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Sample records for arabidopsis cyp51a2 mutant

  1. Arabidopsis mutants impaired in cosuppression.

    PubMed Central

    Elmayan, T; Balzergue, S; Béon, F; Bourdon, V; Daubremet, J; Guénet, Y; Mourrain, P; Palauqui, J C; Vernhettes, S; Vialle, T; Wostrikoff, K; Vaucheret, H

    1998-01-01

    Post-transcriptional gene silencing (cosuppression) results in the degradation of RNA after transcription. A transgenic Arabidopsis line showing post-transcriptional silencing of a 35S-uidA transgene and uidA-specific methylation was mutagenized using ethyl methanesulfonate. Six independent plants were isolated in which uidA mRNA accumulation and beta-glucuronidase activity were increased up to 3500-fold, whereas the transcription rate of the 35S-uidA transgene was increased only up to threefold. These plants each carried a recessive monogenic mutation that is responsible for the release of silencing. These mutations defined two genetic loci, called sgs1 and sgs2 (for suppressor of gene silencing). Transgene methylation was distinctly modified in sgs1 and sgs2 mutants. However, methylation of centromeric repeats was not affected, indicating that sgs mutants differ from ddm (for decrease in DNA methylation) and som (for somniferous) mutants. Indeed, unlike ddm and som mutations, sgs mutations were not able to release transcriptional silencing of a 35S-hpt transgene. Conversely, both sgs1 and sgs2 mutations were able to release cosuppression of host Nia genes and 35S-Nia2 transgenes. These results therefore indicate that sgs mutations act in trans to impede specifically transgene-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing. PMID:9761800

  2. Arabidopsis mutants with a reduced seed dormancy.

    PubMed Central

    Léon-Kloosterziel, K M; van de Bunt, G A; Zeevaart, J A; Koornneef, M

    1996-01-01

    The development of seed dormancy is an aspect of seed maturation, the last stage of seed development. To isolate mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that are affected in this process, we selected directly for the absence of dormancy among freshly harvested M2 seeds. The screen yielded two mutants exhibiting a reduced dormancy, rdo1 and rdo2, that are specifically affected in dormancy determined by the embryo. The rdo1 and rdo2 mutants show normal levels of abscisic acid and the same sensitivity to abscisic acid, ethylene, auxin, and cytokinin as the wild type. The rdo2 mutant but not the rdo1 mutant has a reduced sensitivity to the gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitor tetcyclacis. Double-mutant analysis suggested that the RDO1 and RDO2 genes are involved in separate pathways leading to the development of dormancy. We assume that the RDO2 gene controls a step in the induction of dormancy that is most likely induced by abscisic acid and is expressed as an increase of the gibberellin requirement for germination. PMID:8587986

  3. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  4. Imaging lipid droplets in Arabidopsis mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was adapted for the imaging of neutral lipids in plant leaves with defects in normal lipid metabolism using two different fluorescent dyes. Disruptions in a gene locus, At4g24160, yielded Arabidopsis thaliana plants with a preponderance of oil bodies in their leaves ...

  5. Architectural phenotypes in the transparent testa mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Buer, Charles S.; Djordjevic, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoids are low molecular weight secondary plant metabolites with a myriad of functions. As flavonoids affect auxin transport (an important growth-controlling hormone) and are biologically active in eukaryotes, flavonoid mutants were expected to have undescribed architectural phenotypes. The Arabidopsis thaliana transparent testa (tt) mutants are compromised in the enzymatic steps or transcriptional regulators affecting flavonoid synthesis. tt mutant seedlings were grown on hard-slanted agar (a stress condition), under varying light conditions, and in soil to examine the resulting growth patterns. These tt mutants revealed a wide variety of architectural phenotypes in root and aerial tissues. Mutants with increased inflorescences, siliques, and lateral root density or reduced stature are traits that could affect plant yield or performance under certain environmental conditions. The regulatory genes affected in architectural traits may provide useful molecular targets for examination in other plants. PMID:19129166

  6. An Arabidopsis mutant defective in the general phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, C C; Vogt, T; Ellis, B E; Somerville, C R

    1992-01-01

    Mutants of Arabidopsis deficient in a major leaf phenylpropanoid ester, 2-O-sinapoyl-L-malate, were identified by thin-layer chromatographic screening of methanolic leaf extracts from several thousand mutagenized plants. Mutations at a locus designated SIN1 also eliminate accumulation of the sinapic acid esters characteristic of seed tissues. Because of increased transparency to UV light, the sin1 mutants exhibit a characteristic red fluorescence under UV light, whereas wild-type plants have a blue-green appearance due to the fluorescence of sinapoyl malate in the upper epidermis. As determined by in vivo radiotracer feeding experiments, precursor supplementation studies, and enzymatic assays, the defect in the sin1 mutants appears to block the conversion of ferulate to 5-hydroxyferulate in the general phenylpropanoid pathway. As a result, the lignin of the mutant lacks the sinapic acid-derived components typical of wild-type lignin. PMID:1477555

  7. Gravitropism in roots of intermediate-starch mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Wright, J. B.; Caspar, T.

    1996-01-01

    Gravitropism was studied in roots of wild type (WT) Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (strain Wassilewskija) and three starch-deficient mutants that were generated by T-DNA insertional mutagenesis. One of these mutants was starchless while the other two were intermediate mutants, which had 51% and 60%, respectively, of the WT amount of starch as determined by light and electron microscopy. The four parameters used to assay gravitropism were: orientation during vertical growth, time course of curvature, induction, and intermittent stimulation experiments. WT roots were much more responsive to gravity than were roots of the starchless mutant, and the intermediate starch mutants exhibited an intermediate graviresponse. Our data suggest that lowered starch content in the mutants primarily affects gravitropism rather than differential growth because both phototropic curvature and growth rates were approximately equal among all four genotypes. Since responses of intermediate-starch mutants were closer to the WT response than to the starchless mutant, it appears that 51-60% of the WT level of starch is near the threshold amount needed for full gravitropic sensitivity. While other interpretations are possible, the data are consistent with the starch statolith hypothesis for gravity perception in that the degree of graviresponsiveness is proportional to the total mass of plastids per cell.

  8. An Arabidopsis mutant with enhanced resistance to powdery mildew.

    PubMed Central

    Frye, C A; Innes, R W

    1998-01-01

    We have identified an Arabidopsis mutant that displays enhanced disease resistance to the fungus Erysiphe cichoracearum, causal agent of powdery mildew. The edr1 mutant does not constitutively express the pathogenesis-related genes PR-1, BGL2, or PR-5 and thus differs from previously described disease-resistant mutants of Arabidopsis. E. cichoracearum conidia (asexual spores) germinated normally and formed extensive hyphae on edr1 plants, indicating that the initial stages of infection were not inhibited. Production of conidiophores on edr1 plants, however, was <16% of that observed on wild-type Arabidopsis. Reduction in sporulation correlated with a more rapid induction of defense responses. Autofluorescent compounds and callose accumulated in edr1 leaves 3 days after inoculation with E. cichoracearum, and dead mesophyll cells accumulated in edr1 leaves starting 5 days after inoculation. Macroscopic patches of dead cells appeared 6 days after inoculation. This resistance phenotype is similar to that conferred by "late-acting" powdery mildew resistance genes of wheat and barley. The edr1 mutation is recessive and maps to chromosome 1 between molecular markers ATEAT1 and NCC1. We speculate that the edr1 mutation derepresses multiple defense responses, making them more easily induced by virulent pathogens. PMID:9634583

  9. Characterization of a new Arabidopsis mutant exhibiting enhanced disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Silva, H; Yoshioka, K; Dooner, H K; Klessig, D F

    1999-12-01

    In many plant-pathogen interactions, resistance is associated with the synthesis and accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. At least two general classes of mutants with altered resistance to pathogen attack have been identified in Arabidopsis. One class exhibits increased susceptibility to pathogen infection; the other class exhibits enhanced resistance to pathogens. In an attempt to identify mutations in resistance-associated loci, we screened a population of T-DNA tagged Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Wassilewskija (Ws) for mutants showing constitutive expression of the PR-1 gene (cep). A mutant was isolated and shown to constitutively express PR-1, PR-2, and PR-5 genes. This constitutive phenotype segregated as a single recessive trait in the Ws genetic background. The mutant also had elevated levels of SA, which are responsible for the cep phenotype. The cep mutant spontaneously formed hypersensitive response (HR)-like lesions on the leaves and cotyledons and also exhibited enhanced resistance to virulent bacterial and fungal pathogens. Genetic analyses of segregating progeny from outcrosses to other ecotypes unexpectedly revealed that alterations in more than one gene condition the constitutive expression of PR genes in the original mutant. One of the mutations, designated cpr20, maps to the lower arm of chromosome 4 and is required for the cep phenotype. Another mutation, which has been termed cpr21, maps to chromosome 1 and is often, but not always, associated with this phenotype. The recessive nature of the cep trait suggests that the CPR20 and CPR21 proteins may act as negative regulators in the disease resistance signal transduction pathway. PMID:10624014

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana nucleosidase mutants provide new insights into nucleoside degradation

    PubMed Central

    Riegler, Heike; Geserick, Claudia; Zrenner, Rita

    2011-01-01

    A central step in nucleoside and nucleobase salvage pathways is the hydrolysis of nucleosides to their respective nucleobases. In plants this is solely accomplished by nucleosidases (EC 3.2.2.x). To elucidate the importance of nucleosidases for nucleoside degradation, general metabolism, and plant growth, thorough phenotypic and biochemical analyses were performed using Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion mutants lacking expression of the previously identified genes annotated as uridine ribohydrolases (URH1 and URH2). Comprehensive functional analyses of single and double mutants demonstrated that both isoforms are unimportant for seedling establishment and plant growth, while one participates in uridine degradation. Rather unexpectedly, nucleoside and nucleotide profiling and nucleosidase activity screening of soluble crude extracts revealed a deficiency of xanthosine and inosine hydrolysis in the single mutants, with substantial accumulation of xanthosine in one of them. Mixing of the two mutant extracts, and by in vitro activity reconstitution using a mixture of recombinant URH1 and URH2 proteins, both restored activity, thus providing biochemical evidence that at least these two isoforms are needed for inosine and xanthosine hydrolysis. This mutant study demonstrates the utility of in vivo systems for the examination of metabolic activities, with the discovery of the new substrate xanthosine and elucidation of a mechanism for expanding the nucleosidase substrate spectrum. PMID:21599668

  11. Characterization of Sugar Insensitive (sis) Mutants of Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Susan I.

    2009-06-08

    Despite the fact that soluble sugar levels have been postulated to play an important role in the control of a wide variety of plant metabolic and developmental pathways, the mechanisms by which plants respond to soluble sugar levels remain poorly understood. Plant responses to soluble sugar levels are also important in bioenergy production, as plant sugar responses are believed to help regulate both carbon fixation and carbon partitioning. For example, accumulation of soluble sugars, such as sucrose and glucose, in source tissues leads to feedback inhibition of photosynthesis, thereby decreasing rates of carbon fixation. Soluble sugar levels can also affect sink strengths, affecting the rates of accumulation of carbon-based compounds into both particular molecular forms (e.g. carbohydrates versus lipids versus proteins) and particular plant organs and tissues. Mutants of Arabidopsis that are defective in the ability to respond to soluble sugar levels were isolated and used as tools to identify some of the factors involved in plant sugar response. These sugar insensitive (sis) mutants were isolated by screening mutagenized seeds for those that were able to germinate and develop relatively normal shoot systems on media containing 0.3 M glucose or 0.3 M sucrose. At these sugar concentrations, wild-type Arabidopsis germinate and produce substantial root systems, but show little to no shoot development. Twenty-eight sis mutants were isolated during the course of four independent mutant screens. Based on a preliminary characterization of all of these mutants, sis3 and sis6 were chosen for further study. Both of these mutations appear to lie in previously uncharacterized loci. Unlike many other sugar-response mutants, sis3 mutants exhibit a wild-type or near wild-type response in all phytohormone-response assays conducted to date. The sis6-1 mutation is unusual in that it appears to be due to overexpression of a gene, rather than representing a loss of function mutation

  12. Isolation of Arabidopsis mutants with altered seed fatty acid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, B.; Browse, J.; Somerville, C. Washington State Univ., Pullman )

    1989-04-01

    By direct screening of Arabidopsis seed fatty acid methyl esters, we have isolated mutants which are deficient in the elongation of 18:1 to 20:1 and the desaturation of 18:2 to 18:3. Both the elongation and the desaturation mutants, designated MB14 and BL1 respectively, have only 10% of the wild-type levels of 20:1 and 18:3 in their seeds. The intermediate levels of 20:1 and 18:3 in F1 seeds of crosses to the wild type indicate that the level of enzyme is regulating the amount of 20:1 and 18:3 in seeds. Consistent with this observation, the mutations were found to segregate 1:2:1 in F2 seeds. We have found that the 18:2 desaturase mutation is clearly expressed in root phosphatidylcholine.

  13. Flavonoid Accumulation Patterns of Transparent Testa Mutants of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Wendy Ann; Brown, Dana E.; Tague, Brian W.; Muday, Gloria K.; Taiz, Lincoln; Murphy, Angus S.

    2001-01-01

    Flavonoids have been implicated in the regulation of auxin movements in Arabidopsis. To understand when and where flavonoids may be acting to control auxin movement, the flavonoid accumulation pattern was examined in young seedlings and mature tissues of wild-type Arabidopsis. Using a variety of biochemical and visualization techniques, flavonoid accumulation in mature plants was localized in cauline leaves, pollen, stigmata, and floral primordia, and in the stems of young, actively growing inflorescences. In young Landsberg erecta seedlings, aglycone flavonols accumulated developmentally in three regions, the cotyledonary node, the hypocotyl-root transition zone, and the root tip. Aglycone flavonols accumulated at the hypocotyl-root transition zone in a developmental and tissue-specific manner with kaempferol in the epidermis and quercetin in the cortex. Quercetin localized subcellularly in the nuclear region, plasma membrane, and endomembrane system, whereas kaempferol localized in the nuclear region and plasma membrane. The flavonoid accumulation pattern was also examined in transparent testa mutants blocked at different steps in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. The transparent testa mutants were shown to have precursor accumulation patterns similar to those of end product flavonoids in wild-type Landsberg erecta, suggesting that synthesis and end product accumulation occur in the same cells. PMID:11402185

  14. Flavonoid accumulation patterns of transparent testa mutants of arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peer, W. A.; Brown, D. E.; Tague, B. W.; Muday, G. K.; Taiz, L.; Murphy, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Flavonoids have been implicated in the regulation of auxin movements in Arabidopsis. To understand when and where flavonoids may be acting to control auxin movement, the flavonoid accumulation pattern was examined in young seedlings and mature tissues of wild-type Arabidopsis. Using a variety of biochemical and visualization techniques, flavonoid accumulation in mature plants was localized in cauline leaves, pollen, stigmata, and floral primordia, and in the stems of young, actively growing inflorescences. In young Landsberg erecta seedlings, aglycone flavonols accumulated developmentally in three regions, the cotyledonary node, the hypocotyl-root transition zone, and the root tip. Aglycone flavonols accumulated at the hypocotyl-root transition zone in a developmental and tissue-specific manner with kaempferol in the epidermis and quercetin in the cortex. Quercetin localized subcellularly in the nuclear region, plasma membrane, and endomembrane system, whereas kaempferol localized in the nuclear region and plasma membrane. The flavonoid accumulation pattern was also examined in transparent testa mutants blocked at different steps in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. The transparent testa mutants were shown to have precursor accumulation patterns similar to those of end product flavonoids in wild-type Landsberg erecta, suggesting that synthesis and end product accumulation occur in the same cells.

  15. Genetic analysis of salt-tolerant mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, V; Ponce, M R; Micol, J L

    2000-01-01

    Stress caused by the increased salinity of irrigated fields impairs plant growth and is one of the major constraints that limits crop productivity in many important agricultural areas. As a contribution to solving such agronomic problems, we have carried out a large-scale screening for Arabidopsis thaliana mutants induced on different genetic backgrounds by EMS treatment, fast neutron bombardment, or T-DNA insertions. From the 675,500 seeds we screened, 17 mutant lines were isolated, all but one of which yielded 25-70% germination levels on 250 mm NaCl medium, a condition in which their ancestor ecotypes are unable to germinate. Monogenic recessive inheritance of NaCl-tolerant germination was displayed with incomplete penetrance by all the selected mutants, which fell into five complementation groups. These were named SALOBRENO (SAN) and mapped relative to polymorphic microsatellites, the map positions of three of them suggesting that they are novel genes. Strains carrying mutations in the SAN1-SAN4 genes display similar responses to both ionic effects and osmotic pressure, their germination being NaCl and mannitol tolerant but KCl and Na(2)SO(4) sensitive. In addition, NaCl-, KCl-, and mannitol-tolerant as well as abscisic-acid-insensitive germination was displayed by sañ5, whose genetic and molecular characterization indicates that it carries an extremely hypomorphic or null allele of the ABI4 gene, its deduced protein product lacking the APETALA2 DNA binding domain. PMID:10629000

  16. Arabidopsis AMY1 expressions and early flowering mutant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jie, Wang; Dashi, Yu; XinHong, Guo; Xuanming, Liu

    2009-02-28

    The homozygous T-DNA mutant of the AMY1 gene in Arabidopsis was identified and importantly, shown to cause an early flowering phenotype. We found that the disruption of AMY1 enhanced expression of CO and FT. The expression analyses of genes related to starch metabolism revealed that expression of the AGPase small subunit APS1 in the wild type was higher than in the amy1 mutant. However, there were no significant differences in expression levels of the AGPase large subunit genes ApL1, AMY2, or AMY3 between wild type and the amy1 mutant. Expression profiling showed that AMY1 was highly expressed in leaves, stems, and flowers, and expressed less in leafstalks and roots. Furthermore, the level of AMY1 mRNA was highly elevated with age and in senescing leaves. RT-PCR analyses showed that the expression of AMY1 was induced by heat shock, GA, and ABA, while salt stress had no apparent effect on its expression. PMID:19250611

  17. Distinct Phyllosphere Bacterial Communities on Arabidopsis Wax Mutant Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Reisberg, Eva E.; Hildebrandt, Ulrich; Riederer, Markus; Hentschel, Ute

    2013-01-01

    The phyllosphere of plants is inhabited by diverse microorganisms, however, the factors shaping their community composition are not fully elucidated. The plant cuticle represents the initial contact surface between microorganisms and the plant. We thus aimed to investigate whether mutations in the cuticular wax biosynthesis would affect the diversity of the phyllosphere microbiota. A set of four Arabidopsis thaliana eceriferum mutants (cer1, cer6, cer9, cer16) and their respective wild type (Landsberg erecta) were subjected to an outdoor growth period and analysed towards this purpose. The chemical distinctness of the mutant wax phenotypes was confirmed by gas chromatographic measurements. Next generation amplicon pyrosequencing of the bacterial communities showed distinct community patterns. This observation was supported by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis experiments. Microbial community analyses revealed bacterial phylotypes that were ubiquitously present on all plant lines (termed “core” community) while others were positively or negatively affected by the wax mutant phenotype (termed “plant line-specific“ community). We conclude from this study that plant cuticular wax composition can affect the community composition of phyllosphere bacteria. PMID:24223831

  18. Arabidopsis Flavonoid Mutants Are Hypersensitive to UV-B Irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J; Ou-Lee, TM; Raba, R; Amundson, RG; Last, RL

    1993-01-01

    Increases in the terrestrial levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation (280 to 320 nm) due to diminished stratospheric ozone have prompted an investigation of the protective mechanisms that contribute to UV-B tolerance in plants. In response to UV-B stress, flowering plants produce a variety of UV-absorptive secondary products derived from phenylalanine. Arabidopsis mutants with defects in the synthesis of these compounds were tested for UV-B sensitivity. The transparent testa-4 (tt4) mutant, which has reduced flavonoids and normal levels of sinapate esters, is more sensitive to UV-B than the wild type when grown under high UV-B irradiance. The tt5 and tt6 mutants, which have reduced levels of UV-absorptive leaf flavonoids and the monocyclic sinapic acid ester phenolic compounds, are highly sensitive to the damaging effects of UV-B radiation. These results demonstrate that both flavonoids and other phenolic compounds play important roles in vivo in plant UV-B protection. PMID:12271060

  19. Molecular analysis of ethylene-insensitive mutants in arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerowitz, E.

    1991-01-01

    The subject of this study is the biochemical basis of ethylene reception. The Arabidopsis thaliana ETR gene codes for the ethylene receptor or is involved in transduction of the ethylene-generated signal. We have cloned an etr mutation which results in a decrease in the ethylene response of the plant, with a decrease in ethylene binding of about five-fold. Two genes have been found in the cloned region which confer resistance. By sequence analysis, the first protein contains three distinct regions: a transmembrane region, a serine/threonine protein kinase region, and a control region similar to the RAS-binding region of yeast adenylate cyclase. The second protein contains a zinc-finger; since sequence of the first protein shows no mutant-dependent changes, and transition metals have been implicated in ethylene binding, this protein could be the ETR gene product. However, no mutant dependent differences have been found in this protein, either. The mutation could be upstream of the coding region of either gene and involve regulatory elements, so we are continuing to sequence. (MHB)

  20. Leaf Epicuticular Waxes of the Eceriferum Mutants in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Jenks, M. A.; Tuttle, H. A.; Eigenbrode, S. D.; Feldmann, K. A.

    1995-01-01

    Wild-type Arabidopsis leaf epicuticular wax (EW) occurs as a smooth layer over the epidermal surface, whereas stem EW has a crystalline microstructure. Wild-type EW load was more than 10-fold lower on leaves than on stems. Compared with the EW on wild-type stems, EW on wild-type leaves had a much higher proportion of their total EW load in the form of alkanes and 1-alcohols; a large reduction in secondary alcohols, ketones, and esters; and a chain-length distribution for major EW classes that was skewed toward longer lengths. The eceriferum (cer) mutations often differentially affected leaf and stem EW chemical compositions. For example, the cer2 mutant EW phenotype was expressed on the stem but not on the leaf. Compared to wild type, the amount of primary alcohols on cer9 mutants was reduced on leaves but elevated on stems, whereas an opposite differential effect for primary alcohols was observed on cer16 leaves and stems. Putative functions for CER gene products are discussed. The CER4 and CER6 gene products may be involved in fatty aldehyde reduction and C26 fatty acylcoenzyme A elongation, respectively. CER1, CER8, CER9, and CER16 gene products may be involved in EW substrate transfer. The CER3 gene product may be involved in release of fatty acids from elongase complexes. CER2 gene product may have regulatory functions. PMID:12228482

  1. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rodermel, Steven

    2015-11-16

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.

  2. Characterization of grape Gibberellin Insensitive 1 mutant alleles in transgenic Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We generated a dozen of different mutations in the grape Gibberellin Insensitive or GAI sequence, transformed them into Arabidopsis under the control of 35S, Arabidopsis or grape GAI promoter, and evaluated the impact of these mutant alleles on plant growth and development. These GAI sequence varian...

  3. Metabolomic Characterization of Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis: Development of a Metabolite Profiling Database for Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Kusano, Miyako; Mejia, Ramon Francisco; Iwasa, Mami; Kobayashi, Makoto; Hayashi, Naomi; Watanabe-Takahashi, Akiko; Narisawa, Tomoko; Tohge, Takayuki; Hur, Manhoi; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Nikolau, Basil J.; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent intensive research efforts in functional genomics, the functions of only a limited number of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes have been determined experimentally, and improving gene annotation remains a major challenge in plant science. As metabolite profiling can characterize the metabolomic phenotype of a genetic perturbation in the plant metabolism, it provides clues to the function(s) of genes of interest. We chose 50 Arabidopsis mutants, including a set of characterized and uncharacterized mutants, that resemble wild-type plants. We performed metabolite profiling of the plants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To make the data set available as an efficient public functional genomics tool for hypothesis generation, we developed the Metabolite Profiling Database for Knock-Out Mutants in Arabidopsis (MeKO). It allows the evaluation of whether a mutation affects metabolism during normal plant growth and contains images of mutants, data on differences in metabolite accumulation, and interactive analysis tools. Nonprocessed data, including chromatograms, mass spectra, and experimental metadata, follow the guidelines set by the Metabolomics Standards Initiative and are freely downloadable. Proof-of-concept analysis suggests that MeKO is highly useful for the generation of hypotheses for genes of interest and for improving gene annotation. MeKO is publicly available at http://prime.psc.riken.jp/meko/. PMID:24828308

  4. Plastid distribution in columella cells of a starchless Arabidopsis mutant grown in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, E.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Brown, C. S.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Wild-type and starchless Arabidopsis thaliana mutant seedlings (TC7) were grown and fixed in the microgravity environment of a U.S. Space Shuttle spaceflight. Computer image analysis of longitudinal sections from columella cells suggest a different plastid positioning mechanism for mutant and wild-type in the absence of gravity.

  5. Arabidopsis genes essential for seedling viability: isolation of insertional mutants and molecular cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Budziszewski, G J; Lewis, S P; Glover, L W; Reineke, J; Jones, G; Ziemnik, L S; Lonowski, J; Nyfeler, B; Aux, G; Zhou, Q; McElver, J; Patton, D A; Martienssen, R; Grossniklaus, U; Ma, H; Law, M; Levin, J Z

    2001-01-01

    We have undertaken a large-scale genetic screen to identify genes with a seedling-lethal mutant phenotype. From screening approximately 38,000 insertional mutant lines, we identified >500 seedling-lethal mutants, completed cosegregation analysis of the insertion and the lethal phenotype for >200 mutants, molecularly characterized 54 mutants, and provided a detailed description for 22 of them. Most of the seedling-lethal mutants seem to affect chloroplast function because they display altered pigmentation and affect genes encoding proteins predicted to have chloroplast localization. Although a high level of functional redundancy in Arabidopsis might be expected because 65% of genes are members of gene families, we found that 41% of the essential genes found in this study are members of Arabidopsis gene families. In addition, we isolated several interesting classes of mutants and genes. We found three mutants in the recently discovered nonmevalonate isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway and mutants disrupting genes similar to Tic40 and tatC, which are likely to be involved in chloroplast protein translocation. Finally, we directly compared T-DNA and Ac/Ds transposon mutagenesis methods in Arabidopsis on a genome scale. In each population, we found only about one-third of the insertion mutations cosegregated with a mutant phenotype. PMID:11779813

  6. Cytochemical Analysis of Pollen Development in Wild-Type Arabidopsis and a Male-Sterile Mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Regan, SM; Moffatt, BA

    1990-01-01

    Microsporogenesis has been examined in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the nuclear male-sterile mutant BM3 by cytochemical staining. The mutant lacks adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, an enzyme of the purine salvage pathway that converts adenine to AMP. Pollen development in the mutant began to diverge from wild type just after meiosis, as the tetrads of microspores were released from their callose walls. The first indication of abnormal pollen development in the mutant was a darker staining of the microspore wall due to an incomplete synthesis of the intine. Vacuole formation was delayed and irregular in the mutant, and the majority of the mutant microspores failed to undergo mitotic divisions. Enzyme activities of alcohol dehydrogenase and esterases decreased in the mutant soon after meiosis and were undetectable in mature pollen grains of the mutant. RNA accumulation was also diminished. These results are discussed in relation to the possible role(s) of adenine salvage in pollen development. PMID:12354970

  7. Detecting Functional Groups of Arabidopsis Mutants by Metabolic Profiling and Evaluation of Pleiotropic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jörg; Börnke, Frederik; Schmiedl, Alfred; Kleine, Tatjana; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic profiles and fingerprints of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with various defects in plastidic sugar metabolism or photosynthesis were analyzed to elucidate if the genetic mutations can be traced by comparing their metabolic status. Using a platform of chromatographic and spectrometric tools data from untargeted full MS scans as well as from selected metabolites including major carbohydrates, phosphorylated intermediates, carboxylates, free amino acids, major antioxidants, and plastidic pigments were evaluated. Our key observations are that by multivariate statistical analysis each mutant can be separated by a unique metabolic signature. Closely related mutants come close. Thus metabolic profiles of sugar mutants are different but more similar than those of photosynthesis mutants. All mutants show pleiotropic responses mirrored in their metabolic status. These pleiotropic responses are typical and can be used for separating and grouping of the mutants. Our findings show that metabolite fingerprints can be taken to classify mutants and hence may be used to sort genes into functional groups. PMID:22639613

  8. The phenotype of Arabidopsis thaliana det1 mutants suggest a role for cytokinins in greening

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, J.; Aguilar, N.; Peto, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    When grown in the absence of light, the det1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana develop characteristics of light-grown plants by morphological, cellular, and molecular criteria. Further, in light-grown plants, mutations in the DET1 gene affect cell-type-specific expression of light-regulated genes and the chloroplast developmental program. Here we show that the addition of exogenously added cytokinins (either 2-isopentenyl adenine, kinetin, or benzyladenine) to the growth medium of dark-germinated wild-type seedlings results in seedlings that resemble det1 mutants, instead of having the normal etiolated morphology. Like det1 mutants, these dark-grown seedlings now contain chloroplasts and have high levels of expression of genes that are normally light''-regulated. These results suggest an important role for cytokinins during greening of Arabidopsis, and may implicate cytokinin levels or an increased sensitivity to cytokinins as explanations for some of the observed phenotypes of det1 mutants.

  9. hydra Mutants of Arabidopsis Are Defective in Sterol Profiles and Auxin and Ethylene Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Souter, Martin; Topping, Jennifer; Pullen, Margaret; Friml, Jiri; Palme, Klaus; Hackett, Rachel; Grierson, Don; Lindsey, Keith

    2002-01-01

    The hydra mutants of Arabidopsis are characterized by a pleiotropic phenotype that shows defective embryonic and seedling cell patterning, morphogenesis, and root growth. We demonstrate that the HYDRA1 gene encodes a Δ8-Δ7 sterol isomerase, whereas HYDRA2 encodes a sterol C14 reductase, previously identified as the FACKEL gene product. Seedlings mutant for each gene are similarly defective in the concentrations of the three major Arabidopsis sterols. Promoter::reporter gene analysis showed misexpression of the auxin-regulated DR5 and ACS1 promoters and of the epidermal cell file–specific GL2 promoter in the mutants. The mutants exhibit enhanced responses to auxin. The phenotypes can be rescued partially by inhibition of auxin and ethylene signaling but not by exogenous sterols or brassinosteroids. We propose a model in which correct sterol profiles are required for regulated auxin and ethylene signaling through effects on membrane function. PMID:12034894

  10. Comparative proteomic study of Arabidopsis mutants mpk4 and mpk6.

    PubMed

    Takáč, Tomáš; Vadovič, Pavol; Pechan, Tibor; Luptovčiak, Ivan; Šamajová, Olga; Šamaj, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 and MPK6 are implicated in different signalling pathways responding to diverse external stimuli. This was recently correlated with transcriptomic profiles of Arabidopsis mpk4 and mpk6 mutants, and thus it should be reflected also on the level of constitutive proteomes. Therefore, we performed a shot gun comparative proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis mpk4 and mpk6 mutant roots. We have used bioinformatic tools and propose several new proteins as putative MPK4 and MPK6 phosphorylation targets. Among these proteins in the mpk6 mutant were important modulators of development such as CDC48A and phospholipase D alpha 1. In the case of the mpk4 mutant transcriptional reprogramming might be mediated by phosphorylation and change in the abundance of mRNA decapping complex VCS. Further comparison of mpk4 and mpk6 root differential proteomes showed differences in the composition and regulation of defense related proteins. The mpk4 mutant showed altered abundances of antioxidant proteins. The examination of catalase activity in response to oxidative stress revealed that this enzyme might be preferentially regulated by MPK4. Finally, we proposed developmentally important proteins as either directly or indirectly regulated by MPK4 and MPK6. These proteins contribute to known phenotypic defects in the mpk4 and mpk6 mutants. PMID:27324189

  11. Comparative proteomic study of Arabidopsis mutants mpk4 and mpk6

    PubMed Central

    Takáč, Tomáš; Vadovič, Pavol; Pechan, Tibor; Luptovčiak, Ivan; Šamajová, Olga; Šamaj, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 and MPK6 are implicated in different signalling pathways responding to diverse external stimuli. This was recently correlated with transcriptomic profiles of Arabidopsis mpk4 and mpk6 mutants, and thus it should be reflected also on the level of constitutive proteomes. Therefore, we performed a shot gun comparative proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis mpk4 and mpk6 mutant roots. We have used bioinformatic tools and propose several new proteins as putative MPK4 and MPK6 phosphorylation targets. Among these proteins in the mpk6 mutant were important modulators of development such as CDC48A and phospholipase D alpha 1. In the case of the mpk4 mutant transcriptional reprogramming might be mediated by phosphorylation and change in the abundance of mRNA decapping complex VCS. Further comparison of mpk4 and mpk6 root differential proteomes showed differences in the composition and regulation of defense related proteins. The mpk4 mutant showed altered abundances of antioxidant proteins. The examination of catalase activity in response to oxidative stress revealed that this enzyme might be preferentially regulated by MPK4. Finally, we proposed developmentally important proteins as either directly or indirectly regulated by MPK4 and MPK6. These proteins contribute to known phenotypic defects in the mpk4 and mpk6 mutants. PMID:27324189

  12. Restoration of gravitropic sensitivity in starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis by hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzelle, K. J.; Kiss, J. Z.

    2001-01-01

    Despite the extensive study of plant gravitropism, there have been few experiments which have utilized hypergravity as a tool to investigate gravisensitivity in flowering plants. Previous studies have shown that starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis are less sensitive to gravity compared to the wild-type (WT). In this report, the question addressed was whether hypergravity could restore the sensitivity of starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis. The strains examined include a WT, a starchless mutant and a reduced-starch mutant. Vertical orientation studies with dark-grown seedlings indicate that increased centrifugal acceleration improves orientation relative to the acceleration vector for all strains, even the WT. For starchless roots, growth of seedlings under constant 5 g acceleration was required to restore orientation to the level of the WT at 1 g. In contrast, approximately 10 g was required to restore the orientation of the starchless mutant hypocotyls to a WT level at 1 g. Examination of plastid position in root cap columella cells of the starchless mutant revealed that the restoration of gravitropic sensitivity was correlated with the sedimentation of plastids toward the distal cell wall. Even in WT plants, hypergravity caused greater sedimentation of plastids and improved gravitropic capability. Collectively, these experiments support the hypothesis of a statolith-based system of gravity perception in plants. As far as is known, this is the first report to use hypergravity to study the mechanisms of gravitropism in Arabidopsis.

  13. An Arabidopsis thaliana embryo arrest mutant exhibiting germination potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to initiate radicle elongation, or germination potential, occurs in developing embryos before the completion of seed maturation. Green embryos after walking-stick stage in developing Arabidopsis thaliana seeds germinate when excised from seeds and incubated in MS media containing 1 % suc...

  14. Mutant and overexpression analysis of a C2H2 single zinc finger gene of Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this work was to characterize an Arabidopsis C2H2 single zinc finger gene, named AtZFP11, that is similar to SUPERMAN (SUP) and RABBIT EARS (RBE). No altered phenotype was observed in mutants analyzed that were derived through TILLING, nor a T-DNA insertion into the exon of AtZFP11. Pl...

  15. Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid resistant mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with increased salt tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehle, F.R.; Murphy, M.A.; Khan, R.A. )

    1989-04-01

    Nineteen mutant Arabidopsis families resistant to the proline analog azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (ACA) were characterized in terms of NaCl tolerance and proline content. Mutants were selected from about 64,000 progeny of about 16,000 self-pollinated Columbia parents which had been mutated with ethyl methane sulfonate during seed imbibition. Selections were performed during seed germination on aseptic agar medium containing 0.2 to 0.25 mM ACA. Nineteen mutant families, 12 clearly independent, retained resistance to ACA in the M{sub 4} generation. Based on germination on 150 mM NaCl, 13 of the mutant families were more tolerant than the wild type. Two mutants of intermediate resistance to ACA were markedly more salt tolerant than the others. Four mutant families appeared to overproduce proline. Of these, only 3 showed slight increases in salt tolerance.

  16. Purification of a. beta. -amylase that accumulates in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in starch metabolism. [Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D.; Preiss, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Amylase activity is elevated 5- to 10-fold in leaves of several different Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in starch metabolism when they are grown under a 12-hour photoperiod. Activity is also increased when plants are grown under higher light intensity. It was previously determined that the elevated activity was an extrachloroplastic {beta}-(exo)amylase. Due to the location of this enzyme outside the chloroplast, its function is not known. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity from leaves of both a starchless mutant deficient in plastid phosphoglucomutase and from the wild type using polyethylene glycol fractionation and cyclohexaamylose affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of the {beta}-amylase from both sources was 55,000 daltons as determined by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Gel filtration studies indicated that the enzyme was a monomer. The specific activities of the purified protein from mutant and wild-type sources, their substrate specificities, and K{sub m} for amylopectin were identical. Based on these results it was concluded that the mutant contained an increased level of {beta}-amylase protein. Enzyme neutralization studies using a polyclonal antiserum raised to purified {beta}-amylase showed that in each of two starchless mutants, one starch deficient mutant and one starch overproducing mutant, the elevated amylase activity was due to elevated {beta}-amylase protein.

