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Sample records for arabidopsis thaliana genes

  1. pATsi: Paralogs and Singleton Genes from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosino, Luca; Bostan, Hamed; di Salle, Pasquale; Sangiovanni, Mara; Vigilante, Alessandra; Chiusano, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is widely accepted as a model species in plant biology. Its genome, due to its small size and diploidy, was the first to be sequenced among plants, making this species also a reference for plant comparative genomics. Nevertheless, the evolutionary mechanisms that shaped the Arabidopsis genome are still controversial. Indeed, duplications, translocations, inversions, and gene loss events that contributed to the current organization are difficult to be traced. A reliable identification of paralogs and single-copy genes is essential to understand these mechanisms. Therefore, we implemented a dedicated pipeline to identify paralog genes and classify single-copy genes into opportune categories. PATsi, a web-accessible database, was organized to allow the straightforward access to the paralogs organized into networks and to the classification of single-copy genes. This permits to efficiently explore the gene collection of Arabidopsis for evolutionary investigations and comparative genomics. PMID:26792975

  2. Gene prediction and gene classes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mathé, C; Déhais, P; Pavy, N; Rombauts, S; Van Montagu, M; Rouzé, P

    2000-03-31

    Gene prediction methods for eukaryotic genomes still are not fully satisfying. One way to improve gene prediction accuracy, proven to be relevant for prokaryotes, is to consider more than one model of genes. Thus, we used our classification of Arabidopsis thaliana genes in two classes (CU(1) and CU(2)), previously delineated according to statistical features, in the GeneMark gene identification program. For each gene class, as well as for the two classes combined, a Markov model was developed (respectively, GM-CU(1), GM-CU(2) and GM-all) and then used on a test set of 168 genes to compare their respective efficiency. We concluded from this analysis that GM-CU(1) is more sensitive than GM-CU(2) which seems to be more specific to a gene type. Besides, GM-all does not give better results than GM-CU(1) and combining results from GM-CU(1) and GM-CU(2) greatly improve prediction efficiency in comparison with predictions made with GM-all only. Thus, this work confirms the necessity to consider more than one gene model for gene prediction in eukaryotic genomes, and to look for gene classes in order to build these models. PMID:10751690

  3. Functional divergence in tandemly duplicated Arabidopsis thaliana trypsin inhibitor genes.

    PubMed Central

    Clauss, M J; Mitchell-Olds, T

    2004-01-01

    In multigene families, variation among loci and alleles can contribute to trait evolution. We explored patterns of functional and genetic variation in six duplicated Arabidopsis thaliana trypsin inhibitor (ATTI) loci. We demonstrate significant variation in constitutive and herbivore-induced transcription among ATTI loci that show, on average, 65% sequence divergence. Significant variation in ATTI expression was also found between two molecularly defined haplotype classes. Population genetic analyses for 17 accessions of A. thaliana showed that six ATTI loci arranged in tandem within 10 kb varied 10-fold in nucleotide diversity, from 0.0009 to 0.0110, and identified a minimum of six recombination events throughout the tandem array. We observed a significant peak in nucleotide and indel polymorphism spanning ATTI loci in the interior of the array, due primarily to divergence between the two haplotype classes. Significant deviation from the neutral equilibrium model for individual genes was interpreted within the context of intergene linkage disequilibrium and correlated patterns of functional differentiation. In contrast to the outcrosser Arabidopsis lyrata for which recombination is observed even within ATTI loci, our data suggest that response to selection was slowed in the inbreeding, annual A. thaliana because of interference among functionally divergent ATTI loci. PMID:15082560

  4. Exogenous isoprene modulates gene expression in unstressed Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Christopher M; Sharkey, Thomas D

    2016-06-01

    Isoprene is a well-studied volatile hemiterpene that protects plants from abiotic stress through mechanisms that are not fully understood. The antioxidant and membrane stabilizing potential of isoprene are the two most commonly invoked mechanisms. However, isoprene also affects phenylpropanoid metabolism, suggesting an additional role as a signalling molecule. In this study, microarray-based gene expression profiling reveals transcriptional reprogramming of Arabidopsis thaliana plants fumigated for 24 h with a physiologically relevant concentration of isoprene. Functional enrichment analysis of fumigated plants revealed enhanced heat- and light-stress-responsive processes in response to isoprene. Isoprene induced a network enriched in ERF and WRKY transcription factors, which may play a role in stress tolerance. The isoprene-induced up-regulation of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes was specifically confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results support a role for isoprene as a signalling molecule, in addition to its possible roles as an antioxidant and membrane thermoprotectant. PMID:26477606

  5. Genome-level evolution of resistance genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Andrew; Cannon, Steven; Spangler, Russ; May, Georgiana

    2003-01-01

    Pathogen resistance genes represent some of the most abundant and diverse gene families found within plant genomes. However, evolutionary mechanisms generating resistance gene diversity at the genome level are not well understood. We used the complete Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence to show that most duplication of individual NBS-LRR sequences occurs at close physical proximity to the parent sequence and generates clusters of closely related NBS-LRR sequences. Deploying the statistical strength of phylogeographic approaches and using chromosomal location as a proxy for spatial location, we show that apparent duplication of NBS-LRR genes to ectopic chromosomal locations is largely the consequence of segmental chromosome duplication and rearrangement, rather than the independent duplication of individual sequences. Although accounting for a smaller fraction of NBS-LRR gene duplications, segmental chromosome duplication and rearrangement events have a large impact on the evolution of this multigene family. Intergenic exchange is dramatically lower between NBS-LRR sequences located in different chromosome regions as compared to exchange between sequences within the same chromosome region. Consequently, once translocated to new chromosome locations, NBS-LRR gene copies have a greater likelihood of escaping intergenic exchange and adopting new functions than do gene copies located within the same chromosomal region. We propose an evolutionary model that relates processes of genome evolution to mechanisms of evolution for the large, diverse, NBS-LRR gene family. PMID:14504238

  6. Arabidopsis thaliana contains a single gene encoding squalene synthase.

    PubMed

    Busquets, Antoni; Keim, Verónica; Closa, Marta; del Arco, Ana; Boronat, Albert; Arró, Montserrat; Ferrer, Albert

    2008-05-01

    Squalene synthase (SQS) catalyzes the condensation of two molecules of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) to produce squalene (SQ), the first committed precursor for sterol, brassinosteroid, and triterpene biosynthesis. Arabidopsis thaliana contains two SQS-annotated genomic sequences, At4g34640 (SQS1) and At4g34650 (SQS2), organized in a tandem array. Here we report that the SQS1 gene is widely expressed in all tissues throughout plant development, whereas SQS2 is primarily expressed in the vascular tissue of leaf and cotyledon petioles, and the hypocotyl of seedlings. Neither the complete A. thaliana SQS2 protein nor the chimeric SQS resulting from the replacement of the 69 C-terminal residues of SQS2 by the 111 C-terminal residues of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe SQS were able to confer ergosterol prototrophy to a Saccharomyces cerevisiae erg9 mutant strain lacking SQS activity. A soluble form of SQS2 expressed in Escherichia coli and purified was unable to synthesize SQ from FPP in the presence of NADPH and either Mg2+ or Mn2+. These results demonstrated that SQS2 has no SQS activity, so that SQS1 is the only functional SQS in A. thaliana. Mutational studies revealed that the lack of SQS activity of SQS2 cannot be exclusively attributed to the presence of an unusual Ser replacing the highly conserved Phe at position 287. Expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged versions of SQS1 in onion epidermal cells demonstrated that SQS1 is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and that this location is exclusively dependent on the presence of the SQS1 C-terminal hydrophobic trans-membrane domain. PMID:18236008

  7. Internet Resources for Gene Expression Analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hehl, Reinhard; Bülow, Lorenz

    2008-09-01

    The number of online databases and web-tools for gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana has increased tremendously during the last years. These resources permit the database-assisted identification of putative cis-regulatory DNA sequences, their binding proteins, and the determination of common cis-regulatory motifs in coregulated genes. DNA binding proteins may be predicted by the type of cis-regulatory motif. Further questions of combinatorial control based on the interaction of DNA binding proteins and the colocalization of cis-regulatory motifs can be addressed. The database-assisted spatial and temporal expression analysis of DNA binding proteins and their target genes may help to further refine experimental approaches. Signal transduction pathways upstream of regulated genes are not yet fully accessible in databases mainly because they need to be manually annotated. This review focuses on the use of the AthaMap and PathoPlant((R)) databases for gene expression regulation analysis and discusses similar and complementary online databases and web-tools. Online databases are helpful for the development of working hypothesis and for designing subsequent experiments. PMID:19506727

  8. Internet Resources for Gene Expression Analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hehl, Reinhard; Bülow, Lorenz

    2008-01-01

    The number of online databases and web-tools for gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana has increased tremendously during the last years. These resources permit the database-assisted identification of putative cis-regulatory DNA sequences, their binding proteins, and the determination of common cis-regulatory motifs in coregulated genes. DNA binding proteins may be predicted by the type of cis-regulatory motif. Further questions of combinatorial control based on the interaction of DNA binding proteins and the colocalization of cis-regulatory motifs can be addressed. The database-assisted spatial and temporal expression analysis of DNA binding proteins and their target genes may help to further refine experimental approaches. Signal transduction pathways upstream of regulated genes are not yet fully accessible in databases mainly because they need to be manually annotated. This review focuses on the use of the AthaMap and PathoPlant® databases for gene expression regulation analysis and discusses similar and complementary online databases and web-tools. Online databases are helpful for the development of working hypothesis and for designing subsequent experiments. PMID:19506727

  9. Regulation of Arabidopsis thaliana 5S rRNA Genes.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Isabelle; Tutois, Sylvie; Cuvillier, Claudine; Schubert, Ingo; Tourmente, Sylvette

    2007-05-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome comprises around 1,000 copies of 5S rRNA genes encoding both major and minor 5S rRNAs. In mature wild-type leaves, the minor 5S rRNA genes are silent. Using different mutants of DNA methyltransferases (met1, cmt3 and met1 cmt3), components of the RNAi pathway (ago4) or post-translational histone modifier (hda6/sil1), we show that the corresponding proteins are needed to maintain proper methylation patterns at heterochromatic 5S rDNA repeats. Using reverse transcription-PCR and cytological analyses, we report that a decrease of 5S rDNA methylation at CG or CNG sites in these mutants leads to the release of 5S rRNA gene silencing which occurred without detectable changes of the 5S rDNA chromatin structure. In spite of severely reduced DNA methylation, the met1 cmt3 double mutant revealed no increase in minor 5S rRNA transcripts. Furthermore, the release of silencing of minor 5S rDNAs can be achieved without increased formation of euchromatic loops by 5S rDNA, and is independent from the global heterochromatin content. Additionally, fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric 180 bp repeats confirmed that these highly repetitive sequences, in spite of their elevated transcriptional activity in the DNA methyltransferase mutants (met1, cmt3 and met1 cmt3), remain within chromocenters of the mutant nuclei. PMID:17412735

  10. Interactions among Genes Regulating Ovule Development in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Baker, S. C.; Robinson-Beers, K.; Villanueva, J. M.; Gaiser, J. C.; Gasser, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    The INNER NO OUTER (INO) and AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) genes are essential for ovule integument development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Ovules of ino mutants initiate two integument primordia, but the outer integument primordium forms on the opposite side of the ovule from the normal location and undergoes no further development. The inner integument appears to develop normally, resulting in erect, unitegmic ovules that resemble those of gymnosperms. ino plants are partially fertile and produce seeds with altered surface topography, demonstrating a lineage dependence in development of the testa. ant mutations affect initiation of both integuments. The strongest of five new ant alleles we have isolated produces ovules that lack integuments and fail to complete megasporogenesis. ant mutations also affect flower development, resulting in narrow petals and the absence of one or both lateral stamens. Characterization of double mutants between ant, ino and other mutations affecting ovule development has enabled the construction of a model for genetic control of ovule development. This model proposes parallel independent regulatory pathways for a number of aspects of this process, a dependence on the presence of an inner integument for development of the embryo sac, and the existence of additional genes regulating ovule development. PMID:9093862

  11. Perspectives on Systematic Analyses of Gene Function in Arabidopsis thaliana: New Tools, Topics and Trends

    PubMed Central

    Bolle, C; Schneider, A; Leister, D

    2011-01-01

    Since the sequencing of the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis thaliana ten years ago, various large-scale analyses of gene function have been performed in this model species. In particular, the availability of collections of lines harbouring random T-DNA or transposon insertions, which include mutants for almost all of the ~27,000 A. thaliana genes, has been crucial for the success of forward and reverse genetic approaches. In the foreseeable future, genome-wide phenotypic data from mutant analyses will become available for Arabidopsis, and will stimulate a flood of novel in-depth gene-function analyses. In this review, we consider the present status of resources and concepts for systematic studies of gene function in A. thaliana. Current perspectives on the utility of loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutants will be discussed in light of the genetic and functional redundancy of many A. thaliana genes. PMID:21886450

  12. Transcriptional regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana chalcone synthase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Feinbaum, R.L.; Ausubel, F.M.

    1988-05-01

    The authors cloned an Arabiodpsis thaliana chalcone synthase (CHS) gene on the basis of cross-hybridization with a Petroselinum hortense CHS cDNA clone. The protein sequence deduced from the A. thaliana CHS DNA sequence is at least 85% homologous to the CHS sequences from P. hortense, Antirrhinum majus, and Petunia hybrida. Southern blot analysis indicated that CHS is a single-copy gene in A. thaliana. High-intensity light treatment of A. thaliana plants for 24 h caused a 50-fold increase in CHS enzyme activity and an accumulation of visibly detectable levels of anthocyanin pigments in the vegetative structures of these plants. A corresponding increase in the steady-state level of CHS mRNA was detected after high-intensity light treatment for the same period of time. The accumulation of CHS mRNA in response to high-intensity light was due, at least in part, to an increased rate of transcription of the CHS gene as demonstrated by nuclear runoff experiment.

  13. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  14. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  15. Structure and Evolution of the Actin Gene Family in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, J. M.; Huang, S.; McKinney, E. C.; An, Y. Q.; Meagher, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    Higher plants contain families of actin-encoding genes that are divergent and differentially expressed. Progress in understanding the functions and evolution of plant actins has been hindered by the large size of the actin gene families. In this study, we characterized the structure and evolution of the actin gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana. DNA blot analyses with gene-specific probes suggested that all 10 of the Arabidopsis actin gene family members have been isolated and established that Arabidopsis has a much simpler actin gene family than other plants that have been examined. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that the Arabidopsis gene family contains at least two ancient classes of genes that diverged early in land plant evolution and may have separated vegetative from reproductive actins. Subsequent divergence produced a total of six distinct subclasses of actin, and five showed a distinct pattern of tissue specific expression. The concordance of expression patterns with the phylogenetic structure is discussed. These subclasses appear to be evolving independently, as no evidence of gene conversion was found. The Arabidopsis actin proteins have an unusually large number of nonconservative amino acid substitutions, which mapped to the surface of the actin molecule, and should effect protein-protein interactions. PMID:8852856

  16. Noise-plasticity correlations of gene expression in the multicellular organism Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Koudai; Nagano, Atsushi J; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-12-21

    Gene expression levels exhibit stochastic variations among genetically identical organisms under the same environmental conditions (called gene expression "noise" or phenotype "fluctuation"). In yeast and Escherichia coli, positive correlations have been found between such gene expression noise and "plasticity" with environmental variations. To determine the universality of such correlations in both unicellular and multicellular organisms, we focused on the relationships between gene expression "noise" and "plasticity" in Arabidopsis thaliana, a multicellular model organism. In recent studies on yeast and E. coli, only some gene groups with specific properties of promoter architecture, average expression levels, and functions exhibited strong noise-plasticity correlations. However, we found strong noise-plasticity correlations for most gene groups in Arabidopsis; additionally, promoter architecture, functional essentiality of genes, and circadian rhythm appeared to have only a weak influence on the correlation strength. The differences in the characteristics of noise-plasticity correlations may result from three-dimensional chromosomal structures and/or circadian rhythm. PMID:26431771

  17. Light-independent developmental regulation of cab gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Brusslan, J A; Tobin, E M

    1992-01-01

    We found a transient increase in the amount of mRNA for four nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins during early development of Arabidopsis thaliana. This increase began soon after germination as cotyledons emerged from the seed coat; it occurred in total darkness and was not affected by external factors, such as gibberellins or light treatments used to stimulate germination. Three members of the cab gene family and the rbcS-1A gene exhibited this expression pattern. Because timing of the increase coincided with cotyledon emergence and because it occurred independently of external stimuli, we suggest that this increase represents developmental regulation of these genes. Further, 1.34 kilobases of the cab1 promoter was sufficient to confer this expression pattern on a reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings. The ability of the cab genes to respond to phytochrome preceded this developmental increase, showing that these two types of regulation are independent. Images PMID:1380166

  18. Sugar-inducible expression of a gene for beta-amylase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Mita, S; Suzuki-Fujii, K; Nakamura, K

    1995-01-01

    The levels of beta-amylase activity and of the mRNA for beta-amylase in rosette leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. increased significantly, with the concomitant accumulation of starch, when whole plants or excised mature leaves were supplied with sucrose. A supply of glucose or fructose, but not of mannitol or sorbitol, to plants also induced the expression of the gene for beta-amylase, and the induction occurred not only in rosette leaves but also in roots, stems, and bracts. These results suggest that the gene for beta-amylase of Arabidopsis is subject to regulation by a carbohydrate metabolic signal, and expression of the gene in various tissues may be regulated by the carbon partitioning and sink-source interactions in the whole plant. The sugar-inducible expression of the gene in Arabidopsis was severely repressed in the absence of light. The sugar-inducible expression in the light was not inhibited by 3(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea or by chloramphenicol, but it was inhibited by cycloheximide. These results suggest that a light-induced signal and de novo synthesis of proteins in the cytoplasm are involved in the regulation. A fusion gene composed of the 5' upstream region of the gene for beta-amylase from Arabidopsis and the coding sequence of beta-glucuronidase showed the sugar-inducible expression in a light-dependent manner in rosette leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis. PMID:7716246

  19. Sequence and organization of 5S ribosomal RNA-encoding genes of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Campell, B R; Song, Y; Posch, T E; Cullis, C A; Town, C D

    1992-03-15

    We have isolated a genomic clone containing Arabidopsis thaliana 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-encoding genes (rDNA) by screening an A. thaliana library with a 5S rDNA probe from flax. The clone isolated contains seven repeat units of 497 bp, plus 11 kb of flanking genomic sequence at one border. Sequencing of individual subcloned repeat units shows that the sequence of the 5S rRNA coding region is very similar to that reported for other flowering plants. Four A. thaliana ecotypes were found to contain approx. 1000 copies of 5S rDNA per haploid genome. Southern-blot analysis of genomic DNA indicates that 5S rDNA occurs in long tandem arrays, and shows the presence of numerous restriction-site polymorphisms among the six ecotypes studied. PMID:1348233

  20. Genome-wide analysis of chromatin packing in Arabidopsis thaliana at single-gene resolution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Congmao; Wang, George; Becker, Claude; Zaidem, Maricris; Weigel, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional packing of the genome plays an important role in regulating gene expression. We have used Hi-C, a genome-wide chromatin conformation capture (3C) method, to analyze Arabidopsis thaliana chromosomes dissected into subkilobase segments, which is required for gene-level resolution in this species with a gene-dense genome. We found that the repressive H3K27me3 histone mark is overrepresented in the promoter regions of genes that are in conformational linkage over long distances. In line with the globally dispersed distribution of RNA polymerase II in A. thaliana nuclear space, actively transcribed genes do not show a strong tendency to associate with each other. In general, there are often contacts between 5′ and 3′ ends of genes, forming local chromatin loops. Such self-loop structures of genes are more likely to occur in more highly expressed genes, although they can also be found in silent genes. Silent genes with local chromatin loops are highly enriched for the histone variant H3.3 at their 5′ and 3′ ends but depleted of repressive marks such as heterochromatic histone modifications and DNA methylation in flanking regions. Our results suggest that, different from animals, a major theme of genome folding in A. thaliana is the formation of structural units that correspond to gene bodies. PMID:27225844

  1. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  2. Paternally expressed imprinted genes establish postzygotic hybridization barriers in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Philip; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Guifeng; Santos-González, Juan; Köhler, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon causing parent-of-origin specific differential expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles. While many imprinted genes have been identified in plants, the functional roles of most of them are unknown. In this study, we systematically examine the functional requirement of paternally expressed imprinted genes (PEGs) during seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana. While none of the 15 analyzed peg mutants has qualitative or quantitative abnormalities of seed development, we identify three PEGs that establish postzygotic hybridization barriers in the endosperm, revealing that PEGs have a major role as speciation genes in plants. Our work reveals that a subset of PEGs maintains functional roles in the inbreeding plant Arabidopsis that become evident upon deregulated expression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10074.001 PMID:26344545

  3. Paternally expressed imprinted genes establish postzygotic hybridization barriers in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Philip; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Guifeng; Santos-González, Juan; Köhler, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon causing parent-of-origin specific differential expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles. While many imprinted genes have been identified in plants, the functional roles of most of them are unknown. In this study, we systematically examine the functional requirement of paternally expressed imprinted genes (PEGs) during seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana. While none of the 15 analyzed peg mutants has qualitative or quantitative abnormalities of seed development, we identify three PEGs that establish postzygotic hybridization barriers in the endosperm, revealing that PEGs have a major role as speciation genes in plants. Our work reveals that a subset of PEGs maintains functional roles in the inbreeding plant Arabidopsis that become evident upon deregulated expression. PMID:26344545

  4. A Shortest-Path-Based Method for the Analysis and Prediction of Fruit-Related Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fangchu; Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Biologically, fruits are defined as seed-bearing reproductive structures in angiosperms that develop from the ovary. The fertilization, development and maturation of fruits are crucial for plant reproduction and are precisely regulated by intrinsic genetic regulatory factors. In this study, we used Arabidopsis thaliana as a model organism and attempted to identify novel genes related to fruit-associated biological processes. Specifically, using validated genes, we applied a shortest-path-based method to identify several novel genes in a large network constructed using the protein-protein interactions observed in Arabidopsis thaliana. The described analyses indicate that several of the discovered genes are associated with fruit fertilization, development and maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27434024

  5. Fractionation of Synteny in a Genomic Region Containing Tandemly Duplicated Genes Across Glycine max, Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extended comparison of gene sequences found on homeologous soybean BACs to Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana genomic sequences demonstrated a network of synteny within conserved regions interrupted by gene addition and/or deletions. Consolidation of gene order among all three species prov...

  6. A Global Survey of Gene Regulation during Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hannah, Matthew A; Heyer, Arnd G; Hincha, Dirk K

    2005-01-01

    Many temperate plant species such as Arabidopsis thaliana are able to increase their freezing tolerance when exposed to low, nonfreezing temperatures in a process called cold acclimation. This process is accompanied by complex changes in gene expression. Previous studies have investigated these changes but have mainly focused on individual or small groups of genes. We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of the genome-wide changes of gene expression in response to 14 d of cold acclimation in Arabidopsis, and provide a large-scale validation of these data by comparing datasets obtained for the Affymetrix ATH1 Genechip and MWG 50-mer oligonucleotide whole-genome microarrays. We combine these datasets with existing published and publicly available data investigating Arabidopsis gene expression in response to low temperature. All data are integrated into a database detailing the cold responsiveness of 22,043 genes as a function of time of exposure at low temperature. We concentrate our functional analysis on global changes marking relevant pathways or functional groups of genes. These analyses provide a statistical basis for many previously reported changes, identify so far unreported changes, and show which processes predominate during different times of cold acclimation. This approach offers the fullest characterization of global changes in gene expression in response to low temperature available to date. PMID:16121258

  7. Codon usage biases of transposable elements and host nuclear genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jia; Xue, Qingzhong

    2009-12-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile genetic entities ubiquitously distributed in nearly all genomes. High frequency of codons ending in A/T in TEs has been previously observed in some species. In this study, the biases in nucleotide composition and codon usage of TE transposases and host nuclear genes were investigated in the AT-rich genome of Arabidopsis thaliana and the GC-rich genome of Oryza sativa. Codons ending in A/T are more frequently used by TEs compared with their host nuclear genes. A remarkable positive correlation between highly expressed nuclear genes and C/G-ending codons were detected in O. sativa (r=0.944 and 0.839, respectively, P<0.0001) but not in A. thaliana, indicating a close association between the GC content and gene expression level in monocot species. In both species, TE codon usage biases are similar to that of weakly expressed genes. The expression and activity of TEs may be strictly controlled in plant genomes. Mutation bias and selection pressure have simultaneously acted on the TE evolution in A. thaliana and O. sativa. The consistently observed biases of nucleotide composition and codon usage of TEs may also provide a useful clue to accurately detect TE sequences in different species. PMID:20172490

  8. Gene Expression patterns in cryogenically stored Arabidopsis thaliana shoot tips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genes expressed in response to cryostress in plant shoot tips are not known. In this project we compared the gene expression patterns in untreated, cryoprotectant-treated, and recovering shoot tips using differential display methods. This project identified two genes that appeared to be differ...

  9. Spatio-Temporal Expression Patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula Defensin-Like Genes

    PubMed Central

    Nallu, Sumitha; Wang, Lin; Botanga, Christopher J.; Gomez, S. Karen; Costa, Liliana M.; Harrison, Maria J.; Samac, Deborah A.; Glazebrook, Jane; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Gutierrez-Marcos, Jose F.; VandenBosch, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant genomes contain several hundred defensin-like (DEFL) genes that encode short cysteine-rich proteins resembling defensins, which are well known antimicrobial polypeptides. Little is known about the expression patterns or functions of many DEFLs because most were discovered recently and hence are not well represented on standard microarrays. We designed a custom Affymetrix chip consisting of probe sets for 317 and 684 DEFLs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula, respectively for cataloging DEFL expression in a variety of plant organs at different developmental stages and during symbiotic and pathogenic associations. The microarray analysis provided evidence for the transcription of 71% and 90% of the DEFLs identified in Arabidopsis and Medicago, respectively, including many of the recently annotated DEFL genes that previously lacked expression information. Both model plants contain a subset of DEFLs specifically expressed in seeds or fruits. A few DEFLs, including some plant defensins, were significantly up-regulated in Arabidopsis leaves inoculated with Alternaria brassicicola or Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Among these, some were dependent on jasmonic acid signaling or were associated with specific types of immune responses. There were notable differences in DEFL gene expression patterns between Arabidopsis and Medicago, as the majority of Arabidopsis DEFLs were expressed in inflorescences, while only a few exhibited root-enhanced expression. By contrast, Medicago DEFLs were most prominently expressed in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Thus, our data document salient differences in DEFL temporal and spatial expression between Arabidopsis and Medicago, suggesting distinct signaling routes and distinct roles for these proteins in the two plant species. PMID:23527067

  10. Classification of Arabidopsis thaliana gene sequences: clustering of coding sequences into two groups according to codon usage improves gene prediction.

    PubMed

    Mathé, C; Peresetsky, A; Déhais, P; Van Montagu, M; Rouzé, P

    1999-02-01

    While genomic sequences are accumulating, finding the location of the genes remains a major issue that can be solved only for about a half of them by homology searches. Prediction methods are thus required, but unfortunately are not fully satisfying. Most prediction methods implicitly assume a unique model for genes. This is an oversimplification as demonstrated by the possibility to group coding sequences into several classes in Escherichia coli and other genomes. As no classification existed for Arabidopsis thaliana, we classified genes according to the statistical features of their coding sequences. A clustering algorithm using a codon usage model was developed and applied to coding sequences from A. thaliana, E. coli, and a mixture of both. By using it, Arabidopsis sequences were clustered into two classes. The CU1 and CU2 classes differed essentially by the choice of pyrimidine bases at the codon silent sites: CU2 genes often use C whereas CU1 genes prefer T. This classification discriminated the Arabidopsis genes according to their expressiveness, highly expressed genes being clustered in CU2 and genes expected to have a lower expression, such as the regulatory genes, in CU1. The algorithm separated the sequences of the Escherichia-Arabidopsis mixed data set into five classes according to the species, except for one class. This mixed class contained 89 % Arabidopsis genes from CU1 and 11 % E. coli genes, mostly horizontally transferred. Interestingly, most genes encoding organelle-targeted proteins, except the photosynthetic and photoassimilatory ones, were clustered in CU1. By tailoring the GeneMark CDS prediction algorithm to the observed coding sequence classes, its quality of prediction was greatly improved. Similar improvement can be expected with other prediction systems. PMID:9925779

  11. REDUCED CHLOROPLAST COVERAGE genes from Arabidopsis thaliana help to establish the size of the chloroplast compartment

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Robert M.; Stefano, Giovanni; Ruckle, Michael E.; Stavoe, Andrea K.; Sinkler, Christopher A.; Brandizzi, Federica; Malmstrom, Carolyn M.; Osteryoung, Katherine W.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells require mechanisms to establish the proportion of cellular volume devoted to particular organelles. These mechanisms are poorly understood. From a screen for plastid-to-nucleus signaling mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana, we cloned a mutant allele of a gene that encodes a protein of unknown function that is homologous to two other Arabidopsis genes of unknown function and to FRIENDLY, which was previously shown to promote the normal distribution of mitochondria in Arabidopsis. In contrast to FRIENDLY, these three homologs of FRIENDLY are found only in photosynthetic organisms. Based on these data, we proposed that FRIENDLY expanded into a small gene family to help regulate the energy metabolism of cells that contain both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Indeed, we found that knocking out these genes caused a number of chloroplast phenotypes, including a reduction in the proportion of cellular volume devoted to chloroplasts to 50% of wild type. Thus, we refer to these genes as REDUCED CHLOROPLAST COVERAGE (REC). The size of the chloroplast compartment was reduced most in rec1 mutants. The REC1 protein accumulated in the cytosol and the nucleus. REC1 was excluded from the nucleus when plants were treated with amitrole, which inhibits cell expansion and chloroplast function. We conclude that REC1 is an extraplastidic protein that helps to establish the size of the chloroplast compartment, and that signals derived from cell expansion or chloroplasts may regulate REC1. PMID:26862170

  12. Increase in pectin deposition by overexpression of an ERF gene in cultured cells of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshitsugu; Naito, Yuki; Kakegawa, Koich; Ohtsuki, Namie; Tsujimoto-Inui, Yayoi; Shinshi, Hideaki; Suzuki, Kaoru

    2012-04-01

    Ethylene-responsive transcription factor (ERF) family genes, which are involved in regulation of metabolic pathways and/or are useful for metabolic engineering, were investigated in the cultured cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. The pectin content in the gelatinous precipitates after the ethanol precipitation of extracts derived from calli of a transgenic cell line, A17, overexpressing an ERF gene (At1g44830), increased in comparison with the control. Expression of genes involved in pectin biosynthesis was up-regulated in the A17 calli. Overexpression of the ERF gene coordinately activates the pectin biosynthetic pathway genes and increases the content of pectin. These results therefore will be useful as a genetic resource for engineering pectin biosynthesis in plants. PMID:22160296

  13. Evolutionary Rate Heterogeneity of Primary and Secondary Metabolic Pathway Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Dola; Mukherjee, Ashutosh; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Primary metabolism is essential to plants for growth and development, and secondary metabolism helps plants to interact with the environment. Many plant metabolites are industrially important. These metabolites are produced by plants through complex metabolic pathways. Lack of knowledge about these pathways is hindering the successful breeding practices for these metabolites. For a better knowledge of the metabolism in plants as a whole, evolutionary rate variation of primary and secondary metabolic pathway genes is a prerequisite. In this study, evolutionary rate variation of primary and secondary metabolic pathway genes has been analyzed in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Primary metabolic pathway genes were found to be more conserved than secondary metabolic pathway genes. Several factors such as gene structure, expression level, tissue specificity, multifunctionality, and domain number are the key factors behind this evolutionary rate variation. This study will help to better understand the evolutionary dynamics of plant metabolism. PMID:26556590

  14. Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis thaliana defense metabolism genes modulates field fitness

    PubMed Central

    Kerwin, Rachel; Feusier, Julie; Corwin, Jason; Rubin, Matthew; Lin, Catherine; Muok, Alise; Larson, Brandon; Li, Baohua; Joseph, Bindu; Francisco, Marta; Copeland, Daniel; Weinig, Cynthia; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Natural populations persist in complex environments, where biotic stressors, such as pathogen and insect communities, fluctuate temporally and spatially. These shifting biotic pressures generate heterogeneous selective forces that can maintain standing natural variation within a species. To directly test if genes containing causal variation for the Arabidopsis thaliana defensive compounds, glucosinolates (GSL) control field fitness and are therefore subject to natural selection, we conducted a multi-year field trial using lines that vary in only specific causal genes. Interestingly, we found that variation in these naturally polymorphic GSL genes affected fitness in each of our environments but the pattern fluctuated such that highly fit genotypes in one trial displayed lower fitness in another and that no GSL genotype or genotypes consistently out-performed the others. This was true both across locations and within the same location across years. These results indicate that environmental heterogeneity may contribute to the maintenance of GSL variation observed within Arabidopsis thaliana. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05604.001 PMID:25867014

  15. DNA microarrays detect effects of soil contamination on Arabidopsis thaliana gene expression.

    PubMed

    Magrini, Kimberly D; Basu, Amit; Spotila, James R; Avery, Harold W; Bergman, Lawrence W; Hammond, Rachel; Anandan, Shivanthi

    2008-12-01

    Soil contamination, such as heavy metals and benzene compounds, is a widespread problem on military installations. It is important to be able to determine the effects of soil contamination before any adverse effects appear in organisms in surrounding areas. We examined gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana grown in soil from three sites at the Radford Army Ammunition Plant in Radford, Virginia, USA, using DNA microarrays. We analyzed soil, germination, and growth rate to compare with the microarray data. Soil contamination affected both external phenotype and gene expression. Plants grown in soil with high levels of contaminants were chloritic and were smaller than control plants grown in potting soil. Plants grown in soil with the highest copper concentration had the lowest growth rates and had genes up-regulated across several functional groups. Plants grown in soils with elevated lead had many genes down-regulated that were related to photosystem II, metabolism, cellular transport, and protein synthesis. Genes consistently up-regulated across most microarrays were genes related to photosystem I, genes related to water deprivation and oxidative stress response, heat shock proteins, and toxin catabolism genes such as glutathiones. DNA microarrays, in concert with a model genetic organism such as A. thaliana, were an effective assessment tool to determine the presence of toxic substances in soil at a site used for the production of military explosives. PMID:18613744

  16. Adaptation to warmer climates by parallel functional evolution of CBF genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Monroe, J Grey; McGovern, Cullen; Lasky, Jesse R; Grogan, Kelsi; Beck, James; McKay, John K

    2016-08-01

    The evolutionary processes and genetics underlying local adaptation at a specieswide level are largely unknown. Recent work has indicated that a frameshift mutation in a member of a family of transcription factors, C-repeat binding factors or CBFs, underlies local adaptation and freezing tolerance divergence between two European populations of Arabidopsis thaliana. To ask whether the specieswide evolution of CBF genes in Arabidopsis is consistent with local adaptation, we surveyed CBF variation from 477 wild accessions collected across the species' range. We found that CBF sequence variation is strongly associated with winter temperature variables. Looking specifically at the minimum temperature experienced during the coldest month, we found that Arabidopsis from warmer climates exhibit a significant excess of nonsynonymous polymorphisms in CBF genes and revealed a CBF haplotype network whose structure points to multiple independent transitions to warmer climates. We also identified a number of newly described mutations of significant functional effect in CBF genes, similar to the frameshift mutation previously indicated to be locally adaptive in Italy, and find that they are significantly associated with warm winters. Lastly, we uncover relationships between climate and the position of significant functional effect mutations between and within CBF paralogs, suggesting variation in adaptive function of different mutations. Cumulatively, these findings support the hypothesis that disruption of CBF gene function is adaptive in warmer climates, and illustrate how parallel evolution in a transcription factor can underlie adaptation to climate. PMID:27247130

  17. Transcriptional profiling of pea ABR17 mediated changes in gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Sowmya S; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Rahman, Muhammad H; Deyholos, Michael K; Kav, Nat NV

    2008-01-01

    Background Pathogenesis-related proteins belonging to group 10 (PR10) are elevated in response to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. Previously, we have shown a drastic salinity-induced increase in the levels of ABR17, a member of the PR10 family, in pea. Furthermore, we have also demonstrated that the constitutive expression of pea ABR17 cDNA in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus enhances their germination and early seedling growth under stress. Although it has been reported that several members of the PR10 family including ABR17 possess RNase activity, the exact mechanism by which the aforementioned characteristics are conferred by ABR17 is unknown at this time. We hypothesized that a study of differences in transcriptome between wild type (WT) and ABR17 transgenic A. thaliana may shed light on this process. Results The molecular changes brought about by the expression of pea ABR17 cDNA in A. thaliana in the presence or absence of salt stress were investigated using microarrays consisting of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes representing 23,686 Arabidopsis genes. Statistical analysis identified number of genes which were over represented among up- or down-regulated transcripts in the transgenic line. Our results highlight the important roles of many abscisic acid (ABA) and cytokinin (CK) responsive genes in ABR17 transgenic lines. Although the transcriptional changes followed a general salt response theme in both WT and transgenic seedlings under salt stress, many genes exhibited differential expression patterns when the transgenic and WT lines were compared. These genes include plant defensins, heat shock proteins, other defense related genes, and several transcriptional factors. Our microarray results for selected genes were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Conclusion Transcriptional analysis in ABR17 transgenic Arabidopsis plants, both under normal and saline conditions, revealed significant changes in abundance of transcripts for many stress

  18. Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

    2000-10-11

    Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  19. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scheible, Wolf

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  20. Retinoblastoma-like RRB gene of arabidopsis thaliana

    DOEpatents

    Durfee, Tim; Feiler, Heidi; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Jenkins, Susan; Roe, Judith; Zambryski, Patricia

    2004-02-24

    This invention provides methods and compositions for altering the growth, organization, and differentiation of plant tissues. The invention is based on the discovery that, in plants, genetically altering the levels of Retinoblastoma-related gene (RRB) activity produces dramatic effects on the growth, proliferation, organization, and differentiation of plant meristem.

  1. Exploring potential new floral organ morphogenesis genes of Arabidopsis thaliana using systems biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenchuan; Huang, Junfeng; Liu, Yang; Rao, Jianan; Luo, Da; He, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Flowering is one of the important defining features of angiosperms. The initiation of flower development and the formation of different floral organs are the results of the interplays among numerous genes. But until now, just fewer genes have been found linked with flower development. And the functions of lots of genes of Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Although, the quartet model successfully simplified the ABCDE model to elaborate the molecular mechanism by introducing protein-protein interactions (PPIs). We still don't know much about several important aspects of flower development. So we need to discriminate even more genes involving in the flower development. In this study, we identified seven differentially modules through integrating the weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) method to analyze co-expression network and PPIs using the public floral and non-floral expression profiles data of Arabidopsis thaliana. Gene set enrichment analysis was used for the functional annotation of the related genes, and some of the hub genes were identified in each module. The potential floral organ morphogenesis genes of two significant modules were integrated with PPI information in order to detail the inherent regulation mechanisms. Finally, the functions of the floral patterning genes were elucidated by combining the PPI and evolutionary information. It was indicated that the sub-networks or complexes, rather than the genes, were the regulation unit of flower development. We found that the most possible potential new genes underlining the floral pattern formation in A. thaliana were FY, CBL2, ZFN3, and AT1G77370; among them, FY, CBL2 acted as an upstream regulator of AP2; ZFN3 activated the flower primordial determining gene AP1 and AP2 by HY5/HYH gene via photo induction possibly. And AT1G77370 exhibited similar function in floral morphogenesis, same as ELF3. It possibly formed a complex between RFC3 and RPS15 in

  2. Exploring potential new floral organ morphogenesis genes of Arabidopsis thaliana using systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenchuan; Huang, Junfeng; Liu, Yang; Rao, Jianan; Luo, Da; He, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Flowering is one of the important defining features of angiosperms. The initiation of flower development and the formation of different floral organs are the results of the interplays among numerous genes. But until now, just fewer genes have been found linked with flower development. And the functions of lots of genes of Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Although, the quartet model successfully simplified the ABCDE model to elaborate the molecular mechanism by introducing protein-protein interactions (PPIs). We still don't know much about several important aspects of flower development. So we need to discriminate even more genes involving in the flower development. In this study, we identified seven differentially modules through integrating the weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) method to analyze co-expression network and PPIs using the public floral and non-floral expression profiles data of Arabidopsis thaliana. Gene set enrichment analysis was used for the functional annotation of the related genes, and some of the hub genes were identified in each module. The potential floral organ morphogenesis genes of two significant modules were integrated with PPI information in order to detail the inherent regulation mechanisms. Finally, the functions of the floral patterning genes were elucidated by combining the PPI and evolutionary information. It was indicated that the sub-networks or complexes, rather than the genes, were the regulation unit of flower development. We found that the most possible potential new genes underlining the floral pattern formation in A. thaliana were FY, CBL2, ZFN3, and AT1G77370; among them, FY, CBL2 acted as an upstream regulator of AP2; ZFN3 activated the flower primordial determining gene AP1 and AP2 by HY5/HYH gene via photo induction possibly. And AT1G77370 exhibited similar function in floral morphogenesis, same as ELF3. It possibly formed a complex between RFC3 and RPS15 in

  3. Heterologous Overexpression of Poplar SnRK2 Genes Enhanced Salt Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xueqing; Yu, Xiang; Hori, Chiaki; Demura, Taku; Ohtani, Misato; Zhuge, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Subfamily 2 of SNF1-related protein kinase (SnRK2) plays important roles in plant abiotic stress responses as a global positive regulator of abscisic acid signaling. In the genome of the model tree Populus trichocarpa, 12 SnRK2 genes have been identified, and some are upregulated by abiotic stresses. In this study, we heterologously overexpressed the PtSnRK2 genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and found that overexpression of PtSnRK2.5 and PtSnRK2.7 genes enhanced stress tolerance. In the PtSnRK2.5 and PtSnRK2.7 overexpressors, chlorophyll content, and root elongation were maintained under salt stress conditions, leading to higher survival rates under salt stress compared with those in the wild type. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that PtSnRK2.7 overexpression affected stress-related metabolic genes, including lipid metabolism and flavonoid metabolism, even under normal growth conditions. However, the stress response genes reported to be upregulated in Arabidopsis SRK2C/SnRK2.6 and wheat SnRK2.8 overexpressors were not changed by PtSnRK2.7 overexpression. Furthermore, PtSnRK2.7 overexpression widely and largely influenced the transcriptome in response to salt stress; genes related to transport activity, including anion transport-related genes, were characteristically upregulated, and a variety of metabolic genes were specifically downregulated. We also found that the salt stress response genes were greatly upregulated in the PtSnRK2.7 overexpressor. Taken together, poplar subclass 2 PtSnRK2 genes can modulate salt stress tolerance in Arabidopsis, through the activation of cellular signaling pathways in a different manner from that by herbal subclass 2 SnRK2 genes. PMID:27242819

  4. Sucrose Represses the Developmentally Controlled Transient Activation of the Plastocyanin Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Dijkwel, P. P.; Kock, PAM.; Bezemer, R.; Weisbeek, P. J.; Smeekens, SCM.

