamily of mechanosensitive ion channels function as osmotic safety valves, releasing osmolytes under increased membrane tension. MscS homologs exhibit diverse topology and domain structure, and it has been proposed that the more complex members of the family might have novel regulatory mechanisms or molecular functions. Here, we present a study of MscS-Like (MSL)10 from Arabidopsis thaliana that supports these ideas. High-level expression of MSL10-GFP in Arabidopsis induced small stature, hydrogen peroxide accumulation, ectopic cell death, and reactive oxygen species- and cell death-associated gene expression. Phosphomimetic mutations in the MSL10 N-terminal domain prevented these phenotypes. The phosphorylation state of MSL10 also regulated its ability to induce cell death when transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves but did not affect subcellular localization, assembly, or channel behavior. Finally, the N-terminal domain of MSL10 was sufficient to induce cell death in tobacco, independent of phosphorylation state. We conclude that the plant-specific N-terminal domain of MSL10 is capable of inducing cell death, this activity is regulated by phosphorylation, and MSL10 has two separable activities—one as an ion channel and one as an inducer of cell death. These findings further our understanding of the evolution and significance of mechanosensitive ion channels. PMID:25052715

  18. A comparative study of the Arabidopsis thaliana guard-cell transcriptome and its modulation by sucrose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To test the hypothesis that photosynthesis-derived sugar signals guard cells to adjust stomatal opening, we determined the profile of genes expressed in isolated guard cells. The results revealed that expression of 289 genes increased in guard cells in response to sucrose. Consistent with the hypoth...

  19. Alterations in protein expression of Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures during hyper- , simulated and sounding rocket micro-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, Ruediger; Barjaktarović, Žarko; Babbick, Maren; Magel, Elisabeth; Nordheim, Alfred; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Hampp, Ruediger

    Callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to hypergravity (8g), 2D clinorotation and random positioning exhibit changes in gene expression (Martzivanou et al., Protoplasma 229:155-162, 2003). In a recent investigation we could show that after 2 hrs of exposure also the protein complement shows treatment-related changes. These are indicative for reactive oxygen species being involved in the perception of / response to changes in the gravitational field. In the present study we have extended these investigations for a period of up to 16 hrs of exposure. We report on changes in abundance of 28 proteins which have been identified by nano HPLC-ESI-MS/MS, and which were altered in amount after 2 hrs of treatment. According to changes between 2 and 16 hrs we could distinguish four groups of proteins which either declined, increased from down-regulated to control levels, showed a transient decline or a transient increase. With regard to function, our data indicate stress relief or adaption to a new gravitational steady state under prolonged exposure. The latter assumption is supported by the appearance of a new set of 19 proteins which is changed in abundance after 8 hrs of hypergravity. A comparative analysis of the different treatments showed some similarities in response between 8g centrifugation and 2D clinorotation, while random positioning showed the least responses. In addition, we report on the impact of reduced gravitation on the phospho proteom. Cell cultures exposed to 12 min of microgravity as obtained on board of sounding rockets do not respond with alterations in total protein but in the degree of phosphorylation as demonstrated after 2D SDS PAGE separation and sequencing. On this basis we give evidence for signaling cascades involved in the transduction of gravitational signals.

  20. The MADS Domain Protein DIANA Acts Together with AGAMOUS-LIKE80 to Specify the Central Cell in Arabidopsis Ovules[W

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Marian; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2008-01-01

    MADS box genes in plants consist of MIKC-type and type I genes. While MIKC-type genes have been studied extensively, the functions of type I genes are still poorly understood. Evidence suggests that type I MADS box genes are involved in embryo sac and seed development. We investigated two independent T-DNA insertion alleles of the Arabidopsis thaliana type I MADS box gene AGAMOUS-LIKE61 (AGL61) and showed that in agl61 mutant ovules, the polar nuclei do not fuse and central cell morphology is aberrant. Furthermore, the central cell begins to degenerate before fertilization takes place. Although pollen tubes are attracted and perceived by the mutant ovules, neither endosperm development nor zygote formation occurs. AGL61 is expressed in the central cell during the final stages of embryo sac development. An AGL61:green fluorescent protein–β-glucoronidase fusion protein localizes exclusively to the polar nuclei and the secondary nucleus of the central cell. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that AGL61 can form a heterodimer with AGL80 and that the nuclear localization of AGL61 is lost in the agl80 mutant. Thus, AGL61 and AGL80 appear to function together to differentiate the central cell in Arabidopsis. We renamed AGL61 DIANA, after the virginal Roman goddess of the hunt. PMID:18713950

  1. Arabidopsis Annexin1 Mediates the Radical-Activated Plasma Membrane Ca2+- and K+-Permeable Conductance in Root Cells[W

    PubMed Central

    Laohavisit, Anuphon; Shang, Zhonglin; Rubio, Lourdes; Cuin, Tracey A.; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Wang, Aihua; Mortimer, Jennifer C.; Macpherson, Neil; Coxon, Katy M.; Battey, Nicholas H.; Brownlee, Colin; Park, Ohkmae K.; Sentenac, Hervé; Shabala, Sergey; Webb, Alex A.R.; Davies, Julia M.

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell growth and stress signaling require Ca2+ influx through plasma membrane transport proteins that are regulated by reactive oxygen species. In root cell growth, adaptation to salinity stress, and stomatal closure, such proteins operate downstream of the plasma membrane NADPH oxidases that produce extracellular superoxide anion, a reactive oxygen species that is readily converted to extracellular hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals, OH•. In root cells, extracellular OH• activates a plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable conductance that permits Ca2+ influx. In Arabidopsis thaliana, distribution of this conductance resembles that of annexin1 (ANN1). Annexins are membrane binding proteins that can form Ca2+-permeable conductances in vitro. Here, the Arabidopsis loss-of-function mutant for annexin1 (Atann1) was found to lack the root hair and epidermal OH•-activated Ca2+- and K+-permeable conductance. This manifests in both impaired root cell growth and ability to elevate root cell cytosolic free Ca2+ in response to OH•. An OH•-activated Ca2+ conductance is reconstituted by recombinant ANN1 in planar lipid bilayers. ANN1 therefore presents as a novel Ca2+-permeable transporter providing a molecular link between reactive oxygen species and cytosolic Ca2+ in plants. PMID:22523205

  2. Meristematic competence is disrupted by microgravity, real or simulated, in seedlings and cultured cells of Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Francisco Javier; Herranz, Raul; Van Loon, ing.. Jack J. W. A.; Kiss, John; Valbuena, Miguel A.; Youssef, Khaled

    In actively proliferating plant cells, the rate of cell proliferation is strictly coordinated with cell growth, and this coordination is called “meristematic competence”. Cell proliferation consists of the adequate progression of the cell division cycle throughout specific regulatory checkpoints, and cell growth consists of reaching the critical size making possible cell division, based on the increase of biomass, essentially by means of protein synthesis. There are two cellular models in which these processes can be studied, namely the meristematic tissues of plants and seedlings and the in vitro suspension cell cultures. Meristems are essential for the determination of the developmental pattern of the plant, which is primarily based on the balance between proliferating (meristematic) and differentiated cells. Auxin is a fundamental phytohormone, responsible for the maintenance of meristematic competence and for the control of the rate of differentiation. We first studied the proliferating activity of root meristematic cells in the International Space Station (ISS) and in a random positioning machine (RPM), a ground-based device for simulated microgravity. The result in both experiments was the increase of mitotic activity (cell proliferation) and the depletion of ribosome synthesis (cell growth), that is, the disruption of meristematic competence. We found these effects associated with changes in the auxin levels and polar transport, which is related to the role of auxin as a mediator of the transduction of the gravitropic signal sensed in the root columella. We plan to advance in the investigation of mechanisms of the auxin control of meristematic competence in microgravity conditions in a new experiment, “Seedling Growth”, to be performed in the ISS. We will use mutants of the auxin transport pathway and we will also test the potential activating role of red light, known to be a cell proliferation and gene expression enhancer. The role played by

  3. Two-Step Regulation of a Meristematic Cell Population Acting in Shoot Branching in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bihai; Zhang, Cui; Tian, Caihuan; Wang, Jin; Wang, Quan; Xu, Tengfei; Xu, Yan; Ohno, Carolyn; Sablowski, Robert; Heisler, Marcus G; Theres, Klaus; Wang, Ying; Jiao, Yuling

    2016-07-01

    Shoot branching requires the establishment of new meristems harboring stem cells; this phenomenon raises questions about the precise regulation of meristematic fate. In seed plants, these new meristems initiate in leaf axils to enable lateral shoot branching. Using live-cell imaging of leaf axil cells, we show that the initiation of axillary meristems requires a meristematic cell population continuously expressing the meristem marker SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM). The maintenance of STM expression depends on the leaf axil auxin minimum. Ectopic expression of STM is insufficient to activate axillary buds formation from plants that have lost leaf axil STM expressing cells. This suggests that some cells undergo irreversible commitment to a developmental fate. In more mature leaves, REVOLUTA (REV) directly up-regulates STM expression in leaf axil meristematic cells, but not in differentiated cells, to establish axillary meristems. Cell type-specific binding of REV to the STM region correlates with epigenetic modifications. Our data favor a threshold model for axillary meristem initiation, in which low levels of STM maintain meristematic competence and high levels of STM lead to meristem initiation. PMID:27398935

  4. Two-Step Regulation of a Meristematic Cell Population Acting in Shoot Branching in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Caihuan; Wang, Jin; Xu, Tengfei; Xu, Yan; Ohno, Carolyn; Sablowski, Robert; Heisler, Marcus G.; Theres, Klaus; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Shoot branching requires the establishment of new meristems harboring stem cells; this phenomenon raises questions about the precise regulation of meristematic fate. In seed plants, these new meristems initiate in leaf axils to enable lateral shoot branching. Using live-cell imaging of leaf axil cells, we show that the initiation of axillary meristems requires a meristematic cell population continuously expressing the meristem marker SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM). The maintenance of STM expression depends on the leaf axil auxin minimum. Ectopic expression of STM is insufficient to activate axillary buds formation from plants that have lost leaf axil STM expressing cells. This suggests that some cells undergo irreversible commitment to a developmental fate. In more mature leaves, REVOLUTA (REV) directly up-regulates STM expression in leaf axil meristematic cells, but not in differentiated cells, to establish axillary meristems. Cell type-specific binding of REV to the STM region correlates with epigenetic modifications. Our data favor a threshold model for axillary meristem initiation, in which low levels of STM maintain meristematic competence and high levels of STM lead to meristem initiation. PMID:27398935

  5. Light Quality-Mediated Petiole Elongation in Arabidopsis during Shade Avoidance Involves Cell Wall Modification by Xyloglucan Endotransglucosylase/Hydrolases1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Rashmi; Chinnappa, C.C.; Staal, Marten; Elzenga, J. Theo M.; Yokoyama, Ryusuke; Nishitani, Kazuhiko; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.; Pierik, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Some plants can avoid shaded conditions via rapid shoot elongation, thus growing into better lit areas in a canopy. Cell wall-modifying mechanisms promoting this elongation response, therefore, are important regulatory points during shade avoidance. Two major cell wall-modifying protein families are expansins and xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolases (XTHs). The role of these proteins during shade avoidance was studied in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In response to two shade cues, low red to far-red light (implying neighbor proximity) and green shade (mimicking dense canopy conditions), Arabidopsis showed classic shade avoidance features: petiole elongation and leaf hyponasty. Measurement of the apoplastic proton flux in green shade-treated petioles revealed a rapid efflux of protons into the apoplast within minutes, unlike white light controls. This apoplastic acidification probably provides the acidic pH required for the optimal activity of cell wall-modifying proteins like expansins and XTHs. Acid-induced extension, expansin susceptibility, and extractable expansin activity were similar in petioles from white light- and shade-treated plants. XTH activity, however, was high in petioles exposed to shade treatments. Five XTH genes (XTH9, -15, -16, -17, and -19) were positively regulated by low red to far-red light conditions, while the latter four and XTH22 showed a significant up-regulation also in response to green shade. Consistently, knockout mutants for two of these XTH genes also had reduced or absent shade avoidance responses to these light signals. These results point toward the cell wall as a vital regulatory point during shade avoidance. PMID:20688978

  6. Cellulose-Pectin Spatial Contacts Are Inherent to Never-Dried Arabidopsis Primary Cell Walls: Evidence from Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2015-07-01

    The structural role of pectins in plant primary cell walls is not yet well understood because of the complex and disordered nature of the cell wall polymers. We recently introduced multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize the spatial proximities of wall polysaccharides. The data showed extensive cross peaks between pectins and cellulose in the primary wall of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), indicating subnanometer contacts between the two polysaccharides. This result was unexpected because stable pectin-cellulose interactions are not predicted by in vitro binding assays and prevailing cell wall models. To investigate whether the spatial contacts that give rise to the cross peaks are artifacts of sample preparation, we now compare never-dried Arabidopsis primary walls with dehydrated and rehydrated samples. One-dimensional (13)C spectra, two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra, water-polysaccharide correlation spectra, and dynamics data all indicate that the structure, mobility, and intermolecular contacts of the polysaccharides are indistinguishable between never-dried and rehydrated walls. Moreover, a partially depectinated cell wall in which 40% of homogalacturonan is extracted retains cellulose-pectin cross peaks, indicating that the cellulose-pectin contacts are not due to molecular crowding. The cross peaks are observed both at -20 °C and at ambient temperature, thus ruling out freezing as a cause of spatial contacts. These results indicate that rhamnogalacturonan I and a portion of homogalacturonan have significant interactions with cellulose microfibrils in the native primary wall. This pectin-cellulose association may be formed during wall biosynthesis and may involve pectin entrapment in or between cellulose microfibrils, which cannot be mimicked by in vitro binding assays. PMID:26036615

  7. Cellulose-Pectin Spatial Contacts Are Inherent to Never-Dried Arabidopsis Primary Cell Walls: Evidence from Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The structural role of pectins in plant primary cell walls is not yet well understood because of the complex and disordered nature of the cell wall polymers. We recently introduced multidimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize the spatial proximities of wall polysaccharides. The data showed extensive cross peaks between pectins and cellulose in the primary wall of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), indicating subnanometer contacts between the two polysaccharides. This result was unexpected because stable pectin-cellulose interactions are not predicted by in vitro binding assays and prevailing cell wall models. To investigate whether the spatial contacts that give rise to the cross peaks are artifacts of sample preparation, we now compare never-dried Arabidopsis primary walls with dehydrated and rehydrated samples. One-dimensional 13C spectra, two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation spectra, water-polysaccharide correlation spectra, and dynamics data all indicate that the structure, mobility, and intermolecular contacts of the polysaccharides are indistinguishable between never-dried and rehydrated walls. Moreover, a partially depectinated cell wall in which 40% of homogalacturonan is extracted retains cellulose-pectin cross peaks, indicating that the cellulose-pectin contacts are not due to molecular crowding. The cross peaks are observed both at −20°C and at ambient temperature, thus ruling out freezing as a cause of spatial contacts. These results indicate that rhamnogalacturonan I and a portion of homogalacturonan have significant interactions with cellulose microfibrils in the native primary wall. This pectin-cellulose association may be formed during wall biosynthesis and may involve pectin entrapment in or between cellulose microfibrils, which cannot be mimicked by in vitro binding assays. PMID:26036615