  17. The Arabidopsis elch mutant reveals functions of an ESCRT component in cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Christoph; Schellmann, Swen; Sabovljevic, Aneta; Shahriari, Mojgan; Keshavaiah, Channa; Bechtold, Nicole; Herzog, Michel; Müller, Stefan; Hanisch, Franz-Georg; Hülskamp, Martin

    2006-12-01

    Recently, an alternative route to the proteasomal protein-degradation pathway was discovered that specifically targets transmembrane proteins marked with a single ubiquitin to the endosomal multivesicular body (MVB) and, subsequently, to the vacuole (yeast) or lysosome (animals), where they are degraded by proteases. Vps23p/TSG101 is a key component of the ESCRT I-III machinery in yeast and animals that recognizes mono-ubiquitylated proteins and sorts them into the MVB. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis ELCH (ELC) gene encodes a Vps23p/TSG101 homolog, and that homologs of all known ESCRT I-III components are present in the Arabidopsis genome. As with its animal and yeast counterparts, ELC binds ubiquitin and localizes to endosomes. Gel-filtration experiments indicate that ELC is a component of a high-molecular-weight complex. Yeast two-hybrid and immunoprecipitation assays showed that ELC interacts with Arabidopsis homologs of the ESCRT I complex. The elc mutant shows multiple nuclei in various cell types, indicating a role in cytokinesis. Double-mutant analysis with kaktus shows that increased ploidy levels do not influence the cytokinesis effect of elc mutants, suggesting that ELC is only important during the first endoreduplication cycle. Double mutants with tubulin folding cofactor a mutants show a synergistic phenotype, suggesting that ELC regulates cytokinesis through the microtubule cytoskeleton. PMID:17090720

  18. RARGE II: An Integrated Phenotype Database of Arabidopsis Mutant Traits Using a Controlled Vocabulary

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Kenji; Kurotani, Atsushi; Iida, Kei; Kuromori, Takashi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is one of the most popular experimental plants. However, only 40% of its genes have at least one experimental Gene Ontology (GO) annotation assigned. Systematic observation of mutant phenotypes is an important technique for elucidating gene functions. Indeed, several large-scale phenotypic analyses have been performed and have generated phenotypic data sets from many Arabidopsis mutant lines and overexpressing lines, which are freely available online. Since each Arabidopsis mutant line database uses individual phenotype expression, the differences in the structured term sets used by each database make it difficult to compare data sets and make it impossible to search across databases. Therefore, we obtained publicly available information for a total of 66,209 Arabidopsis mutant lines, including loss-of-function (RATM and TARAPPER) and gain-of-function (AtFOX and OsFOX) lines, and integrated the phenotype data by mapping the descriptions onto Plant Ontology (PO) and Phenotypic Quality Ontology (PATO) terms. This approach made it possible to manage the four different phenotype databases as one large data set. Here, we report a publicly accessible web-based database, the RIKEN Arabidopsis Genome Encyclopedia II (RARGE II; http://rarge-v2.psc.riken.jp/), in which all of the data described in this study are included. Using the database, we demonstrated consistency (in terms of protein function) with a previous study and identified the presumed function of an unknown gene. We provide examples of AT1G21600, which is a subunit in the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase complex, and AT5G56980, which is related to the jasmonic acid signaling pathway. PMID:24272250

  19. An Arabidopsis neutral ceramidase mutant ncer1 accumulates hydroxyceramides and is sensitive to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Bi, Fang-Cheng; Yin, Jian; Wu, Jian-Xin; Rong, Chan; Wu, Jia-Li; Yao, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ceramidases hydrolyze ceramide into sphingosine and fatty acids and, although ceramidases function as key regulators of sphingolipid homeostasis in mammals, their roles in plants remain largely unknown. Here, we characterized the Arabidopsis thaliana ceramidase AtNCER1, a homolog of human neutral ceramidase. AtNCER1 localizes predominantly on the endoplasmic reticulum. The ncer1 T-DNA insertion mutants had no visible phenotype, but accumulated hydroxyceramides, and showed increased sensitivity to oxidative stress induced by methyl viologen. Plants over-expressing AtNCER1 showed increased tolerance to oxidative stress. These data indicate that the Arabidopsis neutral ceramidase affects sphingolipid homeostasis and oxidative stress responses. PMID:26150824

  20. Plastid sedimentation kinetics in roots of wild-type and starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacCleery, S. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Sedimentation and movement of plastids in columella cells of the root cap were measured in seedlings of wild-type, a reduced starch mutant, and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis. To assay for sedimentation, we used both linear measurements and the change of angle from the cell center as indices in vertical and reoriented plants with the aid of computer-assisted image analysis. Seedlings were fixed at short periods after reorientation, and plastid sedimentation correlated with starch content in the three strains of Arabidopsis. Amyloplasts of wild-type seedlings showed the greatest sedimentation, whereas plastids of the starchless mutant showed no significant sedimentation in the vertically grown and reoriented seedlings. Because previous research has shown that a full complement of starch is needed for full gravitropic sensitivity, this study correlates increased sensitivity with plastid sedimentation. However, although plastid sedimentation contributed to gravisensitivity, it was not required, because the gravitropic starchless mutant had plastids that did not sediment. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to measure plastid sedimentation in Arabidopsis roots after reorientation of seedlings. Taken together, the results of this study are consistent with the classic plastid-based and protoplast-based models of graviperception and suggest that multiple systems of perception exist in plant cells.

  1. A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. with modified control of aspartate kinase by threonine.

    PubMed

    Heremans, B; Jacobs, M

    1997-04-01

    Mutagenesis and subsequent selection of Arabidopsis thaliana plantlets on a growth inhibitory concentration of lysine has led to the isolation of lysine-resistant mutants. The ability to grown on 2 mM lysine has been used to isolate mutants that may contain an aspartate kinase with altered regulatory-feedback properties. One of these mutants (RL 4) was characterized by a relative enhancement of soluble lysine. The recessive monogenic nuclear transmission of the resistance trait was established. It was associated with an aspartate kinase less sensitive to feedback inhibition by threonine. Two mutants (RLT 40 and RL 4) in Arabidopsis, characterized by an altered regulation of aspartate kinase, were crossed to assess the effects of the simultaneous presence of these different aspartate kinase forms. A double mutant (RLT40 x RL4) was isolated and characterized by two feedback-desensitized isozymes of aspartate kinase to, respectively, lysine and threonine but no threonine and/or lysine overproduction was observed. Genetical analysis of this unique double aspartate kinase mutant indicated that both mutations were located on chromosome 2, but their loci (ak1 and ak2) were found to be unlinked. PMID:9241437

  2. Light-Induced Acclimation of the Arabidopsis chlorina1 Mutant to Singlet Oxygen[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Ramel, Fanny; Ksas, Brigitte; Akkari, Elsy; Mialoundama, Alexis S.; Monnet, Fabien; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Mueller, Martin J.; Bouvier, Florence; Havaux, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is a reactive oxygen species that can function as a stress signal in plant leaves leading to programmed cell death. In microalgae, 1O2-induced transcriptomic changes result in acclimation to 1O2. Here, using a chlorophyll b–less Arabidopsis thaliana mutant (chlorina1 [ch1]), we show that this phenomenon can also occur in vascular plants. The ch1 mutant is highly photosensitive due to a selective increase in the release of 1O2 by photosystem II. Under photooxidative stress conditions, the gene expression profile of ch1 mutant leaves very much resembled the gene responses to 1O2 reported in the Arabidopsis mutant flu. Preexposure of ch1 plants to moderately elevated light intensities eliminated photooxidative damage without suppressing 1O2 formation, indicating acclimation to 1O2. Substantial differences in gene expression were observed between acclimation and high-light stress: A number of transcription factors were selectively induced by acclimation, and contrasting effects were observed for the jasmonate pathway. Jasmonate biosynthesis was strongly induced in ch1 mutant plants under high-light stress and was noticeably repressed under acclimation conditions, suggesting the involvement of this hormone in 1O2-induced cell death. This was confirmed by the decreased tolerance to photooxidative damage of jasmonate-treated ch1 plants and by the increased tolerance of the jasmonate-deficient mutant delayed-dehiscence2. PMID:23590883

  3. Genetic analysis of incurvata mutants reveals three independent genetic operations at work in Arabidopsis leaf morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Cartagena, J; Candela, H; Robles, P; Ponce, M R; Pérez-Pérez, J M; Piqueras, P; Micol, J L

    2000-01-01

    In an attempt to identify genes involved in the control of leaf morphogenesis, we have studied 13 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with curled, involute leaves, a phenotype herein referred to as Incurvata (Icu), which were isolated by G. Röbbelen and belong to the Arabidopsis Information Service Form Mutants collection. The Icu phenotype was inherited as a single recessive trait in 10 mutants, with semidominance in 2 mutants and with complete dominance in the remaining 1. Complementation analyses indicated that the studied mutations correspond to five genes, representative alleles of which were mapped relative to polymorphic microsatellites. Although most double-mutant combinations displayed additivity of the Icu phenotypes, those of icu1 icu2 and icu3 icu4 double mutants were interpreted as synergistic, which suggests that the five genes studied represent three independent genetic operations that are at work for the leaf to acquire its final form at full expansion. We have shown that icu1 mutations are alleles of the Polycomb group gene CURLY LEAF (CLF) and that the leaf phenotype of the icu2 mutant is suppressed in an agamous background, as is known for clf mutants. In addition, we have tested by means of multiplex RT-PCR the transcription of several floral genes in Icu leaves. Ectopic expression of AGAMOUS and APETALA3 was observed in clf and icu2, but not in icu3, icu4, and icu5 mutants. Taken together, these results suggest that CLF and ICU2 play related roles, the latter being a candidate to belong to the Polycomb group of regulatory genes. We propose that, as flowers evolved, a new major class of genes, including CLF and ICU2, may have been recruited to prevent the expression of floral homeotic genes in the leaves. PMID:11063708

  4. Generation of Arabidopsis mutants by heterologous expression of a full length cDNA library from tomato fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterologous expression of cDNA libraries in Arabidopsis and other plants has been used for gene identifications. To identify functions of tomato genes, we expressed a tomato full-length cDNA library in Arabidopsis thaliana and generated over 7,000 mutants. We constructed a tomato cDNA library with ...

  5. An Arabidopsis thaliana copper-sensitive mutant suggests a role of phytosulfokine in ethylene production

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Kamiya, Takehiro; Yumoto, Hiroko; Sotta, Naoyuki; Katsushi, Yamaguchi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu; Fujiwara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the adaptation for copper (Cu) deficiency, Arabidopsis mutants with apparent alterations under Cu deficiency were identified. In this report, a novel mutant, tpst-2, was found to be more sensitive than wild-type (Col-0) plants to Cu deficiency during root elongation. The positional cloning of tpst-2 revealed that this gene encodes a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST). Moreover, the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant was higher than that of Col-0 under Cu deficiency, and adding the ethylene response inhibitor AgNO3 partially rescued defects in root elongation. Interestingly, peptide hormone phytosulfokine (PSK) treatment also repressed the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant plants. Our results revealed that TPST suppressed ethylene production through the action of PSK. PMID:25908239

  6. A direct screening procedure for gravitropism mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana (L. ) Heynh

    SciTech Connect

    Bullen, B.L.; Best, T.R.; Gregg, M.M.; Barsel, S.E.; Poff, K.L. )

    1990-06-01

    In order to isolate gravitropism mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. var Estland for the genetic dissection of the gravitropism pathway, a direct screening procedure has been developed in which mutants are selected on the basis of their gravitropic response. Variability in hypocotyl curvature was dependent on the germination time of each seed stock, resulting in the incorrect identification of several lines as gravitropism mutants when a standard protocol for the potentiation of germination was used. When the protocol was adjusted to allow for differences in germination time, these lines were eliminated from the collection. Out of the 60,000 M2 seedlings screened, 0.3 to 0.4% exhibited altered gravitropism. In approximately 40% of these mutant lines, only gravitropism by the root or the hypocotyl was altered, while the response of the other organ was unaffected. These data support the hypothesis that root and hypocotyl gravitropism are genetically separable.

  7. A direct screening procedure for gravitropism mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullen, B. L.; Best, T. R.; Gregg, M. M.; Poff, K. L.; Barsel, S-E (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    In order to isolate gravitropism mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. var Estland for the genetic dissection of the gravitropism pathway, a direct screening procedure has been developed in which mutants are selected on the basis of their gravitropic response. Variability in hypocotyl curvature was dependent on the germination time of each seed stock, resulting in the incorrect identification of several lines as gravitropism mutants when a standard protocol for the potentiation of germination was used. When the protocol was adjusted to allow for differences in germination time, these lines were eliminated from the collection. Out of the 60,000 M2 seedlings screened, 0.3 to 0.4% exhibited altered gravitropism. In approximately 40% of these mutant lines, only gravitropism by the root or the hypocotyl was altered, while the response of the other organ was unaffected. These data support the hypothesis that root and hypocotyl gravitropism are genetically separable.

  8. A direct screening procedure for gravitropism mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.

    PubMed

    Bullen, B L; Best, T R; Gregg, M M; Barsel S-E; Poff, K L

    1990-01-01

    In order to isolate gravitropism mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. var Estland for the genetic dissection of the gravitropism pathway, a direct screening procedure has been developed in which mutants are selected on the basis of their gravitropic response. Variability in hypocotyl curvature was dependent on the germination time of each seed stock, resulting in the incorrect identification of several lines as gravitropism mutants when a standard protocol for the potentiation of germination was used. When the protocol was adjusted to allow for differences in germination time, these lines were eliminated from the collection. Out of the 60,000 M2 seedlings screened, 0.3 to 0.4% exhibited altered gravitropism. In approximately 40% of these mutant lines, only gravitropism by the root or the hypocotyl was altered, while the response of the other organ was unaffected. These data support the hypothesis that root and hypocotyl gravitropism are genetically separable. PMID:11537704

  9. A Direct Screening Procedure for Gravitropism Mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. 1

    PubMed Central

    Bullen, Bertha L.; Best, Thérèse R.; Gregg, Mary M.; Barsel, Sara-Ellen; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1990-01-01

    In order to isolate gravitropism mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. var Estland for the genetic dissection of the gravitropism pathway, a direct screening procedure has been developed in which mutants are selected on the basis of their gravitropic response. Variability in hypocotyl curvature was dependent on the germination time of each seed stock, resulting in the incorrect identification of several lines as gravitropism mutants when a standard protocol for the potentiation of germination was used. When the protocol was adjusted to allow for differences in germination time, these lines were eliminated from the collection. Out of the 60,000 M2 seedlings screened, 0.3 to 0.4% exhibited altered gravitropism. In approximately 40% of these mutant lines, only gravitropism by the root or the hypocotyl was altered, while the response of the other organ was unaffected. These data support the hypothesis that root and hypocotyl gravitropism are genetically separable. PMID:11537704

  10. An Arabidopsis thaliana copper-sensitive mutant suggests a role of phytosulfokine in ethylene production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Kamiya, Takehiro; Yumoto, Hiroko; Sotta, Naoyuki; Katsushi, Yamaguchi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu; Fujiwara, Toru

    2015-07-01

    To increase our understanding of the adaptation for copper (Cu) deficiency, Arabidopsis mutants with apparent alterations under Cu deficiency were identified. In this report, a novel mutant, tpst-2, was found to be more sensitive than wild-type (Col-0) plants to Cu deficiency during root elongation. The positional cloning of tpst-2 revealed that this gene encodes a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST). Moreover, the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant was higher than that of Col-0 under Cu deficiency, and adding the ethylene response inhibitor AgNO3 partially rescued defects in root elongation. Interestingly, peptide hormone phytosulfokine (PSK) treatment also repressed the ethylene production of tpst-2 mutant plants. Our results revealed that TPST suppressed ethylene production through the action of PSK. PMID:25908239

  11. Identification of Mutants of Arabidopsis Defective in Acclimation of Photosynthesis to the Light Environment1

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Robin G.; Shephard, Freya; Rogers, Jennifer J.M.; Rolfe, Stephen A.; Horton, Peter

    2003-01-01

    In common with many other higher plant species, Arabidopsis undergoes photosynthetic acclimation, altering the composition of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to fluctuations in its growth environment. The changes in photosynthetic function that result from acclimation can be detected in a noninvasive manner by monitoring chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence. This technique has been used to develop a screen that enables the rapid identification of plants defective at ACCLIMATION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS TO THE ENVIRONMENT (APE) loci. The application of this screen to a population of T-DNA-transformed Arabidopsis has successfully led to the identification of a number of mutant lines with altered Chl fluorescence characteristics. Analysis of photosynthesis and pigment composition in leaves from three such mutants showed that they had altered acclimation responses to the growth light environment, each having a distinct acclimation-defective phenotype, demonstrating that screening for mutants using Chl fluorescence is a viable strategy for the investigation of acclimation. Sequencing of the genomic DNA flanking the T-DNA elements showed that in the ape1 mutant, a gene was disrupted that encodes a protein of unknown function but that appears to be specific to photosynthetic organisms, whereas the ape2 mutant carries an insertion in the region of the TPT gene encoding the chloroplast inner envelope triose phosphate/phosphate translocator. PMID:12586872

  12. On the origin of a slowly reversible fluorescence decay component in the Arabidopsis npq4 mutant.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Wada, Masamitsu; Bassi, Roberto

    2014-04-19

    Over-excitation of photosynthetic apparatus causing photoinhibition is counteracted by non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence, dissipating excess absorbed energy into heat. The PsbS protein plays a key role in this process, thus making the PsbS-less npq4 mutant unable to carry out qE, the major and most rapid component of NPQ. It was proposed that npq4 does perform qE-type quenching, although at lower rate than WT Arabidopsis. Here, we investigated the kinetics of NPQ in PsbS-depleted mutants of Arabidopsis. We show that red light was less effective than white light in decreasing maximal fluorescence in npq4 mutants. Also, the kinetics of fluorescence dark recovery included a decay component, qM, exhibiting the same amplitude and half-life in both WT and npq4 mutants. This component was uncoupler-sensitive and unaffected by photosystem II repair or mitochondrial ATP synthesis inhibitors. Targeted reverse genetic analysis showed that traits affecting composition of the photosynthetic apparatus, carotenoid biosynthesis and state transitions did not affect qM. This was depleted in the npq4phot2 mutant which is impaired in chloroplast photorelocation, implying that fluorescence decay, previously described as a quenching component in npq4 is, in fact, the result of decreased photon absorption caused by chloroplast relocation rather than a change in the activity of quenching reactions. PMID:24591708

  13. On the origin of a slowly reversible fluorescence decay component in the Arabidopsis npq4 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Wada, Masamitsu; Bassi, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Over-excitation of photosynthetic apparatus causing photoinhibition is counteracted by non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence, dissipating excess absorbed energy into heat. The PsbS protein plays a key role in this process, thus making the PsbS-less npq4 mutant unable to carry out qE, the major and most rapid component of NPQ. It was proposed that npq4 does perform qE-type quenching, although at lower rate than WT Arabidopsis. Here, we investigated the kinetics of NPQ in PsbS-depleted mutants of Arabidopsis. We show that red light was less effective than white light in decreasing maximal fluorescence in npq4 mutants. Also, the kinetics of fluorescence dark recovery included a decay component, qM, exhibiting the same amplitude and half-life in both WT and npq4 mutants. This component was uncoupler-sensitive and unaffected by photosystem II repair or mitochondrial ATP synthesis inhibitors. Targeted reverse genetic analysis showed that traits affecting composition of the photosynthetic apparatus, carotenoid biosynthesis and state transitions did not affect qM. This was depleted in the npq4phot2 mutant which is impaired in chloroplast photorelocation, implying that fluorescence decay, previously described as a quenching component in npq4 is, in fact, the result of decreased photon absorption caused by chloroplast relocation rather than a change in the activity of quenching reactions. PMID:24591708

  14. A chilling sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis with altered steryl-ester metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hugly, S.; McCourt, P.; Somerville, C. ); Browse, J. ); Patterson, G.W. )

    1990-07-01

    A chilling-sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana was isolated and subjected to genetic, physiological, and biochemical analysis. The chilling-sensitive nature of the mutant line is due to a single recessive nuclear mutation at a locus designated chs1. In contrast to wild-type plants, which are not adversely affected by low temperatures, the chs1 mutant is killed by several days of exposure to temperatures below 18{degree}C. Following exposure to chilling temperatures, the mutant displays two common symptoms of chilling injury - leaf chlorosis and electrolyte leakage. In these respects, the physiological response of the mutant to low temperatures mimics the response observed in some naturally occurring chilling sensitive species. The biochemical basis of chilling sensitivity was explored by examining the pattern of incorporation of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} into soluble metabolites and lipids in wild-type and mutant plants. The only difference observed between the mutant and wild type was that following low temperature treatment, the mutant accumulated 10-fold more radioactivity in a specific class of neutral lipids which were identified by a variety of criteria to be steryl-esters. The accumulation of radioactivity in the steryl-ester fraction occurs 24 hours before there is any visible evidence of chilling injury.

  15. Arabidopsis thaliana siRNA biogenesis mutants have the lower frequency of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Bilichak, Andriy; Golubov, Andrey; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are involved in the regulation of plant development and response to stress. We have previously shown that mutants impaired in Dicer-like 2 (DCL2), DCL3 and DCL4, RDR2, RDR6 and NPRD1 are partially impaired in their response to stress and dcl2 and dcl3 plants are also impaired in transgenerational response to stress, including changes in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). Here, we have analyzed genome stability of dcl2, dcl3, dcl4, dcl2 dcl3, dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 and rdr6 mutants by measuring the non-induced and the stress-induced recombination frequency. We found that all mutants had the lower spontaneous HRF. The analysis of strand breaks showed that all tested Arabidopsis mutants had a higher level of spontaneous strand breaks, suggesting that the lower HRF is not due to the unusually low level of breaks. Exposure to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) resulted in an increase in the level of strand breaks in wild-type plants and a decrease in mutants. All mutants had the higher methylation of cytosines at CpG sites under non-induced conditions. Exposure to MMS resulted in a decrease in methylation level in wild-type plants and an increase in methylation in all dcl mutants. The expression of several DNA repair genes was altered in dcl4 plants under non-induced and induced conditions. Our data suggest that siRNA biogenesis may be essential for the maintenance of the genome stability and stress response in Arabidopsis. PMID:26901311

  16. Effect of light quality and vernalization on late-flowering mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Zapater, J.M. ); Somerville, C.R. )

    1990-03-01

    We have analyzed the response to vernalization and light quality of six classes of late-flowering mutants (fb, fca, fe, fg, ft, and fy) previously isolated following mutagenesis of the early Landsberg race of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. When grown in continuous fluorescent illumination, four mutants (fca, fe, ft, and fy) and the Landsberg wild type exhibited a reduction in both flowering time and leaf number following 6 weeks of vernalization. A significant decrease in flowering time was also observed for all the mutants and the wild type when constant fluorescent illumination was supplemented with irradiation enriched in the red and far red regions of the spectrum. In the most extreme case, the late-flowering phenotype of the fca mutant was completely suppressed by vernalization, suggesting that this mutation has a direct effect on flowering. The fe and fy mutants also showed a more pronounced response than wild type to both vernalization and incandescent supplementation. The ft mutant showed a similar response to that of the wild type. The fb and fg mutants were substantially less sensitive to these treatments. These results are interpreted in the context of a multifactorial pathway for induction of flowering, in which the various mutations affect different steps of the pathway.

  17. Reduced gravitropism in hypocotyls of starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Guisinger, M. M.; Miller, A. J.; Stackhouse, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    Gravitropism was examined in dark- and light-grown hypocotyls of wild-type (WT), two reduced starch mutants (ACG 20 and ACG 27), and a starchless mutant (ACG 21) of Arabidopsis. In addition, the starch content of these four strains was studied with light and electron microscopy. Based on time course of curvature and orientation studies, the graviresponse in hypocotyls is proportional to the amount of starch in a genotype. Furthermore, starch mutations seem to primarily affect gravitropism rather than differential growth since both phototropic curvature and growth rates among the four genotypes are approximately equal. Our results suggest that gravity perception may require a greater plastid mass in hypocotyls compared to roots. The kinetics of gravitropic curvature also was compared following reorientation at 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and 135 degrees. As has been reported for other plant species, the optimal angle of reorientation is 135 degrees for WT Arabidopsis and the two reduced starch mutants, but the magnitude of curvature of the starchless mutant appears to be independent of the initial angle of displacement. Taken together, the results of the present study and our previous experiments with roots of the same four genotypes [Kiss et al. (1996) Physiol. Plant. 97: 237] support a plastid-based hypothesis for gravity perception in plants.

  18. A mutant of the Arabidopsis thaliana Toc159 gene accumulates reduced levels of linolenic acid and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that a null mutant of Arabidopsis that lacks Toc159 receptor is impaired in chloroplast biogenesis and incapable of importing photosynthetic proteins. The mutant is referred to as plastid protein import 2 or ppi2, and has an albino phenotype. In this study, we measured ...

  19. A mutant of the Arabidopsis thaliana TOC159 gene accumulates reduced levels of linolenic acid and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that a mutant of Arabidopsis that lacks the Toc159 receptor is impaired in chloroplast biogenesis. The mutant is referred as plastid protein import 2 or ppi2 and has an albino phenotype due to its inability to import the photosynthetic proteins. In this study, we measured...

  20. An Arabidopsis mutant impaired in coenzyme A biosynthesis is sugar dependent for seedling establishment.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Silvia; Larson, Tony R; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Alejandro, Santiago; Graham, Ian A; Serrano, Ramón; Rodriguez, Pedro L

    2006-03-01

    Once the plant coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway has been elucidated by comparative genomics, it is feasible to analyze the physiological relevance of CoA biosynthesis in plant life. To this end, we have identified and characterized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) T-DNA knockout mutants of two CoA biosynthetic genes, HAL3A and HAL3B. The HAL3A gene encodes a 4'-phosphopantothenoyl-cysteine decarboxilase that generates 4'-phosphopantetheine. A second gene, HAL3B, whose gene product is 86% identical to that of HAL3A, is present in the Arabidopsis genome. HAL3A appears to have a predominant role over HAL3B according to their respective mRNA expression levels. The hal3a-1, hal3a-2, and hal3b mutants were viable and showed a similar growth rate as that in wild-type plants; in contrast, a hal3a-1 hal3b double mutant was embryo lethal. Unexpectedly, seedlings that were null for HAL3A and heterozygous for HAL3B (aaBb genotype) displayed a sucrose (Suc)-dependent phenotype for seedling establishment, which is in common with mutants defective in beta-oxidation. This phenotype was genetically complemented in aaBB siblings of the progeny and chemically complemented by pantethine. In contrast, seedling establishment of Aabb plants was not Suc dependent, proving a predominant role of HAL3A over HAL3B at this stage. Total fatty acid and acyl-CoA measurements of 5-d-old aaBb seedlings in medium lacking Suc revealed stalled storage lipid catabolism and impaired CoA biosynthesis; in particular, acetyl-CoA levels were reduced by approximately 80%. Taken together, these results provide in vivo evidence for the function of HAL3A and HAL3B, and they point out the critical role of CoA biosynthesis during early postgerminative growth. PMID:16415216

  1. Isolation and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants defective in the induction of ethylene biosynthesis by cytokinin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, J. P.; Schuerman, P.; Woeste, K.; Brandstatter, I.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Cytokinins elevate ethylene biosynthesis in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings via a post-transcriptional modification of one isoform of the key biosynthetic enzyme ACC synthase. In order to begin to dissect the signaling events leading from cytokinin perception to this modification, we have isolated a series of mutants that lack the ethylene-mediated triple response in the presence of cytokinin due to their failure to increase ethylene biosynthesis. Analysis of genetic complementation and mapping revealed that these Cin mutants (cytokinin-insensitive) represent four distinct complementation groups, one of which, cin4, is allelic to the constitutive photomorphogenic mutant fus9/cop10. The Cin mutants have subtle effects on the morphology of adult plants. We further characterized the Cin mutants by analyzing ethylene biosynthesis in response to various other inducers and in adult tissues, as well as by assaying additional cytokinin responses. The cin3 mutant did not disrupt ethylene biosynthesis under any other conditions, nor did it disrupt any other cytokinin responses. Only cin2 disrupted ethylene biosynthesis in multiple circumstances. cin1 and cin2 made less anthocyanin in response to cytokinin. cin1 also displayed reduced shoot initiation in tissue culture in response to cytokinin, suggesting that it affects a cytokinin signaling element.

  2. Analysis of crystal structure of Arabidopsis MPK6 and generation of its mutants with higher activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Qin, Xinghua; Wu, Juan; Deng, Hongying; Li, Yuan; Yang, Hailian; Chen, Zhongzhou; Liu, Guoqin; Ren, Dongtao

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, which are the highly conserved signalling modules in eukaryotic organisms, have been shown to play important roles in regulating growth, development, and stress responses. The structures of various MAPKs from yeast and animal have been solved, and structure-based mutants were generated for their function analyses, however, the structures of plant MAPKs remain unsolved. Here, we report the crystal structure of Arabidopsis MPK6 at a 3.0 Å resolution. Although MPK6 is topologically similar to ERK2 and p38, the structures of the glycine-rich loop, MAPK insert, substrate binding sites, and L16 loop in MPK6 show notable differences from those of ERK2 and p38. Based on the structural comparison, we constructed MPK6 mutants and analyzed their kinase activity both in vitro and in planta. MPK6(F364L) and MPK6(F368L) mutants, in which Phe364 and Phe368 in the L16 loop were changed to Leu, respectively, acquired higher intrinsic kinase activity and retained the normal MAPKK activation property. The expression of MPK6 mutants with basal activity is sufficient to induce camalexin biosynthesis; however, to induce ethylene and leaf senescence, the expression of MPK6 mutants with higher activity is required. The results suggest that these mutants can be used to analyze the specific biological functions of MPK6. PMID:27160427

  3. Analysis of crystal structure of Arabidopsis MPK6 and generation of its mutants with higher activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Qin, Xinghua; Wu, Juan; Deng, Hongying; Li, Yuan; Yang, Hailian; Chen, Zhongzhou; Liu, Guoqin; Ren, Dongtao

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, which are the highly conserved signalling modules in eukaryotic organisms, have been shown to play important roles in regulating growth, development, and stress responses. The structures of various MAPKs from yeast and animal have been solved, and structure-based mutants were generated for their function analyses, however, the structures of plant MAPKs remain unsolved. Here, we report the crystal structure of Arabidopsis MPK6 at a 3.0 Å resolution. Although MPK6 is topologically similar to ERK2 and p38, the structures of the glycine-rich loop, MAPK insert, substrate binding sites, and L16 loop in MPK6 show notable differences from those of ERK2 and p38. Based on the structural comparison, we constructed MPK6 mutants and analyzed their kinase activity both in vitro and in planta. MPK6F364L and MPK6F368L mutants, in which Phe364 and Phe368 in the L16 loop were changed to Leu, respectively, acquired higher intrinsic kinase activity and retained the normal MAPKK activation property. The expression of MPK6 mutants with basal activity is sufficient to induce camalexin biosynthesis; however, to induce ethylene and leaf senescence, the expression of MPK6 mutants with higher activity is required. The results suggest that these mutants can be used to analyze the specific biological functions of MPK6. PMID:27160427

  4. Increased sensitivity to salt stress in tocopherol-deficient Arabidopsis mutants growing in a hydroponic system

    PubMed Central

    Ellouzi, Hasna; Hamed, Karim Ben; Cela, Jana; Müller, Maren; Abdelly, Chedly; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that tocopherols could play physiological roles in salt tolerance but the mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we analyzed changes in growth, mineral and oxidative status in vte1 and vte4 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants exposed to salt stress. vte1 and vte4 mutants lack α-tocopherol, but only the vte1 mutant is additionally deficient in γ-tocopherol. Results showed that a deficiency in vitamin E leads to reduced growth and increased oxidative stress in hydroponically-grown plants. This effect was observed at early stages, not only in rosettes but also in roots. The vte1 mutant was more sensitive to salt-induced oxidative stress than the wild type and the vte4 mutant. Salt sensitivity was associated with (i) high contents of Na+, (ii) reduced efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm ratio) and (iii) more pronounced oxidative stress as indicated by increased hydrogen peroxide and malondialdeyde levels. The vte 4 mutant, which accumulates γ- instead of α-tocopherol showed an intermediate sensitivity to salt stress between the wild type and the vte1 mutant. Contents of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and the ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were higher in the vte1 mutant than the vte4 mutant and wild type. It is concluded that vitamin E-deficient plants show an increased sensitivity to salt stress both in rosettes and roots, therefore indicating the positive role of tocopherols in stress tolerance, not only by minimizing oxidative stress, but also controlling Na+/K+ homeostasis and hormonal balance. PMID:23299430

  5. Increased sensitivity to salt stress in tocopherol-deficient Arabidopsis mutants growing in a hydroponic system.

    PubMed

    Ellouzi, Hasna; Hamed, Karim Ben; Cela, Jana; Müller, Maren; Abdelly, Chedly; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that tocopherols could play physiological roles in salt tolerance but the mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we analyzed changes in growth, mineral and oxidative status in vte1 and vte4 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants exposed to salt stress. vte1 and vte4 mutants lack α-tocopherol, but only the vte1 mutant is additionally deficient in γ-tocopherol. Results showed that a deficiency in vitamin E leads to reduced growth and increased oxidative stress in hydroponically-grown plants. This effect was observed at early stages, not only in rosettes but also in roots. The vte1 mutant was more sensitive to salt-induced oxidative stress than the wild type and the vte4 mutant. Salt sensitivity was associated with (i) high contents of Na(+), (ii) reduced efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm ratio) and (iii) more pronounced oxidative stress as indicated by increased hydrogen peroxide and malondialdeyde levels. The vte 4 mutant, which accumulates γ- instead of α-tocopherol showed an intermediate sensitivity to salt stress between the wild type and the vte1 mutant. Contents of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and the ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were higher in the vte1 mutant than the vte4 mutant and wild type. It is concluded that vitamin E-deficient plants show an increased sensitivity to salt stress both in rosettes and roots, therefore indicating the positive role of tocopherols in stress tolerance, not only by minimizing oxidative stress, but also controlling Na(+)/K(+) homeostasis and hormonal balance. PMID:23299430

  6. [Disturbed thylakoid-formation in chloroplasts of a xantha-mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) HEYNH].

    PubMed

    Röbbeilen, G

    1966-03-01

    A monohybrid recessive xantha-mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana was grown aseptically on mineral agar +2% sucrose up to maturity. The cotyledons and rosette leaves were non-green during all developmental stages, their yellow colour bleaching with age.Palisade cells of various leaves of mutant plants were investigated light- and electron microscopically. All of the organelles of these cells, except the plastids, had a normal appearance. Special attention was paid to the existence of "dense bodies", and their relationship to sphaerosomes and lysosomes was outlined.In the mutant plastids the typical thylakoid differentiation present in the chloroplasts of the green Arabidopsis plant is entirely lacking. Within the palisade cells the plastids are normal in number and size. Under the light microscope they appear as hyaline vesicles with usually two "primary grana". Their outline is characterized by numerous invaginations and protrusions; however, it is still uncertain to what extent this "amoeboidy" is only an artifact.The specific gene dependent block in the plastid development is apparently effective during the conversion of tubules of the prolamellar body to thylakoids. From the persistent "prolamellar bodies" in the mutant only single abnormal thylakoids originate. These often have a deformed cup- or ventricle-like shape and occasionally are piled up as magnograna. In a characteristic manner tubules and fibrils are closely associated in parallel rows with the outsides of the thylakoids. The fibrils having a mean diameter of 75 Å are connected with the tubules which are derived from the "prolamellar body". From this striking aggregation the possibility of a laminal fusion of tubules as a process of normal thylakoid growth is deduced.By pigment analysis of mutant leaves no chlorophyll but only carotenoids were detected. However, many osmiophilic globules as well as large bodies of unknown composition (proteinaceous?) appear in the plastid matrix. Therefore the question

  7. Comparison of rhizosphere bacterial communities in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants for systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Hein, John W; Wolfe, Gordon V; Blee, Kristopher A

    2008-02-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible systemic plant defense against a broad spectrum of plant pathogens, with the potential to secrete antimicrobial compounds into the soil. However, its impact on rhizosphere bacteria is not known. In this study, we examined fingerprints of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to determine the effect of SAR on bacterial community structure and diversity. We compared Arabidopsis mutants that are constitutive and non-inducible for SAR and verified SAR activation by measuring pathogenesis-related protein activity via a beta-glucoronidase (GUS) reporter construct driven by the beta-1-3 glucanase promoter. We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of MspI- and HaeIII-digested 16S rDNA to estimate bacterial rhizosphere community diversity, with Lactobacillus sp. added as internal controls. T-RFLP analysis showed a clear rhizosphere effect on community structure, and diversity analysis of both rhizosphere and bulk soil operational taxonomic units (as defined by terminal restriction fragments) using richness, Shannon-Weiner, and Simpson's diversity indices and evenness confirmed that the presence of Arabidopsis roots significantly altered bacterial communities. This effect of altered soil microbial community structure by plants was also seen upon multivariate cluster analysis of the terminal restriction fragments. We also found visible differences in the rhizosphere community fingerprints of different Arabidopsis SAR mutants; however, there was no clear decrease of rhizosphere diversity because of constitutive SAR expression. Our study suggests that SAR can alter rhizosphere bacterial communities, opening the door to further understanding and application of inducible plant defense as a driving force in structuring soil bacterial assemblages. PMID:17619212

  8. Arabidopsis mutants lacking phenolic sunscreens exhibit enhanced ultraviolet-B injury and oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, L.G.; Last, R.L.; Chapple, C.C.S.