    1996-01-01

    The plastocyanin (PC) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana is activated independently of light during early seedling development. In etiolated seedlings, PC mRNA levels increase transiently and a maximum dark level is reached after 2 d of growth in darkness. In etiolated transgenic seedlings carrying a chimeric PC-promoter: luciferase fusion gene, luciferase activity is similarly increased after 2 d of growth. The transient increase in PC mRNA and luciferase activity levels can be repressed by sucrose. Nonmetabolizable sugars and polyethylene glycol do not have a major effect on PC gene expression. Also, light-grown seedlings show a similar transient and sucrose-sensitive increase in PC mRNA levels and luciferase activity, as in dark-grown seedlings, but here expression levels are 15- fold higher. These findings suggest the presence of a sucrose-sensitive, developmentally controlled expression mechanism that operates independently of light. PMID:12226197

  5. The Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of a purported maize cholinesterase gene encodes a GDSL-lipase

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Mrinalini; Buss, Kristina; Larrimore, Katherine E.; Segerson, Nicholas A.; Kannan, Latha

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme that is intimately associated with regulation of synaptic transmission in the cholinergic nervous system and in neuromuscular junctions of animals. However the presence of cholinesterase activity has been described also in non-metazoan organisms such as slime molds, fungi and plants. More recently, a gene purportedly encoding for acetylcholinesterase was cloned from maize. We have cloned the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of the Zea mays gene, At3g26430, and studied its biochemical properties. Our results indicate that the protein encoded by the gene exhibited lipase activity with preference to long chain substrates but did not hydrolyze choline esters. The At3g26430 protein belongs to the SGNH clan of serine hydrolases, and more specifically to the GDS(L) lipase family. PMID:23430565

  6. The Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of a purported maize cholinesterase gene encodes a GDSL-lipase.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Mrinalini; Buss, Kristina; Larrimore, Katherine E; Segerson, Nicholas A; Kannan, Latha; Mor, Tsafrir S

    2013-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme that is intimately associated with regulation of synaptic transmission in the cholinergic nervous system and in neuromuscular junctions of animals. However the presence of cholinesterase activity has been described also in non-metazoan organisms such as slime molds, fungi and plants. More recently, a gene purportedly encoding for acetylcholinesterase was cloned from maize. We have cloned the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of the Zea mays gene, At3g26430, and studied its biochemical properties. Our results indicate that the protein encoded by the gene exhibited lipase activity with preference to long chain substrates but did not hydrolyze choline esters. The At3g26430 protein belongs to the SGNH clan of serine hydrolases, and more specifically to the GDS(L) lipase family. PMID:23430565

  7. FLOR-ID: an interactive database of flowering-time gene networks in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bouché, Frédéric; Lobet, Guillaume; Tocquin, Pierre; Périlleux, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a hot topic in Plant Biology and important progress has been made in Arabidopsis thaliana toward unraveling the genetic networks involved. The increasing complexity and the explosion of literature however require development of new tools for information management and update. We therefore created an evolutive and interactive database of flowering time genes, named FLOR-ID (Flowering-Interactive Database), which is freely accessible at http://www.flor-id.org. The hand-curated database contains information on 306 genes and links to 1595 publications gathering the work of >4500 authors. Gene/protein functions and interactions within the flowering pathways were inferred from the analysis of related publications, included in the database and translated into interactive manually drawn snapshots. PMID:26476447

  8. FLOR-ID: an interactive database of flowering-time gene networks in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bouché, Frédéric; Lobet, Guillaume; Tocquin, Pierre; Périlleux, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a hot topic in Plant Biology and important progress has been made in Arabidopsis thaliana toward unraveling the genetic networks involved. The increasing complexity and the explosion of literature however require development of new tools for information management and update. We therefore created an evolutive and interactive database of flowering time genes, named FLOR-ID (Flowering-Interactive Database), which is freely accessible at http://www.flor-id.org. The hand-curated database contains information on 306 genes and links to 1595 publications gathering the work of >4500 authors. Gene/protein functions and interactions within the flowering pathways were inferred from the analysis of related publications, included in the database and translated into interactive manually drawn snapshots. PMID:26476447

  9. Gravity regulated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana (GENARA experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron-Dubuisson, Elodie; Carnero-D&íaz, Eugénie; Medina, Francisco Javier; Gasset, Gilbert; Pereda-Loth, Veronica; Graziana, Annick; Mazars, Christian; Le Disquet, Isabelle; Eche, Brigitte; Grat, Sabine; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette

    2012-07-01

    In higher plants, post-embryonic development is possible through the expression of a set of genes constituting the morphogenetic program that contribute to the production of tissues and organs during the whole plant life cycle. Plant development is mainly controlled by internal factors such as phytohormones, as well as by environmental factors, among which gravity plays a key role (gravi-morphogenetic program). The GENARA space experiment has been designed with the goal of contributing to a better understanding of this gravi-morphogenetic program through the identification and characterization of some gravity regulated proteins (GR proteins) by using quantitative proteomic methods, and through the study of the impact of plant hormones on the expression of this program. Among plant hormones, auxin is the major regulator of organogenesis. In fact, it affects numerous plant developmental processes, e.g. cell division and elongation, autumnal loss of leaves, and the formation of buds, roots, flowers and fruits. Furthermore, it also plays a key role in the mechanisms of different tropisms (including gravitropism) that modulate fundamental features of plant growth. The expression of significant genes involved in auxin transport and in auxin signal perception in root cells is being studied in space-grown seedlings and compared with the corresponding ground controls. This experiment was scheduled to be performed in The European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS), a new facility for plant cultivation and Plant Molecular Biology studies, at ISS. However only one aspect of this experiment was flown and concerns the qualitative and quantitative changes in membrane proteins supposed to be mainly associated with cell signaling and has been called GENARA A. The second part dealing with the function of auxin in the gravi-morphogenetic program and the alterations induced by microgravity will be studied through mutants affected on biosynthesis, transport or perception of auxin in a

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana ICE2 gene: phylogeny, structural evolution and functional diversification from ICE1.

    PubMed

    Kurbidaeva, Amina; Ezhova, Tatiana; Novokreshchenova, Maria

    2014-12-01

    The ability to tolerate environmental stresses is crucial for all living organisms, and gene duplication is one of the sources for evolutionary novelties. Arabidopsis thaliana INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 and 2 (ICE1 and ICE2) encode MYC-type bHLH (basic helix-loop-helix) transcription factors. They confer cold stress tolerance by induction of the CBF/DREB1 regulon and regulate stomata formation. Although ICE2 is closely related to ICE1, its origin and role in cold response remains uncertain. Here, we used a bioinformatics/phylogenetic approach to uncover the ICE2 evolutionary history, structural evolution and functional divergence from the putative ancestral gene. Sequence diversification from ICE1 included the gain of cis-acting elements in ICE2 promoter sequence that may provide meristem-specific and defense-related gene expression. By analyzing transgenic Arabidopsis lines with ICE2 over-expression we showed that it contributes to stomata formation, flowering time regulation and cold response. Constitutive ICE2 expression led to induced meristem freezing tolerance, resulting from activation of CBF1 and CBF3 genes and ABA biosynthesis by NCED3 induction. We presume that ICE2 gene has originated from a duplication event about 17.9MYA followed by sub- and neofunctionalization of the ancestral ICE1 gene. Moreover, we predict its role in pathogen resistance and flowering time regulation. PMID:25443829

  11. Interactions of CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON and SPATULA Genes Control Carpel Margin Development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Most. Altaf-Un; Ishida, Tetsuya; Smyth, David R; Tasaka, Masao; Aida, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A characteristic feature of flowering plants is the fusion of carpels, which results in the formation of an enclosed gynoecium. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the gynoecium is formed by the fusion of two carpels along their margins, which also act as a meristematic site for the formation of internal structures such as ovules, the septum and transmitting tract. How gene interactions coordinate the fusion and differentiation of the marginal structures during gynoecium development is largely unknown. It was previously shown that the SPATULA (SPT) gene is required for carpel fusion, whereas overexpression of the CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON genes CUC1 and CUC2 prevents it. Here we provide evidence that SPT promotes carpel fusion in the apical gynoecium partly through the negative regulation of CUC1 and CUC2 expression. In spt, transcripts of both CUC genes accumulated ectopically, and addition of cuc1 and cuc2 mutations to spt suppressed the split phenotype of carpels specifically along their lateral margins. In the basal gynoecium, on the other hand, all three genes promoted the formation of margin-derived structures, as revealed by the synergistic interactions of spt with each of the cuc mutations. Our results suggest that differential interactions among SPT, CUC1 and CUC2 direct the formation of domain-specific structures of the Arabidopsis gynoecium. PMID:22514090

  12. MAN3 gene regulates cadmium tolerance through the glutathione-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Yang, Libo; Gu, Ju; Bai, Xiaoya; Ren, Yongbin; Fan, Tingting; Han, Yi; Jiang, Li; Xiao, Fangming; Liu, Yongsheng; Cao, Shuqing

    2015-01-01

    Pollution of soil by the heavy metal cadmium (Cd) is a global environmental problem. The glutathione (GSH)-dependent phytochelatin (PC) synthesis pathway is one of the most important mechanisms contributing to Cd accumulation and tolerance. However, the regulation of this pathway is poorly understood. Here, we identified an Arabidopsis thaliana cadmium-tolerant dominant mutant xcd1-D (XVE system-induced cadmium-tolerance 1) and cloned XCD1 gene (previously called MAN3), which encodes an endo-β-mannanase. Overexpression of MAN3 led to enhanced Cd accumulation and tolerance, whereas loss-of-function of MAN3 resulted in decreased Cd accumulation and tolerance. In the presence of estradiol, enhanced Cd accumulation and tolerance in xcd1-D was associated with GSH-dependent, Cd-activated synthesis of PCs, which was correlated with coordinated activation of gene expression. Cd stress-induced expression of MAN3 and the consequently increased mannanase activity, led to increased mannose content in cell walls. Moreover, mannose treatment not only rescued the Cd-sensitive phenotype of the xcd1-2 mutant, but also improved the Cd tolerance of wild-type plants. Significantly, this mannose-mediated Cd accumulation and tolerance is dependent on GSH-dependent PC concentrations via coordinated control of expression of genes involved in PC synthesis. Our results suggest that MAN3 regulates the GSH-dependent PC synthesis pathway that contributes to Cd accumulation and tolerance in A. thaliana by coordinated control of gene expression. PMID:25329733

  13. Natural selection for polymorphism in the disease resistance gene Rps2 of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Mauricio, Rodney; Stahl, Eli A; Korves, Tonia; Tian, Dacheng; Kreitman, Martin; Bergelson, Joy

    2003-01-01

    Pathogen resistance is an ecologically important phenotype increasingly well understood at the molecular genetic level. In this article, we examine levels of avrRpt2-dependent resistance and Rps2 locus DNA sequence variability in a worldwide sample of 27 accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana. The rooted parsimony tree of Rps2 sequences drawn from a diverse set of ecotypes includes a deep bifurcation separating major resistance and susceptibility clades of alleles. We find evidence for selection maintaining these alleles and identify the N-terminal part of the leucine-rich repeat region as a probable target of selection. Additional protein variants are found within the two major clades and correlate well with measurable differences among ecotypes in resistance to the avirulence gene avrRpt2 of the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Long-lived polymorphisms have been observed for other resistance genes of A. thaliana; the Rps2 data suggest that the long-term maintenance of phenotypic variation in resistance genes may be a general phenomenon and are consistent with diversifying selection acting in concert with selection to maintain variation. PMID:12618410

  14. Gene introduction into the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana via peptide-based carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuah, Jo-Ann; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Available methods in plant genetic transformation are nuclear and plastid transformations because similar procedures have not yet been established for the mitochondria. The double membrane and small size of the organelle, in addition to its large population in cells, are major obstacles in mitochondrial transfection. Here we report the intracellular delivery of exogenous DNA localized to the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana using a combination of mitochondria-targeting peptide and cell-penetrating peptide. Low concentrations of peptides were sufficient to deliver DNA into the mitochondria and expression of imported DNA reached detectable levels within a short incubation period (12 h). We found that electrostatic interaction with the cell membrane is not a critical factor for complex internalization, instead, improved intracellular penetration of mitochondria-targeted complexes significantly enhanced gene transfer efficiency. Our results delineate a simple and effective peptide-based method, as a starting point for the development of more sophisticated plant mitochondrial transfection strategies.

  15. Gene introduction into the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana via peptide-based carriers

    PubMed Central

    Chuah, Jo-Ann; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Available methods in plant genetic transformation are nuclear and plastid transformations because similar procedures have not yet been established for the mitochondria. The double membrane and small size of the organelle, in addition to its large population in cells, are major obstacles in mitochondrial transfection. Here we report the intracellular delivery of exogenous DNA localized to the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana using a combination of mitochondria-targeting peptide and cell-penetrating peptide. Low concentrations of peptides were sufficient to deliver DNA into the mitochondria and expression of imported DNA reached detectable levels within a short incubation period (12 h). We found that electrostatic interaction with the cell membrane is not a critical factor for complex internalization, instead, improved intracellular penetration of mitochondria-targeted complexes significantly enhanced gene transfer efficiency. Our results delineate a simple and effective peptide-based method, as a starting point for the development of more sophisticated plant mitochondrial transfection strategies. PMID:25583214

  16. On the Origin of De Novo Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana Populations.

    PubMed

    Li, Zi-Wen; Chen, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Hagmann, Jörg; Han, Ting-Shen; Zou, Yu-Pan; Ge, Song; Guo, Ya-Long

    2016-01-01

    De novo genes, which originate from ancestral nongenic sequences, are one of the most important sources of protein-coding genes. This origination process is crucial for the adaptation of organisms. However, how de novo genes arise and become fixed in a population or species remains largely unknown. Here, we identified 782 de novo genes from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and divided them into three types based on the availability of translational evidence, transcriptional evidence, and neither transcriptional nor translational evidence for their origin. Importantly, by integrating multiple types of omics data, including data from genomes, epigenomes, transcriptomes, and translatomes, we found that epigenetic modifications (DNA methylation and histone modification) play an important role in the origination process of de novo genes. Intriguingly, using the transcriptomes and methylomes from the same population of 84 accessions, we found that de novo genes that are transcribed in approximately half of the total accessions within the population are highly methylated, with lower levels of transcription than those transcribed at other frequencies within the population. We hypothesized that, during the origin of de novo gene alleles, those neutralized to low expression states via DNA methylation have relatively high probabilities of spreading and becoming fixed in a population. Our results highlight the process underlying the origin of de novo genes at the population level, as well as the importance of DNA methylation in this process. PMID:27401176

  17. On the Origin of De Novo Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana Populations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zi-Wen; Chen, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Hagmann, Jörg; Han, Ting-Shen; Zou, Yu-Pan; Ge, Song; Guo, Ya-Long

    2016-01-01

    De novo genes, which originate from ancestral nongenic sequences, are one of the most important sources of protein-coding genes. This origination process is crucial for the adaptation of organisms. However, how de novo genes arise and become fixed in a population or species remains largely unknown. Here, we identified 782 de novo genes from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and divided them into three types based on the availability of translational evidence, transcriptional evidence, and neither transcriptional nor translational evidence for their origin. Importantly, by integrating multiple types of omics data, including data from genomes, epigenomes, transcriptomes, and translatomes, we found that epigenetic modifications (DNA methylation and histone modification) play an important role in the origination process of de novo genes. Intriguingly, using the transcriptomes and methylomes from the same population of 84 accessions, we found that de novo genes that are transcribed in approximately half of the total accessions within the population are highly methylated, with lower levels of transcription than those transcribed at other frequencies within the population. We hypothesized that, during the origin of de novo gene alleles, those neutralized to low expression states via DNA methylation have relatively high probabilities of spreading and becoming fixed in a population. Our results highlight the process underlying the origin of de novo genes at the population level, as well as the importance of DNA methylation in this process. PMID:27401176

  18. Arsenic Methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana Expressing an Algal Arsenite Methyltransferase Gene Increases Arsenic Phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhong; Lv, Yanling; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Wenwen; Rosen, Barry P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination in soil can lead to elevated transfer of As to the food chain. One potential mitigation strategy is to genetically engineer plants to enable them to transform inorganic As to methylated and volatile As species. In this study, we genetically engineered two ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana with the arsenite (As(III)) S-adenosylmethyltransferase (arsM) gene from the eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The transgenic A. thaliana plants gained a strong ability to methylate As, converting most of the inorganic As into dimethylarsenate [DMA(V)] in the shoots. Small amounts of volatile As were detected from the transgenic plants. However, the transgenic plants became more sensitive to As(III) in the medium, suggesting that DMA(V) is more phytotoxic than inorganic As. The study demonstrates a negative consequence of engineered As methylation in plants and points to a need for arsM genes with a strong ability to methylate As to volatile species. PMID:26998776

  19. CuO Nanoparticle Interaction with Arabidopsis thaliana: Toxicity, Parent-Progeny Transfer, and Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenyu; Xu, Lina; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Xiangke; White, Jason C; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-06-01

    CuO nanoparticles (NPs) (20, 50 mg L(-1)) inhibited seedling growth of different Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes (Col-0, Bay-0, and Ws-2), as well as the germination of their pollens and harvested seeds. For most of growth parameters (e.g., biomass, relative growth rate, root morphology change), Col-0 was the more sensitive ecotype to CuO NPs compared to Bay-0 and Ws-2. Equivalent Cu(2+) ions and CuO bulk particles had no effect on Arabidopsis growth. After CuO NPs (50 mg L(-1)) exposure, Cu was detected in the roots, leaves, flowers and harvested seeds of Arabidopsis, and its contents were significantly higher than that in CuO bulk particles (50 mg L(-1)) and Cu(2+) ions (0.15 mg L(-1)) treatments. Based on X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis (XANES), Cu in the harvested seeds was confirmed as being mainly in the form of CuO (88.8%), which is the first observation on the presence of CuO NPs in the plant progeny. Moreover, after CuO NPs exposure, two differentially expressed genes (C-1 and C-3) that regulated root growth and reactive oxygen species generation were identified, which correlated well with the physiological root inhibition and oxidative stress data. This current study provides direct evidence for the negative effects of CuO NPs on Arabidopsis, including accumulation and parent-progeny transfer of the particles, which may have significant implications with regard to the risk of NPs to food safety and security. PMID:27226046

  20. Molecular Cloning and Expression of cor (Cold-Regulated) Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Hajela, Ravindra K.; Horvath, David P.; Gilmour, Sarah J.; Thomashow, Michael F.

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that changes in gene expression occur in Arabidopsis thaliana. L. (Heyn) during cold acclimation (SJ Gilmour, RK Hajela, MF Thomashow [1988] Plant Physiol 87: 745-750). Here we report the isolation of cDNA clones of four cold-regulated (cor) genes from Arabidopsis and examine their expression in response to low temperature, abscisic acid (ABA), water stress, and heat shock. The results of Northern analysis indicated that the transcript levels for the four cor genes, represented by clones pHH7.2, pHH28, pHH29, and pHH67, increased markedly between 1 and 4 hours of cold treatment, reached a maximum at about 8 to 12 hours, and remained at elevated levels for as long as the plants were kept in the cold (up to 2 weeks). Returning cold acclimated plants to control temperature resulted in the levels of the cor transcripts falling rapidly to those found in nonacclimated plants; this occurred within 4 hours for the transcripts represented by pHH7.2 and pHH28, and 8 hours for those represented by pHH29 and pHH67. Nuclear run-on transcription assays indicated that the temperature-regulated expression of the cor genes represented by pHH7.2, pHH28, and pHH29 was controlled primarily at the posttranscriptional level while the cor gene represented by pHH67 was regulated largely at the transcriptional level. Northern analysis also indicated that the levels of cor gene transcripts increased in response to both ABA application and water stress, but not to heat shock. The possible significance of cor genes being regulated by both low temperature and water stress is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16667586

  1. Virus-induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana gene homologues in wheat identifies genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lapitan, Nora

    2013-01-01

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat (Triticum aestivumI L.), functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for breeding. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited transformation potential that hamper functional validation studies in wheat. In this study, three potential candidate genes shown to be involved in abiotic stress response pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana were selected for VIGS experiments in wheat. These include Era1 (enhanced response to abscisic acid), Cyp707a (ABA 8’-hydroxylase), and Sal1 (inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase). Gene homologues for these three genes were identified in wheat and cloned in the viral vector barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) in the antisense direction, followed by rub inoculation of BSMV viral RNA transcripts onto wheat plants. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that VIGS-treated wheat plants had significant reductions in target gene transcripts. When VIGS-treated plants generated for Era1 and Sal1 were subjected to limiting water conditions, they showed increased relative water content, improved water use efficiency, reduced gas exchange, and better vigour compared to water-stressed control plants inoculated with RNA from the empty viral vector (BSMV0). In comparison, the Cyp707a-silenced plants showed no improvement over BSMV0-inoculated plants under limited water condition. These results indicate that Era1 and Sal1 play important roles in conferring drought tolerance in wheat. Other traits affected by Era1 silencing were also studied. Delayed seed germination in Era1-silenced plants suggests this gene may be a useful target for developing resistance to pre-harvest sprouting. PMID:23364940

  2. Metabolic regulation of the gene encoding glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, H M; Peng, S S; Coruzzi, G M

    1994-01-01

    Here, we characterize a cDNA encoding a glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase (ASN1) from Arabidopsis thaliana and assess the effects of metabolic regulation on ASN1 mRNA levels. Sequence analysis shows that the predicted ASN1 peptide contains a purF-type glutamine-binding domain. Southern blot experiments and cDNA clone analysis suggest that ASN1 is the only gene encoding glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase in A. thaliana. The ASN1 gene is expressed predominantly in shoot tissues, where light has a negative effect on its mRNA accumulation. This negative effect of light on ASN1 mRNA levels was shown to be mediated, at least in part, via the photoreceptor phytochrome. We also investigated whether light-induced changes in nitrogen to carbon ratios might exert a metabolic regulation of the ASN1 mRNA accumulation. These experiments demonstrated that the accumulation of ASN1 mRNA in dark-grown plants is strongly repressed by the presence of exogenous sucrose. Moreover, this sucrose repression of ASN1 expression can be partially rescued by supplementation with exogenous amino acids such as asparagine, glutamine, and glutamate. These findings suggest that the expression of the ASN1 gene is under the metabolic control of the nitrogen to carbon ratio in cells. This is consistent with the fact that asparagine, synthesized by the ASN1 gene product, is a favored compound for nitrogen storage and nitrogen transport in dark-grown plants. We have put forth a working model suggesting that when nitrogen to carbon ratios are high, the gene product of ASN1 functions to re-direct the flow of nitrogen into asparagine, which acts as a shunt for storage and/or long-distance transport of nitrogen. PMID:7846154

  3. AthaMap-assisted transcription factor target gene identification in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Lorenz; Brill, Yuri; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of potential transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and small RNA target sites in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. The database contains sites for 115 different transcription factors (TFs). TFBS were identified with positional weight matrices (PWMs) or with single binding sites. With the new web tool 'Gene Identification', it is possible to identify potential target genes for selected TFs. For these analyses, the user can define a region of interest of up to 6000 bp in all annotated genes. For TFBS determined with PWMs, the search can be restricted to high-quality TFBS. The results are displayed in tables that identify the gene, position of the TFBS and, if applicable, individual score of the TFBS. In addition, data files can be downloaded that harbour positional information of TFBS of all TFs in a region between -2000 and +2000 bp relative to the transcription or translation start site. Also, data content of AthaMap was increased and the database was updated to the TAIR8 genome release. Database URL: http://www.athamap.de/gene_ident.php. PMID:21177332

  4. AthaMap-assisted transcription factor target gene identification in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bülow, Lorenz; Brill, Yuri; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of potential transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and small RNA target sites in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. The database contains sites for 115 different transcription factors (TFs). TFBS were identified with positional weight matrices (PWMs) or with single binding sites. With the new web tool ‘Gene Identification’, it is possible to identify potential target genes for selected TFs. For these analyses, the user can define a region of interest of up to 6000 bp in all annotated genes. For TFBS determined with PWMs, the search can be restricted to high-quality TFBS. The results are displayed in tables that identify the gene, position of the TFBS and, if applicable, individual score of the TFBS. In addition, data files can be downloaded that harbour positional information of TFBS of all TFs in a region between −2000 and +2000 bp relative to the transcription or translation start site. Also, data content of AthaMap was increased and the database was updated to the TAIR8 genome release. Database URL: http://www.athamap.de/gene_ident.php PMID:21177332

  5. Gene expression and hormone autonomy in radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Persinger, S.M.; Town, C.D. )

    1989-04-01

    In order to study the molecular genetics of factor controlling plant cell growth, we have isolated a group of radiation-induced tumors from Arabidopsis thaliana. Tumors appeared on plants derived from {sup 60}Co gamma-irradiated seed or seedlings, and are capable of hormone-autonomous growth in culture. We have used vertebrate oncogene probes to explore the hypothesis that the tumors arose by the radiation-induced activation of growth-regulating plant oncogenes. One probe, int-2, was used to isolate cDNA clones representing an mRNA differentially expressed between tumors and hormone-dependent callus tissue. The genomic organization and function of this and other differentially expressed Arabidopsis sequences are being further characterized. A second area of study concerns the hormonal status of individual tumors. Tumor tissue varies in color, texture, and degree of differentiation: while some tumors appear undifferentiated, one consistently produces roots, and others occasionally develop shoots or leaflets. The tumors have characteristic growth rates on hormone-free medium, and growth in response to exogenous hormones differs among the tumors themselves and from wild-type. Characterization of the relationships between hormonal status, morphogenesis, and gene expression should yield valuable insights into the mechanisms regulating plant growth and development.

  6. Molecular characterization of a second copy of holocarboxylase synthetase gene (hcs2) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Denis, Laurence; Grossemy, Marie; Douce, Roland; Alban, Claude

    2002-03-22

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS), catalyzing the covalent attachment of biotin, is ubiquitously represented in living organisms. Indeed, the biotinylation is a post-translational modification that allows the transformation of inactive biotin-dependent carboxylases, which are committed in fundamental metabolisms such as fatty acid synthesis, into their active holo form. Among other living organisms, plants present a peculiarly complex situation. In pea, HCS activity has been detected in three subcellular compartments and the systematic sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome revealed the occurrence of two hcs genes (hcs1 and hcs2). Hcs1 gene product had been previously characterized at molecular and biochemical levels. Here, by PCR amplification, we cloned an hcs2 cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana (Ws ecotype) mRNA. We observed the occurrence of multiple cDNA forms which resulted from the alternative splicing of hcs2 mRNA. Furthermore, we evidenced a nucleotide polymorphism at the hcs2 gene within the Ws ecotype, which affected splicing of hcs2 mRNA. This contrasted sharply with the situation at hcs1 locus. However, this polymorphism had no apparent effect on total HCS activity in planta. Finally, hcs2 mRNAs were found 4-fold less abundant than hcs1 mRNA and the most abundant hcs2 mRNA spliced variant should code for a truncated protein. We discuss the possible role of such a multiplicity of putative HCS proteins in plants and discuss the involvement of each of hcs genes in the correct realization of biotinylation. PMID:11784724

  7. The use of artificial microRNA technology to control gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Eamens, Andrew L; McHale, Marcus; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    In plants, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an effective trigger of RNA silencing, and several classes of endogenous small RNA (sRNA), processed from dsRNA substrates by DICER-like (DCL) endonucleases, are essential in controlling gene expression. One such sRNA class, the microRNAs (miRNAs) control the expression of closely related genes to regulate all aspects of plant development, including the determination of leaf shape, leaf polarity, flowering time, and floral identity. A single miRNA sRNA silencing signal is processed from a long precursor transcript of nonprotein-coding RNA, termed the primary miRNA (pri-miRNA). A region of the pri-miRNA is partially self-complementary allowing the transcript to fold back onto itself to form a stem-loop structure of imperfectly dsRNA. Artificial miRNA (amiRNA) technology uses endogenous pri-miRNAs, in which the miRNA and miRNA* (passenger strand of the miRNA duplex) sequences have been replaced with corresponding amiRNA/amiRNA* sequences that direct highly efficient RNA silencing of the targeted gene. Here, we describe the rules for amiRNA design, as well as outline the PCR and bacterial cloning procedures involved in the construction of an amiRNA plant expression vector to control target gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:24057368

  8. Genes of primary sulfate assimilation are part of the glucosinolate biosynthetic network in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yatusevich, Ruslan; Mugford, Sarah G; Matthewman, Colette; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Frerigmann, Henning; Delaney, Sean; Koprivova, Anna; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2010-04-01

    Glucosinolates are plant secondary metabolites involved in responses to biotic stress. The final step of their synthesis is the transfer of a sulfo group from 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) onto a desulfo precursor. Thus, glucosinolate synthesis is linked to sulfate assimilation. The sulfate donor for this reaction is synthesized from sulfate in two steps catalyzed by ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate kinase (APK). Here we demonstrate that R2R3-MYB transcription factors, which are known to regulate both aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana, also control genes of primary sulfate metabolism. Using trans-activation assays we found that two isoforms of APK, APK1, and APK2, are regulated by both classes of glucosinolate MYB transcription factors; whereas two ATPS genes, ATPS1 and ATPS3, are differentially regulated by these two groups of MYB factors. In addition, we show that the adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductases APR1, APR2, and APR3, which participate in primary sulfate reduction, are also activated by the MYB factors. These observations were confirmed by analysis of transgenic lines with modulated expression levels of the glucosinolate MYB factors. The changes in transcript levels also affected enzyme activities, the thiol content and the sulfate reduction rate in some of the transgenic plants. Altogether the data revealed that the MYB transcription factors regulate genes of primary sulfate metabolism and that the genes involved in the synthesis of activated sulfate are part of the glucosinolate biosynthesis network. PMID:20042022

  9. Systematic prediction of gene function in Arabidopsis thaliana using a probabilistic functional gene network

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sohyun; Rhee, Seung Y; Marcotte, Edward M; Lee, Insuk

    2012-01-01

    AraNet is a functional gene network for the reference plant Arabidopsis and has been constructed in order to identify new genes associated with plant traits. It is highly predictive for diverse biological pathways and can be used to prioritize genes for functional screens. Moreover, AraNet provides a web-based tool with which plant biologists can efficiently discover novel functions of Arabidopsis genes (http://www.functionalnet.org/aranet/). This protocol explains how to conduct network-based prediction of gene functions using AraNet and how to interpret the prediction results. Functional discovery in plant biology is facilitated by combining candidate prioritization by AraNet with focused experimental tests. PMID:21886106

  10. Sample Preparation of Arabidopsis thaliana Shoot Apices for Expression Studies of Photoperiod-Induced Genes.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Fernando; Torti, Stefano; Vincent, Coral; Coupland, George

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce new organs from a population of pluripotent cells which are located in specific tissues called meristems. One of these meristems, the shoot apical meristem (SAM), gives rise to leaves during the vegetative phase and flowers during the reproductive phase. The transition from vegetative SAM to an inflorescence meristem (IM) is a dramatic developmental switch, which has been particularly well studied in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. This developmental switch is controlled by multiple environmental signals such as day length (or photoperiod), and it is accompanied by changes in expression of hundreds of genes. A major interest in plant biology is to identify and characterize those genes which are regulated in the stem cells of the SAM in response to the photoperiodic signals. In this sense, techniques such as RNA in situ hybridization (RNA ISH) have been very successfully employed to detect the temporal and spatial expression patterns of genes in the SAM. This method can be specifically optimized for photoperiodic-flowering studies. In this chapter, we describe improved methods to generate plant material and histological samples to be combined with RNA ISH in flowering-related studies. PMID:26867617

  11. The genomic landscape of meiotic crossovers and gene conversions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wijnker, Erik; Velikkakam James, Geo; Ding, Jia; Becker, Frank; Klasen, Jonas R; Rawat, Vimal; Rowan, Beth A; de Jong, Daniël F; de Snoo, C Bastiaan; Zapata, Luis; Huettel, Bruno; de Jong, Hans; Ossowski, Stephan; Weigel, Detlef; Koornneef, Maarten; Keurentjes, Joost JB; Schneeberger, Korbinian

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the exact distribution of meiotic crossovers (COs) and gene conversions (GCs) is essential for understanding many aspects of population genetics and evolution, from haplotype structure and long-distance genetic linkage to the generation of new allelic variants of genes. To this end, we resequenced the four products of 13 meiotic tetrads along with 10 doubled haploids derived from Arabidopsis thaliana hybrids. GC detection through short reads has previously been confounded by genomic rearrangements. Rigid filtering for misaligned reads allowed GC identification at high accuracy and revealed an ∼80-kb transposition, which undergoes copy-number changes mediated by meiotic recombination. Non-crossover associated GCs were extremely rare most likely due to their short average length of ∼25–50 bp, which is significantly shorter than the length of CO-associated GCs. Overall, recombination preferentially targeted non-methylated nucleosome-free regions at gene promoters, which showed significant enrichment of two sequence motifs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01426.001 PMID:24347547

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae NHX1 genes encode amiloride sensitive electroneutral Na+/H+ exchangers.

    PubMed Central

    Darley, C P; van Wuytswinkel , O C; van der Woude , K; Mager, W H; de Boer , A H

    2000-01-01

    Sodium at high millimolar levels in the cytoplasm is toxic to plant and yeast cells. Sequestration of Na(+) ions into the vacuole is one mechanism to confer Na(+)-tolerance on these organisms. In the present study we provide direct evidence that the Arabidopsis thaliana At-NHX1 gene and the yeast NHX1 gene encode low-affinity electroneutral Na(+)/H(+) exchangers. We took advantage of the ability of heterologously expressed At-NHX1 to functionally complement the yeast nhx1-null mutant. Experiments on vacuolar vesicles isolated from yeast expressing At-NHX1 or NHX1 provided direct evidence for pH-gradient-energized Na(+) accumulation into the vacuole. A major difference between NHX1 and At-NHX1 is the presence of a cleavable N-terminal signal peptide (SP) in the former gene. Fusion of the SP to At-NHX1 resulted in an increase in the magnitude of Na(+)/H(+) exchange, indicating a role for the SP in protein targeting or regulation. Another distinguishing feature between the plant and yeast antiporters is their sensitivity to the diuretic compound amiloride. Whereas At-NHX1 was completely inhibited by amiloride, NHX1 activity was reduced by only 20-40%. These results show that yeast as a heterologous expression system provides a convenient model to analyse structural and regulatory features of plant Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. PMID:10998367

  13. Studies on gene expressions analyses for Arabidopsis thaliana plants stimulated by space flight condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jinying; Liu, Min; Pan, Yi; Li, Huasheng

    We carried out whole-genome microarray to screen the transcript profile of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings after three treatment: space microgravity condition( Seedlings grown in microgravity state of space flight of SIMBOX on Shenzhou-8), 1g centrifugal force in space(Seedlings grown in 1g centrifugal force state of space flight of SIMBOX on Shenzhou-8) and ground control. The result of microarray analysis is as followed: There were 368 genes significantly differentially expressed in space microgravity condition compared with that in 1g centrifuge space condition. Space radiation caused 246 genes significantly differentially expressed between seedlings in 1g centrifuge space condition and ground control. Space conditions (including microgravity and radiation) caused 621 genes significantly differentially expressed between seedlings in space microgravity condition and ground control. Microgravity and radiation as a single factor can cause plant gene expression change, but two factors synergism can produce some new effects on plant gene expression. The function of differential expression genes were analyst by bioinformatics, and we found the expression of genes related with stress were more different, such as the dehydration of protein (dehydrin Xero2) expression is up-regulated 57 times; low-temperature-induced protein expression is up-regulated in 49 times; heat shock protein expression is up-regulated 20 times; transcription factor DREB2A expression increase 25 times; protein phosphatase 2C expression is up-regulated 14 times; transcription factor NAM-like protein expression is up-regulated 13 times; cell wall metabolism related genes (xyloglucan, endo-1, 4-beta-D-glucanase) expression is down-regulated in 15 times. The results provide scientific data for the mechanism of space mutation.

  14. Apparent homology of expressed genes from wood-forming tissues of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) with Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kirst, Matias; Johnson, Arthur F.; Baucom, Christie; Ulrich, Erin; Hubbard, Kristy; Staggs, Rod; Paule, Charles; Retzel, Ernest; Whetten, Ross; Sederoff, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    Pinus taeda L. (loblolly pine) and Arabidopsis thaliana differ greatly in form, ecological niche, evolutionary history, and genome size. Arabidopsis is a small, herbaceous, annual dicotyledon, whereas pines are large, long-lived, coniferous forest trees. Such diverse plants might be expected to differ in a large number of functional genes. We have obtained and analyzed 59,797 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from wood-forming tissues of loblolly pine and compared them to the gene sequences inferred from the complete sequence of the Arabidopsis genome. Approximately 50% of pine ESTs have no apparent homologs in Arabidopsis or any other angiosperm in public databases. When evaluated by using contigs containing long, high-quality sequences, we find a higher level of apparent homology between the inferred genes of these two species. For those contigs 1,100 bp or longer, ≈90% have an apparent Arabidopsis homolog (E value < 10-10). Pines and Arabidopsis last shared a common ancestor ≈300 million years ago. Few genes would be expected to retain high sequence similarity for this time if they did not have essential functions. These observations suggest substantial conservation of gene sequence in seed plants. PMID:12771380

  15. Dissecting Arabidopsis thaliana DICER function in small RNA processing, gene silencing and DNA methylation patterning.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Ian R; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lu, Cheng; Johnson, Lianna; Meyers, Blake C; Green, Pamela J; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2006-06-01

    Small RNAs have several important biological functions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs) regulate mRNA stability and translation, and siRNAs cause post-transcriptional gene silencing of transposons, viruses and transgenes and are important in both the establishment and maintenance of cytosine DNA methylation. Here, we study the role of the four Arabidopsis thaliana DICER-LIKE genes (DCL1-DCL4) in these processes. Sequencing of small RNAs from a dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 triple mutant showed markedly reduced tasiRNA and siRNA production and indicated that DCL1, in addition to its role as the major enzyme for processing miRNAs, has a previously unknown role in the production of small RNAs from endogenous inverted repeats. DCL2, DCL3 and DCL4 showed functional redundancy in siRNA and tasiRNA production and in the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation. Our studies also suggest that asymmetric DNA methylation can be maintained by pathways that do not require siRNAs. PMID:16699516

  16. Identification of Multiple Proteins Coupling Transcriptional Gene Silencing to Genome Stability in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Christopher J.; Potok, Magdalena E.; Lopez, Jennifer; Do, Truman; Liu, Ao; Michaels, Scott D.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are regulated by epigenetic marks that act to modulate transcriptional control as well as to regulate DNA replication and repair. In Arabidopsis thaliana, mutation of the ATXR5 and ATXR6 histone methyltransferases causes reduction in histone H3 lysine 27 monomethylation, transcriptional upregulation of transposons, and a genome instability defect in which there is an accumulation of excess DNA corresponding to pericentromeric heterochromatin. We designed a forward genetic screen to identify suppressors of the atxr5/6 phenotype that uncovered loss-of-function mutations in two components of the TREX-2 complex (AtTHP1, AtSAC3B), a SUMO-interacting E3 ubiquitin ligase (AtSTUbL2) and a methyl-binding domain protein (AtMBD9). Additionally, using a reverse genetic approach, we show that a mutation in a plant homolog of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 enhances the atxr5/6 phenotype. Through characterization of these mutations, our results suggest models for the production atxr5 atxr6-induced extra DNA involving conflicts between the replicative and transcriptional processes in the cell, and suggest that the atxr5 atxr6 transcriptional defects may be the cause of the genome instability defects in the mutants. These findings highlight the critical intersection of transcriptional silencing and DNA replication in the maintenance of genome stability of heterochromatin. PMID:27253878

  17. Identification of Multiple Proteins Coupling Transcriptional Gene Silencing to Genome Stability in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hale, Christopher J; Potok, Magdalena E; Lopez, Jennifer; Do, Truman; Liu, Ao; Gallego-Bartolome, Javier; Michaels, Scott D; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are regulated by epigenetic marks that act to modulate transcriptional control as well as to regulate DNA replication and repair. In Arabidopsis thaliana, mutation of the ATXR5 and ATXR6 histone methyltransferases causes reduction in histone H3 lysine 27 monomethylation, transcriptional upregulation of transposons, and a genome instability defect in which there is an accumulation of excess DNA corresponding to pericentromeric heterochromatin. We designed a forward genetic screen to identify suppressors of the atxr5/6 phenotype that uncovered loss-of-function mutations in two components of the TREX-2 complex (AtTHP1, AtSAC3B), a SUMO-interacting E3 ubiquitin ligase (AtSTUbL2) and a methyl-binding domain protein (AtMBD9). Additionally, using a reverse genetic approach, we show that a mutation in a plant homolog of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 enhances the atxr5/6 phenotype. Through characterization of these mutations, our results suggest models for the production atxr5 atxr6-induced extra DNA involving conflicts between the replicative and transcriptional processes in the cell, and suggest that the atxr5 atxr6 transcriptional defects may be the cause of the genome instability defects in the mutants. These findings highlight the critical intersection of transcriptional silencing and DNA replication in the maintenance of genome stability of heterochromatin. PMID:27253878

  18. Nucleolin is required for DNA methylation state and the expression of rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Abou-Ellail, Mohamed; Douet, Julien; Comella, Pascale; Matia, Isabel; Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; Debures, Anne; Blevins, Todd; Cooke, Richard; Medina, Francisco J; Tourmente, Sylvette; Pikaard, Craig S; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2010-11-01

    In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1). Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre-rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis. PMID:21124873

  19. Nucleolin Is Required for DNA Methylation State and the Expression of rRNA Gene Variants in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Abou-Ellail, Mohamed; Douet, Julien; Comella, Pascale; Matia, Isabel; Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; DeBures, Anne; Blevins, Todd; Cooke, Richard; Medina, Francisco J.; Tourmente, Sylvette; Pikaard, Craig S.; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1). Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre–rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis. PMID:21124873

  20. Structure at 1.6 Å resolution of the protein from gene locus At3g22680 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Simon T. M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Bitto, Eduard; Jeon, Won Bae; Phillips, George N. Jr

    2005-07-01

    The crystal structure of the 18 kDa At3g22680 gene product from A. thaliana was determined at 1.6 Å resolution. At3g22680 shows no structural homology to any other known proteins and represents a new fold in protein conformational space. The gene product of At3g22680 from Arabidopsis thaliana codes for a protein of unknown function. The crystal structure of the At3g22680 gene product was determined by multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction and refined to an R factor of 16.0% (R{sub free} = 18.4%) at 1.60 Å resolution. The refined structure shows one monomer in the asymmetric unit, with one molecule of the non-denaturing detergent CHAPS (3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate) tightly bound. Protein At3g22680 shows no structural homology to any other known proteins and represents a new fold in protein conformation space.

  1. The CCoAOMT1 gene from jute (Corchorus capsularis L.) is involved in lignin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaoyang; Zhang, Yujia; Xu, Jiantang; Niu, Xiaoping; Qi, Jianmin; Tao, Aifen; Zhang, Liwu; Fang, Pingping; Lin, LiHui; Su, Jianguang

    2014-08-10

    The Caffeoyl-CoA 3-O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT) is a key enzyme in lignin biosynthesis in plants. In this study we cloned the full-length cDNA of the Caffeoyl-CoA 3-O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT) gene from jute using homology clone (primers were designed according to the sequence of CCoAOMT gene of other plants), and a modified RACE technique, subsequently named "CcCCoAOMT1". Bioinformatic analyses showed that the gene is a member of the CCoAOMT gene family. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that the CcCCoAOMT1 gene is constitutively expressed in all tissues, and the expression level was greatest in stem, followed by stem bark, roots and leaves. In order to understand this gene's function, we transformed it into Arabidopsis thaliana; integration (one insertion site) was confirmed following PCR and southern hybridization. The over-expression of CcCCoAOMT1 in these transgenic A.thaliana plants resulted in increased plant height and silique length relative to non-transgenic plants. Perhaps the most important finding was that the transgenic Arabidopsis plants contained more lignin (20.44-21.26%) than did control plants (17.56%), clearly suggesting an important role of CcCCoAOMT1 gene in lignin biosynthesis. These data are important for the success of efforts to reduce jute lignin content (thereby increasing fiber quality) via CcCCoAOMT1 gene inhibition. PMID:24853202

  2. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes in RNA-seq Data of Arabidopsis thaliana: A Compound Distribution Approach.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Arfa; Jaggi, Seema; Varghese, Eldho; Lall, Shwetank; Bhowmik, Arpan; Rai, Anil

    2016-04-01

    Gene expression is the process by which information from a gene is used in the synthesis of a functional gene product, which may be proteins. A gene is declared differentially expressed if an observed difference or change in read counts or expression levels between two experimental conditions is statistically significant. To identify differentially expressed genes between two conditions, it is important to find statistical distributional property of the data to approximate the nature of differential genes. In the present study, the focus is mainly to investigate the differential gene expression analysis for sequence data based on compound distribution model. This approach was applied in RNA-seq count data of Arabidopsis thaliana and it has been found that compound Poisson distribution is more appropriate to capture the variability as compared with Poisson distribution. Thus, fitting of appropriate distribution to gene expression data provides statistically sound cutoff values for identifying differentially expressed genes. PMID:26949988

  3. Analysis of the chromatin domain organisation around the plastocyanin gene reveals an MAR-specific sequence element in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    van Drunen, C M; Oosterling, R W; Keultjes, G M; Weisbeek, P J; van Driel, R; Smeekens, S C

    1997-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome is currently being sequenced, eventually leading towards the unravelling of all potential genes. We wanted to gain more insight into the way this genome might be organized at the ultrastructural level. To this extent we identified matrix attachment regions demarking potential chromatin domains, in a 16 kb region around the plastocyanin gene. The region was cloned and sequenced revealing six genes in addition to the plastocyanin gene. Using an heterologous in vitro nuclear matrix binding assay, to search for evolutionary conserved matrix attachment regions (MARs), we identified three such MARs. These three MARs divide the region into two small chromatin domains of 5 kb, each containing two genes. Comparison of the sequence of the three MARs revealed a degenerated 21 bp sequence that is shared between these MARs and that is not found elsewhere in the region. A similar sequence element is also present in four other MARs of Arabidopsis.Therefore, this sequence may constitute a landmark for the position of MARs in the genome of this plant. In a genomic sequence database of Arabidopsis the 21 bp element is found approximately once every 10 kb. The compactness of the Arabidopsis genome could account for the high incidence of MARs and MRSs we observed. PMID:9380515

  4. The gene family encoding the Arabidopsis thaliana translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha: molecular cloning, characterization and expression.