  8. The gain-of-function Arabidopsis acd6 mutant reveals novel regulation and function of the salicylic acid signaling pathway in controlling cell death, defenses, and cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Rate, D N; Cuenca, J V; Bowman, G R; Guttman, D S; Greenberg, J T

    1999-01-01

    We isolated a dominant gain-of-function Arabidopsis mutant, accelerated cell death 6 (acd6), with elevated defenses, patches of dead and enlarged cells, reduced stature, and increased resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. The acd6-conferred phenotypes are suppressed by removing a key signaling molecule, salicylic acid (SA), by using the nahG transgene, which encodes SA hydroxylase. This suppression includes phenotypes that are not induced by application of SA to wild-type plants, indicating that SA acts with a second signal to cause many acd6-conferred phenotypes. acd6-nahG plants show hyperactivation of all acd6-conferred phenotypes after treatment with a synthetic inducer of the SA pathway, benzo(1,2, 3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid (BTH), suggesting that SA acts with and also modulates the levels and/or activity of the second defense signal. acd6 acts partially through a NONEXPRESSOR OF PR 1 (NPR1) gene-independent pathway that activates defenses and confers resistance to P. syringae. Surprisingly, BTH-treated acd6-nahG plants develop many tumor-like abnormal growths, indicating a possible role for SA in modulating cell growth. PMID:10488236

  9. The Arabidopsis EIN2 restricts organ growth by retarding cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guanping; Liu, Gang; Xiao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    The growth of plant organ to its characteristic size is a fundamental developmental process, but the mechanism is still poorly understood. Plant hormones play a great role in organ size control by modulating cell division and/or cell expansion. ETHYLENE INSENSITVE 2 (EIN2) was first identified by a genetic screen for ethylene insensitivity and is regarded as a central component of ethylene signaling, but its role in cell growth has not been reported. Here we demonstrate that changed expression of EIN2 led to abnormity of cell expansion by morphological and cytological analyses of EIN2 loss-of-function mutants and the overexpressing transgenic plant. Our findings suggest that EIN2 controls final organ size by restricting cell expansion. PMID:26039475

  10. Common and unique elements of the ABA-regulated transcriptome of Arabidopsis guard cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the presence of drought and other desiccating stresses, plants synthesize and redistribute the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA promotes plant water conservation by acting on specialized cells in the leaf epidermis, guard cells, which border and regulate the apertures of stomatal pores through which transpirational water loss occurs. Following ABA exposure, solute uptake into guard cells is rapidly inhibited and solute loss is promoted, resulting in inhibition of stomatal opening and promotion of stomatal closure, with consequent plant water conservation. There is a wealth of information on the guard cell signaling mechanisms underlying these rapid ABA responses. To investigate ABA regulation of gene expression in guard cells in a systematic genome-wide manner, we analyzed data from global transcriptomes of guard cells generated with Affymetrix ATH1 microarrays, and compared these results to ABA regulation of gene expression in leaves and other tissues. Results The 1173 ABA-regulated genes of guard cells identified by our study share significant overlap with ABA-regulated genes of other tissues, and are associated with well-defined ABA-related promoter motifs such as ABREs and DREs. However, we also computationally identified a unique cis-acting motif, GTCGG, associated with ABA-induction of gene expression specifically in guard cells. In addition, approximately 300 genes showing ABA-regulation unique to this cell type were newly uncovered by our study. Within the ABA-regulated gene set of guard cells, we found that many of the genes known to encode ion transporters associated with stomatal opening are down-regulated by ABA, providing one mechanism for long-term maintenance of stomatal closure during drought. We also found examples of both negative and positive feedback in the transcriptional regulation by ABA of known ABA-signaling genes, particularly with regard to the PYR/PYL/RCAR class of soluble ABA receptors and their downstream targets

  11. XND1, a member of the NAC domain family in Arabidopsis thaliana, negatively regulates lignocellulose synthesis and programmed cell death in xylem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.; U. Avci; E. Grant; C.H. Haigler; E.P. Beers

    2007-10-23

    Members of the large Arabidopsis NAC domain transcription factor family are regulators of meristem development, organ elongation and separation, and deposition of patterned secondary cell walls. XYLEM NAC DOMAIN 1 (XND1) is highly expressed in xylem. Changes observed for XND1 knockout plants compared with wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana included a reduction in both plant height and tracheary element length and an increase in metaxylem relative to protoxylem in roots of plants treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Overexpression of XND1 resulted in extreme dwarfism associated with the absence of xylem vessels and little or no expression of tracheary element marker genes. In contrast, phloem marker-gene expression was not altered and phloem-type cells still formed. Transmission electron microscopy showed that parenchyma-like cells in the incipient xylem zone in hypocotyls of XND1 overexpressors lacked secondary wall thickenings and retained their cytoplasmic content. Considered together, these findings suggest that XND1 affects tracheary element growth through regulation of secondary wall synthesis and programmed cell death.

  12. AtLa1 protein initiates IRES-dependent translation of WUSCHEL mRNA and regulates the stem cell homeostasis of Arabidopsis in response to environmental hazards.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuchao; Rao, Shaofei; Chang, Beibei; Wang, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Kaidian; Hou, Xueliang; Zhu, Xueyi; Wu, Haijun; Tian, Zhaoxia; Zhao, Zhong; Yang, Chengwei; Huang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Plant stem cells are hypersensitive to environmental hazards throughout their life cycle, but the mechanism by which plants safeguard stem cell homeostasis in response to environmental hazards is largely unknown. The homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) protein maintains the stem cell pool in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis. Here, we demonstrate that the translation of WUS mRNA is directed by an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) located in the 5'-untranslated region. The AtLa1 protein, an RNA-binding factor, binds to the 5'-untranslated region and initiates the IRES-dependent translation of WUS mRNA. Knockdown of AtLa1 expression represses the WUS IRES-dependent translation and leads to the arrest of growth and development. The AtLa1 protein is mainly located in the nucleoplasm. However, environmental hazards promote the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation of the AtLa1 protein, which further enhances the IRES-dependent translation of WUS mRNA. Genetic evidence indicates that the WUS protein increases the tolerance of the shoot apical meristem to environmental hazards. Based on these results, we conclude that the stem cell niche in Arabidopsis copes with environmental hazards by enhancing the IRES-dependent translation of WUS mRNA under the control of the AtLa1 protein. PMID:25764476

  13. Identification of Cyclic GMP-Activated Nonselective Ca2+-Permeable Cation Channels and Associated CNGC5 and CNGC6 Genes in Arabidopsis Guard Cells1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Fei; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Ren, Hui-Min; Robert, Nadia; Han, Michelle; Puzõrjova, Irina; Kollist, Hannes; Lee, Stephen; Mori, Izumi; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ in guard cells plays an important role in stomatal movement responses to environmental stimuli. These cytosolic Ca2+ increases result from Ca2+ influx through Ca2+-permeable channels in the plasma membrane and Ca2+ release from intracellular organelles in guard cells. However, the genes encoding defined plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel activity remain unknown in guard cells and, with some exceptions, largely unknown in higher plant cells. Here, we report the identification of two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cation channel genes, CNGC5 and CNGC6, that are highly expressed in guard cells. Cytosolic application of cyclic GMP (cGMP) and extracellularly applied membrane-permeable 8-Bromoguanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate-cGMP both activated hyperpolarization-induced inward-conducting currents in wild-type guard cells using Mg2+ as the main charge carrier. The cGMP-activated currents were strongly blocked by lanthanum and gadolinium and also conducted Ba2+, Ca2+, and Na+ ions. cngc5 cngc6 double mutant guard cells exhibited dramatically impaired cGMP-activated currents. In contrast, mutations in CNGC1, CNGC2, and CNGC20 did not disrupt these cGMP-activated currents. The yellow fluorescent protein-CNGC5 and yellow fluorescent protein-CNGC6 proteins localize in the cell periphery. Cyclic AMP activated modest inward currents in both wild-type and cngc5cngc6 mutant guard cells. Moreover, cngc5 cngc6 double mutant guard cells exhibited functional abscisic acid (ABA)-activated hyperpolarization-dependent Ca2+-permeable cation channel currents, intact ABA-induced stomatal closing responses, and whole-plant stomatal conductance responses to darkness and changes in CO2 concentration. Furthermore, cGMP-activated currents remained intact in the growth controlled by abscisic acid2 and abscisic acid insensitive1 mutants. This research demonstrates that the CNGC5 and CNGC6 genes encode unique cGMP-activated nonselective Ca2+-permeable cation channels

  14. Contrasting roles in ion transport of two K(+)-channel types in root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Maathuis, F J; Sanders, D

    1995-01-01

    Plant roots accumulate K+ over a range of external concentrations. Root cells have evolved at least two parallel plasma-membrane K+ transporters which operate at millimolar and micromolar external [K+]: high-affinity K+ uptake is energised by symport with H+, while low-affinity uptake is assumed to occur via ion channels. To determine the role of ion channels in low-affinity K+ uptake, a characterisation of the principal K(+)-selective ion channels in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. cv. Columbia roots was undertaken. Two classes of K(+)-selective channels were frequently observed: one inward (IRC) and one outward (ORC) rectifying with unitary conductances of 5 pS, 20 pS (IRCs) and 15 pS (ORC), measured in symmetrical 10 mM KCl. The dominant IRC (5 pS) and ORC (15 pS) were highly cation-selective (PCl:PK < 0.025) but less selective amongst monovalent cations (PNa:PK approximately 0.17-0.3). Both the IRC and the ORC were blocked by Ba2+, Cs+ and tetra-ethyl-ammonium, whereas 4-aminopyridine and quinidine selectively inhibited the ORC. The ORC open probability was steeply voltage-dependent and ORC activation potentials were close to the potassium equilibrium potential (EK+), enabling ORCs to conduct mainly outward, but occasionally inward, K+ current. By contrast, gating of the 5-pS IRC was weakly voltage-ependent and IRC gating was invariably restricted to membrane potentials more negative than EK+, ensuring K+ transport was always inwardly directed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8580759

  15. Ectopic Expression of BnaC.CP20.1 Results in Premature Tapetal Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Song, Liping; Zhou, Zhengfu; Tang, Shan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Shengqian; Qin, Maomao; Li, Bao; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Fu, Tingdong; Tu, Jinxing

    2016-09-01

    Tapetal programmed cell death (PCD) is essential in pollen grain development, and cysteine proteases are ubiquitous enzymes participating in plant PCD. Although the major papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCPs) have been investigated, the exact functions of many PLCPs are still poorly understood in PCD. Here, we identified a PLCP gene, BnaC.CP20.1, which was closely related to XP_013596648.1 from Brassica oleracea. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that BnaC.CP20.1 expression was down-regulated in male-sterile lines in oilseed rape, suggesting a connection between this gene and male sterility. BnaC.CP20.1 is especially active in the tapetum and microspores in Brassica napus from the uninucleate stage until formation of mature pollen grains during anther development. On expression of BnaC.CP20.1 prior to the tetrad stage, BnA9::BnaC.CP20.1 transgenic lines in Arabidopsis thaliana showed a male-sterile phenotype with shortened siliques containing fewer or no seeds by self-crossing. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the reticulate exine was defective in aborted microspores. Callose degradation was delayed and microspores were not released from the tetrad in a timely fashion. Additionally, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay indicated that BnaC.CP20.1 ectopic expression led to premature tapetal PCD. Transmission electron microscopy analyses further demonstrated that the pollen abortion was due to the absence of tectum connections to the bacula in the transgenic anthers. These findings suggest that timely expression of BnaC.CP20.1 is necessary for tapetal degeneration and pollen wall formation. PMID:27388342

  16. Activation of Tag1 transposable elements in Arabidopsis dedifferentiating cells and their regulation by CHROMOMETHYLASE 3-mediated CHG methylation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asif; Yadav, Narendra Singh; Morgenstern, Yaakov; Zemach, Assaf; Grafi, Gideon

    2016-10-01

    Dedifferentiation, that is, the acquisition of stem cell-like state, commonly induced by stress (e.g., protoplasting), is characterized by open chromatin conformation, a chromatin state that could lead to activation of transposable elements (TEs). Here, we studied the activation of the Arabidopsis class II TE Tag1, in which two copies, situated close to each other (near genes) on chromosome 1 are found in Landsberg erecta (Ler) but not in Columbia (Col). We first transformed protoplasts with a construct in which a truncated Tag1 (ΔTag1 non-autonomous) blocks the expression of a reporter gene AtMBD5-GFP and found a relatively high ectopic excision of ΔTag1 accompanied by expression of AtMBD5-GFP in protoplasts derived from Ler compared to Col; further increase was observed in ddm1 (decrease in DNA methylation1) protoplasts (Ler background). Ectopic excision was associated with transcription of the endogenous Tag1 and changes in histone H3 methylation at the promoter region. Focusing on the endogenous Tag1 elements we found low level of excision in Ler protoplasts, which was slightly and strongly enhanced in ddm1 and cmt3 (chromomethylase3) protoplasts, respectively, concomitantly with reduction in Tag1 gene body (GB) CHG methylation and increased Tag1 transcription; strong activation of Tag1 was also observed in cmt3 leaves. Notably, in cmt3, but not in ddm1, Tag1 elements were excised out from their original sites and transposed elsewhere in the genome. Our results suggest that dedifferentiation is associated with Tag1 activation and that CMT3 rather than DDM1 plays a central role in restraining Tag1 activation via inducing GB CHG methylation. PMID:27475038

  17. Natural Variation Identifies ICARUS1, a Universal Gene Required for Cell Proliferation and Growth at High Temperatures in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Seleznev, Andrei; Méndez-Vigo, Belén; Picó, F. Xavier; Sureshkumar, Sridevi; Sundaramoorthi, Vignesh; Bulach, Dieter; Powell, David; Seemann, Torsten; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar

    2015-01-01

    Plants are highly sensitive to environmental changes and even small variations in ambient temperature have severe consequences on their growth and development. Temperature affects multiple aspects of plant development, but the processes and mechanisms underlying thermo-sensitive growth responses are mostly unknown. Here we exploit natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana to identify and characterize novel components and processes mediating thermo-sensitive growth responses in plants. Phenotypic screening of wild accessions identified several strains displaying pleiotropic growth defects, at cellular and organism levels, specifically at high ambient temperatures. Positional cloning and characterization of the underlying gene revealed that ICARUS1 (ICA1), which encodes a protein of the tRNAHis guanylyl transferase (Thg1) superfamily, is required for plant growth at high temperatures. Transcriptome and gene marker analyses together with DNA content measurements show that ICA1 loss-of-function results in down regulation of cell cycle associated genes at high temperatures, which is linked with a block in G2/M transition and endoreduplication. In addition, plants with mutations in ICA1 show enhanced sensitivity to DNA damage. Characterization of additional strains that carry lesions in ICA1, but display normal growth, shows that alternative splicing is likely to alleviate the deleterious effects of some natural mutations. Furthermore, analyses of worldwide and regional collections of natural accessions indicate that ICA1 loss-of-function has arisen several times independently, and that these occur at high frequency in some local populations. Overall our results suggest that ICA1-mediated-modulation of fundamental processes such as tRNAHis maturation, modify plant growth responses to temperature changes in a quantitative and reversible manner, in natural populations. PMID:25951176

  18. The conflict between cell proliferation and expansion primarily affects stem organogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Saori; Gunji, Shizuka; Hanai, Kenya; Hirano, Tomonari; Kazama, Yusuke; Ohbayashi, Iwai; Abe, Tomoko; Sawa, Shinichiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Ferjani, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Plant shoot organs such as stems, leaves and flowers are derived from specialized groups of stem cells organized at the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Organogenesis involves two major processes, namely cell proliferation and differentiation, whereby the former contributes to increasing the cell number and the latter involves substantial increases in cell volume through cell expansion. Co-ordination between the above processes in time and space is essential for proper organogenesis. To identify regulatory factors involved in proper organogenesis, heavy-ion beam-irradiated de-etiolated (det) 3-1 seeds have been used to identify striking phenotypes in the A#26-2; det3-1 mutant. In addition to the stunted plant stature mimicking det3-1, the A#26-2; det3-1 mutant exhibited stem thickening, increased floral organ number and a fruit shape reminiscent of clavata (clv) mutants. DNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that A#26-2; det3-1 harbors a mutation in the CLV3 gene. Importantly, A#26-2; det3-1 displayed cracks that randomly occurred on the main stem with a frequency of approximately 50%. Furthermore, the double mutants clv3-8 det3-1, clv1-4 det3-1 and clv2-1 det3-1 consistently showed stem cracks with frequencies of approximately 97, 38 and 35%, respectively. Cross-sections of stems further revealed an increase in vascular bundle number, cell number and size in the pith of clv3-8 det3-1 compared with det3-1. These findings suggest that the stem inner volume increase due to clv mutations exerts an outward mechanical stress; that in a det3-1 background (defective in cell expansion) resulted in cracking of the outermost layer of epidermal cells. PMID:25246492

  19. Interaction of CPR5 with Cell Cycle Regulators UVI4 and OSD1 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhilong; Hua, Jian

    2014-01-01

    The impact of cell cycle on plant immunity was indicated by the enhancement of disease resistance with overexpressing OSD1 and UVI4 genes that are negative regulators of cell cycle controller APC (anaphase promoting complex). CPR5 is another gene that is implicated in cell cycle regulation and plant immunity, but its mode of action is not known. Here we report the analysis of genetic requirement for the function of UVI4 and OSD1 in cell cycle progression control and in particular the involvement of CPR5 in this regulation. We show that the APC activator CCS52A1 partially mediates the function of OSD1 and UVI4 in female gametophyte development. We found that the cpr5 mutation suppresses the endoreduplication defect in the uvi4 single mutant and partially rescued the gametophyte development defect in the osd1 uvi4 double mutant while the uvi4 mutation enhances the cpr5 defects in trichome branching and plant disease resistance. In addition, cyclin B1 genes CYCB1;1, CYCB1;2, and CYCB1;4 are upregulated in cpr5. Therefore, CPR5 has a large role in cell cycle regulation and this role has a complex interaction with that of UVI4 and OSD1. This study further indicates an intrinsic link between plant defense responses and cell cycle progression. PMID:24945150

  20. Transcriptional profiling of Arabidopsis root hairs and pollen defines an apical cell growth signature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Current views on the control of cell development are anchored on the notion that phenotypes are defined by networks of transcriptional activity. The large amounts of information brought about by transcriptomics should allow the definition of these networks through the analysis of cell-specific transcriptional signatures. Here we test this principle by applying an analogue to comparative anatomy at the cellular level, searching for conserved transcriptional signatures, or conserved small gene-regulatory networks (GRNs) on root hairs (RH) and pollen tubes (PT), two filamentous apical growing cells that are a striking example of conservation of structure and function in plants. Results We developed a new method for isolation of growing and mature root hair cells, analysed their transcriptome by microarray analysis, and further compared it with pollen and other single cell transcriptomics data. Principal component analysis shows a statistical relation between the datasets of RHs and PTs which is suggestive of a common transcriptional profile pattern for the apical growing cells in a plant, with overlapping profiles and clear similarities at the level of small GTPases, vesicle-mediated transport and various specific metabolic responses. Furthermore, cis-regulatory element analysis of co-regulated genes between RHs and PTs revealed conserved binding sequences that are likely required for the expression of genes comprising the apical signature. This included a significant occurrence of motifs associated to a defined transcriptional response upon anaerobiosis. Conclusions Our results suggest that maintaining apical growth mechanisms synchronized with energy yielding might require a combinatorial network of transcriptional regulation. We propose that this study should constitute the foundation for further genetic and physiological dissection of the mechanisms underlying apical growth of plant cells. PMID:25080170

  1. The nucleolar structure and nucleolar proteins in proliferating cells of Arabidopsis seeds germinated in the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matía, I.; González-Camacho, F.; Marco, R.; Kiss, J. Z.; Gasset, G.; Medina, F. J.

    Seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana were sent to the ISS in the ``Cervantes Mission'' (Spanish Soyuz Mission) within MAMBA Biocontainers (Dutch Space B.V.). These Biocontainers are capable of supplying liquids to the biosample by means of a motorized mechanism based on the ``Berlingot-Ampoule'' concept. Seed germination was activated by supplying culture medium to them, and the process progressed for 4 days at 22°C. Then, growth was stopped by the addition of paraformaldehyde (PFA) fixative. Once back on the ground, samples were immediately processed for microscopical observation. A parallel ground control experiment was simultaneously replicated, following the same schedule and conditions. Seed germination occurred at a high rate in the Space. No differences in the germination rate were observed with respect to the ground control, although Space-grown seedlings were substantially longer (affecting the roots and also the hypocotyl) than the parallel samples grown at 1 g. The mitotic index and the cellular morphometric parameters (length, width, nuclear size) were measured and compared in both the experimental and control conditions. Bidimensional protein electrophoresis was performed on samples in which PFA fixation was reverted by prolonged (two weeks) storage in PBS buffer. The total proteomic profile of seedlings showed differences between the Space sample and the ground control, affecting to nearly one third of the spots. Remarkably, a set of spots around 35 kDa and pI 8.0 are conspicuous in the Space sample and do not appear in the ground control. A more specialized proteomic analysis, with functional significance, was carried out using the AgNOR staining method on Western blots, a technique revealing nucleolar proteins associated with cell proliferation. Immunocytochemical experiments showed the in situ distribution of nucleolin, a nucleolar multifunctional protein regulated by kinases related with cell cycle and proliferation control mechanisms. Finally, the

  2. Nitrated Cyclic GMP Modulates Guard Cell Signaling in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Joudoi, Takahiro; Shichiri, Yudai; Kamizono, Nobuto; Akaike, Takaaki; Sawa, Tomohiro; Yoshitake, Jun; Yamada, Naotaka; Iwai, Sumio

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in diverse physiological processes, including plant senescence and stomatal closure. The NO and cyclic GMP (cGMP) cascade is the main NO signaling pathway in animals, but whether this pathway operates in plant cells, and the mechanisms of its action, remain unclear. Here, we assessed the possibility that the nitrated cGMP derivative 8-nitro-cGMP functions in guard cell signaling. Mass spectrometry and immunocytochemical analyses showed that abscisic acid and NO induced the synthesis of 8-nitro-cGMP in guard cells in the presence of reactive oxygen species. 8-Nitro-cGMP triggered stomatal closure, but 8-bromoguanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-bromo-cGMP), a membrane-permeating analog of cGMP, did not. However, in the dark, 8-bromo-cGMP induced stomatal opening but 8-nitro-cGMP did not. Thus, cGMP and its nitrated derivative play different roles in the signaling pathways that lead to stomatal opening and closure. Moreover, inhibitor and genetic studies showed that calcium, cyclic adenosine-5′-diphosphate-ribose, and SLOW ANION CHANNEL1 act downstream of 8-nitro-cGMP. This study therefore demonstrates that 8-nitro-cGMP acts as a guard cell signaling molecule and that a NO/8-nitro-cGMP signaling cascade operates in guard cells. PMID:23396828

  3. Chloroplast Activity and 3'phosphadenosine 5'phosphate Signaling Regulate Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, Quentin; Mazubert, Christelle; Prunier, Florence; Lugan, Raphaël; Chan, Kai Xun; Phua, Su Yin; Pogson, Barry James; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Delarue, Marianne; Benhamed, Moussa; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a crucial process both for plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. There is accumulating evidence that chloroplasts may play a central role during plant PCD as for mitochondria in animal cells, but it is still unclear whether they participate in PCD onset, execution, or both. To tackle this question, we have analyzed the contribution of chloroplast function to the cell death phenotype of the myoinositol phosphate synthase1 (mips1) mutant that forms spontaneous lesions in a light-dependent manner. We show that photosynthetically active chloroplasts are required for PCD to occur in mips1, but this process is independent of the redox state of the chloroplast. Systematic genetic analyses with retrograde signaling mutants reveal that 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate, a chloroplast retrograde signal that modulates nuclear gene expression in response to stress, can inhibit cell death and compromises plant innate immunity via inhibition of the RNA-processing 5'-3' exoribonucleases. Our results provide evidence for the role of chloroplast-derived signal and RNA metabolism in the control of cell death and biotic stress response. PMID:26747283

  4. Unidirectional Movement of Cellulose Synthase Complexes in Arabidopsis Seed Coat Epidermal Cells Deposit Cellulose Involved in Mucilage Extrusion, Adherence, and Ray Formation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Patricia; Young, Robin; DeBolt, Seth

    2015-01-01

    CELLULOSE SYNTHASE5 (CESA5) synthesizes cellulose necessary for seed mucilage adherence to seed coat epidermal cells of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The involvement of additional CESA proteins in this process and details concerning the manner in which cellulose is deposited in the mucilage pocket are unknown. Here, we show that both CESA3 and CESA10 are highly expressed in this cell type at the time of mucilage synthesis and localize to the plasma membrane adjacent to the mucilage pocket. The isoxaben resistant1-1 and isoxaben resistant1-2 mutants affecting CESA3 show defects consistent with altered mucilage cellulose biosynthesis. CESA3 can interact with CESA5 in vitro, and green fluorescent protein-tagged CESA5, CESA3, and CESA10 proteins move in a linear, unidirectional fashion around the cytoplasmic column of the cell, parallel with the surface of the seed, in a pattern similar to that of cortical microtubules. Consistent with this movement, cytological evidence suggests that the mucilage is coiled around the columella and unwinds during mucilage extrusion to form a linear ray. Mutations in CESA5 and CESA3 affect the speed of mucilage extrusion and mucilage adherence. These findings imply that cellulose fibrils are synthesized in an ordered helical array around the columella, providing a distinct structure to the mucilage that is important for both mucilage extrusion and adherence. PMID:25926481

  5. The Arabidopsis transcription factor IIB-related protein BRP4 is involved in the regulation of mitotic cell-cycle progression during male gametogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuxin

    2014-01-01

    Male gametogenesis in angiosperms involves two rounds of mitosis that are essential for the generation of two sperm cells to achieve double fertilization, a distinct event in the sexual reproduction of flowering plants. Precise regulation of mitosis during male gametogenesis is critically important for the establishment of the male germline. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying mitotic division during male gametophyte development have not been characterized fully. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis transcription initiation factor TFIIB-related protein BRP4 is involved in the regulation of mitotic cell-cycle progression during male gametogenesis. BRP4 was expressed predominately in developing male gametophytes. Knockdown expression of BRP4 by a native promoter-driven RNA interference construct in Arabidopsis resulted in arrest of the mitotic progression of male gametophytes, leading to a defect in pollen development. Moreover, we showed that the level of expression of a gene encoding a subunit of the origin recognition complex, ORC6, was decreased in BRP4 knockdown plants, and that the ORC6 knockdown transgenic plants phenocopied the male gametophyte defect observed in BRP4 knockdown plants, suggesting that ORC6 acts downstream of BRP4 to mediate male mitotic progression. Taken together, our results reveal that BRP4 plays an important role in the regulation of mitotic cell-cycle progression during male gametogenesis. PMID:24723406

  6. A putative Arabidopsis thaliana glycosyltransferase, At4g01220, which is closely related to three plant cell wall-specific xylosyltransferases, is differentially expressed spatially and temporally.