    1995-12-01

    We have assessed ultraviolet-B (UV-B)-induced injury in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and two mutants with altered aromatic secondary product biosynthesis. Arabidopsis mutants defective in the ability to synthesize UV-B-absorbing compounds (flavonoids in transparent testa 5 [tt5] and sinapate esters in ferulic acid hydroxylase 1 [fah 1]) are more sensitive to UV-B than is the wild-type Landsberg erecta. Despite its ability to accumulate UV-absorptive flavonoid compounds, the ferulic acid hydroxylase mutant fah1 exhibits more physiological injury (growth inhibition and foliar lesions) than either wild type or tt5. The extreme UV-B sensitivity of fah1 demonstrates the importance of hydroxycinnamate esters as UV-B protectants. Consistent with the whole-plant response, the highest levels of lipid and protein oxidation products were seen in fah1. Ascorbate peroxidase enzyme activity was also increased in the leaves of UV-B-treated plants in a dose- and genotype-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that, in A. thaliana, hydryoxycinnamates are more effective UV-B protectants than flavonoids. The data also indicate that A. thaliana responds to UV-B as an oxidative stress, and sunscreen compounds reduce the oxidative damage caused by UV-B. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  9. The Arabidopsis her1 mutant implicates GABA in E-2-hexenal responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Mirabella, Rossana; Rauwerda, Han; Struys, Eduard A; Jakobs, Cornelis; Triantaphylidès, Christian; Haring, Michel A; Schuurink, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    When wounded or attacked by herbivores or pathogens, plants produce a blend of six-carbon alcohols, aldehydes and esters, known as C6-volatiles. Undamaged plants, when exposed to C6-volatiles, respond by inducing defense-related genes and secondary metabolites, suggesting that C6-volatiles can act as signaling molecules regulating plant defense responses. However, to date, the molecular mechanisms by which plants perceive and respond to these volatiles are unknown. To elucidate such mechanisms, we decided to isolate Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in which responses to C6-volatiles were altered. We observed that treatment of Arabidopsis seedlings with the C6-volatile E-2-hexenal inhibits root elongation. Among C6-volatiles this response is specific to E-2-hexenal, and is not dependent on ethylene, jasmonic and salicylic acid. Using this bioassay, we isolated 18 E-2-hexenal-response (her) mutants that showed sustained root growth after E-2-hexenal treatment. Here, we focused on the molecular characterization of one of these mutants, her1. Microarray and map-based cloning revealed that her1 encodes a gamma-amino butyric acid transaminase (GABA-TP), an enzyme that degrades GABA. As a consequence of the mutation, her1 plants accumulate high GABA levels in all their organs. Based on the observation that E-2-hexenal treatment induces GABA accumulation, and that high GABA levels confer resistance to E-2-hexenal, we propose a role for GABA in mediating E-2-hexenal responses. PMID:17971036

  10. Chloroplast 2010: a database for large-scale phenotypic screening of Arabidopsis mutants.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Savage, Linda J; Larson, Matthew D; Wilkerson, Curtis G; Last, Robert L

    2011-04-01

    Large-scale phenotypic screening presents challenges and opportunities not encountered in typical forward or reverse genetics projects. We describe a modular database and laboratory information management system that was implemented in support of the Chloroplast 2010 Project, an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) reverse genetics phenotypic screen of more than 5,000 mutants (http://bioinfo.bch.msu.edu/2010_LIMS; www.plastid.msu.edu). The software and laboratory work environment were designed to minimize operator error and detect systematic process errors. The database uses Ruby on Rails and Flash technologies to present complex quantitative and qualitative data and pedigree information in a flexible user interface. Examples are presented where the database was used to find opportunities for process changes that improved data quality. We also describe the use of the data-analysis tools to discover mutants defective in enzymes of leucine catabolism (heteromeric mitochondrial 3-methylcrotonyl-coenzyme A carboxylase [At1g03090 and At4g34030] and putative hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase [At2g26800]) based upon a syndrome of pleiotropic seed amino acid phenotypes that resembles previously described isovaleryl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (At3g45300) mutants. In vitro assay results support the computational annotation of At2g26800 as hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase. PMID:21224340

  11. Indole-3-butyric acid synthesis in ecotypes and mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana under different growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2007-01-01

    Although IBA is a naturally occurring auxin, its role in plant development is still under debate. In this study a set of Arabidopsis mutants was used to analyze the biosynthesis of IBA in vitro. The mutants chosen for this study can be classified as: (1) involvement in auxin metabolism, transport or synthesis (amt1, aux1, ilr1, nit1, rib1, sur1, trp1-100); (2) other hormones possibly involved in the regulation of IBA synthesis (aba1, aba3, eto2, fae1, hls1, jar1); (3) photomorphogenesis (det1, det2, det3); and (4) root architecture (cob1, cob2, scr1). In addition, two transgenic lines overexpressing the IAA glucose synthase (iaglu) gene from maize were analyzed. The ecotypes No-0 and Wassilewskija showed the highest IBA synthetase activity under control conditions, followed by Columbia, Enkheim and Landsberg erecta. In the mutant lines IBA synthetase activity differed in most cases from the wild type, however no particular pattern of up- or down-regulation, which could be correlated to their possible function, was found. For rib1 mutant seedlings it was tested whether reduced IBA synthetase activity correlates with the endogenous IBA levels. Free IBA differed only depending on the culture conditions, but gave no clear correlation with IBA synthetase activity compared to the wild type. Since drought and osmotic stress as well as abscisic acid (ABA) application enhanced IBA synthesis in maize, it was tested whether IBA synthetase from Arabidopsis is also inducible by drought stress conditions. This was confirmed for the two ecotypes Col and Ler which showed different IBA synthetase activity when cultivated with various degrees of drought stress. IBA synthetase was also determined in photomorphogenic mutants under different light regimes. Induction of IBA synthetase in det1 and det3 plants was found under short day plus a red light pulse or in the dark, respectively. The results are discussed with respect to the functions of the mutated genes. PMID:16325963

  12. Mutants of Arabidopsis lacking a chloroplastic isoamylase accumulate phytoglycogen and an abnormal form of amylopectin.

    PubMed

    Wattebled, Fabrice; Dong, Ying; Dumez, Sylvain; Delvallé, David; Planchot, Véronique; Berbezy, Pierre; Vyas, Darshna; Colonna, Paul; Chatterjee, Manash; Ball, Steven; D'Hulst, Christophe

    2005-05-01

    Mutant lines defective for each of the four starch debranching enzyme (DBE) genes (AtISA1, AtISA2, AtISA3, and AtPU1) detected in the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were produced and analyzed. Our results indicate that both AtISA1 and AtISA2 are required for the production of a functional isoamylase-type of DBE named Iso1, the major isoamylase activity found in leaves. The absence of Iso1 leads to an 80% decrease in the starch content in both lines and to the accumulation of water-soluble polysaccharides whose structure is similar to glycogen. In addition, the residual amylopectin structure in the corresponding mutant lines displays a strong modification when compared to the wild type, suggesting a direct, rather than an indirect, function of Iso1 during the synthesis of amylopectin. Mutant lines carrying a defect in AtISA3 display a strong starch-excess phenotype at the end of both the light and the dark phases accompanied by a small modification of the amylopectin structure. This result suggests that this isoamylase-type of DBE plays a major role during starch mobilization. The analysis of the Atpu1 single-mutant lines did not lead to a distinctive phenotype. However, Atisa2/Atpu1 double-mutant lines display a 92% decrease in starch content. This suggests that the function of pullulanase partly overlaps that of Iso1, although its implication remains negligible when Iso1 is present within the cell. PMID:15849301

  13. Arabidopsis mutant of AtABCG26, an ABC transporter gene, is defective in pollen maturation.

    PubMed

    Kuromori, Takashi; Ito, Takuya; Sugimoto, Eriko; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2011-11-01

    In plants, pollen is the male gametophyte that is generated from microspores, which are haploid cells produced after meiosis of diploid pollen mother cells in floral anthers. In normal maturation, microspores interact with the tapetum, which consists of one layer of metabolically active cells enclosing the locule in anthers. The tapetum plays several important roles in the maturation of microspores. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a highly conserved protein super-family that uses the energy released in ATP hydrolysis to transport substrates. The ABC transporter gene family is more diverse in plants than in animals. Previously, we reported that an Arabidopsis half-size type ABC transporter gene, COF1/AtWBC11/AtABCG11, is involved in lipid transport for the construction of cuticle layers and pollen coats in normal organ formation, as compared to CER5/AtWBC12/AtABCG12. However, physiological functions of most other ABCG members are unknown. Here, we identified another family gene, AtABCG26, which is required for pollen development in Arabidopsis. An AtABCG26 mutant developed very few pollen grains, resulting in a male-sterile phenotype. By investigating microspore and pollen development in this mutant, we observed that there was a slight abnormality in tetrad morphology prior to the formation of haploid microspores. At a later stage, we could not detect exine deposition on the microspore surface. During pollen maturation, many grains in the mutant anthers got aborted, and surviving grains were found to be defective in mitosis. Transmission of the mutant allele through male gametophytes appeared to be normal in genetic transmission analysis, supporting the view that the pollen function was disturbed by sporophytic defects in the AtABCG26 mutant. AtABCG26 can be expected to be involved in the transport of substrates such as sporopollenin monomers from tapetum to microspores, which both are plant-specific structures critical to pollen development. PMID

  14. Identification and Biochemical Characterization of Mutants in the Proanthocyanidin Pathway in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Abrahams, Sharon; Tanner, Gregory J.; Larkin, Philip J.; Ashton, Anthony R.

    2002-01-01

    Proanthocyanidin (PA), or condensed tannin, is a polymeric flavanol that accumulates in a number of tissues in a wide variety of plants. In Arabidopsis, we found that PA precursors (detected histochemically using OsO4) accumulate in the endothelial cell layer of the seed coat from the two-terminal cell stage of embryo development onwards. To understand how PA is made, we screened mature seed pools of T-DNA-tagged Arabidopsis lines to identify mutants defective in the synthesis of PA and found six tds (tannin-deficient seed) complementation groups defective in PA synthesis. Mutations in these loci disrupt the amount (tds1, tds2, tds3, tds5, and tds6) or location and amount of PA (tds4) in the endothelial cell layer. The PA intermediate epicatechin has been identified in wild type and mutants tds1, tds2, tds3, and tds5 (which do not produce PA) and tds6 (6% of wild-type PA), whereas tds4 (2% of wild-type PA) produces an unidentified dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde-reacting compound, indicating that the mutations may be acting on genes beyond leucoanthocyanidin reductase, the first enzymatic reduction step dedicated to PA synthesis. Two other mutants were identified, an allele of tt7, which has a spotted pattern of PA deposition and produces only 8% of the wild-type level of type PA as propelargonidin, and an allele of tt8 producing no PA. Spotted patterns of PA deposition observed in seed of mutants tds4 and tt7-3 result from altered PA composition and distribution in the cell. Our mutant screen, which was not exhaustive, suggests that the cooperation of many genes is required for successful PA accumulation. PMID:12376625

  15. Expression of OsCAS (Calcium-Sensing Receptor) in an Arabidopsis Mutant Increases Drought Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Xu, Mengmeng; Wei, Rongrong; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaS), which is localized in the chloroplasts, is a crucial regulator of extracellular calcium-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis. It has homologs in Oryza sativa and other plants. These sequences all have a rhodanese-like protein domain, which has been demonstrated to be associated with specific stress conditions. In this study, we cloned the Oryza sativa calcium-sensing receptor gene (OsCAS) and demonstrated that OsCAS could sense an increase of extracellular Ca2+ concentration and mediate an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. The OsCAS gene was transformed into an Arabidopsis CaS knockout mutant (Salk) and overexpressed in the transgenic plants. OsCAS promoted stomatal closure. We screened homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis plants and determined physiological indices such as the oxidative damage biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA), relative membrane permeability (RMP), proline content, and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, after 21 days of drought treatment. Our results revealed lower RMP and MDA contents and a higher Proline content in transgenic Arabidopsis plants after drought stress, whereas the opposite was observed in Salk plants. With respect to chlorophyll fluorescence, the electron transport rate and effective PSII quantum yield decreased in all lines under drought stress; however, in the transgenic plants these two parameters changed fewer and were higher than those in wild-type and Salk plants. The quantum yield of regulated energy dissipation and nonregulated energy dissipation in PSII were higher in Salk plants, whereas these values were lower in the transgenic plants than in the wild type under drought stress. The above results suggest that the transgenic plants showed better resistance to drought stress by decreasing damage to the cell membrane, increasing the amount of osmoprotectants, and maintaining a relatively high photosynthetic capacity. In conclusion, OsCAS is an extracellular calcium-sensing receptor

  16. Expression of OsCAS (Calcium-Sensing Receptor) in an Arabidopsis Mutant Increases Drought Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Rongrong; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaS), which is localized in the chloroplasts, is a crucial regulator of extracellular calcium-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis. It has homologs in Oryza sativa and other plants. These sequences all have a rhodanese-like protein domain, which has been demonstrated to be associated with specific stress conditions. In this study, we cloned the Oryza sativa calcium-sensing receptor gene (OsCAS) and demonstrated that OsCAS could sense an increase of extracellular Ca2+ concentration and mediate an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. The OsCAS gene was transformed into an Arabidopsis CaS knockout mutant (Salk) and overexpressed in the transgenic plants. OsCAS promoted stomatal closure. We screened homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis plants and determined physiological indices such as the oxidative damage biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA), relative membrane permeability (RMP), proline content, and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, after 21 days of drought treatment. Our results revealed lower RMP and MDA contents and a higher Proline content in transgenic Arabidopsis plants after drought stress, whereas the opposite was observed in Salk plants. With respect to chlorophyll fluorescence, the electron transport rate and effective PSII quantum yield decreased in all lines under drought stress; however, in the transgenic plants these two parameters changed fewer and were higher than those in wild-type and Salk plants. The quantum yield of regulated energy dissipation and nonregulated energy dissipation in PSII were higher in Salk plants, whereas these values were lower in the transgenic plants than in the wild type under drought stress. The above results suggest that the transgenic plants showed better resistance to drought stress by decreasing damage to the cell membrane, increasing the amount of osmoprotectants, and maintaining a relatively high photosynthetic capacity. In conclusion, OsCAS is an extracellular calcium-sensing receptor

  17. Embryo and endosperm development is disrupted in the female gametophytic capulet mutants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Grini, Paul E; Jürgens, Gerd; Hülskamp, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The female gametophyte of higher plants gives rise, by double fertilization, to the diploid embryo and triploid endosperm, which develop in concert to produce the mature seed. What roles gametophytic maternal factors play in this process is not clear. The female-gametophytic effects on embryo and endosperm development in the Arabidopsis mea, fis, and fie mutants appear to be due to gametic imprinting that can be suppressed by METHYL TRANSFERASE1 antisense (MET1 a/s) transgene expression or by mutation of the DECREASE IN DNA METHYLATION1 (DDM1) gene. Here we describe two novel gametophytic maternal-effect mutants, capulet1 (cap1) and capulet2 (cap2). In the cap1 mutant, both embryo and endosperm development are arrested at early stages. In the cap2 mutant, endosperm development is blocked at very early stages, whereas embryos can develop to the early heart stage. The cap mutant phenotypes were not rescued by wild-type pollen nor by pollen from tetraploid plants. Furthermore, removal of silencing barriers from the paternal genome by MET1 a/s transgene expression or by the ddm1 mutation also failed to restore seed development in the cap mutants. Neither cap1 nor cap2 displayed autonomous seed development, in contrast to mea, fis, and fie mutants. In addition, cap2 was epistatic to fis1 in both autonomous endosperm and sexual development. Finally, both cap1 and cap2 mutant endosperms, like wild-type endosperms, expressed the paternally inactive endosperm-specific FIS2 promoter GUS fusion transgene only when the transgene was introduced via the embryo sac, indicating that imprinting was not affected. Our results suggest that the CAP genes represent novel maternal functions supplied by the female gametophyte that are required for embryo and endosperm development. PMID:12524359

  18. Cellular differentiation regulated by gibberellin in the Arabidopsis thaliana pickle mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Ogas, J.; Somerville, C.; Cheng, Jin-Chen; Sung, R.

    1997-07-04

    The plant growth regulator gibberellin (GA) has a profound effect on shoot development and promotes developmental transitions such as flowering. Little is known about any analogous effect GA might have on root development. In a screen for mutants, Arabi-dopsis plants carrying a mutation designated pickle (pkl) were isolated in which the primary root meristem retained characteristics of embryonic tissue. Expression of this aberrant differentiation state was suppressed by GA. Root tissue from plants carrying the pkl mutation spontaneously regenerated new embryos and plants. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The Critical Requirement for Linolenic Acid Is Pollen Development, Not Photosynthesis, in an Arabidopsis Mutant.

    PubMed Central

    McConn, M; Browse, J

    1996-01-01

    The very high proportions of trienoic fatty acids found in chloroplast membranes of all higher plants suggest that these lipid structures might be essential for photosynthesis. We report here on the production of Arabidopsis triple mutants that contain negligible levels of trienoic fatty acids. Photosynthesis at 22[deg]C was barely affected, and vegetative growth of the mutants was identical with that of the wild type, demonstrating that any requirement for trienoic acyl groups in membrane structure and function is relatively subtle. Although vegetative growth and development were unaffected, the triple mutants are male sterlle and produce no seed under normal conditions. Comparisons of pollen development in wild-type and triple mutant flowers established that pollen grains in the mutant developed to the tricellular stage. Exogenous applications of [alpha]-llnolenate or jasmonate restored fertility. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the critical role of trienoic acids in the life cycle of plants is as the precursor of oxylipin, a signaling compound that regulates final maturation processes and the release of pollen. PMID:12239389

  20. Gravitropism of inflorescence stems in starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weise, S. E.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have assayed the gravitropic response of roots and hypocotyls of wild type Arabidopsis thaliana, two reduced-starch strains, and a starchless strain. Because there have been few reports on inflorescence gravitropism, in this article, we use microscopic analyses and time-course studies of these mutants and their wild type to study gravitropism in these stems. Sedimentation of plastids was observed in endodermal cells of the wild type and reduced-starch mutants but not in the starchless mutant. In all of these strains, the short inflorescence stems (1.0-2.9 cm) were less responsive to the gravistimulus compared with the long stems (3.0-6.0 cm). In both long and short inflorescence stems, the wild type initially had the greatest response; the starchless mutant had the least response; and the reduced starch mutants exhibited an intermediate response. Furthermore, growth rates among all four strains were approximately equal. At about 6 h after reorientation, inflorescences of all strains returned to a position parallel to the gravity vector. Thus, in inflorescence stems, sedimentation of plastids may act as an accelerator but is not required to elicit a gravitropic response. Furthermore, the site of perception appears to be diffuse throughout the inflorescence stem. These results are consistent with both a plastid-based statolith model and the protoplast pressure hypothesis, and it is possible that multiple systems for gravity perception occur in plant cells.

  1. An Arabidopsis mutant hypersensitive to red and far-red light signals.

    PubMed Central

    Genoud, T; Millar, A J; Nishizawa, N; Kay, S A; Schäfer, E; Nagatani, A; Chua, N H

    1998-01-01

    A new mutant called psi2 (for phytochrome signaling) was isolated by screening for elevated activity of a chlorophyll a/b binding protein-luciferase (CAB2-LUC) transgene in Arabidopsis. This mutant exhibited hypersensitive induction of CAB1, CAB2, and the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RBCS) promoters in the very low fluence range of red light and a hypersensitive response in hypocotyl growth in continuous red light of higher fluences. In addition, at high- but not low-light fluence rates, the mutant showed light-dependent superinduction of the pathogen-related protein gene PR-1a and developed spontaneous necrotic lesions in the absence of any pathogen. Expression of genes responding to various hormone and environmental stress pathways in the mutant was not significantly different from that of the wild type. Analysis of double mutants demonstrated that the effects of the psi2 mutation are dependent on both phytochromes phyA and phyB. The mutation is recessive and maps to the bottom of chromosome 5. Together, our results suggest that PSI2 specifically and negatively regulates both phyA and phyB phototransduction pathways. The induction of cell death by deregulated signaling pathways observed in psi2 is reminiscent of retinal degenerative diseases in animals and humans. PMID:9634578

  2. Light-stimulated cotyledon expansion in the blu3 and hy4 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Blum, D E; Neff, M M; Van Volkenburgh, E

    1994-08-01

    Cotyledon expansion in response to blue light was compared for wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and the mutants blu3 and hy4, which show reduced inhibition of hypocotyl growth in blue light. White, blue, and red light stimulated cotyledon expansion in both intact and excised cotyledons of wild-type seedlings (ecotypes No-0, WS, Co-0, La-er). Cotyledons on intact blu3 and hy4 seedlings did not grow as well as those on the wild type in response to blue light, but pretreatment of blu3 seedlings with low fluence rates of red light increased their responsiveness to blue light. Excision of cotyledons alleviated the mutant phenotype so that both mutant and wild-type cotyledons grew equally well in blue light. The loss of the mutant cotyledon phenotype upon excision indicates that the blu3 and hy4 lesions affect cotyledon expansion indirectly via a whole-plant response to light. Furthermore, the ability of excised, mutant cotyledons to grow normally in blue light shows that this growth response to blue light is mediated by a photosystem other than the ones impaired by the blu3 and hy4 lesions. PMID:7972499

  3. A novel root gravitropism mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibiting altered auxin physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, C.; Migliaccio, F.; Masson, P.; Caspar, T.; Soll, D.

    1995-01-01

    A root gravitropism mutant was isolated from the DuPont Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertional mutagenesis collection. This mutant has reduced root gravitropism, hence the name rgr1. Roots of rgr1 are shorter than those of wild-type, and they have reduced lateral root formation. In addition, roots of rgr1 coil clockwise on inclined agar plates, unlike wild-type roots which grow in a wavy pattern. The rgr1 mutant has increased resistance, as measured by root elongation, to exogenously applied auxins (6-fold to indole-3-acetic acid, 3-fold to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and 2-fold to napthyleneacetic acid). It is also resistant to polar auxin transport inhibitors (2-fold to triiodobenzoic acid and 3- to 5-fold to napthylphthalamic acid). The rgr1 mutant does not appear to be resistant to other plant hormone classes. When grown in the presence of 10(-7) M 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, rgr1 roots have fewer root hairs than wild type. All these rgr1 phenotypes are Mendelian recessives. Complementation tests indicate that rgr1 is not allelic to previously characterized agravitropic or auxin-resistant mutants. The rgr1 locus was mapped using visible markers to 1.4 +/- 0.6 map units from the CH1 locus at 1-65.4. The rgr1 mutation and the T-DNA cosegregate, suggesting that rgr1 was caused by insertional gene inactivation.

  4. Isolation and characterization of low-sulphur-tolerant mutants of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu; Zhao, Qing; Gao, Lei; Yu, Xiao-Min; Fang, Ping; Oliver, David J.; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2010-01-01

    Sulphur is an essential element for plant growth and development as well as for defence against biotic and abiotic stresses. Increasing sulphate utilization efficiency (SUE) is an important issue for crop improvement. Little is known about the genetic determinants of sulphate utilization efficiency. No gain-of-function mutants with improved SUE have been reported to date. Here the isolation and characterization of two low-sulphur-tolerant mutants, sue3 and sue4 are reported using a high-throughput genetic screen where a ‘sulphur-free’ solid medium was devised to give the selection pressure necessary to suppress the growth of the wild-type seedlings. Both mutants showed improved tolerance to low sulphur conditions and well-developed root systems. The mutant phenotype of both sue3 and sue4 was specific to sulphate deficiency and the mutants displayed enhanced tolerance to heavy metal and oxidative stress. Genetic analysis revealed that sue3 was caused by a single recessive nuclear mutation while sue4 was caused by a single dominant nuclear mutation. The recessive locus in sue3 is the previously identified VirE2-interacting Protein 1. The dominant locus in sue4 is a function-unknown locus activated by the four enhancers on the T-DNA. The function of SUE3 and SUE4 in low sulphur tolerance was confirmed either by multiple mutant alleles or by recapitulation analysis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that this genetic screen is a reasonable approach to isolate Arabidopsis mutants with improved low sulphur tolerance and potentially with enhanced sulphate utilization efficiency. The two loci identified in sue3 and sue4 should assist in understanding the molecular mechanisms of low sulphur tolerance. PMID:20547563

  5. Large genetic screens for gynogenesis and androgenesis haploid inducers in Arabidopsis thaliana failed to identify mutants

    PubMed Central

    Portemer, Virginie; Renne, Charlotte; Guillebaux, Alexia; Mercier, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Gynogenesis is a process in which the embryo genome originates exclusively from female origin, following embryogenesis stimulation by a male gamete. In contrast, androgenesis is the development of embryos that contain only the male nuclear genetic background. Both phenomena are of great interest in plant breeding as haploidization is an efficient tool to reduce the length of breeding schemes to create varieties. Although few inducer lines have been described, the genetic control of these phenomena is poorly understood. We developed genetic screens to identify mutations that would induce gynogenesis or androgenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. The ability of mutant pollen to induce either gynogenesis or androgenesis was tested by crossing mutagenized plants as males. Seedlings from these crosses were screened with recessive phenotypic markers, one genetically controlled by the female genome and another by the male genome. Positive and negative controls confirmed the unambiguous detection of both gynogenesis and androgenesis events. This strategy was applied to 1,666 EMS-mutagenised lines and 47 distant Arabidopsis strains. While an internal control suggested that the mutagenesis reached saturation, no gynogenesis or androgenesis inducer was found. However, spontaneous gynogenesis was observed at a frequency of 1/10,800. Altogether, these results suggest that no simple EMS-induced mutation in the male genome is able to induce gynogenesis or androgenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:25814999

  6. Interaction of root gravitropism and phototropism in Arabidopsis wild-type and starchless mutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitha, S.; Zhao, L.; Sack, F. D.

    2000-01-01

    Root gravitropism in wild-type Arabidopsis and in two starchless mutants, pgm1-1 and adg1-1, was evaluated as a function of light position to determine the relative strengths of negative phototropism and of gravitropism and how much phototropism affects gravitropic measurements. Gravitropism was stronger than phototropism in some but not all light positions in wild-type roots grown for an extended period, indicating that the relationship between the two tropisms is more complex than previously reported. Root phototropism significantly influenced the time course of gravitropic curvature and the two measures of sensitivity. Light from above during horizontal exposure overestimated all three parameters for all three genotypes except the wild-type perception time. At the irradiance used (80 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), the shortest periods of illumination found to exaggerate gravitropism were 45 min of continuous illumination and 2-min doses of intermittent illumination. By growing roots in circumlateral light or by gravistimulating in the dark, corrected values were obtained for each gravitropic parameter. Roots of both starchless mutants were determined to be about three times less sensitive than prior estimates. This study demonstrates the importance of accounting for phototropism in the design of root gravitropism experiments in Arabidopsis.

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Mutants Defective in Seed Coat Mucilage Secretory Cell Development in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Western, Tamara L.; Burn, Joanne; Tan, Wei Ling; Skinner, Debra J.; Martin-McCaffrey, Luke; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Haughn, George W.

    2001-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, fertilization induces the epidermal cells of the outer ovule integument to differentiate into a specialized seed coat cell type producing extracellular pectinaceous mucilage and a volcano-shaped secondary cell wall. Differentiation involves a regulated series of cytological events including growth, cytoplasmic rearrangement, mucilage synthesis, and secondary cell wall production. We have tested the potential of Arabidopsis seed coat epidermal cells as a model system for the genetic analysis of these processes. A screen for mutants defective in seed mucilage identified five novel genes (MUCILAGE-MODIFIED [MUM]1–5). The seed coat development of these mutants, and that of three previously identified ones (TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1, GLABRA2, and APETALA2) were characterized. Our results show that the genes identified define several events in seed coat differentiation. Although APETALA2 is needed for differentiation of both outer layers of the seed coat, TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1, GLABRA2, and MUM4 are required for complete mucilage synthesis and cytoplasmic rearrangement. MUM3 and MUM5 may be involved in the regulation of mucilage composition, whereas MUM1 and MUM2 appear to play novel roles in post-synthesis cell wall modifications necessary for mucilage extrusion. PMID:11706181

  8. Identification of plant defence regulators through transcriptional profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana cdd1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Swain, Swadhin; Singh, Nidhi; Nandi, Ashis Kumar

    2015-03-01

    A sustainable balance between defence and growth is essential for optimal fitness under pathogen stress. Plants activate immune response at the cost of normal metabolic requirements. Thus, plants that constitutively activate defence are deprived of growth. Arabidopsis thaliana mutant constitutive defence without defect in growth and development1 (cdd1) is an exception. The cdd1 mutant is constitutive for salicylic acid accumulation, signalling, and defence against biotrophic and hemibiotrophic pathogens, without having much impact on growth. Thus, cdd1 offers an ideal genetic background to identify novel regulators of plant defence. Here we report the differential gene expression profile between cdd1 and wild-type plants as obtained by microarray hybridization. Expression of several defence-related genes also supports constitutive activation of defence in cdd1. We screened T-DNA insertion mutant lines of selected genes, for resistance against virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). Through bacterial resistance, callose deposition and pathogenesis-associated expression analyses, we identified four novel regulators of plant defence. Resistance levels in the mutants suggest that At2g19810 and [rom] At5g05790 are positive regulators, whereas At1g61370 and At3g42790 are negative regulators of plant defence against bacterial pathogens. PMID:25740148

  9. Differential sensitivity of Arabidopsis siRNA biogenesis mutants to genotoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Bilichak, Andriy; Golubov, Andrey; Blevins, Todd; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-12-01

    Plant response to stress has been linked to different RNA-silencing processes and epigenetic mechanisms. Our recent results showed that Arabidopsis thaliana Dicer-like (DCL) mutants were impaired in transgenerational changes, recombination frequency and stress tolerance. We also found that transgenerational changes were dependent on changes in DNA methylation. Here, we hypothesized that plants deficient in the production of small RNAs would show an impaired abiotic stress response. To test this, we exposed A. thaliana dcl2, dcl3, dcl4, dcl2 dcl3 (d2d3), dcl2 dcl4 (d2d4), dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 (d2d3d4), nrpd1a, rdr2 and rdr6 mutants to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS). We found dcl4 and rdr6 to be more sensitive and dcl2, dcl3, d2d3 and rdr2 plants more resistant to MMS, as shown by fresh weight, root length and survival rate. The in vitro repair assay showed the lower ability of dcl2 and dcl3 to repair UV-damaged DNA. To summarize, we found that whereas mutants impaired in transactivating siRNA biogenesis were more sensitive to MMS, mutants impaired in natural antisense siRNA and heterochromatic siRNA biogeneses were more tolerant. Our data suggest that plant response to MMS is in part regulated through biogenesis of various siRNAs. PMID:20953786

  10. An In Vivo Quantitative Comparison of Photoprotection in Arabidopsis Xanthophyll Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Maxwell A.; Dall’Osto, Luca; Ruban, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Contribution of different LHCII antenna carotenoids to protective NPQ (pNPQ) were tested using a range of xanthophyll biosynthesis mutants of Arabidopsis: plants were either devoid of lutein (lut2), violaxanthin (npq2), or synthesized a single xanthophyll species, namely violaxanthin (aba4npq1lut2), zeaxanthin (npq2lut2), or lutein (chy1chy2lut5). A novel pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorescence analysis procedure, that used a gradually increasing actinic light intensity, allowed the efficiency of pNPQ to be tested using the photochemical quenching (qP) parameter measured in the dark (qPd). Furthermore, the yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) was calculated, and the light intensity which induces photoinhibition in 50% of leaves for each mutant was ascertained. Photoprotective capacities of each xanthophyll were quantified, taking into account chlorophyll a/b ratios and excitation pressure. Here, light tolerance, pNPQ capacity, and ΦPSII were highest in wild type plants. Of the carotenoid mutants, lut2 (lutein-deficient) plants had the highest light tolerance, and the joint the highest ΦPSII with violaxanthin only plants. We conclude that all studied mutants possess pNPQ and a more complete composition of xanthophylls in their natural binding sites is the most important factor governing photoprotection, rather than any one specific xanthophyll suggesting a strong structural effect of the molecules upon the LHCII antenna organization and discuss the results significance for future crop development. PMID:27446097

  11. Root graviresponsiveness and cellular differentiation in wild-type and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1989-01-01

    Primary roots of a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana L. are strongly graviresponsive despite lacking amyloplasts in their columella cells. The ultrastructures of calyptrogen and peripheral cells in wild-type as compared to mutant seedlings are not significantly different. The largest difference in cellular differentiation in caps of mutant and wild-type roots is the relative volume of plastids in columella cells. Plastids occupy 12.3% of the volume of columella cells in wild-type seedlings, but only 3.69% of columella cells in mutant seedlings. These results indicate that: (1) amyloplasts and starch are not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; (2) the increase in relative volume of plastids that usually accompanies differentiation of columella cells is not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; and (3) the absence of starch and amyloplasts does not affect the structure of calyptrogen (i.e. meristematic) and secretory (i.e. peripheral) cells in root caps. These results are discussed relative to proposed models for root gravitropism.

  12. An In Vivo Quantitative Comparison of Photoprotection in Arabidopsis Xanthophyll Mutants.

    PubMed

    Ware, Maxwell A; Dall'Osto, Luca; Ruban, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Contribution of different LHCII antenna carotenoids to protective NPQ (pNPQ) were tested using a range of xanthophyll biosynthesis mutants of Arabidopsis: plants were either devoid of lutein (lut2), violaxanthin (npq2), or synthesized a single xanthophyll species, namely violaxanthin (aba4npq1lut2), zeaxanthin (npq2lut2), or lutein (chy1chy2lut5). A novel pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorescence analysis procedure, that used a gradually increasing actinic light intensity, allowed the efficiency of pNPQ to be tested using the photochemical quenching (qP) parameter measured in the dark (qPd). Furthermore, the yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) was calculated, and the light intensity which induces photoinhibition in 50% of leaves for each mutant was ascertained. Photoprotective capacities of each xanthophyll were quantified, taking into account chlorophyll a/b ratios and excitation pressure. Here, light tolerance, pNPQ capacity, and ΦPSII were highest in wild type plants. Of the carotenoid mutants, lut2 (lutein-deficient) plants had the highest light tolerance, and the joint the highest ΦPSII with violaxanthin only plants. We conclude that all studied mutants possess pNPQ and a more complete composition of xanthophylls in their natural binding sites is the most important factor governing photoprotection, rather than any one specific xanthophyll suggesting a strong structural effect of the molecules upon the LHCII antenna organization and discuss the results significance for future crop development. PMID:27446097

  13. 5-Fluoroindole Resistance Identifies Tryptophan Synthase Beta Subunit Mutants in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Barczak, A. J.; Zhao, J.; Pruitt, K. D.; Last, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the biochemical genetics of the Arabidopsis thaliana tryptophan synthase beta subunit was initiated by characterization of mutants resistant to the inhibitor 5-fluoroindole. Thirteen recessive mutations were recovered that are allelic to trp2-1, a mutation in the more highly expressed of duplicate tryptophan synthase beta subunit genes (TSB1). Ten of these mutations (trp2-2 through trp2-11) cause a tryptophan requirement (auxotrophs), whereas three (trp2-100 through trp2-102) remain tryptophan prototrophs. The mutations cause a variety of changes in tryptophan synthase beta expression. For example, two mutations (trp2-5 and trp2-8) cause dramatically reduced accumulation of TSB mRNA and immunologically detectable protein, whereas trp2-10 is associated with increased mRNA and protein. A correlation exists between the quantity of mutant beta and wild-type alpha subunit levels in the trp2 mutant plants, suggesting that the synthesis of these proteins is coordinated or that the quantity or structure of the beta subunit influences the stability of the alpha protein. The level of immunologically detectable anthranilate synthase alpha subunit protein is increased in the trp2 mutants, suggesting the possibility of regulation of anthranilate synthase levels in response to tryptophan limitation. PMID:7635295

  14. A large-scale genetic screen for mutants with altered salicylic acid accumulation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yezhang; Shaholli, Danjela; Mou, Zhonglin

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a key defense signal molecule against biotrophic and hemibiotrophic pathogens in plants, but how SA is synthesized in plant cells still remains elusive. Identification of new components involved in pathogen-induced SA accumulation would help address this question. To this end, we performed a large-scale genetic screen for mutants with altered SA accumulation during pathogen infection in Arabidopsis using a bacterial biosensor Acinetobacter sp. ADPWH_lux-based SA quantification method. A total of 35,000 M2 plants in the npr1-3 mutant background have been individually analyzed for the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola (Psm) ES4326-induced SA accumulation. Among the mutants isolated, 19 had SA levels lower than npr1 (sln) and two exhibited increased SA accumulation in npr1 (isn). Complementation tests revealed that seven of the sln mutants are new alleles of eds5/sid1, two are sid2/eds16 alleles, one is allelic to pad4, and the remaining seven sln and two isn mutants are new non-allelic SA accumulation mutants. Interestingly, a large group of mutants (in the npr1-3 background), in which Psm ES4326-induced SA levels were similar to those in the wild-type Columbia plants, were identified, suggesting that the signaling network fine-tuning pathogen-induced SA accumulation is complex. We further characterized the sln1 single mutant and found that Psm ES4326-induced defense responses were compromised in this mutant. These defense response defects could be rescued by exogenous SA, suggesting that SLN1 functions upstream of SA. The sln1 mutation was mapped to a region on the north arm of chromosome I, which contains no known genes regulating pathogen-induced SA accumulation, indicating that SLN1 likely encodes a new regulator of SA biosynthesis. Thus, the new sln and isn mutants identified in this genetic screen are valuable for dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogen-induced SA accumulation in plants. PMID:25610446

  15. The phenotype of Arabidopsis thaliana det1 mutants suggest a role for cytokinins in greening. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, J.; Aguilar, N.; Peto, C.A.

    1990-12-31

    When grown in the absence of light, the det1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana develop characteristics of light-grown plants by morphological, cellular, and molecular criteria. Further, in light-grown plants, mutations in the DET1 gene affect cell-type-specific expression of light-regulated genes and the chloroplast developmental program. Here we show that the addition of exogenously added cytokinins (either 2-isopentenyl adenine, kinetin, or benzyladenine) to the growth medium of dark-germinated wild-type seedlings results in seedlings that resemble det1 mutants, instead of having the normal etiolated morphology. Like det1 mutants, these dark-grown seedlings now contain chloroplasts and have high levels of expression of genes that are normally ``light``-regulated. These results suggest an important role for cytokinins during greening of Arabidopsis, and may implicate cytokinin levels or an increased sensitivity to cytokinins as explanations for some of the observed phenotypes of det1 mutants.