    PubMed

    Axelos, M; Bardet, C; Liboz, T; Le Van Thai, A; Curie, C; Lescure, B

    1989-10-01

    The gene family encoding the Arabidopsis thaliana translation elongation factor (EF-1 alpha) was analysed. This family contains four genes (A1-A4) organized in a similar manner in different varieties of Arabidopsis. Based upon both their physical separation and a comparison of their sequences, it is suggested that the A4 gene and the A1, A2, and A3 genes constitute two distinct subfamilies within the genome. By introducing chimaeric gene constructs into Arabidopsis cells, we showed that the A1 gene promoter mediates a transient expression about twofold higher than that obtained using the CaMV 35 S promoter. This expression depends on a 348 bp DNA fragment extending from -982 to -634 bp upstream of the initiation codon. This element contains a characteristic telomeric sequence (AACCCTAA) which is also found in the promoters of the A2 and A4 genes as well as in the promoters of the Drosophila EF-1 alpha F1 gene and of several highly expressed plant genes. PMID:2615757

  5. Assembly of a gene sequence tag microarray by reversible biotin-streptavidin capture for transcript analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wirta, Valtteri; Holmberg, Anders; Lukacs, Morten; Nilsson, Peter; Hilson, Pierre; Uhlén, Mathias; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2005-01-01

    Background Transcriptional profiling using microarrays has developed into a key molecular tool for the elucidation of gene function and gene regulation. Microarray platforms based on either oligonucleotides or purified amplification products have been utilised in parallel to produce large amounts of data. Irrespective of platform examined, the availability of genome sequence or a large number of representative expressed sequence tags (ESTs) is, however, a pre-requisite for the design and selection of specific and high-quality microarray probes. This is of great importance for organisms, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, with a high number of duplicated genes, as cross-hybridisation signals between evolutionary related genes cannot be distinguished from true signals unless the probes are carefully designed to be specific. Results We present an alternative solid-phase purification strategy suitable for efficient preparation of short, biotinylated and highly specific probes suitable for large-scale expression profiling. Twenty-one thousand Arabidopsis thaliana gene sequence tags were amplified and subsequently purified using the described technology. The use of the arrays is exemplified by analysis of gene expression changes caused by a four-hour indole-3-acetic (auxin) treatment. A total of 270 genes were identified as differentially expressed (120 up-regulated and 150 down-regulated), including several previously known auxin-affected genes, but also several previously uncharacterised genes. Conclusions The described solid-phase procedure can be used to prepare gene sequence tag microarrays based on short and specific amplified probes, facilitating the analysis of more than 21 000 Arabidopsis transcripts. PMID:15689241

  6. Effects of chronic ozone exposure on gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes and in Thellungiella halophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Pinghua; Mane, Shrinivasrao P; Sioson, Allan A; Robinet, Cecilia Vasquez; Heath, Lenwood S; Bohnert, Hans J; Grene, Ruth

    2006-05-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana (At) ecotypes Columbia-0 (Col-0), Wassilewskija (WS), Cape Verde Islands (Cvi-0) and a relative, Thellungiella halophila (Th), were exposed to 20-25% over ambient ozone [O3] in a free air concentration enrichment (FACE) experiment (http://www.soyFACE. uiuc.edu), mirroring increases expected in the near future. Col-0 and WS accelerated development and developed lesions within 10 d under increased ozone, while Cvi-0 and Th grew slowly. RNAs were used in microarray hybridizations (Col-0-based 26 000 elements, 70-mer oligonucleotides). A two-step analysis of variance (ANOVA) model, including comparison with values obtained under [O3], was used for analyses. WS showed the greatest number of changes in gene expression in response to ozone. Th showed the least changes, suggesting that its expression state at [O3] was sufficient for resistance at increased ozone. Patterns observed in ambient air controls for Cvi-0 and Col-0 were most similar, while Th showed the greatest number of differences compared with the other controls. Compared with Col-0, however, Cvi-0 showed higher levels of expression of chaperones, receptor kinase-like and photosynthesis-related genes in ambient air. Cvi-0 exhibited ozone-mediated changes in a pathway involving AtSR, a homologue of the mammalian NF kappa B family of redox-sensitive transcription factors, changes in chaperones, WRKY and C2H2 proteins and antioxidants. WS displayed ozone-mediated decreases in the expression of two AtSR/NF kappa B family members, C2-domain proteins and genes associated with cell wall growth and changes in the expression of marker genes for programmed cell death (PCD), among them RCD1, a key regulator in this pathway. Microarray data were verified by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. We relate O3-response diversity across the four lines to different responses among signaling and transcriptional response networks and differences in gene expression at [O3] levels. PMID:17087469

  7. A Dynamic Gene Regulatory Network Model That Recovers the Cyclic Behavior of Arabidopsis thaliana Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Elizabeth; García-Cruz, Karla; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Castillo, Aaron; Sánchez, María de la Paz; Álvarez-Buylla, Elena R.

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle control is fundamental in eukaryotic development. Several modeling efforts have been used to integrate the complex network of interacting molecular components involved in cell cycle dynamics. In this paper, we aimed at recovering the regulatory logic upstream of previously known components of cell cycle control, with the aim of understanding the mechanisms underlying the emergence of the cyclic behavior of such components. We focus on Arabidopsis thaliana, but given that many components of cell cycle regulation are conserved among eukaryotes, when experimental data for this system was not available, we considered experimental results from yeast and animal systems. We are proposing a Boolean gene regulatory network (GRN) that converges into only one robust limit cycle attractor that closely resembles the cyclic behavior of the key cell-cycle molecular components and other regulators considered here. We validate the model by comparing our in silico configurations with data from loss- and gain-of-function mutants, where the endocyclic behavior also was recovered. Additionally, we approximate a continuous model and recovered the temporal periodic expression profiles of the cell-cycle molecular components involved, thus suggesting that the single limit cycle attractor recovered with the Boolean model is not an artifact of its discrete and synchronous nature, but rather an emergent consequence of the inherent characteristics of the regulatory logic proposed here. This dynamical model, hence provides a novel theoretical framework to address cell cycle regulation in plants, and it can also be used to propose novel predictions regarding cell cycle regulation in other eukaryotes. PMID:26340681

  8. A Dynamic Gene Regulatory Network Model That Recovers the Cyclic Behavior of Arabidopsis thaliana Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Elizabeth; García-Cruz, Karla; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Castillo, Aaron; Sánchez, María de la Paz; Álvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2015-09-01

    Cell cycle control is fundamental in eukaryotic development. Several modeling efforts have been used to integrate the complex network of interacting molecular components involved in cell cycle dynamics. In this paper, we aimed at recovering the regulatory logic upstream of previously known components of cell cycle control, with the aim of understanding the mechanisms underlying the emergence of the cyclic behavior of such components. We focus on Arabidopsis thaliana, but given that many components of cell cycle regulation are conserved among eukaryotes, when experimental data for this system was not available, we considered experimental results from yeast and animal systems. We are proposing a Boolean gene regulatory network (GRN) that converges into only one robust limit cycle attractor that closely resembles the cyclic behavior of the key cell-cycle molecular components and other regulators considered here. We validate the model by comparing our in silico configurations with data from loss- and gain-of-function mutants, where the endocyclic behavior also was recovered. Additionally, we approximate a continuous model and recovered the temporal periodic expression profiles of the cell-cycle molecular components involved, thus suggesting that the single limit cycle attractor recovered with the Boolean model is not an artifact of its discrete and synchronous nature, but rather an emergent consequence of the inherent characteristics of the regulatory logic proposed here. This dynamical model, hence provides a novel theoretical framework to address cell cycle regulation in plants, and it can also be used to propose novel predictions regarding cell cycle regulation in other eukaryotes. PMID:26340681

  9. Modulation of NADPH-oxidase gene expression in rolB-transformed calli of Arabidopsis thaliana and Rubia cordifolia.

    PubMed

    Veremeichik, Galina; Bulgakov, Victor; Shkryl, Yury

    2016-08-01

    Expression of rol genes from Agrobacterium rhizogenes induces reprogramming of transformed plant cells and provokes pleiotropic effects on primary and secondary metabolism. We have previously established that the rolB and rolC genes impair reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in transformed cells of Rubia cordifolia and Arabidopsis thaliana. In the present investigation, we tested whether this effect is associated with changes in the expression levels of NADPH oxidases, which are considered to be the primary source of ROS during plant-microbe interactions. We identified two full-length NADPH oxidase genes from R. cordifolia and examined their expression in non-transformed and rolB-transformed calli. In addition, we examined the expression of their homologous genes from A. thaliana in non-transformed and rolB-expressing cells. The expression of Rboh isoforms was 3- to 7-fold higher in both R. cordifolia and A. thaliana rolB-transformed cells compared with non-transformed cells. Our results for the first time show that Agrobacterium rolB gene regulates particular NADPH oxidase isoforms. PMID:27208504

  10. Exploiting Differential Gene Expression and Epistasis to Discover Candidate Genes for Drought-Associated QTLs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, John T.; Mullen, Jack L.; Lowry, David B.; Awole, Kedija; Richards, James H.; Sen, Saunak; Verslues, Paul E.; Juenger, Thomas E.; McKay, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Soil water availability represents one of the most important selective agents for plants in nature and the single greatest abiotic determinant of agricultural productivity, yet the genetic bases of drought acclimation responses remain poorly understood. Here, we developed a systems-genetic approach to characterize quantitative trait loci (QTLs), physiological traits and genes that affect responses to soil moisture deficit in the TSUxKAS mapping population of Arabidopsis thaliana. To determine the effects of candidate genes underlying QTLs, we analyzed gene expression as a covariate within the QTL model in an effort to mechanistically link markers, RNA expression, and the phenotype. This strategy produced ranked lists of candidate genes for several drought-associated traits, including water use efficiency, growth, abscisic acid concentration (ABA), and proline concentration. As a proof of concept, we recovered known causal loci for several QTLs. For other traits, including ABA, we identified novel loci not previously associated with drought. Furthermore, we documented natural variation at two key steps in proline metabolism and demonstrated that the mitochondrial genome differentially affects genomic QTLs to influence proline accumulation. These findings demonstrate that linking genome, transcriptome, and phenotype data holds great promise to extend the utility of genetic mapping, even when QTL effects are modest or complex. PMID:25873386

  11. Distribution of 5-methylcytosine residues in 5S rRNA genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Secale cereale.

    PubMed

    Fulnecek, J; Matyásek, R; Kovarík, A

    2002-12-01

    Bisulfite genomic sequencing was used to localise 5-methylcytosine residues (mC) in 5S rRNA genes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Secale cereale. The maps of mC distribution were compared with the previously published map of the corresponding region in Nicotiana tabacum. In all three species, the level of methylation of 5S rRNA genes was generally higher than the average for the entire genome. The ratio of 5S rDNA methylation to average overall methylation was 44%/30-33% for N. tabacum, 27%/4-6% for A. thaliana and 24%/20-22% for S. cereale. With the exception of one clone from S. cereale, no methylation-free 5S rDNA was detected. The level of methylation at different sequence motifs in 5S rDNA was calculated for N. tabacum/A. thaliana/ S. cereale, and this analysis yielded the following values (expressed as a percentage of total C): mCG 90%/78%/85%, mCWG 89%/41%/53%, mCmCG 72%/32%/16%, mCCG 4%/2%/0%, mCHH 15%/6%/1%, where W=A or T, and H=A or C or T. Non-symmetrical methylation was almost negligible in the large genome of S. cereale but relatively frequent in N. tabacum and A. thaliana, suggesting that the strict correlation between genome size and cytosine methylation might be violated for this type of methylation. Among non-symmetrical motifs the mCWA triplets were significantly over-represented in Arabidopsis, while in tobacco this preference was not as pronounced. The differences in methylation levels in different sequence contexts might be of phylogenetic significance, but further species in related and different taxa need to be studied before firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:12471448

  12. Natural variations in expression of regulatory and detoxification related genes under limiting phosphate and arsenate stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Tapsi; Kumar, Smita; Khare, Ria; Tripathi, Rudra D.; Trivedi, Prabodh K.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stress including nutrient deficiency and heavy metal toxicity severely affects plant growth, development, and productivity. Genetic variations within and in between species are one of the important factors in establishing interactions and responses of plants with the environment. In the recent past, natural variations in Arabidopsis thaliana have been used to understand plant development and response toward different stresses at genetic level. Phosphorus deficiency negatively affects plant growth and metabolism and modulates expression of the genes involved in Pi homeostasis. Arsenate, As(V), a chemical analog of Pi, is taken up by the plants via phosphate transport system. Studies suggest that during Pi deficiency, enhanced As(V) uptake leads to increased toxicity in plants. Here, the natural variations in Arabidopsis have been utilized to study the As(V) stress response under limiting Pi condition. The primary root length was compared to identify differential response of three Arabidopsis accessions (Col-0, Sij-1, and Slavi-1) under limiting Pi and As(V) stress. To study the molecular mechanisms responsible for the differential response, comprehensive expression profiling of the genes involved in uptake, detoxification, and regulatory mechanisms was carried out. Analysis suggests genetic variation-dependent regulatory mechanisms may affect differential response of Arabidopsis natural variants toward As(V) stress under limiting Pi condition. Therefore, it is hypothesized that detailed analysis of the natural variations under multiple stress conditions might help in the better understanding of the biological processes involved in stress tolerance and adaptation. PMID:26557133

  13. A transcriptomic study reveals differentially expressed genes and pathways respond to simulated acid rain in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Wu; Niu, Li; Fu, Bin; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Acid rain, as a worldwide environmental issue, can cause serious damage to plants. In this study, we provided the first case study on the systematic responses of arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.) to simulated acid rain (SiAR) by transcriptome approach. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the expression of a set of genes related to primary metabolisms, including nitrogen, sulfur, amino acid, photosynthesis, and reactive oxygen species metabolism, were altered under SiAR. In addition, transport and signal transduction related pathways, especially calcium-related signaling pathways, were found to play important roles in the response of arabidopsis to SiAR stress. Further, we compared our data set with previously published data sets on arabidopsis transcriptome subjected to various stresses, including wound, salt, light, heavy metal, karrikin, temperature, osmosis, etc. The results showed that many genes were overlapped in several stresses, suggesting that plant response to SiAR is a complex process, which may require the participation of multiple defense-signaling pathways. The results of this study will help us gain further insights into the response mechanisms of plants to acid rain stress. PMID:23379338

  14. A Sulfonylurea Herbicide Resistance Gene from Arabidopsis thaliana as a New Selectable Marker for Production of Fertile Transgenic Rice Plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Hayashimoto, A; Murai, N

    1992-10-01

    A mutant acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene, csr1-1, isolated from sulfonylurea herbicide-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana, was placed under control of a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (35S). Rice protoplasts were transformed with the 35S/ALS chimeric gene and regenerated into fertile transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) plants. The 35S/ALS gene was expressed effectively as demonstrated by northern blot hybridization analysis, and conferred to transformed calli at least 200-fold greater chlorsulfuron resistance than nontransformed control calli. Effective selection of 35S/ALS-transformed protoplasts was achieved at extremely low chlorsulfuron concentrations of 10 nm. The results demonstrated that the 35S/ALS gene is an alternative selectable marker for rice protoplast transformation and fertile transgenic rice production. The results also suggest that the mutant form of Arabidopsis ALS enzyme operates normally in rice cells. Thus, the mechanism of protein transport to chloroplast and ALS inhibition by chlorsulfuron is apparently conserved among plant species as diverse as Arabidopsis (dicotyledon) and rice (monocotyledon). PMID:16653044

  15. Isolation of AtNUDT5 gene promoter and characterization of its activity in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-Chun; Li, Mei-Ying; Ruan, Meng-Bin; Xia, Yi-Ji; Wu, Kun-Xin; Peng, Ming

    2013-03-01

    AtNUDT5 is a cytosol Nudix that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a variety of substrates. In this report, a 1,387-bp 5'-flanking region of the AtNUDT5 gene was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. The tissue-specific activity of the 5'-flanking region was investigated by using the GUS gene as a reporter in transgenic A. thaliana plants. Weak GUS activity appeared in vascular tissues of young plants, strong GUS activity appeared in the axial roots, but no GUS activity was observed in the root cap, lateral roots, rosette leaf, mature silique and reproductive tissues such as stamen, pistil, and petal. Furthermore, by using these transgenic A. thaliana plants, results of the histochemical staining and fluorometric assays of GUS activity showed that the AtNUDT5 promoter can be activated by both avirulent Pst avrRpm1 and virulent Pst strains at 5 h post-infiltration and that the activity of AtNUDT5 promoter increased significantly at 24 h post-infiltration. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the AtNUDT5 promoter is pathogen-responsive. The promoter may be used to develop transgenic plants with an increased tolerance to pathogenic stresses. PMID:23322251

  16. EXPORTIN1 Genes are Essential for Development and Function of the Gametophytes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gametes are produced in plants through mitotic divisions in the haploid gametophytes. We investigated the role of EXPORTIN1 (XPO1) genes during the development of both female and male gametophytes of Arabidopsis. Exportins exclude target proteins from the nucleus and are also part of a complex recru...

  17. Evolution of MicroRNA Genes in Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana: An Update of the Inverted Duplication Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Jiang, Wen-kai; Gao, Li-zhi

    2011-01-01

    The origin and evolution of microRNA (miRNA) genes, which are of significance in tuning and buffering gene expressions in a number of critical cellular processes, have long attracted evolutionary biologists. However, genome-wide perspectives on their origins, potential mechanisms of their de novo generation and subsequent evolution remain largely unsolved in flowering plants. Here, genome-wide analyses of Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana revealed apparently divergent patterns of miRNA gene origins. A large proportion of miRNA genes in O. sativa were TE-related and MITE-related miRNAs in particular, whereas the fraction of these miRNA genes much decreased in A. thaliana. Our results show that the majority of TE-related and pseudogene-related miRNA genes have originated through inverted duplication instead of segmental or tandem duplication events. Based on the presented findings, we hypothesize and illustrate the four likely molecular mechanisms to de novo generate novel miRNA genes from TEs and pseudogenes. Our rice genome analysis demonstrates that non-MITEs and MITEs mediated inverted duplications have played different roles in de novo generating miRNA genes. It is confirmed that the previously proposed inverted duplication model may give explanations for non-MITEs mediated duplication events. However, many other miRNA genes, known from the earlier proposed model, were rather arisen from MITE transpositions into target genes to yield binding sites. We further investigated evolutionary processes spawned from de novo generated to maturely-formed miRNA genes and their regulatory systems. We found that miRNAs increase the tunability of some gene regulatory systems with low gene copy numbers. The results also suggest that gene balance effects may have largely contributed to the evolution of miRNA regulatory systems. PMID:22194805

  18. Cloning and characterization of a gene (UVR3) required for photorepair of 6-4 photoproducts in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, S; Sugiyama, M; Iwai, S; Hitomi, K; Otoshi, E; Kim, S T; Jiang, C Z; Todo, T; Britt, A B; Yamamoto, K

    1998-01-01

    UV radiation induces two major classes of pyrimidine dimers: the pyrimidine [6-4] pyrimidone photoproduct (6-4 product) and the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD). Many organisms produce enzymes, termed photolyases, that specifically bind to these damage products and split them via a UV-A/blue light-dependent mechanism, thereby reversing the damage. These photolyases are specific for either CPDs or 6-4 products. A gene that expresses a protein with 6-4 photolyase activity in vitro was recently cloned from Drosophila melanogaster and Xenopus laevis. We report here the isolation of a homolog of this gene, cloned on the basis of sequence similarity, from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This cloned gene produces a protein with 6-4 photolyase activity when expressed in Escherichia coli. We also find that a previously described mutant of Arabidopsis (uvr3) that is defective in photoreactivation of 6-4 products carries a nonsense mutation in this 6-4 photolyase homolog. We have therefore termed this gene UVR3. Although homologs of this gene have previously been shown to produce a functional 6-4 photolyase when expressed in heterologous systems, this is the first demonstration of a requirement for this gene for photoreactivation of 6-4 products in vivo. PMID:9421527

  19. A Predictive Coexpression Network Identifies Novel Genes Controlling the Seed-to-Seedling Phase Transition in Arabidopsis thaliana1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Anderson Tadeu; Ribone, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a quiescent dry seed to an actively growing photoautotrophic seedling is a complex and crucial trait for plant propagation. This study provides a detailed description of global gene expression in seven successive developmental stages of seedling establishment in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using the transcriptome signature from these developmental stages, we obtained a coexpression gene network that highlights interactions between known regulators of the seed-to-seedling transition and predicts the functions of uncharacterized genes in seedling establishment. The coexpressed gene data sets together with the transcriptional module indicate biological functions related to seedling establishment. Characterization of the homeodomain leucine zipper I transcription factor AtHB13, which is expressed during the seed-to-seedling transition, demonstrated that this gene regulates some of the network nodes and affects late seedling establishment. Knockout mutants for athb13 showed increased primary root length as compared with wild-type (Columbia-0) seedlings, suggesting that this transcription factor is a negative regulator of early root growth, possibly repressing cell division and/or cell elongation or the length of time that cells elongate. The signal transduction pathways present during the early phases of the seed-to-seedling transition anticipate the control of important events for a vigorous seedling, such as root growth. This study demonstrates that a gene coexpression network together with transcriptional modules can provide insights that are not derived from comparative transcript profiling alone. PMID:26888061

  20. Wheat TaSP gene improves salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoli; Cui, Weina; Liang, Wenji; Huang, Zhanjing

    2015-12-01

    A novel salt-induced gene with unknown functions was cloned through analysis of gene expression profile of a salt-tolerant wheat mutant RH8706-49 under salt stress. The gene was named Triticum aestivum salt-related protein (TaSP) and deposited in GenBank (Accession No. KF307326). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results showed that TaSP expression was induced under salt, abscisic acid (ABA), and polyethylene glycol (PEG) stresses. Subcellular localization revealed that TaSP was mainly localized in cell membrane. Overexpression of TaSP in Arabidopsis could improve salt tolerance of 35S::TaSP transgenic Arabidopsis. 35S::TaSP transgenic Arabidopsis lines after salt stress presented better physiological indexes than the control group. In the non-invasive micro-test (NMT), an evident Na(+) excretion was observed at the root tip of salt-stressed 35S::TaSP transgenic Arabidopsis. TaSP promoter was cloned, and its beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activities before and after ABA, salt, cold, heat, and salicylic acid (SA) stresses were determined. Full-length TaSP promoter contained ABA and salt response elements. PMID:26476792

  1. Redox state of plastoquinone pool regulates expression of Arabidopsis thaliana genes in response to elevated irradiance.

    PubMed

    Adamiec, Małgorzata; Drath, Maria; Jackowski, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    DNA microarray technology was applied to gain insight into the role of the redox state of PQ pool as a retrograde factor mediating differential expression of Arabidopsis nuclear genes during the acclimation to changing irradiance. DNA microarray chips containing probes corresponding to 24,000 Arabidopsis nuclear genes were screened with cRNA samples prepared from leaves of plants exposed for 5 h to low irradiance (control) vs. medium, high and excessive irradiances (MI, HI and EI, respectively). Six hundred and sixty three genes were differentially expressed as a result of an exposure to at least one elevated irradiance. Among 663 differentially expressed genes a total of 50 were reverted by DCMU--24 ones modulated at medium irradiance, 32 ones modulated at high irradiance and a single one modulated at excessive irradiance. We postulate that their expression is regulated by redox state of plastoquinone (PQ) pool. Thus the PQ-mediated redox regulation of expression of Arabidopsis nuclear genes is probably limited to the irradiance window representing non-stressing conditions. We found that the promoter regions of the PQ-regulated genes contained conserved elements, suggesting transcriptional control by a shared set of trans-acting factors which participate in signal transduction from the redox state of the PQ pool. PMID:18231654

  2. UVH6, a plant homolog of the human/yeast TFIIH transcription factor subunit XPD/RAD3, regulates cold-stress genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The UVH6 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana is predicted to function in transcription regulation, based on known activities of its human and yeast homologs. In this study, we show that UVH6-1 mutants are ultra-sensitive to cold and suggest that this defect results from reduced expression of cold-stress...

  3. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA SEEDLING ROOTS EXPOSED TO THE MUNITION HEXAHYDRO-1,3,5-TRINITRO-1,3,5-TRIAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arabidopsis thaliana root transcriptome responses to the munition, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), were assessed using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE). Comparison of the transcriptional profile for the RDX response to a profile previously described for Ar...

  4. Response of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots with Altered Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP) Gene Expression to the Clubroot Disease and Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jülke, Sabine; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-01-01

    The clubroot disease of Brassicaceae is caused by the obligate biotrophic protist Plasmodiophora brassicae. The disease is characterized by abnormal tumorous swellings of infected roots that result in reduced drought resistance and insufficient distribution of nutrients, leading to reduced crop yield. It is one of the most damaging diseases among cruciferous crops worldwide. The acquisition of nutrients by the protist is not well understood. Gene expression profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana clubroots indicate that lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) could be involved in disease development or at least in adaptation to the disease symptoms. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the role of some, of the still enigmatic LTPs during clubroot development. For a functional approach, we have generated transgenic plants that overexpress LTP genes in a root specific manner or show reduced LTP gene expression. Our results showed that overexpression of some of the LTP genes resulted in reduced disease severity whereas the lipid content in clubs of LTP mutants seems to be unaffected. Additional studies indicate a role for some LTPs during salt stress conditions in roots of A. thaliana. PMID:27135222

  5. Response of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots with Altered Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP) Gene Expression to the Clubroot Disease and Salt Stress.

    PubMed

    Jülke, Sabine; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-01-01

    The clubroot disease of Brassicaceae is caused by the obligate biotrophic protist Plasmodiophora brassicae. The disease is characterized by abnormal tumorous swellings of infected roots that result in reduced drought resistance and insufficient distribution of nutrients, leading to reduced crop yield. It is one of the most damaging diseases among cruciferous crops worldwide. The acquisition of nutrients by the protist is not well understood. Gene expression profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana clubroots indicate that lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) could be involved in disease development or at least in adaptation to the disease symptoms. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the role of some, of the still enigmatic LTPs during clubroot development. For a functional approach, we have generated transgenic plants that overexpress LTP genes in a root specific manner or show reduced LTP gene expression. Our results showed that overexpression of some of the LTP genes resulted in reduced disease severity whereas the lipid content in clubs of LTP mutants seems to be unaffected. Additional studies indicate a role for some LTPs during salt stress conditions in roots of A. thaliana. PMID:27135222

  6. Overexpression of Actinidia deliciosa pyruvate decarboxylase 1 gene enhances waterlogging stress in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Yu; Huang, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Gang; Xuan, Ji-Ping; Guo, Zhong-Ren

    2016-09-01

    Ethanolic fermentation is classically associated with waterlogging tolerance when plant cells switch from respiration to anaerobic fermentation. Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), which catalyzes the first step in this pathway, is thought to be the main regulatory enzyme. Here, we cloned a full-length PDC cDNA sequence from kiwifruit, named AdPDC1. We determined the expression of the AdPDC1 gene in kiwifruit under different environmental stresses using qRT-PCR, and the results showed that the increase of AdPDC1 expression during waterlogging stress was much higher than that during salt, cold, heat and drought stresses. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced the resistance to waterlogging stress but could not enhance resistance to cold stress at five weeks old seedlings. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis could not enhance resistance to NaCl and mannitol stresses at the stage of seed germination and in early seedlings. These results suggested that the kiwifruit AdPDC1 gene is required during waterlogging but might not be required during other environmental stresses. Expression of the AdPDC1 gene was down-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) in kiwifruit, and overexpression of the AdPDC1 gene in Arabidopsis inhibited seed germination and root length under ABA treatment, indicating that ABA might negatively regulate the AdPDC1 gene under waterlogging stress. PMID:27191596

  7. Analysis of rRNA Gene Methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana by CHEF-Conventional 2D Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mohannath, Gireesha; Pikaard, Craig S

    2016-01-01

    Contour-clamped homogenous electric field (CHEF) gel electrophoresis, a variant of Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), is a powerful technique for resolving large fragments of DNA (10 kb-9 Mb). CHEF has many applications including the physical mapping of chromosomes, artificial chromosomes, and sub-chromosomal DNA fragments, etc. Here, we describe the use of CHEF and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze rRNA gene methylation patterns within the two ~4 million base pair nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) of Arabidopsis thaliana. The method involves CHEF gel electrophoresis of agarose-embedded DNA following restriction endonuclease digestion to cut the NORs into large but resolvable segments, followed by digestion with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases and conventional (or CHEF) gel electrophoresis, in a second dimension. Resulting products are then detected by Southern blotting or PCR analyses capable of discriminating rRNA gene subtypes. PMID:27576719

  8. [Evaluation of Salt Tolerance of Transgenic Tobacco Plants Bearing with P5CS1 Gene of Arabidopsis thaliana].

    PubMed

    Ibragimova, S M; Trifonova, E A; Filipenko, E A; Shymny, V K

    2015-12-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana delta1-pyrroline-5-carhoxylate synthase 1 gene (P5CS1) cDNA was cloned under the control of the potent constitutive 35S RNA promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus and transferred into genome of tobacco cv. Petit Havana SR-1 (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants. It is shown that the constitutive level of proline in the transgenic plants T0 exceeds that of the SR1 reference line by 1.5 to 4 times. Under conditions of salt stress (200, 300 mM NaCl) T1-generation transgenic plants in early stages of development formed a large biomass, developed more quickly, and had a higher rate of root growth compared to the control, which confirms the involvement of the P5CS1 gene in molecular mechanisms of stress resistance in plants. PMID:27055296

  9. Developmental Functions of miR156-Regulated SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingli; Hu, Tieqiang; Zhao, Jianfei; Park, Mee-Yeon; Earley, Keith W; Wu, Gang; Yang, Li; Poethig, R Scott

    2016-08-01

    Correct developmental timing is essential for plant fitness and reproductive success. Two important transitions in shoot development-the juvenile-to-adult vegetative transition and the vegetative-to-reproductive transition-are mediated by a group of genes targeted by miR156, SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP) genes. To determine the developmental functions of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we characterized their expression patterns, and their gain-of-function and loss-of-function phenotypes. Our results reveal that SBP-LIKE (SPL) genes in Arabidopsis can be divided into three functionally distinct groups: 1) SPL2, SPL9, SPL10, SPL11, SPL13 and SPL15 contribute to both the juvenile-to-adult vegetative transition and the vegetative-to-reproductive transition, with SPL9, SP13 and SPL15 being more important for these processes than SPL2, SPL10 and SPL11; 2) SPL3, SPL4 and SPL5 do not play a major role in vegetative phase change or floral induction, but promote the floral meristem identity transition; 3) SPL6 does not have a major function in shoot morphogenesis, but may be important for certain physiological processes. We also found that miR156-regulated SPL genes repress adventitious root development, providing an explanation for the observation that the capacity for adventitious root production declines as the shoot ages. miR156 is expressed at very high levels in young seedlings, and declines in abundance as the shoot develops. It completely blocks the expression of its SPL targets in the first two leaves of the rosette, and represses these genes to different degrees at later stages of development, primarily by promoting their translational repression. These results provide a framework for future studies of this multifunctional family of transcription factors, and offer new insights into the role of miR156 in Arabidopsis development. PMID:27541584

  10. Developmental Functions of miR156-Regulated SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tieqiang; Park, Mee-Yeon; Earley, Keith W.; Wu, Gang; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Correct developmental timing is essential for plant fitness and reproductive success. Two important transitions in shoot development—the juvenile-to-adult vegetative transition and the vegetative-to-reproductive transition—are mediated by a group of genes targeted by miR156, SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP) genes. To determine the developmental functions of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we characterized their expression patterns, and their gain-of-function and loss-of-function phenotypes. Our results reveal that SBP-LIKE (SPL) genes in Arabidopsis can be divided into three functionally distinct groups: 1) SPL2, SPL9, SPL10, SPL11, SPL13 and SPL15 contribute to both the juvenile-to-adult vegetative transition and the vegetative-to-reproductive transition, with SPL9, SP13 and SPL15 being more important for these processes than SPL2, SPL10 and SPL11; 2) SPL3, SPL4 and SPL5 do not play a major role in vegetative phase change or floral induction, but promote the floral meristem identity transition; 3) SPL6 does not have a major function in shoot morphogenesis, but may be important for certain physiological processes. We also found that miR156-regulated SPL genes repress adventitious root development, providing an explanation for the observation that the capacity for adventitious root production declines as the shoot ages. miR156 is expressed at very high levels in young seedlings, and declines in abundance as the shoot develops. It completely blocks the expression of its SPL targets in the first two leaves of the rosette, and represses these genes to different degrees at later stages of development, primarily by promoting their translational repression. These results provide a framework for future studies of this multifunctional family of transcription factors, and offer new insights into the role of miR156 in Arabidopsis development. PMID:27541584

  11. Heterologous expression of the halophyte Zoysia matrella H⁺-pyrophosphatase gene improved salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Li, Lanlan; Zong, Junqin; Chen, Jingbo; Guo, Hailin; Guo, Aigui; Liu, Jianxiu

    2015-06-01

    A number of vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase (VP) family genes play important roles in plant growth under salt stress condition. Despite their biological importance in plant salt-stress regulation, there is no report about VP in the halophytic turfgrass Zoysia matrella. Here, we isolated ZmVP1, a type I VP homologues gene encoding 768 amino acids by using the degenerated PCR and RACE PCR methods from Zoysia matrella. The expression level of ZmVP1 was significantly induced by salinity, drought and cold, but not by heat. ZmVP1 can restore the salt-tolerant ability of a salt-sensitive yeast strain. Overexpression of ZmVP1 in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in more vigorous growth under salt stress. Moreover, the transgenic Arabidopsis accumulated more Na(+) and K(+) in the leaves compared to that of wild type plants under salt stress, had higher activities of V-ATPase and V-PPase, and showed higher relative gene expression levels of 5 stress-related genes (AtNHX1, AtLEA, AtP5CS, AtMn-SOD, AtAPX1). These results demonstrated that ZmVP1 from Z. matrella was a functional tonoplast H(+)-pyrophosphatase contributing to salt tolerance potentially through regulating the Na(+) compartment in vacuole, K(+) assimilation, osmotic regulation and antioxidant response. PMID:25874657

  12. ABI3 mediates dehydration stress recovery response in Arabidopsis thaliana by regulating expression of downstream genes.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Sonia; Sengupta, Sourabh; Ray, Anagh; Nag Chaudhuri, Ronita

    2016-09-01

    ABI3, originally discovered as a seed-specific transcription factor is now implicated to act beyond seed physiology, especially during abiotic stress. In non-seed plants, ABI3 is known to act in desiccation stress signaling. Here we show that ABI3 plays a role in dehydration stress response in Arabidopsis. ABI3 gene was upregulated during dehydration stress and its expression was maintained during subsequent stress recovery phases. Comparative gene expression studies in response to dehydration stress and stress recovery were done with genes which had potential ABI3 binding sites in their upstream regulatory regions. Such studies showed that several genes including known seed-specific factors like CRUCIFERIN1, CRUCIFERIN3 and LEA-group of genes like LEA76, LEA6, DEHYDRIN LEA and LEA-LIKE got upregulated in an ABI3-dependent manner, especially during the stress recovery phase. ABI3 got recruited to regions upstream to the transcription start site of these genes during dehydration stress response through direct or indirect DNA binding. Interestingly, ABI3 also binds to its own promoter region during such stress signaling. Nucleosomes covering potential ABI3 binding sites in the upstream sequences of the above-mentioned genes alter positions, and show increased H3 K9 acetylation during stress-induced transcription. ABI3 thus mediates dehydration stress signaling in Arabidopsis through regulation of a group of genes that play a role primarily during stress recovery phase. PMID:27457990

  13. Genome Wide Association Mapping in Arabidopsis thaliana Identifies Novel Genes Involved in Linking Allyl Glucosinolate to Altered Biomass and Defense

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Marta; Joseph, Bindu; Caligagan, Hart; Li, Baohua; Corwin, Jason A.; Lin, Catherine; Kerwin, Rachel E.; Burow, Meike; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    A key limitation in modern biology is the ability to rapidly identify genes underlying newly identified complex phenotypes. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have become an increasingly important approach for dissecting natural variation by associating phenotypes with genotypes at a genome wide level. Recent work is showing that the Arabidopsis thaliana defense metabolite, allyl glucosinolate (GSL), may provide direct feedback regulation, linking defense metabolism outputs to the growth, and defense responses of the plant. However, there is still a need to identify genes that underlie this process. To start developing a deeper understanding of the mechanism(s) that modulate the ability of exogenous allyl GSL to alter growth and defense, we measured changes in plant biomass and defense metabolites in a collection of natural 96 A. thaliana accessions fed with 50 μM of allyl GSL. Exogenous allyl GSL was introduced exclusively to the roots and the compound transported to the leaf leading to a wide range of heritable effects upon plant biomass and endogenous GSL accumulation. Using natural variation we conducted GWAS to identify a number of new genes which potentially control allyl responses in various plant processes. This is one of the first instances in which this approach has been successfully utilized to begin dissecting a novel phenotype to the underlying molecular/polygenic basis. PMID:27462337

  14. Metabolic fingerprinting of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions.

    PubMed

    Sotelo-Silveira, Mariana; Chauvin, Anne-Laure; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Winkler, Robert; de Folter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In the post-genomic era much effort has been put on the discovery of gene function using functional genomics. Despite the advances achieved by these technologies in the understanding of gene function at the genomic and proteomic level, there is still a big genotype-phenotype gap. Metabolic profiling has been used to analyze organisms that have already been characterized genetically. However, there is a small number of studies comparing the metabolic profile of different tissues of distinct accessions. Here, we report the detection of over 14,000 and 17,000 features in inflorescences and leaves, respectively, in two widely used Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. A predictive Random Forest Model was developed, which was able to reliably classify tissue type and accession of samples based on LC-MS profile. Thereby we demonstrate that the morphological differences among A. thaliana accessions are reflected also as distinct metabolic phenotypes within leaves and inflorescences. PMID:26074932

  15. Metabolic fingerprinting of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    PubMed Central

    Sotelo-Silveira, Mariana; Chauvin, Anne-Laure; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Winkler, Robert; de Folter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In the post-genomic era much effort has been put on the discovery of gene function using functional genomics. Despite the advances achieved by these technologies in the understanding of gene function at the genomic and proteomic level, there is still a big genotype-phenotype gap. Metabolic profiling has been used to analyze organisms that have already been characterized genetically. However, there is a small number of studies comparing the metabolic profile of different tissues of distinct accessions. Here, we report the detection of over 14,000 and 17,000 features in inflorescences and leaves, respectively, in two widely used Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. A predictive Random Forest Model was developed, which was able to reliably classify tissue type and accession of samples based on LC-MS profile. Thereby we demonstrate that the morphological differences among A. thaliana accessions are reflected also as distinct metabolic phenotypes within leaves and inflorescences. PMID:26074932

  16. Coselected genes determine adaptive variation in herbivore resistance throughout the native range of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Brachi, Benjamin; Meyer, Christopher G; Villoutreix, Romain; Platt, Alexander; Morton, Timothy C; Roux, Fabrice; Bergelson, Joy

    2015-03-31

    The "mustard oil bomb" is a major defense mechanism in the Brassicaceae, which includes crops such as canola and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. These plants produce and store blends of amino acid-derived secondary metabolites called glucosinolates. Upon tissue rupture by natural enemies, the myrosinase enzyme hydrolyses glucosinolates, releasing defense molecules. Brassicaceae display extensive variation in the mixture of glucosinolates that they produce. To investigate the genetics underlying natural variation in glucosinolate profiles, we conducted a large genome-wide association study of 22 methionine-derived glucosinolates using A. thaliana accessions from across Europe. We found that 36% of among accession variation in overall glucosinolate profile was explained by genetic differentiation at only three known loci from the glucosinolate pathway. Glucosinolate-related SNPs were up to 490-fold enriched in the extreme tail of the genome-wide [Formula: see text] scan, indicating strong selection on loci controlling this pathway. Glucosinolate profiles displayed a striking longitudinal gradient with alkenyl and hydroxyalkenyl glucosinolates enriched in the West. We detected a significant contribution of glucosinolate loci toward general herbivore resistance and lifetime fitness in common garden experiments conducted in France, where accessions are enriched in hydroxyalkenyls. In addition to demonstrating the adaptive value of glucosinolate profile variation, we also detected long-distance linkage disequilibrium at two underlying loci, GS-OH and GS-ELONG. Locally cooccurring alleles at these loci display epistatic effects on herbivore resistance and fitness in ecologically realistic conditions. Together, our results suggest that natural selection has favored a locally adaptive configuration of physically unlinked loci in Western Europe. PMID:25775585

  17. Coselected genes determine adaptive variation in herbivore resistance throughout the native range of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Christopher G.; Villoutreix, Romain; Platt, Alexander; Morton, Timothy C.; Roux, Fabrice; Bergelson, Joy

    2015-01-01

    The “mustard oil bomb” is a major defense mechanism in the Brassicaceae, which includes crops such as canola and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. These plants produce and store blends of amino acid-derived secondary metabolites called glucosinolates. Upon tissue rupture by natural enemies, the myrosinase enzyme hydrolyses glucosinolates, releasing defense molecules. Brassicaceae display extensive variation in the mixture of glucosinolates that they produce. To investigate the genetics underlying natural variation in glucosinolate profiles, we conducted a large genome-wide association study of 22 methionine-derived glucosinolates using A. thaliana accessions from across Europe. We found that 36% of among accession variation in overall glucosinolate profile was explained by genetic differentiation at only three known loci from the glucosinolate pathway. Glucosinolate-related SNPs were up to 490-fold enriched in the extreme tail of the genome-wide FST scan, indicating strong selection on loci controlling this pathway. Glucosinolate profiles displayed a striking longitudinal gradient with alkenyl and hydroxyalkenyl glucosinolates enriched in the West. We detected a significant contribution of glucosinolate loci toward general herbivore resistance and lifetime fitness in common garden experiments conducted in France, where accessions are enriched in hydroxyalkenyls. In addition to demonstrating the adaptive value of glucosinolate profile variation, we also detected long-distance linkage disequilibrium at two underlying loci, GS-OH and GS-ELONG. Locally cooccurring alleles at these loci display epistatic effects on herbivore resistance and fitness in ecologically realistic conditions. Together, our results suggest that natural selection has favored a locally adaptive configuration of physically unlinked loci in Western Europe. PMID:25775585

  18. Terpene Specialized Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tholl, Dorothea; Lee, Sungbeom

    2011-01-01

    Terpenes constitute the largest class of plant secondary (or specialized) metabolites, which are compounds of ecological function in plant defense or the attraction of beneficial organisms. Using biochemical and genetic approaches, nearly all Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) enzymes of the core biosynthetic pathways producing the 5-carbon building blocks of terpenes have been characterized and closer insight has been gained into the transcriptional and posttranscriptional/translational mechanisms regulating these pathways. The biochemical function of most prenyltransferases, the downstream enzymes that condense the C5-precursors into central 10-, 15-, and 20-carbon prenyldiphosphate intermediates, has been described, although the function of several isoforms of C20-prenyltranferases is not well understood. Prenyl diphosphates are converted to a variety of C10-, C15-, and C20-terpene products by enzymes of the terpene synthase (TPS) family. Genomic organization of the 32 Arabidopsis TPS genes indicates a species-specific divergence of terpene synthases with tissue- and cell-type specific expression profiles that may have emerged under selection pressures by different organisms. Pseudogenization, differential expression, and subcellular segregation of TPS genes and enzymes contribute to the natural variation of terpene biosynthesis among Arabidopsis accessions (ecotypes) and species. Arabidopsis will remain an important model to investigate the metabolic organization and molecular regulatory networks of terpene specialized metabolism in relation to the biological activities of terpenes. PMID:22303268

  19. Simultaneous knockdown of six non-family genes using a single synthetic RNAi fragment in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Czarnecki, Olaf; Bryan, Anthony C.; Jawdy, Sara S.; Yang, Xiaohan; Cheng, Zong-Ming; Chen, Jin-Gui; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2016-02-17

    Genetic engineering of plants that results in successful establishment of new biochemical or regulatory pathways requires stable introduction of one or more genes into the plant genome. It might also be necessary to down-regulate or turn off expression of endogenous genes in order to reduce activity of competing pathways. An established way to knockdown gene expression in plants is expressing a hairpin-RNAi construct, eventually leading to degradation of a specifically targeted mRNA. Knockdown of multiple genes that do not share homologous sequences is still challenging and involves either sophisticated cloning strategies to create vectors with different serial expression constructs ormore » multiple transformation events that is often restricted by a lack of available transformation markers. Synthetic RNAi fragments were assembled in yeast carrying homologous sequences to six or seven non-family genes and introduced into pAGRIKOLA. Transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana and subsequent expression analysis of targeted genes proved efficient knockdown of all target genes. In conclusion, we present a simple and cost-effective method to create constructs to simultaneously knockdown multiple non-family genes or genes that do not share sequence homology. The presented method can be applied in plant and animal synthetic biology as well as traditional plant and animal genetic engineering.« less

  20. Effects of hypergravity stimulus on the expression level of genes responsible for lignin formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaoki, D.; Karahara, I.; Nishiuchi, T.; Wakasugi, T.; Yamada, K.; Yamaguchi, K.; Kamisaka, S.