    PubMed

    Fangel, Jonatan U; Petersen, Bent L; Jensen, Niels B; Willats, William G T; Bacic, Antony; Egelund, Jack

    2011-03-01

    Plant cell wall polysaccharides are amongst the most complex, heterogeneous and abundant bio-molecules on earth. This makes the biosynthetic enzymes, namely the glycosyltransferases and polysaccharide synthases, important research targets in plant science and biotechnology. As an initial step to characterize At4g01220, a putative Arabidopsis thaliana encoding glycosyltransferases in CAZy GT-family-77 that is similar to three known xylosyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan II, we conducted an expression analysis. In transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants containing a fusion between the At4g01220 promoter and the gusA reporter gene we found the expression to be spatially and developmentally regulated. Analysis of Nicotiana benthamiana transfected with the At2g01220::YFP fusion protein revealed that the fusion protein resided in a Brefeldin A-sensitive compartment consistent with a sub-cellular location in the Golgi apparatus. In addition, in silico expression analysis from the Genevestigator database revealed that At4g01220 was up-regulated upon treatment with isoxaben, an inhibitor of cellulose synthesis, which, together with a co-expression analysis that identified a number of plant cell wall co-related biosynthetic genes, suggests involvement in cell wall biosynthesis with pectin being a prime candidate. The data presented provide insights into the expression, sub-cellular location and regulation of At4g01220 under various conditions and may help elucidate its specific function. PMID:21421394

  7. Lesion simulating disease 1 and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 differentially regulate UV-C-induced photooxidative stress signalling and programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wituszyńska, Weronika; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Sobczak, Mirosław; Rusaczonek, Anna; Kozłowska-Makulska, Anna; Witoń, Damian; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-02-01

    As obligate photoautotrophs, plants are inevitably exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Because of stratospheric ozone depletion, UV has become more and more dangerous to the biosphere. Therefore, it is important to understand UV perception and signal transduction in plants. In the present study, we show that lesion simulating disease 1 (LSD1) and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) are antagonistic regulators of UV-C-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in Arabidopsis thaliana. This regulatory dependence is manifested by a complex deregulation of photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, antioxidative enzyme activity and UV-responsive genes expression. We also prove that a UV-C radiation episode triggers apoptotic-like morphological changes within the mesophyll cells. Interestingly, chloroplasts are the first organelles that show features of UV-C-induced damage, which may indicate their primary role in PCD development. Moreover, we show that Arabidopsis Bax inhibitor 1 (AtBI1), which has been described as a negative regulator of plant PCD, is involved in LSD1-dependent cell death in response to UV-C. Our results imply that LSD1 and EDS1 regulate processes extinguishing excessive energy, reactive oxygen species formation and subsequent PCD in response to different stresses related to impaired electron transport. PMID:24471507

  8. A temperature-sensitive allele of a putative mRNA splicing helicase down-regulates many cell wall genes and causes radial swelling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Howles, Paul A; Gebbie, Leigh K; Collings, David A; Varsani, Arvind; Broad, Ronan C; Ohms, Stephen; Birch, Rosemary J; Cork, Ann H; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    The putative RNA helicase encoded by the Arabidopsis gene At1g32490 is a homolog of the yeast splicing RNA helicases Prp2 and Prp22. We isolated a temperature-sensitive allele (rsw12) of the gene in a screen for root radial swelling mutants. Plants containing this allele grown at the restrictive temperature showed weak radial swelling, were stunted with reduced root elongation, and contained reduced levels of cellulose. The role of the protein was further explored by microarray analysis. By using both fold change cutoffs and a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) to investigate coexpression of genes, we found that the radial swelling phenotype was not linked to genes usually associated with primary cell wall biosynthesis. Instead, the mutation has strong effects on expression of secondary cell wall related genes. Many genes potentially associated with secondary walls were present in the most significant WGCNA module, as were genes coding for arabinogalactans and proteins with GPI anchors. The proportion of up-regulated genes that possess introns in rsw12 was above that expected if splicing was unrelated to the activity of the RNA helicase, suggesting that the helicase does indeed play a role in splicing in Arabidopsis. The phenotype may be due to a change in the expression of one or more genes coding for cell wall proteins. PMID:27008640

  9. AcEBP1, an ErbB3-Binding Protein (EBP1) from halophyte Atriplex canescens, negatively regulates cell growth and stress responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingtao; Yu, Gang; Sun, Xinhua; Zhang, Xianghui; Liu, Jinliang; Pan, Hongyu

    2016-07-01

    An ErbB-3-binding protein gene AcEBP1, also known as proliferation-associated 2G4 gene (PA2G4s) belonging to the M24 superfamily, was obtained from the saltbush Atriplex canescens. Subcellular localization imaging showed the fusion protein AcEBP1-eGFP was located in the nucleus of epidermal cells in Nicotiana benthamiana. The AcEBP1 gene expression levels were up-regulated under salt, osmotic stress, and hormones treatment as revealed by qRT-PCR. Overexpression of AcEBP1 in Arabidopsis demonstrated that AcEBP1 was involved in root cell growth and stress responses (NaCl, osmotic stress, ABA, low temperature, and drought). These phenotypic data were correlated with the expression patterns of stress responsive genes and PR genes. The AcEBP1 transgenic Arabidopsis plants also displayed increased sensitivity under low temperature and evaluated resistance to drought stress. Together, these results demonstrate that AcEBP1 negatively affects cell growth and is a regulator under stress conditions. PMID:27181948

  10. A MYB transcription factor regulates very-long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis for activation of the hypersensitive cell death response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Vailleau, Fabienne; Léger, Amandine; Joubès, Jérôme; Miersch, Otto; Huard, Carine; Blée, Elisabeth; Mongrand, Sébastien; Domergue, Frédéric; Roby, Dominique

    2008-03-01

    Plant immune responses to pathogen attack include the hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death occurring at invasion sites. We previously reported on Arabidopsis thaliana MYB30, a transcription factor that acts as a positive regulator of a cell death pathway conditioning the HR. Here, we show by microarray analyses of Arabidopsis plants misexpressing MYB30 that the genes encoding the four enzymes forming the acyl-coA elongase complex are putative MYB30 targets. The acyl-coA elongase complex synthesizes very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), and the accumulation of extracellular VLCFA-derived metabolites (leaf epidermal wax components) was affected in MYB30 knockout mutant and overexpressing lines. In the same lines, a lipid extraction procedure allowing high recovery of sphingolipids revealed changes in VLCFA contents that were amplified in response to inoculation. Finally, the exacerbated HR phenotype of MYB30-overexpressing lines was altered by the loss of function of the acyl-ACP thioesterase FATB, which causes severe defects in the supply of fatty acids for VLCFA biosynthesis. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which MYB30 modulates HR via VLCFAs by themselves, or VLCFA derivatives, as cell death messengers in plants. PMID:18326828

  11. Live and let die: a REM complex promotes fertilization through synergid cell death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Marta Adelina; Guerra, Rosalinda Fiorella; Castelnovo, Beatrice; Silva-Velazquez, Yuriria; Morandini, Piero; Manrique, Silvia; Baumann, Nadine; Groß-Hardt, Rita; Dickinson, Hugh; Colombo, Lucia

    2016-08-01

    Fertilization in flowering plants requires a complex series of coordinated events involving interaction between the male and female gametophyte. We report here molecular data on one of the key events underpinning this process - the death of the receptive synergid cell and the coincident bursting of the pollen tube inside the ovule to release the sperm. We show that two REM transcription factors, VALKYRIE (VAL) and VERDANDI (VDD), both targets of the ovule identity MADS-box complex SEEDSTICK-SEPALLATA3, interact to control the death of the receptive synergid cell. In vdd-1/+ mutants and VAL_RNAi lines, we find that GAMETOPHYTIC FACTOR 2 (GFA2), which is required for synergid degeneration, is downregulated, whereas expression of FERONIA (FER) and MYB98, which are necessary for pollen tube attraction and perception, remain unaffected. We also demonstrate that the vdd-1/+ phenotype can be rescued by expressing VDD or GFA2 in the synergid cells. Taken together, our findings reveal that the death of the receptive synergid cell is essential for maintenance of the following generations, and that a complex comprising VDD and VAL regulates this event. PMID:27338615

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana POLYOL/MONOSACCHARIDE TRANSPORTERS 1 and 2: fructose and xylitol/H+ symporters in pollen and young xylem cells.

    PubMed

    Klepek, Yvonne-Simone; Volke, Melanie; Konrad, Kai R; Wippel, Kathrin; Hoth, Stefan; Hedrich, Rainer; Sauer, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana contains six genes, AtPMT1 to AtPMT6 (Arabidopsis thaliana POLYOL/MONOSACCHARIDE TRANSPORTER 1-6), which form a distinct subfamily within the large family of more than 50 monosaccharide transporter-like (MST-like) genes. So far, only AtPMT5 [formerly named AtPLT5 (At3g18830)] has been characterized and was shown to be a plasma membrane-localized H(+)-symporter with broad substrate specificity. The characterization of AtPMT1 (At2g16120) and AtPMT2 (At2g16130), two other, almost identical, members of this transporter subfamily, are presented here. Expression of the AtPMT1 and AtPMT2 cDNAs in baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) revealed that these proteins catalyse the energy-dependent, high-capacity transport of fructose and xylitol, and the transport of several other compounds with lower rates. Expression of their cRNAs in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that both proteins are voltage-dependent and catalyse the symport of their substrates with protons. Fusions of AtPMT1 or AtPMT2 with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) localized to Arabidopsis plasma membranes. Analyses of reporter genes performed with AtPMT1 or AtPMT2 promoter sequences showed expression in mature (AtPMT2) or germinating (AtPMT1) pollen grains, as well as in growing pollen tubes, hydathodes, and young xylem cells (both genes). The expression was confirmed with an anti-AtPMT1/AtPMT2 antiserum (alphaAtPMT1/2) raised against peptides conserved in AtPMT1 and AtPMT2. The physiological roles of the proteins are discussed and related to plant cell wall modifications. PMID:19969532

  13. Arabidopsis thaliana POLYOL/MONOSACCHARIDE TRANSPORTERS 1 and 2: fructose and xylitol/H+ symporters in pollen and young xylem cells

    PubMed Central

    Klepek, Yvonne-Simone; Konrad, Kai R.; Wippel, Kathrin; Hoth, Stefan; Hedrich, Rainer; Sauer, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana contains six genes, AtPMT1 to AtPMT6 (Arabidopsis thaliana POLYOL/MONOSACCHARIDE TRANSPORTER 1–6), which form a distinct subfamily within the large family of more than 50 monosaccharide transporter-like (MST-like) genes. So far, only AtPMT5 [formerly named AtPLT5 (At3g18830)] has been characterized and was shown to be a plasma membrane-localized H+-symporter with broad substrate specificity. The characterization of AtPMT1 (At2g16120) and AtPMT2 (At2g16130), two other, almost identical, members of this transporter subfamily, are presented here. Expression of the AtPMT1 and AtPMT2 cDNAs in baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) revealed that these proteins catalyse the energy-dependent, high-capacity transport of fructose and xylitol, and the transport of several other compounds with lower rates. Expression of their cRNAs in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that both proteins are voltage-dependent and catalyse the symport of their substrates with protons. Fusions of AtPMT1 or AtPMT2 with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) localized to Arabidopsis plasma membranes. Analyses of reporter genes performed with AtPMT1 or AtPMT2 promoter sequences showed expression in mature (AtPMT2) or germinating (AtPMT1) pollen grains, as well as in growing pollen tubes, hydathodes, and young xylem cells (both genes). The expression was confirmed with an anti-AtPMT1/AtPMT2 antiserum (αAtPMT1/2) raised against peptides conserved in AtPMT1 and AtPMT2. The physiological roles of the proteins are discussed and related to plant cell wall modifications. PMID:19969532

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of the R2R3 MYB secondary cell wall regulators of Arabidopsis, poplar, rice, maize, and switchgrass

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background R2R3 MYB proteins constitute one of the largest plant transcription factor clades and regulate diverse plant-specific processes. Several R2R3 MYB proteins act as regulators of secondary cell wall (SCW) biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana (At), a dicotyledenous plant. Relatively few studies have examined SCW R2R3 MYB function in grasses, which may have diverged from dicots in terms of SCW regulatory mechanisms, as they have in cell wall composition and patterning. Understanding cell wall regulation is especially important for improving lignocellulosic bioenergy crops, such as switchgrass. Results Here, we describe the results of applying phylogenic, OrthoMCL, and sequence identity analyses to classify the R2R3 MYB family proteins from the annotated proteomes of Arabidposis, poplar, rice, maize and the initial genome (v0.0) and translated transcriptome of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). We find that the R2R3 MYB proteins of the five species fall into 48 subgroups, including three dicot-specific, six grass-specific, and two panicoid grass-expanded subgroups. We observe four classes of phylogenetic relationships within the subgroups of known SCW-regulating MYB proteins between Arabidopsis and rice, ranging from likely one-to-one orthology (for AtMYB26, AtMYB103, AtMYB69) to no homologs identifiable (for AtMYB75). Microarray data for putative switchgrass SCW MYBs indicate that many maintain similar expression patterns with the Arabidopsis SCW regulators. However, some of the switchgrass-expanded candidate SCW MYBs exhibit differences in gene expression patterns among paralogs, consistent with subfunctionalization. Furthermore, some switchgrass representatives of grass-expanded clades have gene expression patterns consistent with regulating SCW development. Conclusions Our analysis suggests that no single comparative genomics tool is able to provide a complete picture of the R2R3 MYB protein family without leaving ambiguities, and establishing likely false

  15. Disruption of the human CGI-58 homologue in Arabidopsis results in lipid droplet accumulation in the cytosol of plant cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CGI-58 has been identified as the causative gene in the human neutral lipid storage disease called Chanarin-Dorfman Syndrome. This disorder results in accumulation of intracellular lipid droplets in non-adipose tissues. Here we show that disruption of the homologous CGI-58 gene in Arabidopsis thal...

  16. The Association of the Arabidopsis Actin-Related Protein2/3 Complex with Cell Membranes Is Linked to Its Assembly Status But Not Its Activation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Zakharova, Taya; Mallery, Eileen L.; Le, Jie; El-Assal, Salah El-Din; Szymanski, Daniel B.