  16. Alterations of the degree of xylan acetylation in Arabidopsis xylan mutants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chanhui; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Xylan is the second most abundant polysaccharide in secondary walls of dicot plants and one of its structural features is the high degree of acetylation of xylosyl residues. In Arabidopsis, about 60% of xylosyl residues in xylan are acetylated and the biochemical mechanisms controlling xylan acetylation are largely unknown. A recent report by Yuan et al. (2013) revealed the essential role of a DUF231 domain-containing protein, ESKIMO1 (ESK1), in xylan acetylation in Arabidopsis as the esk1 mutation caused specific reductions in the degree of xylan 2-O or 3-O-monoacetylation and in the activity of xylan acetyltransferase. Interestingly, the esk1 mutation also resulted in an elevation of glucuronic acid (GlcA) substitutions in xylan. Since GlcA substitutions in xylan occur at the O-2 position of xylosyl residues, it is plausible that the increase in GlcA substitutions in the esk1 mutant is attributed to the reduction in acetylation at O-2 of xylosyl residues, which renders more O-2 positions available for GlcA substitutions. Here, we investigated the effect of removal of GlcA substitutions on the degree of xylan acetylation. We found that a complete loss of GlcA substitutions in the xylan of the gux1/2/3 triple mutant led to a significant increase in the degree of xylan acetylation, indicating that xylan acetyltransferases and glucuronyltransferases compete with each other for xylosyl residues for their acetylation or GlcA substitutions in planta. In addition, detailed structure analysis of xylan from the rwa1/2/3/4 quadruple mutant revealed that it had a uniform reduction of acetyl substitutions at different positions of the xylosyl residues, which is consistent with the proposed role of RWAs as acetyl coenzyme A transporters. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:24518588

  17. Biochemical characterization of the aba2 and aba3 mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, S H; Léon-Kloosterziel, K M; Koornneef, M; Zeevaart, J A

    1997-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient mutants in a variety of species have been identified by screening for precocious germination and a wilty phenotype. Mutants at two new loci, aba2 and aba3, have recently been isolated in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Hynh. (K.M. Léon-Kloosterziel, M. Alvarez-Gil, G.J. Ruijs, S.E. Jacobsen, N.E. Olszewski, S.H. Schwartz, J.A.D. Zeevaart, M. Koornneef [1996] Plant J 10: 655-661), and the biochemical characterization of these mutants is presented here. Protein extracts from aba2 and aba3 plants displayed a greatly reduced ability to convert xanthoxin to ABA relative to the wild type. The next putative intermediate in ABA synthesis, ABA-aldehyde, was efficiently converted to ABA by extracts from aba2 but not by extracts from aba3 plants. This indicates that the aba2 mutant is blocked in the conversion of xanthoxin to ABA-aldehyde and that aba3 is impaired in the conversion of ABA-aldehyde to ABA. Extracts from the aba3 mutant also lacked additional activities that require a molybdenum cofactor (Moco). Nitrate reductase utilizes a Moco but its activity was unaffected in extracts from aba3 plants. Moco hydroxylases in animals require a desulfo moiety of the cofactor. A sulfido ligand can be added to the Moco by treatment with Na2S and dithionite. Treatment of aba3 extracts with Na2S restored ABA-aldehyde oxidase activity. Therefore, the genetic lesion in aba3 appears to be in the introduction of S into the Moco. PMID:9159947

  18. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific 'carbonic anhydrase domain' of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe 'life without complex I'. PMID:27122571

  19. Life without complex I: proteome analyses of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Steffanie; Senkler, Jennifer; Eubel, Holger; Peterhänsel, Christoph; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase complex (complex I) is of particular importance for the respiratory chain in mitochondria. It is the major electron entry site for the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) and therefore of great significance for mitochondrial ATP generation. We recently described an Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant lacking the genes encoding the carbonic anhydrases CA1 and CA2, which both form part of a plant-specific ‘carbonic anhydrase domain’ of mitochondrial complex I. The mutant lacks complex I completely. Here we report extended analyses for systematically characterizing the proteome of the ca1ca2 mutant. Using various proteomic tools, we show that lack of complex I causes reorganization of the cellular respiration system. Reduced electron entry into the respiratory chain at the first segment of the mETC leads to induction of complexes II and IV as well as alternative oxidase. Increased electron entry at later segments of the mETC requires an increase in oxidation of organic substrates. This is reflected by higher abundance of proteins involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and branched-chain amino acid catabolism. Proteins involved in the light reaction of photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and photorespiration are clearly reduced, contributing to the significant delay in growth and development of the double-mutant. Finally, enzymes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species and stress symptoms are much induced. These together with previously reported insights into the function of plant complex I, which were obtained by analysing other complex I mutants, are integrated in order to comprehensively describe ‘life without complex I’. PMID:27122571

  20. Properties of proteins and the glassy matrix in maturation-defective mutant seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wolkers, W F; Alberda, M; Koornneef, M; Léon-Kloosterziel, K M; Hoekstra, F A

    1998-10-01

    In situ Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy was used to study the heat stability of proteins and hydrogen bonding interactions in dry maturation-defective mutant seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana. alpha-Helical, turn and beta-sheet conformations were the major protein secondary structures in all of these seeds. On heating, intermolecular extended beta-sheet structures, typical of protein denaturation, were formed in abscisic acid-insensitive (abi3) and leafy cotyledon (lec) mutant seeds. Proteins in dry wild-type seeds did not denature up to 150 degrees C, but those in dry desiccation-sensitive, lec1-1, lec1-3 and abi3-5 seeds did at 68, 89 and 87 degrees C, respectively. In the desiccation-tolerant abi3-7 and abi3-1 seeds, denaturation commenced above 120 and 135 degrees C, respectively. Seeds of the aba1-1 abi3-1 double mutant showed signs of denaturation already upon drying. The molecular packing in the seeds was studied by observing the shift in the position of the OH-stretching vibration band with temperature. The maximal rate of change of this band with temperature was much higher in the desiccation-sensitive abi3-5, aba1-1 abi3-1, lec1-1, and lec1-3 mutant seeds than in the desiccation-tolerant wild-type, abi3-1, abi3-7, and lec2-1 seeds. We interpret this to mean that the molecular packing density is higher in dry desiccation-tolerant than in dry desiccation-sensitive seeds, which is associated with a higher or lower protein denaturation temperature, respectively. The results are discussed in relation to the physiological and biochemical characteristics of these mutant seeds. PMID:9839460

  1. Leaf biomechanical properties in Arabidopsis thaliana polysaccharide mutants affect drought survival.

    PubMed

    Balsamo, Ronald; Boak, Merewyn; Nagle, Kayla; Peethambaran, Bela; Layton, Bradley

    2015-11-26

    Individual sugars are the building blocks of cell wall polysaccharides, which in turn comprise a plant׳s overall architectural structure. But which sugars play the most prominent role in maintaining a plant׳s mechanical stability during large cellular deformations induced by drought? We investigated the individual contributions of several genes that are involved in the synthesis of monosaccharides which are important for cell wall structure. We then measured drought tolerance and mechanical integrity during simulated drought in Arabidopsis thaliana. To assess mechanical properties, we designed a small-scale tensile tester for measuring failure strain, ultimate tensile stress, work to failure, toughness, and elastic modulus of 6-week-old leaves in both hydrated and drought-simulated states. Col-0 mutants used in this study include those deficient in lignin, cellulose, components of hemicellulose such as xylose and fucose, the pectic components arabinose and rhamnose, as well as mutants with enhanced arabinose and total pectin content. We found that drought tolerance is correlated to the mechanical and architectural stability of leaves as they experience dehydration. Of the mutants, S096418 with mutations for reduced xylose and galactose was the least drought tolerant, while the arabinose-altered CS8578 mutants were the least affected by water loss. There were also notable correlations between drought tolerance and mechanical properties in the diminished rhamnose mutant, CS8575 and the dehydrogenase-disrupted S120106. Our findings suggest that components of hemicellulose and pectins affect leaf biomechanical properties and may play an important role in the ability of this model system to survive drought. PMID:26520913

  2. Biochemical characterization of the aba2 and aba3 mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, S H; Léon-Kloosterziel, K M; Koornneef, M; Zeevaart, J A

    1997-05-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient mutants in a variety of species have been identified by screening for precocious germination and a wilty phenotype. Mutants at two new loci, aba2 and aba3, have recently been isolated in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Hynh. (K.M. Léon-Kloosterziel, M. Alvarez-Gil, G.J. Ruijs, S.E. Jacobsen, N.E. Olszewski, S.H. Schwartz, J.A.D. Zeevaart, M. Koornneef [1996] Plant J 10: 655-661), and the biochemical characterization of these mutants is presented here. Protein extracts from aba2 and aba3 plants displayed a greatly reduced ability to convert xanthoxin to ABA relative to the wild type. The next putative intermediate in ABA synthesis, ABA-aldehyde, was efficiently converted to ABA by extracts from aba2 but not by extracts from aba3 plants. This indicates that the aba2 mutant is blocked in the conversion of xanthoxin to ABA-aldehyde and that aba3 is impaired in the conversion of ABA-aldehyde to ABA. Extracts from the aba3 mutant also lacked additional activities that require a molybdenum cofactor (Moco). Nitrate reductase utilizes a Moco but its activity was unaffected in extracts from aba3 plants. Moco hydroxylases in animals require a desulfo moiety of the cofactor. A sulfido ligand can be added to the Moco by treatment with Na2S and dithionite. Treatment of aba3 extracts with Na2S restored ABA-aldehyde oxidase activity. Therefore, the genetic lesion in aba3 appears to be in the introduction of S into the Moco. PMID:9159947

  3. The gravity persistent signal (gps) Mutants of Arabidopsis: Insights into Gravitropic Signal Transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, S.

    The gravitropic response of Arabidopsis stems is rapid with a visible within 30 min and vertical reorientation within 2 h. However, horizontal gravistimulation for 3 h at 4°C does not cause curvature. When the stems are subsequently placed in the vertical position at RT, they bend in response to the previous, horizontal gravistimulation. These results indicate that the gravity perception step can occur at 4°C, but that part of the response is sensitive to cold. At 4°C, starch-containing amyloplasts in the endodermis of the inflorescence stems sedimented normally but auxin transport was abolished indicating that the cold treatment affected early events of the signal transduction pathway that occur after amyloplast sedimentation but prior to auxin transport. The gps mutants of Arabidopsis are a unique group of mutants that respond abnormally after gravistimulation at 4°C. gps1 shows no response to the cold gravistimulation, gps2 bends the wrong way as compared to wild type and gps3 over responds, bending past the anticipated curvature. The mutants were selected from a T-DNA tagged population. Cloning strategies based on the tag have been employed to identify the genes disrupted. GPS1 was cloned using TAIL PCR and is At3g20130, a cytochrome P450, CYP705A22, of unknown function. GPS1p::GFP fusions are being used to determine temporal and spatial expression of GPS1. The mutation in gps3 appears to disrupt a non-coding region downstream of At1g43950 No function has yet been determined for this region, but it appears that the mutation disrupts transcription of a transcription factor homologous to the DNA binding domain of an auxin response factor (ARF) 9-like protein. The identity of GPS2 is as yet unknown. The gps mutants represent potentially three independent aspects of signal transduction in the gravitropic response: perception or retention of the gravity signal (gps1), determination of the polarity of the response (gps2), and the tissue specificity of the

  4. A NEW ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA MUTANT DEFICIENT IN THE EXPRESSION OF OMETHYLTRANSFERASE 1: IMPACT ON LIGNINS AND ON SINAPOYL ESTERI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A promoter-trap screen allowed us to identify an Arabidopsis line expressing GUS in the root vascular tissues. T-DNA border sequencing showed that the line was mutated in the COMT 1 gene (AtOMT1) and therefore deficient in OMT1 activity. In this knockout mutant and relative to the wild type, lignins...

  5. ahg12 is a dominant proteasome mutant that affects multiple regulatory systems for germination of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shimpei; Hirayama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is fundamentally involved in myriad biological phenomena of eukaryotes. In plants, this regulated protein degradation system has a pivotal role in the cellular response mechanisms for both internal and external stimuli, such as plant hormones and environmental stresses. Information about substrate selection by the ubiquitination machinery has accumulated, but there is very little information about selectivity for substrates at the proteasome. Here, we report characterization of a novel abscisic acid (ABA)-hypersensitive mutant named ABA hypersensitive germination12 (ahg12) in Arabidopsis. The ahg12 mutant showed a unique pleiotropic phenotype, including hypersensitivity to ABA and ethylene, and hyposensitivity to light. Map-based cloning identified the ahg12 mutation to cause an amino acid conversion in the L23 loop of RPT5a, which is predicted to form the pore structure of the 19S RP complex of the proteasome. Transient expression assays demonstrated that some plant-specific signaling components accumulated at higher levels in the ahg12 mutant. These results suggest that the ahg12 mutation led to changes in the substrate preference of the 26S proteasome. The discovery of the ahg12 mutation thus will contribute to elucidate the characteristics of the regulated protein degradation system. PMID:27139926

  6. Ascorbate-Deficient vtc2 Mutants in Arabidopsis Do Not Exhibit Decreased Growth

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Benson; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Cobbett, Christopher S.; Golz, John F.

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants the L-galactose pathway represents the major route for ascorbate biosynthesis. The first committed step of this pathway is catalyzed by the enzyme GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase and is encoded by two paralogs in Arabidopsis – VITAMIN C2 (VTC2) and VTC5. The first mutant of this enzyme, vtc2-1, isolated via an EMS mutagenesis screen, has approximately 20–30% of wildtype ascorbate levels and has been reported to have decreased growth under standard laboratory conditions. Here, we show that a T-DNA insertion into the VTC2 causes a similar reduction in ascorbate levels, but does not greatly affect plant growth. Subsequent segregation analysis revealed the growth defects of vtc2-1 mutants segregate independently of the vtc2-1 mutation. These observations suggest that it is the presence of an independent cryptic mutation that affects growth of vtc2-1 mutants, and not the 70–80% decrease in ascorbate levels that has been assumed in past studies. PMID:27468291

  7. Biochemical characterization of Arabidopsis wild-type and mutant phytochrome B holoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Elich, T D; Chory, J

    1997-01-01

    Although phytochrome B (phyB) plays a particularly important role throughout the life cycle of a plant, it has not been studied in detail at the molecular level due to its low abundance. Here, we report on the expression, assembly with chromophore, and purification of epitope-tagged Arabidopsis phyB. In addition, we have reconstructed two missense mutations, phyB-4 and phyB-101, isolated in long hypocotyl screens. We show that mutant proteins phyB-4 and phyB-101 exhibit altered spectrophotometric and biochemical properties relative to the wild-type protein. In particular, we demonstrate that phyB-101 Pfr exhibits rapid nonphotochemical (dark) reversion to Pr that results in a lower photoequilibrium level of the active Pfr form. We conclude that this occurs in vivo as well because phyB-101 mutants are shown to lack an end-of-day-far-red hypocotyl elongation response that requires a stable Pfr species. We propose that this Pfr instability may be the primary molecular mechanism underlying the phyB-101 mutant phenotype. PMID:9437866

  8. ahg12 is a dominant proteasome mutant that affects multiple regulatory systems for germination of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shimpei; Hirayama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is fundamentally involved in myriad biological phenomena of eukaryotes. In plants, this regulated protein degradation system has a pivotal role in the cellular response mechanisms for both internal and external stimuli, such as plant hormones and environmental stresses. Information about substrate selection by the ubiquitination machinery has accumulated, but there is very little information about selectivity for substrates at the proteasome. Here, we report characterization of a novel abscisic acid (ABA)-hypersensitive mutant named ABA hypersensitive germination12 (ahg12) in Arabidopsis. The ahg12 mutant showed a unique pleiotropic phenotype, including hypersensitivity to ABA and ethylene, and hyposensitivity to light. Map-based cloning identified the ahg12 mutation to cause an amino acid conversion in the L23 loop of RPT5a, which is predicted to form the pore structure of the 19S RP complex of the proteasome. Transient expression assays demonstrated that some plant-specific signaling components accumulated at higher levels in the ahg12 mutant. These results suggest that the ahg12 mutation led to changes in the substrate preference of the 26S proteasome. The discovery of the ahg12 mutation thus will contribute to elucidate the characteristics of the regulated protein degradation system. PMID:27139926

  9. Analysis of Vascular Development in the hydra Sterol Biosynthetic Mutants of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pullen, Margaret; Clark, Nick; Zarinkamar, Fatemeh; Topping, Jennifer; Lindsey, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Background The control of vascular tissue development in plants is influenced by diverse hormonal signals, but their interactions during this process are not well understood. Wild-type sterol profiles are essential for growth, tissue patterning and signalling processes in plant development, and are required for regulated vascular patterning. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we investigate the roles of sterols in vascular tissue development, through an analysis of the Arabidopsis mutants hydra1 and fackel/hydra2, which are defective in the enzymes sterol isomerase and sterol C-14 reductase respectively. We show that defective vascular patterning in the shoot is associated with ectopic cell divisions. Expression of the auxin-regulated AtHB8 homeobox gene is disrupted in mutant embryos and seedlings, associated with variably incomplete vascular strand formation and duplication of the longitudinal axis. Misexpression of the auxin reporter proIAA2∶GUS and mislocalization of PIN proteins occurs in the mutants. Introduction of the ethylene-insensitive ein2 mutation partially rescues defective cell division, localization of PIN proteins, and vascular strand development. Conclusions The results support a model in which sterols are required for correct auxin and ethylene crosstalk to regulate PIN localization, auxin distribution and AtHB8 expression, necessary for correct vascular development. PMID:20808926

  10. A mutant of Arabidopsis deficient in desaturation of palmitic acid in leaf lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Kunst, L.; Somerville, C. ); Browse, J. )

    1989-07-01

    The overall fatty acid composition of leaf lipids in a mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana was characterized by elevated amounts of palmitic acid and a decreased amount of unsaturated 16-carbon fatty acids as a consequence of a single nuclear mutation. Quantitative analysis of the fatty acid composition of individual lipids suggested that the mutant is deficient in the activity of a chloroplast {omega}9 fatty acid desaturase which normally introduces a double bond in 16-carbon acyl chains esterified to monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGD). The mutant exhibited an increased ratio of 18- to 16-carbon fatty acids in MGD due to a change in the relative contribution of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways of lipid biosynthesis. This appears to be a regulated response to the loss of chloroplast {omega}9 desaturase and presumably reflects a requirement for polyunsaturated fatty acids for the normal assembly of chloroplast membranes. The reduction in mass of prokaryotic MGD species involved both a reduction in synthesis of MGD by the prokaryotic pathway and increased turnover of MGD molecular species which contain 16:0.

  11. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase lambda mutant is mildly sensitive to DNA double strand breaks but defective in integration of a transgene

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Tomoyuki; Angelis, Karel J.; Britt, Anne B.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA double-strand break (DSB) is a critical type of damage, and can be induced by both endogenous sources (e.g., errors of oxidative metabolism, transposable elements, programmed meiotic breaks, or perturbation of the DNA replication fork) and exogenous sources (e.g., ionizing radiation or radiomimetic chemicals). Although higher plants, like mammals, are thought to preferentially repair DSBs via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), much remains unclear about plant DSB repair pathways. Our reverse genetic approach suggests that DNA polymerase λ is involved in DSB repair in Arabidopsis. The Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant (atpolλ-1) displayed sensitivity to both gamma-irradiation and treatment with radiomimetic reagents, but not to other DNA damaging treatments. The atpolλ-1 mutant showed a moderate sensitivity to DSBs, while Arabidopsis Ku70 and DNA ligase 4 mutants (atku70-3 and atlig4-2), both of which play critical roles in NHEJ, exhibited a hypersensitivity to these treatments. The atpolλ-1/atlig4-2 double mutant exhibited a higher sensitivity to DSBs than each single mutant, but the atku70/atpolλ-1 showed similar sensitivity to the atku70-3 mutant. We showed that transcription of the DNA ligase 1, DNA ligase 6, and Wee1 genes was quickly induced by BLM in several NHEJ deficient mutants in contrast to wild-type. Finally, the T-DNA transformation efficiency dropped in NHEJ deficient mutants and the lowest transformation efficiency was scored in the atpolλ-1/atlig4-2 double mutant. These results imply that AtPolλ is involved in both DSB repair and DNA damage response pathway. PMID:26074930

  12. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with decreased amplitude in their phototropic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Ren, Z.; Steinitz, B.; Parks, B.; Best, T. R.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Two mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana have been identified with decreased phototropism to 450-nanometer light. Fluence-response relationships for these strains (ZR8 and ZR19) to single and multiple flashes of light show thresholds, curve shapes, and fluence for maximum curvature in first positive' phototropism which are the same as those of the wild type. Similarly, there is no alteration from the wild type in the kinetics of curvature or in the optimum dark period separating sequential flashes in a multiple flash regimen. In addition, in both strains, gravitropism is decreased compared to the wild type by an amount which is comparable to the decrease in phototropism. Based on reciprocal backcrosses, it appears that the alteration is due to a recessive nuclear mutation. It is suggested that ZR8 and ZR19 represent alterations in some step analogous to an amplifier, downstream of the photoreceptor pigment, and common to both phototropism and gravitropism.

  13. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with Decreased Amplitude in Their Phototropic Response 1

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Jitendra P.; Ren, Zhangling; Steinitz, Benjamin; Parks, Brian; Best, Thérèse R.; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1989-01-01

    Two mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana have been identified with decreased phototropism to 450-nanometer light. Fluence-response relationships for these strains (ZR8 and ZR19) to single and multiple flashes of light show thresholds, curve shapes, and fluence for maximum curvature in `first positive' phototropism which are the same as those of the wild type. Similarly, there is no alteration from the wild type in the kinetics of curvature or in the optimum dark period separating sequential flashes in a multiple flash regimen. In addition, in both strains, gravitropism is decreased compared to the wild type by an amount which is comparable to the decrease in phototropism. Based on reciprocal backcrosses, it appears that the alteration is due to a recessive nuclear mutation. It is suggested that ZR8 and ZR19 represent alterations in some step analogous to an amplifier, downstream of the photoreceptor pigment, and common to both phototropism and gravitropism. PMID:11537461

  14. Reduced Na+ uptake in the NaCl-hypersensitive sos1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Ding, L; Zhu, J K

    1997-01-01

    Sos1 is an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant with > 20 times higher sensitivity toward Na+ inhibition due to a defective high-affinity potassium-uptake system. We report here that sos1 accumulates less Na+ than the wild type in response to NaCl stress. The Na+ contents in sos1 seedlings exposed to 25 mM NaCl for 2 or more d are about 43% lower than those in the wild type. When assayed at 20 mM external NaCl, sos1 seedlings pretreated with low potassium have 32% lower Na+ uptake than the wild type. However, little difference in Na+ uptake could be measured when the seedlings were not pretreated with low potassium. Low-potassium treatment was shown to induce high-affinity potassium-uptake activity in Arabidopsis seedlings. No substantial difference in Na+ efflux between sos1 and the wild type was detected. The results show that the reduced Na+ accumulation in sos1 is due to a lower Na+ influx rate. Therefore, the sos1 mutation appears to disrupt low-affinity Na+ uptake in addition to its impairment of high-affinity K+ uptake. PMID:9085573

  15. An Arabidopsis syntaxin homologue isolated by functional complementation of a yeast pep12 mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Bassham, D.C.; Conceicao, A.S. Da; Gal, S.

    1995-08-01

    The syntaxin family of integral membrane proteins are thought to function as receptors for transport vesicles, with different isoforms of this family localized to various membranes throughout the cell. The yeast Pep12 protein is a syntaxin homologue which may function in the trafficking of vesicles from the trans-Golgi network to the vacuole. We have isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA by functional complementation of a yeast pep12 mutant. The Arabidopsis cDNA (aPEP12) potentially encodes a 31-kDa protein which is homologous to yeast Pep12 and to other members of the syntaxin family, indicating that this protein may function in the docking or fusion of transport vesicles with the vacuolar membrane in plant cells. Northern blot analysis indicates that the mRNA is expressed in all tissues examined, although at a very low level in leaves. The mRNA is found in all cell types in roots and leaves, as shown by in situ hybridization experiments. The existence of plant homologues of proteins of the syntaxin family indicates that the basic vesicle docking and fusion machinery may be conserved in plants as it is in yeast and mammals. 41 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2014-04-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2-4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2-4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:24717634

  17. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2014-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2–4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2–4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone’s expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:24717634

  18. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2015-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2–4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2–4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:26042727

  19. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2015-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2-4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2-4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:26042727

  20. On the role of a Lipid-Transfer Protein. Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant is compromised in germination and seedling growth.

    PubMed Central

    Pagnussat, Luciana A; Oyarburo, Natalia; Cimmino, Carlos; Pinedo, Marcela L; de la Canal, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Plant Lipid-Transfer Proteins (LTPs) exhibit the ability to reversibly bind/transport lipids in vitro. LTPs have been involved in diverse physiological processes but conclusive evidence on their role has only been presented for a few members, none of them related to seed physiology. Arabidopsis seeds rely on storage oil breakdown to supply carbon skeletons and energy for seedling growth. Here, Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant was analyzed for its ability to germinate and for seedling establishment. Ltp3 showed delayed germination and reduced germination frequency. Seedling growth appeared reduced in the mutant but this growth restriction was rescued by the addition of an exogenous carbon supply, suggesting a defective oil mobilization. Lipid breakdown analysis during seedling growth revealed a differential profile in the mutant compared to the wild type. The involvement of LTP3 in germination and seedling growth and its relationship with the lipid transfer ability of this protein is discussed. PMID:26479260

  1. Regulated ethylene insensitivity through the inducible expression of the Arabidopsis etr1-1 mutant ethylene receptor in tomato.

    PubMed

    Gallie, Daniel R

    2010-04-01

    Ethylene serves as an important hormone controlling several aspects of plant growth and development, including fruit ripening and leaf and petal senescence. Ethylene is perceived following its binding to membrane-localized receptors, resulting in their inactivation and the induction of ethylene responses. Five distinct types of receptors are expressed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and mutant receptors have been described that repress ethylene signaling in a dominant negative manner. One such mutant, ethylene resistant1-1 (etr1-1), results in a strong ethylene-insensitive phenotype in Arabidopsis. In this study, regulated expression of the Arabidopsis etr1-1 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) was achieved using an inducible promoter. In the absence of the inducer, transgenic seedlings remained sensitive to ethylene, but in its presence, a state of ethylene insensitivity was induced, resulting in the elongation of the hypocotyl and root in dark-grown seedlings in the presence of ethylene, a reduction or absence of an apical hook, and repression of ethylene-inducible E4 expression. The level of ethylene sensitivity could be controlled by the amount of inducer used, demonstrating a linear relationship between the degree of insensitivity and etr1-1 expression. Induction of etr1-1 expression also repressed the epinastic response to ethylene as well as delayed fruit ripening. Restoration of ethylene sensitivity was achieved following the cessation of the induction. These results demonstrate the ability to control ethylene responses temporally and in amount through the control of mutant receptor expression. PMID:20181754

  2. Identification of new adventitious rooting mutants amongst suppressors of the Arabidopsis thaliana superroot2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Pacurar, Daniel Ioan; Pacurar, Monica Lacramioara; Bussell, John Desmond; Schwambach, Joseli; Pop, Tiberia Ioana; Kowalczyk, Mariusz; Gutierrez, Laurent; Cavel, Emilie; Chaabouni, Salma; Ljung, Karin; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano; Pamfil, Doru; Bellini, Catherine

    2014-04-01

    The plant hormone auxin plays a central role in adventitious rooting and is routinely used with many economically important, vegetatively propagated plant species to promote adventitious root initiation and development on cuttings. Nevertheless the molecular mechanisms through which it acts are only starting to emerge. The Arabidopsis superroot2-1 (sur2-1) mutant overproduces auxin and, as a consequence, develops excessive adventitious roots in the hypocotyl. In order to increase the knowledge of adventitious rooting and of auxin signalling pathways and crosstalk, this study performed a screen for suppressors of superroot2-1 phenotype. These suppressors provide a new resource for discovery of genetic players involved in auxin signalling pathways or at the crosstalk of auxin and other hormones or environmental signals. This study reports the identification and characterization of 26 sur2-1 suppressor mutants, several of which were identified as mutations in candidate genes involved in either auxin biosynthesis or signalling. In addition to confirming the role of auxin as a central regulator of adventitious rooting, superroot2 suppressors indicated possible crosstalk with ethylene signalling in this process. PMID:24596172

  3. The arc mutants of Arabidopsis with fewer large chloroplasts have a lower mesophyll conductance.

    PubMed

    Weise, Sean E; Carr, David J; Bourke, Ashley M; Hanson, David T; Swarthout, Debbie; Sharkey, Thomas D

    2015-04-01

    Photosynthetic cells of most land plant lineages have numerous small chloroplasts even though most algae, and even the early diverging land plant group the hornworts, tend to have one or a few large chloroplasts. One constraint that small chloroplasts could improve is the resistance to CO2 diffusion from the atmosphere to the chloroplast stroma. We examined the mesophyll conductance (inverse of the diffusion resistance) of mutant Arabidopsis thaliana plants with one or only a few large chloroplasts per cell. The accumulation and replication of chloroplasts (arc) mutants of A. thaliana were studied by model fitting to gas exchange data and (13)CO2 discrimination during carbon fixation. The two methods generally agreed, but the value of the CO2 compensation point of Rubisco (Γ *) used in the model had a large impact on the estimated photosynthetic parameters, including mesophyll conductance. We found that having only a few large chloroplasts per cell resulted in a 25-50 % reduction in the mesophyll conductance at ambient CO2. PMID:25733184

  4. Transformation of shoots into roots in Arabidopsis embryos mutant at the TOPLESS locus.

    PubMed

    Long, Jeff A; Woody, Scott; Poethig, Scott; Meyerowitz, Elliot M; Barton, M Kathryn

    2002-06-01

    We describe a novel phenotype in Arabidopsis embryos homozygous for the temperature-sensitive topless-1 mutation. This mutation causes the transformation of the shoot pole into a root. Developing topless embryos fail to express markers for the shoot apical meristem (SHOOT MERISTEMLESS and UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS) and the hypocotyl (KNAT1). By contrast, the pattern of expression of root markers is either duplicated (LENNY, J1092) or expanded (SCARECROW). Shifts of developing topless embryos between permissive and restrictive temperatures show that apical fates (cotyledons plus shoot apical meristem) can be transformed to basal fates (root) as late as transition stage. As the apical pole of transition stage embryos shows both morphological and molecular characteristics of shoot development, this demonstrates that the topless 1 mutation is capable of causing structures specified as shoot to be respecified as root. Finally, our experiments fail to show a clear link between auxin signal transduction and topless-1 mutant activity: the development of the apical root in topless mutant individuals is not dependent on the activity of the predicted auxin response factor MONOPTEROS nor is the expression of DR5, a proposed 'auxin maximum reporter', expanded in the apical domain of topless embryos. PMID:12050130

  5. Overproduction of stomatal lineage cells in Arabidopsis mutants defective in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamuro, Chizuko; Miki, Daisuke; Zheng, Zhimin; Ma, Jun; Wang, Jing; Yang, Zhenbiao; Dong, Juan; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a reversible epigenetic mark regulating genome stability and function in many eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, active DNA demethylation depends on the function of the ROS1 subfamily of genes that encode 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases/lyases. ROS1-mediated DNA demethylation plays a critical role in the regulation of transgenes, transposable elements and some endogenous genes, but there have been no reports of clear developmental phenotypes in ros1 mutant plants. Here we report that, in the ros1 mutant, the promoter region of the peptide ligand gene EPF2 is hypermethylated, which greatly reduces EPF2 expression and thereby leads to a phenotype of overproduction of stomatal lineage cells. EPF2 gene expression in ros1 is restored and the defective epidermal cell patterning is suppressed by mutations in genes in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway. Our results show that active DNA demethylation combats the activity of RNA-directed DNA methylation to influence the initiation of stomatal lineage cells. PMID:24898766

  6. Hormonal Studies of fass, an Arabidopsis Mutant That Is Altered in Organ Elongation.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, R. H.; Barton, M. K.; Cohen, J. D.; Cooke, T. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated an allele of fass, an Arabidopsis thaliana mutation that separates plant development and organ differentiation from plant elongation, and studied its hormonal regulation. Micro-surgically isolated fass roots elongate 2.5 times as much as the roots on intact mutant plants. Wild-type heart embryos, when cultured with a strong auxin, naphthaleneacetic acid, phenocopy fass embryos. fass seedlings contain variable levels of free auxin, which average 2.5 times higher than wild-type seedling levels, and fass seedlings evolve 3 times as much ethylene as wild-type seedlings on a per-plant basis over a 24-h period. The length-to-width ratios of fass seedlings can be changed by several compounds that affect their endogenous ethylene levels, but fass is epistatic to etr1, an ethylene-insensitive mutant. fass's high levels of free auxin may be inducing its high levels of ethylene, which may, in turn, result in the fass phenotype. We postulate that FASS may be acting as a negative regulator to maintain wild-type auxin levels and that the mutation may be in an auxin-conjugating enzyme. PMID:12226245

  7. Protection of Chloroplast Membranes by VIPP1 Rescues Aberrant Seedling Development in Arabidopsis nyc1 Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingang; Kusaba, Makoto; Tanaka, Ayumi; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophylls (Chl) in photosynthetic apparatuses, along with other macromolecules in chloroplasts, are known to undergo degradation during leaf senescence. Several enzymes involved in Chl degradation, by which detoxification of Chl is safely implemented, have been identified. Chl degradation also occurs during embryogenesis and seedling development. Some genes encoding Chl degradation enzymes such as Chl b reductase (CBR) function during these developmental stages. Arabidopsis mutants lacking CBR (NYC1 and NOL) have been reported to exhibit reduced seed storability, compromised germination, and cotyledon development. In this study, we examined aberrant cotyledon development and found that NYC1 is solely responsible for this phenotype. We inferred that oxidative damage of chloroplast membranes caused the aberrant cotyledon. To test the inference, we attempted to trans-complement nyc1 mutant with overexpressing VIPP1 protein that is unrelated to Chl degradation but which supports chloroplast membrane integrity. VIPP1 expression actually complemented the aberrant cotyledon of nyc1, whereas stay-green phenotype during leaf senescence remained. The swollen chloroplasts observed in unfixed cotyledons of nyc1, which are characteristics of chloroplasts receiving envelope membrane damage, were recovered by overexpressing VIPP1. These results suggest that chloroplast membranes are a target for oxidative damage caused by the impairment in Chl degradation. Trans-complementation of nyc1 with VIPP1 also suggests that VIPP1 is useful for protecting chloroplasts against oxidative stress. PMID:27200011

  8. Effects of microgravity and clinorotation on stress ethylene production in two starchless mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallegos, Gregory L.; Hilaire, Emmanuel M.; Peterson, Barbara V.; Brown, Christopher S.; Guikema, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Starch filled plastids termed amyloplasts, contained within columella cells of the root caps of higher plant roots, are believed to play a statolith-like role in the gravitropic response of roots. Plants having amyloplasts containing less starch exhibit a corresponding reduction in gravitropic response. We have observed enhanced ethylene production by sweet clover (Melilotus alba L.) seedlings grown in the altered gravity condition of a slow rotating clinostat, and have suggested that this is a stress response resulting from continuous gravistimulation rather than as a result of the simulation of a microgravity condition. If so, we expect that plants deficient in starch accumulation in amyloplasts may produce less stress ethylene when grown on a clinostat. Therefore, we have grown Arabidopsis thaliana in the small, closed environment of the Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA). In this preliminary report we compare stationary plants with clinorotated and those grown in microgravity aboard Discovery during the STS-63 flight in February 1995. In addition to wildtype, two mutants deficient in starch biosynthesis, mutants TC7 and TL25, which are, respectively, deficient in the activity of amyloplast phosphoglucomutase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, were grown for three days before being fixed within the FPA. Gas samples were aspirated from the growth chambers and carbon dioxide and ethylene concentations were measured using a gas chromatograph. The fixed tissue is currently undergoing further morphologic and microscopic characterization.