    Secondary cell walls contribute mechanical strength to plant bodies Deposition of lignin in secondary cell walls has been considered to be prerequisite for the evolution of land plants In the present study we examined the effects of hypergravity conditions on lignin deposition in secondary cell walls of Arabidopsis Arabidopsis thaliana L inflorescence stems Plants were grown for 3 days after exposure to basipetal hypergravity at 300 x g for 24 h A secondary cell wall fraction was prepared by enzyme digestion of inflorescence stem segments to remove primary cell wall components The content of lignin in a secondary cell wall fraction was significantly increased by hypergravity stimulus Microarray analysis 22K was used to identify genes that are modulated in expression in response to hypergravity conditions The results showed that many genes putatively involved in lignin biosynthesis were expressed more than 2-fold by hypergravity treatment These data indicate that hypergravity-induced increase in the content of the constituents of secondary cell walls is attributed to increase in the expression level of genes responsible for the formation of secondary cell walls under hypergravity conditions

  1. Cloning and characterization of a Verticillium wilt resistance gene from Gossypium barbadense and functional analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xingfen; Yang, Shuo; Chi, Jina; Zhang, Guiyin; Ma, Zhiying

    2011-11-01

    Verticillium wilt causes enormous loss to yield or quality in many crops. In an effort to help controlling this disease through genetic engineering, we first cloned and characterized a Verticillium wilt resistance gene (GbVe) from cotton (Gossypium barbadense) and analyzed its function in Arabidopsis thaliana. Its nucleotide sequence is 3,819 bp long, with an open reading frame of 3,387 bp, and encoding an 1,128-aa protein precursor. Sequence analysis shows that GbVe produces a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein. It shares identities of 55.9% and 57.4% with tomato Ve1 and Ve2, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that the Ve gene expression pattern was different between the resistant and susceptible cultivars. In the resistant Pima90-53, GbVe was quickly induced and reached to a peak at 2 h after inoculation, two-fold higher than that of control. We localized the GbVe-GFP fusion protein to the cytomembrane in onion epidermal cells. By inserting GbVe into Arabidopsis via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, T(3) transgenic lines were obtained. Compared with the wild-type control, GbVe-overexpressing plants had greater levels of resistance to V. dahliae. This suggests that GbVe is a useful gene for improving the plant resistance against fungal diseases. PMID:21739145

  2. The arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 gene encodes a component of the polar-auxin-transport efflux carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R.; Hilson, P.; Sedbrook, J.; Rosen, E.; Caspar, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Auxins are plant hormones that mediate many aspects of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxins are polarly transported from sites of synthesis in the shoot apex to their sites of action in the basal regions of shoots and in roots. Polar auxin transport is an important aspect of auxin functions and is mediated by cellular influx and efflux carriers. Little is known about the molecular identity of its regulatory component, the efflux carrier [Estelle, M. (1996) Current Biol. 6, 1589-1591]. Here we show that mutations in the Arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 (AGR1) gene involved in root gravitropism confer increased root-growth sensitivity to auxin and decreased sensitivity to ethylene and an auxin transport inhibitor, and cause retention of exogenously added auxin in root tip cells. We used positional cloning to show that AGR1 encodes a putative transmembrane protein whose amino acid sequence shares homologies with bacterial transporters. When expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, AGR1 promotes an increased efflux of radiolabeled IAA from the cells and confers increased resistance to fluoro-IAA, a toxic IAA-derived compound. AGR1 transcripts were localized to the root distal elongation zone, a region undergoing a curvature response upon gravistimulation. We have identified several AGR1-related genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting a global role of this gene family in the control of auxin-regulated growth and developmental processes.

  3. The Arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 gene encodes a component of the polar-auxin-transport efflux carrier

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rujin; Hilson, Pierre; Sedbrook, John; Rosen, Elizabeth; Caspar, Timothy; Masson, Patrick H.

    1998-01-01

    Auxins are plant hormones that mediate many aspects of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxins are polarly transported from sites of synthesis in the shoot apex to their sites of action in the basal regions of shoots and in roots. Polar auxin transport is an important aspect of auxin functions and is mediated by cellular influx and efflux carriers. Little is known about the molecular identity of its regulatory component, the efflux carrier [Estelle, M. (1996) Current Biol. 6, 1589–1591]. Here we show that mutations in the Arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 (AGR1) gene involved in root gravitropism confer increased root-growth sensitivity to auxin and decreased sensitivity to ethylene and an auxin transport inhibitor, and cause retention of exogenously added auxin in root tip cells. We used positional cloning to show that AGR1 encodes a putative transmembrane protein whose amino acid sequence shares homologies with bacterial transporters. When expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, AGR1 promotes an increased efflux of radiolabeled IAA from the cells and confers increased resistance to fluoro-IAA, a toxic IAA-derived compound. AGR1 transcripts were localized to the root distal elongation zone, a region undergoing a curvature response upon gravistimulation. We have identified several AGR1-related genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting a global role of this gene family in the control of auxin-regulated growth and developmental processes. PMID:9844024

  4. Inferring transcriptional gene regulation network of starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves using graphical Gaussian model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Starch serves as a temporal storage of carbohydrates in plant leaves during day/night cycles. To study transcriptional regulatory modules of this dynamic metabolic process, we conducted gene regulation network analysis based on small-sample inference of graphical Gaussian model (GGM). Results Time-series significant analysis was applied for Arabidopsis leaf transcriptome data to obtain a set of genes that are highly regulated under a diurnal cycle. A total of 1,480 diurnally regulated genes included 21 starch metabolic enzymes, 6 clock-associated genes, and 106 transcription factors (TF). A starch-clock-TF gene regulation network comprising 117 nodes and 266 edges was constructed by GGM from these 133 significant genes that are potentially related to the diurnal control of starch metabolism. From this network, we found that β-amylase 3 (b-amy3: At4g17090), which participates in starch degradation in chloroplast, is the most frequently connected gene (a hub gene). The robustness of gene-to-gene regulatory network was further analyzed by TF binding site prediction and by evaluating global co-expression of TFs and target starch metabolic enzymes. As a result, two TFs, indeterminate domain 5 (AtIDD5: At2g02070) and constans-like (COL: At2g21320), were identified as positive regulators of starch synthase 4 (SS4: At4g18240). The inference model of AtIDD5-dependent positive regulation of SS4 gene expression was experimentally supported by decreased SS4 mRNA accumulation in Atidd5 mutant plants during the light period of both short and long day conditions. COL was also shown to positively control SS4 mRNA accumulation. Furthermore, the knockout of AtIDD5 and COL led to deformation of chloroplast and its contained starch granules. This deformity also affected the number of starch granules per chloroplast, which increased significantly in both knockout mutant lines. Conclusions In this study, we utilized a systematic approach of microarray analysis to discover

  5. Introns Structure Patterns of Variation in Nucleotide Composition in Arabidopsis thaliana and Rice Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ressayre, Adrienne; Glémin, Sylvain; Montalent, Pierre; Serre-Giardi, Laurana; Dillmann, Christine; Joets, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Plant genomes present a continuous range of variation in nucleotide composition (G + C content). In coding regions, G + C-poor species tend to have unimodal distributions of G + C content among genes within genomes and slight 5′–3′ gradients along genes. In contrast, G + C-rich species display bimodal distributions of G + C content among genes and steep 5′–3′ decreasing gradients along genes. The causes of these peculiar patterns are still poorly understood. Within two species (Arabidopsis thaliana and rice), each representative of one side of the continuum, we studied the consequences of intron presence on coding region and intron G + C content at different scales. By properly taking intron structure into account, we showed that, in both species, intron presence is associated with step changes in nucleotide, codon, and amino acid composition. This suggests that introns have a barrier effect structuring G + C content along genes and that previous continuous characterizations of the 5′–3′ gradients were artifactual. In external gene regions (located upstream first or downstream last introns), species-specific factors, such as GC-biased gene conversion, are shaping G + C content whereas in internal gene regions (surrounded by introns), G + C content is likely constrained to remain within a range common to both species. PMID:26450849

  6. Introns Structure Patterns of Variation in Nucleotide Composition in Arabidopsis thaliana and Rice Protein-Coding Genes.

    PubMed

    Ressayre, Adrienne; Glémin, Sylvain; Montalent, Pierre; Serre-Giardi, Laurana; Dillmann, Christine; Joets, Johann

    2015-10-01

    Plant genomes present a continuous range of variation in nucleotide composition (G + C content). In coding regions, G + C-poor species tend to have unimodal distributions of G + C content among genes within genomes and slight 5'-3' gradients along genes. In contrast, G + C-rich species display bimodal distributions of G + C content among genes and steep 5'-3' decreasing gradients along genes. The causes of these peculiar patterns are still poorly understood. Within two species (Arabidopsis thaliana and rice), each representative of one side of the continuum, we studied the consequences of intron presence on coding region and intron G + C content at different scales. By properly taking intron structure into account, we showed that, in both species, intron presence is associated with step changes in nucleotide, codon, and amino acid composition. This suggests that introns have a barrier effect structuring G + C content along genes and that previous continuous characterizations of the 5'-3' gradients were artifactual. In external gene regions (located upstream first or downstream last introns), species-specific factors, such as GC-biased gene conversion, are shaping G + C content whereas in internal gene regions (surrounded by introns), G + C content is likely constrained to remain within a range common to both species. PMID:26450849

  7. The subtelomeric region of the Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome IIIR contains potential genes and duplicated fragments from other chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Ting; Ho, Chia-Hsing; Hseu, Ming-Jhy; Chen, Chung-Mong

    2010-09-01

    The subtelomere and a portion of the associated telomeric region (together named 3RTAS) of chromosome IIIR from the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes Columbia (Col) and Wassilewskija (Ws) were specifically amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subsequently cloned and sequenced. The centromere-proximal portion of 3RTAS from both ecotypes contained two newly identified potential genes, one encoding the chloroplast luminal 19-kDa protein precursor and the other encoding three potential alternatively spliced CCCH-type zinc finger proteins. The telomere-proximal portion of 3RTAS from the Col ecotype contained short duplicated fragments derived from chromosomes I, II, and III, and that from the Ws ecotype contained a duplicated fragment derived from chromosome V. Each duplicated fragment has diverged somewhat in sequence from that of the ectopic template. Small patches of homologous nucleotides were found within the flanking sequences of both the duplicated fragments and the corresponding ectopic template sequences. The structural characteristics of these duplicated fragments suggest that they are filler DNAs captured by non-homologous end joining during double-strand break repair. Our characterization of 3RTAS not only filled up a gap in the chromosome IIIR sequence of A. thaliana but also identified new genes with unknown functions. PMID:20652368

  8. Cadmium-induced ethylene production and responses in Arabidopsis thaliana rely on ACS2 and ACS6 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic activities cause metal pollution worldwide. Plants can absorb and accumulate these metals through their root system, inducing stress as a result of excess metal concentrations inside the plant. Ethylene is a regulator of multiple plant processes, and is affected by many biotic and abiotic stresses. Increased ethylene levels have been observed after exposure to excess metals but it remains unclear how the increased ethylene levels are achieved at the molecular level. In this study, the effects of cadmium (Cd) exposure on the production of ethylene and its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), and on the expression of the ACC Synthase (ACS) and ACC Oxidase (ACO) multigene families were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Increased ethylene release after Cd exposure was directly measurable in a system using rockwool-cultivated plants; enhanced levels of the ethylene precursor ACC together with higher mRNA levels of ethylene responsive genes: ACO2, ETR2 and ERF1 also indicated increased ethylene production in hydroponic culture. Regarding underlying mechanisms, it was found that the transcript levels of ACO2 and ACO4, the most abundantly expressed members of the ACO multigene family, were increased upon Cd exposure. ACC synthesis is the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis, and transcript levels of both ACS2 and ACS6 showed the highest increase and became the most abundant isoforms after Cd exposure, suggesting their importance in the Cd-induced increase of ethylene production. Conclusions Cadmium induced the biosynthesis of ACC and ethylene in Arabidopsis thaliana plants mainly via the increased expression of ACS2 and ACS6. This was confirmed in the acs2-1acs6-1 double knockout mutants, which showed a decreased ethylene production, positively affecting leaf biomass and resulting in a delayed induction of ethylene responsive gene expressions without significant differences in Cd contents between wild-type and

  9. Overexpressing the Multiple-Stress Responsive Gene At1g74450 Reduces Plant Height and Male Fertility in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Visscher, Anne M.; Belfield, Eric J.; Vlad, Daniela; Irani, Niloufer; Moore, Ian; Harberd, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    A subset of genes in Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be up-regulated in response to a wide range of different environmental stress factors. However, not all of these genes are characterized as yet with respect to their functions. In this study, we used transgenic knockout, overexpression and reporter gene approaches to try to elucidate the biological roles of five unknown multiple-stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis. The selected genes have the following locus identifiers: At1g18740, At1g74450, At4g27652, At4g29780 and At5g12010. Firstly, T-DNA insertion knockout lines were identified for each locus and screened for altered phenotypes. None of the lines were found to be visually different from wildtype Col-0. Secondly, 35S-driven overexpression lines were generated for each open reading frame. Analysis of these transgenic lines showed altered phenotypes for lines overexpressing the At1g74450 ORF. Plants overexpressing the multiple-stress responsive gene At1g74450 are stunted in height and have reduced male fertility. Alexander staining of anthers from flowers at developmental stage 12–13 showed either an absence or a reduction in viable pollen compared to wildtype Col-0 and At1g74450 knockout lines. Interestingly, the effects of stress on crop productivity are most severe at developmental stages such as male gametophyte development. However, the molecular factors and regulatory networks underlying environmental stress-induced male gametophytic alterations are still largely unknown. Our results indicate that the At1g74450 gene provides a potential link between multiple environmental stresses, plant height and pollen development. In addition, ruthenium red staining analysis showed that At1g74450 may affect the composition of the inner seed coat mucilage layer. Finally, C-terminal GFP fusion proteins for At1g74450 were shown to localise to the cytosol. PMID:26485022

  10. Molecular and biochemical characterizations of the monoacylglycerol lipase gene family of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ryeo Jin; Kim, Hae Jin; Shim, Donghwan; Suh, Mi Chung

    2016-03-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) catalyzes the last step of triacylglycerol breakdown, which is the hydrolysis of monoacylglycerol (MAG) to fatty acid and glycerol. Arabidopsis harbors over 270 genes annotated as 'lipase', the largest class of acyl lipid metabolism genes that have not been characterized experimentally. In this study, computational modeling suggested that 16 Arabidopsis putative MAGLs (AtMAGLs) have a three-dimensional structure that is similar to a human MAGL. Heterologous expression and enzyme assays indicated that 11 of the 16 encoded proteins indeed possess MAG lipase activity. Additionally, AtMAGL4 displayed hydrolase activity with lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) substrates and AtMAGL1 and 2 utilized LPE as a substrate. All recombinant AtMAGLs preferred MAG substrates with unsaturated fatty acids over saturated fatty acids and AtMAGL8 exhibited the highest hydrolase activities with MAG containing 20:1 fatty acids. Except for AtMAGL4, -14 and -16, all AtMAGLs showed similar activity with both sn-1 and sn-2 MAG isomers. Spatial, temporal and stress-induced expression of the 16 AtMAGL genes was analyzed by transcriptome analyses. AtMAGL:eYFP fusion proteins provided initial evidence that AtMAGL1, -3, -6, -7, -8, -11, -13, -14 and -16 are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi network, AtMAGL10, -12 and -15 to the cytosol and AtMAGL2, -4 and -5 to the chloroplasts. Furthermore, AtMAGL8 was associated with the surface of oil bodies in germinating seeds and leaves accumulating oil bodies. This study provides the broad characterization of one of the least well-understood groups of Arabidopsis lipid-related enzymes and will be useful for better understanding their roles in planta. PMID:26932457

  11. Identification and analysis of novel genes involved in gravitropism of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Miyo T.; Tasaka, Masao; Masatoshi Taniguchi, .

    2012-07-01

    Gravitropism is a continuous control with regard to the orientation and juxtaposition of the various parts of the plant body in response to gravity. In higher plants, the relative directional change of gravity is mainly suscepted in specialized cells called statocytes, followed by signal conversion from physical information into physiological information within the statocytes. We have studied the early process of shoot gravitropism, gravity sensing and signaling process, mainly by molecular genetic approach. In Arabidopsis shoot, statocytes are the endodermal cells. sgr1/scarcrow (scr) and sgr7/short-root (shr) mutants fail to form the endodermis and to respond to gravity in their inflorescence stems. Since both SGR1/SCR and SGR7/SHR are transcriptional factors, at least a subset of their downstream genes can be expected to be involved in gravitropism. In addition, eal1 (endodermal-amyloplast less 1), which exhibits no gravitropism in inflorescence stem but retains ability to form endodermis, is a hypomorphic allele of sgr7/shr. Take advantage of these mutants, we performed DNA microarray analysis and compared gene expression profiles between wild type and the mutants. We found that approx. 40 genes were commonly down-regulated in these mutants and termed them DGE (DOWN-REGULATED GENE IN EAL1) genes. DGE1 has sequence similarity to Oryza sativa LAZY1 that is involved in shoot gravitropism of rice. DGE2 has a short region homologous to DGE1. DTL (DGE TWO-LIKE}) that has 54% identity to DGE2 is found in Arabidopsis genome. All three genes are conserved in angiosperm but have no known functional domains or motifs. We analyzed T-DNA insertion for these genes in single or multiple combinations. In dge1 dge2 dtl triple mutant, gravitropic response of shoot, hypocotyl and root dramatically reduced. Now we are carrying out further physiological and molecular genetic analysis of the triple mutant.

  12. JcCBF2 gene from Jatropha curcas improves freezing tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana during the early stage of stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linghui; Gao, Jihai; Qin, Xiaobo; Shi, Xiaodong; Luo, Lin; Zhang, Guozhen; Yu, Hongwu; Li, Chenyang; Hu, Minchao; Liu, Qifan; Xu, Ying; Chen, Fang

    2015-05-01

    High chilling-susceptibility is becoming the bottleneck for cultivation and commercialization of Jatropha curcas L. For insights to chilling resistance ability of this plant species, a cold response transcription factor, JcCBF2, was cloned and studied. It codes a 26 kDa protein, which contains all conserved motifs unique to the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) family and has high similarity to CBFs of Ricinus communis and Populus. Its transcripts express specifically in leaves of Jatropha at cold temperature. After transmitting the report vector, 35S::JcCBF2-GFP, into Arabidopsis thaliana, JcCBF2 protein is main detected in cell nucleus, being consistent to the nuclear orientation signal in its N-terminal. Compared to the control Arabidopsis, the frozen leaves of JcCBF2-overexpressed seedlings grow stronger with less malondialdehyde, smaller leaf conductivity and activer superoxide dismutase, showing their higher freezing tolerance. RT-PCR tests revealed that JcCBF2 functioned mainly at the early stage (0-6 h) of resistance events in Arabidopsis, and its transcripts reduced after 6 h. In addition, JcCBF2 could quickly regulate transcripts of some cold-responsive (COR) genes such as RD29A, COR105A and COR6.6, also during the early stage of frozen treatment. This study not only proves the chilling resistance roles of JcCBF2, but also presents a candidate gene engineering for improvement of chilling tolerance in J. curcas. PMID:25433432

  13. Modular organization and development activity of an Arabidopsis thaliana EF-1 alpha gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Curie, C; Axelos, M; Bardet, C; Atanassova, R; Chaubet, N; Lescure, B

    1993-04-01

    The activity of the Arabidopsis thalana A1 EF-1 alpha gene promoter was analyzed in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. The 5' upstream sequence of the A1 gene and several promoter deletions were fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) coding region. Promoter activity was monitored by quantitative and histochemical assays of GUS activity. The results show that the A1 promoter exhibits a modular organization. Sequences both upstream and downstream relative to the transcription initiation site are involved in quantitative and tissue-specific expression during vegetative growth. One upstream element may be involved in the activation of expression in meristematic tissues; the downstream region, corresponding to an intron within the 5' non-coding region (5'IVS), is important for expression in roots; both upstream and downstream sequences are required for expression in leaves, suggesting combinatorial properties of EF-1 alpha cis-regulatory elements. This notion of specific combinatorial regulation is reinforced by the results of transient expression experiments in transfected Arabidopsis protoplasts. The deletion of the 5'IVS has much more effect on expression when the promoter activity is under the control of A1 EF-1 alpha upstream sequences than when these upstream sequences were replaced by the 35S enhancer. Similarly, a synthetic oligonucleotide corresponding to an A1 EF-1 alpha upstream cis-acting element (the TEF1 box), is able to restore partially the original activity when fused to a TEF1-less EF1-alpha promoter but has no significant effect when fused to an enhancer-less 35S promoter. PMID:8492811

  14. Integrating roots into a whole plant network of flowering time genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bouché, Frédéric; D'Aloia, Maria; Tocquin, Pierre; Lobet, Guillaume; Detry, Nathalie; Périlleux, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Molecular data concerning the involvement of roots in the genetic pathways regulating floral transition are lacking. In this study, we performed global analyses of the root transcriptome in Arabidopsis in order to identify flowering time genes that are expressed in the roots and genes that are differentially expressed in the roots during the induction of flowering. Data mining of public microarray experiments uncovered that about 200 genes whose mutations are reported to alter flowering time are expressed in the roots (i.e. were detected in more than 50% of the microarrays). However, only a few flowering integrator genes passed the analysis cutoff. Comparison of root transcriptome in short days and during synchronized induction of flowering by a single 22-h long day revealed that 595 genes were differentially expressed. Enrichment analyses of differentially expressed genes in root tissues, gene ontology categories, and cis-regulatory elements converged towards sugar signaling. We concluded that roots are integrated in systemic signaling, whereby carbon supply coordinates growth at the whole plant level during the induction of flowering. This coordination could involve the root circadian clock and cytokinin biosynthesis as a feed forward loop towards the shoot. PMID:27352932

  15. Integrating roots into a whole plant network of flowering time genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bouché, Frédéric; D’Aloia, Maria; Tocquin, Pierre; Lobet, Guillaume; Detry, Nathalie; Périlleux, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Molecular data concerning the involvement of roots in the genetic pathways regulating floral transition are lacking. In this study, we performed global analyses of the root transcriptome in Arabidopsis in order to identify flowering time genes that are expressed in the roots and genes that are differentially expressed in the roots during the induction of flowering. Data mining of public microarray experiments uncovered that about 200 genes whose mutations are reported to alter flowering time are expressed in the roots (i.e. were detected in more than 50% of the microarrays). However, only a few flowering integrator genes passed the analysis cutoff. Comparison of root transcriptome in short days and during synchronized induction of flowering by a single 22-h long day revealed that 595 genes were differentially expressed. Enrichment analyses of differentially expressed genes in root tissues, gene ontology categories, and cis-regulatory elements converged towards sugar signaling. We concluded that roots are integrated in systemic signaling, whereby carbon supply coordinates growth at the whole plant level during the induction of flowering. This coordination could involve the root circadian clock and cytokinin biosynthesis as a feed forward loop towards the shoot. PMID:27352932

  16. Geomagnetic Field (Gmf) and Plant Evolution: Investigating the Effects of Gmf Reversal on Arabidopsis thaliana Development and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bertea, Cinzia M.; Narayana, Ravishankar; Agliassa, Chiara; Rodgers, Christopher T.; Maffei, Massimo E.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most stimulating observations in plant evolution is a correlation between the occurrence of geomagnetic field (GMF) reversals (or excursions) and the moment of the radiation of Angiosperms. This led to the hypothesis that alterations in GMF polarity may play a role in plant evolution. Here, we describe a method to test this hypothesis by exposing Arabidopsis thaliana to artificially reversed GMF conditions. We used a three-axis magnetometer and the collected data were used to calculate the magnitude of the GMF. Three DC power supplies were connected to three Helmholtz coil pairs and were controlled by a computer to alter the GMF conditions. Plants grown in Petri plates were exposed to both normal and reversed GMF conditions. Sham exposure experiments were also performed. Exposed plants were photographed during the experiment and images were analyzed to calculate root length and leaf areas. Arabidopsis total RNA was extracted and Quantitative Real Time-PCR (qPCR) analyses were performed on gene expression of CRUCIFERIN 3 (CRU3), copper transport protein1 (COTP1), Redox Responsive Transcription Factor1 (RRTF1), Fe Superoxide Dismutase 1, (FSD1), Catalase3 (CAT3), Thylakoidal Ascorbate Peroxidase (TAPX), a cytosolic Ascorbate Peroxidase1 (APX1), and NADPH/respiratory burst oxidase protein D (RbohD). Four different reference genes were analysed to normalize the results of the qPCR. The best of the four genes was selected and the most stable gene for normalization was used. Our data show for the first time that reversing the GMF polarity using triaxial coils has significant effects on plant growth and gene expression. This supports the hypothesis that GMF reversal contributes to inducing changes in plant development that might justify a higher selective pressure, eventually leading to plant evolution. PMID:26649488

  17. In silico and in vivo studies of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene, ACR2, putatively involved in arsenic accumulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Noor; Rahman, Aminur; Moś, Maria; Warzecha, Tomasz; Algerin, Maria; Ghosh, Sibdas; Johnson-Brousseau, Sheila; Mandal, Abul

    2012-09-01

    Previously, our in silico analyses identified four candidate genes that might be involved in uptake and/or accumulation of arsenics in plants: arsenate reductase 2 (ACR2), phytochelatin synthase 1 (PCS1) and two multi-drug resistant proteins (MRP1 and MRP2) [Lund et al. (2010) J Biol Syst 18:223-224]. We also postulated that one of these four genes, ACR2, seems to play a central role in this process. To investigate further, we have constructed a 3D structure of the Arabidopsis thaliana ACR2 protein using the iterative implementation of the threading assembly refinement (I-TASSER) server. These analyses revealed that, for catalytic metabolism of arsenate, the arsenate binding-loop (AB-loop) and residues Phe-53, Phe-54, Cys-134, Cys-136, Cys-141, Cys-145, and Lys-135 are essential for reducing arsenate to arsenic intermediates (arsenylated enzyme-substrate intermediates) and arsenite in plants. Thus, functional predictions suggest that the ACR2 protein is involved in the conversion of arsenate to arsenite in plant cells. To validate the in silico results, we exposed a transfer-DNA (T-DNA)-tagged mutant of A. thaliana (mutation in the ACR2 gene) to various amounts of arsenic. Reverse transcriptase PCR revealed that the mutant exhibits significantly reduced expression of the ACR2 gene. Spectrophotometric analyses revealed that the amount of accumulated arsenic compounds in this mutant was approximately six times higher than that observed in control plants. The results obtained from in silico analyses are in complete agreement with those obtained in laboratory experiments. PMID:22562211

  18. Overexpression of lycopene ε-cyclase gene from lycium chinense confers tolerance to chilling stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinyu; Diao, Jinjin; Ji, Jing; Wang, Gang; Li, Zhaodi; Wu, Jiang; Josine, Tchouopou Lontchi; Wang, Yurong

    2016-01-15

    Lutein plays an important role in protecting the photosynthetic apparatus from photodamage and eliminating ROS to render normal physiological function of cells. As a rate-limiting step for lutein synthesis in plants, lycopene ε-cyclase catalyzes lycopene to δ-carotene. We cloned a lycopene ε-cyclase gene (Lcε-LYC) from Lycium chinense (L. chinense), a deciduous woody perennial halophyte growing in various environmental conditions. The Lcε-LYC gene has an ORF of 1569bp encoding a protein of 522 aa. The deduced amino acid sequence of Lcε-LYC gene has higher homology with LycEs in other plants, such as Nicotiana tabacum and Solanum tuberosum. When L. chinense was exposed to chilling stress, relative expression of Lcε-LYC increased. To study the protective role of Lcε-LYC against chilling stress, we overexpressed the Lcε-LYC gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. Lcε-LYC overexpression led to an increase of lutein accumulation in transgenic A. thaliana, and the content of lutein decreased when transgenics were under cold conditions. In addition, the transgenic plants under chilling stress displayed higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) and less H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) than the control. Moreover, the photosynthesis rate, photosystem II activity (Fv/fm), and Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) also increased in the transgenetic plants. On the whole, overexpression of Lcε-LYC ameliorates photoinhibition and photooxidation, and decreases the sensitivity of photosynthesis to chilling stress in transgenic plants. PMID:26526130

  19. Unique and redundant functional domains of APETALA1 and CAULIFLOWER, two recently duplicated Arabidopsis thaliana floral MADS-box genes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R; García-Ponce, Berenice; Garay-Arroyo, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    APETALA1 (AP1) and CAULIFLOWER (CAL) are closely related MADS box genes that are partially redundant during Arabidopsis thaliana floral meristem determination. AP1 is able to fully substitute for CAL functions, but not vice versa, and AP1 has unique sepal and petal identity specification functions. In this study, the unique and redundant functions of these two genes has been mapped to the four protein domains that characterize type-II MADS-domain proteins by expressing all 15 chimeric combinations of AP1 and CAL cDNA regions under control of the AP1 promoter in ap1-1 loss-of-function plants. The "in vivo" function of these chimeric genes was analysed in Arabidopsis plants by expressing the chimeras. Rescue of flower meristem and sepal/petal identities was scored in single and multiple insert homozygous transgenic lines. Using these chimeric lines, it was found that distinct residues of the AP1 K domain not shared by the same CAL domain are necessary and sufficient for complete recovery of floral meristem identity, in the context of the CAL protein sequence, while both AP1 COOH and K domains are indispensable for complete rescue of sepal identity. By contrast, either one of these two AP1 domains is necessary and sufficient for complete petal identity recovery. It was also found that there were positive and negative synergies among protein domains and their combinations, and that multiple-insert lines showed relatively better rescue than equivalent single-insert lines. Finally, several lines had flowers with extra sepals and petals suggesting that chimeric proteins yield abnormal transcriptional complexes that may alter the expression or regulation of genes that control floral organ number under normal conditions. PMID:16893974

  20. Exploiting natural variation of secondary metabolism identifies a gene controlling the glycosylation diversity of dihydroxybenzoic acids in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Svedin, Elisabeth; Mo, Huaping; Atwell, Susanna; Dilkes, Brian P; Chapple, Clint

    2014-11-01

    Plant secondary metabolism is an active research area because of the unique and important roles the specialized metabolites have in the interaction of plants with their biotic and abiotic environment, the diversity and complexity of the compounds and their importance to human medicine. Thousands of natural accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana characterized with increasing genomic precision are available, providing new opportunities to explore the biochemical and genetic mechanisms affecting variation in secondary metabolism within this model species. In this study, we focused on four aromatic metabolites that were differentially accumulated among 96 Arabidopsis natural accessions as revealed by leaf metabolic profiling. Using UV, mass spectrometry, and NMR data, we identified these four compounds as different dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) glycosides, namely 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (gentisic acid) 5-O-β-D-glucoside, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid 3-O-β-D-glucoside, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid 5-O-β-D-xyloside, and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid 3-O-β-D-xyloside. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping using recombinant inbred lines generated from C24 and Col-0 revealed a major-effect QTL controlling the relative proportion of xylosides vs. glucosides. Association mapping identified markers linked to a gene encoding a UDP glycosyltransferase gene. Analysis of Transfer DNA (T-DNA) knockout lines verified that this gene is required for DHBA xylosylation in planta and recombinant protein was able to xylosylate DHBA in vitro. This study demonstrates that exploiting natural variation of secondary metabolism is a powerful approach for gene function discovery. PMID:25173843

  1. Sulfenome mining in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Waszczak, Cezary; Akter, Salma; Eeckhout, Dominique; Persiau, Geert; Wahni, Khadija; Bodra, Nandita; Van Molle, Inge; De Smet, Barbara; Vertommen, Didier; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Montagu, Marc; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2014-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to be potent signaling molecules. Today, oxidation of cysteine residues is a well-recognized posttranslational protein modification, but the signaling processes steered by such oxidations are poorly understood. To gain insight into the cysteine thiol-dependent ROS signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent sulfenome: that is, proteins with at least one cysteine thiol oxidized to a sulfenic acid. By means of a genetic construct consisting of a fusion between the C-terminal domain of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) AP-1-like (YAP1) transcription factor and a tandem affinity purification tag, we detected ∼ 100 sulfenylated proteins in Arabidopsis cell suspensions exposed to H2O2 stress. The in vivo YAP1-based trapping of sulfenylated proteins was validated by a targeted in vitro analysis of dehydroascorbate reductase2 (DHAR2). In DHAR2, the active site nucleophilic cysteine is regulated through a sulfenic acid-dependent switch, leading to S-glutathionylation, a protein modification that protects the protein against oxidative damage. PMID:25049418

  2. Tissue-specific expression and developmental regulation of cytochrome b561 genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Raphanus sativus.

    PubMed

    Verelst, Wim; Kapila, Jyoti; De Almeida Engler, Janice; Stone, Julie M.; Caubergs, Roland; Asard, Han

    2004-02-01

    Ascorbate (Asc) is an essential molecule in many aspects of development and stress responses in plants and animals. Cytochromes b561 (cyts b561) are tightly coupled to Asc homeostasis. These proteins are found in mammalian tissues, where they are involved in the regeneration of Asc, serving the synthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters, and in intestinal iron reduction. Plant genomes encode homologous membrane-associated, Asc-reducible cyts b561. The expression of these proteins in plants, however, has so far not been studied. We have now examined the expression of two Arabidopsis thaliana cyt b561-encoding genes-Artb561-1 and Artb561-2-using relative-quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization (ISH) techniques. The genes show overlapping and distinct tissue- and organ-specific expression patterns. Transcripts of both genes are found in leaf epidermal cells, and expression seems to correlate with leaf maturation and cessation of cell elongation. Both genes are also expressed in the epidermal cell layer of stems and roots in the L1 layer of the shoot apex, in the vascular system of leaves, stems and roots, and in the root pericycle. In addition, Artb561-1 is expressed in the root cap, whereas Artb561-2 mRNA is found in the epidermis of lateral roots, in the root meristem, and in unfertilized ovules. These observations provide important information for the elucidation of the physiological function of cyts b561 in plants. PMID:15032866

  3. Transformation of Brassica napus canola cultivars with Arabidopsis thaliana acetohydroxyacid synthase genes and analysis of herbicide resistance.

    PubMed

    Miki, B L; Labbé, H; Hattori, J; Ouellet, T; Gabard, J; Sunohara, G; Charest, P J; Iyer, V N

    1990-10-01

    A survey of selected crop species and weeds was conducted to evaluate the inhibition of the enzyme acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) and seedling growth in vitro by the sulfonylurea herbicides chlorsulfuron, DPX A7881, DPX L5300, DPX M6316 and the imidazolinone herbicides AC243,997, AC263,499, AC252,214. Particular attention was given to the Brassica species including canola cultivars and cruciferous weeds such as B. kaber (wild mustard) and Thlaspi arvense (stinkweed). Transgenic lines of B. napus cultivars Westar and Profit, which express the Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type AHAS gene or the mutant gene csr1-1 at levels similar to the resident AHAS genes, were generated and compared. The mutant gene was essential for resistance to the sulfonylurea chlorsulfuron but not to DPX A7881, which appeared to be tolerated by certain Brassica species. Cross-resistance to the imidazolinones did not occur. The level of resistance to chlorsulfuron in transgenic canola greatly exceeded the levels that were toxic to the Brassica species or cruciferous weeds. Direct selection of transgenic lines with chlorsulfuron sprayed at field levels under greenhouse conditions was achieved. PMID:24221001

  4. Uncovering the Arabidopsis thaliana nectary transcriptome: investigation of differential gene expression in floral nectariferous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kram, Brian W; Xu, Wayne W; Carter, Clay J

    2009-01-01

    Background Many flowering plants attract pollinators by offering a reward of floral nectar. Remarkably, the molecular events involved in the development of nectaries, the organs that produce nectar, as well as the synthesis and secretion of nectar itself, are poorly understood. Indeed, to date, no genes have been shown to directly affect the de novo production or quality of floral nectar. To address this gap in knowledge, the ATH1 Affymetrix® GeneChip array was used to systematically investigate the Arabidopsis nectary transcriptome to identify genes and pathways potentially involved in nectar production. Results In this study, we identified a large number of genes differentially expressed between secretory lateral nectaries and non-secretory median nectary tissues, as well as between mature lateral nectaries (post-anthesis) and immature lateral nectaries (pre-anthesis). Expression within nectaries was also compared to thirteen non-nectary reference tissues, from which 270 genes were identified as being significantly upregulated in nectaries. The expression patterns of 14 nectary-enriched genes were also confirmed via RT PCR. Upon looking into functional groups of upregulated genes, pathways involved in gene regulation, carbohydrate metabolism, and lipid metabolism were particularly enriched in nectaries versus reference tissues. Conclusion A large number of genes preferentially expressed in nectaries, as well as between nectary types and developmental stages, were identified. Several hypotheses relating to mechanisms of nectar production and regulation thereof are proposed, and provide a starting point for reverse genetics approaches to determine molecular mechanisms underlying nectar synthesis and secretion. PMID:19604393

  5. Efficient In Planta Detection and Dissection of De Novo Mutation Events in the Arabidopsis thaliana Disease Resistance Gene UNI.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomohiko; Mori, Akiko; Igari, Kadunari; Morita, Miyo Terao; Tasaka, Masao; Uchida, Naoyuki

    2016-06-01

    Plants possess disease resistance (R) proteins encoded by R genes, and each R protein recognizes a specific pathogen factor(s) for immunity. Interestingly, a remarkably high degree of polymorphisms in R genes, which are traces of past mutation events during evolution, suggest the rapid diversification of R genes. However, little is known about molecular aspects that facilitate the rapid change of R genes because of the lack of tools that enable us to monitor de novo R gene mutations efficiently in an experimentally feasible time scale, especially in living plants. Here we introduce a model assay system that enables efficient in planta detection of de novo mutation events in the Arabidopsis thaliana R gene UNI in one generation. The uni-1D mutant harbors a gain-of-function allele of the UNI gene. uni-1D heterozygous individuals originally exhibit dwarfism with abnormally short stems. However, interestingly, morphologically normal stems sometimes emerge spontaneously from the uni-1D plants, and the morphologically reverted tissues carry additional de novo mutations in the UNI gene. Strikingly, under an extreme condition, almost half of the examined population shows the reversion phenomenon. By taking advantage of this phenomenon, we demonstrate that the reversion frequency is remarkably sensitive to a variety of fluctuations in DNA stability, underlying a mutable tendency of the UNI gene. We also reveal that activities of the salicylic acid pathway and DNA damage sensor pathway are involved in the reversion phenomenon. Thus, we provide an experimentally feasible model tool to explore factors and conditions that significantly affect the R gene mutation phenomenon. PMID:27016096

  6. Arabidopsis thaliana glucuronosyltransferase in family GT14.

    PubMed

    Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Geshi, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins are abundant cell-surface proteoglycans in plants and are involved in many cellular processes including somatic embryogenesis, cell-cell interactions, and cell elongation. We reported a glucuronosyltransferase encoded by Arabidopsis AtGlcAT14A, which catalyzes an addition of glucuronic acid residues to β-1,3- and β-1,6-linked galactans of arabinogalactan (Knoch et al. 2013). The knockout mutant of this gene resulted in the enhanced growth rate of hypocotyls and roots of seedlings, suggesting an involvement of AtGlcAT14A in cell elongation. AtGlcAt14A belongs to the family GT14 in the Carbohydrate Active Enzyme database (CAZy; www.cazy.org), in which a total of 11 proteins, including AtGLCAT14A, are classified from Arabidopsis thaliana. In this paper, we report the enzyme activities for the rest of the Arabidopsis GT14 isoforms, analyzed in the same way as for AtGlcAT14A. Evidently, two other Arabidopsis GT14 isoforms, At5g15050 and At2g37585, also possess the glucuronosyltransferase activity adding glucuronic acid residues to β-1,3- and β-1,6-linked galactans. Therefore, we named At5g15050 and At2g37585 as AtGlcAT14B and AtGlcAT14C, respectively. PMID:24739253

  7. Apple latent spherical virus vectors for reliable and effective virus-induced gene silencing among a broad range of plants including tobacco, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucurbits, and legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Aki; Yamagata, Kousuke; Sugai, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Yukari; Sugawara, Emiko; Tamura, Akihiro; Yaegashi, Hajime; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Isogai, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2009-04-10

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vectors were evaluated for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of endogenous genes among a broad range of plant species. ALSV vectors carrying partial sequences of a subunit of magnesium chelatase (SU) and phytoene desaturase (PDS) genes induced highly uniform knockout phenotypes typical of SU and PDS inhibition on model plants such as tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana, and economically important crops such as tomato, legume, and cucurbit species. The silencing phenotypes persisted throughout plant growth in these plants. In addition, ALSV vectors could be successfully used to silence a meristem gene, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and disease resistant N gene in tobacco and RCY1 gene in A. thaliana. As ALSV infects most host plants symptomlessly and effectively induces stable VIGS for long periods, the ALSV vector is a valuable tool to determine the functions of interested genes among a broad range of plant species.