    2009-01-01

    In growing plant cells, the combined activities of the cytoskeleton, endomembrane, and cell wall biosynthetic systems organize the cytoplasm and define the architecture and growth properties of the cell. These biosynthetic machineries efficiently synthesize, deliver, and recycle the raw materials that support cell expansion. The precise roles of the actin cytoskeleton in these processes are unclear. Certainly, bundles of actin filaments position organelles and are a substrate for long-distance intracellular transport, but the functional linkages between dynamic actin filament arrays and the cell growth machinery are poorly understood. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) “distorted group” mutants have defined protein complexes that appear to generate and convert small GTPase signals into an Actin-Related Protein2/3 (ARP2/3)-dependent actin filament nucleation response. However, direct biochemical knowledge about Arabidopsis ARP2/3 and its cellular distribution is lacking. In this paper, we provide biochemical evidence for a plant ARP2/3. The plant complex utilizes a conserved assembly mechanism. ARPC4 is the most critical core subunit that controls the assembly and steady-state levels of the complex. ARP2/3 in other systems is believed to be mostly a soluble complex that is locally recruited and activated. Unexpectedly, we find that Arabidopsis ARP2/3 interacts strongly with cell membranes. Membrane binding is linked to complex assembly status and not to the extent to which it is activated. Mutant analyses implicate ARP2 as an important subunit for membrane association. PMID:19801398

  17. Neighboring Parenchyma Cells Contribute to Arabidopsis Xylem Lignification, while Lignification of Interfascicular Fibers Is Cell Autonomous[W

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca A.; Schuetz, Mathias; Roach, Melissa; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Ellis, Brian; Samuels, Lacey

    2013-01-01

    Lignin is a critical structural component of plants, providing vascular integrity and mechanical strength. Lignin precursors (monolignols) must be exported to the extracellular matrix where random oxidative coupling produces a complex lignin polymer. The objectives of this study were twofold: to determine the timing of lignification with respect to programmed cell death and to test if nonlignifying xylary parenchyma cells can contribute to the lignification of tracheary elements and fibers. This study demonstrates that lignin deposition is not exclusively a postmortem event, but also occurs prior to programmed cell death. Radiolabeled monolignols were not detected in the cytoplasm or vacuoles of tracheary elements or neighbors. To experimentally define which cells in lignifying tissues contribute to lignification in intact plants, a microRNA against CINNAMOYL CoA-REDUCTASE1 driven by the promoter from CELLULOSE SYNTHASE7 (ProCESA7:miRNA CCR1) was used to silence monolignol biosynthesis specifically in cells developing lignified secondary cell walls. When monolignol biosynthesis in ProCESA7:miRNA CCR1 lines was silenced in the lignifying cells themselves, but not in the neighboring cells, lignin was still deposited in the xylem secondary cell walls. Surprisingly, a dramatic reduction in cell wall lignification of extraxylary fiber cells demonstrates that extraxylary fibers undergo cell autonomous lignification. PMID:24096341

  18. Myosins XI-K, XI-1, and XI-2 are required for development of pavement cells, trichomes, and stigmatic papillae in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The positioning and dynamics of vesicles and organelles, and thus the growth of plant cells, is mediated by the acto-myosin system. In Arabidopsis there are 13 class XI myosins which mediate vesicle and organelle transport in different cell types. So far the involvement of five class XI myosins in cell expansion during the shoot and root development has been shown, three of which, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, are essential for organelle transport. Results Simultaneous depletion of Arabidopsis class XI myosins XI-K, XI-1, and XI-2 in double and triple mutant plants affected the growth of several types of epidermal cells. The size and shape of trichomes, leaf pavement cells and the elongation of the stigmatic papillae of double and triple mutant plants were affected to different extent. Reduced cell size led to significant size reduction of shoot organs in the case of triple mutant, affecting bolt formation, flowering time and fertility. Phenotype analysis revealed that the reduced fertility of triple mutant plants was caused by delayed or insufficient development of pistils. Conclusions We conclude that the class XI myosins XI-K, XI-1 and XI-2 have partially redundant roles in the growth of shoot epidermis. Myosin XI-K plays more important role whereas myosins XI-1 and XI-2 have minor roles in the determination of size and shape of epidermal cells, because the absence of these two myosins is compensated by XI-K. Co-operation between myosins XI-K and XI-2 appears to play an important role in these processes. PMID:22672737

  19. Senescence-inducible cell wall and intracellular purple acid phosphatases: implications for phosphorus remobilization in Hakea prostrata (Proteaceae) and Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Shane, Michael W.; Stigter, Kyla; Fedosejevs, Eric T.; Plaxton, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its agronomic importance, the metabolic networks mediating phosphorus (P) remobilization during plant senescence are poorly understood. Highly efficient P remobilization (~85%) from senescing leaves and proteoid roots of harsh hakea (Hakea prostrata), a native ‘extremophile’ plant of south-western Australia, was linked with striking up-regulation of cell wall-localized and intracellular acid phosphatase (APase) and RNase activities. Non-denaturing PAGE followed by in-gel APase activity staining revealed senescence-inducible 120kDa and 60kDa intracellular APase isoforms, whereas only the 120kDa isoform was detected in corresponding cell wall fractions. Kinetic and immunological properties of the 120kDa and 60kDa APases partially purified from senescing leaves indicated that they are purple acid phosphatases (PAPs). Results obtained with cell wall-targeted hydrolases of harsh hakea were corroborated using Arabidopsis thaliana in which an ~200% increase in cell wall APase activity during leaf senescence was paralleled by accumulation of immunoreactive 55kDa AtPAP26 polypeptides. Senescing leaves of an atpap26 T-DNA insertion mutant displayed a >90% decrease in cell wall APase activity. Previous research established that senescing leaves of atpap26 plants exhibited a similar reduction in intracellular (vacuolar) APase activity, while displaying markedly impaired P remobilization efficiency and delayed senescence. It is hypothesized that up-regulation and dual targeting of PAPs and RNases to the cell wall and vacuolar compartments make a crucial contribution to highly efficient P remobilization that dominates the P metabolism of senescing tissues of harsh hakea and Arabidopsis. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the apparent contribution of cell wall-targeted hydrolases to remobilizing key macronutrients such as P during senescence has not been previously suggested. PMID:25170100

  20. Senescence-inducible cell wall and intracellular purple acid phosphatases: implications for phosphorus remobilization in Hakea prostrata (Proteaceae) and Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Shane, Michael W; Stigter, Kyla; Fedosejevs, Eric T; Plaxton, William C

    2014-11-01

    Despite its agronomic importance, the metabolic networks mediating phosphorus (P) remobilization during plant senescence are poorly understood. Highly efficient P remobilization (~85%) from senescing leaves and proteoid roots of harsh hakea (Hakea prostrata), a native 'extremophile' plant of south-western Australia, was linked with striking up-regulation of cell wall-localized and intracellular acid phosphatase (APase) and RNase activities. Non-denaturing PAGE followed by in-gel APase activity staining revealed senescence-inducible 120kDa and 60kDa intracellular APase isoforms, whereas only the 120kDa isoform was detected in corresponding cell wall fractions. Kinetic and immunological properties of the 120kDa and 60kDa APases partially purified from senescing leaves indicated that they are purple acid phosphatases (PAPs). Results obtained with cell wall-targeted hydrolases of harsh hakea were corroborated using Arabidopsis thaliana in which an ~200% increase in cell wall APase activity during leaf senescence was paralleled by accumulation of immunoreactive 55kDa AtPAP26 polypeptides. Senescing leaves of an atpap26 T-DNA insertion mutant displayed a >90% decrease in cell wall APase activity. Previous research established that senescing leaves of atpap26 plants exhibited a similar reduction in intracellular (vacuolar) APase activity, while displaying markedly impaired P remobilization efficiency and delayed senescence. It is hypothesized that up-regulation and dual targeting of PAPs and RNases to the cell wall and vacuolar compartments make a crucial contribution to highly efficient P remobilization that dominates the P metabolism of senescing tissues of harsh hakea and Arabidopsis. To the best of the authors' knowledge, the apparent contribution of cell wall-targeted hydrolases to remobilizing key macronutrients such as P during senescence has not been previously suggested. PMID:25170100

  1. Abscisic Acid–Responsive Guard Cell Metabolomes of Arabidopsis Wild-Type and gpa1 G-Protein Mutants[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaofen; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Zhu, Mengmeng; Jeon, Byeong Wook; Albert, Reka; Chen, Sixue; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Individual metabolites have been implicated in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in guard cells, but a metabolite profile of this specialized cell type is lacking. We used liquid chromatography–multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry for targeted analysis of 85 signaling-related metabolites in Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell protoplasts over a time course of ABA treatment. The analysis utilized ∼350 million guard cell protoplasts from ∼30,000 plants of the Arabidopsis Columbia accession (Col) wild type and the heterotrimeric G-protein α subunit mutant, gpa1, which has ABA-hyposensitive stomata. These metabolomes revealed coordinated regulation of signaling metabolites in unrelated biochemical pathways. Metabolites clustered into different temporal modules in Col versus gpa1, with fewer metabolites showing ABA-altered profiles in gpa1. Ca2+-mobilizing agents sphingosine-1-phosphate and cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose exhibited weaker ABA-stimulated increases in gpa1. Hormone metabolites were responsive to ABA, with generally greater responsiveness in Col than in gpa1. Most hormones also showed different ABA responses in guard cell versus mesophyll cell metabolomes. These findings suggest that ABA functions upstream to regulate other hormones, and are also consistent with G proteins modulating multiple hormonal signaling pathways. In particular, indole-3-acetic acid levels declined after ABA treatment in Col but not gpa1 guard cells. Consistent with this observation, the auxin antagonist α-(phenyl ethyl-2-one)-indole-3-acetic acid enhanced ABA-regulated stomatal movement and restored partial ABA sensitivity to gpa1. PMID:24368793

  2. Loss of Calmodulin Binding to Bax Inhibitor-1 Affects Pseudomonas-mediated Hypersensitive Response-associated Cell Death in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Hori, Zenta; Ogawa, Taro; Ihara-Ohori, Yuri; Tamura, Katsunori; Nagano, Minoru; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Uchimiya, Hirofumi

    2009-01-01

    Bax inhibitor-1 (BI-1) is a cell death suppressor protein conserved across a variety of organisms. The Arabidopsis atbi1-1 plant is a mutant in which the C-terminal 6 amino acids of the expressed BI-1 protein have been replaced by T-DNA insertion. This mutant BI-1 protein (AtBI-CM) produced in Escherichia coli can no longer bind to calmodulin. A promoter-reporter assay demonstrated compartmentalized expression of BI-1 during hypersensitive response, introduced by the inoculation of Pseudomonas syringae possessing the avrRTP2 gene, Pst(avrRPT2). In addition, both BI-1 knockdown plants and atbi1-1 showed increased sensitivity to Pst(avrRPT2)-induced cell death. The results indicated that the loss of calmodulin binding reduces the cell death suppressor activity of BI-1 in planta. PMID:19674971

  3. Expression of endo-1,4-beta-glucanase (cel1) in Arabidopsis thaliana is associated with plant growth, xylem development and cell wall thickening.

    PubMed

    Shani, Ziv; Dekel, Mara; Roiz, Levava; Horowitz, Miri; Kolosovski, Natalia; Lapidot, Shaul; Alkan, Sari; Koltai, Hinanit; Tsabary, Galit; Goren, Raphael; Shoseyov, Oded

    2006-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana CEL1 protein was detected in young expanding tissues. Immunostaining revealed that CEL1 accumulated mostly in xylem cells. The primary, as well as the secondary xylem showed considerable CEL1 staining. CEL1 was also observed in young epidermal cells, in which the thicker lateral and tangential walls stained more intensely than the inner walls. In newly formed cell walls, the lateral tangential walls were labeled more intensively than the inner walls. Cellulase activity was found to be significantly higher in growing tissue compared to mature parts of the plant. Cel1 expression concurrently with cellulase activity could be restored in detached matured leaves by sucrose treatment after 48 h in the culture medium. PMID:16758197

  4. Distinct UV-B and UV-A/blue light signal transduction pathways induce chalcone synthase gene expression in Arabidopsis cells.

    PubMed Central

    Christie, J M; Jenkins, G I

    1996-01-01

    UV and blue light control the expression of flavonoid biosynthesis genes in a range of higher plants. To investigate the signal transduction processes involved in the induction of chalcone synthase (CHS) gene expression by UV-B and UV-A/blue light, we examined the effects of specific agonists and inhibitors of known signaling components in mammalian systems in a photomixotrophic Arabidopsis cell suspension culture. CHS expression is induced specifically by these wavelengths in the cell culture, in a manner similar to that in mature Arabidopsis leaf tissue. Both the UV-B and UV-A/blue phototransduction processes involve calcium, although the elevation of cytosolic calcium is insufficient on its own to stimulate CHS expression. The UV-A/blue light induction of CHS expression does not appear to involve calmodulin, whereas the UV-B response does; this difference indicates that the signal transduction pathways are, at least in part, distinct. We provide evidence that both pathways involve reversible protein phosphorylation and require protein synthesis. The UV-B and UV-A/blue light signaling pathways are therefore different from the phytochrome signal transduction pathway regulating CHS expression in other species. PMID:8837509

  5. The Cell Wall Arabinose-Deficient Arabidopsis thaliana Mutant murus5 Encodes a Defective Allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE21[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dugard, Christopher K.; Olek, Anna T.; Cooper, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional marker-based mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to determine that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) low cell wall arabinose mutant murus5 (mur5) encodes a defective allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2 (RGP2). Marker analysis of 13 F2 confirmed mutant progeny from a recombinant mapping population gave a rough map position on the upper arm of chromosome 5, and deep sequencing of DNA from these 13 lines gave five candidate genes with G→A (C→T) transitions predicted to result in amino acid changes. Of these five, only insertional mutant alleles of RGP2, a gene that encodes a UDP-arabinose mutase that interconverts UDP-arabinopyranose and UDP-arabinofuranose, exhibited the low cell wall arabinose phenotype. The identities of mur5 and two SALK insertional alleles were confirmed by allelism tests and overexpression of wild-type RGP2 complementary DNA placed under the control of the 35S promoter in the three alleles. The mur5 mutation results in the conversion of cysteine-257 to tyrosine-257 within a conserved hydrophobic cluster predicted to be distal to the active site and essential for protein stability and possible heterodimerization with other isoforms of RGP. PMID:27217494

  6. Nitrate reductase mutation alters potassium nutrition as well as nitric oxide-mediated control of guard cell ion channels in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Yizhou; Wang, Jian-Wen; Babla, Mohammad; Zhao, Chenchen; García-Mata, Carlos; Sani, Emanuela; Differ, Christopher; Mak, Michelle; Hills, Adrian; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining potassium (K(+) ) nutrition and a robust guard cell K(+) inward channel activity is considered critical for plants' adaptation to fluctuating and challenging growth environment. ABA induces stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (NO) along with subsequent ion channel-mediated loss of K(+) and anions. However, the interactions of NO synthesis and signalling with K(+) nutrition and guard cell K(+) channel activities have not been fully explored in Arabidopsis. Physiological and molecular techniques were employed to dissect the interaction of nitrogen and potassium nutrition in regulating stomatal opening, CO2 assimilation and ion channel activity. These data, gene expression and ABA signalling transduction were compared in wild-type Columbia-0 (Col-0) and the nitrate reductase mutant nia1nia2. Growth and K(+) nutrition were impaired along with stomatal behaviour, membrane transport, and expression of genes associated with ABA signalling in the nia1nia2 mutant. ABA-inhibited K(+) in current and ABA-enhanced slow anion current were absent in nia1nia2. Exogenous NO restored regulation of these channels for complete stomatal closure in nia1nia2. While NO is an important signalling component in ABA-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis, our findings demonstrate a more complex interaction associating potassium nutrition and nitrogen metabolism in the nia1nia2 mutant that affects stomatal function. PMID:26508536

  7. The Simbox Experiment with Arabidopsis Thaliana Cell Cultures: Hardware-Tests and First Resutls from the German-Chinese satellite Mission Shenzhou 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengler, Svenja; Neef, Maren; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Ruediger

    2013-02-01

    The Simbox experiment was the first joint German-Chinese space project. In this context Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures were exposed to microgravity for a 17-day period. To carry out a successful space mission, diverse hardware tests were performed in advance. Due to the limited oxygen supply inside the hardware units, cells were fixed after 5 days under microgravity conditions. As a control, samples were exposed in an on-board 1g reference centrifuge. To investigate the space effect, a ground-based study was performed with the same hardware and identical experimental procedures. As we were able to obtain high quality RNA from the RNAlater quenched samples, we used the Affymetrix Arabidopsis genome array for a transcriptome analysis. Our experiment aimed at the identification of plant genes that were differentially expressed after long-term exposure to microgravity. Pair-wise comparison of flight samples with 1g controls revealed the largest differences between space 1g and ground 1g controls.