  9. Hyperspectral imaging techniques for rapid identification of Arabidopsis mutants with altered leaf pigment status.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Osamu; Tanaka, Ayako; Fujita, Takao; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-01

    The spectral reflectance signature of living organisms provides information that closely reflects their physiological status. Because of its high potential for the estimation of geomorphic biological parameters, particularly of gross photosynthesis of plants, two-dimensional spectroscopy, via the use of hyperspectral instruments, has been widely used in remote sensing applications. In genetics research, in contrast, the reflectance phenotype has rarely been the subject of quantitative analysis; its potential for illuminating the pathway leading from the gene to phenotype remains largely unexplored. In this study, we employed hyperspectral imaging techniques to identify Arabidopsis mutants with altered leaf pigment status. The techniques are comprised of two modes; the first is referred to as the 'targeted mode' and the second as the 'non-targeted mode'. The 'targeted' mode is aimed at visualizing individual concentrations and compositional parameters of leaf pigments based on reflectance indices (RIs) developed for Chls a and b, carotenoids and anthocyanins. The 'non-targeted' mode highlights differences in reflectance spectra of leaf samples relative to reference spectra from the wild-type leaves. Through the latter approach, three mutant lines with weak irregular reflectance phenotypes, that are hardly identifiable by simple observation, were isolated. Analysis of these and other mutants revealed that the RI-based targeted pigment estimation was robust at least against changes in trichome density, but was confounded by genetic defects in chloroplast photorelocation movement. Notwithstanding such a limitation, the techniques presented here provide rapid and high-sensitive means to identify genetic mechanisms that coordinate leaf pigment status with developmental stages and/or environmental stress conditions. PMID:22470059

  10. Hyperspectral Imaging Techniques for Rapid Identification of Arabidopsis Mutants with Altered Leaf Pigment Status

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Osamu; Tanaka, Ayako; Fujita, Takao; Iba, Koh

    2012-01-01

    The spectral reflectance signature of living organisms provides information that closely reflects their physiological status. Because of its high potential for the estimation of geomorphic biological parameters, particularly of gross photosynthesis of plants, two-dimensional spectroscopy, via the use of hyperspectral instruments, has been widely used in remote sensing applications. In genetics research, in contrast, the reflectance phenotype has rarely been the subject of quantitative analysis; its potential for illuminating the pathway leading from the gene to phenotype remains largely unexplored. In this study, we employed hyperspectral imaging techniques to identify Arabidopsis mutants with altered leaf pigment status. The techniques are comprised of two modes; the first is referred to as the ‘targeted mode’ and the second as the ‘non-targeted mode’. The ‘targeted’ mode is aimed at visualizing individual concentrations and compositional parameters of leaf pigments based on reflectance indices (RIs) developed for Chls a and b, carotenoids and anthocyanins. The ‘non-targeted’ mode highlights differences in reflectance spectra of leaf samples relative to reference spectra from the wild-type leaves. Through the latter approach, three mutant lines with weak irregular reflectance phenotypes, that are hardly identifiable by simple observation, were isolated. Analysis of these and other mutants revealed that the RI-based targeted pigment estimation was robust at least against changes in trichome density, but was confounded by genetic defects in chloroplast photorelocation movement. Notwithstanding such a limitation, the techniques presented here provide rapid and high-sensitive means to identify genetic mechanisms that coordinate leaf pigment status with developmental stages and/or environmental stress conditions. PMID:22470059

  11. MicroRNAs and other small RNAs enriched in the Arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-2 mutant.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng; Kulkarni, Karthik; Souret, Frédéric F; MuthuValliappan, Ramesh; Tej, Shivakundan Singh; Poethig, R Scott; Henderson, Ian R; Jacobsen, Steven E; Wang, Wenzhong; Green, Pamela J; Meyers, Blake C

    2006-10-01

    The Arabidopsis genome contains a highly complex and abundant population of small RNAs, and many of the endogenous siRNAs are dependent on RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase 2 (RDR2) for their biogenesis. By analyzing an rdr2 loss-of-function mutant using two different parallel sequencing technologies, MPSS and 454, we characterized the complement of miRNAs expressed in Arabidopsis inflorescence to considerable depth. Nearly all known miRNAs were enriched in this mutant and we identified 13 new miRNAs, all of which were relatively low abundance and constitute new families. Trans-acting siRNAs (ta-siRNAs) were even more highly enriched. Computational and gel blot analyses suggested that the minimal number of miRNAs in Arabidopsis is approximately 155. The size profile of small RNAs in rdr2 reflected enrichment of 21-nt miRNAs and other classes of siRNAs like ta-siRNAs, and a significant reduction in 24-nt heterochromatic siRNAs. Other classes of small RNAs were found to be RDR2-independent, particularly those derived from long inverted repeats and a subset of tandem repeats. The small RNA populations in other Arabidopsis small RNA biogenesis mutants were also examined; a dcl2/3/4 triple mutant showed a similar pattern to rdr2, whereas dcl1-7 and rdr6 showed reductions in miRNAs and ta-siRNAs consistent with their activities in the biogenesis of these types of small RNAs. Deep sequencing of mutants provides a genetic approach for the dissection and characterization of diverse small RNA populations and the identification of low abundance miRNAs. PMID:16954541

  12. Complementation of the pha2 yeast mutant suggests functional differences for arogenate dehydratases from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bross, Crystal D; Corea, Oliver R A; Kaldis, Angelo; Menassa, Rima; Bernards, Mark A; Kohalmi, Susanne E

    2011-08-01

    The final steps of phenylalanine (Phe) biosynthesis in bacteria, fungi and plants can occur via phenylpyruvate or arogenate intermediates. These routes are determined by the presence of prephenate dehydratase (PDT, EC4.2.1.51), which forms phenylpyruvate from prephenate, or arogenate dehydratase (ADT, EC4.2.1.91), which forms phenylalanine directly from arogenate. We compared sequences from select yeast species to those of Arabidopsis thaliana. The in silico analysis showed that plant ADTs and yeast PDTs share many common features allowing them to act as dehydratase/decarboxylases. However, plant and yeast sequences clearly group independently conferring distinct substrate specificities. Complementation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pha2 mutant, which lacks PDT activity and cannot grow in the absence of exogenous Phe, was used to test the PDT activity of A. thaliana ADTs in vivo. Previous biochemical characterization showed that all six AtADTs had high catalytic activity with arogenate as a substrate, while AtADT1, AtADT2 and AtADT6 also had limited activity with prephenate. Consistent with these results, the complementation test showed AtADT2 readily recovered the pha2 phenotype after ∼6 days growth at 30 °C, while AtADT1 required ∼13 days to show visible growth. By contrast, AtADT6 (lowest PDT activity) and AtADT3-5 (no PDT activity) were unable to recover the phenotype. These results suggest that only AtADT1 and AtADT2, but not the other four ADTs from Arabidopsis, have functional PDT activity in vivo, showing that there are two functional distinct groups. We hypothesize that plant ADTs have evolved to use the arogenate route for Phe synthesis while keeping some residual PDT activity. PMID:21388819

  13. The Arabidopsis ABHD11 Mutant Accumulates Polar Lipids in Leaves as a Consequence of Absent Acylhydrolase Activity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Anitha; Vijayaraj, Panneerselvam; Vijayakumar, Arun Kumar; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2016-01-01

    Alpha/beta hydrolase domain (ABHD)-containing proteins are structurally related with diverse catalytic activities. In various species, some ABHD proteins have been characterized and shown to play roles in lipid homeostasis. However, little is known about ABHD proteins in plants. Here, we characterized AT4G10030 (AtABHD11), an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog of a human ABHD11 gene. In silico analyses of AtABHD11 revealed homology with other plant species with a conserved GXSXG lipid motif. Interestingly, Arabidopsis abhd11 mutant plants exhibited an enhanced growth rate compared with wild-type plants. Quantitative analyses of the total lipids showed that the mutant abhd11 has a high amount of phospholipid and galactolipid in Arabidopsis leaves. The overexpression of AtABHD11 in Escherichia coli led to a reduction in phospholipid levels. The bacterially expressed recombinant AtABHD11 hydrolyzed lyso(phospho)lipid and monoacylglycerol. Furthermore, using whole-genome microarray and real-time PCR analyses of abhd11 and wild-type plants, we noted the up-regulation of MGD1, -2, and -3 and DGD1. Together, these findings suggested that AtABHD11 is a lyso(phospho)lipase. The disruption of AtABHD11 caused the accumulation of the polar lipids in leaves, which in turn promoted a higher growth rate compared with wild-type plants. PMID:26589672

  14. Ectopic expression of a Catalpa bungei (Bignoniaceae) PISTILLATA homologue rescues the petal and stamen identities in Arabidopsis pi-1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Jing, Danlong; Xia, Yan; Chen, Faju; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Shougong; Wang, Junhui

    2015-02-01

    PISTILLATA (PI) plays crucial roles in Arabidopsis flower development by specifying petal and stamen identities. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying organ development of woody angiosperm in Catalpa, we isolated and identified a PI homologue, referred to as CabuPI (C. bungei PISTILLATA), from two genetically cognate C. bungei (Bignoniaceae) bearing single and double flowers. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that the gene is closest related to the eudicot PI homologues. Moreover, a highly conserved PI-motif is found in the C-terminal regions of CabuPI. Semi-quantitative and quantitative real time PCR analyses showed that the expression of CabuPI was restricted to petals and stamens. However, CabuPI expression in the petals and stamens persisted throughout all floral development stages, but the expression levels were different. In 35S::CabuPI transgenic homozygous pi-1 mutant Arabidopsis, the second and the third whorl floral organs produced normal petals and a different number of stamens, respectively. Furthermore, ectopic expression of the CabuPI in transgenic wild-type or heterozygote pi-1 mutant Arabidopsis caused the first whorl sepal partially converted into a petal-like structure. These results clearly reveal the functional conservation of PI homologues between C. bungei and Arabidopsis. PMID:25575990

  15. Characterization of an activation-tagged mutant uncovers a role of GLABRA2 in anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Xianling; Hu, Qingnan; Dai, Xuemei; Tian, Hainan; Zheng, Kaijie; Wang, Xiaoping; Mao, Tonglin; Chen, Jin-Gui; Wang, Shucai

    2015-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, anthocyanin biosynthesis is controlled by a MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) transcriptional activator complex. The MBW complex activates the transcription of late biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway, leading to the production of anthocyanins. A similar MBW complex regulates epidermal cell fate by activating the transcription of GLABRA2 (GL2), a homeodomain transcription factor required for trichome formation in shoots and non-hair cell formation in roots. Here we provide experimental evidence to show that GL2 also plays a role in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. From an activation-tagged mutagenized population of Arabidopsis plants, we isolated a dominant, gain-of-function mutant with reduced anthocyanins. Molecular cloning revealed that this phenotype is caused by an elevated expression of GL2, thus the mutant was named gl2-1D. Consistent with the view that GL2 acts as a negative regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis, gl2-1D seedlings accumulated less whereas gl2-3 seedlings accumulated more anthocyanins in response to sucrose. Gene expression analysis indicated that expression of late, but not early, biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway was dramatically reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants. Further analysis showed that expression of some MBW component genes involved in the regulation of late biosynthesis genes was reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants, and chromatin immunoprecipitation results indicated that some MBW component genes are targets of GL2. We also showed that GL2 functions as a transcriptional repressor. Taken together, these results indicate that GL2 negatively regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis by directly repressing the expression of some MBW component genes. PMID:26017690

  16. Cold acclimation of the Arabidopsis dgd1 mutant results in recovery from photosystem I-limited photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Luke; Vlcková, Alexandra; Selstam, Eva; Huner, Norman; Oquist, Gunnar; Hurry, Vaughan

    2006-09-01

    We compared the thylakoid membrane composition and photosynthetic properties of non- and cold-acclimated leaves from the dgd1 mutant (lacking >90% of digalactosyl-diacylglycerol; DGDG) and wild type (WT) Arabidopsis thaliana. In contrast to warm grown plants, cold-acclimated dgd1 leaves recovered pigment-protein pools and photosynthetic function equivalent to WT. Surprisingly, this recovery was not correlated with an increase in DGDG. When returned to warm temperatures the severe dgd1 mutant phenotype reappeared. We conclude that the relative recovery of photosynthetic activity at 5 degrees C resulted from a temperature/lipid interaction enabling the stable assembly of PSI complexes in the thylakoid. PMID:16930596

  17. Tryptophan-Derived Metabolites Are Required for Antifungal Defense in the Arabidopsis mlo2 Mutant1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Consonni, Chiara; Bednarek, Paweł; Humphry, Matt; Francocci, Fedra; Ferrari, Simone; Harzen, Anne; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Panstruga, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O2 (MLO2), MLO6, and MLO12 exhibit unequal genetic redundancy with respect to the modulation of defense responses against powdery mildew fungi and the control of developmental phenotypes such as premature leaf decay. We show that early chlorosis and necrosis of rosette leaves in mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 mutants reflects an authentic but untimely leaf senescence program. Comparative transcriptional profiling revealed that transcripts of several genes encoding tryptophan biosynthetic and metabolic enzymes hyperaccumulate during vegetative development in the mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 mutant. Elevated expression levels of these genes correlate with altered steady-state levels of several indolic metabolites, including the phytoalexin camalexin and indolic glucosinolates, during development in the mlo2 single mutant and the mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 triple mutant. Results of genetic epistasis analysis suggest a decisive role for indolic metabolites in mlo2-conditioned antifungal defense against both biotrophic powdery mildews and a camalexin-sensitive strain of the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. The wound- and pathogen-responsive callose synthase POWDERY MILDEW RESISTANCE4/GLUCAN SYNTHASE-LIKE5 was found to be responsible for the spontaneous callose deposits in mlo2 mutant plants but dispensable for mlo2-conditioned penetration resistance. Our data strengthen the notion that powdery mildew resistance of mlo2 genotypes is based on the same defense execution machinery as innate antifungal immune responses that restrict the invasion of nonadapted fungal pathogens. PMID:20023151

  18. Classification and identification of Arabidopsis cell wall mutants using Fourier-Transform InfraRed (FT-IR) microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mouille, Grégory; Robin, Stéphane; Lecomte, Mannaïg; Pagant, Silvère; Höfte, Herman

    2003-08-01

    We have developed a novel procedure for the rapid classification and identification of Arabidopsis mutants with altered cell wall architecture based on Fourier-Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy. FT-IR transmission spectra were sampled from native 4-day-old dark-grown hypocotyls of 46 mutants and the wild type treated with various drugs. The Mahalanobis distance between mutants, calculated from the spectral information after compression with the Discriminant Variables Selection procedure, was used for alpha hierarchical cluster analysis. Despite the completely unsupervised nature of the classification procedure, we show that all mutants with cellulose defects appeared in the same cluster. In addition, mutant alleles of similar strength for several unrelated loci were also clustered, which demonstrates the sensitivity of the method to detect a wide array of cell wall defects. Comparing the cellulose-deficient cluster with the cluster that contained wild-type controls led to the identification of wave numbers that were diagnostic for altered cellulose content in the context of an intact cell wall. The results show that FT-IR spectra can be used to identify different classes of mutants and to characterize cell wall changes at a microscopic level in unknown mutants. This procedure significantly accelerates the identification and classification of cell wall mutants, which makes cell wall polysaccharides more accessible to functional genomics approaches. PMID:12887590

  19. An altered hydrotropic response (ahr1) mutant of Arabidopsis recovers root hydrotropism with cytokinin

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo, Manuel; Ponce, Georgina; Campos, María Eugenia; Eapen, Delfeena; García, Edith; Luján, Rosario; Sánchez, Yoloxóchitl; Cassab, Gladys I.

    2012-01-01

    Roots are highly plastic and can acclimate to heterogeneous and stressful conditions. However, there is little knowledge of the effect of moisture gradients on the mechanisms controlling root growth orientation and branching, and how this mechanism may help plants to avoid drought responses. The aim of this study was to isolate mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered hydrotropic responses. Here, altered hydrotropic response 1 (ahr1), a semi-dominant allele segregating as a single gene mutation, was characterized. ahr1 directed the growth of its primary root towards the source of higher water availability and developed an extensive root system over time. This phenotype was intensified in the presence of abscisic acid and was not observed if ahr1 seedlings were grown in a water stress medium without a water potential gradient. In normal growth conditions, primary root growth and root branching of ahr1 were indistinguishable from those of the wild type (wt). The altered hydrotropic growth of ahr1 roots was confirmed when the water-rich source was placed at an angle of 45° from the gravity vector. In this system, roots of ahr1 seedlings grew downward and did not display hydrotropism; however, in the presence of cytokinins, they exhibited hydrotropism like those of the wt, indicating that cytokinins play a critical role in root hydrotropism. The ahr1 mutant represents a valuable genetic resource for the study of the effects of cytokinins in the differential growth of hydrotropism and control of lateral root formation during the hydrotropic response. PMID:22442413

  20. L-ascorbic acid metabolism in the ascorbate-deficient arabidopsis mutant vtc1.

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, P L; Pallanca, J E; Last, R L; Smirnoff, N

    1997-01-01

    The biosynthesis of L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is not well understood in plants. The ozone-sensitive Arabidopsis thaliana mutant vitamin c-1 (vtc1; formerly known as soz1) is deficient in ascorbic acid, accumulating approximately 30% of wild-type levels. This deficiency could result from elevated catabolism or decreased biosynthesis. No differences that could account for the deficiency were found in the activities of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation or reduction of ascorbic acid. The absolute rate of ascorbic acid turnover is actually less in vtc1 than in wild type; however, the turnover rate relative to the pool of ascorbic acid is not significantly different. The results from [U-14C]Glc labeling experiments suggest that the deficiency is the result of a biosynthetic defect: less L-[14C]ascorbic acid as a percentage of total soluble 14C accumulates in vtc1 than in wild type. The feeding of two putative biosynthetic intermediates, D-glucosone and L-sorbosone, had no positive effect on ascorbic acid levels in either genotype. The vtc1 defect does not appear to be the result of a deficiency in L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase, an enzyme able to convert L-galactono-1,4-lactone to ascorbic acid. PMID:9390448

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana sku mutant seedlings show exaggerated surface-dependent alteration in root growth vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R.; Masson, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in the Wassilewskija (WS) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotypes often grow aslant on vertical agar surfaces. Slanted root growth always occurs to the right of the gravity vector when the root is viewed through the agar surface, and is not observed in the Columbia ecotype. Right-slanted root growth is surface-dependent and does not result directly from directional environmental stimuli or gradients in the plane of skewing. We have isolated two partially dominant mutations in WS (sku1 and sku2) that show an exaggerated right-slanting root-growth phenotype on agar surfaces. The right-slanting root-growth phenotype of wild-type and mutant roots is not the result of diagravitropism or of an alteration in root gravitropism. It is accompanied by a left-handed rotation of the root about its axis within the elongation zone, the rate of which positively correlates with the degree of right-slanted curvature. Our data suggest that the right-slanting root growth phenotype results from an endogenous structural asymmetry that expresses itself by a directional root-tip rotation.

  2. Rootcap structure in wild type and in a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, F. D.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Rootcaps of the wild type (WT) and of a starchless, gravitropic mutant (TC7) of Arabidopsis thaliana L. were examined by electron microscopy to identify cellular polarities with respect to gravity. In columella cells, nuclei are located proximally, and the nuclear envelope is continuous with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that is in turn connected to nearby plasmodesmata. Impregnation of ER with osmium ferricyanide revealed numerous contacts between columella plastids and ER in both genotypes. ER is present mostly in the outer regions of the columella protoplast except in older columella cells that are developing into peripheral cells. In vertical roots, only columella cells that are intermediate in development (story 2 cells) have a higher surface density (S) of ER in the distal compared to proximal regions of the cell. The distal but not the proximal S of the ER is constant throughout columella development. Plastids are less sedimented in TC7 columella cells compared to those of the WT. It is hypothesized that plastid contact with the ER plays a role in gravity perception in both genotypes.

  3. Structure of cellulose-deficient secondary cell walls from the irx3 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ha, Marie-Ann; MacKinnon, Iain M; Sturcová, Adriana; Apperley, David C; McCann, Maureen C; Turner, Simon R; Jarvis, Michael C

    2002-09-01

    In the Arabidopsis mutant irx3, truncation of the AtCesA7 gene encoding a xylem-specific cellulose synthase results in reduced cellulose synthesis in the affected xylem cells and collapse of mature xylem vessels. Here we describe spectroscopic experiments to determine whether any cellulose, normal or abnormal, remained in the walls of these cells and whether there were consequent effects on other cell-wall polysaccharides. Xylem cell walls from irx3 and its wild-type were prepared by anatomically specific isolation and were examined by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and FTIR microscopy. The affected cell walls of irx3 contained low levels of crystalline cellulose, probably associated with primary cell walls. There was no evidence that crystalline cellulose was replaced by less ordered glucans. From the molecular mobility of xylans and lignin it was deduced that these non-cellulosic polymers were cross-linked together in both irx3 and the wild-type. The disorder previously observed in the spatial pattern of non-cellulosic polymer deposition in the secondary walls of irx3 xylem could not be explained by any alteration in the structure or cross-linking of these polymers and may be attributed directly to the absence of cellulose microfibrils which, in the wild-type, scaffold the organisation of the other polymers into a coherent secondary cell wall. PMID:12165296

  4. Disturbed excitation energy transfer in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking minor antenna complexes of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Ünlü, Caner; Cazzaniga, Stefano; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2014-12-01

    Minor light-harvesting complexes (Lhcs) CP24, CP26 and CP29 occupy a position in photosystem II (PSII c' plants between the major light-harvesting complexes LHCII and the PSII core subunits. Lack of minor Lhcs in vivo causes impairment of PSII organization, and negatively affects electron transport rates anc photoprotection capacity. Here we used picosecond-fluorescence spectroscopy to study excitation-energy transfer (EET) in thylakoid membranes isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type plants and knockout lines depleted of either two (koCP26/24 and koCP29/24) or all minor Lhcs (NoM). In the absence of all minor Lhcs. the functional connection ofLHCII to the PSII cores appears to be seriously impaired whereas the "disconnected" LHCII is substantially quenched. For both double knock-out mutants, excitation trapping in PSII is faster than in NoM thylakoids but slower than in WT thylakoids. In NoM thylakoids, the loss of all minor Lhcs is accompanied by an over-accumulation ofLHCII, suggesting a compensating response to the reduced trapping efficiency in limiting light, which leads to a photosynthetic phenotype resembling that of low-light-acclimated plants. Finally. fluorescence kinetics and biochemical results show that the missing minor complexes are not replaced by other Lhcs, implying that they are unique among the antenna subunits and crucial for the functioning and macroorganization of PSII. PMID:25291424

  5. Arabidopsis thaliana sku mutant seedlings show exaggerated surface-dependent alteration in root growth vector.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, R; Masson, P H

    1996-08-01

    Roots of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in the Wassilewskija (WS) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotypes often grow aslant on vertical agar surfaces. Slanted root growth always occurs to the right of the gravity vector when the root is viewed through the agar surface, and is not observed in the Columbia ecotype. Right-slanted root growth is surface-dependent and does not result directly from directional environmental stimuli or gradients in the plane of skewing. We have isolated two partially dominant mutations in WS (sku1 and sku2) that show an exaggerated right-slanting root-growth phenotype on agar surfaces. The right-slanting root-growth phenotype of wild-type and mutant roots is not the result of diagravitropism or of an alteration in root gravitropism. It is accompanied by a left-handed rotation of the root about its axis within the elongation zone, the rate of which positively correlates with the degree of right-slanted curvature. Our data suggest that the right-slanting root growth phenotype results from an endogenous structural asymmetry that expresses itself by a directional root-tip rotation. PMID:8756492

  6. Gravitropism and development of wild-type and starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Katembe, W. J.; Edelmann, R. E.

    1998-01-01

    The "starch-statolith" hypothesis has been used by plant physiologists to explain the gravity perception mechanism in higher plants. In order to help resolve some of the controversy associated with ground-based research that has supported this theory, we performed a spaceflight experiment during the January 1997 mission of the Space Shuttle STS-81. Seedlings of wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, two reduced-starch strains, and a starchless mutant were grown in microgravity and then given a gravity stimulus on a centrifuge. In terms of development in space, germination was greater than 90% for seeds in microgravity, and flight seedlings were smaller (60% in total length) compared to control plants grown on the ground and to control plants on a rotating clinostat. Seedlings grown in space had two structural features that distinguished them from the controls: a greater density of root hairs and an anomalous hypocotyl hook structure. However, the slower growth and morphological changes observed in the flight seedlings may be due to the effects of ethylene present in the spacecraft. Nevertheless, during the flight hypocotyls of WT seedlings responded to a unilateral 60 min stimulus provided by a 1-g centrifuge while those of the starch-deficient strains did not. Thus the strain with the greatest amount of starch responded to the stimulus given in flight and therefore, these data support the starch-statolith model for gravity sensing.

  7. Wax and cutin mutants of Arabidopsis: Quantitative characterization of the cuticular transport barrier in relation to chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Christina; Schroll, Bettina; Zeisler, Viktoria; Waßmann, Friedrich; Franke, Rochus; Schreiber, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    Using (14)C-labeled epoxiconazole as a tracer, cuticular permeability of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves was quantitatively measured in order to compare different wax and cutin mutants (wax2, cut1, cer5, att1, bdg, shn3 and shn1) to the corresponding wild types (Col-0 and Ws). Mutants were characterized by decreases or increases in wax and/or cutin amounts. Permeances [ms(-1)] of Arabidopsis cuticles either increased in the mutants compared to wild type or were not affected. Thus, genetic changes in wax and cutin biosynthesis in some of the investigated Arabidopsis mutants obviously impaired the coordinated cutin and wax deposition at the outer leaf epidermal cell wall. As a consequence, barrier properties of cuticles were significantly decreased. However, increasing cutin and wax amounts by genetic modifications, did not automatically lead to improved cuticular barrier properties. As an alternative approach to the radioactive transport assay, changes in chlorophyll fluorescence were monitored after foliar application of metribuzine, an herbicide inhibiting electron transport in chloroplasts. Since both, half-times of photosynthesis inhibition as well as times of complete inhibition, in fact correlated with (14)C-epoxiconazole permeances, different rates of decline of photosynthetic yield between mutants and wild type must be a function of foliar uptake of the herbicide across the cuticle. Thus, monitoring changes in chlorophyll fluorescence, instead of conducting radioactive transport assays, represents an easy-to-handle and fast alternative evaluating cuticular barrier properties of different genotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:26965486

  8. Gravitropism in a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis: implications for the starch-statolith theory of gravity sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspar, T.; Pickard, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    The starch-statolith theory of gravity reception has been tested with a mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. which, lacking plastid phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1) activity, does not synthesize starch. The hypocotyls and seedling roots of the mutant were examined by light and electron microscopy to confirm that they did not contain starch. In upright wild-type (WT) seedlings, starch-filled plastids in the starch sheath of the hypocotyl and in three of the five columellar layers of the root cap were piled on the cell floors, and sedimented to the ceilings when the plants were inverted. However, starchless plastids of the mutant were not significantly sedimented in these cells in either upright or inverted seedlings. Gravitropism of light-grown seedling roots was vigorous: e.g., 10 degrees curvature developed in mutants rotated on a clinostat following a 5 min induction at 1 g, compared with 14 degrees in the WT. Curvatures induced during intervals from 2.5 to 30 min were 70% as great in the mutant as the WT. Thus under these conditions the presence of starch and the sedimentation of plastids are unnecessary for reception of gravity by Arabidopsis roots. Gravitropism by hypocotyls of light-grown seedlings was less vigorous than that by roots, but the mutant hypocotyls exhibited an average of 70-80% as much curvature as the WT. Roots and hypocotyls of etiolated seedlings and flower stalks of mature plants were also gravitropic, although in these cases the mutant was generally less closely comparable to the WT. Thus, starch is also unnecessary for gravity reception in these tissues.

  9. The Arabidopsis cax1 Mutant Exhibits Impaired Ion Homeostasis, Development, and Hormonal Responses and Reveals Interplay among Vacuolar Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ning-Hui; Pittman, Jon K.; Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Shigaki, Toshiro; Hirschi, Kendal D.

    2003-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Ca2+/H+ transporter CAX1 (Cation Exchanger1) may be an important regulator of intracellular Ca2+ levels. Here, we describe the preliminary localization of CAX1 to the tonoplast and the molecular and biochemical characterization of cax1 mutants. We show that these mutants exhibit a 50% reduction in tonoplast Ca2+/H+ antiport activity, a 40% reduction in tonoplast V-type H+-translocating ATPase activity, a 36% increase in tonoplast Ca2+-ATPase activity, and increased expression of the putative vacuolar Ca2+/H+ antiporters CAX3 and CAX4. Enhanced growth was displayed by the cax1 lines under Mn2+ and Mg2+ stress conditions. The mutants exhibited altered plant development, perturbed hormone sensitivities, and altered expression of an auxin-regulated promoter-reporter gene fusion. We propose that CAX1 regulates myriad plant processes and discuss the observed phenotypes with regard to the compensatory alterations in other transporters. PMID:12566577

  10. Utilization of mutants to analyze the interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana and its naturally root-associated Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Persello-Cartieaux, F; David, P; Sarrobert, C; Thibaud, M C; Achouak, W; Robaglia, C; Nussaume, L

    2001-01-01

    A model system based on the Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Ws ecotype and its naturally colonizing Pseudomonas thivervalensis rhizobacteria was defined. Pseudomonas strains colonizing A. thaliana were found to modify the root architecture either in vivo or in vitro. A gnotobiotic system using bacteria labelled with green fluorescent protein revealed that P. thivervalensis exhibited a colonization profile similar to that of other rhizobacterial species. Mutants of A. thaliana affected in root hair development and possible hormone perception were used to analyze the plant genetic determinants of bacterial colonization. A screen for mutants insensitive to P. thivervalensis colonization yielded two mutants found to be auxin resistant. This further supports a proposed role for bacterial auxin in inducing morphological modifications of roots. This work paves the way for studying the interaction between plants and non-pathogenic rhizobacteria in a gnotobiotic system, derived from a natural association, where interactions between both partners can be genetically dissected. PMID:11216839

  11. A Cytosolic Acyltransferase Contributes to Triacylglycerol Synthesis in Sucrose-Rescued Arabidopsis Seed Oil Catabolism Mutants1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, M. Luisa; Whitehead, Lynne; He, Zhesi; Gazda, Valeria; Gilday, Alison; Kozhevnikova, Ekaterina; Vaistij, Fabián E.; Larson, Tony R.; Graham, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) levels and oil bodies persist in sucrose (Suc)-rescued Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings disrupted in seed oil catabolism. This study set out to establish if TAG levels persist as a metabolically inert pool when downstream catabolism is disrupted, or if other mechanisms, such as fatty acid (FA) recycling into TAG are operating. We show that TAG composition changes significantly in Suc-rescued seedlings compared with that found in dry seeds, with 18:2 and 18:3 accumulating. However, 20:1 FA is not efficiently recycled back into TAG in young seedlings, instead partitioning into the membrane lipid fraction and diacylglycerol. In the lipolysis mutant sugar dependent1and the β-oxidation double mutant acx1acx2 (for acyl-Coenzyme A oxidase), levels of TAG actually increased in seedlings growing on Suc. We performed a transcriptomic study and identified up-regulation of an acyltransferase gene, DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE3 (DGAT3), with homology to a peanut (Arachis hypogaea) cytosolic acyltransferase. The acyl-Coenzyme A substrate for this acyltransferase accumulates in mutants that are blocked in oil breakdown postlipolysis. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana confirmed involvement in TAG synthesis and specificity toward 18:3 and 18:2 FAs. Double-mutant analysis with the peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter mutant peroxisomal ABC transporter1 indicated involvement of DGAT3 in the partitioning of 18:3 into TAG in mutant seedlings growing on Suc. Fusion of the DGAT3 protein with green fluorescent protein confirmed localization to the cytosol of N. benthamiana. This work has demonstrated active recycling of 18:2 and 18:3 FAs into TAG when seed oil breakdown is blocked in a process involving a soluble cytosolic acyltransferase. PMID:22760209

  12. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 Restores the Expression of Auxin-Responsive Genes in Mutant Arabidopsis Leaf Mesophyll ProtoplastsW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shucai; Tiwari, Shiv B.; Hagen, Gretchen; Guilfoyle, Tom J.

    2005-01-01

    AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 (ARF7) is one of five ARF transcriptional activators in Arabidopsis thaliana that is proposed to regulate auxin-responsive expression of genes containing TGTCTC auxin response elements in their promoters. An Arabidopsis mutant (nonphototropic hypocotyl4-1 [nph4-1]) that is a null for ARF7 showed strongly reduced expression of integrated auxin-responsive reporter genes and natural genes that were monitored in Arabidopsis leaf mesophyll protoplasts. Expression of the reporter and natural genes was restored in an auxin-dependent manner when protoplasts were transfected with a 35S:ARF7 effector gene, encoding a full-length ARF7 protein. Transfection of effector genes encoding other ARF activators restored auxin-responsive gene expression to varying degrees, but less than that observed with the ARF7 effector gene. Arabidopsis lines that were null for ARF6, ARF8, or ARF19 were not defective in expression of the reporter and natural auxin response genes assayed in mesophyll protoplasts, suggesting that ARF7 plays a major role in regulating expression of a subset of auxin response genes in leaf mesophyll cells. Auxin-responsive gene expression was induced in wild-type protoplasts and restored in nph4-1 protoplasts only with auxin and not with other hormones, including brassinolide. In the presence of auxin, however, brassinolide modestly enhanced auxin-responsive gene expression. PMID:15923351

  13. Genetic Analysis of Arabidopsis Mutants Impaired in Plastid Lipid Import Reveals a Role of Membrane Lipids in Chloroplast Division

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, J.; Xu, C.

    2011-03-01

    The biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes in plants relies largely on lipid import from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and this lipid transport process is mediated by TGD proteins in Arabidopsis. Such a dependency of chloroplast biogenesis on ER-to-plastid lipid transport was recently exemplified by analyzing double mutants between tgd1-1 or tgd4-3 and fad6 mutants. The fad6 mutants are defective in the desaturation of membrane lipids in chloroplasts and therefore dependent on import of polyunsaturated lipid precursors from the ER for constructing a competent thylakoid membrane system. In support of a critical role of TGD proteins in ER-to-plastid lipid trafficking, we showed that the introduction of the tgd mutations into fad6 mutant backgrounds led to drastic reductions in relative amounts of thylakoid lipids. Moreover, the tgd1-1 fad6 and tgd4-3 fad6 double mutants were deficient in polyunsaturated fatty acids in chloroplast membrane lipids, and severely compromised in the biogenesis of photosynthetic membrane systems. Here we report that these double mutants are severely impaired in chloroplast division. The possible role of membrane lipids in chloroplast division is discussed.

  14. Altered chloroplast structure and function in a mutant of Arabidopsis deficient in plastid glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kunst, L.; Somerville, C. ); Browse, J. )

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in plastid glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity have altered chloroplast membrane lipid composition. This caused an increase in the number of regions of appressed membrane per chloroplast and a decrease in the average number of thylakoid membranes in the appressed regions. The net effect was a significant decrease in the ratio of appressed to nonappressed membranes. A comparison of 77 K fluorescence emission spectra of thylakoid membranes from the mutant and wild type indicated that the ultrastructural changes were associated with an altered distribution of excitation energy transfer from antenna chlorophyll to photosystem II and photosystem I in the mutant. The changes in leaf lipid composition did not significantly affect growth or development of the mutant under standard conditions. However, at temperatures above 28{degree}C the mutant grew slightly more rapidly than the wild type, and measurements of temperature-induced fluorescence yield enhancement suggested an increased thermal stability of the photosynthetic apparatus of the mutant. These effects are consistent with other evidence suggesting that membrane lipid composition is an important determinant of chloroplast structure but has relatively minor direct effects on the function of the membrane proteins associated with photosynthetic electron transport.

  15. Cell-wall structure and anisotropy in procuste, a cellulose synthase mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Iain M; Sturcová, Adriana; Sugimoto-Shirasu, Keiko; His, Isabelle; McCann, Maureen C; Jarvis, Michael C

    2006-07-01

    In dark-grown hypocotyls of the Arabidopsis procuste mutant, a mutation in the CesA6 gene encoding a cellulose synthase reduces cellulose synthesis and severely inhibits elongation growth. Previous studies had left it uncertain why growth was inhibited, because cellulose synthesis was affected before, not during, the main phase of elongation. We characterised the quantity, structure and orientation of the cellulose remaining in the walls of affected cells. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy and infrared microscopy showed that the residual cellulose did not differ in structure from that of the wild type, but the cellulose content of the prc-1 cell walls was reduced by 28%. The total mass of cell-wall polymers per hypocotyl was reduced in prc-1 by about 20%. Therefore, the fourfold inhibition of elongation growth in prc-1 does not result from aberrant cellulose structure, nor from uniform reduction in the dimensions of the cell-wall network due to reduced cellulose or cell-wall mass. Cellulose orientation was quantified by two quantitative methods. First, the orientation of newly synthesised microfibrils was measured in field-emission scanning electron micrographs of the cytoplasmic face of the inner epidermal cell wall. The ordered transverse orientation of microfibrils at the inner face of the cell wall was severely disrupted in prc-1 hypocotyls, particularly in the early growth phase. Second, cellulose orientation distributions across the whole cell-wall thickness, measured by polarised infrared microscopy, were much broader. Analysis of the microfibril orientations according to the theory of composite materials showed that during the initial growth phase, their anisotropy at the plasma membrane was sufficient to explain the anisotropy of subsequent growth. PMID:16404578

  16. A mutant of the Arabidopsis thaliana TOC159 gene accumulates reduced levels of linolenic acid and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Afitlhile, Meshack; Workman, Samantha; Duffield, Kayla; Sprout, Danielle; Berhow, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that a mutant of Arabidopsis that lacks the Toc159 receptor is impaired in chloroplast biogenesis. The mutant is referred as plastid protein import 2 or ppi2 and has an albino phenotype due to its inability to import the photosynthetic proteins. In this study, we measured fatty acid composition and transcript levels of plastid-localized fatty acid desaturases in the wild type and ppi2 mutant. The objective was to evaluate whether the Toc159 receptor was critical in the import of lipid-synthesizing enzymes. The ppi2 mutant accumulated decreased levels of oleic acid (18:1) and α-linolenic acid (18:3). The mutant accumulated drastically reduced amounts of the chloroplast lipid monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), which contains more than 80% of 18:3. The expression of genes that encode stearoyl-ACP desaturase and MGD1 synthase were down-regulated in the ppi2 mutant, and this corresponded to decreased levels of 18:1 and MGDG, respectively. We conclude that in the ppi2 mutant the impaired synthesis of MGDG resulted in decreased amounts of 18:3. The mutant however, had a 30-fold increase in fad5 transcript levels; this increase was mirrored by a 16- to 50-fold accumulation of hexadecatrienoic acid (16:3), a fatty acid found exclusively in MGDG. Taken together, these data suggest that the Toc159 receptor is required in the import of stearoyl-ACP desaturase and MGD1 synthase into the chloroplasts. Since the expression of fad5 gene was up-regulated in the ppi2 mutant, we propose that fad5 desaturase is imported into plastids through the atToc132/atToc120 protein import pathway. PMID:24184455

  17. The Cell Wall Arabinose-Deficient Arabidopsis thaliana Mutant murus5 Encodes a Defective Allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2.

    PubMed

    Dugard, Christopher K; Mertz, Rachel A; Rayon, Catherine; Mercadante, Davide; Hart, Christopher; Benatti, Matheus R; Olek, Anna T; SanMiguel, Phillip J; Cooper, Bruce R; Reiter, Wolf-Dieter; McCann, Maureen C; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2016-07-01

    Traditional marker-based mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to determine that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) low cell wall arabinose mutant murus5 (mur5) encodes a defective allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2 (RGP2). Marker analysis of 13 F2 confirmed mutant progeny from a recombinant mapping population gave a rough map position on the upper arm of chromosome 5, and deep sequencing of DNA from these 13 lines gave five candidate genes with G→A (C→T) transitions predicted to result in amino acid changes. Of these five, only insertional mutant alleles of RGP2, a gene that encodes a UDP-arabinose mutase that interconverts UDP-arabinopyranose and UDP-arabinofuranose, exhibited the low cell wall arabinose phenotype. The identities of mur5 and two SALK insertional alleles were confirmed by allelism tests and overexpression of wild-type RGP2 complementary DNA placed under the control of the 35S promoter in the three alleles. The mur5 mutation results in the conversion of cysteine-257 to tyrosine-257 within a conserved hydrophobic cluster predicted to be distal to the active site and essential for protein stability and possible heterodimerization with other isoforms of RGP. PMID:27217494

  18. Overaccumulation of γ-Glutamylcysteine in a Jasmonate-Hypersensitive Arabidopsis Mutant Causes Jasmonate-Dependent Growth Inhibition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hsin-Ho; Rowe, Martha; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M.; Grove, Ryan; Adamec, Jiri; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Staswick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is essential for many aspects of plant biology and is associated with jasmonate signaling in stress responses. We characterized an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) jasmonate-hypersensitive mutant (jah2) with seedling root growth 100-fold more sensitive to inhibition by the hormone jasmonyl-isoleucine than the wild type. Genetic mapping and genome sequencing determined that the mutation is in intron 6 of GLUTATHIONE SYNTHETASE2, encoding the enzyme that converts γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) to GSH. The level of GSH in jah2 was 71% of the wild type, while the phytoalexin-deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant, defective in GSH1 and having only 27% of wild-type GSH level, was not jasmonate hypersensitive. Growth defects for jah2, but not pad2, were also seen in plants grown to maturity. Surprisingly, all phenotypes in the jah2 pad2-1 double mutant were weaker than in jah2. Quantification of γ-EC indicated these defects result from hyperaccumulation of this GSH precursor by 294- and 65-fold in jah2 and the double mutant, respectively. γ-EC reportedly partially substitutes for loss of GSH, but growth inhibition seen here was likely not due to an excess of total glutathione plus γ-EC because their sum in jah2 pad2-1 was only 16% greater than in the wild type. Further, the jah2 phenotypes were lost in a jasmonic acid biosynthesis mutant background, indicating the effect of γ-EC is mediated through jasmonate signaling and not as a direct result of perturbed redox status. PMID:26282239

  19. Redirection of the phenylpropanoid pathway to feruloyl malate in Arabidopsis mutants deficient for cinnamoyl-CoA reductase 1.