  8. Chromate alters root system architecture and activates expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trujillo, Miguel; Méndez-Bravo, Alfonso; Ortiz-Castro, Randy; Hernández-Madrigal, Fátima; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; Long, Terri A; Cervantes, Carlos; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; López-Bucio, José

    2014-09-01

    Soil contamination by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI) or chromate] due to anthropogenic activities has become an increasingly important environmental problem. To date few studies have been performed to elucidate the signaling networks involved on adaptive responses to (CrVI) toxicity in plants. In this work, we report that depending upon its concentration, Cr(VI) alters in different ways the architecture of the root system in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Low concentrations of Cr (20-40 µM) promoted primary root growth, while concentrations higher than 60 µM Cr repressed growth and increased formation of root hairs, lateral root primordia and adventitious roots. We analyzed global gene expression changes in seedlings grown in media supplied with 20 or 140 µM Cr. The level of 731 transcripts was significantly modified in response to Cr treatment with only five genes common to both Cr concentrations. Interestingly, 23 genes related to iron (Fe) acquisition were up-regulated including IRT1, YSL2, FRO5, BHLH100, BHLH101 and BHLH039 and the master controllers of Fe deficiency responses PYE and BTS were specifically activated in pericycle cells. It was also found that increasing concentration of Cr in the plant correlated with a decrease in Fe content, but increased both acidification of the rhizosphere and activity of the ferric chelate reductase. Supply of Fe to Cr-treated Arabidopsis allowed primary root to resume growth and alleviated toxicity symptoms, indicating that Fe nutrition is a major target of Cr stress in plants. Our results show that low Cr levels are beneficial to plants and that toxic Cr concentrations activate a low-Fe rescue system. PMID:24928490

  9. Transcriptome analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown in space: implications for gravity-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Correll, Melanie J; Pyle, Tyler P; Millar, Katherine D L; Sun, Yijun; Yao, Jin; Edelmann, Richard E; Kiss, John Z

    2013-09-01

    The transcriptome of seedlings was analyzed from experiments performed on the International Space Station to study the interacting effects of light and gravity on plant tropisms (project named TROPI-2; Kiss et al. 2012). Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated in space, and seedlings were then grown in the European Modular Cultivation System for 4 days at ~1g followed by exposure to a range of gravitational accelerations (from microgravity to 1g) and two light treatments (blue light with or without a 1 h pretreatment with red). At the end of the experiments, the cassettes containing the seedlings were frozen in the minus eighty laboratory freezer and returned to Earth on space shuttle mission STS-131. The RNA was extracted from whole seedlings and used for the transcriptome analyses. A comparison of 1g spaceflight samples with 1g ground controls identified 230 genes that were differentially regulated at least twofold, emphasizing the need for "in situ" tissue fixation on a 1g centrifuge as an important control for spaceflight experiments. A further comparison of all spaceflight samples with ground controls identified approximately 280 genes that were differentially regulated at least twofold. Of these genes, several were involved in regulating cell polarity (i.e., auxin, calcium, lipid metabolism), cell-wall development, oxygen status, and cell defense or stress. However, when the transcriptome of the all g-treated spaceflight samples was compared with microgravity samples, only ~130 genes were identified as being differently regulated (P ≤ 0.01). Of this subset, only 27 genes were at least twofold differently regulated between microgravity and 1g space samples and included putative/pseudo/undefined genes (14), transposable elements (5), an expansin (ATEXP24; At1g21240), a cell-wall kinase (WAK3; At1g21240), a laccase-like flavonoid oxidase (TT10; At5g48100), among others. PMID:23771594

  10. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is facilitated by mutations in genes repressing meristematic cell divisions.

    PubMed

    Mordhorst, A P; Voerman, K J; Hartog, M V; Meijer, E A; van Went, J; Koornneef, M; de Vries, S C

    1998-06-01

    Embryogenesis in plants can commence from cells other than the fertilized egg cell. Embryogenesis initiated from somatic cells in vitro is an attractive system for studying early embryonic stages when they are accessible to experimental manipulation. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis offers the additional advantage that many zygotic embryo mutants can be studied under in vitro conditions. Two systems are available. The first employs immature zygotic embryos as starting material, yielding continuously growing embryogenic cultures in liquid medium. This is possible in at least 11 ecotypes. A second, more efficient and reproducible system, employing the primordia timing mutant (pt allelic to hpt, cop2, and amp1), was established. A significant advantage of the pt mutant is that intact seeds, germinated in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 4-D) containing liquid medium, give rise to stable embryonic cell cultures, circumventing tedious hand dissection of immature zygotic embryos. pt zygotic embryos are first distinguishable from wild type at early heart stage by a broader embryonic shoot apical meristem (SAM). In culture, embryogenic clusters originate from the enlarged SAMs. pt somatic embryos had all characteristic embryo pattern elements seen in zygotic embryos, but with higher and more variable numbers of cells. Embryogenic cell cultures were also established from seedling, of other mutants with enlarged SAMs, such as clavata (clv). pt clv double mutants showed additive effects on SAM size and an even higher frequency of seedlings producing embryogenic cell lines. pt clv double mutant plants had very short fasciated inflorescence stems and additive effects on the number of rosette leaves. This suggests that the PT and CLV genes act in independent pathways that control SAM size. An increased population of noncommitted SAM cells may be responsible for facilitated establishment of somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:9611173

  11. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is facilitated by mutations in genes repressing meristematic cell divisions.

    PubMed Central

    Mordhorst, A P; Voerman, K J; Hartog, M V; Meijer, E A; van Went, J; Koornneef, M; de Vries, S C

    1998-01-01

    Embryogenesis in plants can commence from cells other than the fertilized egg cell. Embryogenesis initiated from somatic cells in vitro is an attractive system for studying early embryonic stages when they are accessible to experimental manipulation. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis offers the additional advantage that many zygotic embryo mutants can be studied under in vitro conditions. Two systems are available. The first employs immature zygotic embryos as starting material, yielding continuously growing embryogenic cultures in liquid medium. This is possible in at least 11 ecotypes. A second, more efficient and reproducible system, employing the primordia timing mutant (pt allelic to hpt, cop2, and amp1), was established. A significant advantage of the pt mutant is that intact seeds, germinated in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 4-D) containing liquid medium, give rise to stable embryonic cell cultures, circumventing tedious hand dissection of immature zygotic embryos. pt zygotic embryos are first distinguishable from wild type at early heart stage by a broader embryonic shoot apical meristem (SAM). In culture, embryogenic clusters originate from the enlarged SAMs. pt somatic embryos had all characteristic embryo pattern elements seen in zygotic embryos, but with higher and more variable numbers of cells. Embryogenic cell cultures were also established from seedling, of other mutants with enlarged SAMs, such as clavata (clv). pt clv double mutants showed additive effects on SAM size and an even higher frequency of seedlings producing embryogenic cell lines. pt clv double mutant plants had very short fasciated inflorescence stems and additive effects on the number of rosette leaves. This suggests that the PT and CLV genes act in independent pathways that control SAM size. An increased population of noncommitted SAM cells may be responsible for facilitated establishment of somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:9611173

  12. A screen for genes that function in abscisic acid signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Nambara, Eiji; Suzuki, Masaharu; Abrams, Suzanne; McCarty, Donald R; Kamiya, Yuji; McCourt, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls many aspects of plant growth and development under a diverse range of environmental conditions. To identify genes functioning in ABA signaling, we have carried out a screen for mutants that takes advantage of the ability of wild-type Arabidopsis seeds to respond to (-)-(R)-ABA, an enantiomer of the natural (+)-(S)-ABA. The premise of the screen was to identify mutations that preferentially alter their germination response in the presence of one stereoisomer vs. the other. Twenty-six mutants were identified and genetic analysis on 23 lines defines two new loci, designated CHOTTO1 and CHOTTO2, and a collection of new mutant alleles of the ABA-insensitive genes, ABI3, ABI4, and ABI5. The abi5 alleles are less sensitive to (+)-ABA than to (-)-ABA. In contrast, the abi3 alleles exhibit a variety of differences in response to the ABA isomers. Genetic and molecular analysis of these alleles suggests that the ABI3 transcription factor may perceive multiple ABA signals. PMID:12136027

  13. Multiple genes, tissue specificity, and expression-dependent modulationcontribute to the functional diversity of potassium channels in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Y; Ward, J M; Kelly, W B; Ichida, A M; Gaber, R F; Anderson, J A; Uozumi, N; Schroeder, J I; Crawford, N M

    1995-01-01

    K+ channels play diverse roles in mediating K+ transport and in modulating the membrane potential in higher plant cells during growth and development. Some of the diversity in K+ channel functions may arise from the regulated expression of multiple genes encoding different K+ channel polypeptides. Here we report the isolation of a novel Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA (AKT2) that is highly homologous to the two previously identified K+ channel genes, KAT1 and AKT1. This cDNA mapped to the center of chromosome 4 by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and was highly expressed in leaves, whereas AKT1 was mainly expressed in roots. In addition, we show that diversity in K+ channel function may be attributable to differences in expression levels. Increasing KAT1 expression in Xenopus oocytes by polyadenylation of the KAT1 mRNA increased the current amplitude and led to higher levels of KAT1 protein, as assayed in western blots. The increase in KAT1 expression in oocytes produced shifts in the threshold potential for activation to more positive membrane potentials and decreased half-activation times. These results suggest that different levels of expression and tissue-specific expression of different K+ channel isoforms can contribute to the functional diversity of plant K+ channels. The identification of a highly expressed, leaf-specific K+ channel homolog in plants should allow further molecular characterization of K+ channel functions for physiological K+ transport processes in leaves. PMID:8552711

  14. Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway affect root waving on tilted agar surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R.; Gallois, P.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow in a wavy pattern upon a slanted surface. A novel mutation in the anthranilate synthase alpha 1 (ASA1) gene, named trp5-2wvc1, and mutations in the tryptophan synthase alpha and beta 1 genes (trp3-1 and trp2-1, respectively) confer a compressed root wave phenotype on tilted agar surfaces. When trp5-2wvc1 seedlings are grown on media supplemented with anthranilate metabolites, their roots wave like wild type. Genetic and pharmacological experiments argue that the compressed root wave phenotypes of trp5-2wvc1, trp2-1 and trp3-1 seedlings are not due to reduced IAA biosynthetic potential, but rather to a deficiency in L-tryptophan (L-Trp), or in a L-Trp derivative. Although the roots of 7-day-old seedlings possess higher concentrations of free L-Trp than the shoot as a whole, trp5-2wvc1 mutants show no detectable alteration in L-Trp levels in either tissue type, suggesting that a very localized shortage of L-Trp, or of a L-Trp-derived compound, is responsible for the observed phenotype.

  15. Differential induction of the Arabidopsis thaliana Thi2.1 gene by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. matthiolae.

    PubMed

    Epple, P; Vignutelli, A; Apel, K; Bohlmann, H

    1998-06-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana Thi2.1 gene is inducible by necrotrophic fungi through a signal transduction pathway different from that for pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. We have identified three ecotypes that are susceptible (Col-2, Ler, and Ws) and two ecotypes that are resistant (Mt-0 and Uk-4) to spray inoculation with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. matthiolae. The Thi2.1 transcript level after infection correlates with resistance, being 5 to 10 times higher in the resistant than in the susceptible ecotypes. The beta-glucuronidase (GUS) expression of a Thi2.1-promoter-uidA fusion (with a promoter derived from Col-2) is on the average almost 10 times higher in the Uk-4 background than in the Col-2 background. This confirms the results obtained by Northern (RNA) blots and indicates that Uk-4, and probably other resistant ecotypes too, might have a more sensitive recognition system for F. oxysporum f. sp. matthiolae or might have a signal transduction system that gives a higher amplification of the original recognition signal. Our results suggest a role of the Thi2.1 gene in resistance against F. oxysporum f. sp. matthiolae and perhaps other necrotrophic fungi. PMID:9612950

  16. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  17. Paenibacillus yonginensis DCY84(T) induces changes in Arabidopsis thaliana gene expression against aluminum, drought, and salt stress.

    PubMed

    Sukweenadhi, Johan; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Eul-Su; Koh, Sung-Cheol; Lee, Sang-Won; Kim, Yu-Jin; Yang, Deok Chun

    2015-03-01

    Current agricultural production methods, for example the improper use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, create many health and environmental problems. Use of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) for agricultural benefits is increasing worldwide and also appears to be a trend for the future. There is possibility to develop microbial inoculants for use in agricultural biotechnology, based on these beneficial plant-microbe interactions. For this study, ten bacterial strains were isolated from Yongin forest soil for which in vitro plant-growth promoting trait screenings, such as indole acetic acid (IAA) production, a phosphate solubilization test, and a siderophore production test were used to select two PGPB candidates. Arabidopsis thaliana plants were inoculated with Paenibacillus yonginensis DCY84(T) and Micrococcus yunnanensis PGPB7. Salt stress, drought stress and heavy metal (aluminum) stress challenges indicated that P. yonginensis DCY84(T)-inoculated plants were more resistant than control plants. AtRSA1, AtVQ9 and AtWRKY8 were used as the salinity responsive genes. The AtERD15, AtRAB18, and AtLT178 were selected to check A. thaliana responses to drought stress. Aluminum stress response was checked using AtAIP, AtALS3 and AtALMT1. The qRT-PCR results indicated that P. yonginensis DCY84(T) can promote plant tolerance against salt, drought, and aluminum stress. P. yonginensis DCY84(T) also showed positive results during in vitro compatibility testing and virulence assay against X. oryzae pv. oryzae Philippine race 6 (PXO99). Better germination rates and growth parameters were also recorded for the P. yonginensis DCY84(T) Chuchung cultivar rice seed which was grown on coastal soil collected from Suncheon. Based on these results, P. yonginensis DCY84(T) can be used as a promising PGPB isolate for crop improvement. PMID:25721473

  18. [Arabidopsis thaliana accessions - a tool for biochemical and phylogentical studies].

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Renata; Gabruk, Michał; Kruk, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana since a few decades is used as a model for biological and plant genetic research. Natural variation of this species is related to its geographical range which covers different climate zones and habitats. The ability to occupy such a wide area by Arabidopsis is possible due to its stress tolerance and adaptability. Arabidopsis accessions exhibit phenotypic and genotypic variation, which is a result of adaptation to local environmental conditions. During development, plants are subjected to various stress factors. Plants show a spectrum of reactions, processes and phenomena that determine their survival in these adverse conditions. The response of plants to stress involves signal detection and transmission. These reactions are different and depend on the stressor, its intensity, plant species and life strategy. It is assumed that the populations of the same species from different geographical regions acclimated to the stress conditions develop a set of alleles, which allow them to grow and reproduce. Therefore, the study of natural variation in response to abiotic stress among Arabidopsis thaliana accessions allows to find key genes or alleles, and thus the mechanisms by which plants cope with adverse physical and chemical conditions. This paper presents an overview of recent findings, tools and research directions used in the study of natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. Additionally, we explain why accessions can be used in the phylogenetic analyses and to study demography and migration of Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:26281359

  19. Characterization of a small auxin-up RNA (SAUR)-like gene involved in Arabidopsis thaliana development.

    PubMed

    Markakis, Marios Nektarios; Boron, Agnieszka Karolina; Van Loock, Bram; Saini, Kumud; Cirera, Susanna; Verbelen, Jean-Pierre; Vissenberg, Kris

    2013-01-01

    The root of Arabidopsis thaliana is used as a model system to unravel the molecular nature of cell elongation and its arrest. From a micro-array performed on roots that were treated with aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), the precursor of ethylene, a Small auxin-up RNA (SAUR)-like gene was found to be up regulated. As it appeared as the 76th gene in the family, it was named SAUR76. Root and leaf growth of overexpression lines ectopically expressing SAUR76 indicated the possible involvement of the gene in the division process. Using promoter::GUS and GFP lines strong expression was seen in endodermal and pericycle cells at the end of the elongation zone and during several stages of lateral root primordia development. ACC and IAA/NAA were able to induce a strong up regulation of the gene and changed the expression towards cortical and even epidermal cells at the beginning of the elongation zone. Confirmation of this up regulation of expression was delivered using qPCR, which also indicated that the expression quickly returned to normal levels when the inducing IAA-stimulus was removed, a behaviour also seen in other SAUR genes. Furthermore, confocal analysis of protein-GFP fusions localized the protein in the nucleus, cytoplasm and plasma membrane. SAUR76 expression was quantified in several mutants in ethylene and auxin-related pathways, which led to the conclusion that the expression of SAUR76 is mainly regulated by the increase in auxin that results from the addition of ACC, rather than by ACC itself. PMID:24312429

  20. Identification of Coilin Mutants in a Screen for Enhanced Expression of an Alternatively Spliced GFP Reporter Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Tatsuo; Lin, Wen-Dar; Fu, Jason L.; Wu, Ming-Tsung; Yang, Ho-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2016-01-01

    Coilin is a marker protein for subnuclear organelles known as Cajal bodies, which are sites of various RNA metabolic processes including the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Through self-associations and interactions with other proteins and RNA, coilin provides a structural scaffold for Cajal body formation. However, despite a conspicuous presence in Cajal bodies, most coilin is dispersed in the nucleoplasm and expressed in cell types that lack these organelles. The molecular function of coilin, particularly of the substantial nucleoplasmic fraction, remains uncertain. We identified coilin loss-of-function mutations in a genetic screen for mutants showing either reduced or enhanced expression of an alternatively spliced GFP reporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. The coilin mutants feature enhanced GFP fluorescence and diminished Cajal bodies compared with wild-type plants. The amount of GFP protein is several-fold higher in the coilin mutants owing to elevated GFP transcript levels and more efficient splicing to produce a translatable GFP mRNA. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing data from two distinct coilin mutants revealed a small, shared subset of differentially expressed genes, many encoding stress-related proteins, and, unexpectedly, a trend toward increased splicing efficiency. These results suggest that coilin attenuates splicing and modulates transcription of a select group of genes. The transcriptional and splicing changes observed in coilin mutants are not accompanied by gross phenotypic abnormalities or dramatically altered stress responses, supporting a role for coilin in fine tuning gene expression. Our GFP reporter gene provides a sensitive monitor of coilin activity that will facilitate further investigations into the functions of this enigmatic protein. PMID:27317682

  1. Identification of Coilin Mutants in a Screen for Enhanced Expression of an Alternatively Spliced GFP Reporter Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Tatsuo; Lin, Wen-Dar; Fu, Jason L; Wu, Ming-Tsung; Yang, Ho-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2016-08-01

    Coilin is a marker protein for subnuclear organelles known as Cajal bodies, which are sites of various RNA metabolic processes including the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Through self-associations and interactions with other proteins and RNA, coilin provides a structural scaffold for Cajal body formation. However, despite a conspicuous presence in Cajal bodies, most coilin is dispersed in the nucleoplasm and expressed in cell types that lack these organelles. The molecular function of coilin, particularly of the substantial nucleoplasmic fraction, remains uncertain. We identified coilin loss-of-function mutations in a genetic screen for mutants showing either reduced or enhanced expression of an alternatively spliced GFP reporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana The coilin mutants feature enhanced GFP fluorescence and diminished Cajal bodies compared with wild-type plants. The amount of GFP protein is several-fold higher in the coilin mutants owing to elevated GFP transcript levels and more efficient splicing to produce a translatable GFP mRNA. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing data from two distinct coilin mutants revealed a small, shared subset of differentially expressed genes, many encoding stress-related proteins, and, unexpectedly, a trend toward increased splicing efficiency. These results suggest that coilin attenuates splicing and modulates transcription of a select group of genes. The transcriptional and splicing changes observed in coilin mutants are not accompanied by gross phenotypic abnormalities or dramatically altered stress responses, supporting a role for coilin in fine tuning gene expression. Our GFP reporter gene provides a sensitive monitor of coilin activity that will facilitate further investigations into the functions of this enigmatic protein. PMID:27317682

  2. An Arabidopsis thaliana pectin acetylesterase gene is upregulated in nematode feeding sites induced by root-knot and cyst nematodes.

    PubMed

    Vercauteren, Isabel; de Almeida Engler, Janice; De Groodt, Ruth; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2002-04-01

    By using differential display, gene expression was investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana roots shortly after nematode infection, and a putative pectin acetylesterase (PAE) homolog (DiDi 9C-12) was found to be upregulated. PAEs catalyze the deacetylation of pectin, a major compound of primary cell walls. mRNA in situ hybridization experiments showed that the expression of DiDi 9C-12 was enhanced very early after infection in initiating giant-cells and in cells surrounding the nematodes. Later on, the level of DiDi 9C-12 mRNA was lower in giant-cells and transcripts were mainly found in parenchyma, endodermis, and pericycle cells of the root gall. Twenty days after infection, DiDi 9C-12 transcripts could no longer be detected. DiDi 9C-12 transcripts were also found in young syncytia and in the cells surrounding the expanding syncytium. Our results suggest that plant parasitic nematodes can modulate the rapid growth of the feeding cells and the expansion of the root gall by triggering the expression of DiDi 9C-12. PAEs, which probably act together with a range of other pectin-degrading enzymes, could be involved in softening and loosening the primary cell wall in nematode-infected plant roots. PMID:12026180

  3. A Sweetpotato Geranylgeranyl Pyrophosphate Synthase Gene, IbGGPS, Increases Carotenoid Content and Enhances Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; He, Shaozhen; Liu, Degao; Patil, Gunvant B; Zhai, Hong; Wang, Feibing; Stephenson, Troy J; Wang, Yannan; Wang, Bing; Valliyodan, Babu; Nguyen, Henry T; Liu, Qingchang

    2015-01-01

    Sweetpotato highly produces carotenoids in storage roots. In this study, a cDNA encoding geranylgeranyl phyrophosphate synthase (GGPS), named IbGGPS, was isolated from sweetpotato storage roots. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was fused to the C-terminus of IbGGPS to obtain an IbGGPS-GFP fusion protein that was transiently expressed in both epidermal cells of onion and leaves of tobacco. Confocal microscopic analysis determined that the IbGGPS-GFP protein was localized to specific areas of the plasma membrane of onion and chloroplasts in tobacco leaves. The coding region of IbGGPS was cloned into a binary vector under the control of 35S promoter and then transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana to obtain transgenic plants. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed a significant increase of total carotenoids in transgenic plants. The seeds of transgenic and wild-type plants were germinated on an agar medium supplemented with polyethylene glycol (PEG). Transgenic seedlings grew significantly longer roots than wild-type ones did. Further enzymatic analysis showed an increased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in transgenic seedlings. In addition, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) was reduced in transgenics. qRT-PCR analysis showed altered expressions of several genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis in transgenic plants. These data results indicate that IbGGPS is involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids in sweetpotato storage roots and likely associated with tolerance to osmotic stress. PMID:26376432

  4. A Sweetpotato Geranylgeranyl Pyrophosphate Synthase Gene, IbGGPS, Increases Carotenoid Content and Enhances Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Degao; Patil, Gunvant B.; Zhai, Hong; Wang, Feibing; Stephenson, Troy J.; Wang, Yannan; Wang, Bing; Valliyodan, Babu; Nguyen, Henry T.; Liu, Qingchang

    2015-01-01

    Sweetpotato highly produces carotenoids in storage roots. In this study, a cDNA encoding geranylgeranyl phyrophosphate synthase (GGPS), named IbGGPS, was isolated from sweetpotato storage roots. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was fused to the C-terminus of IbGGPS to obtain an IbGGPS-GFP fusion protein that was transiently expressed in both epidermal cells of onion and leaves of tobacco. Confocal microscopic analysis determined that the IbGGPS-GFP protein was localized to specific areas of the plasma membrane of onion and chloroplasts in tobacco leaves. The coding region of IbGGPS was cloned into a binary vector under the control of 35S promoter and then transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana to obtain transgenic plants. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed a significant increase of total carotenoids in transgenic plants. The seeds of transgenic and wild-type plants were germinated on an agar medium supplemented with polyethylene glycol (PEG). Transgenic seedlings grew significantly longer roots than wild-type ones did. Further enzymatic analysis showed an increased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in transgenic seedlings. In addition, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) was reduced in transgenics. qRT-PCR analysis showed altered expressions of several genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis in transgenic plants. These data results indicate that IbGGPS is involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids in sweetpotato storage roots and likely associated with tolerance to osmotic stress. PMID:26376432

  5. Expression differences for genes involved in lignin, glutathione and sulphate metabolism in response to cadmium in Arabidopsis thaliana and the related Zn/Cd-hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens.

    PubMed

    van de Mortel, Judith E; Schat, Henk; Moerland, Perry D; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; van der Ent, Sjoerd; Blankestijn, Hetty; Ghandilyan, Artak; Tsiatsiani, Styliani; Aarts, Mark G M

    2008-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread, naturally occurring element present in soil, rock, water, plants and animals. Cd is a non-essential element for plants and is toxic at higher concentrations. Transcript profiles of roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and Thlaspi caerulescens plants exposed to Cd and zinc (Zn) are examined, with the main aim to determine the differences in gene expression between the Cd-tolerant Zn-hyperaccumulator T. caerulescens and the Cd-sensitive non-accumulator Arabidopsis. This comparative transcriptional analysis emphasized the role of genes involved in lignin, glutathione and sulphate metabolism. Furthermore the transcription factors MYB72 and bHLH100 were studied for their involvement in metal homeostasis, as they showed an altered expression after exposure to Cd. The Arabidopsis myb72 knockout mutant was more sensitive to excess Zn or iron (Fe) deficiency than wild type, while Arabidopsis transformants overexpressing bHLH100 showed increased tolerance to high Zn and nickel (Ni) compared to wild-type plants, confirming their role in metal homeostasis in Arabidopsis. PMID:18088336

  6. Natural Variation Identifies ICARUS1, a Universal Gene Required for Cell Proliferation and Growth at High Temperatures in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Seleznev, Andrei; Méndez-Vigo, Belén; Picó, F. Xavier; Sureshkumar, Sridevi; Sundaramoorthi, Vignesh; Bulach, Dieter; Powell, David; Seemann, Torsten; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar

    2015-01-01

    Plants are highly sensitive to environmental changes and even small variations in ambient temperature have severe consequences on their growth and development. Temperature affects multiple aspects of plant development, but the processes and mechanisms underlying thermo-sensitive growth responses are mostly unknown. Here we exploit natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana to identify and characterize novel components and processes mediating thermo-sensitive growth responses in plants. Phenotypic screening of wild accessions identified several strains displaying pleiotropic growth defects, at cellular and organism levels, specifically at high ambient temperatures. Positional cloning and characterization of the underlying gene revealed that ICARUS1 (ICA1), which encodes a protein of the tRNAHis guanylyl transferase (Thg1) superfamily, is required for plant growth at high temperatures. Transcriptome and gene marker analyses together with DNA content measurements show that ICA1 loss-of-function results in down regulation of cell cycle associated genes at high temperatures, which is linked with a block in G2/M transition and endoreduplication. In addition, plants with mutations in ICA1 show enhanced sensitivity to DNA damage. Characterization of additional strains that carry lesions in ICA1, but display normal growth, shows that alternative splicing is likely to alleviate the deleterious effects of some natural mutations. Furthermore, analyses of worldwide and regional collections of natural accessions indicate that ICA1 loss-of-function has arisen several times independently, and that these occur at high frequency in some local populations. Overall our results suggest that ICA1-mediated-modulation of fundamental processes such as tRNAHis maturation, modify plant growth responses to temperature changes in a quantitative and reversible manner, in natural populations. PMID:25951176

  7. Branched-chain-amino-acid biosynthesis in plants: molecular cloning and characterization of the gene encoding acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase (ketol-acid reductoisomerase) from Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress).

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, R; Curien, G; DeRose, R T; Douce, R

    1993-01-01

    Towards the goal of gaining a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling branched-chain-amino-acid biosynthesis in plants, we have isolated, sequenced and characterized a gene encoding acetohydroxy acid isomero-reductase (ketol-acid reductoisomerase) from Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress). Comparison between the acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase cDNA and the genomic sequence has allowed us to determine the exon structure of the coding region. The isolated acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase gene is distributed over approx. 4.5 kbp and contains nine introns (79-347 bp). The transcriptional start site was found to be 52 bp upstream of the translational initiation site. Southern-blot analysis of A. thaliana genomic DNA shows that the acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase is encoded by a single-copy gene. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8379936

  8. The ASRG database: identification and survey of Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing-Bing; Brendel, Volker

    2004-01-01

    A total of 74 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes and 395 genes encoding splicing-related proteins were identified in the Arabidopsis genome by sequence comparison and motif searches, including the previously elusive U4atac snRNA gene. Most of the genes have not been studied experimentally. Classification of these genes and detailed information on gene structure, alternative splicing, gene duplications and phylogenetic relationships are made accessible as a comprehensive database of Arabidopsis Splicing Related Genes (ASRG) on our website. PMID:15575968

  9. Heterologous Expression of the Wheat Aquaporin Gene TaTIP2;2 Compromises the Abiotic Stress Tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Taiyong; Xia, Guangmin

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins are channel proteins which transport water across cell membranes. We show that the bread wheat aquaporin gene TaTIP2;2 maps to the long arm of chromosome 7b and that its product localizes to the endomembrane system. The gene is expressed constitutively in both the root and the leaf, and is down-regulated by salinity and drought stress. Salinity stress induced an increased level of C-methylation within the CNG trinucleotides in the TaTIP2;2 promoter region. The heterologous expression of TaTIP2;2 in Arabidopsis thaliana compromised its drought and salinity tolerance, suggesting that TaTIP2;2 may be a negative regulator of abiotic stress. The proline content of transgenic A. thaliana plants fell, consistent with the down-regulation of P5CS1, while the expression of SOS1, SOS2, SOS3, CBF3 and DREB2A, which are all stress tolerance-related genes acting in an ABA-independent fashion, was also down-regulated. The supply of exogenous ABA had little effect either on TaTIP2;2 expression in wheat or on the phenotype of transgenic A. thaliana. The expression level of the ABA signalling genes ABI1, ABI2 and ABF3 remained unaltered in the transgenic A. thaliana plants. Thus TaTIP2;2 probably regulates the response to stress via an ABA-independent pathway(s). PMID:24223981

  10. The activation process of Arabidopsis thaliana A1 gene encoding the translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha is conserved among angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Curie, C; Liboz, T; Montané, M H; Rouan, D; Axelos, M; Lescure, B

    1992-04-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the activation process of the A1 EF-1 alpha gene depends on several elements. Using the GUS reporter gene, transient expression experiments have shown that mutations of upstream cis-acting elements of the A1 promoter, or the deletion of an intron located within the 5' non-coding region, similarly affect expression in dicot or monocot protoplasts. The results reported here strongly suggest that this 5' intron is properly spliced in Zea mays. We show that two trans-acting factors, specifically interacting with an upstream activating sequence (the TEF 1 box), are present in nuclear extracts prepared from A. thaliana, Brassica rapa, Nicotiana tabacum and Z. mays. In addition, a DNA sequence homologous to the TEF 1 box, found at approximately the same location within a Lycopersicon esculentum EF-1 alpha promoter, interacts with the same trans-acting factors. Homologies found between the A. thaliana and L. esculentum TEF 1 box sequences have allowed us to define mutations of this upstream element which affect the interaction with the corresponding trans-acting factors. These results support the notion that the activation processes of A. thaliana EF-1 alpha genes have been conserved among angiosperms and provide interesting data on the functional structure of the TEF 1 box. PMID:1600144

  11. Photoperiodic flowering regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Golembeski, Greg S.; Kinmonth-Schultz, Hannah A.; Song, Young Hun; Imaizumi, Takato

    2015-01-01

    Photoperiod, or the duration of light in a given day, is a critical cue that flowering plants utilize to effectively assess seasonal information and coordinate their reproductive development in synchrony with the external environment. The use of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, has greatly improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that determine how plants process and utilize photoperiodic information to coordinate a flowering response. This mechanism is typified by the transcriptional activation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene by the transcription factor CONSTANS (CO) under inductive long-day conditions in Arabidopsis. FT protein then moves from the leaves to the shoot apex, where floral meristem development can be initiated. As a point of integration from a variety of environmental factors in the context of a larger system of regulatory pathways that affect flowering, the importance of photoreceptors and the circadian clock in CO regulation throughout the day has been a key feature of the photoperiodic flowering pathway. In addition to these established mechanisms, the recent discovery of a photosynthate derivative trehalose-6-phosphate as an activator of FT in leaves has interesting implications for the involvement of photosynthesis in the photoperiodic flowering response that were suggested from previous physiological experiments in flowering induction. PMID:25684830

  12. Effects of tung oilseed FAD2 and DGAT2 genes on unsaturated fatty acid accumulation in Rhodotorula glutinis and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yicun; Cui, Qinqin; Xu, Yongjie; Yang, Susu; Gao, Ming; Wang, Yangdong

    2015-08-01

    Genetic engineering to produce valuable lipids containing unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) holds great promise for food and industrial applications. Efforts to genetically modify plants to produce desirable UFAs with single enzymes, however, have had modest success. The key enzymes fatty acid desaturase (FAD) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) are responsible for UFA biosynthesis (a push process) and assembling fatty acids into lipids (a pull process) in plants, respectively. To examine their roles in UFA accumulation, VfFAD2 and VfDGAT2 genes cloned from Vernicia fordii (tung tree) oilseeds were conjugated and transformed into Rhodotorula glutinis and Arabidopsis thaliana via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed variable gene expression levels in the transformants, with a much higher level of VfDGAT2 than VfFAD2. The relationship between VfFAD2 expression and linoleic acid (C18:2) increases in R. glutinis (R (2) = 0.98) and A. thaliana (R (2) = 0.857) transformants was statistically linear. The VfDGAT2 expression level was statistically correlated with increased total fatty acid content in R. glutinis (R (2) = 0.962) and A. thaliana (R (2) = 0.8157) transformants. With a similar expression level between single- and two-gene transformants, VfFAD2-VfDGAT2 co-transformants showed a higher linolenic acid (C18:3) yield in R. glutinis (174.36 % increase) and A. thaliana (14.61 % increase), and eicosatrienoic acid (C20:3) was enriched (17.10 % increase) in A. thaliana. Our data suggest that VfFAD2-VfDGAT2 had a synergistic effect on UFA metabolism in R. glutinis, and to a lesser extent, A. thaliana. These results show promise for further genetic engineering of plant lipids to produce desirable UFAs. PMID:25754996

  13. Multiple reference genomes and transcriptomes for Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiangchao; Stegle, Oliver; Behr, Jonas; Steffen, Joshua G; Drewe, Philipp; Hildebrand, Katie L; Lyngsoe, Rune; Schultheiss, Sebastian J; Osborne, Edward J; Sreedharan, Vipin T; Kahles, André; Bohnert, Regina; Jean, Géraldine; Derwent, Paul; Kersey, Paul; Belfield, Eric J; Harberd, Nicholas P; Kemen, Eric; Toomajian, Christopher; Kover, Paula X; Clark, Richard M; Rätsch, Gunnar; Mott, Richard

    2011-09-22

    Genetic differences between Arabidopsis thaliana accessions underlie the plant's extensive phenotypic variation, and until now these have been interpreted largely in the context of the annotated reference accession Col-0. Here we report the sequencing, assembly and annotation of the genomes of 18 natural A. thaliana accessions, and their transcriptomes. When assessed on the basis of the reference annotation, one-third of protein-coding genes are predicted to be disrupted in at least one accession. However, re-annotation of each genome revealed that alternative gene models often restore coding potential. Gene expression in seedlings differed for nearly half of expressed genes and was frequently associated with cis variants within 5 kilobases, as were intron retention alternative splicing events. Sequence and expression variation is most pronounced in genes that respond to the biotic environment. Our data further promote evolutionary and functional studies in A. thaliana, especially the MAGIC genetic reference population descended from these accessions. PMID:21874022

  14. Neutralization of Bacterial YoeBSpn Toxicity and Enhanced Plant Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana via Co-Expression of the Toxin-Antitoxin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Abu Bakar, Fauziah; Yeo, Chew Chieng; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems have various cellular functions, including as part of the general stress response. The genome of the Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae harbors several putative TA systems, including yefM-yoeBSpn, which is one of four systems that had been demonstrated to be biologically functional. Overexpression of the yoeBSpn toxin gene resulted in cell stasis and eventually cell death in its native host, as well as in Escherichia coli. Our previous work showed that induced expression of a yoeBSpn toxin-Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fusion gene apparently triggered apoptosis and was lethal in the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we investigated the effects of co-expression of the yefMSpn antitoxin and yoeBSpn toxin-GFP fusion in transgenic A. thaliana. When co-expressed in Arabidopsis, the YefMSpn antitoxin was found to neutralize the toxicity of YoeBSpn-GFP. Interestingly, the inducible expression of both yefMSpn antitoxin and yoeBSpn toxin-GFP fusion in transgenic hybrid Arabidopsis resulted in larger rosette leaves and taller plants with a higher number of inflorescence stems and increased silique production. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a prokaryotic antitoxin neutralizing its cognate toxin in plant cells. PMID:27104531

  15. Neutralization of Bacterial YoeBSpn Toxicity and Enhanced Plant Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana via Co-Expression of the Toxin-Antitoxin Genes.

    PubMed

    Abu Bakar, Fauziah; Yeo, Chew Chieng; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems have various cellular functions, including as part of the general stress response. The genome of the Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae harbors several putative TA systems, including yefM-yoeBSpn, which is one of four systems that had been demonstrated to be biologically functional. Overexpression of the yoeBSpn toxin gene resulted in cell stasis and eventually cell death in its native host, as well as in Escherichia coli. Our previous work showed that induced expression of a yoeBSpn toxin-Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fusion gene apparently triggered apoptosis and was lethal in the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we investigated the effects of co-expression of the yefMSpn antitoxin and yoeBSpn toxin-GFP fusion in transgenic A. thaliana. When co-expressed in Arabidopsis, the YefMSpn antitoxin was found to neutralize the toxicity of YoeBSpn-GFP. Interestingly, the inducible expression of both yefMSpn antitoxin and yoeBSpn toxin-GFP fusion in transgenic hybrid Arabidopsis resulted in larger rosette leaves and taller plants with a higher number of inflorescence stems and increased silique production. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a prokaryotic antitoxin neutralizing its cognate toxin in plant cells. PMID:27104531

  16. Shotgun Proteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two shotgun tandem mass spectrometry proteomics approaches, Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) and 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS, were used to identify Arabidopsis thaliana leaf proteins. These methods utilize different protein/peptide separation strategies. Detergents not compatible wit...

  17. Efficient use of artificial micro-RNA to downregulate the expression of genes at the post-transcriptional level in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, A; Rauf, M; Ghafoor, S; Khattak, M N K; Hameed, M W; Shah, H; Jan, S; Muhammad, K; Rehman, A; Inamullah

    2016-01-01

    Micro-RNAs are cellular components regulating gene expression at the post-transcription level. In the present study, artificial micro-RNAs were used to decrease the transcript level of two genes, AtExpA8 (encoding an expansin) and AHL25 (encoding an AT-hook motif nuclear localized protein) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The backbone of the Arabidopsis endogenous MIR319a micro-RNA was used in a site-directed mutagenesis approach for the generation of artificial micro-RNAs targeting two genes. The recombinant cassettes were expressed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in individual A. thaliana plants. Transgenic lines of the third generation were tested by isolating total RNA and by subsequent cDNA synthesis using oligo-dT18 primers and mRNAs as templates. The expression of the two target genes was checked through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to confirm reduced transcript levels for AtExpA8 and AHL25. Downregulation of AtExpA8 resulted in the formation of short hypocotyls compared with those of the wild-type control in response to low pH and high salt concentration. This technology could be used to prevent the expression of exogenous and invading genes posing a threat to the normal cellular physiology of the host plant. PMID:27173203

  18. Analysis of the Metabolic Pathways Affected by Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) in Arabidopsis thaliana Based on GeneChip Microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zongqi; Lei, Peng; Feng, Xiaohai; Li, Sha; Xu, Hong

    2016-08-17

    Plant growth is promoted by poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA). However, the molecular mechanism underlying such promotion is not yet well understood. Therefore, we used GeneChip microarrays to explore the effects of γ-PGA on gene transcription in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results revealed 299 genes significantly regulated by γ-PGA. These differently expressed genes participate mainly in metabolic and cellular processes and in stimuli responses. The metabolic pathways linked to these differently expressed genes were also investigated. A total of 64 of the 299 differently expressed genes were shown to be directly involved in 24 pathways such as brassinosteroid biosynthesis, α-linolenic acid metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and nitrogen metabolism, all of which were influenced by γ-PGA. The analysis demonstrated that γ-PGA promoted nitrogen assimilation and biosynthesis of brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid, and lignins, providing a better explanation for why γ-PGA promotes growth and enhances stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27465513

  19. SIAMESE, a gene controlling the endoreduplication cell cycle in Arabidopsis thaliana trichomes.

    PubMed

    Walker, J D; Oppenheimer, D G; Concienne, J; Larkin, J C

    2000-09-01

    Cell differentiation is generally tightly coordinated with the cell cycle, typically resulting in a nondividing cell with a unique differentiated morphology. The unicellular trichomes of Arabidopsis are a well-established model for the study of plant cell differentiation. Here, we describe a new genetic locus, SIAMESE (SIM), required for coordinating cell division and cell differentiation during the development of Arabidopsis trichomes (epidermal hairs). A recessive mutation in the sim locus on chromosome 5 results in clusters of adjacent trichomes that appeared to be morphologically identical 'twins'. Upon closer inspection, the sim mutant was found to produce multicellular trichomes in contrast to the unicellular trichomes produced by wild-type (WT) plants. Mutant trichomes consisting of up to 15 cells have been observed. Scanning electron microscopy of developing sim trichomes suggests that the cell divisions occur very early in the development of mutant trichomes. WT trichome nuclei continue to replicate their DNA after mitosis and cytokinesis have ceased, and as a consequence have a DNA content much greater than 2C. This phenomenon is known as endoreduplication. Individual nuclei of sim trichomes have a reduced level of endoreduplication relative to WT trichome nuclei. Endoreduplication is also reduced in dark-grown sim hypocotyls relative to WT, but not in light-grown hypocotyls. Double mutants of sim with either of two other mutants affecting endoreduplication, triptychon (try) and glabra3 (gl3) are consistent with a function for SIM in endoreduplication. SIM may function as a repressor of mitosis in the endoreduplication cell cycle. Additionally, the relatively normal morphology of multicellular sim trichomes indicates that trichome morphogenesis can occur relatively normally even when the trichome precursor cell continues to divide. The sim mutant phenotype also has implications for the evolution of multicellular trichomes. PMID:10952891

  20. Co-introduction of an antisense gene for an endogenous seed storage protein can increase expression of a transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

    PubMed

    Goossens, A; Van Montagu, M; Angenon, G

    1999-07-30

    We have investigated whether the expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds of a transgene (the Phaseolus vulgaris arcelin (arc)5-I gene) could be enhanced by the simultaneous introduction of an antisense gene for an endogenous seed storage protein (2S albumin). Seeds of plants transformed with both the arc5-I gene and a 2S albumin antisense gene contained reduced amounts of 2S albumins and increased arcelin-5 (Arc5) accumulation levels compared to lines harboring the arc5-I gene only. Arc5 production could be enhanced to more than 24% of the total seed protein content, suggesting that antisense technology could be of great utility to favor high expression of transgenes. PMID:10452550

  1. Trichome cell growth in Arabidopsis thaliana can be derepressed by mutations in at least five genes.

    PubMed Central

    Perazza, D; Herzog, M; Hülskamp, M; Brown, S; Dorne, A M; Bonneville, J M

    1999-01-01

    Leaf trichomes in Arabidopsis are unicellular epidermal hairs with a branched morphology. They undergo successive endoreduplication rounds early during cell morphogenesis. Mutations affecting trichome nuclear DNA content, such as triptychon or glabra3, alter trichome branching. We isolated new mutants with supernumerary trichome branches, which fall into three unlinked complementation groups: KAKTUS and the novel loci, POLYCHOME and RASTAFARI. They map to chromosomes IV, II, and V, respectively. The trichomes of these mutants presented an increased DNA content, although to a variable extent. The spindly-5 mutant, which displays a constitutive gibberellin response, also produces overbranched trichomes containing more nuclear DNA. We analyzed genetic interactions using double mutants and propose that two independent pathways, defined by SPINDLY and TRIPTYCHON, act to limit trichome growth. KAKTUS and POLYCHOME might have redundant actions mediating gibberellin control via SPINDLY. The overall leaf polysomaty was not notably affected by these mutations, suggesting that they affect the control of DNA synthesis in a tissue- or cell type-specific manner. Wild-type tetraploids also produce overbranched trichomes; they displayed a shifted polysomaty in trichomes and in the whole leaf, suggesting a developmental program controlling DNA increases via the counting of endoreduplication rounds. PMID:10224275

  2. Trichome cell growth in Arabidopsis thaliana can be derepressed by mutations in at least five genes.

    PubMed

    Perazza, D; Herzog, M; Hülskamp, M; Brown, S; Dorne, A M; Bonneville, J M

    1999-05-01

    Leaf trichomes in Arabidopsis are unicellular epidermal hairs with a branched morphology. They undergo successive endoreduplication rounds early during cell morphogenesis. Mutations affecting trichome nuclear DNA content, such as triptychon or glabra3, alter trichome branching. We isolated new mutants with supernumerary trichome branches, which fall into three unlinked complementation groups: KAKTUS and the novel loci, POLYCHOME and RASTAFARI. They map to chromosomes IV, II, and V, respectively. The trichomes of these mutants presented an increased DNA content, although to a variable extent. The spindly-5 mutant, which displays a constitutive gibberellin response, also produces overbranched trichomes containing more nuclear DNA. We analyzed genetic interactions using double mutants and propose that two independent pathways, defined by SPINDLY and TRIPTYCHON, act to limit trichome growth. KAKTUS and POLYCHOME might have redundant actions mediating gibberellin control via SPINDLY. The overall leaf polysomaty was not notably affected by these mutations, suggesting that they affect the control of DNA synthesis in a tissue- or cell type-specific manner. Wild-type tetraploids also produce overbranched trichomes; they displayed a shifted polysomaty in trichomes and in the whole leaf, suggesting a developmental program controlling DNA increases via the counting of endoreduplication rounds. PMID:10224275

  3. Spatio-temporal expression patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula defensin-like genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant genomes typically contain several hundred defensin-like (DEFL) genes that encode short proteins resembling defensins, which are antimicrobial polypeptides. Little is known about the expression patterns of DEFL genes because most were recently discovered and many are not well represented on sta...