  8. Calcium specificity signaling mechanisms in abscisic acid signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Benjamin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Wang, Cun; Nguyen, Desiree; Yong, Taiming; Yang, Paul G; Poretsky, Elly; Belknap, Thomas F; Waadt, Rainer; Alemán, Fernando; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-01-01

    A central question is how specificity in cellular responses to the eukaryotic second messenger Ca(2+) is achieved. Plant guard cells, that form stomatal pores for gas exchange, provide a powerful system for in depth investigation of Ca(2+)-signaling specificity in plants. In intact guard cells, abscisic acid (ABA) enhances (primes) the Ca(2+)-sensitivity of downstream signaling events that result in activation of S-type anion channels during stomatal closure, providing a specificity mechanism in Ca(2+)-signaling. However, the underlying genetic and biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show impairment of ABA signal transduction in stomata of calcium-dependent protein kinase quadruple mutant plants. Interestingly, protein phosphatase 2Cs prevent non-specific Ca(2+)-signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate an unexpected interdependence of the Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent ABA-signaling branches and the in planta requirement of simultaneous phosphorylation at two key phosphorylation sites in SLAC1. We identify novel mechanisms ensuring specificity and robustness within stomatal Ca(2+)-signaling on a cellular, genetic, and biochemical level. PMID:26192964

  9. Calcium specificity signaling mechanisms in abscisic acid signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Benjamin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Wang, Cun; Nguyen, Desiree; Yong, Taiming; Yang, Paul G; Poretsky, Elly; Belknap, Thomas F; Waadt, Rainer; Alemán, Fernando; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-01-01

    A central question is how specificity in cellular responses to the eukaryotic second messenger Ca2+ is achieved. Plant guard cells, that form stomatal pores for gas exchange, provide a powerful system for in depth investigation of Ca2+-signaling specificity in plants. In intact guard cells, abscisic acid (ABA) enhances (primes) the Ca2+-sensitivity of downstream signaling events that result in activation of S-type anion channels during stomatal closure, providing a specificity mechanism in Ca2+-signaling. However, the underlying genetic and biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show impairment of ABA signal transduction in stomata of calcium-dependent protein kinase quadruple mutant plants. Interestingly, protein phosphatase 2Cs prevent non-specific Ca2+-signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate an unexpected interdependence of the Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent ABA-signaling branches and the in planta requirement of simultaneous phosphorylation at two key phosphorylation sites in SLAC1. We identify novel mechanisms ensuring specificity and robustness within stomatal Ca2+-signaling on a cellular, genetic, and biochemical level. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03599.001 PMID:26192964

  10. Spatiotemporal relationships between growth and microtubule orientation as revealed in living root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana transformed with green-fluorescent-protein gene construct GFP-MBD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, C. L.; Cyr, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transformed with GFP-MBD (J. Marc et al., Plant Cell 10: 1927-1939, 1998) under the control of a constitutive (35S) or copper-inducible promoter. GFP-specific fluorescence distributions, levels, and persistence were determined and found to vary with age, tissue type, transgenic line, and individual plant. With the exception of an increased frequency of abnormal roots of 35S GFP-MBD plants grown on kanamycin-containing media, expression of GFP-MBD does not appear to affect plant phenotype. The number of leaves, branches, bolts, and siliques as well as overall height, leaf size, and seed set are similar between wild-type and transgenic plants as is the rate of root growth. Thus, we conclude that the transgenic plants can serve as a living model system in which the dynamic behavior of microtubules can be visualized. Confocal microscopy was used to simultaneously monitor growth and microtubule behavior within individual cells as they passed through the elongation zone of the Arabidopsis root. Generally, microtubules reoriented from transverse to oblique or longitudinal orientations as growth declined. Microtubule reorientation initiated at the ends of the cell did not necessarily occur simultaneously in adjacent neighboring cells and did not involve complete disintegration and repolymerization of microtubule arrays. Although growth rates correlated with microtubule reorientation, the two processes were not tightly coupled in terms of their temporal relationships, suggesting that other factor(s) may be involved in regulating both events. Additionally, microtubule orientation was more defined in cells whose growth was accelerating and less stringent in cells whose growth was decelerating, indicating that microtubule-orienting factor(s) may be sensitive to growth acceleration, rather than growth per se.

  11. Variation in growth rate between Arabidopsis ecotypes is correlated with cell division and A-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Beemster, Gerrit T S; De Vusser, Kristof; De Tavernier, Evelien; De Bock, Kirsten; Inzé, Dirk

    2002-06-01

    We used a kinematic analysis to investigate the growth processes responsible for variation in primary root growth between 18 ecotypes of Arabidopsis. Root elongation rate differed 4-fold between the slowest (Landsberg erecta, 71 microm h(-1)) and fastest growing line (Wassilewskija [Ws]; 338 microm h(-1)). This difference was contributed almost equally by variations in mature cortical cell length (84 microm [Landsberg erecta] to 237 microm [Ws]) and rate of cell production (0.63 cell h(-1) [NW108] to 1.83 cell h(-1) [Ws]). Cell production, in turn, was determined by variation in cell cycle duration (19 h [Tsu] to 48 h [NW108]) and, to a lesser extent, by differences in the number of dividing cells (32 [Weiningen] to 61 [Ws]). We found no correlation between mature cell size and endoreduplication, refuting the hypothesis that the two are linked. However, there was a strong correlation between cell production rates and the activity of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKA). The level of the protein could explain 32% of the variation in CDKA. Therefore, it is likely that regulators of CDKA, such as cyclins and inhibitors, are also involved. These data provide a functional link between cell cycle regulation and whole-plant growth rate as affected by genetic differences. PMID:12068124

  12. RALFL34 regulates formative cell divisions in Arabidopsis pericycle during lateral root initiation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Evan; Vu, Lam Dai; Van den Broeck, Lisa; Lin, Zhefeng; Ramakrishna, Priya; van de Cotte, Brigitte; Gaudinier, Allison; Goh, Tatsuaki; Slane, Daniel; Beeckman, Tom; Inzé, Dirk; Brady, Siobhan M; Fukaki, Hidehiro; De Smet, Ive

    2016-08-01

    In plants, many signalling molecules, such as phytohormones, miRNAs, transcription factors, and small signalling peptides, drive growth and development. However, very few small signalling peptides have been shown to be necessary for lateral root development. Here, we describe the role of the peptide RALFL34 during early events in lateral root development, and demonstrate its specific importance in orchestrating formative cell divisions in the pericycle. Our results further suggest that this small signalling peptide acts on the transcriptional cascade leading to a new lateral root upstream of GATA23, an important player in lateral root formation. In addition, we describe a role for ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs (ERFs) in regulating RALFL34 expression. Taken together, we put forward RALFL34 as a new, important player in lateral root initiation. PMID:27521602

  13. RALFL34 regulates formative cell divisions in Arabidopsis pericycle during lateral root initiation

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Evan; Vu, Lam Dai; Van den Broeck, Lisa; Lin, Zhefeng; Ramakrishna, Priya; van de Cotte, Brigitte; Gaudinier, Allison; Goh, Tatsuaki; Slane, Daniel; Beeckman, Tom; Inzé, Dirk; Brady, Siobhan M.; Fukaki, Hidehiro; De Smet, Ive

    2016-01-01

    In plants, many signalling molecules, such as phytohormones, miRNAs, transcription factors, and small signalling peptides, drive growth and development. However, very few small signalling peptides have been shown to be necessary for lateral root development. Here, we describe the role of the peptide RALFL34 during early events in lateral root development, and demonstrate its specific importance in orchestrating formative cell divisions in the pericycle. Our results further suggest that this small signalling peptide acts on the transcriptional cascade leading to a new lateral root upstream of GATA23, an important player in lateral root formation. In addition, we describe a role for ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs (ERFs) in regulating RALFL34 expression. Taken together, we put forward RALFL34 as a new, important player in lateral root initiation. PMID:27521602

  14. Reassessment of an Arabidopsis cell wall invertase inhibitor AtCIF1 reveals its role in seed germination and early seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Su, Tao; Wolf, Sebastian; Han, Mei; Zhao, Hongbo; Wei, Hongbin; Greiner, Steffen; Rausch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, cell wall invertase (CWI) and vacuolar invertase (VI) are recognized as essential players in sugar metabolism and sugar signaling, thereby affecting source-sink interactions, plant development and responses to environmental cues. CWI and VI expression levels are transcriptionally controlled; however, both enzymes are also subject to posttranslational control by invertase inhibitor proteins. The physiological significances of inhibitor proteins during seed germination and early seedling development are not yet fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the inhibitor isoform AtCIF1 impacted on seed germination and early seedling growth in Arabidopsis. The primary target of AtCIF1 was shown to be localized to the apoplast after expressing an AtCIF1 YFP-fusion construct in tobacco epidermis and transgenic Arabidopsis root. The analysis of expression patterns showed that AtCWI1 was co-expressed spatiotemporally with AtCIF1 within the early germinating seeds. Seed germination was observed to be accelerated independently of exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) in the AtCIF1 loss-of-function mutant cif1-1. This effect coincided with a drastic increase of CWI activity in cif1-1 mutant seeds by 24 h after the onset of germination, both in vitro and in planta. Accordingly, quantification of sugar content showed that hexose levels were significantly boosted in germinating seeds of the cif1-1 mutant. Further investigation of AtCIF1 overexpressors in Arabidopsis revealed a markedly suppressed CWI activity as well as delayed seed germination. Thus, we conclude that the posttranslational modulation of CWI activity by AtCIF1 helps to orchestrate seed germination and early seedling growth via fine-tuning sucrose hydrolysis and, possibly, sugar signaling. PMID:26546341

  15. Unravelling the potential of a new uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) from Arabidopsis thaliana in sensitizing HeLa cells towards 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sharmila; Sanpui, Pallab; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-10-01

    In silico studies with uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtUPRT) revealed its lower binding energies for uracil and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as compared to those of bacterial UPRT indicating the prospective of AtUPRT in gene therapy implications. Hence, AtUPRT was cloned and stably expressed in cervical cancer cells (HeLa) to investigate the effect of prodrug 5-FU on these transfected cancer cells. The treatment of AtUPRT-expressing HeLa (HeLa-UPP) cells with 5-FU for 72h resulted in significant decrease in cell viability. Moreover, 5-FU was observed to induce apoptosis and perturb mitochondrial membrane potential in HeLa-UPP cells. While cell cycle analysis revealed significant S-phase arrest as a result of 5-FU treatment in HeLa-UPP cells, quantitative gene expression analysis demonstrated simultaneous upregulation of important cell cycle related genes, cyclin D1 and p21. The survival fractions of non-transfected, vector-transfected and AtUPRT-transfected HeLa cells, following 5-FU treatment, were calculated to be 0.425, 0.366 and 0.227, respectively. PMID:27180296

  16. Arabidopsis G-protein interactome reveals connections to cell wall carbohydrates and morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klopffleisch, Karsten; Phan, Nguyen; Chen, Jay; Panstruga, Ralph; Uhrig, Joachim; Jones, Alan M

    2011-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G-protein complex is minimally composed of G{alpha}, G{beta}, and G{gamma} subunits. In the classic scenario, the G-protein complex is the nexus in signaling from the plasma membrane, where the heterotrimeric G-protein associates with heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), to cytoplasmic target proteins called effectors. Although a number of effectors are known in metazoans and fungi, none of these are predicted to exist in their canonical forms in plants. To identify ab initio plant G-protein effectors and scaffold proteins, we screened a set of proteins from the G-protein complex using two-hybrid complementation in yeast. After deep and exhaustive interrogation, we detected 544 interactions between 434 proteins, of which 68 highly interconnected proteins form the core G-protein interactome. Within this core, over half of the interactions comprising two-thirds of the nodes were retested and validated as genuine in planta. Co-expression analysis in combination with phenotyping of loss-of-function mutations in a set of core interactome genes revealed a novel role for G-proteins in regulating cell wall modification.

  17. Lhcb transcription is coordinated with cell size and chlorophyll accumulation. Studies on fluorescence-activated, cell-sorter-purified single cells from wild-type and immutans Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, L.; Harkins, K.; Rodermel, S.

    1996-11-01

    To study the mechanisms that integrate pigment and chlorophyll a/b-binding apoprotein biosynthesis during light-harvesting complex II assembly, we have examined {beta}-glucuronidase (GUS) enzyme activities, cell-sorting-separated single cells sizes in fluorescence activated, cell-sorting-separated single cells from transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type and immutans variegation mutant plants that express an Lhcb (photosystem II chlorophyll a/b-binding polypeptide gene)/GUS promoter fusion. We found that GUS activities are positively correlated with chlorophyll content and cell size in green cells from the control and immutans plants, indicating that Lhcb gene transcription is coordinated with cell size in this species. Compared with the control plants, however, chlorophyll production is enhanced in the green cells of immutans; this may represent part of a strategy to maximize photosynthesis in the white sectors of the mutant. Lhcb transcription is significantly higher in pure-white cells of the transgenic immutans plants than in pure-white cells from norflurazon-treated, photooxidized A. thaliana leaves. This suggests that immutans partially uncouples Lhcb transcription from its normal dependence on chlorophyll accumulation and chloroplast development. We conclude that immutans may play a role in regulating Lhcb transcription, and may be a key component in the signal transduction pathways that control chloroplast biogenesis. 58 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14

    SciTech Connect

    Mortimer, Jenny C.; Faria-Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Z.; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-06-04

    Xylan is a crucial component of many plant primary and secondary cell walls. However, the structure and function of xylan in the dicotyledon primary cell wall is not well understood. Here, we characterized a xylan that is specific to tissues enriched in Arabidopsis primary cell walls. Unlike previously described xylans, this xylan carries a pentose linked 1–2 to the α-1,2-d-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains on the β-1,4-Xyl backbone. The frequent and precisely regular spacing of GlcA substitutions every six xylosyl residues along the backbone is also unlike that previously observed in secondary cell wall xylan. Molecular genetics, in vitro assays, and expression data suggest that IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14 are required for xylan backbone synthesis in primary cell wall synthesising tissues. IRX9 and IRX10 are not involved in the primary cell wall xylan synthesis but are functionally exchangeable with IRX9L and IRX10L. GUX3 is the only glucuronyltransferase required for the addition of the GlcA decorations on the xylan. The differences in xylan structure in primary versus secondary cell walls might reflect the different roles in cross-linking and interaction with other cell wall components.