    PubMed

    Mir Derikvand, Mohammad; Sierra, Jimmy Berrio; Ruel, Katia; Pollet, Brigitte; Do, Cao-Trung; Thévenin, Johanne; Buffard, Dominique; Jouanin, Lise; Lapierre, Catherine

    2008-04-01

    Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase 1 (CCR1, gene At1g15950) is the main CCR isoform implied in the constitutive lignification of Arabidopsis thaliana. In this work, we have identified and characterized two new knockout mutants for CCR1. Both have a dwarf phenotype and a delayed senescence. At complete maturity, their inflorescence stems display a 25-35% decreased lignin level, some alterations in lignin structure with a higher frequency of resistant interunit bonds and a higher content in cell wall-bound ferulic esters. Ferulic acid-coniferyl alcohol ether dimers were found for the first time in dicot cell walls and in similar levels in wild-type and mutant plants. The expression of CCR2, a CCR gene usually involved in plant defense, was increased in the mutants and could account for the biosynthesis of lignins in the CCR1-knockout plants. Mutant plantlets have three to four-times less sinapoyl malate (SM) than controls and accumulate some feruloyl malate. The same compositional changes occurred in the rosette leaves of greenhouse-grown plants. By contrast and relative to the control, their stems accumulated unusually high levels of both SM and feruloyl malate as well as more kaempferol glycosides. These findings suggest that, in their hypolignified stems, the mutant plants would avoid the feruloyl-CoA accumulation by its redirection to cell wall-bound ferulate esters, to feruloyl malate and to SM. The formation of feruloyl malate to an extent far exceeding the levels reported so far indicates that ferulic acid is a potential substrate for the enzymes involved in SM biosynthesis and emphasizes the remarkable plasticity of Arabidopsis phenylpropanoid metabolism. PMID:18046574

  20. Systematic Phenotypic Screen of Arabidopsis Peroxisomal Mutants Identifies Proteins Involved in β-Oxidation1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cassin-Ross, Gaëlle; Hu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes are highly dynamic and multifunctional organelles essential to development. Plant peroxisomes accommodate a multitude of metabolic reactions, many of which are related to the β-oxidation of fatty acids or fatty acid-related metabolites. Recently, several dozens of novel peroxisomal proteins have been identified from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) through in silico and experimental proteomic analyses followed by in vivo protein targeting validations. To determine the functions of these proteins, we interrogated their transfer DNA insertion mutants with a series of physiological, cytological, and biochemical assays to reveal peroxisomal deficiencies. Sugar dependence and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid response assays uncovered statistically significant phenotypes in β-oxidation-related processes in mutants for 20 of 27 genes tested. Additional investigations uncovered a subset of these mutants with abnormal seed germination, accumulation of oil bodies, and delayed degradation of long-chain fatty acids during early seedling development. Mutants for seven genes exhibited deficiencies in multiple assays, strongly suggesting the involvement of their gene products in peroxisomal β-oxidation and initial seedling growth. Proteins identified included isoforms of enzymes related to β-oxidation, such as acyl-CoA thioesterase2, acyl-activating enzyme isoform1, and acyl-activating enzyme isoform5, and proteins with functions previously unknown to be associated with β-oxidation, such as Indigoidine synthase A, Senescence-associated protein/B12D-related protein1, Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, and Unknown protein5. This multipronged phenotypic screen allowed us to reveal β-oxidation proteins that have not been discovered by single assay-based mutant screens and enabled the functional dissection of different isoforms of multigene families involved in β-oxidation. PMID:25253886

  1. Overaccumulation of γ-Glutamylcysteine in a Jasmonate-Hypersensitive Arabidopsis Mutant Causes Jasmonate-Dependent Growth Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hsin-Ho; Rowe, Martha; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M; Grove, Ryan; Adamec, Jiri; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Staswick, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is essential for many aspects of plant biology and is associated with jasmonate signaling in stress responses. We characterized an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) jasmonate-hypersensitive mutant (jah2) with seedling root growth 100-fold more sensitive to inhibition by the hormone jasmonyl-isoleucine than the wild type. Genetic mapping and genome sequencing determined that the mutation is in intron 6 of GLUTATHIONE SYNTHETASE2, encoding the enzyme that converts γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) to GSH. The level of GSH in jah2 was 71% of the wild type, while the phytoalexin-deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant, defective in GSH1 and having only 27% of wild-type GSH level, was not jasmonate hypersensitive. Growth defects for jah2, but not pad2, were also seen in plants grown to maturity. Surprisingly, all phenotypes in the jah2 pad2-1 double mutant were weaker than in jah2. Quantification of γ-EC indicated these defects result from hyperaccumulation of this GSH precursor by 294- and 65-fold in jah2 and the double mutant, respectively. γ-EC reportedly partially substitutes for loss of GSH, but growth inhibition seen here was likely not due to an excess of total glutathione plus γ-EC because their sum in jah2 pad2-1 was only 16% greater than in the wild type. Further, the jah2 phenotypes were lost in a jasmonic acid biosynthesis mutant background, indicating the effect of γ-EC is mediated through jasmonate signaling and not as a direct result of perturbed redox status. PMID:26282239

  2. Arabidopsis mutant sk156 reveals complex regulation of SPL15 in a miR156-controlled gene network

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Arabidopsis microRNA156 (miR156) regulates 11 members of the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN LIKE (SPL) family by base pairing to complementary target mRNAs. Each SPL gene further regulates a set of other genes; thus, miR156 controls numerous genes through a complex gene regulation network. Increased axillary branching occurs in transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing miR156b, similar to that observed in loss-of-function max3 and max4 mutants with lesions in carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases. Arabidopsis miR156b was found to enhance carotenoid levels and reproductive shoot branching when expressed in Brassica napus, suggesting a link between miR156b expression and carotenoid metabolism. However, details of the miR156 regulatory network of SPL genes related to carotenoid metabolism are not known. Results In this study, an Arabidopsis T-DNA enhancer mutant, sk156, was identified due to its altered branching and trichome morphology and increased seed carotenoid levels compared to wild type (WT) ecovar Columbia. Enhanced miR156b expression due to the 35S enhancers present on the T-DNA insert was responsible for these phenotypes. Constitutive and leaf primodium-specific expression of a miR156-insensitive (mutated) SPL15 (SPL15m) largely restored WT seed carotenoid levels and plant morphology when expressed in sk156. The Arabidopsis native miR156-sensitive SPL15 (SPL15n) and SPL15m driven by a native SPL15 promoter did not restore the WT phenotype in sk156. Our findings suggest that SPL15 function is somewhat redundant with other SPL family members, which collectively affect plant phenotypes. Moreover, substantially decreased miR156b transcript levels in sk156 expressing SPL15m, together with the presence of multiple repeats of SPL-binding GTAC core sequence close to the miR156b transcription start site, suggested feedback regulation of miR156b expression by SPL15. This was supported by the demonstration of specific in vitro interaction between DNA

  3. A New Vertical Mesh Transfer Technique for Metal-Tolerance Studies in Arabidopsis (Ecotypic Variation and Copper-Sensitive Mutants).

    PubMed

    Murphy, A.; Taiz, L.

    1995-05-01

    A new vertical mesh transfer (VMT) technique has been developed to facilitate the rapid isolation of plant metal-tolerance mutants. The technique is quantitative, allowing comparisons of the growth responses of different strains or ecotypes. Using the VMT technique, we have characterized the dose responses of 10 ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana to Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cr3+, Cd2+, and Al3+. Ecotypic variations in the highest concentration causing no inhibition and the lowest concentration causing complete inhibition for the six metals were observed. Two ecotypes, Ws and Enkheim, exhibited an inducible tolerance mechanism in response to copper. Pretreatment of Ws with the highest concentration causing no inhibition for copper resulted in a shifting of the lowest concentration causing complete inhibition to a higher value. Partial cross-induction and cross-tolerance between Cu2+ and Zn2+ were demonstrated. In addition, ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized Columbia seeds were screened for copper-sensitive (cus) mutants using the VMT procedure. Thus far, 59 putative cus mutants have survived retesting to the M4 or M5 generation. When grown on gellan gum supplemented with 30 [mu]M CuCl2, cus mutants develop marked toxicity symptoms. A copper dose-response curve of the cus1 mutant showed that the metal-sensitive phenotype is specific for the lower concentration range. PMID:12228451

  4. Arabidopsis serotonin N-acetyltransferase knockout mutant plants exhibit decreased melatonin and salicylic acid levels resulting in susceptibility to an avirulent pathogen.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Yool; Byeon, Yeong; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) is the penultimate enzyme in the melatonin biosynthesis pathway in plants. We examined the effects of SNAT gene inactivation in two Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant lines. After inoculation with the avirulent pathogen Pseudomonas syringe pv. tomato DC3000 harboring the elicitor avrRpt2 (Pst-avrRpt2), melatonin levels in the snat knockout mutant lines were 50% less than in wild-type Arabidopsis Col-0 plants. The snat knockout mutant lines exhibited susceptibility to pathogen infection that coincided with decreased induction of defense genes including PR1, ICS1, and PDF1.2. Because melatonin acts upstream of salicylic acid (SA) synthesis, the reduced melatonin levels in the snat mutant lines led to decreased SA levels compared to wild-type, suggesting that the increased pathogen susceptibility of the snat mutant lines could be attributed to decreased SA levels and subsequent attenuation of defense gene induction. Exogenous melatonin treatment failed to induce defense gene expression in nahG Arabidopsis plants, but restored the induction of defense gene expression in the snat mutant lines. In addition, melatonin caused translocation of NPR1 (nonexpressor of PR1) protein from the cytoplasm into the nucleus indicating that melatonin-elicited pathogen resistance in response to avirulent pathogen attack is SA-dependent in Arabidopsis. PMID:25652756

  5. Transcriptional profiles of Arabidopsis stomataless mutants reveal developmental and physiological features of life in the absence of stomata

    PubMed Central

    de Marcos, Alberto; Triviño, Magdalena; Pérez-Bueno, María Luisa; Ballesteros, Isabel; Barón, Matilde; Mena, Montaña; Fenoll, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function of the positive stomata development regulators SPCH or MUTE in Arabidopsis thaliana renders stomataless plants; spch-3 and mute-3 mutants are extreme dwarfs, but produce cotyledons and tiny leaves, providing a system to interrogate plant life in the absence of stomata. To this end, we compared their cotyledon transcriptomes with that of wild-type plants. K-means clustering of differentially expressed genes generated four clusters: clusters 1 and 2 grouped genes commonly regulated in the mutants, while clusters 3 and 4 contained genes distinctively regulated in mute-3. Classification in functional categories and metabolic pathways of genes in clusters 1 and 2 suggested that both mutants had depressed secondary, nitrogen and sulfur metabolisms, while only a few photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. In situ quenching analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence revealed limited inhibition of photosynthesis. This and other fluorescence measurements matched the mutant transcriptomic features. Differential transcriptomes of both mutants were enriched in growth-related genes, including known stomata development regulators, which paralleled their epidermal phenotypes. Analysis of cluster 3 was not informative for developmental aspects of mute-3. Cluster 4 comprised genes differentially up−regulated in mute−3, 35% of which were direct targets for SPCH and may relate to the unique cell types of mute−3. A screen of T-DNA insertion lines in genes differentially expressed in the mutants identified a gene putatively involved in stomata development. A collection of lines for conditional overexpression of transcription factors differentially expressed in the mutants rendered distinct epidermal phenotypes, suggesting that these proteins may be novel stomatal development regulators. Thus, our transcriptome analysis represents a useful source of new genes for the study of stomata development and for characterizing physiology and growth in the absence of

  6. Analysis of leaf development in fugu mutants of Arabidopsis reveals three compensation modes that modulate cell expansion in determinate organs.

    PubMed

    Ferjani, Ali; Horiguchi, Gorou; Yano, Satoshi; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2007-06-01

    In multicellular organisms, the coordination of cell proliferation and expansion is fundamental for proper organogenesis, yet the molecular mechanisms involved in this coordination are largely unexplored. In plant leaves, the existence of this coordination is suggested by compensation, in which a decrease in cell number triggers an increase in mature cell size. To elucidate the mechanisms of compensation, we isolated five new Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants (fugu1-fugu5) that exhibit compensation. These mutants were characterized together with angustifolia3 (an3), erecta (er), and a KIP-RELATED PROTEIN2 (KRP2) overexpressor, which were previously reported to exhibit compensation. Time-course analyses of leaf development revealed that enhanced cell expansion in fugu2-1, fugu5-1, an3-4, and er-102 mutants is induced postmitotically, indicating that cell enlargement is not caused by the uncoupling of cell division from cell growth. In each of the mutants, either the rate or duration of cell expansion was selectively enhanced. In contrast, we found that enhanced cell expansion in KRP2 overexpressor occurs during cell proliferation. We further demonstrated that enhanced cell expansion occurs in cotyledons with dynamics similar to that in leaves. In contrast, cell expansion was not enhanced in roots even though they exhibit decreased cell numbers. Thus, compensation was confirmed to occur preferentially in determinate organs. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that increases in ploidy level are not always required to trigger compensation, suggesting that compensation is only partially mediated by ploidy-dependent processes. Our results suggest that compensation reflects an organ-wide coordination of cell proliferation and expansion in determinate organs, and involves at least three different expansion pathways. PMID:17468216

  7. Arabidopsis mutants in sphingolipid synthesis as tools to understand the structure and function of membrane microdomains in plasmodesmata

    PubMed Central

    González-Solís, Ariadna; Cano-Ramírez, Dora L.; Morales-Cedillo, Francisco; Tapia de Aquino, Cinthya; Gavilanes-Ruiz, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodesmata—intercellular channels that communicate adjacent cells—possess complex membranous structures. Recent evidences indicate that plasmodesmata contain membrane microdomains. In order to understand how these submembrane regions collaborate to plasmodesmata function, it is necessary to characterize their size, composition and dynamics. An approach that can shed light on these microdomain features is based on the use of Arabidopsis mutants in sphingolipid synthesis. Sphingolipids are canonical components of microdomains together with sterols and some glycerolipids. Moreover, sphingolipids are transducers in pathways that display programmed cell death as a defense mechanism against pathogens. The study of Arabidopsis mutants would allow determining which structural features of the sphingolipids are important for the formation and stability of microdomains, and if defense signaling networks using sphingoid bases as second messengers are associated to plasmodesmata operation. Such studies need to be complemented by analysis of the ultrastructure and the use of protein probes for plasmodesmata microdomains and may constitute a very valuable source of information to analyze these membrane structures. PMID:24478783

  8. Characterization of a JAZ7 activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutant with increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Louise F.; Cevik, Volkan; Grant, Murray; Zhai, Bing; Jones, Jonathan D.G.; Manners, John M.; Kazan, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, jasmonate (JA)-signaling plays a key role in mediating Fusarium oxysporum disease outcome. However, the roles of JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins that repress JA-signaling have not been characterized in host resistance or susceptibility to this pathogen. Here, we found most JAZ genes are induced following F. oxysporum challenge, and screening T-DNA insertion lines in Arabidopsis JAZ family members identified a highly disease-susceptible JAZ7 mutant (jaz7-1D). This mutant exhibited constitutive JAZ7 expression and conferred increased JA-sensitivity, suggesting activation of JA-signaling. Unlike jaz7 loss-of-function alleles, jaz7-1D also had enhanced JA-responsive gene expression, altered development and increased susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pst DC3000 that also disrupts host JA-responses. We also demonstrate that JAZ7 interacts with transcription factors functioning as activators (MYC3, MYC4) or repressors (JAM1) of JA-signaling and contains a functional EAR repressor motif mediating transcriptional repression via the co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL). We propose through direct TPL recruitment, in wild-type plants JAZ7 functions as a repressor within the JA-response network and that in jaz7-1D plants, misregulated ectopic JAZ7 expression hyper-activates JA-signaling in part by disturbing finely-tuned COI1-JAZ-TPL-TF complexes. PMID:26896849

  9. Photosynthetic redox imbalance governs leaf sectoring in the Arabidopsis thaliana variegation mutants immutans, spotty, var1, and var2.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Dominic; Bode, Rainer; Li, Wenze; Krol, Marianna; Saccon, Diego; Wang, Shelly; Schillaci, Lori A; Rodermel, Steven R; Maxwell, Denis P; Hüner, Norman P A

    2009-11-01

    We hypothesized that chloroplast energy imbalance sensed through alterations in the redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, measured as excitation pressure, governs the extent of variegation in the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana. To test this hypothesis, we developed a nondestructive imaging technique and used it to quantify the extent of variegation in vivo as a function of growth temperature and irradiance. The extent of variegation was positively correlated (R(2) = 0.750) with an increase in excitation pressure irrespective of whether high light, low temperature, or continuous illumination was used to induce increased excitation pressure. Similar trends were observed with the variegated mutants spotty, var1, and var2. Measurements of greening of etiolated wild-type and immutans cotyledons indicated that the absence of IMMUTANS increased excitation pressure twofold during the first 6 to 12 h of greening, which led to impaired biogenesis of thylakoid membranes. In contrast with IMMUTANS, the expression of its mitochondrial analog, AOX1a, was transiently upregulated in the wild type but permanently upregulated in immutans, indicating that the effects of excitation pressure during greening were also detectable in mitochondria. We conclude that mutations involving components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, such as those present in immutans, spotty, var1, and var2, predispose Arabidopsis chloroplasts to photooxidation under high excitation pressure, resulting in the variegated phenotype. PMID:19897671

  10. Photosynthetic Redox Imbalance Governs Leaf Sectoring in the Arabidopsis thaliana Variegation Mutants immutans, spotty, var1, and var2[W

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Dominic; Bode, Rainer; Li, Wenze; Krol, Marianna; Saccon, Diego; Wang, Shelly; Schillaci, Lori A.; Rodermel, Steven R.; Maxwell, Denis P.; Hüner, Norman P.A.

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that chloroplast energy imbalance sensed through alterations in the redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, measured as excitation pressure, governs the extent of variegation in the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana. To test this hypothesis, we developed a nondestructive imaging technique and used it to quantify the extent of variegation in vivo as a function of growth temperature and irradiance. The extent of variegation was positively correlated (R2 = 0.750) with an increase in excitation pressure irrespective of whether high light, low temperature, or continuous illumination was used to induce increased excitation pressure. Similar trends were observed with the variegated mutants spotty, var1, and var2. Measurements of greening of etiolated wild-type and immutans cotyledons indicated that the absence of IMMUTANS increased excitation pressure twofold during the first 6 to 12 h of greening, which led to impaired biogenesis of thylakoid membranes. In contrast with IMMUTANS, the expression of its mitochondrial analog, AOX1a, was transiently upregulated in the wild type but permanently upregulated in immutans, indicating that the effects of excitation pressure during greening were also detectable in mitochondria. We conclude that mutations involving components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, such as those present in immutans, spotty, var1, and var2, predispose Arabidopsis chloroplasts to photooxidation under high excitation pressure, resulting in the variegated phenotype. PMID:19897671

  11. ß-amylase1 mutant Arabidopsis plants show improved drought tolerance due to reduced starch breakdown in guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Prasch, Christian Maximilian; Ott, Kirsten Verena; Bauer, Hubert; Ache, Peter; Hedrich, Rainer; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    In plants, drought stress is a major growth limiting factor causing cell water loss through open stomata. In this study, guard cell-specific transcripts from drought-stressed Arabidopsis plants were analysed and a down-regulation of β-amylase 1 (BAM1) was found. In previous studies, BAM1 was shown to be involved in stomatal starch degradation under ambient conditions. Impaired starch breakdown of bam1 mutant plants was accompanied by decreased stomatal opening. Here, it is shown that drought tolerance of bam1 mutant plants is improved as compared with wild-type controls. Microarray analysis of stomata-specific transcripts from bam1 mutant plants revealed a significant down-regulation of genes encoding aquaporins, auxin- and ethylene-responsive factors, and cell-wall modifying enzymes. This expression pattern suggests that reduced water uptake and limited cell wall extension are associated with the closed state of stomata of bam1 mutant plants. Together these data suggest that regulation of stomata-specific starch turnover is important for adapting stomata opening to environmental needs and its breeding manipulation may result in drought tolerant crop plants. PMID:26139825

  12. ß-amylase1 mutant Arabidopsis plants show improved drought tolerance due to reduced starch breakdown in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Prasch, Christian Maximilian; Ott, Kirsten Verena; Bauer, Hubert; Ache, Peter; Hedrich, Rainer; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    In plants, drought stress is a major growth limiting factor causing cell water loss through open stomata. In this study, guard cell-specific transcripts from drought-stressed Arabidopsis plants were analysed and a down-regulation of β-amylase 1 (BAM1) was found. In previous studies, BAM1 was shown to be involved in stomatal starch degradation under ambient conditions. Impaired starch breakdown of bam1 mutant plants was accompanied by decreased stomatal opening. Here, it is shown that drought tolerance of bam1 mutant plants is improved as compared with wild-type controls. Microarray analysis of stomata-specific transcripts from bam1 mutant plants revealed a significant down-regulation of genes encoding aquaporins, auxin- and ethylene-responsive factors, and cell-wall modifying enzymes. This expression pattern suggests that reduced water uptake and limited cell wall extension are associated with the closed state of stomata of bam1 mutant plants. Together these data suggest that regulation of stomata-specific starch turnover is important for adapting stomata opening to environmental needs and its breeding manipulation may result in drought tolerant crop plants. PMID:26139825

  13. Dissection of the Complex Phenotype in Cuticular Mutants of Arabidopsis Reveals a Role of SERRATE as a Mediator

    PubMed Central

    Voisin, Derry; Nawrath, Christiane; Kurdyukov, Sergey; Franke, Rochus B.; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Efremova, Nadia; Will, Isa; Schreiber, Lukas; Yephremov, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in LACERATA (LCR), FIDDLEHEAD (FDH), and BODYGUARD (BDG) cause a complex developmental syndrome that is consistent with an important role for these Arabidopsis genes in cuticle biogenesis. The genesis of their pleiotropic phenotypes is, however, poorly understood. We provide evidence that neither distorted depositions of cutin, nor deficiencies in the chemical composition of cuticular lipids, account for these features, instead suggesting that the mutants alleviate the functional disorder of the cuticle by reinforcing their defenses. To better understand how plants adapt to these mutations, we performed a genome-wide gene expression analysis. We found that apparent compensatory transcriptional responses in these mutants involve the induction of wax, cutin, cell wall, and defense genes. To gain greater insight into the mechanism by which cuticular mutations trigger this response in the plants, we performed an overlap meta-analysis, which is termed MASTA (MicroArray overlap Search Tool and Analysis), of differentially expressed genes. This suggested that different cell integrity pathways are recruited in cesA cellulose synthase and cuticular mutants. Using MASTA for an in silico suppressor/enhancer screen, we identified SERRATE (SE), which encodes a protein of RNA–processing multi-protein complexes, as a likely enhancer. In confirmation of this notion, the se lcr and se bdg double mutants eradicate severe leaf deformations as well as the organ fusions that are typical of lcr and bdg and other cuticular mutants. Also, lcr does not confer resistance to Botrytis cinerea in a se mutant background. We propose that there is a role for SERRATE-mediated RNA signaling in the cuticle integrity pathway. PMID:19876373

  14. Auxin transport in an auxin-resistant mutant of arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, C.; Benning, C.; Estelle, M.

    1987-04-01

    The authors are studying a group of allelic recessive mutations in Arabidopsis called axr-1. Homozygous axr-1 plants are resistant to exogenously applied auxin. In addition, axr-1 mutations all confer a number of development abnormalities including an apparent reduction in apical dominance, loss of normal geotropic response, and a failure to self-fertilize due to a decrease in stamen elongation. In order to determine whether this pleiotropic phenotype is due to an alteration in auxin transport they have adapted the agar block transport assay for use in Arabidopsis stem segments. Their results indicate that as in other plant species, auxin transport is strongly polar in Arabidopsis stem segments. In addition transport is inhibited by the well characterized auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid and the artificial auxin 2,4-D. These results as well as the characterization of transport in axr-1 plants will be presented.

  15. Identification of Coilin Mutants in a Screen for Enhanced Expression of an Alternatively Spliced GFP Reporter Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Tatsuo; Lin, Wen-Dar; Fu, Jason L.; Wu, Ming-Tsung; Yang, Ho-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2016-01-01

    Coilin is a marker protein for subnuclear organelles known as Cajal bodies, which are sites of various RNA metabolic processes including the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Through self-associations and interactions with other proteins and RNA, coilin provides a structural scaffold for Cajal body formation. However, despite a conspicuous presence in Cajal bodies, most coilin is dispersed in the nucleoplasm and expressed in cell types that lack these organelles. The molecular function of coilin, particularly of the substantial nucleoplasmic fraction, remains uncertain. We identified coilin loss-of-function mutations in a genetic screen for mutants showing either reduced or enhanced expression of an alternatively spliced GFP reporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. The coilin mutants feature enhanced GFP fluorescence and diminished Cajal bodies compared with wild-type plants. The amount of GFP protein is several-fold higher in the coilin mutants owing to elevated GFP transcript levels and more efficient splicing to produce a translatable GFP mRNA. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing data from two distinct coilin mutants revealed a small, shared subset of differentially expressed genes, many encoding stress-related proteins, and, unexpectedly, a trend toward increased splicing efficiency. These results suggest that coilin attenuates splicing and modulates transcription of a select group of genes. The transcriptional and splicing changes observed in coilin mutants are not accompanied by gross phenotypic abnormalities or dramatically altered stress responses, supporting a role for coilin in fine tuning gene expression. Our GFP reporter gene provides a sensitive monitor of coilin activity that will facilitate further investigations into the functions of this enigmatic protein. PMID:27317682

  16. Identification of Coilin Mutants in a Screen for Enhanced Expression of an Alternatively Spliced GFP Reporter Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Tatsuo; Lin, Wen-Dar; Fu, Jason L; Wu, Ming-Tsung; Yang, Ho-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2016-08-01

    Coilin is a marker protein for subnuclear organelles known as Cajal bodies, which are sites of various RNA metabolic processes including the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Through self-associations and interactions with other proteins and RNA, coilin provides a structural scaffold for Cajal body formation. However, despite a conspicuous presence in Cajal bodies, most coilin is dispersed in the nucleoplasm and expressed in cell types that lack these organelles. The molecular function of coilin, particularly of the substantial nucleoplasmic fraction, remains uncertain. We identified coilin loss-of-function mutations in a genetic screen for mutants showing either reduced or enhanced expression of an alternatively spliced GFP reporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana The coilin mutants feature enhanced GFP fluorescence and diminished Cajal bodies compared with wild-type plants. The amount of GFP protein is several-fold higher in the coilin mutants owing to elevated GFP transcript levels and more efficient splicing to produce a translatable GFP mRNA. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing data from two distinct coilin mutants revealed a small, shared subset of differentially expressed genes, many encoding stress-related proteins, and, unexpectedly, a trend toward increased splicing efficiency. These results suggest that coilin attenuates splicing and modulates transcription of a select group of genes. The transcriptional and splicing changes observed in coilin mutants are not accompanied by gross phenotypic abnormalities or dramatically altered stress responses, supporting a role for coilin in fine tuning gene expression. Our GFP reporter gene provides a sensitive monitor of coilin activity that will facilitate further investigations into the functions of this enigmatic protein. PMID:27317682

  17. Membrane function in lipid mutants of Arabidopsis. First year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Browse, J.A.

    1993-06-01

    Progress on the biochemical characterization of the fad3 mutants deficient in 18:3 fatty acid synthesis and the fab2 mutant that accumulates increased amounts of 18:0 is described. Studies of the cell biology and physiology of the fab2 and fad2 mutants have provided evidence for some of the critical roles played by unsaturated fatty acids as components of plant membranes. Finally, the fab2 mutant has allowed us to carry out the first isolation and characterization of intergenic suppressor mutations in a higher plant.

  18. A SAL1 Loss-of-Function Arabidopsis Mutant Exhibits Enhanced Cadmium Tolerance in Association with Alleviation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Xi, Hongmei; Xu, Hua; Xu, Wenxiu; He, Zhenyan; Xu, Wenzhong; Ma, Mi

    2016-06-01

    SAL1, as a negative regulator of stress response signaling, has been studied extensively for its role in plant response to environmental stresses. However, the role of SAL1 in cadmium (Cd) stress response and the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using an Arabidopsis thaliana loss-of-function mutant of SAL1, we assessed Cd resistance and further explored the Cd toxicity mechanism through analysis of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. The loss of SAL1 function greatly improved Cd tolerance and significantly attenuated ER stress in Arabidopsis. Exposure to Cd induced an ER stress response in Arabidopsis as evidenced by unconventional splicing of AtbZIP60 and up-regulation of ER stress-responsive genes. Damage caused by Cd was markedly reduced in the ER stress response double mutant bzip28 bzip60 or by application of the ER stress-alleviating chemical agents, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) and 4-phenyl butyric acid (4-PBA), in wild-type plants. The Cd-induced ER stress in Arabidopsis was also alleviated by loss of function of SAL1. These results identified SAL1 as a new component mediating Cd toxicity and established the role of the ER stress response in Cd toxicity. Additionally, the attenuated ER stress in the sal1 mutant might also shed new light on the mechanism of diverse abiotic stress resistance in the SAL1 loss-of-function mutants. PMID:27044671

  19. Use of the "gl1" Mutant and the "CA-rop2" Transgenic Plants of "Arabidopsis thaliana" in the Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the use of the "glabrous1 (g11)" mutant and constitutively active "(CA)-rop2" transgenic plants of "Arabidopsis thaliana" in teaching genetics laboratory for both high school and undergraduate students. The experiments provide students with F[subscript 1] and F[subscript 2] generations within a semester for genetic and…

  20. An Arabidopsis pex10 Null Mutant Is Embryo Lethal, Implicating Peroxisomes in an Essential Role during Plant Embryogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Sparkes, Imogen A.; Brandizzi, Federica; Slocombe, Stephen P.; El-Shami, Mahmoud; Hawes, Chris; Baker, Alison

    2003-01-01

    Peroxisomes participate in many important functions in plants, including seed reserve mobilization, photorespiration, defense against oxidative stress, and auxin and jasmonate signaling. In mammals, defects in peroxisome biogenesis result in multiple system abnormalities, severe developmental delay, and death, whereas in unicellular yeasts, peroxisomes are dispensable unless required for growth of specific substrates. PEX10 encodes an integral membrane protein required for peroxisome biogenesis in mammals and yeast. To investigate the importance of PEX10 in plants, we characterized a Ds insertion mutant in the PEX10 gene of Arabidopsis (AtPEX10). Heterozygous AtPEX10::dissociation element mutants show normal vegetative phenotypes under optimal growth conditions, but produce about 20% abnormal seeds. The embryos in the abnormal seeds are predominantly homozygous for the disruption allele. They show retarded development and some morphological abnormalities. No viable homozygous mutant plants were obtained. AtPEX10 fused to yellow fluorescent protein colocalized with green fluorescent protein-serine-lysine-leucine, a well-documented peroxisomal marker, suggesting that AtPEX10 encodes a peroxisomal protein that is essential for normal embryo development and viability. PMID:14576288

  1. Effects of reduced amounts of lipid unsaturation on chloroplast ultrastructure and photosynthesis in a mutant of Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    McCourt, P.; Kunst, L.; Browse, J.; Somerville, C.R.

    1987-06-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana with reduced content of C/sub 18:3/ and C/sub 16:3/ fatty acids in membrane lipids exhibited a 45% reduction in the cross-sectional area of chloroplasts and had a decrease of similar magnitude in the amount of chloroplast lamellar membranes. The reduction in chloroplast size was partially compensated by a 45% increase in the number of chloroplasts per cell in the mutant. When expressed on a chlorophyll basis the rates of CO/sub 2/-fixation and photosynthetic electron transport were not affected by these changes. Fluorescence polarization measurements indicated that the fluidity of the thylakoid membranes was not significantly altered by the mutation. Similarly, on the basis of temperature-induced fluorescence yield enhancement measurements, there was no significant effect on the thermal stability of chlorophyll-protein complexes in the mutant. These observations suggest that the high content of trienoic fatty acids in chloroplast lipids may be an important factor regulating organelle biogenesis but is not required to support normal levels of the photosynthetic activities associated with the thylakoid membranes.

  2. Flowering responses to altered expression of phytochrome in mutants and transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.

    PubMed Central

    Bagnall, D J; King, R W; Whitelam, G C; Boylan, M T; Wagner, D; Quail, P H

    1995-01-01

    The long-day plant Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. flowers early in response to brief end-of-day (EOD) exposures to far-red light (FR) following a fluorescent short day of 8 h. FR promotion of flowering was nullified by subsequent brief red light (R) EOD exposure, indicating phytochrome involvement. The EOD response to R or FR is a robust measure of phytochrome action. Along with their wild-type (WT) parents, mutants deficient in either phytochrome A or B responded similarly to the EOD treatments. Thus, neither phytochrome A nor B exclusively regulated flowering, although phytochrome B controlled hypocotyl elongation. Perhaps a third phytochrome species is important for the EOD responses of the mutants and/or their flowering is regulated by the amount of the FR-absorbing form of phytochrome, irrespective of the phytochrome species. Overexpression of phytochrome A or phytochrome B resulted in differing photoperiod and EOD responses among the genotypes. The day-neutral overexpressor of phytochrome A had an EOD response similar to all of the mutants and WTs, whereas R EOD exposure promoted flowering in the overexpressor of phytochrome B and FR EOD exposure inhibited this promotion. The comparisons between relative flowering times and leaf numbers at flowering of the over-expressors and their WTs were not consistent across photoperiods and light treatments, although both phytochromes A and B contributed to regulating flowering of the transgenic plants. PMID:7659750

  3. A putative soybean GmsSOS1 confers enhanced salt tolerance to transgenic Arabidopsis sos1-1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Nie, Wang-Xing; Xu, Lin; Yu, Bing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The cDNA of GmsSOS1, a putative plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene isolated from Glycine max, Glycine soja, and their hybrid, was constructed into plant expression vector pCAMBIA 1300 and then transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens under the control of CaMV 35S promoter to Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type (WT) and mutant (atsos1-1) plants. By hygromycin resistance detection and PCR analysis, transgenic plants (WT35S:GmsSOS1 and atsos1-1 35S:GmsSOS1) were obtained. Seed germination, seedling growth, and Na(+) contents in roots and shoots were analytically compared among WT, atsos1-1 mutant, and their transgenic lines under salt stress. The results showed that when GmsSOS1 was integrated into the genome of A. thaliana, the inhibitions of salt stress on seed germination and seedling growth were all significantly improved, and enhanced salt tolerance was displayed, which may be attributed to the decrease of Na(+) absorption in roots and transportation in shoots of the transgenic lines, especially for that of atsos1-1 mutant. PMID:24934653

  4. The Evolutionarily Conserved Protein PHOTOSYNTHESIS AFFECTED MUTANT71 Is Required for Efficient Manganese Uptake at the Thylakoid Membrane in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Anja; Steinberger, Iris; Herdean, Andrei; Gandini, Chiara; Eisenhut, Marion; Kurz, Samantha; Morper, Anna; Hoecker, Natalie; Rühle, Thilo; Labs, Mathias; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Geimer, Stefan; Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Husted, Søren; Weber, Andreas P M; Spetea, Cornelia; Leister, Dario

    2016-04-01

    In plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-driven oxidation of water. The oxygen-evolving complex of PSII is a Mn4CaO5 cluster embedded in a well-defined protein environment in the thylakoid membrane. However, transport of manganese and calcium into the thylakoid lumen remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana PHOTOSYNTHESIS AFFECTED MUTANT71 (PAM71) is an integral thylakoid membrane protein involved in Mn(2+) and Ca(2+) homeostasis in chloroplasts. This protein is required for normal operation of the oxygen-evolving complex (as evidenced by oxygen evolution rates) and for manganese incorporation. Manganese binding to PSII was severely reduced in pam71 thylakoids, particularly in PSII supercomplexes. In cation partitioning assays with intact chloroplasts, Mn(2+) and Ca(2+) ions were differently sequestered in pam71, with Ca(2+) enriched in pam71 thylakoids relative to the wild type. The changes in Ca(2+) homeostasis were accompanied by an increased contribution of the transmembrane electrical potential to the proton motive force across the thylakoid membrane. PSII activity in pam71 plants and the corresponding Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant cgld1 was restored by supplementation with Mn(2+), but not Ca(2+) Furthermore, PAM71 suppressed the Mn(2+)-sensitive phenotype of the yeast mutant Δpmr1 Therefore, PAM71 presumably functions in Mn(2+) uptake into thylakoids to ensure optimal PSII performance. PMID:27020959

  5. An Arabidopsis Mutant with High Cyclic Electron Flow around Photosystem I (hcef) Involving the NADPH Dehydrogenase Complex[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Aaron K.; Cruz, Jeffrey A.; Kohzuma, Kaori; Dhingra, Amit; Kramer, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow (CEFI) has been proposed to balance the chloroplast energy budget, but the pathway, mechanism, and physiological role remain unclear. We isolated a new class of mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana, hcef for high CEF1, which shows constitutively elevated CEF1. The first of these, hcef1, was mapped to chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. Crossing hcef1 with pgr5, which is deficient in the antimycin A–sensitive pathway for plastoquinone reduction, resulted in a double mutant that maintained the high CEF1 phenotype, implying that the PGR5-dependent pathway is not involved. By contrast, crossing hcef1 with crr2-2, deficient in thylakoid NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH) complex, results in a double mutant that is highly light sensitive and lacks elevated CEF1, suggesting that NDH plays a direct role in catalyzing or regulating CEF1. Additionally, the NdhI component of the NDH complex was highly expressed in hcef1, whereas other photosynthetic complexes, as well as PGR5, decreased. We propose that (1) NDH is specifically upregulated in hcef1, allowing for increased CEF1; (2) the hcef1 mutation imposes an elevated ATP demand that may trigger CEF1; and (3) alternative mechanisms for augmenting ATP cannot compensate for the loss of CEF1 through NDH. PMID:20081115

  6. Insights into lignin primary structure and deconstruction from Arabidopsis thaliana COMT (caffeic acid O-methyl transferase) mutant Atomt1.

    PubMed

    Moinuddin, Syed G A; Jourdes, Michaël; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D; Ki, Chanyoung; Cardenas, Claudia L; Kim, Kye-Won; Zhang, Dianzhong; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2010-09-01

    The Arabidopsis mutant Atomt1 lignin differs from native lignin in wild type plants, in terms of sinapyl (S) alcohol-derived substructures in fiber cell walls being substituted by 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol (5OHG)-derived moieties. During programmed lignin assembly, these engender formation of benzodioxane substructures due to intramolecular cyclization of their quinone methides that are transiently formed following 8-O-4' radical-radical coupling. Thioacidolytic cleavage of the 8-O-4' inter-unit linkages in the Atomt1 mutant, relative to the wild type, indicated that cleavable sinapyl (S) and coniferyl (G) alcohol-derived monomeric moieties were stoichiometrically reduced by a circa 2 : 1 ratio. Additionally, lignin degradative analysis resulted in release of a 5OHG-5OHG-G trimer from the Atomt1 mutant, which then underwent further cleavage. Significantly, the trimeric moiety released provides new insight into lignin primary structure: during polymer assembly, the first 5OHG moiety is linked via a C8-O-X inter-unit linkage, whereas subsequent addition of monomers apparently involves sequential addition of 5OHG and G moieties to the growing chain in a 2 : 1 overall stoichiometry. This quantification data thus provides further insight into how inter-unit linkage frequencies in native lignins are apparently conserved (or near conserved) during assembly in both instances, as well as providing additional impetus to resolve how the overall question of lignin macromolecular assembly is controlled in terms of both type of monomer addition and primary sequence. PMID:20652169

  7. The influence of microgravity and spaceflight on columella cell ultrastructure in starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guisinger, M. M.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    The ultrastructure of root cap columella cells was studied by morphometric analysis in wild-type, a reduced-starch mutant, and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis grown in microgravity (F-microgravity) and compared to ground 1g (G-1g) and flight 1g (F-1g) controls. Seedlings of the wild-type and reduced-starch mutant that developed during an experiment on the Space Shuttle (both the F-microgravity samples and the F-lg control) exhibited a decreased starch content in comparison to the G-1g control. These results suggest that some factor associated with spaceflight (and not microgravity per se) affects starch metabolism. Elevated levels of ethylene were found during the experiments on the Space Shuttle, and analysis of ground controls with added ethylene demonstrated that this gas was responsible for decreased starch levels in the columella cells. This is the first study to use an on-board centrifuge as a control when quantifying starch in spaceflight-grown plants. Furthermore, our results show that ethylene levels must be carefully considered and controlled when designing experiments with plants for the International Space Station.