  4. Multi site polyadenylation and transcriptional response to stress of a vacuolar type H+-ATPase subunit A gene in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Magnotta, Scot M; Gogarten, Johann Peter

    2002-01-01

    Background Vacuolar type H+-ATPases play a critical role in the maintenance of vacuolar homeostasis in plant cells. V-ATPases are also involved in plants' defense against environmental stress. This research examined the expression and regulation of the catalytic subunit of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase in Arabidopsis thaliana and the effect of environmental stress on multiple transcripts generated by this gene. Results Evidence suggests that subunit A of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase is encoded by a single gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genome blot analysis showed no indication of a second subunit A gene being present. The single gene identified was shown by whole RNA blot analysis to be transcribed in all organs of the plant. Subunit A was shown by sequencing the 3' end of multiple cDNA clones to exhibit multi site polyadenylation. Four different poly (A) tail attachment sites were revealed. Experiments were performed to determine the response of transcript levels for subunit A to environmental stress. A PCR based strategy was devised to amplify the four different transcripts from the subunit A gene. Conclusions Amplification of cDNA generated from seedlings exposed to cold, salt stress, and etiolation showed that transcript levels for subunit A of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase in Arabidopsis were responsive to stress conditions. Cold and salt stress resulted in a 2–4 fold increase in all four subunit A transcripts evaluated. Etiolation resulted in a slight increase in transcript levels. All four transcripts appeared to behave identically with respect to stress conditions tested with no significant differential regulation. PMID:11985780

  5. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  6. A Sulfonylurea Herbicide Resistance Gene from Arabidopsis thaliana as a New Selectable Marker for Production of Fertile Transgenic Rice Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhijian; Hayashimoto, Akio; Murai, Norimoto

    1992-01-01

    A mutant acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene, csr1-1, isolated from sulfonylurea herbicide-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana, was placed under control of a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (35S). Rice protoplasts were transformed with the 35S/ALS chimeric gene and regenerated into fertile transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) plants. The 35S/ALS gene was expressed effectively as demonstrated by northern blot hybridization analysis, and conferred to transformed calli at least 200-fold greater chlorsulfuron resistance than nontransformed control calli. Effective selection of 35S/ALS-transformed protoplasts was achieved at extremely low chlorsulfuron concentrations of 10 nm. The results demonstrated that the 35S/ALS gene is an alternative selectable marker for rice protoplast transformation and fertile transgenic rice production. The results also suggest that the mutant form of Arabidopsis ALS enzyme operates normally in rice cells. Thus, the mechanism of protein transport to chloroplast and ALS inhibition by chlorsulfuron is apparently conserved among plant species as diverse as Arabidopsis (dicotyledon) and rice (monocotyledon). Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16653044

  7. Nucleotide sequence of psbQ gene for 16-kDa protein of oxygen-evolving complex from Arabidopsis thaliana and regulation of its expression.

    PubMed

    Grover, M; Gaur, T; Kochhar, A; Maheshwari, S C; Tyagi, A K

    1999-06-30

    The psbQ gene encoding a 16-kDa polypeptide of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II has been isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana and characterized. The gene consists of a 28 nucleotide long leader sequence, two introns and three exons encoding a 223-amino-acid precursor polypeptide. The first 75 amino acids act as a transit peptide for the translocation of the polypeptide into the thylakoid lumen. Expression studies show that the gene is light-inducible and expresses only in green tissues with high steady-state mRNA levels in leaves. Using this gene as a probe, restriction fragment length polymorphism between two ecotypes, Columbia and Estland, has also been detected. PMID:10470848

  8. Dated molecular phylogenies indicate a Miocene origin for Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Beilstein, Mark A; Nagalingum, Nathalie S; Clements, Mark D; Manchester, Steven R; Mathews, Sarah

    2010-10-26

    Dated molecular phylogenies are the basis for understanding species diversity and for linking changes in rates of diversification with historical events such as restructuring in developmental pathways, genome doubling, or dispersal onto a new continent. Valid fossil calibration points are essential to the accurate estimation of divergence dates, but for many groups of flowering plants fossil evidence is unavailable or limited. Arabidopsis thaliana, the primary genetic model in plant biology and the first plant to have its entire genome sequenced, belongs to one such group, the plant family Brassicaceae. Thus, the timing of A. thaliana evolution and the history of its genome have been controversial. We bring previously overlooked fossil evidence to bear on these questions and find the split between A. thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata occurred about 13 Mya, and that the split between Arabidopsis and the Brassica complex (broccoli, cabbage, canola) occurred about 43 Mya. These estimates, which are two- to threefold older than previous estimates, indicate that gene, genomic, and developmental evolution occurred much more slowly than previously hypothesized and that Arabidopsis evolved during a period of warming rather than of cooling. We detected a 2- to 10-fold shift in species diversification rates on the branch uniting Brassicaceae with its sister families. The timing of this shift suggests a possible impact of the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction on their radiation and that Brassicales codiversified with pierid butterflies that specialize on mustard-oil-producing plants. PMID:20921408

  9. Ectopic expression of a grape aspartic protease gene, AP13, in Arabidopsis thaliana improves resistance to powdery mildew but increases susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rongrong; Tu, Mingxing; Wang, Xianhang; Zhao, Jiao; Wan, Ran; Li, Zhi; Wang, Yuejin; Wang, Xiping

    2016-07-01

    The grape aspartic protease gene, AP13 was previously reported to be responsive, in Chinese wild Vitis quinquangularis cv. 'Shang-24', to infection by Erysiphe necator, the causal agent of powdery mildew disease, as well as to treatment with salicylic acid in V. labrusca×V. vinifera cv. 'Kyoho'. In the current study, we evaluated the expression levels of AP13 in 'Shang-24' in response to salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and ethylene (ET) treatments, as well as to infection by the necrotrophic fungus, Botrytis cinerea, and the transcript levels of VqAP13 decreased after B. cinerea infection and MeJA treatment, but increased following ET and SA treatments. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines over-expressing VqAP13 under the control of a constitutive promoter showed enhanced resistance to powdery mildew and to the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, and accumulated more callose than wild type plants, while the resistance of transgenic A. thaliana lines to B. cinerea inoculation was reduced. In addition, the expression profiles of various disease resistance- related genes in the transgenic A. thaliana lines following infection by different pathogens were compared to the equivalent profiles in the wild type plants. The results suggest that VqAP13 action promotes the SA dependent signal transduction pathway, but suppresses the JA signal transduction pathway. PMID:27181943

  10. The role of Arabidopsis thaliana NAR1, a cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly component, in gametophytic gene expression and oxidative stress responses in vegetative tissue.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Miyuki; Buzas, Diana Mihaela; Kato, Akira; Fujita, Masahiro; Kurata, Nori; Kinoshita, Tetsu

    2013-09-01

    Iron-sulfur proteins have iron-sulfur clusters as a prosthetic group and are responsible for various cellular processes, including general transcriptional regulation, photosynthesis and respiration. The cytosolic iron-sulfur assembly (CIA) pathway of yeast has been shown to be responsible for regulation of iron-sulfur cluster assembly in both the cytosol and the nucleus. However, little is known about the roles of this pathway in multicellular organisms. In a forward genetic screen, we identified an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant with impaired expression of the endosperm-specific gene Flowering Wageningen (FWA). To characterize this mutant, we carried out detailed phenotypic and genetic analyses during reproductive and vegetative development. The mutation affects NAR1, which encodes a homolog of a yeast CIA pathway component. Comparison of embryo development in nar1-3 and other A. thaliana mutants affected in the CIA pathway showed that the embryos aborted at a similar stage, suggesting that this pathway potentially functions in early seed development. Transcriptome analysis of homozygous viable nar1-4 seedlings showed transcriptional repression of a subset of genes involved in 'iron ion transport' and 'response to nitrate'. nar1-4 also exhibited resistance to the herbicide paraquat. Our results indicate that A. thaliana NAR1 has various functions including transcriptional regulation in gametophytes and abiotic stress responses in vegetative tissues. PMID:23734982

  11. Expression analysis of the VTC2 and VTC5 genes encoding GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase, an enzyme involved in ascorbate biosynthesis, in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongshun; Badejo, Adebanjo Ayobamidele; Shibata, Hitoshi; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Maruta, Takanori; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Page, Mike; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ishikawa, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana contains two GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase genes, VTC2 and VTC5, which are critical for ascorbate (AsA) biosynthesis. We investigated the expression levels of both VTC2 and VTC5 genes in wild-type A. thaliana and the AsA deficient mutants during early seedling growth. Ascorbate accumulated to an equal extent in all genotypes up to 5 d post-germination (DPG). The transcript level of VTC2 was dominant, and increased in parallel with AsA accumulation in the wild type. On the other hand, the expression of VTC5 compensated for the reduced VTC2 transcription levels in the AsA deficient mutant vtc2-1 in young seedlings. A luciferase activity assay indicated that the VTC5 promoter was more active in young (2 DPG) cotyledons and that the VTC2 and VTC5 promoters drove a day-to-night variation in expression. The present work provides clues to the precise roles of VTC2 and VTC5 in AsA biosynthesis in A. thaliana at the young seedling stage. PMID:21897033

  12. Flavonoid-specific staining of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, J J; Rechnitz, G A

    1992-12-01

    Crop yields may be threatened by increases in UV-B radiation resulting from depletion of the ozone layer. In higher plants, the presence of flavonols provides a protective mechanism, and we report a novel staining procedure for the visualization of such protectants in plant tissue. It is shown that the proposed technique provides sensitive and specific fluorescence of flavonoids in chlorophyll-bleached tissue of Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:1282347

  13. Heterologous expression of the gourd E3 ubiquitin ligase gene LsRZF1 compromises the drought stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji-Hee; Ju, Hyun-Woo; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Chung, Jung-Sung; Cho, Baik-Ho; Kim, Cheol Soo

    2014-04-01

    Protein ubiquitination is one of the major regulatory processes used by eukaryotic cells. The ubiquitin E3 ligase acts as a main determinant of substrate specificity. However, the precise roles of E3 ligase in plants to drought stress are poorly understood. In this study, a gourd family (Lagenaria siceraria) ortholog of Arabidopsis thaliana RING Zinc Finger 1 (AtRZF1) gene, designated LsRZF1, was identified and characterized. LsRZF1 was reduced by abscisic acid (ABA), osmotic stress, and drought conditions. Compared to wild type, transgenic Arabidopsis plants ectopic expressing LsRZF1 were hypersensitive to ABA and osmotic stress during early seedling development, indicating that LsRZF1 negatively regulates drought-mediated control of early seedling development. Moreover, the ectopic expression of the LsRZF1 gene was very influential in drought sensitive parameters including proline content, water loss, and the expression of dehydration stress-related genes. Furthermore, ubiquitin E3 ligase activity and genetic data indicate that AtRZF1 and LsRZF1 function in similar pathway to control proline metabolism in Arabidopsis under drought condition. Together, these results suggest that the E3 ligase LsRZF1 is an important regulator of water deficit stress during early seedling development. PMID:24525351

  14. Gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana: Root-specific action of the EHB gene and violation of the resultant law.

    PubMed

    Dümmer, Michaela; Forreiter, Christoph; Galland, Paul

    2015-09-15

    Gravitropic bending of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana in response to centrifugal accelerations was determined in a range between 0.0025 and 4×g to revisit and validate the so-called resultant law, which claims that centrifugation causes gravitropic organs to orient parallel to the resultant stimulus vector. We show here for seedlings of A. thaliana that this empirical law holds for hypocotyls but surprisingly fails for roots. While the behavior of hypocotyls could be modeled by an arc tangent function predicted by the resultant law, roots displayed a sharp maximum at 1.8×g that substantially overshoots the predicted value and that represents a novel phenomenon, diagravitropism elicited by centrifugal acceleration. The gravitropic bending critically depended on the orientation of the seedling relative to the centrifugal acceleration. If the centrifugal vector pointed toward the cotyledons, gravitropic bending of hypocotyls and roots was substantially enhanced. The complex behavior of Arabidopsis seedlings provides strong evidence that gravitropic bending entails a cosine component (longitudinal stimulus) to which the seedlings were more sensitive than to the classical sine component. The absolute gravitropic thresholds of hypocotyls and roots were determined in a clinostat-centrifuge and found to be below 0.015×g. A tropism mutant lacking the EHB1 protein, which interacts with ARF-GAP (ARF GTPase-activating protein) and thus indirectly with a small ARF-type G protein, displayed a lower gravitropic threshold for roots and also enhanced bending, while the responses of the hypocotyls remained nearly unaffected. PMID:26496692

  15. ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 gene, a member of LOB/AS2 family of Arabidopsis thaliana, causes an abaxializing leaves in transgenic cockscomb.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shao-Bo; Song, Jiang-Ping; Meng, Lai-Sheng

    2012-04-01

    The leaf primordium derives from the peripheral zone of shoot apical meristem. During the formation of leaf primordia, they need to establish the proximodistal, mediolateral, and ab/adaxial axes. Among these axes, the ab/adaxial axis might be the most important. ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 (AS2) gene is a member of AS2/LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARY (LOB) family of Arabidopsis thaliana. In this work, we transformed 35S:AS2 transgene constructs to cockscomb (Celosia cristata) via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. All primary transformants subsequently obtained were placed into phenotypic categories and self-pollinated. As a whole, a total of 44 T1 35S:AS2 cockscomb plants obtained were grouped into two major categories: (I) slightly wrinkled leaves (28/44), (II) extremely curved leaves (16/44), on the basis of their leaf phenotypes. Furthermore, we characterized the anatomical features of these malformed leaves; and found the transformation of adaxial cell types into abaxial cell ones. A series of data suggest that AS2 might be involved in the determination of abaxial polarity in cockscomb plants. However, a few research teams have reported that AS2 might be involved in the determination of adaxial polarity in leaf primodia of Arabidopsis thaliana. These data above indicate that the roles of the same ab/adaxial determinant might differ between distinct species. At last, the different function of AS2 in distinct species was discussed. PMID:22143880

  16. Proteomic Identification of Putative MicroRNA394 Target Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana Identifies Major Latex Protein Family Members Critical for Normal Development.

    PubMed

    Litholdo, Celso G; Parker, Benjamin L; Eamens, Andrew L; Larsen, Martin R; Cordwell, Stuart J; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2016-06-01

    Expression of the F-Box protein Leaf Curling Responsiveness (LCR) is regulated by microRNA, miR394, and alterations to this interplay in Arabidopsis thaliana produce defects in leaf polarity and shoot apical meristem organization. Although the miR394-LCR node has been documented in Arabidopsis, the identification of proteins targeted by LCR F-box itself has proven problematic. Here, a proteomic analysis of shoot apices from plants with altered LCR levels identified a member of the Latex Protein (MLP) family gene as a potential LCR F-box target. Bioinformatic and molecular analyses also suggested that other MLP family members are likely to be targets for this post-translational regulation. Direct interaction between LCR F-Box and MLP423 was validated. Additional MLP members had reduction in protein accumulation, in varying degrees, mediated by LCR F-Box. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines, in which MLP28 expression was reduced through an artificial miRNA technology, displayed severe developmental defects, including changes in leaf patterning and morphology, shoot apex defects, and eventual premature death. These phenotypic characteristics resemble those of Arabidopsis plants modified to over-express LCR Taken together, the results demonstrate that MLPs are driven to degradation by LCR, and indicate that MLP gene family is target of miR394-LCR regulatory node, representing potential targets for directly post-translational regulation mediated by LCR F-Box. In addition, MLP28 family member is associated with the LCR regulation that is critical for normal Arabidopsis development. PMID:27067051

  17. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene from wild rice, OgUBC1, confers resistance against UV-B radiation and Botrytis infection in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, En Hee; Pak, Jung Hun; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong; Shin, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jai Heon; Kim, Doh Hoon; Oh, Ju Sung; Oh, Boung-Jun; Jung, Ho Won; Chung, Young Soo

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated a novel E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme from leaves of wild rice plants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 was highly expressed in leaves treated with SA and UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recombinant OgUBC1 has an enzymatic activity of E2 in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 could protect disruption of plant cells by UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OgUBC1 confers disease resistance and UV-B tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. -- Abstract: A previously unidentified gene encoding ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme was isolated from leaves of wild rice plant treated with wounding and microbe-associated molecular patterns. The OgUBC1 gene was composed of 148 amino acids and contained a typical active site and 21 ubiquitin thioester intermediate interaction residues and 4 E3 interaction residues. Both exogenous application of salicylic acid and UV-B irradiation triggered expression of OgUBC1 in leaves of wild rice. Recombinant OgUBC1 proteins bound to ubiquitins in vitro, proposing that the protein might act as E2 enzyme in planta. Heterologous expression of the OgUBC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana protected plants from cellular damage caused by an excess of UV-B radiation. A stable expression of chalcone synthase gene was detected in leaves of OgUBC1-expressing Arabidopsis, resulting in producing higher amounts of anthocyanin than those in wild-type Col-0 plants. Additionally, both pathogenesis-related gene1 and 5 were transcribed in the transgenic Arabidopsis in the absence of pathogen infection. The OgUBC1-expressing plants were resistant to the infection of Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, we suggested that the OgUBC1 is involved in ubiquitination process important for cellular response against biotic and abiotic stresses in plants.

  18. Bioavailability of nanoparticulate hematite to Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Marusenko, Yevgeniy; Shipp, Jessie; Hamilton, George A; Morgan, Jennifer L L; Keebaugh, Michael; Hill, Hansina; Dutta, Arnab; Zhuo, Xiaoding; Upadhyay, Nabin; Hutchings, James; Herckes, Pierre; Anbar, Ariel D; Shock, Everett; Hartnett, Hilairy E

    2013-03-01

    The environmental effects and bioavailability of nanoparticulate iron (Fe) to plants are currently unknown. Here, plant bioavailability of synthesized hematite Fe nanoparticles was evaluated using Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) as a model. Over 56-days of growing wild-type A. thaliana, the nanoparticle-Fe and no-Fe treatments had lower plant biomass, lower chlorophyll concentrations, and lower internal Fe concentrations than the Fe-treatment. Results for the no-Fe and nanoparticle-Fe treatments were consistently similar throughout the experiment. These results suggest that nanoparticles (mean diameter 40.9 nm, range 22.3-67.0 nm) were not taken up and therefore not bioavailable to A. thaliana. Over 14-days growing wild-type and transgenic (Type I/II proton pump overexpression) A. thaliana, the Type I plant grew more than the wild-type in the nanoparticle-Fe treatment, suggesting Type I plants cope better with Fe limitation; however, the nanoparticle-Fe and no-Fe treatments had similar growth for all plant types. PMID:23262070

  19. A Root-Expressed Magnesium Transporter of the MRS2/MGT Gene Family in Arabidopsis thaliana Allows for Growth in Low-Mg2+ Environments[W

    PubMed Central

    Gebert, Michael; Meschenmoser, Karoline; Svidová, Soňa; Weghuber, Julian; Schweyen, Rudolf; Eifler, Karolin; Lenz, Henning; Weyand, Katrin; Knoop, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The MRS2/MGT gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana belongs to the superfamily of CorA-MRS2-ALR-type membrane proteins. Proteins of this type are characterized by a GMN tripeptide motif (Gly-Met-Asn) at the end of the first of two C-terminal transmembrane domains and have been characterized as magnesium transporters. Using the recently established mag-fura-2 system allowing direct measurement of Mg2+ uptake into mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we find that all members of the Arabidopsis family complement the corresponding yeast mrs2 mutant. Highly different patterns of tissue-specific expression were observed for the MRS2/MGT family members in planta. Six of them are expressed in root tissues, indicating a possible involvement in plant magnesium supply and distribution after uptake from the soil substrate. Homozygous T-DNA insertion knockout lines were obtained for four members of the MRS2/MGT gene family. A strong, magnesium-dependent phenotype of growth retardation was found for mrs2-7 when Mg2+ concentrations were lowered to 50 μM in hydroponic cultures. Ectopic overexpression of MRS2-7 from the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter results in complementation and increased biomass accumulation. Green fluorescent protein reporter gene fusions indicate a location of MRS2-7 in the endomembrane system. Hence, contrary to what is frequently found in analyses of plant gene families, a single gene family member knockout results in a strong, environmentally dependent phenotype. PMID:19966073

  20. Stress-induced expression in wheat of the Arabidopsis thaliana DREB1A gene delays water stress symptoms under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Pellegrineschi, Alessandro; Reynolds, Matthew; Pacheco, Mario; Brito, Rosa Maria; Almeraya, Rosaura; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Hoisington, David

    2004-06-01

    One of the major environmental factors limiting plant productivity is lack of water. This is especially true for the major cereals maize, rice, and wheat, which demonstrate a range of susceptibility to moisture deficit. Although conventional breeding and marker-assisted selection are being used to develop varieties more tolerant to water stress, these methods are time and resource consuming and germplasm dependent. Genetic engineering is attractive because of its potential to improve abiotic stress tolerance more rapidly. Transcription factors have been shown to produce multiple phenotypic alterations, many of which are involved in stress responses. DREB1A, a transcription factor that recognizes dehydration response elements, has been shown in Arabidopsis thaliana to play a crucial role in promoting the expression of drought-tolerance genes. In our efforts to enhance drought tolerance in wheat, the A. thaliana DREB1A gene was placed under control of a stress-inducible promoter from the rd29A gene and transferred via biolistic transformation into bread wheat. Plants expressing the DREB1A gene demonstrated substantial resistance to water stress in comparison with checks under experimental greenhouse conditions, manifested by a 10-day delay in wilting when water was withheld. PMID:15190366

  1. Genetic Regulation of Transcriptional Variation in Natural Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Yanjun; Shen, Xia; Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2016-01-01

    An increased knowledge of the genetic regulation of expression in Arabidopsis thaliana is likely to provide important insights about the basis of the plant’s extensive phenotypic variation. Here, we reanalyzed two publicly available datasets with genome-wide data on genetic and transcript variation in large collections of natural A. thaliana accessions. Transcripts from more than half of all genes were detected in the leaves of all accessions, and from nearly all annotated genes in at least one accession. Thousands of genes had high transcript levels in some accessions, but no transcripts at all in others, and this pattern was correlated with the genome-wide genotype. In total, 2669 eQTL were mapped in the largest population, and 717 of them were replicated in the other population. A total of 646 cis-eQTL-regulated genes that lacked detectable transcripts in some accessions was found, and for 159 of these we identified one, or several, common structural variants in the populations that were shown to be likely contributors to the lack of detectable RNA transcripts for these genes. This study thus provides new insights into the overall genetic regulation of global gene expression diversity in the leaf of natural A. thaliana accessions. Further, it also shows that strong cis-acting polymorphisms, many of which are likely to be structural variations, make important contributions to the transcriptional variation in the worldwide A. thaliana population. PMID:27226169

  2. Structure at 1.6 Å resolution of the protein from gene locus At3g22680 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Simon T. M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Bitto, Eduard; Jeon, Won Bae; Phillips, George N.

    2005-01-01

    The gene product of At3g22680 from Arabidopsis thaliana codes for a protein of unknown function. The crystal structure of the At3g22680 gene product was determined by multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction and refined to an R factor of 16.0% (R free = 18.4%) at 1.60 Å resolution. The refined structure shows one monomer in the asymmetric unit, with one molecule of the non-denaturing detergent CHAPS {3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfon­ate} tightly bound. Protein At3g22680 shows no structural homology to any other known proteins and represents a new fold in protein conformation space. PMID:16511118

  3. Characterization of the Nrt2.6 Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana: A Link with Plant Response to Biotic and Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dechorgnat, Julie; Patrit, Oriane; Krapp, Anne; Fagard, Mathilde; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    The high affinity nitrate transport system in Arabidopsis thaliana involves one gene and potentially seven genes from the NRT1 and NRT2 family, respectively. Among them, NRT2.1, NRT2.2, NRT2.4 and NRT2.7 proteins have been shown to transport nitrate and are localized on the plasmalemma or the tonoplast membranes. NRT2.1, NRT2.2 and NRT2.4 play a role in nitrate uptake from soil solution by root cells while NRT2.7 is responsible for nitrate loading in the seed vacuole. We have undertaken the functional characterization of a third member of the family, the NRT2.6 gene. NRT2.6 was weakly expressed in most plant organs and its expression was higher in vegetative organs than in reproductive organs. Contrary to other NRT2 members, NRT2.6 expression was not induced by limiting but rather by high nitrogen levels, and no nitrate-related phenotype was found in the nrt2.6-1 mutant. Consistently, the over-expression of the gene failed to complement the nitrate uptake defect of an nrt2.1-nrt2.2 double mutant. The NRT2.6 expression is induced after inoculation of Arabidopsis thaliana by the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora. Interestingly, plants with a decreased NRT2.6 expression showed a lower tolerance to pathogen attack. A correlation was found between NRT2.6 expression and ROS species accumulation in response to infection by E. amylovora and treatment with the redox-active herbicide methyl viologen, suggesting a probable link between NRT2.6 activity and the production of ROS in response to biotic and abiotic stress. PMID:22880003

  4. Analysis of two L-Galactono-1,4-lactone-responsive genes with complementary expression during the development of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongshun; Badejo, Adebanjo A; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro

    2012-03-01

    Unraveling the role of genes annotated as protein of unknown function is of importance in progression of plant science. l-Galactono-1,4-lactone (l-GalL) is the terminal precursor for ascorbic acid (AsA) biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana, and a previous study showed two DUF (domains of unknown function) 642 family genes (At1g80240 and At5g25460, designated as DGR1 and DGR2, respectively) to be sensitive to it. In this work, leaves from wild-type Arabidopsis were fed with d-glucose, l-galactose, l-GalL and AsA, and the expression level of the At1g80240 and At5g25460 genes showed a specific response to l-GalL, but not to the other supplements despite the increases of the tissue AsA contents. Analysis of promoter-β-glucuronidase (GUS) transgenic plants showed the two genes to be complementarily expressed at the root apex and in the rest of the root excluding the apex, respectively, in both young and old seedlings, and to be expressed at the leaf primordia. The GUS activity under the control of the At5g25460 promoter was high in the cotyledon and leaf veins of young seedlings. These findings were consistent with the results of quantitative real-time PCR. Interestingly, the T-DNA insertion mutant of At5g25460 (SALK_125079) displayed shorter roots and smaller rosettes than Col-0; however, no phenotypic difference was observed between the T-DNA insertion mutant of At1g80240 and the wild type. This is the first report on the expression and functional analysis of these two DUF642 family genes, with the results revealing the contribution of DGR genes to the development of Arabidopsis. PMID:22323769

  5. RcLEA, a late embryogenesis abundant protein gene isolated from Rosa chinensis, confers tolerance to Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana and stabilizes enzyme activity under diverse stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Lu, Songchong; Jiang, Changhua; Wang, Yaofeng; Lv, Bo; Shen, Jiabin; Ming, Feng

    2014-07-01

    The late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family is a large protein family that is closely associated with resistance to abiotic stresses in many organisms, such as plants, bacteria and animals. In this study, we isolated a LEA gene, RcLEA, which was cytoplasm-localized, from Rosa chinensis. RcLEA was found to be induced by high temperature through RT-PCR. Overexpression of RcLEA in Escherichia coli improved its growth performance compared with the control under high temperature, low temperature, NaCl and oxidative stress conditions. RcLEA was also overexpressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. The transgenic Arabidopsis showed better growth after high and low temperature treatment and exhibited less peroxide according to 3, 3-diaminobenzidine staining. However, RcLEA did not improve the tolerance to NaCl or osmotic stress in Arabidopsis. In vitro analysis showed that RcLEA was able to prevent the freeze-thaw-induced inactivation or heat-induced aggregation of various substrates, such as lactate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. It also protected the proteome of E. coli from denaturation when the proteins were heat-shocked or subjected to acidic conditions. Furthermore, bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays suggested that RcLEA proteins function in a complex manner by making the form of homodimers. PMID:24760474

  6. Expression and Regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana Cel1 Endo 1,4 β Glucanase Gene During Compatible Plant-Nematode Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sukno, Serenella; Shimerling, Orit; McCuiston, Jamie; Tsabary, Galit; Shani, Ziv; Shoseyov, Oded; Davis, Eric L

    2006-01-01

    The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita is an obligate endoparasite of plant roots and stimulates elaborate modifications of selected root vascular cells to form giant cells for feeding. An Arabidopsis thaliana endoglucanase (Atcel1) promoter is activated in giant cells that were formed in Atcel1::UidA transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants. Activity of the full-length Atcel1 promoter was detected in root and shoot elongation zones and in the lateral root primordia. Different 5’ and internal deletions of regions of the 1,673 bp Atcel1 promoter were each fused to the UidA reporter gene and transformed in tobacco, and roots of the transformants were inoculated with M. incognita to assay for GUS expression in giant cells and noninfected plant tissues. Comparison of the Atcel1 promoter deletion constructs showed that the region between −1,673 and −1,171 (fragment 1) was essential for Atcel1 promoter activity in giant cells and roots. Fragment 1 alone, however, was not sufficient for Atcel1 expression in giant cells or roots, suggesting that cis-acting elements in fragment 1 may function in consort with other elements within the Atcel1 promoter. Root-knot nematodes and giant cells developed normally within roots of Arabidopsis that expressed a functional antisense construct to Atcel1, suggesting that a functional redundancy in endoglucanase activity may represent another level of regulatory control of cell wall-modifying activity within nematode feeding cells. PMID:19259541

  7. Expression and Regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana Cel1 Endo 1,4 beta Glucanase Gene During Compatible Plant-Nematode Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sukno, Serenella; Shimerling, Orit; McCuiston, Jamie; Tsabary, Galit; Shani, Ziv; Shoseyov, Oded; Davis, Eric L

    2006-09-01

    The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita is an obligate endoparasite of plant roots and stimulates elaborate modifications of selected root vascular cells to form giant cells for feeding. An Arabidopsis thaliana endoglucanase (Atcel1) promoter is activated in giant cells that were formed in Atcel1::UidA transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants. Activity of the full-length Atcel1 promoter was detected in root and shoot elongation zones and in the lateral root primordia. Different 5' and internal deletions of regions of the 1,673 bp Atcel1 promoter were each fused to the UidA reporter gene and transformed in tobacco, and roots of the transformants were inoculated with M. incognita to assay for GUS expression in giant cells and noninfected plant tissues. Comparison of the Atcel1 promoter deletion constructs showed that the region between -1,673 and -1,171 (fragment 1) was essential for Atcel1 promoter activity in giant cells and roots. Fragment 1 alone, however, was not sufficient for Atcel1 expression in giant cells or roots, suggesting that cis-acting elements in fragment 1 may function in consort with other elements within the Atcel1 promoter. Root-knot nematodes and giant cells developed normally within roots of Arabidopsis that expressed a functional antisense construct to Atcel1, suggesting that a functional redundancy in endoglucanase activity may represent another level of regulatory control of cell wall-modifying activity within nematode feeding cells. PMID:19259541

  8. Isolation of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene encoding cycloartenol synthase by functional expression in a yeast mutant lacking lanosterol synthase by the use of a chromatographic screen.

    PubMed

    Corey, E J; Matsuda, S P; Bartel, B

    1993-12-15

    Whereas vertebrates and fungi synthesize sterols from epoxysqualene through the intermediate lanosterol, plants cyclize epoxysqualene to cycloartenol as the initial sterol. We report the cloning and characterization of CAS1, an Arabidopsis thaliana gene encoding cycloartenol synthase [(S)-2,3-epoxysqualene mutase (cyclizing, cycloartenol forming), EC 5.4.99.8]. A yeast mutant lacking lanosterol synthase [(S)-2,3-epoxysqualene mutase (cyclizing, lanosterol forming), EC 5.4.99.7] was transformed with an A. thaliana cDNA yeast expression library, and colonies were assayed for epoxysqualene mutase activity by thin-layer chromatography. One out of approximately 10,000 transformants produced a homogenate that cyclized 2,3-epoxysqualene to the plant sterol cycloartenol. This activity was shown to be plasmid dependent. The plasmid insert contains a 2277-bp open reading frame capable of encoding an 86-kDa protein with significant homology to lanosterol synthase from Candida albicans and squalene-hopene cyclase (EC 5.4.99.-) from Bacillus acidocalcarius. The method used to clone this gene should be generally applicable to genes responsible for secondary metabolite biosynthesis. PMID:7505443

  9. Blue light alters miR167 expression and microRNA-targeted auxin response factor genes in Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    PubMed

    Pashkovskiy, Pavel P; Kartashov, Alexander V; Zlobin, Ilya E; Pogosyan, Sergei I; Kuznetsov, Vladimir V

    2016-07-01

    The effect of blue LED (450 nm) on the photomorphogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 plants and the transcript levels of several genes, including miRNAs, photoreceptors and auxin response factors (ARF) was investigated. It was observed that blue light accelerated the generative development, reduced the rosette leaf number, significantly reduced the leaf area, dry biomass and led to the disruption of conductive tissue formation. The blue LED differentially influenced the transcript levels of several phytochromes (PHY a, b, c, d, and e), cryptochromes (CRY 1 and 2) and phototropins (PHOT 1 and 2). At the same time, the blue LED significantly increased miR167 expression compared to a fluorescent lamp or white LEDs. This increase likely resulted in the enhanced transcription of the auxin response factor genes ARF4 and ARF8, which are regulated by this miRNA. These findings support the hypothesis that the effects of blue light on A. thaliana are mediated by auxin signalling pathway involving miRNA-dependent regulation of ARF gene expression. PMID:27031426

  10. Nucleosome structure incorporated histone acetylation site prediction in arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Acetylation is a crucial post-translational modification for histones, and plays a key role in gene expression regulation. Due to limited data and lack of a clear acetylation consensus sequence, a few researches have focused on prediction of lysine acetylation sites. Several systematic prediction studies have been conducted for human and yeast, but less for Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Concerning the insufficient observation on acetylation site, we analyzed contributions of the peptide-alignment-based distance definition and 3D structure factors in acetylation prediction. We found that traditional structure contributes little to acetylation site prediction. Identified acetylation sites of histones in Arabidopsis thaliana are conserved and cross predictable with that of human by peptide based methods. However, the predicted specificity is overestimated, because of the existence of non-observed acetylable site. Here, by performing a complete exploration on the factors that affect the acetylability of lysines in histones, we focused on the relative position of lysine at nucleosome level, and defined a new structure feature to promote the performance in predicting the acetylability of all the histone lysines in A. thaliana. Conclusion We found a new spacial correlated acetylation factor, and defined a ε-N spacial location based feature, which contains five core spacial ellipsoid wired areas. By incorporating the new feature, the performance of predicting the acetylability of all the histone lysines in A. Thaliana was promoted, in which the previous mispredicted acetylable lysines were corrected by comparing to the peptide-based prediction. PMID:21047388

  11. Transcriptional regulation of receptor-like protein genes by environmental stresses and hormones and their overexpression activities in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinbin; Liu, Zhijun; Zhang, Zhao; Lv, Yanting; Yang, Nan; Zhang, Guohua; Wu, Menyao; Lv, Shuo; Pan, Lixia; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; Wang, Guodong

    2016-05-01

    Receptor-like proteins (RLPs) have been implicated in multiple biological processes, including plant development and immunity to microbial infection. Fifty-seven AtRLP genes have been identified in Arabidopsis, whereas only a few have been functionally characterized. This is due to the lack of suitable physiological screening conditions and the high degree of functional redundancy among AtRLP genes. To overcome the functional redundancy and further understand the role of AtRLP genes, we studied the evolution of AtRLP genes and compiled a comprehensive profile of the transcriptional regulation of AtRLP genes upon exposure to a range of environmental stresses and different hormones. These results indicate that the majority of AtRLP genes are differentially expressed under various conditions that were tested, an observation that will help to select certain AtRLP genes involved in a specific biological process for further experimental studies to eventually dissect their function. A large number of AtRLP genes were found to respond to more than one treatment, suggesting that one single AtRLP gene may be involved in multiple physiological processes. In addition, we performed a genome-wide cloning of the AtRLP genes, and generated and characterized transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the individual AtRLP genes, presenting new insight into the roles of AtRLP genes, as exemplified by AtRLP3, AtRLP11 and AtRLP28 Our study provides an overview of biological processes in which AtRLP genes may be involved, and presents valuable resources for future investigations into the function of these genes. PMID:27099374

  12. Transcriptional regulation of receptor-like protein genes by environmental stresses and hormones and their overexpression activities in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinbin; Liu, Zhijun; Zhang, Zhao; Lv, Yanting; Yang, Nan; Zhang, Guohua; Wu, Menyao; Lv, Shuo; Pan, Lixia; Joosten, Matthieu H. A. J.; Wang, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-like proteins (RLPs) have been implicated in multiple biological processes, including plant development and immunity to microbial infection. Fifty-seven AtRLP genes have been identified in Arabidopsis, whereas only a few have been functionally characterized. This is due to the lack of suitable physiological screening conditions and the high degree of functional redundancy among AtRLP genes. To overcome the functional redundancy and further understand the role of AtRLP genes, we studied the evolution of AtRLP genes and compiled a comprehensive profile of the transcriptional regulation of AtRLP genes upon exposure to a range of environmental stresses and different hormones. These results indicate that the majority of AtRLP genes are differentially expressed under various conditions that were tested, an observation that will help to select certain AtRLP genes involved in a specific biological process for further experimental studies to eventually dissect their function. A large number of AtRLP genes were found to respond to more than one treatment, suggesting that one single AtRLP gene may be involved in multiple physiological processes. In addition, we performed a genome-wide cloning of the AtRLP genes, and generated and characterized transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the individual AtRLP genes, presenting new insight into the roles of AtRLP genes, as exemplified by AtRLP3, AtRLP11 and AtRLP28. Our study provides an overview of biological processes in which AtRLP genes may be involved, and presents valuable resources for future investigations into the function of these genes. PMID:27099374

  13. Expression analysis of flavonoid biosynthesis genes during Arabidopsis thaliana silique and seed development with a primary focus on the proanthocyanidin biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The coordinated activity of different flavonoid biosynthesis genes in Arabidopsis thaliana results in tissue-specific accumulation of flavonols, anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs). These compounds possess diverse functions in plants including light-attenuation and oxidative stress protection. Flavonoids accumulate in a stimulus- and/or development-dependent manner in specific parts of the plant. PAs accumulate in the seed coat (testa). Findings We describe the biological material and the preparation of total RNA for the AtGenExpress developmental silique and seed series. AtGenExpress ATH1 GeneChip expression data from the different stages were reanalyzed and verified using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). We observed organ-specific transcript accumulation of specific flavonoid biosynthetic genes consistent with previously published data and our PA compound accumulation data. In addition, we investigated the regulation of PA accumulation in developing A. thaliana seeds by correlating gene expression patterns of specific flavonoid biosynthesis genes with different seed embryonic developmental stages and organs and present two useful marker genes for isolated valve and replum organs, as well as one seed-specific marker. Conclusions Potential caveats of array-based expression data are discussed based on comparisons with qPCR data. Results from ATH1 microarray and qPCR experiments revealed a shift in gene activity from general flavonoid biosynthesis at early stages of seed development to PA synthesis at late (mature) stages of embryogenesis. The examined PA accumulation-associated genes, including biosynthetic and regulatory genes, were found to be exclusively expressed in immature seeds. Accumulation of PAs initiates at the early heart stage of silique and seed development. Our findings provide new insights for further studies targeting the PA pathway in seeds. PMID:20929528

  14. Tetrapyrrole Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ryouichi; Kobayashi, Koichi; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2011-01-01

    Higher plants produce four classes of tetrapyrroles, namely, chlorophyll (Chl), heme, siroheme, and phytochromobilin. In plants, tetrapyrroles play essential roles in a wide range of biological activities including photosynthesis, respiration and the assimilation of nitrogen/sulfur. All four classes of tetrapyrroles are derived from a common biosynthetic pathway that resides in the plastid. In this article, we present an overview of tetrapyrrole metabolism in Arabidopsis and other higher plants, and we describe all identified enzymatic steps involved in this metabolism. We also summarize recent findings on Chl biosynthesis and Chl breakdown. Recent advances in this field, in particular those on the genetic and biochemical analyses of novel enzymes, prompted us to redraw the tetrapyrrole metabolic pathways. In addition, we also summarize our current understanding on the regulatory mechanisms governing tetrapyrrole metabolism. The interactions of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and other cellular processes including the plastid-to-nucleus signal transduction are discussed. PMID:22303270

  15. Characterization of a glutamine synthetase gene DvGS2 from Dunaliella viridis and biochemical identification of DvGS2-transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenguang; Fan, Qianlan; Wang, Wei; Shen, Chunlei; Meng, Xiangzong; Tang, Yuanping; Mei, Bing; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2014-02-25

    The salt-tolerant green alga Dunaliella has remarkable capability to survive in some extreme environments such as nitrogen starvation, which makes Dunaliella be a proper model for mining novel genes on nitrogen uptake or assimilation. In this study, a glutamine synthetase (GS) gene DvGS2 with amino acid identity of 72% to other homologous GS proteins, was isolated and characterized from Dunaliella viridis. Phylogenetic comparison with other GSs revealed that DvGS2 occupied an independent phylogenetic position. Expressional analysis in D. viridis cells under nitrogen starvation confirmed that DvGS2 increased its mRNA level in 12h. Subcellular localization study and functional analysis in a GS-deficient Escherichia coli mutant proved that DvGS2 was a chloroplastic and functional GS enzyme. In order to investigate the potential application of DvGS2 in higher plants, the transgenic studies of DvGS2 in Arabidopsis thaliana were carried out. Results showed that the transgenic lines expressed the DvGS2 gene and demonstrated obviously enhanced root length (29%), fresh weight (40%-48% at two concentrations of nitrate supplies), stem length (21%), leaf size (39%) and silique number (44%) in contrast with the wild-type Arabidopsis. Furthermore, the transgenic lines had higher total nitrogen content (35%-43%), total GS activity (39%-45%) and soluble protein concentration (23%-24%) than the wild type. These results indicated that the overexpression of DvGS2 in A. thaliana resulted in higher biomass and the improvement of the host's nitrogen use efficiency. PMID:24334123

  16. PpCBF3 from Cold-Tolerant Kentucky Bluegrass Involved in Freezing Tolerance Associated with Up-Regulation of Cold-Related Genes in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Xu, Bin; Yang, Zhimin; Huang, Bingru