  19. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mortimer, Jenny C.; Faria-Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Z.; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-06-04

    Xylan is a crucial component of many plant primary and secondary cell walls. However, the structure and function of xylan in the dicotyledon primary cell wall is not well understood. Here, we characterized a xylan that is specific to tissues enriched in Arabidopsis primary cell walls. Unlike previously described xylans, this xylan carries a pentose linked 1–2 to the α-1,2-d-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains on the β-1,4-Xyl backbone. The frequent and precisely regular spacing of GlcA substitutions every six xylosyl residues along the backbone is also unlike that previously observed in secondary cell wall xylan. Molecular genetics, in vitro assays,more » and expression data suggest that IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14 are required for xylan backbone synthesis in primary cell wall synthesising tissues. IRX9 and IRX10 are not involved in the primary cell wall xylan synthesis but are functionally exchangeable with IRX9L and IRX10L. GUX3 is the only glucuronyltransferase required for the addition of the GlcA decorations on the xylan. The differences in xylan structure in primary versus secondary cell walls might reflect the different roles in cross-linking and interaction with other cell wall components.« less

  20. Trans-Golgi network localized ECHIDNA/Ypt interacting protein complex is required for the secretion of cell wall polysaccharides in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gendre, Delphine; McFarlane, Heather E; Johnson, Errin; Mouille, Gregory; Sjödin, Andreas; Oh, Jaesung; Levesque-Tremblay, Gabriel; Watanabe, Yoichiro; Samuels, Lacey; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P

    2013-07-01

    The secretion of cell wall polysaccharides through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) is required for plant cell elongation. However, the components mediating the post-Golgi secretion of pectin and hemicellulose, the two major cell wall polysaccharides, are largely unknown. We identified evolutionarily conserved YPT/RAB GTPase Interacting Protein 4a (YIP4a) and YIP4b (formerly YIP2), which form a TGN-localized complex with ECHIDNA (ECH) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The localization of YIP4 and ECH proteins at the TGN is interdependent and influences the localization of VHA-a1 and SYP61, which are key components of the TGN. YIP4a and YIP4b act redundantly, and the yip4a yip4b double mutants have a cell elongation defect. Genetic, biochemical, and cell biological analyses demonstrate that the ECH/YIP4 complex plays a key role in TGN-mediated secretion of pectin and hemicellulose to the cell wall in dark-grown hypocotyls and in secretory cells of the seed coat. In keeping with these observations, Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy analysis revealed that the ech and yip4a yip4b mutants exhibit changes in their cell wall composition. Overall, our results reveal a TGN subdomain defined by ECH/YIP4 that is required for the secretion of pectin and hemicellulose and distinguishes the role of the TGN in secretion from its roles in endocytic and vacuolar trafficking. PMID:23832588

  1. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Jenny C; Faria-Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Z; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Xylan is a crucial component of many plant primary and secondary cell walls. However, the structure and function of xylan in the dicotyledon primary cell wall is not well understood. Here, we characterized a xylan that is specific to tissues enriched in Arabidopsis primary cell walls. Unlike previously described xylans, this xylan carries a pentose linked 1–2 to the α-1,2-d-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains on the β-1,4-Xyl backbone. The frequent and precisely regular spacing of GlcA substitutions every six xylosyl residues along the backbone is also unlike that previously observed in secondary cell wall xylan. Molecular genetics, in vitro assays, and expression data suggest that IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14 are required for xylan backbone synthesis in primary cell wall synthesising tissues. IRX9 and IRX10 are not involved in the primary cell wall xylan synthesis but are functionally exchangeable with IRX9L and IRX10L. GUX3 is the only glucuronyltransferase required for the addition of the GlcA decorations on the xylan. The differences in xylan structure in primary versus secondary cell walls might reflect the different roles in cross-linking and interaction with other cell wall components. PMID:26043357

  2. Changes in cytosolic pH within Arabidopsis root columella cells play a key role in the early signaling pathway for root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, A. C.; Allen, N. S.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Ratiometric wide-field fluorescence microscopy with 1',7'- bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF)-dextran demonstrated that gravistimulation leads to rapid changes in cytoplasmic pH (pHc) in columella cells of Arabidopsis roots. The pHc of unstimulated columella cells in tiers 2 and 3, known sites of graviperception (E.B. Blancaflor, J.B. Fasano, S. Gilroy [1998] Plant Physiol 116: 213-222), was 7.22 +/- 0.02 pH units. Following gravistimulation, the magnitude and direction of pHc changes in these cells depended on their location in the columella. Cells in the lower side of tier 2 became more alkaline by 0.4 unit within 55 s of gravistimulation, whereas alkalinization of the cells on the upper side was slower (100 s). In contrast, all cells in tier 3 acidified by 0.4 pH unit within 480 s after gravistimulation. Disrupting these pHc changes in the columella cells using pHc modifiers at concentrations that do not affect root growth altered the gravitropic response. Acidifying agents, including bafilomycin A1, enhanced curvature, whereas alkalinizing agents disrupted gravitropic bending. These results imply that pHc changes in the gravisensing cells and the resultant pH gradients across the root cap are important at an early stage in the signal cascade leading to the gravitropic response.

  3. Arabidopsis thalianaMRE11 is essential for activation of cell cycle arrest, transcriptional regulation and DNA repair upon the induction of double-stranded DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Šamanić, I; Cvitanić, R; Simunić, J; Puizina, J

    2016-07-01

    Given the fundamental role of MRE11 in many aspects of DNA metabolism and signalling in eukaryotes, we analysed the impact of several MRE11 mutations on DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair in Arabidopsis thaliana. Three different atmre11 and an atatm-2 mutant lines, together with the wild type (WT), were compared using a new Arabidopsis genotoxic assay for in situ evaluation of genome integrity and DNA damage repair efficiency after double strand break (DSB) induction. The results showed that, despite the phenotypic differences and different lengths of the putative truncated AtMRE11 proteins, all three atmre11 and the atatm-2 mutant lines exhibited common hypersensitivity to bleomycin treatment, where they only slightly reduced mitotic activity, indicating a G2/M checkpoint abrogation. In contrast to the WT, which reduced the frequency of chromosomal aberrations throughout the recovery period after treatment, none of the three atmre11 and atatm-2 mutants recovered. Moreover, atmre11-3 mutants, similarly to atatm-2 mutants, failed to transcriptionally induce several DDR genes and had altered expression of the CYCB1;1::GUS protein. Nevertheless, numerous chromosomal fusions in the atmre11 mutants, observed after DNA damage induction, suggest intensive DNA repair activity. These results indicate that functional and full-length AtMRE11 is essential for activation of the cell cycle arrest, transcriptional regulation and DNA repair upon induction of DSB. PMID:27007017

  4. The Arabidopsis SKU6/SPIRAL1 Gene Encodes a Plus End–Localized Microtubule-Interacting Protein Involved in Directional Cell ExpansionW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sedbrook, John C.; Ehrhardt, David W.; Fisher, Sarah E.; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Somerville, Chris R.

    2004-01-01

    The sku6-1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibits altered patterns of root and organ growth. sku6 roots, etiolated hypocotyls, and leaf petioles exhibit right-handed axial twisting, and root growth on inclined agar media is strongly right skewed. The touch-dependent sku6 root skewing phenotype is suppressed by the antimicrotubule drugs propyzamide and oryzalin, and right skewing is exacerbated by cold treatment. Cloning revealed that sku6-1 is allelic to spiral1-1 (spr1-1). However, modifiers in the Columbia (Col) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotype backgrounds mask noncomplementation in sku6-1 (Col)/spr1-1 (Ler) F1 plants. The SPR1 gene encodes a plant-specific 12-kD protein that is ubiquitously expressed and belongs to a six-member gene family in Arabidopsis. An SPR1:green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion expressed in transgenic seedlings localized to microtubules within the cortical array, preprophase band, phragmoplast, and mitotic spindle. SPR1:GFP was concentrated at the growing ends of cortical microtubules and was dependent on polymer growth state; the microtubule-related fluorescence dissipated upon polymer shortening. The protein has a repeated motif at both ends, separated by a predicted rod-like domain, suggesting that it may act as an intermolecular linker. These observations suggest that SPR1 is involved in microtubule polymerization dynamics and/or guidance, which in turn influences touch-induced directional cell expansion and axial twisting. PMID:15155883

  5. A Generic Tool for Transcription Factor Target Gene Discovery in Arabidopsis Cell Suspension Cultures Based on Tandem Chromatin Affinity Purification1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Verkest, Aurine; Abeel, Thomas; Heyndrickx, Ken S.; Van Leene, Jelle; Lanz, Christa; Van De Slijke, Eveline; De Winne, Nancy; Eeckhout, Dominique; Persiau, Geert; Van Breusegem, Frank; Inzé, Dirk; Vandepoele, Klaas; De Jaeger, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide identification of transcription factor (TF) binding sites is pivotal to our understanding of gene expression regulation. Although much progress has been made in the determination of potential binding regions of proteins by chromatin immunoprecipitation, this method has some inherent limitations regarding DNA enrichment efficiency and antibody necessity. Here, we report an alternative strategy for assaying in vivo TF-DNA binding in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cells by tandem chromatin affinity purification (TChAP). Evaluation of TChAP using the E2Fa TF and comparison with traditional chromatin immunoprecipitation and single chromatin affinity purification illustrates the suitability of TChAP and provides a resource for exploring the E2Fa transcriptional network. Integration with transcriptome, cis-regulatory element, functional enrichment, and coexpression network analyses demonstrates the quality of the E2Fa TChAP sequencing data and validates the identification of new direct E2Fa targets. TChAP enhances both TF target mapping throughput, by circumventing issues related to antibody availability, and output, by improving DNA enrichment efficiency. PMID:24453163

  6. The Role of the Plant-Specific ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 Protein in Arabidopsis Cell Wall Polysaccharide O-Acetylation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schultink, Alex; Naylor, Dan; Dama, Murali; Pauly, Markus

    2015-01-01

    A mutation in the ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 (AXY9) gene was found to be causative for the decreased xyloglucan acetylation phenotype of the axy9.1 mutant, which was identified in a forward genetic screen for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants. The axy9.1 mutant also exhibits decreased O-acetylation of xylan, implying that the AXY9 protein has a broad role in polysaccharide acetylation. An axy9 insertional mutant exhibits severe growth defects and collapsed xylem, demonstrating the importance of wall polysaccharide O-acetylation for normal plant growth and development. Localization and topological experiments indicate that the active site of the AXY9 protein resides within the Golgi lumen. The AXY9 protein appears to be a component of the plant cell wall polysaccharide acetylation pathway, which also includes the REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION and TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins. The AXY9 protein is distinct from the TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins, reported to be polysaccharide acetyltransferases, but does share homology with them and other acetyltransferases, suggesting that the AXY9 protein may act to produce an acetylated intermediate that is part of the O-acetylation pathway. PMID:25681330

  7. Phospholipase D Activation Is an Early Component of the Salicylic Acid Signaling Pathway in Arabidopsis Cell Suspensions1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Krinke, Ondřej; Flemr, Matyáš; Vergnolle, Chantal; Collin, Sylvie; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Taconnat, Ludivine; Yu, Agnès; Burketová, Lenka; Valentová, Olga; Zachowski, Alain; Ruelland, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a central role in defense against pathogen attack, as well as in germination, flowering, senescence, and the acquisition of thermotolerance. In this report we investigate the involvement of phospholipase D (PLD) in the SA signaling pathway. In presence of exogenous primary alcohols, the production of phosphatidic acid by PLD is diverted toward the formation of phosphatidylalcohols through a reaction called transphosphatidylation. By in vivo metabolic phospholipid labeling with 33Pi, PLD activity was found to be induced 45 min after addition of SA. We show that incubation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell suspensions with primary alcohols inhibited the induction of two SA-responsive genes, PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 and WRKY38, in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect was more pronounced when the primary alcohols were more hydrophobic. Secondary or tertiary alcohols had no inhibitory effect. These results provide compelling arguments for PLD activity being upstream of the induction of these genes by SA. A subsequent study of n-butanol effects on the SA-responsive transcriptome identified 1,327 genes differentially expressed upon SA treatment. Strikingly, the SA response of 380 of these genes was inhibited by n-butanol but not by tert-butanol. A detailed analysis of the regulation of these genes showed that PLD could act both positively and negatively, either on gene induction or gene repression. The overlap with the previously described phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase pathway is discussed. PMID:19304931

  8. Disruption of cellulose synthesis by 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile affects the structure of the cytoskeleton and cell wall construction in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Peng, L; Zhang, L; Cheng, X; Fan, L-S; Hao, H-Q

    2013-03-01

    Cellulose is the major component of plant cell walls and is an important source of industrial raw material. Although cellulose biosynthesis is one of the most important biochemical processes in plant biology, the regulatory mechanisms of cellulose synthesis are still unclear. Here, we report that 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB), an inhibitor of cellulose synthesis, inhibits Arabidopsis root development in a dose- and time-dependent manner. When treated with DCB, the plant cell wall showed altered cellulose distribution and intensity, as shown by calcofluor white and S4B staining. Moreover, pectin deposition was reduced in the presence of DCB when immunostained with the monoclonal antibody JIM5, which was raised against pectin epitopes. This result was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis. Confocal microscopy revealed that the organisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton was significantly disrupted in the presence of low concentrations of DCB, whereas the actin cytoskeleton only showed changes with the application of high DCB concentrations. In addition, the subcellular dynamics of Golgi bodies labelled with N-ST-YFP and TGN labelled with VHA-a1-GFP were both partially blocked by DCB. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the cell wall structure was affected by DCB, as were the Golgi bodies. Scanning electron microscopy showed changes in the organisation of cellulose microfibrils. These results suggest that the inhibition of cellulose synthesis by DCB not only induced changes in the chemical composition of the root cell wall and cytoskeleton structure, but also changed the distribution of cellulose microfibrils, implying that cellulose plays an important role in root development in Arabidopsis. PMID:22759307