  8. Analysis of knockout mutants reveals non-redundant functions of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase isoforms in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pham, Phuong Anh; Wahl, Vanessa; Tohge, Takayuki; de Souza, Laise Rosado; Zhang, Youjun; Do, Phuc Thi; Olas, Justyna J; Stitt, Mark; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) has a dual function being involved both in the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and being a constituent of the NAD(+) salvage pathway. To date most studies, both in plant and non-plant systems, have focused on the signaling role of PARP in poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation rather than any role that can be ascribed to its metabolic function. In order to address this question we here used a combination of expression, transcript and protein localization studies of all three PARP isoforms of Arabidopsis alongside physiological analysis of the corresponding mutants. Our analyses indicated that whilst all isoforms of PARP were localized to the nucleus they are also present in non-nuclear locations with parp1 and parp3 also localised in the cytosol, and parp2 also present in the mitochondria. We next isolated and characterized insertional knockout mutants of all three isoforms confirming a complete knockout in the full length transcript levels of the target genes as well as a reduced total leaf NAD hydrolase activity in the two isoforms (PARP1, PARP2) that are highly expressed in leaves. Physiological evaluation of the mutant lines revealed that they displayed distinctive metabolic and root growth characteristics albeit unaltered leaf morphology under optimal growth conditions. We therefore conclude that the PARP isoforms play non-redundant non-nuclear metabolic roles and that their function is highly important in rapidly growing tissues such as the shoot apical meristem, roots and seeds. PMID:26428915

  9. Dominant negative suppression of arabidopsis photoresponses by mutant phytochrome A sequences identifies spatially discrete regulatory domains in the photoreceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, M; Douglas, N; Quail, P H

    1994-01-01

    We used the exaggerated short hypocotyl phenotype induced by oat phytochrome A overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis to monitor the biological activity of mutant phytochrome A derivatives. Three different mutations, which were generated by removing 52 amino acids from the N terminus (delta N52), the entire C-terminal domain (delta C617), or amino acids 617-686 (delta 617-686) of the oat molecule, each caused striking dominant negative interference with the ability of endogenous Arabidopsis phytochrome A to inhibit hypocotyl growth in continuous far-red light ("far-red high irradiance response" conditions). By contrast, in continuous white or red light, delta N52 was as active as the unmutagenized oat phytochrome A protein in suppressing hypocotyl elongation, while delta C617 and delta 617-686 continued to exhibit dominant negative behavior under these conditions. These data suggest that at least three spatially discrete molecular domains coordinate the photoregulatory activities of phytochrome A in Arabidopsis seedlings. The first is the chromophore-bearing N-terminal domain between residues 53 and 616 that is apparently sufficient for the light-induced initiation but not the completion of productive interactions with transduction chain components. The second is the C-terminal domain between residues 617 and 1129 that is apparently necessary for completion of productive interactions under all irradiation conditions. The third is the N-terminal 52 amino acids that are apparently necessary for completion of productive interactions only under far-red high irradiance conditions and are completely dispensable under white and red light regimes. PMID:8180501

  10. Agrobacterium mediated transfer of a mutant Arabidopsis acetolactate synthase gene confers resistance to chlorsulfuron in chicory (Cichorium intybus L.).

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, A; Vaucheret, H; Pautot, V; Chupeau, Y

    1992-06-01

    Leaf discs of C. intybus were inoculated with an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain harboring a neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) gene for kanamycin resistance and a mutant acetolactate synthase gene (csr1-1) from Arabidopsis thaliana conferring resistance to sulfonylurea herbicides. A regeneration medium was optimized which permitted an efficient shoot regeneration from leaf discs. Transgenic shoots were selected on rooting medium containing 100 mg/l kanamycin sulfate. Integration of the csr1-1 gene into genomic DNA of kanamycin resistant chicory plants was confirmed by Southern blot hybridizations. Analysis of the selfed progenies (S1 and S2) of two independent transformed clones showed that kanamycin and chlorsulfuron resistances were inherited as dominant Mendelian traits. The method described here for producing transformed plants will allow new opportunities for chicory breeding. PMID:24203132

  11. Root hair formation at the root-hypocotyl junction in CPC-LIKE MYB double and triple mutants of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Takuji; Hayashi, Naoto; Tominaga-Wada, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, R3-type MYB genes, CAPRICE (CPC) and its family of genes including TRIPTYCHON (TRY), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC1 (ETC1), ETC2 and CPC-LIKE MYB3 cooperatively regulate epidermal cell differentiation. Root hair formation is greatly reduced by a mutation in CPC, and try and etc1 enhance this phenotype. In this study, we demonstrate that CPC, TRY and ETC1 are also involved in root hair formation at the root-hypocotyl junction. The cpc try and cpc etc1 double mutants showed a reduced number of root hairs in that area. Additionally, the expression of ETC1::GUS was higher near this area. These results suggest that CPC family of genes also cooperatively regulates root hair formation at the root-hypocotyl junction in unique ways. PMID:26339713

  12. Identification of activation-tag Arabidopsis mutants with altered production of germination stimulants for Phelipanche ramosa (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kirilova, Ina; Denev, Iliya D.; Bineva, Rumyana; Gevezova, Maria; Alexandrova, Milena; Kostov, Kaloyan; Batchvarova, Rossitza

    2014-01-01

    Germination of seeds of root parasites like broomrapes (Orobanchaceae) is tightly regulated by chemical products exuded from the roots of the host plant, known as germination stimulants (GSs). Changes in the levels of synthesis and emission of GS can allow the development of practical measures for control of the crops-harming parasitic species. However, the genes encoding enzymes responsible for GS biosynthesis are still unknown. We performed a large-scale screening of 62,000 Arabidopsis activation-tag mutants for alteration in susceptibility to Phelipanche ramosa and to identify lines with altered GS production among them. After five successive screenings we identified 36 lines with altered susceptibility to P. ramosa. Seven of them displayed altered levels of GS production. By using a combination of Southern blot and thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction (TAIL-PCR), we pinpointed the location of activation-tag constructs in these lines. A combination of differential display and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) allowed us to identify several affected genes. Two of them are directly involved in isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway in chloroplasts, and we believe that their activation led to increased levels of GS production. We believe that these genes are responsible for increased GS production in five of the Arabidopsis lines resistant to P. ramosa. PMID:26740753

  13. A small GTP-binding protein from Arabidopsis thaliana functionally complements the yeast YPT6 null mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Bednarek, S Y; Reynolds, T L; Schroeder, M; Grabowski, R; Hengst, L; Gallwitz, D; Raikhel, N V

    1994-01-01

    A clone designated A.t.RAB6 encoding a small GTP-binding protein was isolated from a cDNA library of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue. The predicted amino acid sequence was highly homologous to the mammalian and yeast counterparts, H.Rab6 and Ryh1/Ypt6, respectively. Lesser homology was found between the predicted Arabidopsis protein sequence and two small GTP-binding proteins isolated from plant species (44% homology to Zea mays Ypt1 and 43% homology to Nicotiana tabacum Rab5). Conserved stretches in the deduced amino acid sequence of A.t.Rab6 include four regions involved in GTP-binding, an effector region, and C-terminal cysteine residues required for prenylation and subsequent membrane attachment. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that A.t.Rab6 mRNA was expressed in root, leaf, stem, and flower tissues from A. thaliana with the highest levels present in roots. Escherichia coli produced histidine-tagged A.t.Rab6 protein-bound GTP, whereas a mutation in one of the guanine nucleotide-binding sites (asparagine122 to isoleucine) rendered it incapable of binding GTP. Functionally, the A.t.RAB6 gene was able to complement the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the YPT6 null mutant in yeast. The isolation of this gene will aid in the dissection of the machinery involved in soluble protein sorting at the trans-Golgi network of plants. PMID:8159788

  14. The Arabidopsis szl1 mutant reveals a critical role of β-carotene in photosystem I photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, Stefano; Li, Zhirong; Niyogi, Krishna K; Bassi, Roberto; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2012-08-01

    Carotenes and their oxygenated derivatives, the xanthophylls, are structural determinants in both photosystems (PS) I and II. They bind and stabilize photosynthetic complexes, increase the light-harvesting capacity of chlorophyll-binding proteins, and have a major role in chloroplast photoprotection. Localization of carotenoid species within each PS is highly conserved: Core complexes bind carotenes, whereas peripheral light-harvesting systems bind xanthophylls. The specific functional role of each xanthophyll species has been recently described by genetic dissection, however the in vivo role of carotenes has not been similarly defined. Here, we have analyzed the function of carotenes in photosynthesis and photoprotection, distinct from that of xanthophylls, by characterizing the suppressor of zeaxanthin-less (szl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) which, due to the decreased activity of the lycopene-β-cyclase, shows a lower carotene content than wild-type plants. When grown at room temperature, mutant plants showed a lower content in PSI light-harvesting complex I complex than the wild type, and a reduced capacity for chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, the rapidly reversible component of nonphotochemical quenching. When exposed to high light at chilling temperature, szl1 plants showed stronger photoxidation than wild-type plants. Both PSI and PSII from szl1 were similarly depleted in carotenes and yet PSI activity was more sensitive to light stress than PSII as shown by the stronger photoinhibition of PSI and increased rate of singlet oxygen release from isolated PSI light-harvesting complex I complexes of szl1 compared with the wild type. We conclude that carotene depletion in the core complexes impairs photoprotection of both PS under high light at chilling temperature, with PSI being far more affected than PSII. PMID:23029671

  15. A double mutant allele, csr1-4, of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes an acetolactate synthase with altered kinetics.

    PubMed

    Mourad, G; Williams, D; King, J

    1995-01-01

    A comparison is made of the kinetic characteristics of acetolactate synthase (EC 4.1.3.18) in extracts from Columbia wild type and four near-isogenic, herbicide-resistant mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. The mutants used were the chlorsulfuron-resistant GH50 (csr1-1), the imazapyr-resistant GH90 (csr1-2), the triazolopyrimidine-resistant Tzp5 (csr1-3) and the multiherbicide-resistant, double mutant GM4.8 (csr1-4), derived from csr1-1 and csr1-2 by intragenic recombination (G. Mourad et al. 1994, Mol. Gen. Genet. 243, 178-184). Kmapp and Vmax values for the substrate pyruvate were unaffected by any of the mutations giving rise to herbicide resistance. Feedback inhibition by L-valine (L-Val), L-leucine (L-Leu) and L-isoleucine (L-Ile) of acetolactate synthase extracted from wild type and mutants fitted a mixed competitive pattern most closely. Ki values for L-Val, L-Leu and L-Ile inhibition were not significantly different from wild type in extracts from csr1-1, csr1-2, and csr1-3. Ki values were significantly higher than wild type by two- and five-fold, respectively, for csr1-4 with L-Val and L-Leu but not L-Ile. GM4.8 (csr1-4) plants were also highly resistant in their growth to added L-Val and L-Leu.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7767237

  16. An Effective Strategy for Reliably Isolating Heritable and Cas9-Free Arabidopsis Mutants Generated by CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiuhua; Chen, Jilin; Dai, Xinhua; Zhang, Da

    2016-01-01

    Mutations generated by CRISPR/Cas9 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are often somatic and are rarely heritable. Isolation of mutations in Cas9-free Arabidopsis plants can ensure the stable transmission of the identified mutations to next generations, but the process is laborious and inefficient. Here, we present a simple visual screen for Cas9-free T2 seeds, allowing us to quickly obtain Cas9-free Arabidopsis mutants in the T2 generation. To demonstrate this in principle, we targeted two sites in the AUXIN-BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) gene, whose function as a membrane-associated auxin receptor has been challenged recently. We obtained many T1 plants with detectable mutations near the target sites, but only a small fraction of T1 plants yielded Cas9-free abp1 mutations in the T2 generation. Moreover, the mutations did not segregate in Mendelian fashion in the T2 generation. However, mutations identified in the Cas9-free T2 plants were stably transmitted to the T3 generation following Mendelian genetics. To further simplify the screening procedure, we simultaneously targeted two sites in ABP1 to generate large deletions, which can be easily identified by PCR. We successfully generated two abp1 alleles that contained 1,141- and 711-bp deletions in the ABP1 gene. All of the Cas9-free abp1 alleles we generated were stable and heritable. The method described here allows for effectively isolating Cas9-free heritable CRISPR mutants in Arabidopsis. PMID:27208253

  17. An Effective Strategy for Reliably Isolating Heritable and Cas9-Free Arabidopsis Mutants Generated by CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiuhua; Chen, Jilin; Dai, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Zhao, Yunde

    2016-07-01

    Mutations generated by CRISPR/Cas9 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are often somatic and are rarely heritable. Isolation of mutations in Cas9-free Arabidopsis plants can ensure the stable transmission of the identified mutations to next generations, but the process is laborious and inefficient. Here, we present a simple visual screen for Cas9-free T2 seeds, allowing us to quickly obtain Cas9-free Arabidopsis mutants in the T2 generation. To demonstrate this in principle, we targeted two sites in the AUXIN-BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) gene, whose function as a membrane-associated auxin receptor has been challenged recently. We obtained many T1 plants with detectable mutations near the target sites, but only a small fraction of T1 plants yielded Cas9-free abp1 mutations in the T2 generation. Moreover, the mutations did not segregate in Mendelian fashion in the T2 generation. However, mutations identified in the Cas9-free T2 plants were stably transmitted to the T3 generation following Mendelian genetics. To further simplify the screening procedure, we simultaneously targeted two sites in ABP1 to generate large deletions, which can be easily identified by PCR. We successfully generated two abp1 alleles that contained 1,141- and 711-bp deletions in the ABP1 gene. All of the Cas9-free abp1 alleles we generated were stable and heritable. The method described here allows for effectively isolating Cas9-free heritable CRISPR mutants in Arabidopsis. PMID:27208253

  18. Functional characterization of mutants affected in the carbonic anhydrase domain of the respiratory complex I in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Soto, Débora; Córdoba, Juan Pablo; Villarreal, Fernando; Bartoli, Carlos; Schmitz, Jessica; Maurino, Veronica G; Braun, Hans Peter; Pagnussat, Gabriela C; Zabaleta, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    The NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex (complex I) (EC 1.6.5.3) is the main entrance site of electrons into the respiratory chain. In a variety of eukaryotic organisms, except animals and fungi (Opisthokonta), it contains an extra domain comprising trimers of putative γ-carbonic anhydrases, named the CA domain, which has been proposed to be essential for assembly of complex I. However, its physiological role in plants is not fully understood. Here, we report that Arabidopsis mutants defective in two CA subunits show an altered photorespiratory phenotype. Mutants grown in ambient air show growth retardation compared to wild-type plants, a feature that is reversed by cultivating plants in a high-CO2 atmosphere. Moreover, under photorespiratory conditions, carbon assimilation is diminished and glycine accumulates, suggesting an imbalance with respect to photorespiration. Additionally, transcript levels of specific CA subunits are reduced in plants grown under non-photorespiratory conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that the CA domain of plant complex I contributes to sustaining efficient photosynthesis under ambient (photorespiratory) conditions. PMID:26148112

  19. Hormone Autotrophic Growth and Differentiation Identifies Mutant Lines of Arabidopsis with Altered Cytokinin and Auxin Content or Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Markus; Rupp, Hans-Michael; Prinsen, Els; Motyka, Václav; Van Onckelen, Harry; Schmülling, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    We describe mutant tissue lines of Arabidopsis that are able to grow in vitro as callus on hormone-free medium. The 14 lines presented here show different hormone autotrophic differentiation behaviors that can be classified into three categories: (a) forming roots (rooty callus), (b) forming shoots or shoot-like structures (shooty callus), or (c) growing without organ formation (callus). Three fast-growing lines showed altered steady-state mRNA levels of the Cdc2 and CycD3 cell cycle genes. Three of the six rooty callus lines contained about 20- to 30-fold higher levels of auxins than wild-type callus. These and two other lines with normal auxin content showed an increased steady-state level of IAA1 and IAA2 transcripts in the absence of exogenous auxin. Five of the six shooty callus lines had increased steady-state mRNA levels of the CKI1 gene and/or of the homeobox genes KNAT1 and STM, suggesting that the phenotype is linked to altered cytokinin signaling. Also, one cytokinin-overproducing line with only 5% of wild-type cytokinin oxidase activity was identified. These results indicate that screening for hormone-autonomous growth identifies mutants with altered hormone content or signaling. PMID:10712535

  20. The irregular xylem 2 mutant is an allele of korrigan that affects the secondary cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Szyjanowicz, Pio M J; McKinnon, Iain; Taylor, Neil G; Gardiner, John; Jarvis, Mike C; Turner, Simon R

    2004-03-01

    The irregular xylem 2 (irx2) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibits a cellulose deficiency in the secondary cell wall, which is brought about by a point mutation in the KORRIGAN (KOR) beta,1-4 endoglucanase (beta,1-4 EGase) gene. Measurement of the total crystalline cellulose in the inflorescence stem indicates that the irx2 mutant contains approximately 30% of the level present in the wild type (WT). Fourier-Transform Infra Red (FTIR) analysis, however, indicates that there is no decrease in cellulose in primary cell walls of the cortical and epidermal cells of the stem. KOR expression is correlated with cellulose synthesis and is highly expressed in cells synthesising a secondary cell wall. Co-precipitation experiments, using either an epitope-tagged form of KOR or IRX3 (AtCesA7), suggest that KOR is not an integral part of the cellulose synthase complex. These data are supported by immunolocalisation of KOR that suggests that KOR does not localise to sites of secondary cell wall deposition in the developing xylem. The defect in irx2 plant is consistent with a role for KOR in the later stages of secondary cell wall formation, suggesting a role in processing of the growing microfibrils or release of the cellulose synthase complex. PMID:14871312

  1. The rib1 Mutant Is Resistant to Indole-3-Butyric Acid, an Endogenous Auxin in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Poupart, Julie; Waddell, Candace S.

    2000-01-01

    The presence of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) as an endogenous auxin in Arabidopsis has been recently demonstrated. However, the in vivo role of IBA remains to be elucidated. We present the characterization of a semi-dominant mutant that is affected in its response to IBA, but shows a wild-type response to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the predominant and most studied form of auxin. We have named this mutant rib1 for resistant to IBA. Root elongation assays show that rib1 is specifically resistant to IBA, to the synthetic auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and to auxin transport inhibitors. rib1 does not display increased resistance to IAA, to the synthetic auxin naphthalene acetic acid, or to other classes of plant hormones. rib1 individuals also have other root specific phenotypes including a shortened primary root, an increased number of lateral roots, and a more variable response than wild type to a change in gravitational vector. Adult rib1 plants are morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type plants. These phenotypes suggest that rib1 alters IBA activity in the root, thereby affecting root development and response to environmental stimuli. We propose models in which RIB1 has a function in either IBA transport or response. Our experiments also suggest that IBA does not use the same mechanism to exit cells as does IAA and we propose a model for IBA transport. PMID:11115890

  2. The Arabidopsis nox mutant lacking carotene hydroxylase activity reveals a critical role for xanthophylls in photosystem I biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Piques, Maria; Ronzani, Michela; Molesini, Barbara; Alboresi, Alessandro; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Bassi, Roberto

    2013-02-01

    Carotenes, and their oxygenated derivatives xanthophylls, are essential components of the photosynthetic apparatus. They contribute to the assembly of photosynthetic complexes and participate in light absorption and chloroplast photoprotection. Here, we studied the role of xanthophylls, as distinct from that of carotenes, by characterizing a no xanthophylls (nox) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which was obtained by combining mutations targeting the four carotenoid hydroxylase genes. nox plants retained α- and β-carotenes but were devoid in xanthophylls. The phenotype included depletion of light-harvesting complex (LHC) subunits and impairment of nonphotochemical quenching, two effects consistent with the location of xanthophylls in photosystem II antenna, but also a decreased efficiency of photosynthetic electron transfer, photosensitivity, and lethality in soil. Biochemical analysis revealed that the nox mutant was specifically depleted in photosystem I function due to a severe deficiency in PsaA/B subunits. While the stationary level of psaA/B transcripts showed no major differences between genotypes, the stability of newly synthesized PsaA/B proteins was decreased and translation of psaA/B mRNA was impaired in nox with respect to wild-type plants. We conclude that xanthophylls, besides their role in photoprotection and LHC assembly, are also needed for photosystem I core translation and stability, thus making these compounds indispensable for autotrophic growth. PMID:23396829

  3. Plasma membrane lipid–protein interactions affect signaling processes in sterol-biosynthesis mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zauber, Henrik; Burgos, Asdrubal; Garapati, Prashanth; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane is an important organelle providing structure, signaling and transport as major biological functions. Being composed of lipids and proteins with different physicochemical properties, the biological functions of membranes depend on specific protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions. Interactions of proteins with their specific sterol and lipid environment were shown to be important factors for protein recruitment into sub-compartmental structures of the plasma membrane. System-wide implications of altered endogenous sterol levels for membrane functions in living cells were not studied in higher plant cells. In particular, little is known how alterations in membrane sterol composition affect protein and lipid organization and interaction within membranes. Here, we conducted a comparative analysis of the plasma membrane protein and lipid composition in Arabidopsis sterol-biosynthesis mutants smt1 and ugt80A2;B1. smt1 shows general alterations in sterol composition while ugt80A2;B1 is significantly impaired in sterol glycosylation. By systematically analyzing different cellular fractions and combining proteomic with lipidomic data we were able to reveal contrasting alterations in lipid–protein interactions in both mutants, with resulting differential changes in plasma membrane signaling status. PMID:24672530

  4. Photosystem II Repair and Plant Immunity: Lessons Learned from Arabidopsis Mutant Lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3.

    PubMed

    Järvi, Sari; Isojärvi, Janne; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Mamedov, Fikret; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415-425). Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light. PMID:27064270

  5. Photosystem II Repair and Plant Immunity: Lessons Learned from Arabidopsis Mutant Lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3

    PubMed Central

    Järvi, Sari; Isojärvi, Janne; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Mamedov, Fikret; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415–425). Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light. PMID:27064270

  6. An Arabidopsis Mutant Tolerant to Lethal Ultraviolet-B Levels Shows Constitutively Elevated Accumulation of Flavonoids and Other Phenolics1

    PubMed Central

    Bieza, Kim; Lois, Rodrigo

    2001-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of mutants hypersensitive to ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been a powerful tool to learn about the mechanisms that protect plants against UV-induced damage. To increase our understanding of the various mechanisms of defense against UVB radiation, we searched for mutations that would increase the level of tolerance of Arabidopsis plants to UV radiation. We describe a single gene dominant mutation (uvt1) that leads to a remarkable tolerance to UVB radiation conditions that would kill wild-type plants. Pigment analyses show a constitutive increase in accumulation of UV-absorbing compounds in uvt1 that increases the capacity of the leaves to block UVB radiation and therefore is likely to be responsible for the elevated resistance of this mutant to UVB radiation. These increases in absorption in the UV region are due, at least in part, to increases in flavonoid and sinapate accumulation. Expression of chalcone synthase (CHS) mRNA was shown to be constitutively elevated in uvt1 plants, suggesting that the increases in absorption may be a consequence of changes in gene expression. Expression of CHS in uvt1 was shown to be still inducible by UV, indicating that the uvt1 lesion may not affect the UV-mediated regulation of CHS gene expression. Our data support an important role for UV screens in the overall protection of plants to UVB radiation. The uvt1 mutant could prove to be an important tool to elucidate further the exact role of UV-absorbing pigments in UV protection as well as the relative contribution of other mechanisms to the overall tolerance of plants to UV radiation. PMID:11457961

  7. SHORT-ROOT Deficiency Alleviates the Cell Death Phenotype of the Arabidopsis catalase2 Mutant under Photorespiration-Promoting Conditions.

    PubMed

    Waszczak, Cezary; Kerchev, Pavel I; Mühlenbock, Per; Hoeberichts, Frank A; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Mhamdi, Amna; Willems, Patrick; Denecker, Jordi; Kumpf, Robert P; Noctor, Graham; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can act as a signaling molecule that influences various aspects of plant growth and development, including stress signaling and cell death. To analyze molecular mechanisms that regulate the response to increased H2O2 levels in plant cells, we focused on the photorespiration-dependent peroxisomal H2O2 production in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking CATALASE2 (CAT2) activity (cat2-2). By screening for second-site mutations that attenuate the PSII maximum efficiency (Fv'/Fm') decrease and lesion formation linked to the cat2-2 phenotype, we discovered that a mutation in SHORT-ROOT (SHR) rescued the cell death phenotype of cat2-2 plants under photorespiration-promoting conditions. SHR deficiency attenuated H2O2-dependent gene expression, oxidation of the glutathione pool, and ascorbate depletion in a cat2-2 genetic background upon exposure to photorespiratory stress. Decreased glycolate oxidase and catalase activities together with accumulation of glycolate further implied that SHR deficiency impacts the cellular redox homeostasis by limiting peroxisomal H2O2 production. The photorespiratory phenotype of cat2-2 mutants did not depend on the SHR functional interactor SCARECROW and the sugar signaling component ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE4, despite the requirement for exogenous sucrose for cell death attenuation in cat2-2 shr-6 double mutants. Our findings reveal a link between SHR and photorespiratory H2O2 production that has implications for the integration of developmental and stress responses. PMID:27432873

  8. Analysis of multiple photoreceptor pigments for phototropism in a mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konjevic, R.; Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    The shape of the fluence-response relationship for the phototropic response of the JK224 strain of Arabidopsis thaliana depends on the fluence rate and wavelength of the actinic light. At low fluence rate (0.1 micromole m-2 s-1), the response to 450-nm light is characterized by a single maximum at about 9 micromoles m-2. At higher fluence rate (0.4 micromole m-2 s-1), the response shows two maxima, at 4.5 and 9 micromoles m-2. The response to 510-nm light shows a single maximum at 4.5 micromoles m-2. Unilateral preirradiation with high fluence rate (25 micromoles m-2 s-1) 510-nm light eliminates the maximum at 4.5 micromoles m-2 in the fluence response curve to a subsequent unilateral 450-nm irradiation, while the second maximum at 9 micromoles m-2 is unaffected. Based on these results, it is concluded that a single photoreceptor pigment has been altered in the JK224 strain of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  9. Quenching in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking monomeric antenna proteins of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Miloslavina, Yuliya; de Bianchi, Silvia; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto; Holzwarth, Alfred R

    2011-10-21

    The minor light-harvesting complexes CP24, CP26, and CP29 have been proposed to play a key role in the zeaxanthin (Zx)-dependent high light-induced regulation (NPQ) of excitation energy in higher plants. To characterize the detailed roles of these minor complexes in NPQ and to determine their specific quenching effects we have studied the ultrafast fluorescence kinetics in knockout (ko) mutants koCP26, koCP29, and the double mutant koCP24/CP26. The data provide detailed insight into the quenching processes and the reorganization of the Photosystem (PS) II supercomplex under quenching conditions. All genotypes showed two NPQ quenching sites. Quenching site Q1 is formed by a light-induced functional detachment of parts of the PSII supercomplex and a pronounced quenching of the detached antenna parts. The antenna remaining bound to the PSII core was also quenched substantially in all genotypes under NPQ conditions (quenching site Q2) as compared with the dark-adapted state. The latter quenching was about equally strong in koCP26 and the koCP24/CP26 mutants as in the WT. Q2 quenching was substantially reduced, however, in koCP29 mutants suggesting a key role for CP29 in the total NPQ. The observed quenching effects in the knockout mutants are complicated by the fact that other minor antenna complexes do compensate in part for the lack of the CP24 and/or CP29 complexes. Their lack also causes some LHCII dissociation already in the dark. PMID:21844190

  10. Quenching in Arabidopsis thaliana Mutants Lacking Monomeric Antenna Proteins of Photosystem II*

    PubMed Central

    Miloslavina, Yuliya; de Bianchi, Silvia; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto; Holzwarth, Alfred R.

    2011-01-01

    The minor light-harvesting complexes CP24, CP26, and CP29 have been proposed to play a key role in the zeaxanthin (Zx)-dependent high light-induced regulation (NPQ) of excitation energy in higher plants. To characterize the detailed roles of these minor complexes in NPQ and to determine their specific quenching effects we have studied the ultrafast fluorescence kinetics in knockout (ko) mutants koCP26, koCP29, and the double mutant koCP24/CP26. The data provide detailed insight into the quenching processes and the reorganization of the Photosystem (PS) II supercomplex under quenching conditions. All genotypes showed two NPQ quenching sites. Quenching site Q1 is formed by a light-induced functional detachment of parts of the PSII supercomplex and a pronounced quenching of the detached antenna parts. The antenna remaining bound to the PSII core was also quenched substantially in all genotypes under NPQ conditions (quenching site Q2) as compared with the dark-adapted state. The latter quenching was about equally strong in koCP26 and the koCP24/CP26 mutants as in the WT. Q2 quenching was substantially reduced, however, in koCP29 mutants suggesting a key role for CP29 in the total NPQ. The observed quenching effects in the knockout mutants are complicated by the fact that other minor antenna complexes do compensate in part for the lack of the CP24 and/or CP29 complexes. Their lack also causes some LHCII dissociation already in the dark. PMID:21844190

  11. Proteome readjustments in the apoplastic space of Arabidopsis thaliana ggt1 mutant leaves exposed to UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Trentin, Anna Rita; Pivato, Micaela; Mehdi, Syed M M; Barnabas, Leonard Ebinezer; Giaretta, Sabrina; Fabrega-Prats, Marta; Prasad, Dinesh; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Masi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation acts as an environmental stimulus, but in high doses it has detrimental effects on plant metabolism. Plasma membranes represent a major target for Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generated by this harmful radiation. Oxidative reactions occurring in the apoplastic space are counteracted by antioxidative systems mainly involving ascorbate and, to some extent, glutathione. The occurrence of the latter and its exact role in the extracellular space are not well documented, however. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the gamma-glutamyl transferase isoform (GGT1) bound to the cell wall takes part in the so-called gamma-glutamyl cycle for extracellular glutathione degradation and recovery, and may be implicated in redox sensing and balance. In this work, oxidative conditions were imposed with Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) and studied in redox altered ggt1 mutants. The response of ggt1 knockout Arabidopsis leaves to UV-B radiation was assessed by investigating changes in extracellular glutathione and ascorbate content and their redox state, and in apoplastic protein composition. Our results show that, on UV-B exposure, soluble antioxidants respond to the oxidative conditions in both genotypes. Rearrangements occur in their apoplastic protein composition, suggesting an involvement of Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2), which may ultimately act as a signal. Other important changes relating to hormonal effects, cell wall remodeling, and redox activities are discussed. We argue that oxidative stress conditions imposed by UV-B and disruption of the gamma-glutamyl cycle result in similar stress-induced responses, to some degree at least. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001807. PMID:25852701

  12. Proteome readjustments in the apoplastic space of Arabidopsis thaliana ggt1 mutant leaves exposed to UV-B radiation

    PubMed Central

    Trentin, Anna Rita; Pivato, Micaela; Mehdi, Syed M. M.; Barnabas, Leonard Ebinezer; Giaretta, Sabrina; Fabrega-Prats, Marta; Prasad, Dinesh; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Masi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation acts as an environmental stimulus, but in high doses it has detrimental effects on plant metabolism. Plasma membranes represent a major target for Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generated by this harmful radiation. Oxidative reactions occurring in the apoplastic space are counteracted by antioxidative systems mainly involving ascorbate and, to some extent, glutathione. The occurrence of the latter and its exact role in the extracellular space are not well documented, however. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the gamma-glutamyl transferase isoform (GGT1) bound to the cell wall takes part in the so-called gamma-glutamyl cycle for extracellular glutathione degradation and recovery, and may be implicated in redox sensing and balance. In this work, oxidative conditions were imposed with Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) and studied in redox altered ggt1 mutants. The response of ggt1 knockout Arabidopsis leaves to UV-B radiation was assessed by investigating changes in extracellular glutathione and ascorbate content and their redox state, and in apoplastic protein composition. Our results show that, on UV-B exposure, soluble antioxidants respond to the oxidative conditions in both genotypes. Rearrangements occur in their apoplastic protein composition, suggesting an involvement of Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2), which may ultimately act as a signal. Other important changes relating to hormonal effects, cell wall remodeling, and redox activities are discussed. We argue that oxidative stress conditions imposed by UV-B and disruption of the gamma-glutamyl cycle result in similar stress-induced responses, to some degree at least. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001807. PMID:25852701

  13. Leaf apoplastic proteome composition in UV-B treated Arabidopsis thaliana mutants impaired in extracellular glutathione degradation

    PubMed Central

    Masi, A.; Trentin, A.R.; Arrigoni, G.

    2015-01-01

    In plants, environmental perturbations often result in oxidative reactions in the apoplastic space, which are counteracted for by enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidative systems, including ascorbate and glutathione. However, the occurrence of the latter and its exact role in the extracellular space are not well documented. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the gamma-glutamyl transferase isoform GGT1 bound to the cell wall takes part in the so-called gamma-glutamyl cycle for extracellular glutathione degradation and recovery, and may be implicated in redox sensing and balance. In this work, oxidative conditions were imposed with UV-B radiation and studied in redox altered ggt1 mutants. Elevated UV-B has detrimental effects on plant metabolism, plasma membranes representing a major target for ROS generated by this harmful radiation. The response of ggt1 knockout Arabidopsis leaves to UV-B radiation was assessed by investigating changes in apoplastic protein composition. We then compared the expression changes resulting from the mutation and from the UV-B treatment. Rearrangements occurring in apoplastic protein composition suggest the involvement of hydrogen peroxide, which may ultimately act as a signal. Other important changes related to hormonal effects, cell wall remodeling, and redox activities are also reported. We argue that oxidative stress conditions imposed by UV-B and by disruption of the gamma-glutamyl cycle result in similar stress-induced responses, to some degree at least. Data shown here are associated with the article from Trentin et al. (2015) [1]; protein data have been deposited to the PRIDE database (Vizcaíno et al., 2014) [2] with identifier PXD001807. PMID:26862584

  14. The rib1 Mutant of Arabidopsis Has Alterations in Indole-3-Butyric Acid Transport, Hypocotyl Elongation, and Root Architecture1

    PubMed Central

    Poupart, Julie; Rashotte, Aaron M.; Muday, Gloria K.; Waddell, Candace S.

    2005-01-01

    Polar transport of the auxin indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) has recently been shown to occur in Arabidopsis (Arabidopis thaliana) seedlings, yet the physiological importance of this process has yet to be fully resolved. Here we describe the first demonstration of altered IBA transport in an Arabidopsis mutant, and show that the resistant to IBA (rib1) mutation results in alterations in growth, development, and response to exogenous auxin consistent with an important physiological role for IBA transport. Both hypocotyl and root IBA basipetal transport are decreased in rib1 and root acropetal IBA transport is increased. While indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) transport levels are not different in rib1 compared to wild type, root acropetal IAA transport is insensitive to the IAA efflux inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid in rib1, as is the dependent physiological process of lateral root formation. These observed changes in IBA transport are accompanied by altered rib1 phenotypes. Previously, rib1 roots were shown to be less sensitive to growth inhibition by IBA, but to have a wild-type response to IAA in root elongation. rib1 is also less sensitive to IBA in stimulation of lateral root formation and in hypocotyl elongation under most, but not all, light and sucrose conditions. rib1 has wild-type responses to IAA, except under one set of conditions, low light and 1.5% sucrose, in which both hypocotyl elongation and lateral root formation show altered IAA response. Taken together, our results support a model in which endogenous IBA influences wild-type seedling morphology. Modifications in IBA distribution in seedlings affect hypocotyl and root elongation, as well as lateral root formation. PMID:16258013

  15. Genetic screens for floral mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana: enhancers and suppressors.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Thanh Theresa; Luscher, Elizabeth; Li, Shaofang; Liu, Xigang; Won, So Youn; Chen, Xuemei

    2014-01-01

    The flower is a hallmark feature that has contributed to the evolutionary success of land plants. Diverse mutagenic agents have been employed as a tool to genetically perturb flower development and identify genes involved in floral patterning and morphogenesis. Since the initial studies to identify genes governing processes such as floral organ specification, mutagenesis in sensitized backgrounds has been used to isolate enhancers and suppressors to further probe the molecular basis of floral development. Here, we first describe two commonly employed methods for mutagenesis (using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) or T-DNAs as mutagens), and then describe three methods for identifying a mutation that leads to phenotypic alterations--traditional map-based cloning, TAIL-PCR, and deep sequencing in the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:24395255

  16. Genetic Screens for Floral Mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana: Enhancers and Suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Thanh Theresa; Luscher, Elizabeth; Li, Shaofang; Liu, Xigang; Won, So Youn; Chen, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    The flower is a hallmark feature that has contributed to the evolutionary success of land plants. Diverse mutagenic agents have been employed as a tool to genetically perturb flower development and identify genes involved in floral patterning and morphogenesis. Since the initial studies to identify genes governing processes such as floral organ specification, mutagenesis in sensitized backgrounds has been used to isolate enhancers and suppressors to further probe the molecular basis of floral development. Here, we first describe two commonly employed methods for mutagenesis (using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) or T-DNAs as mutagens), and then describe three methods for identifying a mutation that leads to phenotypic alterations—traditional map-based cloning, TAIL-PCR, and deep sequencing in the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:24395255

  17. A Protein-Based Genetic Screening Uncovers Mutants Involved in Phytochrome Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling; Xin, Ruijiao; Huq, Enamul

    2016-01-01

    Plants perceive red and far-red region of the light spectrum to regulate photomorphogenesis through a family of photoreceptors called phytochromes. Phytochromes transduce the light signals to trigger a cascade of downstream gene regulation in part via a subfamily of bHLH transcription factors called Phytochrome Interacting Factors (PIFs). As the repressors of light signaling pathways, most PIFs are phosphorylated and degraded through the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway in response to light. The mechanisms involved in the phosphorylation and degradation of PIFs have not been fully understood yet. Here we used an EMS mutagenesis and luminescent imaging system to identify mutants defective in the degradation of one of the PIFs, called PIF1. We identified five mutants named stable PIF (spf) that showed reduced degradation of PIF1 under light treatment in both luminescent imaging and immunoblot assays. The amounts of PIF1 in spf3, spf4, and spf5 were similar to a PIF1 missense mutant (PIF1–3M) that lacks interactions between PIF1 and phyA/phyB under light. The hypocotyl lengths of spf1 and spf2 were slightly longer under red light compared to the LUC-PIF1 control, while only spf1 displayed weak phenotype under far-red light conditions. Interestingly, the spf3, spf4, and spf5 displayed high abundance of PIF1, yet the hypocotyl lengths were similar to the wild type under these conditions. Cloning and characterization of these mutants will help identify key players in the light signaling pathways including, the light-regulated kinase(s) and the E3 ligase(s) necessary for the light-induced degradation of PIFs. PMID:27499759

  18. Mutants of arabidopsis thaliana that exhibit chlorosis in an atmosphere enriched with CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Artus, N.N ); Somerville, C. )

    1989-04-01

    Two nonallelic, nuclear recessive mutations have been isolated which cause chlorosis of plants grown in an atmosphere enriched to 2% CO{sub 2}. For one of the mutant lines, chlorosis begins at the veins and gradually spreads to the interveinal regions. A minimum light intensity of ca. 50 {mu}E m{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} was required for this response. For the other mutant line, the yellowing is independent of the light intensity and begins at the basal regions of the leaves and spreads to the tips. Neither line became chlorotic in a low O{sub 2} atmosphere which suppressed photorespiration as effectively as 2% CO{sub 2}. Thus, the mutations do not impose a requirement for photorespiration. Root elongation and callus growth were not affected by high CO{sub 2} for either mutant line. The possibilities that the high CO{sub 2}-sensitive phenotypes are caused by an effect of CO{sub 2} on stomata or ethylene synthesis have also been ruled out.