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration-Responsive Element Binding proteins (DREB)/C-repeat (CRT) Binding Factors (CBF) have been identified as transcriptional activators during plant responses to cold stress. The objective of this study was to determine the physiological roles of a CBF gene isolated from a cold-tolerant perennial grass species, Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.), which designated as PpCBF3, in regulating plant tolerance to freezing stress. Transient transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll protoplast with PpCBF3-eGFP fused protein showed that PpCBF3 was localized to the nucleus. RT-PCR analysis showed that PpCBF3 was specifically induced by cold stress (4°C) but not by drought stress [induced by 20% polyethylene glycol 6000 solution (PEG-6000)] or salt stress (150 mM NaCl). Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing PpCBF3 showed significant improvement in freezing (-20°C) tolerance demonstrated by a lower percentage of chlorotic leaves, lower cellular electrolyte leakage (EL) and H2O2 and O2.- content, and higher chlorophyll content and photochemical efficiency compared to the wild type. Relative mRNA expression level analysis by qRT-PCR indicated that the improved freezing tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing PpCBF3 was conferred by sustained activation of downstream cold responsive (COR) genes. Other interesting phenotypic changes in the PpCBF3-transgenic Arabidopsis plants included late flowering and slow growth or ‘dwarfism’, both of which are desirable phenotypic traits for perennial turfgrasses. Therefore, PpCBF3 has potential to be used in genetic engineering for improvement of turfgrass freezing tolerance and other desirable traits. PMID:26177510

  17. PpCBF3 from Cold-Tolerant Kentucky Bluegrass Involved in Freezing Tolerance Associated with Up-Regulation of Cold-Related Genes in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Lili; Yuan, Xiuyun; Chen, Yu; Xu, Bin; Yang, Zhimin; Huang, Bingru

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration-Responsive Element Binding proteins (DREB)/C-repeat (CRT) Binding Factors (CBF) have been identified as transcriptional activators during plant responses to cold stress. The objective of this study was to determine the physiological roles of a CBF gene isolated from a cold-tolerant perennial grass species, Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.), which designated as PpCBF3, in regulating plant tolerance to freezing stress. Transient transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll protoplast with PpCBF3-eGFP fused protein showed that PpCBF3 was localized to the nucleus. RT-PCR analysis showed that PpCBF3 was specifically induced by cold stress (4°C) but not by drought stress [induced by 20% polyethylene glycol 6000 solution (PEG-6000)] or salt stress (150 mM NaCl). Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing PpCBF3 showed significant improvement in freezing (-20°C) tolerance demonstrated by a lower percentage of chlorotic leaves, lower cellular electrolyte leakage (EL) and H2O2 and O2.- content, and higher chlorophyll content and photochemical efficiency compared to the wild type. Relative mRNA expression level analysis by qRT-PCR indicated that the improved freezing tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing PpCBF3 was conferred by sustained activation of downstream cold responsive (COR) genes. Other interesting phenotypic changes in the PpCBF3-transgenic Arabidopsis plants included late flowering and slow growth or 'dwarfism', both of which are desirable phenotypic traits for perennial turfgrasses. Therefore, PpCBF3 has potential to be used in genetic engineering for improvement of turfgrass freezing tolerance and other desirable traits. PMID:26177510

  18. Identification of proliferation-induced genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Characterization of a new member of the highly evolutionarily conserved histone H2A.F/Z variant subfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Callard, D; Mazzolini, L

    1997-01-01

    The changes in gene expression associated with the reinitiation of cell division and subsequent progression through the cell cycle in Arabidopsis thaliana cell-suspension cultures were investigated. Partial synchronization of cells was achieved by a technique combining phosphate starvation and a transient treatment with the DNA replication inhibitor aphidicolin. Six cDNAs corresponding to genes highly induced in proliferating cells and showing cell-cycle-regulated expression were obtained by the mRNA differential display technique. Full-length cDNA clones (cH2BAt and cH2AvAt) corresponding to two of the display products were subsequently isolated. The cH2BAt clone codes for a novel histone H2B protein, whereas the cH2AvAt cDNA corresponds to a gene encoding a new member of the highly conserved histone H2A.F/Z subfamily of chromosomal proteins. Further studies indicated that H2AvAt mRNA expression is tightly correlated with cell proliferation in cell-suspension cultures, and that closely related analogs of the encoded protein exist in Arabidopsis. The implications of the conservation of histone H2A.F/Z variants in plants are discussed. PMID:9414552

  19. A drought-stress-inducible histone gene in Arabidopsis thaliana is a member of a distinct class of plant linker histone variants.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, R; Gantt, J S

    1997-07-01

    We have isolated and characterized a gene, His1-3, encoding a structurally divergent linker histone in Arabidopsis thaliana. Southern and northern hybridization data indicate that A. thaliana expresses three single-copy linker histone genes, each encoding a structurally distinct variant. H1-3 is a considerably smaller protein (167 amino acids with a mass of 19.0 kDa) than any other described linker histone from higher eukaryotes. We examined the expression of His1-3 at the RNA and protein levels and found that it is induced specifically by water stress. In contrast, expression of His1-1, His1-2 and His4 appear unaffected by water stress. Furthermore, the primary structure of the protein possesses distinct characteristics that are shared with another drought-inducible linker histone, H1-D, isolated from Lycopersicon pennellii. Based on structural characteristics of the deduced protein and its inducible expression, we hypothesize that H1-3 and H1-D are linker histone variants that have specialized roles in the structure and function of plant chromatin and therefore they can be considered to be members of a unique subclass of plant histones. Immunoblotting with an antibody produced against a short polypeptide in the conserved domain of this subtype indicates that similar proteins may exist in other plants. PMID:9247544

  20. AthaMap web tools for the analysis of transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hehl, Reinhard; Bülow, Lorenz

    2014-01-01

    The AthaMap database provides a map of verified and predicted transcription factor (TF) and small RNA-binding sites for the A. thaliana genome. The database can be used for bioinformatic predictions of putative regulatory sites. Several online web tools are available that address specific questions. Starting with the identification of transcription factor-binding sites (TFBS) in any gene of interest, colocalizing TFBS can be identified as well as common TFBS in a set of user-provided genes. Furthermore, genes can be identified that are potentially targeted by specific transcription factors or small inhibitory RNAs. This chapter provides detailed information on how each AthaMap web tool can be used online. Examples on how this database is used to address questions in circadian and diurnal regulation are given. Furthermore, complementary databases and databases that go beyond questions addressed with AthaMap are discussed. PMID:24792049

  1. Overexpression of a wheat phospholipase D gene, TaPLDα, enhances tolerance to drought and osmotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junbin; Ding, Bo; Guo, Yaolin; Li, Ming; Chen, Shuaijun; Huang, Guozhong; Xie, Xiaodong

    2014-07-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is crucial for plant responses to stress and signal transduction, however, the regulatory mechanism of PLD in abiotic stress is not completely understood; especially, in crops. In this study, we isolated a gene, TaPLDα, from common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Analysis of the amino acid sequence of TaPLDα revealed a highly conserved C2 domain and two characteristic HKD motifs, which is similar to other known PLD family genes. Further characterization revealed that TaPLDα expressed differentially in various organs, such as roots, stems, leaves and spikelets of wheat. After treatment with abscisic acid (ABA), methyl jasmonate, dehydration, polyethylene glycol and NaCl, the expression of TaPLDα was up-regulated in shoots. Subsequently, we generated TaPLDα-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis lines under the control of the dexamethasone-inducible 35S promoter. The overexpression of TaPLDα in Arabidopsis resulted in significantly enhanced tolerance to drought, as shown by reduced chlorosis and leaf water loss, higher relative water content and lower relative electrolyte leakage than the wild type. Moreover, the TaPLDα-overexpressing plants exhibited longer roots in response to mannitol treatment. In addition, the seeds of TaPLDα-overexpressing plants showed hypersensitivity to ABA and osmotic stress. Under dehydration, the expression of several stress-related genes, RD29A, RD29B, KIN1 and RAB18, was up-regulated to a higher level in TaPLDα-overexpressing plants than in wild type. Taken together, our results indicated that TaPLDα can enhance tolerance to drought and osmotic stress in Arabidopsis and represents a potential candidate gene to enhance stress tolerance in crops. PMID:24705986

  2. Identification of a receptor-like protein kinase gene rapidly induced by abscisic acid, dehydration, high salt, and cold treatments in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S W; Jon, J H; Kwak, J M; Nam, H G

    1997-01-01

    A cDNA clone for a receptor-like protein kinase gene (RPK1) was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. The clone is 1952 bp long with 1623 bp of an open reading frame encoding a peptide of 540 amino acids. The deduced peptide (RPK1) contains four distinctive domains characteristic of receptor kinases: (a) a putative amino-terminal signal sequence domain; (b) a domain with five extracellular leucine-rich repeat sequences; (c) a membrane-spanning domain; and (d) a cytoplasmic protein kinase domain that contains all of the 11 subdomains conserved among protein kinases. The RPK1 gene is expressed in flowers, stems, leaves, and roots. Expression of the RPK1 gene is induced within 1 h after treatment with abscisic acid (ABA). The gene is also rapidly induced by several environmental stresses such as dehydration, high salt, and low temperature, suggesting that the gene is involved in a general stress response. The dehydration-induced expression is not impaired in aba-1, abi1-1, abi2-1, and abi3-1 mutants, suggesting that the dehydration-induced expression of the RPK1 gene is ABA-independent. A possible role of this gene in the signal transduction pathway of ABA and the environmental stresses is discussed. PMID:9112773

  3. Ectopic Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of an NB-ARC Encoding Putative Disease Resistance Gene from Wild Chinese Vitis pseudoreticulata Enhances Resistance to Phytopathogenic Fungi and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhifeng; Yao, Liping; Wan, Ran; Li, Zhi; Liu, Chonghuai; Wang, Xiping

    2015-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins mediate pathogen recognition and activate innate immune responses to restrict pathogen proliferation. One common feature of these proteins is an NB-ARC domain. In this study, we characterized a gene encoding a protein with an NB-ARC domain from wild Chinese grapevine Vitis pseudoreticulata accession “Baihe-35-1,” which was identified in a transcriptome analysis of the leaves following inoculation with Erysiphe necator (Schw.), a causal agent of powdery mildew. Transcript levels of this gene, designated VpCN (GenBank accession number KT265084), increased strongly after challenge of grapevine leaves with E. necator. The deduced amino acid sequence was predicted to contain an NB-ARC domain in the C-terminus and an RxCC-like domain similar to CC domain of Rx protein in the N-terminus. Ectopic expression of VpCN in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in either a wild-type phenotype or a dwarf phenotype. The phenotypically normal transgenic A. thaliana showed enhance resistance to A. thaliana powdery mildew Golovinomyces cichoracearum, as well as to a virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Moreover, promoter::GUS (β-glucuronidase) analysis revealed that powdery mildew infection induced the promoter activity of VpCN in grapevine leaves. Finally, a promoter deletion analysis showed that TC rich repeat elements likely play an important role in the response to E. necator infection. Taken together, our results suggest that VpCN contribute to powdery mildew disease resistant in grapevine. PMID:26697041

  4. Functional and evolutionary analysis of DXL1, a non-essential gene encoding a 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase like protein in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Cairó, Albert; Talavera, David; Saura, Andreu; Imperial, Santiago; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Campos, Narciso; Boronat, Albert

    2013-07-15

    The synthesis of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP), catalyzed by the enzyme DXP synthase (DXS), represents a key regulatory step of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis. In plants DXS is encoded by small multigene families that can be classified into, at least, three specialized subfamilies. Arabidopsis thaliana contains three genes encoding proteins with similarity to DXS, including the well-known DXS1/CLA1 gene, which clusters within subfamily I. The remaining proteins, initially named DXS2 and DXS3, have not yet been characterized. Here we report the expression and functional analysis of A. thaliana DXS2. Unexpectedly, the expression of DXS2 failed to rescue Escherichia coli and A. thaliana mutants defective in DXS activity. Coherently, we found that DXS activity was negligible in vitro, being renamed as DXL1 following recent nomenclature recommendation. DXL1 is targeted to plastids as DXS1, but shows a distinct expression pattern. The phenotypic analysis of a DXL1 defective mutant revealed that the function of the encoded protein is not essential for growth and development. Evolutionary analyses indicated that DXL1 emerged from DXS1 through a recent duplication apparently specific of the Brassicaceae lineage. Divergent selective constraints would have affected a significant fraction of sites after diversification of the paralogues. Furthermore, amino acids subjected to divergent selection and likely critical for functional divergence through the acquisition of a novel, although not yet known, biochemical function, were identified. Our results provide with the first evidences of functional specialization at both the regulatory and biochemical level within the plant DXS family. PMID:23154062

  5. Overexpression of GmHsp90s, a heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) gene family cloning from soybean, decrease damage of abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinyan; Xue, Chenchen; Xue, Dong; Zhao, Jinming; Gai, Junyi; Guo, Na; Xing, Han

    2013-01-01

    Hsp90 is one of the most conserved and abundant molecular chaperones and is an essential component of the protective stress response; however, its roles in abiotic stress responses in soybean (Glycine max) remain obscure. Here, 12 GmHsp90 genes from soybean were identified and found to be expressed and to function differentially under abiotic stresses. The 12 GmHsp90 genes were isolated and named GmHsp90A1-GmHsp90A6, GmHsp90B1, GmHsp90B2, GmHsp90C1.1, GmHsp90C1.2, GmHsp90C2.1 and GmHsp90C2.2 based on their characteristics and high homology to other Hsp90s according to a new nomenclature system. Quantitative real-time PCR expression data revealed that all the genes exhibited higher transcript levels in leaves and could be strongly induced under heat, osmotic and salt stress but not cold stress. Overexpression of five typical genes (GmHsp90A2, GmHsp90A4, GmHsp90B1, GmHsp90C1.1 and GmHsp90C2.1) in Arabidopsis thaliana provided useful evidences that GmHsp90 genes can decrease damage of abiotic stresses. In addition, an abnormal accumulation of proline was detected in some transgenic Arabidopsis plants suggested overexpressing GmHsp90s may affect the synthesis and response system of proline. Our work represents a systematic determination of soybean genes encoding Hsp90s, and provides useful evidence that GmHsp90 genes function differently in response to abiotic stresses and may affect the synthesis and response system of proline. PMID:23936107

  6. Negative regulation in the expression of a sugar-inducible gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. A recessive mutation causing enhanced expression of a gene for beta-amylase.

    PubMed Central

    Mita, S; Hirano, H; Nakamura, K

    1997-01-01

    Expression of a beta-amylase gene of Arabidopsis thaliana (AT beta-Amy) is regulated by sugars. We identified a mutant, hba1, in which the level of expression of AT beta-Amy in leaves of plants that had been grown in a medium with 2% sucrose was significantly higher than that in wild-type plants. Higher that wild-type levels of beta-amylase in hba1 plants depended on the presence of 1 to 2% sucrose or 1% glucose in the medium, whereas leaves of mutant plants grown with higher levels of sugars had beta-amylase activities similar to those in leaves of wild-type plants. The hba1 phenotype was recessive and did not affect levels of sugars and starch in leaves. It is proposed that expression of AT beta-Amy is regulated by a combination of both positive and negative factors, dependent on the level of sugars, and that HBA1 might function to maintain low-level expression of AT beta-Amy until the level of sugars reaches some high level. Results of crosses of hba1 plants with transgenic plants that harbored an AT beta-Amy:GUS transgene with 1587 bp of the 5'-upstream region suggested that HBA1 affects expressions of AT beta-Amy in trans. The hba1 plants also had growth defects and elevated levels of anthocyanin in their petioles. However, sugar-related changes in levels of several mRNAs other than beta-amylase mRNA were unaffected in hba1 plants, suggesting that only a subset of sugar-regulated genes is under the control HBA1. PMID:9193090

  7. Genetic control of polar cell expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, J.; Ford, S. ); Somerville, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Certain plant cells, like root hairs and pollen tubes, exhibit polar cell growth, with expansion limited to the tip of the growing cell. In order to understand the mechanisms regulating polar cell expansion, we are studying the process of root hair elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana. By visually screening roots from 12,000 mutagenized Arabidopsis seedlings on Petri dishes, more than 40 root hair mutants have been identified. We have focused our attention on mutants that possess nuclear recessive mutations in three genes (RHD2, RHD3, and RDH4) that appear to be involved in controlling polar cell growth in root hairs. We are currently using cellular, genetic, and molecular approaches to understand these genes' normal roles in root hair elongation.

  8. Involvement of NRAMP1 from Arabidopsis thaliana in iron transport.

    PubMed Central

    Curie, C; Alonso, J M; Le Jean, M; Ecker, J R; Briat, J F

    2000-01-01

    Nramp genes code for a widely distributed class of proteins involved in a variety of processes, ranging from the control of susceptibility to bacterial infection in mammalian cells and taste behaviour in Drosophila to manganese uptake in yeast. Some of the NRAMP proteins in mammals and in yeast are capable of transporting metal ions, including iron. In plants, iron transport was shown to require a reduction/Fe(II) transport system. In Arabidopsis thaliana this process involves the IRT1 and Fro2 genes. Here we report the sequence of five NRAMP proteins from A. thaliana. Sequence comparison suggests that there are two classes of NRAMP proteins in plants: A. thaliana (At) NRAMP1 and Oriza sativa (Os) NRAMP1 and 3 (two rice isologues) represent one class, and AtNRAMP2-5 and OsNRAMP2 the other. AtNramp1 and OsNramp1 are able to complement the fet3fet4 yeast mutant defective both in low- and high-affinity iron transports, whereas AtNramp2 and OsNramp2 fail to do so. In addition, AtNramp1 transcript, but not AtNramp2 transcript, accumulates in response to iron deficiency in roots but not in leaves. Finally, overexpression of AtNramp1 in transgenic A. thaliana plants leads to an increase in plant resistance to toxic iron concentration. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AtNramp1 participates in the control of iron homoeostasis in plants. PMID:10769179

  9. Involvement of NRAMP1 from Arabidopsis thaliana in iron transport.

    PubMed

    Curie, C; Alonso, J M; Le Jean, M; Ecker, J R; Briat, J F

    2000-05-01

    Nramp genes code for a widely distributed class of proteins involved in a variety of processes, ranging from the control of susceptibility to bacterial infection in mammalian cells and taste behaviour in Drosophila to manganese uptake in yeast. Some of the NRAMP proteins in mammals and in yeast are capable of transporting metal ions, including iron. In plants, iron transport was shown to require a reduction/Fe(II) transport system. In Arabidopsis thaliana this process involves the IRT1 and Fro2 genes. Here we report the sequence of five NRAMP proteins from A. thaliana. Sequence comparison suggests that there are two classes of NRAMP proteins in plants: A. thaliana (At) NRAMP1 and Oriza sativa (Os) NRAMP1 and 3 (two rice isologues) represent one class, and AtNRAMP2-5 and OsNRAMP2 the other. AtNramp1 and OsNramp1 are able to complement the fet3fet4 yeast mutant defective both in low- and high-affinity iron transports, whereas AtNramp2 and OsNramp2 fail to do so. In addition, AtNramp1 transcript, but not AtNramp2 transcript, accumulates in response to iron deficiency in roots but not in leaves. Finally, overexpression of AtNramp1 in transgenic A. thaliana plants leads to an increase in plant resistance to toxic iron concentration. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AtNramp1 participates in the control of iron homoeostasis in plants. PMID:10769179

  10. PHH1, a novel gene from Arabidopsis thaliana that encodes a protein similar to plant blue-light photoreceptors and microbial photolyases.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, P D; Batschauer, A; Hays, J B

    1996-11-27

    A cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana similar to microbial photolyase genes, and designated AT-PHH1, was isolated using a photolyase-like cDNA from Sinapsis alba (SA-PHR1) as a probe. Multiple isolations yielded only PHH1 cDNAs, and a few blue-light-receptor CRY1 (HY4) cDNAs (also similar to microbial photolyase genes), suggesting the absence of any other highly similar Arabidopsis genes. The AT-PHH1 and SA-PHR1 cDNA sequences predict 89% identity at the protein level, except for an AT-PHH1 C-terminal extension (111 amino acids), also not seen in microbial photolyases. AT-PHH1 and CRY1 show less similarity (54% p4erein identity), including respective C-terminal extensions that are themselves mostly dissimilar. Analysis of fifteen AT-PHH1 genomic isolates reveals a single gene, with three introns in the coding sequence and one in the 5'-untranslated leader. Full-length AT-PHH1, and both AT-PHH1 and AT-PHH1 delta C-513 (truncated to be approximately the size of microbial photolyase genes) cDNAs, were overexpressed, respectively, in yeast and Escherichia coli mutants hypersensitive to ultraviolet light. The absence of significant effects on resistance suggests either that any putative AT-PHH1 DNA repair activity requires cofactors/chromophores not present in yeast or E. coli, or that AT-PHH1 encodes a blue-light/ultraviolet-A receptor rather than a DNA repair protein. PMID:9003312

  11. Over-expression of Arabidopsis thaliana SFD1/GLY1, the gene encoding plastid localized glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, increases plastidic lipid content in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijayata; Singh, Praveen Kumar; Siddiqui, Adnan; Singh, Subaran; Banday, Zeeshan Zahoor; Nandi, Ashis Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Lipids are the major constituents of all membranous structures in plants. Plants possess two pathways for lipid biosynthesis: the prokaryotic pathway (i.e., plastidic pathway) and the eukaryotic pathway (i.e., endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) pathway). Whereas some plants synthesize galactolipids from diacylglycerol assembled in the plastid, others, including rice, derive their galactolipids from diacylglycerols assembled by the eukaryotic pathway. Arabidopsis thaliana glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3pDH), coded by SUPPRESSOR OF FATTY ACID DESATURASE 1 (SFD1; alias GLY1) gene, catalyzes the formation of glycerol 3-phosphate (G3p), the backbone of many membrane lipids. Here SFD1 was introduced to rice as a transgene. Arabidopsis SFD1 localizes in rice plastids and its over-expression increases plastidic membrane lipid content in transgenic rice plants without any major impact on ER lipids. The results suggest that over-expression of plastidic G3pDH enhances biosynthesis of plastid-localized lipids in rice. Lipid composition in the transgenic plants is consistent with increased phosphatidylglycerol synthesis in the plastid and increased galactolipid synthesis from diacylglycerol produced via the ER pathway. The transgenic plants show a higher photosynthetic assimilation rate, suggesting a possible application of this finding in crop improvement. PMID:26747130

  12. Over-expression of the PaAP1 gene from sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) causes early flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yan, Guohua; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Kaichun

    2013-02-15

    A homologue of SQUAMOSA/APETALA1, designated PaAP1, was isolated from Prunus avium by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The full length of PaAP1 cDNA is 753 bp, and it codes for a polypeptide of 250 amino acid residues. Sequence comparison revealed that PaAP1 belongs to the MADS-box gene family. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that PaAP1 shared the highest identity with SQUA/AP1 homologues from Prunus serrulata. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that PaAP1 was expressed at high levels in petal, sepal, style, and flower buds, which was slightly different from the expression pattern of AP1 of Arabidopsis thaliana. To characterize the functions of PaAP1, we assessed Arabidopsis transformed with 35S::PaAP1. A total of 8 transgenic T(1) lines with an early flowering phenotype were obtained, and a 3:1 segregation ratio of flowering time was observed in the T(2) generation of 4 lines. This study provides the first functional analysis of an SQUA/AP1 homolog from P. avium and suggests that PaAP1 is potentially useful for shortening the juvenile period in sweet cherry. PMID:23206932

  13. Quantitative trait loci for inflorescence development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Ungerer, Mark C; Halldorsdottir, Solveig S; Modliszewski, Jennifer L; Mackay, Trudy F C; Purugganan, Michael D

    2002-01-01

    Variation in inflorescence development patterns is a central factor in the evolutionary ecology of plants. The genetic architectures of 13 traits associated with inflorescence developmental timing, architecture, rosette morphology, and fitness were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant system. There is substantial naturally occurring genetic variation for inflorescence development traits, with broad sense heritabilities computed from 21 Arabidopsis ecotypes ranging from 0.134 to 0.772. Genetic correlations are significant for most (64/78) pairs of traits, suggesting either pleiotropy or tight linkage among loci. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping indicates 47 and 63 QTL for inflorescence developmental traits in Ler x Col and Cvi x Ler recombinant inbred mapping populations, respectively. Several QTL associated with different developmental traits map to the same Arabidopsis chromosomal regions, in agreement with the strong genetic correlations observed. Epistasis among QTL was observed only in the Cvi x Ler population, and only between regions on chromosomes 1 and 5. Examination of the completed Arabidopsis genome sequence in three QTL regions revealed between 375 and 783 genes per region. Previously identified flowering time, inflorescence architecture, floral meristem identity, and hormone signaling genes represent some of the many candidate genes in these regions. PMID:11901129

  14. A Chemical Genetic Screening Procedure for Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, Marta; Song, Xingshun; Dandekar, Abhaya; Franz, Annaliese; Drakakaki, Georgia; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-01-01

    Unbiased screening approaches are powerful tools enabling identification of novel players in biological processes. Chemical genetic screening refers to the technique of using a reporter response, such as expression of luciferase driven by a promoter of interest, to discover small molecules that affect a given process when applied to plants. These chemicals then act as tools for identification of regulatory components that could not otherwise be detected by forward genetic screens due to gene family redundancy or mutant lethality. This protocol describes a chemical genetic screen using Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, which has led to recognition of novel players in the plant general stress response.

  15. Ectopic expression of Arabidopsis thaliana Na+(K+)/H+ antiporter gene, AtNHX5, enhances soybean salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wu, X X; Li, J; Wu, X D; Liu, Q; Wang, Z K; Liu, S S; Li, S N; Ma, Y L; Sun, J; Zhao, L; Li, H Y; Li, D M; Li, W B; Su, A Y

    2016-01-01

    Drought and salt stresses are the two major factors influencing the yield and quality of crops worldwide. Na(+)(K(+))/H(+) antiporters (NHXs) are ubiquitous membrane proteins that play important roles in maintaining the cellular pH and Na(+)(K(+)) homeostasis. The model plant Arabidopsis potentially encodes six NHX genes, namely AtNHX1 to 6. In the present study, AtNHX5, a comparatively less well-studied NHX, was cloned and transferred into a soybean variety, Dongnong-50, via Agrobacterium-mediated cotyledonary node transformation to assess its role in improving salt tolerance of the transgenic plants. The transgenic soybean plants were tolerant to the presence of 300 mM NaCl whereas the non-transgenic plants were not. Furthermore, after NaCl treatment, the transgenic plants had a higher content of free proline but lower content of malondialdehyde compared to the non-transgenic plants. Our results revealed that that AtNHX5 possibly functioned by efficiently transporting Na(+) and K(+) ions from the roots to the leaves. Overall, the results obtained in this study suggest that soybean salt tolerance could be improved through the over expression of Arabidopsis AtNHX5. PMID:27323012

  16. Overexpression of MuHSP70 gene from Macrotyloma uniflorum confers multiple abiotic stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Masand, Shikha; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2016-02-01

    A 70-KD heat shock protein (HSP70) is one of the most conserved chaperones. It is involved in de novo protein folding and prevents the aggregation of unfolded proteins under lethal environmental factors. The purpose of this study is to characterise a MuHSP70 from horsegram (Macrotyloma uniflorum) and elucidating its role in stress tolerance of plants. A MuHSP70 was cloned and characterised from a natural drought stress tolerant HPK4 variety of horsegram (M. uniflorum). For functional characterization, MuHSP70 was overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. Overexpression of MuHSP70 was found to provide tolerance to the transgenic Arabidopsis against various stresses such as heat, cold, drought, salinity and oxidative stress. MuHSP70 transgenics were observed to maintain the shoot biomass, root length, relative water content, and chlorophyll content during exposure to multi-stresses relative to non-transgenic control. Transgenic lines have further shown the reduced levels of MDA, H2O2, and proteolytic activity. Together, these findings suggest that overexpression of MuHSP70 plays an important role in improving abiotic stress tolerance and could be a crucial candidate gene for exploration in crop improvement program. PMID:26694324

  17. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  18. Molecular characterization of a Phi-class mustard (Brassica juncea) glutathione S-transferase gene in Arabidopsis thaliana by 5'-deletion analysis of its promoter.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibiao; Hu, Wen-Wei; Jiao, Yuxia; Pua, Eng-Chong

    2005-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are regulated by various stimuli at the transcriptional level. In this study, a 2,640-bp promoter sequence of a mustard GST gene, BjGSTF2, was cloned. Several truncated BjGSTF2 promoters were generated by 5'-deletion, fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) coding sequence and the chimeric genes expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. Transgene expression in GST2623::GUS plants carrying the longest promoter varied considerably. GUS activity was high in the roots, cotyledons, anthers and both ends of the silique, but it was low or barely detectable in the leaves, seeds, petals and stamens. Analysis of transgenic plants expressing the GUS gene under the control of different truncated BjGSTF2 promoters revealed several regions that possessed cis-acting elements required for the basal and induced expression by H(2)O(2), salicylic acid and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate and down-regulation by spermidine. The results also showed that the GUS activity of GST2623::GUS coincided well with the H(2)O(2) accumulation pattern in cultured leaf-disc explants during the regeneration process. PMID:15926064

  19. RCY1, an Arabidopsis thaliana RPP8/HRT family resistance gene, conferring resistance to cucumber mosaic virus requires salicylic acid, ethylene and a novel signal transduction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideki; Miller, Jennifer; Nozaki, Yukine; Takeda, Megumi; Shah, Jyoti; Hase, Shu; Ikegami, Masato; Ehara, Yoshio; Dinesh-Kumar, S P

    2002-12-01

    The dominant locus, RCY1, in the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype C24 confers resistance to the yellow strain of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV-Y). The RCY1 locus was mapped to a 150-kb region on chromosome 5. Sequence comparison of this region from C24 and a CMV-Y-susceptible C24 mutant predicts that the RCY1 gene encodes a 104-kDa CC-NBS-LRR-type protein. The RCY1 gene from C24, when expressed in the susceptible ecotype Wassilewskija (Ws), restricted the systemic spread of virus. RCY1 is allelic to the resistance genes RPP8 from the ecotype Landsberg erecta and HRT from the ecotype Dijon-17, which confer resistance to Peronospora parasitica biotype Emco5 and turnip crinkle virus (TCV), respectively. Examination of RCY1 plants defective in salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene signaling revealed a requirement for SA and ethylene signaling in mounting a resistance response to CMV-Y. The RCY1 nahG etr1 double mutants exhibited an intermediate level of susceptibility to CMV-Y, compared to the resistant ecotype C24 and the susceptible ecotypes Columbia and Nossen. This suggests that in addition to SA and ethylene, a novel signaling mechanism is associated with the induction of resistance in CMV-Y-infected C24 plants. Moreover, our results suggest that the signaling pathways downstream of the RPP8, HRT, and RCY1 have evolved independently. PMID:12472683

  20. RNAi-mediated silencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana ULCS1 gene, encoding a WDR protein, results in cell wall modification impairment and plant infertility.

    PubMed

    Beris, Despoina; Kapolas, Georgios; Livanos, Pantelis; Roussis, Andreas; Milioni, Dimitra; Haralampidis, Kosmas

    2016-04-01

    Ubiquitin mediated protein degradation constitutes one of the most complex post translational gene regulation mechanisms in eukaryotes. This fine-tuned proteolytic machinery is based on a vast number of E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes that mark target proteins with ubiquitin. The specificity is accomplished by a number of adaptor proteins that contain functional binding domains, including the WD40 repeat motif (WDRs). To date, only few of these proteins have been identified in plants. An RNAi mediated silencing approach was used here to functionally characterize the Arabidopsis thaliana ULCS1 gene, which encodes for a small molecular weight WDR protein. AtULCS1 interacts with the E3Cullin Ring Ligase subunit DDB1a, regulating most likely the degradation of specific proteins involved in the manifestation of diverse developmental events. Silencing of AtULCS1 results in sterile plants with pleiotropic phenotypes. Detailed analysis revealed that infertility is the outcome of anther indehiscence, which in turn is due to the impairment of the plants to accomplish secondary wall modifications. Furthermore, IREGULAR XYLEM gene expression and lignification is diminished in anther endothecium and the stem vascular tissue of the silenced plants. These data underline the importance of AtULCS1 in plant development and reproduction. PMID:26940493

  1. Accumulation of γ- Rather than α-Tocopherol Alters Ethylene Signaling Gene Expression in the vte4 Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Cela, Jana; Chang, Caren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Tocopherols are antioxidants found in chloroplasts of leaves, and it is a matter of current debate whether or not they can affect signaling and gene expression in plant cells. For insight into the possible effects of altered tocopherol composition in chloroplasts on gene expression in the nucleus, the expression of ethylene biosynthesis, perception and signaling genes was investigated in vte1 and vte4 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, which are impaired in tocopherol (vitamin E) biosynthesis. Changes in gene expression were measured in plants exposed to either salt or water stress, and in young and mature leaves of vte1 and vte4 mutants, which lack tocopherol cyclase and γ-tocopherol methyltransferase, respectively. While transcript levels of ethylene signaling genes in the vte1 mutant and the wild type were similar in all tested conditions, major changes in gene expression occurred in the vte4 mutant, particularly in mature leaves (compared with young leaves) and under salt stress. Accumulation of γ- instead of α-tocopherol in this mutant led to elevated transcript levels of ethylene signaling pathway genes (particularly CTR1, EIN2, EIN3 and ERF1) in mature leaves of control plants. However, with salt treatment, transcript levels of most of these genes remained constant or dropped in the vte4 mutant, while they were dramatically induced in the wild type and the vte1 mutant. Furthermore, under salt stress, leaf age-induced jasmonic acid accumulated in both the vte1 mutant and the wild type, but not in the vte4 mutant. It is concluded that jasmonic acid and ethylene signaling pathways are down-regulated in mature leaves of salt-stressed vte4 plants. PMID:21719428

  2. The CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON2 and 3 genes have a post-meristematic effect on Arabidopsis thaliana phyllotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Burian, Agata; Raczyńska-Szajgin, Magdalena; Borowska-Wykręt, Dorota; Piatek, Agnieszka; Aida, Mitsuhiro; Kwiatkowska, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The arrangement of flowers in inflorescence shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana represents a regular spiral Fibonacci phyllotaxis. However, in the cuc2 cuc3 double mutant, flower pedicels are fused to the inflorescence stem, and phyllotaxis is aberrant in the mature shoot regions. This study examined the causes of this altered development, and in particular whether the mutant phenotype is a consequence of defects at the shoot apex, or whether post-meristematic events are involved. Methods The distribution of flower pedicels and vascular traces was examined in cross-sections of mature shoots; sequential replicas were used to investigate the phyllotaxis and geometry of shoot apices, and growth of the young stem surface. The expression pattern of CUC3 was analysed by examining its promoter activity. Key Results Phyllotaxis irregularity in the cuc2 cuc3 double mutant arises during the post-meristematic phase of shoot development. In particular, growth and cell divisions in nodes of the elongating stem are not restricted in the mutant, resulting in pedicel–stem fusion. On the other hand, phyllotaxis in the mutant shoot apex is nearly as regular as that of the wild type. Vascular phyllotaxis, generated almost simultaneously with the phyllotaxis at the apex, is also much more regular than pedicel phyllotaxis. The most apparent phenotype of the mutant apices is a higher number of contact parastichies. This phenotype is associated with increased meristem size, decreased angular width of primordia and a shorter plastochron. In addition, the appearance of a sharp and deep crease, a characteristic shape of the adaxial primordium boundary, is slightly delayed and reduced in the mutant shoot apices. Conclusions The cuc2 cuc3 double mutant displays irregular phyllotaxis in the mature shoot but not in the shoot apex, thus showing a post-meristematic effect of the mutations on phyllotaxis. The main cause of this effect is the formation of pedicel–stem fusions

  3. An Arabidopsis thaliana methyltransferase Capable of Methylating Farnesoic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,Y.; Yuan, J.; Ross, J.; Noel, J.; Pichersky, E.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the identification of a new family of plant methyltransferases (MTs), named the SABATH family, that use S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to methylate a carboxyl moiety or a nitrogen-containing functional group on a diverse array of plant compounds. The Arabidopsis genome alone contains 24 distinct SABATH genes. To identify the catalytic specificities of members of this protein family in Arabidopsis, we screened recombinantly expressed and purified enzymes with a large number of potential substrates. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene At3g44860 encodes a protein with high catalytic specificity towards farnesoic acid (FA). Under steady-state conditions, this farnesoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (FAMT) exhibits K{sub M} values of 41 and 71 {mu}M for FA and SAM, respectively. A three-dimensional model of FAMT constructed based upon similarity to the experimentally determined structure of Clarkia breweri salicylic acid methyltransferase (SAMT) suggests a reasonable model for FA recognition in the FAMT active site. In plants, the mRNA levels of At3g44860 increase in response to the exogenous addition of several compounds previously shown to induce plant defense responses at the transcriptional level. Although methyl farnesoate (MeFA) has not yet been detected in Arabidopsis, the presence of a FA-specific carboxyl methyltransferase in Arabidopsis capable of producing MeFA, an insect juvenile hormone made by some plants as a presumed defense against insect herbivory, suggests that MeFA or chemically similar compounds are likely to serve as new specialized metabolites in Arabidopsis.

  4. CYP709B3, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene involved in salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Within the Arabidopsis genome, there are 272 cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) genes. However, the biological functions of the majority of these P450s remain unknown. The CYP709B family of P450s includes three gene members, CYP709B1, CYP709B2 and CYP709B3, which have high amino acid sequence similarity and lack reports elucidating biological functions. Results We identified T-DNA insertion-based null mutants of the CYP709B subfamily of genes. No obvious morphological phenotypes were exhibited under normal growth conditions. When the responses to ABA and salt stress were studied in these mutants, only the cyp709b3 mutant showed sensitivity to ABA and salt during germination. Under moderate salt treatment (150 mM NaCl), cyp709b3 showed a higher percentage of damaged seedlings, indicating a lower tolerance to salt stress. CYP709B3 was highly expressed in all analyzed tissues and especially high in seedlings and leaves. In contrast, CYP709B1 and CYP709B2 were highly expressed in siliques, but were at very low levels in other tissues. Under salt stress condition, CYP709B3 gene expression was induced after 24 hr and remained at high expression level. Expression of the wild type CYP709B3 gene in the cyp709b3 mutant fully complemented the salt intolerant phenotype. Furthermore, metabolite profiling analysis revealed some differences between wild type and cyp709b3 mutant plants, supporting the salt intolerance phenotype of the cyp709b3 mutant. Conclusions These results suggest that CYP709B3 plays a role in ABA and salt stress response and provides evidence to support the functions of cytochrome P450 enzymes in plant stress response. PMID:24164720

  5. Uncovering Genes and Ploidy Involved in the High Diversity in Root Hair Density, Length and Response to Local Scarce Phosphate in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Stetter, Markus G.; Schmid, Karl; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Plant root hairs increase the root surface to enhance the uptake of sparingly soluble and immobile nutrients, such as the essential nutrient phosphorus, from the soil. Here, root hair traits and the response to scarce local phosphorus concentration were studied in 166 accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana using split plates. Root hair density and length were correlated, but highly variable among accessions. Surprisingly, the well-known increase in root hair density under low phosphorus was mostly restricted to genotypes that had less and shorter root hairs under P sufficient conditions. By contrast, several accessions with dense and long root hairs even had lower hair density or shorter hairs in local scarce phosphorus. Furthermore, accessions with whole-genome duplications developed more dense but phosphorus-insensitive root hairs. The impact of genome duplication on root hair density was confirmed by comparing tetraploid accessions with their diploid ancestors. Genome-wide association mapping identified candidate genes potentially involved in root hair responses tp scarce local phosphate. Knock-out mutants in identified candidate genes (CYR1, At1g32360 and RLP48) were isolated and differences in root hair traits in the mutants were confirmed. The large diversity in root hair traits among accessions and the diverse response when local phosphorus is scarce is a rich resource for further functional analyses. PMID:25781967

  6. Overexpression of Arabidopsis thaliana gibberellic acid 20 oxidase (AtGA20ox) gene enhance the vegetative growth and fiber quality in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) plants.

    PubMed

    Withanage, Samanthi Priyanka; Hossain, Md Aktar; Kumar M, Sures; Roslan, Hairul Azman B; Abdullah, Mohammad Puad; Napis, Suhaimi B; Shukor, Nor Aini Ab

    2015-06-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.; Family: Malvaceae), is multipurpose crop, one of the potential alternatives of natural fiber for biocomposite materials. Longer fiber and higher cellulose contents are required for good quality biocomposite materials. However, average length of kenaf fiber (2.6 mm in bast and 1.28 mm in whole plant) is below the critical length (4 mm) for biocomposite production. Present study describes whether fiber length and cellulose content of kenaf plants could be enhanced by increasing GA biosynthesis in plants by overexpressing Arabidopsis thaliana Gibberellic Acid 20 oxidase (AtGA20ox) gene. AtGA20ox gene with intron was overexpressed in kenaf plants under the control of double CaMV 35S promoter, followed by in planta transformation into V36 and G4 varieties of kenaf. The lines with higher levels of bioactive GA (0.3-1.52 ng g(-1) fresh weight) were further characterized for their morphological and biochemical traits including vegetative and reproductive growth, fiber dimension and chemical composition. Positive impact of increased gibberellins on biochemical composition, fiber dimension and their derivative values were demonstrated in some lines of transgenic kenaf including increased cellulose content (91%), fiber length and quality but it still requires further study to confirm the critical level of this particular bioactive GA in transgenic plants. PMID:26175614

  7. Gene Networks Involved in Hormonal Control of Root Development in Arabidopsis thaliana: A Framework for Studying Its Disturbance by Metal Stress.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Stefanie; Cuypers, Ann; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Remans, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Plant survival under abiotic stress conditions requires morphological and physiological adaptations. Adverse soil conditions directly affect root development, although the underlying mechanisms remain largely to be discovered. Plant hormones regulate normal root growth and mediate root morphological responses to abiotic stress. Hormone synthesis, signal transduction, perception and cross-talk create a complex network in which metal stress can interfere, resulting in root growth alterations. We focus on Arabidopsis thaliana, for which gene networks in root development have been intensively studied, and supply essential terminology of anatomy and growth of roots. Knowledge of gene networks, mechanisms and interactions related to the role of plant hormones is reviewed. Most knowledge has been generated for auxin, the best-studied hormone with a pronounced primary role in root development. Furthermore, cytokinins, gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, jasmonic acid, strigolactones, brassinosteroids and salicylic acid are discussed. Interactions between hormones that are of potential importance for root growth are described. This creates a framework that can be used for investigating the impact of abiotic stress factors on molecular mechanisms related to plant hormones, with the limited knowledge of the effects of the metals cadmium, copper and zinc on plant hormones and root development included as case example. PMID:26287175

  8. Gene Networks Involved in Hormonal Control of Root Development in Arabidopsis thaliana: A Framework for Studying Its Disturbance by Metal Stress

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Stefanie; Cuypers, Ann; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Remans, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Plant survival under abiotic stress conditions requires morphological and physiological adaptations. Adverse soil conditions directly affect root development, although the underlying mechanisms remain largely to be discovered. Plant hormones regulate normal root growth and mediate root morphological responses to abiotic stress. Hormone synthesis, signal transduction, perception and cross-talk create a complex network in which metal stress can interfere, resulting in root growth alterations. We focus on Arabidopsis thaliana, for which gene networks in root development have been intensively studied, and supply essential terminology of anatomy and growth of roots. Knowledge of gene networks, mechanisms and interactions related to the role of plant hormones is reviewed. Most knowledge has been generated for auxin, the best-studied hormone with a pronounced primary role in root development. Furthermore, cytokinins, gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, jasmonic acid, strigolactones, brassinosteroids and salicylic acid are discussed. Interactions between hormones that are of potential importance for root growth are described. This creates a framework that can be used for investigating the impact of abiotic stress factors on molecular mechanisms related to plant hormones, with the limited knowledge of the effects of the metals cadmium, copper and zinc on plant hormones and root development included as case example. PMID:26287175

  9. Minimal influence of G-protein null mutations on ozone-induced changes in gene expression, foliar injury, gas exchange and peroxidase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana L

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Fitzgerald; Burkey, Kent; Morgan, Patrick; Fiscus, Edwin; Jones, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Ozone (O3) uptake by plants leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the intercellular space of leaves and induces signalling processes reported to involve the membrane-bound heterotrimeric G-protein complex. Therefore, potential G-protein-mediated response mechanisms to O3 were compared between Arabidopsis thaliana L. lines with null mutations in the α- and β-subunits (gpa1-4, agb1-2 and gpa1-4/agb1-2) and Col-0 wild-type plants. Plants were treated with a range of O3 concentrations (5, 125, 175 and 300 nL L−1) for 1 and 2 d in controlled environment chambers. Transcript levels of GPA1, AGB1 and RGS1 transiently increased in Col-0 exposed to 125 nL L−1 O3 compared with the 5 nL L−1 control treatment. However, silencing of α and β G-protein genes resulted in little alteration of many processes associated with O3 injury, including the induction of ROS-signalling genes, increased leaf tissue ion leakage, decreased net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, and increased peroxidase activity, especially in the leaf apoplast. These results indicated that many responses to O3 stress at physiological levels were not detectably influenced by α and β G-proteins. PMID:21988569

  10. Overexpression of Arabidopsis thaliana gibberellic acid 20 oxidase (AtGA20ox) gene enhance the vegetative growth and fiber quality in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) plants

    PubMed Central

    Withanage, Samanthi Priyanka; Hossain, Md Aktar; Kumar M., Sures; Roslan, Hairul Azman B; Abdullah, Mohammad Puad; Napis, Suhaimi B.; Shukor, Nor Aini Ab.