  9. The Arabidopsis thaliana MYB60 promoter provides a tool for the spatio-temporal control of gene expression in stomatal guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Priscilla; Cominelli, Eleonora; Galbiati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Plants have evolved different strategies to resist drought, of which the best understood is the abscisic acid (ABA)-induced closure of stomatal pores to reduce water loss by transpiration. The availability of useful promoters that allow for precise spatial and temporal control of gene expression in stomata is essential both for investigating stomatal regulation in model systems and for biotechnological applications in field crops. Previous work indicated that the regulatory region of the transcription factor AtMYB60 specifically drives gene expression in guard cells of Arabidopsis, although its activity is rapidly down-regulated by ABA. Here, the activity of the full-length and minimal AtMYB60 promoters is reported in rice (Oryza sativa), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), using a reporter gene approach. In rice, the activity of both promoters was completely abolished, whereas it was spatially restricted to guard cells in tobacco and tomato. To overcome the negative effect of ABA on the AtMYB60 promoter, a chimeric inducible system was developed, which combined the cellular specificity of the AtMYB60 minimal promoter with the positive responsiveness to dehydration and ABA of the rd29A promoter. Remarkably, the synthetic module specifically up-regulated gene expression in guard cells of Arabidopsis, tobacco, and tomato in response to dehydration or ABA. The comparative analysis of different native and synthetic regulatory modules derived from the AtMYB60 promoter offers new insights into the functional conservation of the cis-mechanisms that mediate gene expression in guard cells in distantly related dicotyledonous species and provides novel tools for modulating stomatal activity in plants. PMID:23828545

  10. Disruption of the Vacuolar Calcium-ATPases in Arabidopsis Results in the Activation of a Salicylic Acid-Dependent Programmed Cell Death Pathway1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Boursiac, Yann; Lee, Sang Min; Romanowsky, Shawn; Blank, Robert; Sladek, Chris; Chung, Woo Sik; Harper, Jeffrey F.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signals regulate many aspects of plant development, including a programmed cell death pathway that protects plants from pathogens (hypersensitive response). Cytosolic Ca2+ signals result from a combined action of Ca2+ influx through channels and Ca2+ efflux through pumps and cotransporters. Plants utilize calmodulin-activated Ca2+ pumps (autoinhibited Ca2+-ATPase [ACA]) at the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuole. Here, we show that a double knockout mutation of the vacuolar Ca2+ pumps ACA4 and ACA11 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) results in a high frequency of hypersensitive response-like lesions. The appearance of macrolesions could be suppressed by growing plants with increased levels (greater than 15 mm) of various anions, providing a method for conditional suppression. By removing plants from a conditional suppression, lesion initials were found to originate primarily in leaf mesophyll cells, as detected by aniline blue staining. Initiation and spread of lesions could also be suppressed by disrupting the production or accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), as shown by combining aca4/11 mutations with a sid2 (for salicylic acid induction-deficient2) mutation or expression of the SA degradation enzyme NahG. This indicates that the loss of the vacuolar Ca2+ pumps by itself does not cause a catastrophic defect in ion homeostasis but rather potentiates the activation of a SA-dependent programmed cell death pathway. Together, these results provide evidence linking the activity of the vacuolar Ca2+ pumps to the control of a SA-dependent programmed cell death pathway in plants. PMID:20837703

  11. Rubidium (Potassium) Uptake by Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Polley, L. David; Hopkins, Johns W.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments are reported in which the uptake of 86Rb+, used as an analog of K+, into cultured cells of Arabidopsis thaliana is investigated. A single transport system is found with Km = 0.34 millimolar and Vmax = 14 nmoles per milligram of protein per hour. This system is blocked by the metabolic inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) and by cold. At high concentrations of external K+ (above 1 millimolar), a significant fraction of total uptake is energy-independent. No evidence is found for more than one energy-dependent uptake system or for concentration-dependent modifications of a carrier as postulated in multiphasic transport models. Rb+ uptake was also examined in cultured cells derived from an “osmotic mutant” of Arabidopsis. The system closely resembles that found in wild type cells with the exception that the Michaelis-Menten constants are higher: Km = 1 millimolar and Vmax = 32 nanomoles per milligram of protein per hour. The possibility that these results are artifacts associated with use of cultured cells was checked by examining 86Rb+ uptake by roots of intact seedlings of wild type Arabidopsis. A single energy-dependent transport system is found with Km = 0.42 millimolar which is not significantly different from the Km of cultured cells. There is also energy-independent uptake at high external ion concentration. PMID:16660969

  12. PECTIN METHYLESTERASE INHIBITOR6 Promotes Arabidopsis Mucilage Release by Limiting Methylesterification of Homogalacturonan in Seed Coat Epidermal Cells[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Saez-Aguayo, Susana; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Berger, Adeline; Botran, Lucy; Ropartz, David; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Imbibed seeds of the Arabidopsis thaliana accession Djarly are affected in mucilage release from seed coat epidermal cells. The impaired locus was identified as a pectin methylesterase inhibitor gene, PECTIN METHYLESTERASE INHIBITOR6 (PMEI6), specifically expressed in seed coat epidermal cells at the time when mucilage polysaccharides are accumulated. This spatio-temporal regulation appears to be modulated by GLABRA2 and LEUNIG HOMOLOG/MUCILAGE MODIFIED1, as expression of PMEI6 is reduced in mutants of these transcription regulators. In pmei6, mucilage release was delayed and outer cell walls of epidermal cells did not fragment. Pectin methylesterases (PMEs) demethylate homogalacturonan (HG), and the majority of HG found in wild-type mucilage was in fact derived from outer cell wall fragments. This correlated with the absence of methylesterified HG labeling in pmei6, whereas transgenic plants expressing the PMEI6 coding sequence under the control of the 35S promoter had increased labeling of cell wall fragments. Activity tests on seeds from pmei6 and 35S:PMEI6 transgenic plants showed that PMEI6 inhibits endogenous PME activities, in agreement with reduced overall methylesterification of mucilage fractions and demucilaged seeds. Another regulator of PME activity in seed coat epidermal cells, the subtilisin-like Ser protease SBT1.7, acts on different PMEs, as a pmei6 sbt1.7 mutant showed an additive phenotype. PMID:23362209

  13. The Arabidopsis root hair cell wall formation mutant lrx1 is suppressed by mutations in the RHM1 gene encoding a UDP-L-rhamnose synthase.

    PubMed

    Diet, Anouck; Link, Bruce; Seifert, Georg J; Schellenberg, Barbara; Wagner, Ulrich; Pauly, Markus; Reiter, Wolf-Dieter; Ringli, Christoph

    2006-07-01

    Cell and cell wall growth are mutually dependent processes that must be tightly coordinated and controlled. LRR-extensin1 (LRX1) of Arabidopsis thaliana is a potential regulator of cell wall development, consisting of an N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain and a C-terminal extensin-like domain typical for structural cell wall proteins. LRX1 is expressed in root hairs, and lrx1 mutant plants develop distorted root hairs that often swell, branch, or collapse. The aberrant cell wall structures found in lrx1 mutants point toward a function of LRX1 during the establishment of the extracellular matrix. To identify genes that are involved in an LRX1-dependent developmental pathway, a suppressor screen was performed on the lrx1 mutant, and two independent rol1 (for repressor of lrx1) alleles were isolated. ROL1 is allelic to Rhamnose Biosynthesis1, which codes for a protein involved in the biosynthesis of rhamnose, a major monosaccharide component of pectin. The rol1 mutations modify the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan I and, for one allele, rhamnogalacturonan II. Furthermore, the rol1 mutations cause a change in the expression of a number of cell wall-related genes. Thus, the lrx1 mutant phenotype is likely to be suppressed by changes in pectic polysaccharides or other cell wall components. PMID:16766693

  14. The manipulation of auxin in the abscission zone cells of Arabidopsis flowers reveals that indoleacetic acid signaling is a prerequisite for organ shedding.

    PubMed

    Basu, Manojit M; González-Carranza, Zinnia H; Azam-Ali, Sayed; Tang, Shouya; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Roberts, Jeremy A

    2013-05-01

    A number of novel strategies were employed to examine the role of indoleacetic acid (IAA) in regulating floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Analysis of auxin influx facilitator expression in β-glucuronidase reporter plants revealed that AUXIN RESISTANT1, LIKE AUX1, and LAX3 were specifically up-regulated at the site of floral organ shedding. Flowers from mutants where individual family members were down-regulated exhibited a reduction in the force necessary to bring about petal separation; however, the effect was not additive in double or quadruple mutants. Using the promoter of a polygalacturonase (At2g41850), active primarily in cells undergoing separation, to drive expression of the bacterial genes iaaL and iaaM, we have shown that it is possible to manipulate auxin activity specifically within the floral organ abscission zone (AZ). Analysis of petal breakstrength reveals that if IAA AZ levels are reduced, shedding takes place prematurely, while if they are enhanced, organ loss is delayed. The At2g41850 promoter was also used to transactivate the gain-of-function AXR3-1 gene in order to disrupt auxin signaling specifically within the floral organ AZ cells. Flowers from transactivated lines failed to shed their sepals, petals, and anthers during pod expansion and maturity, and these organs frequently remained attached to the plant even after silique desiccation and dehiscence had taken place. These observations support a key role for IAA in the regulation of abscission in planta and reveal, to our knowledge for the first time, a requirement for a functional IAA signaling pathway in AZ cells for organ shedding to take place. PMID:23509178

  15. Tissue-Specific and Developmentally Regulated Expression of a Cluster of Tandemly Arrayed Cell Wall-Associated Kinase-Like Kinase Genes in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Verica, Joseph A.; Chae, Lee; Tong, Hongyun; Ingmire, Peter; He, Zheng-Hui

    2003-01-01

    The Arabidopsis cell wall-associated kinase (WAK) and WAK-like kinase (WAKL) family of receptor-like kinase genes encodes transmembrane proteins with a cytoplasmic serine/threonine kinase domain and an extracellular region containing epidermal growth factor-like repeats. Previous studies have suggested that some WAK members are involved in plant defense and heavy metal responses, whereas others are required for cell elongation and plant development. The WAK/WAKL gene family consists of 26 members in Arabidopsis and can be divided into four groups. Here, we describe the characterization of group 2 members that are composed of a cluster of seven tandemly arrayed WAKL genes. The predicted WAKL proteins are highly similar in their cytoplasmic region but are more divergent in their predicted extracellular ligand-binding region. WAKL7 encodes a truncated WAKL isoform that is predicted to be secreted from the cytoplasm. Ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions suggest that the extracellular region is subject to diversifying selection. Comparison of the WAKL and WAK gene clusters suggests that they arose independently. Protein gel-blot and immunolocalization analyses suggest that WAKL6 is associated with the cell wall. Histochemical analyses of WAKL promoters fused with the β-glucuronidase reporter gene have shown that the expressions of WAKL members are developmentally regulated and tissue specific. Unlike WAK members whose expressions were found predominately in green tissues, WAKL genes are highly expressed in roots and flowers. The expression of WAKL5 and WAKL7 can be induced by wounding stress and by the salicylic acid analog 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid in an nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1-dependent manner, suggesting that they, like some WAK members, are wound inducible and can be defined as pathogenesis-related genes. PMID:14576286

  16. The Specification of Geometric Edges by a Plant Rab GTPase Is an Essential Cell-Patterning Principle During Organogenesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhelle, Charlotte; Chow, Cheung-Ming; Foucart, Camille; Neto, Helia; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Kalde, Monika; Walton, Carol; Fricker, Mark; Smith, Richard S.; Jérusalem, Antoine; Irani, Niloufer; Moore, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Summary Plant organogenesis requires control over division planes and anisotropic cell wall growth, which each require spatial patterning of cells. Polyhedral plant cells can display complex patterning in which individual faces are established as biochemically distinct domains by endomembrane trafficking. We now show that, during organogenesis, the Arabidopsis endomembrane system specifies an important additional cellular spatial domain: the geometric edges. Previously unidentified membrane vesicles lying immediately beneath the plasma membrane at cell edges were revealed through localization of RAB-A5c, a plant GTPase of the Rab family of membrane-trafficking regulators. Specific inhibition of RAB-A5c activity grossly perturbed cell geometry in developing lateral organs by interfering independently with growth anisotropy and cytokinesis without disrupting default membrane trafficking. The initial loss of normal cell geometry can be explained by a failure to maintain wall stiffness specifically at geometric edges. RAB-A5c thus meets a requirement to specify this cellular spatial domain during organogenesis. PMID:26906735

  17. The Arabidopsis SWI2/SNF2 Chromatin Remodeling ATPase BRAHMA Targets Directly to PINs and Is Required for Root Stem Cell Niche Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Songguang; Li, Chenlong; Zhao, Linmao; Gao, Sujuan; Lu, Jingxia; Zhao, Minglei; Chen, Chia-Yang; Liu, Xuncheng; Luo, Ming; Cui, Yuhai; Yang, Chengwei; Wu, Keqiang

    2015-06-01

    BRAHMA (BRM), a SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling ATPase, is essential for the transcriptional reprogramming associated with development and cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we show that loss-of-function mutations in BRM led to defective maintenance of the root stem cell niche, decreased meristematic activity, and stunted root growth. Mutations of BRM affected auxin distribution by reducing local expression of several PIN-FORMED (PIN) genes in the stem cells and impaired the expression of the stem cell transcription factor genes PLETHORA (PLT1) and PLT2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that BRM could directly target to the chromatin of PIN1, PIN2, PIN3, PIN4, and PIN7. In addition, genetic interaction assays indicate that PLTs acted downstream of BRM, and overexpression of PLT2 partially rescued the stem cell niche defect of brm mutants. Taken together, these results support the idea that BRM acts in the PLT pathway to maintain the root stem cell niche by altering the expression of PINs. PMID:25991732

  18. Misexpression of FATTY ACID ELONGATION1 in the Arabidopsis Epidermis Induces Cell Death and Suggests a Critical Role for Phospholipase A2 in This Process[W

    PubMed Central

    Reina-Pinto, José J.; Voisin, Derry; Kurdyukov, Sergey; Faust, Andrea; Haslam, Richard P.; Michaelson, Louise V.; Efremova, Nadia; Franke, Benni; Schreiber, Lukas; Napier, Johnathan A.; Yephremov, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) are important functional components of various lipid classes, including cuticular lipids in the higher plant epidermis and lipid-derived second messengers. Here, we report the characterization of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that epidermally express FATTY ACID ELONGATION1 (FAE1), the seed-specific β-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS) catalyzing the first rate-limiting step in VLCFA biosynthesis. Misexpression of FAE1 changes the VLCFAs in different classes of lipids but surprisingly does not complement the KCS fiddlehead mutant. FAE1 misexpression plants are similar to the wild type but display an essentially glabrous phenotype, owing to the selective death of trichome cells. This cell death is accompanied by membrane damage, generation of reactive oxygen species, and callose deposition. We found that nuclei of arrested trichome cells in FAE1 misexpression plants cell-autonomously accumulate high levels of DNA damage, including double-strand breaks characteristic of lipoapoptosis. A chemical genetic screen revealed that inhibitors of KCS and phospholipase A2 (PLA2), but not inhibitors of de novo ceramide biosynthesis, rescue trichome cells from death. These results support the functional role of acyl chain length of fatty acids and PLA2 as determinants for programmed cell death, likely involving the exchange of VLCFAs between phospholipids and the acyl-CoA pool. PMID:19376931

  19. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. PMID:26884603

  20. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. PMID:26884603