  19. The dominance of the herbicide resistance cost in several Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lines.

    PubMed

    Roux, Fabrice; Gasquez, Jacques; Reboud, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    Resistance evolution depends upon the balance between advantage and disadvantage (cost) conferred in treated and untreated areas. By analyzing morphological characters and simple fitness components, the cost associated with each of eight herbicide resistance alleles (acetolactate synthase, cellulose synthase, and auxin-induced target genes) was studied in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The use of allele-specific PCR to discriminate between heterozygous and homozygous plants was used to provide insights into the dominance of the resistance cost, a parameter rarely described. Morphological characters appear more sensitive than fitness (seed production) because 6 vs. 4 differences between resistant and sensitive homozygous plants were detected, respectively. Dominance levels for the fitness cost ranged from recessivity (csr1-1, ixr1-2, and axr1-3) to dominance (axr2-1) to underdominance (aux1-7). Furthermore, the dominance level of the herbicide resistance trait did not predict the dominance level of the cost of resistance. The relationship of our results to theoretical predictions of dominance and the consequences of fitness cost and its dominance in resistance management are discussed. PMID:15020435

  20. Lutein Accumulation in the Absence of Zeaxanthin Restores Nonphotochemical Quenching in the Arabidopsis thaliana npq1 Mutant[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhirong; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cruz, Jeffrey A.; Kramer, David M.; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.; Keasling, Jay D.; Niyogi, Krishna K.

    2009-01-01

    Plants protect themselves from excess absorbed light energy through thermal dissipation, which is measured as nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (NPQ). The major component of NPQ, qE, is induced by high transthylakoid ΔpH in excess light and depends on the xanthophyll cycle, in which violaxanthin and antheraxanthin are deepoxidized to form zeaxanthin. To investigate the xanthophyll dependence of qE, we identified suppressor of zeaxanthin-less1 (szl1) as a suppressor of the Arabidopsis thaliana npq1 mutant, which lacks zeaxanthin. szl1 npq1 plants have a partially restored qE but lack zeaxanthin and have low levels of violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and neoxanthin. However, they accumulate more lutein and α-carotene than the wild type. szl1 contains a point mutation in the lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) gene. Based on the pigment analysis, LCYB appears to be the major lycopene β-cyclase and is not involved in neoxanthin synthesis. The Lhcb4 (CP29) and Lhcb5 (CP26) protein levels are reduced by 50% in szl1 npq1 relative to the wild type, whereas other Lhcb proteins are present at wild-type levels. Analysis of carotenoid radical cation formation and leaf absorbance changes strongly suggest that the higher amount of lutein substitutes for zeaxanthin in qE, implying a direct role in qE, as well as a mechanism that is weakly sensitive to carotenoid structural properties. PMID:19549928

  1. A vacuolar carboxypeptidase mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is degraded by the ERAD pathway independently of its N-glycan

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaya; Kawanabe, Mitsuyoshi; Hayashi, Yoko; Endo, Toshiya; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi

    2010-03-12

    Misfolded proteins produced in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are degraded by a mechanism, the ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here we report establishment of the experimental system to analyze the ERAD in plant cells. Carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) is a vacuolar enzyme and its mutant CPY* is degraded by the ERAD in yeast. Since Arabidopsis thaliana has AtCPY, an ortholog of yeast CPY, we constructed and expressed fusion proteins consisting of AtCPY and GFP and of AtCPY*, which carries a mutation homologous to yeast CPY*, and GFP in A. thaliana cells. While AtCPY-GFP was efficiently transported to the vacuole, AtCPY*-GFP was retained in the ER to be degraded in proteasome- and Cdc48-dependent manners. We also found that AtCPY*-GFP was degraded by the ERAD in yeast cells, but that its single N-glycan did not function as a degradation signal in yeast or plant cells. Therefore, AtCPY*-GFP can be used as a marker protein to analyze the ERAD pathway, likely for nonglycosylated substrates, in plant cells.

  2. Strong morphological defects in conditional Arabidopsis abp1 knock-down mutants generated in absence of functional ABP1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine; Friml, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The Auxin Binding Protein 1 (ABP1) is one of the most studied proteins in plants. Since decades ago, it has been the prime receptor candidate for the plant hormone auxin with a plethora of described functions in auxin signaling and development. The developmental importance of ABP1 has recently been questioned by identification of Arabidopsis thaliana abp1 knock-out alleles that show no obvious phenotypes under normal growth conditions. In this study, we examined the contradiction between the normal growth and development of the abp1 knock-outs and the strong morphological defects observed in three different ethanol-inducible abp1 knock-down mutants ( abp1-AS, SS12K, SS12S). By analyzing segregating populations of abp1 knock-out vs. abp1 knock-down crosses we show that the strong morphological defects that were believed to be the result of conditional down-regulation of ABP1 can be reproduced also in the absence of the functional ABP1 protein. This data suggests that the phenotypes in  abp1 knock-down lines are due to the off-target effects and asks for further reflections on the biological function of ABP1 or alternative explanations for the missing phenotypic defects in the abp1 loss-of-function alleles. PMID:26925228

  3. Intragenic Suppression of a Trafficking-Defective Brassinosteroid Receptor Mutant in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Belkhadir, Youssef; Durbak, Amanda; Wierzba, Michael; Schmitz, Robert J.; Aguirre, Andrea; Michel, Rene; Rowe, Scott; Fujioka, Shozo; Tax, Frans E.

    2010-01-01

    The cell surface receptor kinase BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE-1 (BRI1) is the major receptor for steroid hormones in Arabidopsis. Plants homozygous for loss-of-function mutations in BRI1 display a reduction in the size of vegetative organs, resulting in dwarfism. The recessive bri1-5 mutation produces receptors that do not accumulate to wild-type levels and are retained mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum. We have isolated a dominant suppressor of the dwarf phenotype of bri1-5 plants. We show that this suppression is caused by a second-site mutation in BRI1, bri1-5R1. The bri1-5R1 mutation partially rescues the phenotypes of bri1-5 in many tissues and enhances bri1-5 phenotypes above wild-type levels in several other tissues. We demonstrate that the phenotypes of bri1-5R1 plants are due to both increased cell expansion and increased cell division. To test the mechanism of bri1-5 suppression, we assessed whether the phenotypic suppression in bri1-5R1 was dependent on ligand availability and the integrity of the signaling pathway. Our results indicate that the suppression of the dwarf phenotypes associated with bri1-5R1 requires both BR biosynthesis and the receptor kinase BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE-1 (BAK1). Finally, we show that bri1-5R1 partially restores the accumulation and plasma membrane localization of BRI1. Collectively, our results point toward a model in which bri1-R1 compensates for the protein-folding abnormalities caused by bri1-5, restoring accumulation of the receptor and its delivery to the cell surface. PMID:20457881

  4. Identification of the Abundant Hydroxyproline-Rich Glycoproteins in the Root Walls of Wild-Type Arabidopsis, an ext3 Mutant Line, and Its Phenotypic Revertant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuning; Ye, Dening; Held, Michael A.; Cannon, Maura C.; Ray, Tui; Saha, Prasenjit; Frye, Alexandra N.; Mort, Andrew J.; Kieliszewski, Marcia J.

    2015-01-01

    Extensins are members of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) superfamily that form covalently cross-linked networks in primary cell walls. A knockout mutation in EXT3 (AT1G21310), the gene coding EXTENSIN 3 (EXT3) in Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta resulted in a lethal phenotype, although about 20% of the knockout plants have an apparently normal phenotype (ANP). In this study the root cell wall HRGP components of wild-type, ANP and the ext3 mutant seedlings were characterized by peptide fractionation of trypsin digested anhydrous hydrogen fluoride deglycosylated wall residues and by sequencing using LC-MS/MS. Several HRGPs, including EXT3, were identified in the wild-type root walls but not in walls of the ANP and lethal mutant. Indeed the ANP walls and walls of mutants displaying the lethal phenotype possessed HRGPs, but the profiles suggest that changes in the amount and perhaps type may account for the corresponding phenotypes. PMID:27135319

  5. Identification of the Abundant Hydroxyproline-Rich Glycoproteins in the Root Walls of Wild-Type Arabidopsis, an ext3 Mutant Line, and Its Phenotypic Revertant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuning; Ye, Dening; Held, Michael A; Cannon, Maura C; Ray, Tui; Saha, Prasenjit; Frye, Alexandra N; Mort, Andrew J; Kieliszewski, Marcia J

    2015-01-01

    Extensins are members of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) superfamily that form covalently cross-linked networks in primary cell walls. A knockout mutation in EXT3 (AT1G21310), the gene coding EXTENSIN 3 (EXT3) in Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta resulted in a lethal phenotype, although about 20% of the knockout plants have an apparently normal phenotype (ANP). In this study the root cell wall HRGP components of wild-type, ANP and the ext3 mutant seedlings were characterized by peptide fractionation of trypsin digested anhydrous hydrogen fluoride deglycosylated wall residues and by sequencing using LC-MS/MS. Several HRGPs, including EXT3, were identified in the wild-type root walls but not in walls of the ANP and lethal mutant. Indeed the ANP walls and walls of mutants displaying the lethal phenotype possessed HRGPs, but the profiles suggest that changes in the amount and perhaps type may account for the corresponding phenotypes. PMID:27135319

  6. Analysis of a Partial Male-Sterile Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana Isolated from a Low-Energy Argon Ion Beam Mutagenized Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Min; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Yu, Zengliang

    2008-04-01

    A screen for Arabidopsis fertility mutants, mutagenized by low-energy argon ion beam, yielded two partial male-sterile mutants tc243-1 and tc243-2 which have similar phenotypes. tc243-2 was investigated in detail. The segregation ratio of the mutant phenotypes in the M2 pools suggested that mutation behaved as single Mendelian recessive mutations. tc243 showed a series of mutant phenotypes, among which partial male-sterile was its striking mutant characteristic. Phenotype analysis indicates that there are four factors leading to male sterility. a. Floral organs normally develop inside the closed bud, but the anther filaments do not elongate sufficiently to position the locules above the stigma at anthesis. b. The anther locules do not dehisce at the time of flower opening (although limited dehiscence occurs later). c. Pollens of mutant plants develop into several types of pollens at the trinucleated stage, as determined by staining with DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole), which shows a variable size, shape and number of nucleus. d. The viability of pollens is lower than that of the wild type on the germination test in vivo and vitro.

  7. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pogorelko, Gennady V.; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A.; Rodermel, Steven R.

    2016-04-06

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplificationmore » of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-tonucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. Lastly, we conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and hostpathogen interactions.« less

  8. Transcriptomic Profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana Mutant pad2.1 in Response to Combined Cold and Osmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Datta, Riddhi; Hazra, Saptarshi; Sultana, Asma; Mukhopadhyay, Ria; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of glutathione (GSH) in stress tolerance, defense response and antioxidant signaling is an established fact. In this study transcriptome analysis of pad2.1, an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, after combined osmotic and cold stress treatment has been performed to explore the intricate position of GSH in the stress and defense signaling network in planta. Microarray data revealed the differential regulation of about 1674 genes in pad2.1 amongst which 973 and 701 were significantly up- and down-regulated respectively. Gene enrichment, functional pathway analysis by DAVID and MapMan analysis identified various stress and defense related genes viz. members of heat shock protein family, peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PPIase), thioredoxin peroxidase (TPX2), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), NBS-LRR type resistance protein etc. as down-regulated. The expression pattern of the above mentioned stress and defense related genes and APETALA were also validated by comparative proteomic analysis of combined stress treated Col-0 and pad2.1. Functional annotation noted down-regulation of UDP-glycosyl transferase, 4-coumarate CoA ligase 8, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 4 (CAD4), ACC synthase and ACC oxidase which are the important enzymes of phenylpropanoid, lignin and ethylene (ET) biosynthetic pathway respectively. Since the only difference between Col-0 (Wild type) and pad2.1 is the content of GSH, so, this study suggested that in addition to its association with specific stress responsive genes and proteins, GSH provides tolerance to plants by its involvement with phenylpropanoid, lignin and ET biosynthesis under stress conditions. PMID:25822199

  9. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelko, Gennady V.; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A.; Rodermel, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-to-nucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. We conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27050746

  10. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Pogorelko, Gennady V; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A; Rodermel, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-to-nucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. We conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27050746

  11. Gravity-dependent differentiation and root coils in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and phospholipase-A-I knockdown mutant grown on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Scherer, G F E; Pietrzyk, P

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis roots on 45° tilted agar in 1-g grow in wave-like figures. In addition to waves, formation of root coils is observed in several mutants compromised in gravitropism and/or auxin transport. The knockdown mutant ppla-I-1 of patatin-related phospholipase-A-I is delayed in root gravitropism and forms increased numbers of root coils. Three known factors contribute to waving: circumnutation, gravisensing and negative thigmotropism. In microgravity, deprivation of wild type (WT) and mutant roots of gravisensing and thigmotropism and circumnutation (known to slow down in microgravity, and could potentially lead to fewer waves or increased coiling in both WT and mutant). To resolve this, mutant ppla-I-1 and WT were grown in the BIOLAB facility in the International Space Station. In 1-g, roots of both types only showed waving. In the first experiment in microgravity, the mutant after 9 days formed far more coils than in 1-g but the WT also formed several coils. After 24 days in microgravity, in both types the coils were numerous with slightly more in the mutant. In the second experiment, after 9 days in microgravity only the mutant formed coils and the WT grew arcuated roots. Cell file rotation (CFR) on the mutant root surface in microgravity decreased in comparison to WT, and thus was not important for coiling. Several additional developmental responses (hypocotyl elongation, lateral root formation, cotyledon expansion) were found to be gravity-influenced. We tentatively discuss these in the context of disturbances in auxin transport, which are known to decrease through lack of gravity. PMID:24373011

  12. Accumulation of γ- Rather than α-Tocopherol Alters Ethylene Signaling Gene Expression in the vte4 Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Cela, Jana; Chang, Caren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Tocopherols are antioxidants found in chloroplasts of leaves, and it is a matter of current debate whether or not they can affect signaling and gene expression in plant cells. For insight into the possible effects of altered tocopherol composition in chloroplasts on gene expression in the nucleus, the expression of ethylene biosynthesis, perception and signaling genes was investigated in vte1 and vte4 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, which are impaired in tocopherol (vitamin E) biosynthesis. Changes in gene expression were measured in plants exposed to either salt or water stress, and in young and mature leaves of vte1 and vte4 mutants, which lack tocopherol cyclase and γ-tocopherol methyltransferase, respectively. While transcript levels of ethylene signaling genes in the vte1 mutant and the wild type were similar in all tested conditions, major changes in gene expression occurred in the vte4 mutant, particularly in mature leaves (compared with young leaves) and under salt stress. Accumulation of γ- instead of α-tocopherol in this mutant led to elevated transcript levels of ethylene signaling pathway genes (particularly CTR1, EIN2, EIN3 and ERF1) in mature leaves of control plants. However, with salt treatment, transcript levels of most of these genes remained constant or dropped in the vte4 mutant, while they were dramatically induced in the wild type and the vte1 mutant. Furthermore, under salt stress, leaf age-induced jasmonic acid accumulated in both the vte1 mutant and the wild type, but not in the vte4 mutant. It is concluded that jasmonic acid and ethylene signaling pathways are down-regulated in mature leaves of salt-stressed vte4 plants. PMID:21719428

  13. Arabidopsis phosphatase under-producer mutants pup1 and pup3 contain mutations in the AtPAP10 and AtPAP26 genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Wang, Xiaoyue; Liu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Production and secretion of acid phosphatases (APases) is a hallmark adaptive response of plants to phosphate (Pi) deprivation. Researchers have long hypothesized that Pi starvation-induced APases are involved in internal Pi recycling and remobilization as well as in external Pi utilization. Two phosphatase under-producer (pup) mutants, pup1 and pup3, were previously isolated in Arabidopsis. Characterization of these 2 pup mutants provided the first genetic evidence for the above hypothesis. To date, however, the molecular lesions in these 2 pup mutants remain unknown. In this work, we demonstrate that pup1 and pup3 contain point mutations in the Arabidopsis purple acid phosphatase gene AtPAP10 and AtPAP26, respectively. Our results answer a long-standing question about the molecular identity of the PUP1 and PUP3 genes and corroborate the conclusions from previous studies regarding the function of AtPAP10 and AtPAP26 in plant acclimation to Pi deprivation. PMID:26251878

  14. The Cell Wall Arabinose-Deficient Arabidopsis thaliana Mutant murus5 Encodes a Defective Allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE21[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dugard, Christopher K.; Olek, Anna T.; Cooper, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional marker-based mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to determine that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) low cell wall arabinose mutant murus5 (mur5) encodes a defective allele of REVERSIBLY GLYCOSYLATED POLYPEPTIDE2 (RGP2). Marker analysis of 13 F2 confirmed mutant progeny from a recombinant mapping population gave a rough map position on the upper arm of chromosome 5, and deep sequencing of DNA from these 13 lines gave five candidate genes with G→A (C→T) transitions predicted to result in amino acid changes. Of these five, only insertional mutant alleles of RGP2, a gene that encodes a UDP-arabinose mutase that interconverts UDP-arabinopyranose and UDP-arabinofuranose, exhibited the low cell wall arabinose phenotype. The identities of mur5 and two SALK insertional alleles were confirmed by allelism tests and overexpression of wild-type RGP2 complementary DNA placed under the control of the 35S promoter in the three alleles. The mur5 mutation results in the conversion of cysteine-257 to tyrosine-257 within a conserved hydrophobic cluster predicted to be distal to the active site and essential for protein stability and possible heterodimerization with other isoforms of RGP. PMID:27217494

  15. Desaturase mutants reveal that membrane rigidification acts as a cold perception mechanism upstream of the diacylglycerol kinase pathway in Arabidopsis cells.

    PubMed

    Vaultier, Marie-Noëlle; Cantrel, Catherine; Vergnolle, Chantal; Justin, Anne-Marie; Demandre, Chantal; Benhassaine-Kesri, Ghouziel; Ciçek, Dominique; Zachowski, Alain; Ruelland, Eric

    2006-07-24

    Membrane rigidification could be the first step of cold perception in poikilotherms. We have investigated its implication in diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) activation by cold stress in suspension cells from Arabidopsis mutants altered in desaturase activities. By lateral diffusion assay, we showed that plasma membrane rigidification with temperature decrease was steeper in cells deficient in oleate desaturase than in wild type cells and in cells overexpressing linoleate desaturase. The threshold for the activation of the DAGK pathway in each type of cells correlated with this order of rigidification rate, suggesting that cold induced-membrane rigidification is upstream of DAGK pathway activation. PMID:16839551

  16. Proteomic and biochemical analyses show a functional network of proteins involved in antioxidant defense of the Arabidopsis anp2anp3 double mutant.

    PubMed

    Takáč, Tomáš; Šamajová, Olga; Vadovič, Pavol; Pechan, Tibor; Košútová, Petra; Ovečka, Miroslav; Husičková, Alexandra; Komis, George; Šamaj, Jozef

    2014-12-01

    Disentanglement of functional complexity associated with plant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling has benefited from transcriptomic, proteomic, phosphoproteomic, and genetic studies. Published transcriptomic analysis of a double homozygous recessive anp2anp3 mutant of two MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) genes called Arabidopsis thaliana Homologues of Nucleus- and Phragmoplast-localized Kinase 2 (ANP2) and 3 (ANP3) showed the upregulation of stress-related genes. In this study, a comparative proteomic analysis of anp2anp3 mutant against its respective Wassilevskaja ecotype (Ws) wild type background is provided. Such differential proteomic analysis revealed overabundance of core enzymes such as FeSOD1, MnSOD, DHAR1, and FeSOD1-associated regulatory protein CPN20, which are involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species in the anp2anp3 mutant. The proteomic results were validated at the level of single protein abundance by Western blot analyses and by quantitative biochemical determination of antioxidant enzymatic activities. Finally, the functional network of proteins involved in antioxidant defense in the anp2anp3 mutant was physiologically linked with the increased resistance of mutant seedlings against paraquat treatment. PMID:25325904

  17. Partially dissecting the steady-state electron fluxes in Photosystem I in wild-type and pgr5 and ndh mutants of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Jiancun; Takahashi, Shunichi; Fan, Da-Yong; Badger, Murray R.; Chow, Wah S.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic electron flux (CEF) around Photosystem I (PS I) is difficult to quantify. We obtained the linear electron flux (LEFO2) through both photosystems and the total electron flux through PS I (ETR1) in Arabidopsis in CO2-enriched air. ΔFlux = ETR1 – LEFO2 is an upper estimate of CEF, which consists of two components, an antimycin A-sensitive, PGR5 (proton gradient regulation 5 protein)-dependent component and an insensitive component facilitated by a chloroplastic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH). Using wild type as well as pgr5 and ndh mutants, we observed that (1) 40% of the absorbed light was partitioned to PS I; (2) at high irradiance a substantial antimycin A-sensitive CEF occurred in the wild type and the ndh mutant; (3) at low irradiance a sizable antimycin A-sensitive CEF occurred in the wild type but not in the ndh mutant, suggesting an enhancing effect of NDH in low light; and (4) in the pgr5 mutant, and the wild type and ndh mutant treated with antimycin A, a residual ΔFlux existed at high irradiance, attributable to charge recombination and/or pseudo-cyclic electron flow. Therefore, in low-light-acclimated plants exposed to high light, ΔFlux has contributions from various paths of electron flow through PS I. PMID:26442071

  18. Ultraviolet-B Radiation Impacts Light-Mediated Turnover of the Photosystem II Reaction Center Heterodimer in Arabidopsis Mutants Altered in Phenolic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Booij-James, Isabelle S.; Dube, Shyam K.; Jansen, Marcel A.K.; Edelman, Marvin; Mattoo, Autar K.

    2000-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation can have a negative impact on the growth and development of plants. Plants tolerant to UV-B alleviate these effects using UV-screening pigments that reduce the penetration of UV-B into mesophyll tissue. Little is known about the relative contribution of specific phenolic compounds to the screening capacity of leaves. The D1 and D2 proteins constituting the photosystem (PS) II reaction center heterodimer are targets of UV-B radiation and can be used as an in situ sensor for UV penetration into photosynthetic tissue. Degradation of these proteins occurs under very low fluences of UV-B, and is strongly accelerated in the presence of visible light. Using the D1-D2 degradation assay, we characterized UV-B sensitivity of Arabidopsis mutants (tt4, tt5, and fah1) that are genetically altered in their composition of phenolic compounds. We found that changes in phenol metabolism result in altered rates of PSII reaction center heterodimer degradation under mixtures of photosynthetically active radiation and UV-B. A comparison of D2 degradation kinetics showed increased UV sensitivity of the Landsberg (Landsberg erecta) tt5 mutant relative to the Landsberg tt4 mutant and the Landsberg wild type. Despite a lack of flavonoid accumulation, the tt4 mutant is not particularly UV sensitive. However, the tolerance of this mutant to UV-B may reflect the increased accumulation of sinapate esters that strongly absorb in the UV range, and may thus protect the plant against environmentally relevant UV-B radiation. This sinapate-mediated protection is less obvious for the tt4 mutant of Columbia ecotype, indicating that the relative contribution of particular phenolics to the total screening capacity varies with the genetic background. The role of sinapate esters in UV screening is further substantiated by the results with the fah1 mutant where absence of most of the sinapate esters results in a significantly accelerated degradation of D2 under mixed light

  19. Modeling the Arabidopsis seed shape by a cardioid: efficacy of the adjustment with a scale change with factor equal to the Golden Ratio and analysis of seed shape in ethylene mutants.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Emilio; Javier Martín, José; Ardanuy, Ramón; de Diego, Juana G; Tocino, Angel

    2010-03-15

    A new model for the description of Arabidopsis seed shape based on the comparison of the outline of its longitudinal section with a transformed cardioid is presented. The transformation consists of scaling the horizontal axis by a factor equal to the Golden Ratio. The elongated cardioid approximates the shape of the Arabidopsis seed with more accuracy than other figures. The length to width ratio in wild-type Columbia Arabidopsis dry seeds is close to the Golden Ratio and decreases over the course of imbibition. Dry seeds of etr1-1 mutants presented a reduced length to width ratio. Application of the new model based on the cardioid allows for comparison of shape between wild-type and mutant genotypes, revealing other general alterations in the seeds in ethylene signaling pathway mutants (etr1-1). PMID:19880215

  20. Gene expression profile of zeitlupe/lov kelch protein1 T-DNA insertion mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana: Downregulation of auxin-inducible genes in hypocotyls

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Aya; Takase, Tomoyuki; Kitaki, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kiyosue, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Elongation of hypocotyl cells has been studied as a model for elucidating the contribution of cellular expansion to plant organ growth. ZEITLUPE (ZTL) or LOV KELCH PROTEIN1 (LKP1) is a positive regulator of warmth-induced hypocotyl elongation under white light in Arabidopsis, although the molecular mechanisms by which it promotes hypocotyl cell elongation remain unknown. Microarray analysis showed that 134 genes were upregulated and 204 genes including 15 auxin-inducible genes were downregulated in the seedlings of 2 ztl T-DNA insertion mutants grown under warm conditions with continuous white light. Application of a polar auxin transport inhibitor, an auxin antagonist or an auxin biosynthesis inhibitor inhibited hypocotyl elongation of control seedlings to the level observed with the ztl mutant. Our data suggest the involvement of auxin and auxin-inducible genes in ZTL-mediated hypocotyl elongation. PMID:26237185

  1. The effect of NaCl on stomatal opening in Arabidopsis wild type and agb1 heterotrimeric G-protein mutant plants

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a major agricultural problem that affects crop yield. Na+ is transported to the shoot through the transpiration stream. The mutant of the sole Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein β subunit, agb1, is hypersensitive to salinity in part due to a higher transpiration rate. Here, we investigated the direct effect of Na+ on stomatal opening using detached epidermal peels of wild type and agb1 plants. In both genotypes, NaCl is equally as effective as KCl in mediating stomatal opening at the concentrations tested. In both genotypes, ABA is less effective in inhibiting Na+ mediated stomatal opening than K+ mediated stomatal opening. The agb1 mutant is hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of K+-mediated but not Na+-mediated stomatal opening. These results suggest that the greater transpiration observed in agb1 plants grown in saline conditions is likely not mediated by differential genotypic direct effects of Na+ on stomatal apertures. PMID:26431457

  2. The effect of NaCl on stomatal opening in Arabidopsis wild type and agb1 heterotrimeric G-protein mutant plants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a major agricultural problem that affects crop yield. Na(+) is transported to the shoot through the transpiration stream. The mutant of the sole Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein β subunit, agb1, is hypersensitive to salinity in part due to a higher transpiration rate. Here, we investigated the direct effect of Na(+) on stomatal opening using detached epidermal peels of wild type and agb1 plants. In both genotypes, NaCl is equally as effective as KCl in mediating stomatal opening at the concentrations tested. In both genotypes, ABA is less effective in inhibiting Na(+) mediated stomatal opening than K(+) mediated stomatal opening. The agb1 mutant is hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of K(+)-mediated but not Na(+)-mediated stomatal opening. These results suggest that the greater transpiration observed in agb1 plants grown in saline conditions is likely not mediated by differential genotypic direct effects of Na(+) on stomatal apertures. PMID:26431457

  3. Arabidopsis Cytokinin Receptor Mutants Reveal Functions in Shoot Growth, Leaf Senescence, Seed Size, Germination, Root Development, and Cytokinin MetabolismW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Riefler, Michael; Novak, Ondrej; Strnad, Miroslav; Schmülling, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    We used loss-of-function mutants to study three Arabidopsis thaliana sensor histidine kinases, AHK2, AHK3, and CRE1/AHK4, known to be cytokinin receptors. Mutant seeds had more rapid germination, reduced requirement for light, and decreased far-red light sensitivity, unraveling cytokinin functions in seed germination control. Triple mutant seeds were more than twice as large as wild-type seeds. Genetic analysis indicated a cytokinin-dependent endospermal and/or maternal control of embryo size. Unchanged red light sensitivity of mutant hypocotyl elongation suggests that previously reported modulation of red light signaling by A-type response regulators may not depend on cytokinin. Combined loss of AHK2 and AHK3 led to the most prominent changes during vegetative development. Leaves of ahk2 ahk3 mutants formed fewer cells, had reduced chlorophyll content, and lacked the cytokinin-dependent inhibition of dark-induced chlorophyll loss, indicating a prominent role of AHK2 and, particularly, AHK3 in the control of leaf development. ahk2 ahk3 double mutants developed a strongly enhanced root system through faster growth of the primary root and, more importantly, increased branching. This result supports a negative regulatory role for cytokinin in root growth regulation. Increased cytokinin content of receptor mutants indicates a homeostatic control of steady state cytokinin levels through signaling. Together, the analyses reveal partially redundant functions of the cytokinin receptors and prominent roles for the AHK2/AHK3 receptor combination in quantitative control of organ growth in plants, with opposite regulatory functions in roots and shoots. PMID:16361392

  4. Seed germination of GA-insensitive sleepy1 mutants does not require RGL2 protein disappearance in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed germination is a complex developmental process regulated by phytohormones. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits seed germination, whereas gibberellin (GA) stimulates seed germination. In tomato and Arabidopsis, GA is clearly required for seed germination. Recent evidence suggests tha...

  5. Arabidopsis AtDjA3 Null Mutant Shows Increased Sensitivity to Abscisic Acid, Salt, and Osmotic Stress in Germination and Post-germination Stages

    PubMed Central

    Salas-Muñoz, Silvia; Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída A.; Ortega-Amaro, Maria A.; Salazar-Badillo, Fatima B.; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    DnaJ proteins are essential co-chaperones involved in abiotic and biotic stress responses. Arabidopsis AtDjA3 gene encodes a molecular co-chaperone of 420 amino acids, which belongs to the J-protein family. In this study, we report the functional characterization of the AtDjA3 gene using the Arabidopsis knockout line designated j3 and the 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. Loss of AtDjA3 function was associated with small seed production. In fact, j3 mutant seeds showed a reduction of 24% in seed weight compared to Col-0 seeds. Expression analysis showed that the AtDjA3 gene was modulated in response to NaCl, glucose, and abscisic acid (ABA). The j3 line had increased sensitivity to NaCl and glucose treatments in the germination and cotyledon development in comparison to parental Col-0. Furthermore, the j3 mutant line exhibited higher ABA sensitivity in comparison to parental Col-0 and 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. In addition, we examined the expression of ABI3 gene, which is a central regulator in ABA signaling, in j3 mutant and 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines. Under 5 μM ABA treatment at 24 h, j3 mutant seedlings displayed higher ABI3 expression, whereas in 35S::AtDjA3 overexpression lines, ABI3 gene expression was repressed. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the AtDjA3 gene is involved in seed development and abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:26941772

  6. Metabolome Analysis of Biosynthetic Mutants Reveals a Diversity of Metabolic Changes and Allows Identification of a Large Number of New Compounds in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Christoph; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Schmidt, Jürgen; Schmotz, Constanze; Neumann, Steffen; Scheel, Dierk; Clemens, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Metabolomics is facing a major challenge: the lack of knowledge about metabolites present in a given biological system. Thus, large-scale discovery of metabolites is considered an essential step toward a better understanding of plant metabolism. We show here that the application of a metabolomics approach generating structural information for the analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants allows the efficient cataloging of metabolites. Fifty-six percent of the features that showed significant differences in abundance between seeds of wild-type, transparent testa4, and transparent testa5 plants could be annotated. Seventy-five compounds were structurally characterized, 21 of which could be identified. About 40 compounds had not been known from Arabidopsis before. Also, the high-resolution analysis revealed an unanticipated expansion of metabolic conversions upstream of biosynthetic blocks. Deficiency in chalcone synthase results in the increased seed-specific biosynthesis of a range of phenolic choline esters. Similarly, a lack of chalcone isomerase activity leads to the accumulation of various naringenin chalcone derivatives. Furthermore, our data provide insight into the connection between p-coumaroyl-coenzyme A-dependent pathways. Lack of flavonoid biosynthesis results in elevated synthesis not only of p-coumarate-derived choline esters but also of sinapate-derived metabolites. However, sinapoylcholine is not the only accumulating end product. Instead, we observed specific and sophisticated changes in the complex pattern of sinapate derivatives. PMID:18552234

  7. Effect of hypergravity on lignin formation and expression of lignin-related genes in inflorescence stems of an ethylene-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant ein3-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahara, Ichirou; Kobayashi, Mai; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Kamisaka, Seiichiro

    Our previous studies have shown that hypergravity inhibits growth and promotes lignin forma-tion in inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana by up-regulation of genes involved in lignin biosynthesis (Tamaoki et al. 2006, 2009). In the present study, we have examined whether ethylene is involved in these responses using an ethylene-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant ein3-1. Our results revealed that hypergravity treatment at 300 G for 24 h significantly inhibited growth of inflorescence stems, promoted both deposition of acetyl bromide extractable lignin and gene expression involved in lignin formation in inflorescence stems of wild type plants. Growth inhibition of inflorescence stems was also observed in ein3-1. However, the effects of hypergravity on the promotion of the deposition of acetyl bromide lignin and the expression of genes involved in lignin formation were not observed in ein3-1, indicating that ethylene sig-naling is involved in the up-regulation of the expression of lignin-related genes as well as the promotion of deposition of lignin by hypergravity in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems.

  8. Deficiency in phylloquinone (vitamin K1) methylation affects prenyl quinone distribution, photosystem I abundance, and anthocyanin accumulation in the Arabidopsis AtmenG mutant.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Antje; Schöttler, Mark Aurel; Bréhélin, Claire; Kessler, Felix; Bock, Ralph; Cahoon, Edgar B; Dörmann, Peter

    2006-12-29

    Phylloquinone (vitamin K(1)) is synthesized in cyanobacteria and in chloroplasts of plants, where it serves as electron carrier of photosystem I. The last step of phylloquinone synthesis in cyanobacteria is the methylation of 2-phytyl-1,4-naphthoquinone by the menG gene product. Here, we report that the uncharacterized Arabidopsis gene At1g23360, which shows sequence similarity to menG, functionally complements the Synechocystis menG mutant. An Arabidopsis mutant, AtmenG, carrying a T-DNA insertion in the gene At1g23360 is devoid of phylloquinone, but contains an increased amount of 2-phytyl-1,4-naphthoquinone. Phylloquinone and 2-phytyl-1,4-naphthoquinone in thylakoid membranes of wild type and AtmenG, respectively, predominantly localize to photosystem I, whereas excess amounts of prenyl quinones are stored in plastoglobules. Photosystem I reaction centers are decreased in AtmenG plants under high light, as revealed by immunoblot and spectroscopic measurements. Anthocyanin accumulation and chalcone synthase (CHS1) transcription are affected during high light exposure, indicating that alterations in photosynthesis in AtmenG affect gene expression in the nucleus. Photosystem II quantum yield is decreased under high light. Therefore, the loss of phylloquinone methylation affects photosystem I stability or turnover, and the limitation in functional photosystem I complexes results in overreduction of photosystem II under high light. PMID:17082184

  9. The phospholipid-deficient pho1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is affected in the organization, but not in the light acclimation, of the thylakoid membrane.

    PubMed

    Härtel, H; Essigmann, B; Lokstein, H; Hoffmann-Benning, S; Peters-Kottig, M; Benning, C

    1998-12-01

    The pho1 mutant of Arabidopsis has been shown to respond to the phosphate deficiency in the leaves by decreasing the amount of phosphatidylglycerol (PG). PG is thought to be of crucial importance for the organization and function of the thylakoid membrane. This prompted us to ask what the consequences of the PG deficiency may be in the pho1 mutant when grown under low or high light. While in the wild-type, the lipid pattern was almost insensitive to changes in the growth light, PG was reduced to 45% under low light in the mutant, and it decreased further to 35% under high light. Concomitantly, sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol (SQDG) and to a lesser extent digalactosyl diacylglycerol (DGDG) increased. The SQDG increase correlated with increased amounts of the SQD1 protein, an indicator for an actively mediated process. Despite of alterations in the ultrastructure, mutant thylakoids showed virtually no effects on photosynthetic electron transfer, O2 evolution and excitation energy allocation to the reaction centers. Our results support the idea that PG deficiency can at least partially be compensated for by the anionic lipid SQDG and the not charged lipid DGDG. This seems to be an important strategy to maintain an optimal thylakoid lipid milieu for vital processes, such as photosynthesis, under a restricted phosphate availability. PMID:9858733

  10. Isolation and characterization of mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with increased resistance to growth inhibition by indoleacetic acid-amino acid conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, J J; Ludwig-Mueller, J; Town, C D

    1996-01-01

    Two mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that are resistant to growth inhibition by indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-phenylalanine have been isolated. Both mutants were 2- to 3-fold more resistant than wild type to inhibition by IAA-phenylalanine, IAA-alanine, and IAA-glycine in root growth assays. The mutant icr1 (but not icr2) also shows some resistance to IAA-aspartate. Studies using 3H-labeled IAA-phenylalanine showed that the uptake of conjugate from the medium by icr1 was the same as wild type and was reduced by about 25% in icr2. No differences in hydrolysis of the exogenous conjugate were detected between the mutants and their wild-type parents. There was no significant metabolism of the IAA released from the [3H]IAA-phenylalanine, whereas exogenous [3H]IAA was rapidly metabolized to two unidentified products considerably more polar than IAA. Analysis of a cross between icr1 and icr2 indicated that these mutations were at distinct loci and that their effects were additive, and preliminary mapping data indicated that icr1 and icr2 were located at the top and bottom of chromosome V, respectively. PMID:8883385