    2015-01-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.; Family: Malvaceae), is multipurpose crop, one of the potential alternatives of natural fiber for biocomposite materials. Longer fiber and higher cellulose contents are required for good quality biocomposite materials. However, average length of kenaf fiber (2.6 mm in bast and 1.28 mm in whole plant) is below the critical length (4 mm) for biocomposite production. Present study describes whether fiber length and cellulose content of kenaf plants could be enhanced by increasing GA biosynthesis in plants by overexpressing Arabidopsis thaliana Gibberellic Acid 20 oxidase (AtGA20ox) gene. AtGA20ox gene with intron was overexpressed in kenaf plants under the control of double CaMV 35S promoter, followed by in planta transformation into V36 and G4 varieties of kenaf. The lines with higher levels of bioactive GA (0.3–1.52 ng g−1 fresh weight) were further characterized for their morphological and biochemical traits including vegetative and reproductive growth, fiber dimension and chemical composition. Positive impact of increased gibberellins on biochemical composition, fiber dimension and their derivative values were demonstrated in some lines of transgenic kenaf including increased cellulose content (91%), fiber length and quality but it still requires further study to confirm the critical level of this particular bioactive GA in transgenic plants. PMID:26175614

  11. Pattern Dynamics in Adaxial-Abaxial Specific Gene Expression Are Modulated by a Plastid Retrograde Signal during Arabidopsis thaliana Leaf Development

    PubMed Central

    Tameshige, Toshiaki; Fujita, Hironori; Watanabe, Keiro; Toyokura, Koichi; Kondo, Maki; Tatematsu, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Noritaka; Tsugeki, Ryuji; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Nishimura, Mikio; Okada, Kiyotaka

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance and reformation of gene expression domains are the basis for the morphogenic processes of multicellular systems. In a leaf primordium of Arabidopsis thaliana, the expression of FILAMENTOUS FLOWER (FIL) and the activity of the microRNA miR165/166 are specific to the abaxial side. This miR165/166 activity restricts the target gene expression to the adaxial side. The adaxial and abaxial specific gene expressions are crucial for the wide expansion of leaf lamina. The FIL-expression and the miR165/166-free domains are almost mutually exclusive, and they have been considered to be maintained during leaf development. However, we found here that the position of the boundary between the two domains gradually shifts from the adaxial side to the abaxial side. The cell lineage analysis revealed that this boundary shifting was associated with a sequential gene expression switch from the FIL-expressing (miR165/166 active) to the miR165/166-free (non-FIL-expressing) states. Our genetic analyses using the enlarged fil expression domain2 (enf2) mutant and chemical treatment experiments revealed that impairment in the plastid (chloroplast) gene expression machinery retards this boundary shifting and inhibits the lamina expansion. Furthermore, these developmental effects caused by the abnormal plastids were not observed in the genomes uncoupled1 (gun1) mutant background. This study characterizes the dynamic nature of the adaxial-abaxial specification process in leaf primordia and reveals that the dynamic process is affected by the GUN1-dependent retrograde signal in response to the failure of plastid gene expression. These findings advance our understanding on the molecular mechanism linking the plastid function to the leaf morphogenic processes. PMID:23935517

  12. A functional genomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana PP2C clade D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the reference dicot plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the PP2C family of P-protein phosphatases includes the products of 80 genes that have been separated into 10 multi-protein clades plus six singletons. Clade D includes the products of nine genes distributed among 3 chromosomes (PPD1, At3g12620; PPD2...

  13. Chromosomal rearrangement in autotetraploid plants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Weiss, H; Maluszynska, J

    2000-01-01

    Recent development of cytogenetic techniques has facilitated significant progress in Arabidopsis thaliana karyotype studies. Double-target FISH with rRNA genes provides makers that allow individual chromosome in the genome to be distinguished. Those studies have revealed that the number and position of rDNA loci is ecotype-specific. Arabidopsis is believed to be a true diploid (x = 5) with numerous ecotypes (accessions) and only a very few natural polyploid populations reported. Few studies were undertaken to induce polyploidy in Arabidopsis, however none of those gave the cytogenetic characteristics of polyploid plants. Our analysis of chromosome pairing of colchicine-induced autotetraploid Arabidopsis (Wilna ecotype) revealed preferential bivalent pairing in PMCs (pollen mother cells). In order to attempt to explain this phenomenon, first of all more detailed cytogenetic studies of autopolyploid plants have been undertaken. The localization of 45S and 5S rDNA loci in the diploid and autotetraploid plants revealed that Wilna ecotypes belongs to the group of Arabidopsis accessions with only two 5S rDNA loci present in a genome. Furthermore, the rearrangement of 45S rDNA locus in autopolyploid, when compared to the diploid plants of the same ecotype, was revealed. These results are interesting also in the context of the recently emphasised role of polyploidy in plant evolution and speciation. Arabidopsis, despite having small chromosomes, is a good system to study chromosome behaviour in relation to diploidization of autopolyploids and to evaluate the degree of chromosomal rearrangements during this process. PMID:11433970

  14. AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE genes have partly overlapping functions with AINTEGUMENTA but make distinct contributions to Arabidopsis thaliana flower development.

    PubMed

    Krizek, Beth A

    2015-08-01

    AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) is an important regulator of Arabidopsis flower development that has overlapping functions with the related AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6 (AIL6) gene in floral organ initiation, identity specification, growth, and patterning. Two other AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE (AIL) genes, AIL5 and AIL7, are expressed in developing flowers in spatial domains that partly overlap with those of ANT. Here, it is shown that AIL5 and AIL7 also act in a partially redundant manner with ANT. The results demonstrate that AIL genes exhibit unequal genetic redundancy with roles for AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 only revealed in the absence of ANT function. ant ail5 and ant ail7 double mutant flowers show alterations in floral organ positioning and growth, sepal fusion, and reductions in petal number. In ant ail5, petals are often replaced by filaments or dramatically reduced in size. ant ail7 double mutants produce increased numbers of carpels, which have defects in valve fusion and a loss of apical tissues. The distinct phenotypes of ant ail5, ant ail7 and the previously characterized ant ail6 indicate that AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 make unique contributions to flower development. These distinct roles are also supported by genetic analyses of ant ail triple mutants. While ant ail5 ail6 triple mutants closely resemble ant ail6 double mutants, ant ail5 ail7 triple mutants exhibit more severe deviations from the wild type than either ant ail5 or ant ail7 double mutants. Furthermore, it is shown that AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 act in a dose dependent manners in ant and other mutant backgrounds. PMID:25956884

  15. AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE genes have partly overlapping functions with AINTEGUMENTA but make distinct contributions to Arabidopsis thaliana flower development

    PubMed Central

    Krizek, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) is an important regulator of Arabidopsis flower development that has overlapping functions with the related AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6 (AIL6) gene in floral organ initiation, identity specification, growth, and patterning. Two other AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE (AIL) genes, AIL5 and AIL7, are expressed in developing flowers in spatial domains that partly overlap with those of ANT. Here, it is shown that AIL5 and AIL7 also act in a partially redundant manner with ANT. The results demonstrate that AIL genes exhibit unequal genetic redundancy with roles for AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 only revealed in the absence of ANT function. ant ail5 and ant ail7 double mutant flowers show alterations in floral organ positioning and growth, sepal fusion, and reductions in petal number. In ant ail5, petals are often replaced by filaments or dramatically reduced in size. ant ail7 double mutants produce increased numbers of carpels, which have defects in valve fusion and a loss of apical tissues. The distinct phenotypes of ant ail5, ant ail7 and the previously characterized ant ail6 indicate that AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 make unique contributions to flower development. These distinct roles are also supported by genetic analyses of ant ail triple mutants. While ant ail5 ail6 triple mutants closely resemble ant ail6 double mutants, ant ail5 ail7 triple mutants exhibit more severe deviations from the wild type than either ant ail5 or ant ail7 double mutants. Furthermore, it is shown that AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 act in a dose dependent manners in ant and other mutant backgrounds. PMID:25956884

  16. Sugars and light/dark exposure trigger differential regulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase genes in Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress).

    PubMed

    Sokolov, L N; Déjardin, A; Kleczkowski, L A

    1998-12-15

    Expression of four Arabidopsis (thale cress) genes corresponding to the small (ApS) and large subunits (ApL1, ApL2, ApL3) of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), a key enzyme of starch biosynthesis, was found to be profoundly and differentially regulated by sugar and light/dark exposures. Transcript levels of both ApL2 and ApL3, and to a lesser extent ApS, increased severalfold upon feeding sucrose or glucose to the detached leaves in the dark, whereas the mRNA content for ApL1 decreased under the same conditions. Glucose was, in general, less effective than sucrose in inducing regulation of AGPase genes, possibly due to observed limitations in its uptake when compared with sucrose uptake by detached leaves. Osmotic agents [sorbitol, poly(ethylene glycol)] had no effect on ApS, ApL2 and ApL3 transcript level, but they did mimic the effect of sucrose on ApL1 gene, suggesting that the latter is regulated by osmotic pressure rather than any particular sugar. For all the genes the sugar effect was closely mimicked by an exposure of the dark-pre-adapted leaves to the light. Under both dark and light conditions, sucrose fed to the detached leaves was found to be rapidly metabolized to hexoses and, to some extent, starch. Starch production reflected most probably an increase in substrate availability for AGPase reaction rather than being due to changes in AGPase protein content, since both the sugar feeding and light exposure had little or no effect on the activity of AGPase or on the levels of its small and large subunit proteins in leaf extracts. The data suggest tight translational or post-translational control, but they may also reflect spatial control of AGPase gene expression within a leaf. The sugar/light-dependent regulation of AGPase gene expression may represent a part of a general cellular response to the availability/allocation of carbohydrates during photosynthesis. PMID:9841881

  17. Disruption of both chloroplastic and cytosolic FBPase genes results in a dwarf phenotype and important starch and metabolite changes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-González, José A.; Soto-Súarez, Mauricio; García-Díaz, Ángel; Romero-Puertas, María C.; Sandalio, Luisa M.; Mérida, Ángel; Thormählen, Ina; Geigenberger, Peter; Serrato, Antonio J.; Sahrawy, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    In this study, evidence is provided for the role of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases (FBPases) in plant development and carbohydrate synthesis and distribution by analysing two Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA knockout mutant lines, cyfbp and cfbp1, and one double mutant cyfbp cfbp1 which affect each FBPase isoform, cytosolic and chloroplastic, respectively. cyFBP is involved in sucrose synthesis, whilst cFBP1 is a key enzyme in the Calvin–Benson cycle. In addition to the smaller rosette size and lower rate of photosynthesis, the lack of cFBP1 in the mutants cfbp1 and cyfbp cfbp1 leads to a lower content of soluble sugars, less starch accumulation, and a greater superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The mutants also had some developmental alterations, including stomatal opening defects and increased numbers of root vascular layers. Complementation also confirmed that the mutant phenotypes were caused by disruption of the cFBP1 gene. cyfbp mutant plants without cyFBP showed a higher starch content in the chloroplasts, but this did not greatly affect the phenotype. Notably, the sucrose content in cyfbp was close to that found in the wild type. The cyfbp cfbp1 double mutant displayed features of both parental lines but had the cfbp1 phenotype. All the mutants accumulated fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and triose-phosphate during the light period. These results prove that while the lack of cFBP1 induces important changes in a wide range of metabolites such as amino acids, sugars, and organic acids, the lack of cyFBP activity in Arabidopsis essentially provokes a carbon metabolism imbalance which does not compromise the viability of the double mutant cyfbp cfbp1. PMID:25743161

  18. Disruption of both chloroplastic and cytosolic FBPase genes results in a dwarf phenotype and important starch and metabolite changes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Rojas-González, José A; Soto-Súarez, Mauricio; García-Díaz, Ángel; Romero-Puertas, María C; Sandalio, Luisa M; Mérida, Ángel; Thormählen, Ina; Geigenberger, Peter; Serrato, Antonio J; Sahrawy, Mariam

    2015-05-01

    In this study, evidence is provided for the role of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases (FBPases) in plant development and carbohydrate synthesis and distribution by analysing two Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA knockout mutant lines, cyfbp and cfbp1, and one double mutant cyfbp cfbp1 which affect each FBPase isoform, cytosolic and chloroplastic, respectively. cyFBP is involved in sucrose synthesis, whilst cFBP1 is a key enzyme in the Calvin-Benson cycle. In addition to the smaller rosette size and lower rate of photosynthesis, the lack of cFBP1 in the mutants cfbp1 and cyfbp cfbp1 leads to a lower content of soluble sugars, less starch accumulation, and a greater superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The mutants also had some developmental alterations, including stomatal opening defects and increased numbers of root vascular layers. Complementation also confirmed that the mutant phenotypes were caused by disruption of the cFBP1 gene. cyfbp mutant plants without cyFBP showed a higher starch content in the chloroplasts, but this did not greatly affect the phenotype. Notably, the sucrose content in cyfbp was close to that found in the wild type. The cyfbp cfbp1 double mutant displayed features of both parental lines but had the cfbp1 phenotype. All the mutants accumulated fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and triose-phosphate during the light period. These results prove that while the lack of cFBP1 induces important changes in a wide range of metabolites such as amino acids, sugars, and organic acids, the lack of cyFBP activity in Arabidopsis essentially provokes a carbon metabolism imbalance which does not compromise the viability of the double mutant cyfbp cfbp1. PMID:25743161

  19. A mutant of the Arabidopsis thaliana TOC159 gene accumulates reduced levels of linolenic acid and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Afitlhile, Meshack; Workman, Samantha; Duffield, Kayla; Sprout, Danielle; Berhow, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that a mutant of Arabidopsis that lacks the Toc159 receptor is impaired in chloroplast biogenesis. The mutant is referred as plastid protein import 2 or ppi2 and has an albino phenotype due to its inability to import the photosynthetic proteins. In this study, we measured fatty acid composition and transcript levels of plastid-localized fatty acid desaturases in the wild type and ppi2 mutant. The objective was to evaluate whether the Toc159 receptor was critical in the import of lipid-synthesizing enzymes. The ppi2 mutant accumulated decreased levels of oleic acid (18:1) and α-linolenic acid (18:3). The mutant accumulated drastically reduced amounts of the chloroplast lipid monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), which contains more than 80% of 18:3. The expression of genes that encode stearoyl-ACP desaturase and MGD1 synthase were down-regulated in the ppi2 mutant, and this corresponded to decreased levels of 18:1 and MGDG, respectively. We conclude that in the ppi2 mutant the impaired synthesis of MGDG resulted in decreased amounts of 18:3. The mutant however, had a 30-fold increase in fad5 transcript levels; this increase was mirrored by a 16- to 50-fold accumulation of hexadecatrienoic acid (16:3), a fatty acid found exclusively in MGDG. Taken together, these data suggest that the Toc159 receptor is required in the import of stearoyl-ACP desaturase and MGD1 synthase into the chloroplasts. Since the expression of fad5 gene was up-regulated in the ppi2 mutant, we propose that fad5 desaturase is imported into plastids through the atToc132/atToc120 protein import pathway. PMID:24184455

  20. Detection of oligonucleotide hybridization at femtomolar level and sequence-specific gene analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana leaf extract with an ultrasensitive surface plasmon resonance spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fayi; Zhou, Feimeng; Wang, Jun; Tao, Nongjian; Lin, Jianqiao; Vellanoweth, Robert L.; Morquecho, Yvonne; Wheeler-Laidman, Janel

    2002-01-01

    A flow-injection (FI) device is combined, through the use of a low-volume (4 µl) flow cell, with an ultrasensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectrometer equipped with a bi-cell photodiode detector. The application of this novel FI–SPR device for sequence-specific ultratrace analysis of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) and polydeoxynucleotides was demonstrated. Self-assembled monolayers of ODN probes are tethered onto Au films with a mercaptohexyl group at the 3′ ends. The FI–SPR provides a detection level (≤54 fM) 2–3 orders of magnitude lower than other SPR devices and compares well with several ultrasensitive detection methods for labeled DNA targets (e.g. fluorophore-tagged and radiolabeled DNA samples). The technique is also highly selective, since a 47mer ODN target with a single-base mismatch yielded a much smaller SPR signal, and a specific interaction was detected when the complementary target was present at 0.001% of the total DNA. The FI–SPR was extended to the measurement of two individual genes in a cDNA mixture transcribed from an Arabidopsis thaliana leaf mRNA pool. The greatly enhanced sensitivity not only obviates the necessity of DNA labeling, but also significantly reduces sample consumption, allowing direct quantification of low abundance mRNAs in cellular samples without amplification. PMID:12136120

  1. Characterization of an AtCCX5 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana that involves in high-affinity K⁺ uptake and Na⁺ transport in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxin; Zhang, Min; Takano, Tetsuo; Liu, Shenkui

    2011-10-14

    The gene for a putative cation calcium exchanger (CCX) from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtCCX5, was cloned and its function was analyzed in yeast. Green fluorescent protein-tagged AtCCX5 expressed in yeast was localized in the plasma membrane and nuclear periphery. The yeast transformants expressing AtCCX5 were created and their growth in the presence of various cations (K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Co(2+), Cd(2+), Mn(2+), Ba(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), and Li(+)) were analyzed. AtCCX5 expression was found to affect the response to K(+) and Na(+) in yeast. The AtCCX5 transformant also showed a little better growth to Zn(2+). The yeast mutant 9.3 expressing AtCCX5 restored growth of the mutant on medium with low K(+) (0.5mM), and also suppressed its Na(+) sensitivity. Ion uptake experiments showed that AtCCX5 mediated relatively high-affinity K(+) uptake and was also involved in Na(+) transport in yeast. Taken together, these findings suggest that the AtCCX5 is a novel transport protein involves in mediating high-affinity K(+) uptake and Na(+) transport in yeast. PMID:21945443

  2. Disrupting Two Arabidopsis thaliana Xylosyltransferase Genes Results in Plants Deficient in Xyloglucan, a Major Primary Cell Wall Component[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Cavalier, David M.; Lerouxel, Olivier; Neumetzler, Lutz; Yamauchi, Kazuchika; Reinecke, Antje; Freshour, Glenn; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hahn, Michael G.; Burgert, Ingo; Pauly, Markus; Raikhel, Natasha V.; Keegstra, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Xyloglucans are the main hemicellulosic polysaccharides found in the primary cell walls of dicots and nongraminaceous monocots, where they are thought to interact with cellulose to form a three-dimensional network that functions as the principal load-bearing structure of the primary cell wall. To determine whether two Arabidopsis thaliana genes that encode xylosyltransferases, XXT1 and XXT2, are involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis in vivo and to determine how the plant cell wall is affected by the lack of expression of XXT1, XXT2, or both, we isolated and characterized xxt1 and xxt2 single and xxt1 xxt2 double T-DNA insertion mutants. Although the xxt1 and xxt2 mutants did not have a gross morphological phenotype, they did have a slight decrease in xyloglucan content and showed slightly altered distribution patterns for xyloglucan epitopes. More interestingly, the xxt1 xxt2 double mutant had aberrant root hairs and lacked detectable xyloglucan. The reduction of xyloglucan in the xxt2 mutant and the lack of detectable xyloglucan in the xxt1 xxt2 double mutant resulted in significant changes in the mechanical properties of these plants. We conclude that XXT1 and XXT2 encode xylosyltransferases that are required for xyloglucan biosynthesis. Moreover, the lack of detectable xyloglucan in the xxt1 xxt2 double mutant challenges conventional models of the plant primary cell wall. PMID:18544630

  3. Genetic Architecture of Mitochondrial Editing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bentolila, Stéphane; Elliott, Leah E.; Hanson, Maureen R.

    2008-01-01

    We have analyzed the mitochondrial editing behavior of two Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, Landsberg erecta (Ler) and Columbia (Col). A survey of 362 C-to-U editing sites in 33 mitochondrial genes was conducted on RNA extracted from rosette leaves. We detected 67 new editing events in A. thaliana rosette leaves that had not been observed in a prior study of mitochondrial editing in suspension cultures. Furthermore, 37 of the 441 C-to-U editing events reported in A. thaliana suspension cultures were not observed in rosette leaves. Forty editing sites that are polymorphic in extent of editing were detected between Col and Ler. Silent editing sites, which do not change the encoded amino acid, were found in a large excess compared to nonsilent sites among the editing events that differed between accessions and between tissue types. Dominance relationships were assessed for 15 of the most polymorphic sites by evaluating the editing values of the reciprocal hybrids. Dominance is more common in nonsilent sites than in silent sites, while additivity was observed only in silent sites. A maternal effect was detected for 8 sites. QTL mapping with recombinant inbred lines detected 12 major QTL for 11 of the 13 editing traits analyzed, demonstrating that efficiency of editing of individual mitochondrial C targets is generally governed by a major factor. PMID:17565941

  4. Epigenetic Natural Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongmei; Carrasquillo, Robert; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Dedhia, Neilay; McCombie, W. Richard; Agier, Nicolas; Bulski, Agnès; Colot, Vincent; Doerge, R.W; Martienssen, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Cytosine methylation of repetitive sequences is widespread in plant genomes, occurring in both symmetric (CpG and CpNpG) as well as asymmetric sequence contexts. We used the methylation-dependent restriction enzyme McrBC to profile methylated DNA using tiling microarrays of Arabidopsis Chromosome 4 in two distinct ecotypes, Columbia and Landsberg erecta. We also used comparative genome hybridization to profile copy number polymorphisms. Repeated sequences and transposable elements (TEs), especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons, are densely methylated, but one third of genes also have low but detectable methylation in their transcribed regions. While TEs are almost always methylated, genic methylation is highly polymorphic, with half of all methylated genes being methylated in only one of the two ecotypes. A survey of loci in 96 Arabidopsis accessions revealed a similar degree of methylation polymorphism. Within-gene methylation is heritable, but is lost at a high frequency in segregating F2 families. Promoter methylation is rare, and gene expression is not generally affected by differences in DNA methylation. Small interfering RNA are preferentially associated with methylated TEs, but not with methylated genes, indicating that most genic methylation is not guided by small interfering RNA. This may account for the instability of gene methylation, if occasional failure of maintenance methylation cannot be restored by other means. PMID:17579518

  5. The AtCathB3 gene, encoding a cathepsin B-like protease, is expressed during germination of Arabidopsis thaliana and transcriptionally repressed by the basic leucine zipper protein GBF1

    PubMed Central

    Wozny, Dorothee; Barrero-Sicilia, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Protein hydrolysis plays an important role during seed germination and post-germination seedling establishment. In Arabidopsis thaliana, cathepsin B-like proteases are encoded by a gene family of three members, but only the AtCathB3 gene is highly induced upon seed germination and at the early post-germination stage. Seeds of a homozygous T-DNA insertion mutant in the AtCathB3 gene have, besides a reduced cathepsin B activity, a slower germination than the wild type. To explore the transcriptional regulation of this gene, we used a combined phylogenetic shadowing approach together with a yeast one-hybrid screening of an arrayed library of approximately 1200 transcription factor open reading frames from Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified a conserved CathB3-element in the promoters of orthologous CathB3 genes within the Brassicaceae species analysed, and, as its DNA-interacting protein, the G-Box Binding Factor1 (GBF1). Transient overexpression of GBF1 together with a PAtCathB3::uidA (β-glucuronidase) construct in tobacco plants revealed a negative effect of GBF1 on expression driven by the AtCathB3 promoter. In stable P35S::GBF1 lines, not only was the expression of the AtCathB3 gene drastically reduced, but a significant slower germination was also observed. In the homozygous knockout mutant for the GBF1 gene, the opposite effect was found. These data indicate that GBF1 is a transcriptional repressor of the AtCathB3 gene and affects the germination kinetics of Arabidopsis thaliana seeds. As AtCathB3 is also expressed during post-germination in the cotyledons, a role for the AtCathB3-like protease in reserve mobilization is also inferred. PMID:24600022

  6. Gene Gain and Loss during Evolution of Obligate Parasitism in the White Rust Pathogen of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kemen, Eric; Gardiner, Anastasia; Schultz-Larsen, Torsten; Kemen, Ariane C.; Balmuth, Alexi L.; Robert-Seilaniantz, Alexandre; Bailey, Kate; Holub, Eric; Studholme, David J.; MacLean, Dan; Jones, Jonathan D. G.

    2011-01-01

    Biotrophic eukaryotic plant pathogens require a living host for their growth and form an intimate haustorial interface with parasitized cells. Evolution to biotrophy occurred independently in fungal rusts and powdery mildews, and in oomycete white rusts and downy mildews. Biotroph evolution and molecular mechanisms of biotrophy are poorly understood. It has been proposed, but not shown, that obligate biotrophy results from (i) reduced selection for maintenance of biosynthetic pathways and (ii) gain of mechanisms to evade host recognition or suppress host defence. Here we use Illumina sequencing to define the genome, transcriptome, and gene models for the obligate biotroph oomycete and Arabidopsis parasite, Albugo laibachii. A. laibachii is a member of the Chromalveolata, which incorporates Heterokonts (containing the oomycetes), Apicomplexa (which includes human parasites like Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii), and four other taxa. From comparisons with other oomycete plant pathogens and other chromalveolates, we reveal independent loss of molybdenum-cofactor-requiring enzymes in downy mildews, white rusts, and the malaria parasite P. falciparum. Biotrophy also requires “effectors” to suppress host defence; we reveal RXLR and Crinkler effectors shared with other oomycetes, and also discover and verify a novel class of effectors, the “CHXCs”, by showing effector delivery and effector functionality. Our findings suggest that evolution to progressively more intimate association between host and parasite results in reduced selection for retention of certain biosynthetic pathways, and particularly reduced selection for retention of molybdopterin-requiring biosynthetic pathways. These mechanisms are not only relevant to plant pathogenic oomycetes but also to human pathogens within the Chromalveolata. PMID:21750662

  7. Genetic architecture of regulatory variation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Cal, Andrew J; Borevitz, Justin O

    2011-05-01

    Studying the genetic regulation of expression variation is a key method to dissect complex phenotypic traits. To examine the genetic architecture of regulatory variation in Arabidopsis thaliana, we performed genome-wide association (GWA) mapping of gene expression in an F(1) hybrid diversity panel. At a genome-wide false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.2, an associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) explains >38% of trait variation. In comparison with SNPs that are distant from the genes to which they were associated, locally associated SNPs are preferentially found in regions with extended linkage disequilibrium (LD) and have distinct population frequencies of the derived alleles (where Arabidopsis lyrata has the ancestral allele), suggesting that different selective forces are acting. Locally associated SNPs tend to have additive inheritance, whereas distantly associated SNPs are primarily dominant. In contrast to results from mapping of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) in linkage studies, we observe extensive allelic heterogeneity for local regulatory loci in our diversity panel. By association mapping of allele-specific expression (ASE), we detect a significant enrichment for cis-acting variation in local regulatory variation. In addition to gene expression variation, association mapping of splicing variation reveals both local and distant genetic regulation for intron and exon level traits. Finally, we identify candidate genes for 59 diverse phenotypic traits that were mapped to eQTL. PMID:21467266

  8. Momilactone sensitive proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Kitajima, Shinya

    2015-05-01

    The labdane-related diterpenoid, momilactone B has potent growth inhibitory activity and was demonstrated to play a particularly critical role in the allelopathy of rice (Oryza sativa L.). However, there is limited information available about the mode of action of momilactone B on the growth inhibition. The present research describes the effects of momilactone B on protein expression in the early development of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling, which was determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOFMS. Momilactone B inhibited the accumulation of subtilisin-like serine protease, amyrin synthase LUP2, β-glucosidase and malate synthase at 1 h after the momilactone application. Those proteins are involved in the metabolic turnover and the production of intermediates needed for cell structures resulting in plant growth and development. Momilactone B also inhibited the breakdown of cruciferin 2, which is essential for seed germination and seedling growth to construct cell structures. Momilactone B induced the accumulation of translationally controlled tumor protein, glutathione S-transferase and 1-cysteine peroxiredoxin 1. These proteins are involved in stress responses and increased stress tolerance. In addition, glutathione S-transferase has the activity of herbicide detoxification and 1-cysteine peroxiredoxin 1 has inhibitory activity for seed germination under unfavorable conditions. The present research suggests that momilactone B may inhibit the seedling growth by the inhibition of the metabolic turnover and the production of intermediates for cell structures. In addition, momilactone induced proteins associated with plant defense responses. PMID:26058145

  9. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  10. Metabolic profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Berit; Zöller, Daniela; Erban, Alexander; Fehrle, Ines; Hartmann, Jürgen; Niehl, Annette; Kopka, Joachim; Fisahn, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic phenotyping at cellular resolution may be considered one of the challenges in current plant physiology. A method is described which enables the cell type-specific metabolic analysis of epidermal cell types in Arabidopsis thaliana pavement, basal, and trichome cells. To achieve the required high spatial resolution, single cell sampling using microcapillaries was combined with routine gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) based metabolite profiling. The identification and relative quantification of 117 mostly primary metabolites has been demonstrated. The majority, namely 90 compounds, were accessible without analytical background correction. Analyses were performed using cell type-specific pools of 200 microsampled individual cells. Moreover, among these identified metabolites, 38 exhibited differential pool sizes in trichomes, basal or pavement cells. The application of an independent component analysis confirmed the cell type-specific metabolic phenotypes. Significant pool size changes between individual cells were detectable within several classes of metabolites, namely amino acids, fatty acids and alcohols, alkanes, lipids, N-compounds, organic acids and polyhydroxy acids, polyols, sugars, sugar conjugates and phenylpropanoids. It is demonstrated here that the combination of microsampling and GC-MS based metabolite profiling provides a method to investigate the cellular metabolism of fully differentiated plant cell types in vivo. PMID:20150518

  11. Molecular genetics of root gravitropism and waving in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedbrook, J.; Boonsirichai, K.; Chen, R.; Hilson, P.; Pearlman, R.; Rosen, E.; Rutherford, R.; Batiza, A.; Carroll, K.; Schulz, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    When Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grow embedded in an agar-based medium, their roots grow vertically downward. This reflects their ability to sense the gravity vector and to position their tip parallel to it (gravitropism). We have isolated a number of mutations affecting root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. One of these mutations, named arg1, affects root and hypocotyl gravitropism without promoting defects in starch content or in the ability of seedlings' organs to respond to plant hormones. The ARG1 gene was cloned and shown to code for a protein with a J domain at its amino terminus and a second sequence motif found in several cytoskeleton binding proteins. Mutations in the AGR1 locus promote a strong defect in root gravitropism. Some alleles also confer an increased root resistance to exogenous ethylene and an increased sensitivity to auxin. AGR1 was cloned and found to encode a putative transmembrane protein which might be involved in polar auxin transport, or in regulating the differential growth response to gravistimulation. When Arabidopsis seedlings grow on the surface of agar-based media tilted backward, their roots wave. That wavy pattern of root growth derives from a combined response to gravity, touch and other surface-derived stimuli. It is accompanied by a reversible rotation of the root tip about its axis. A number of mutations affect the presence or the shape of root waves on tilted agar-based surfaces. One of them, wvc1, promotes the formation of compressed root waves under these conditions. The physiological and molecular analyses of this mutant suggest that a tryptophan-derived molecule other than IAA might be an important regulator of the curvature responsible for root waving.

  12. Building a hair: tip growth in Arabidopsis thaliana root hairs.

    PubMed Central

    Carol, Rachel J; Dolan, Liam

    2002-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana root hair is used as a model for studying tip growth in plants. We review recent advances, made using physiological and genetic approaches, which give rise to different, yet compatible, current views of the establishment and maintenance of tip growth in epidermal cells. For example, an active calcium influx channel localized at the tip of Arabidopsis root hairs has been identified by patch-clamp measurements. Actin has been visualized in vivo in Arabidopsis root hairs by using a green-fluorescent-protein-talin reporter and shown to form a dense mesh in the apex of the growing tip. The kojak gene, which encodes a protein similar to the catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase, is needed in the first stages of hair growth. A role for LRX1, a leucine-rich repeat extensin, in determining the morphology of the cell wall of root hairs has been established using reverse genetics. The new information can be integrated into a general and more advanced view of how these specialized plant cells grow. PMID:12079677

  13. Positional distribution of transcription factor binding sites in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chun-Ping; Lin, Jinn-Jy; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Binding of a transcription factor (TF) to its DNA binding sites (TFBSs) is a critical step to initiate the transcription of its target genes. It is therefore interesting to know where the TFBSs of a gene are likely to locate in the promoter region. Here we studied the positional distribution of TFBSs in Arabidopsis thaliana, for which many known TFBSs are now available. We developed a method to identify the locations of TFBSs in the promoter sequences of genes in A. thaliana. We found that the distribution is nearly bell-shaped with a peak at 50 base pairs (bp) upstream of the transcription start site (TSS) and 86% of the TFBSs are in the region from −1,000 bp to +200 bp with respect to the TSS. Our distribution was supported by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and microarray data and DNase I hypersensitive site sequencing data. When TF families were considered separately, differences in positional preference were observed between TF families. Our study of the positional distribution of TFBSs seems to be the first in a plant. PMID:27117388

  14. Arabidopsis thaliana DNA gyrase is targeted to chloroplasts and mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Melisa K.; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    DNA gyrase is the bacterial DNA topoisomerase (topo) that supercoils DNA by using the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. The enzyme, an A2B2 tetramer encoded by the gyrA and gyrB genes, catalyses topological changes in DNA during replication and transcription, and is the only topo that is able to introduce negative supercoils. Gyrase is essential in bacteria and apparently absent from eukaryotes and is, consequently, an important target for antibacterial agents (e.g., quinolones and coumarins). We have identified four putative gyrase genes in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana; one gyrA and three gyrB homologues. DNA gyrase protein A (GyrA) has a dual translational initiation site targeting the mature protein to both chloroplasts and mitochondria, and there are individual targeting sequences for two of the DNA gyrase protein B (GyrB) homologues. N-terminal fusions of the organellar targeting sequences to GFPs support the hypothesis that one enzyme is targeted to the chloroplast and another to the mitochondrion, which correlates with supercoiling activity in isolated organelles. Treatment of seedlings and cultured cells with gyrase-specific drugs leads to growth inhibition. Knockout of A. thaliana gyrA is embryo-lethal whereas knockouts in the gyrB genes lead to seedling-lethal phenotypes or severely stunted growth and development. The A. thaliana genes have been cloned in Escherichia coli and found to complement gyrase temperature-sensitive strains. This report confirms the existence of DNA gyrase in eukaryotes and has important implications for drug targeting, organelle replication, and the evolution of topos in plants. PMID:15136745

  15. Molecular Genetics of Root Thigmoresponsiveness in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, Patrick H.

    2002-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that allow plant roots to use gravity and touch as growth guides are investigated. We are using a molecular genetic strategy in Arabidopsis thaliana to study these processes. When Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grow on tilted hard-agar surfaces, their roots develop a wavy pattern of growth which appears to derive from a succession of left-handed and right-handed circumnutation-like processes triggered by gravity and touch stimulation (Okada and Shimura, 1990; Rutherford et al., 1998; Rutherford and Masson, 1996). Interestingly, mutations that affect root waving on tilted hard-agar surfaces can be identified and characterized. Some of these mutations affect root gravitropism, while others appear to be responsible for the production of abnormal waves (no waves, compressed or square waves, coils) without affecting gravitropism. The specific objectives of this project were to functionally characterize two genes (WVD2 and WVD6) which are required for root waving on tilted agar surfaces, but not for root gravitropism. Specific objectives included a physiological and cytological analysis of the mutants, and molecular cloning and characterization of the corresponding genes. As summarized in this paper, we have reached these objectives. We have also identified and partially characterized other mutations that affect root skewing on hard-agar surfaces (sku5-1 and ago1), and have completed our work on the root-wave phenotype associated with mutations in genes of the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway (Lynn et al., 1999; Rutherford et al., 1998; Sedbrook et al., 2000, 2002). We briefly describe our progress on the cloning and characterization of WVD6, WVD2 and SKU5, and provide a list of papers (published, or in preparation) that derived from this grant. We also discuss the biological implications of our findings, with special emphasis on the analysis of WVD2.

  16. A mutant of the Arabidopsis thaliana Toc159 gene accumulates reduced levels of linolenic acid and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that a null mutant of Arabidopsis that lacks Toc159 receptor is impaired in chloroplast biogenesis and incapable of importing photosynthetic proteins. The mutant is referred to as plastid protein import 2 or ppi2, and has an albino phenotype. In this study, we measured ...

  17. A mutant of the Arabidopsis thaliana TOC159 gene accumulates reduced levels of linolenic acid and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that a mutant of Arabidopsis that lacks the Toc159 receptor is impaired in chloroplast biogenesis. The mutant is referred as plastid protein import 2 or ppi2 and has an albino phenotype due to its inability to import the photosynthetic proteins. In this study, we measured...

  18. Cytosolic Calcium, hydrogen peroxide, and related gene expression and protein modulation in Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures respond immediately to altered gravitation: Parabolic flight data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, Ruediger; Hausmann, Niklas; Neef, Maren; Fengler, Svenja

    Callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) were exposed to parabolic flights in order to assess molecular short-term responses to altered gravity fields. Using transgenic cell lines, hydrogen peroxide and cytosolic Ca2+ were continuously monitored. In parallel, the metabolism of samples was chemically quenched (RNAlater, Ambion, for RNA; acid/base for NADPH, NADP) at typical stages of a parabola (1g before pull up; end of pull up (1.8 g), end of microgravity (µg, 20 sec), and end of pull out (1.8 g)). Cells exhibited an increase of both Ca2+ and hydrogen peroxide with the onset of µg, and a decline thereafter. This behaviour was accompanied by a decrease of the NADPH/NADP redox ratio, indicating a Ca2+-dependent activation of a NADPH oxidase. Microarray analyses revealed concomitant expression profiles. At the end of the microgravity phase, 396 transcripts were specifically up-, while 485 were down-regulated. Up-regulation was dominated by Ca2+- and ROS(reactive oxygen species)-related gene products. The same material was also used for the analysis of phosphopeptides by 2D SDS PAGE. Relevant spots were identified by liquid chromatography-MS. With the exception of a chaperone (HSP 70-3), hypergravity (1.8 g) and microgravity modified different sets of proteins. These are partly involved in primary metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citrate cycle) and detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Taken together, these data show that both gene expression and protein modulation jointly respond within seconds to alterations in the gravity field, with a focus on metabolic adaptation, signalling and control of ROS.

  19. Inferring the Brassica rapa Interactome Using Protein–Protein Interaction Data from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianhua; Osman, Kim; Iqbal, Mudassar; Stekel, Dov J.; Luo, Zewei; Armstrong, Susan J.; Franklin, F. Chris H.

    2013-01-01

    Following successful completion of the Brassica rapa sequencing project, the next step is to investigate functions of individual genes/proteins. For Arabidopsis thaliana, large amounts of protein–protein interaction (PPI) data are available from the major PPI databases (DBs). It is known that Brassica crop species are closely related to A. thaliana. This provides an opportunity to infer the B. rapa interactome using PPI data available from A. thaliana. In this paper, we present an inferred B. rapa interactome that is based on the A. thaliana PPI data from two resources: (i) A. thaliana PPI data from three major DBs, BioGRID, IntAct, and TAIR. (ii) ortholog-based A. thaliana PPI predictions. Linking between B. rapa and A. thaliana was accomplished in three complementary ways: (i) ortholog predictions, (ii) identification of gene duplication based on synteny and collinearity, and (iii) BLAST sequence similarity search. A complementary approach was also applied, which used known/predicted domain–domain interaction data. Specifically, since the two species are closely related, we used PPI data from A. thaliana to predict interacting domains that might be conserved between the two species. The predicted interactome was investigated for the component that contains known A. thaliana meiotic proteins to demonstrate its usability. PMID:23293649

  20. Inferring the Brassica rapa Interactome Using Protein-Protein Interaction Data from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianhua; Osman, Kim; Iqbal, Mudassar; Stekel, Dov J; Luo, Zewei; Armstrong, Susan J; Franklin, F Chris H

    2012-01-01

    Following successful completion of the Brassica rapa sequencing project, the next step is to investigate functions of individual genes/proteins. For Arabidopsis thaliana, large amounts of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data are available from the major PPI databases (DBs). It is known that Brassica crop species are closely related to A. thaliana. This provides an opportunity to infer the B. rapa interactome using PPI data available from A. thaliana. In this paper, we present an inferred B. rapa interactome that is based on the A. thaliana PPI data from two resources: (i) A. thaliana PPI data from three major DBs, BioGRID, IntAct, and TAIR. (ii) ortholog-based A. thaliana PPI predictions. Linking between B. rapa and A. thaliana was accomplished in three complementary ways: (i) ortholog predictions, (ii) identification of gene duplication based on synteny and collinearity, and (iii) BLAST sequence similarity search. A complementary approach was also applied, which used known/predicted domain-domain interaction data. Specifically, since the two species are closely related, we used PPI data from A. thaliana to predict interacting domains that might be conserved between the two species. The predicted interactome was investigated for the component that contains known A. thaliana meiotic proteins to demonstrate its usability. PMID:23293649

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana SEPALLATA3 protein prokaryotic expression and purification.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Fu, A Y; Zhang, G C; Li, T J; Zhang, J H

    2015-01-01

    SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) can be attributed to E class gene of the ABCE model of floral organ development. In order to reveal how SEP3 proteins form polymers, and the relationship between the polymers and their biological functions, the experiments of Arabidopsis thaliana AtSEP3 protein soluble expression in vitro were performed to construct a vector of prokaryotic expression, and investigate induced expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli cells. The protein soluble expression was analyzed through the aspects of different protein domains, induction time, induction temperature, etc. Different structural domains and expression conditions were screened, and 0.1% IPTG inducing at 22 oC for 15 h was estimated as an optimal expression strategy. The nickel chelating resin was used to purify the protein in size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and the results indicated that AtSEP3 protein was present in the form of tetramer. PMID:26025404

  2. Architectural phenotypes in the transparent testa mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Buer, Charles S.; Djordjevic, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoids are low molecular weight secondary plant metabolites with a myriad of functions. As flavonoids affect auxin transport (an important growth-controlling hormone) and are biologically active in eukaryotes, flavonoid mutants were expected to have undescribed architectural phenotypes. The Arabidopsis thaliana transparent testa (tt) mutants are compromised in the enzymatic steps or transcriptional regulators affecting flavonoid synthesis. tt mutant seedlings were grown on hard-slanted agar (a stress condition), under varying light conditions, and in soil to examine the resulting growth patterns. These tt mutants revealed a wide variety of architectural phenotypes in root and aerial tissues. Mutants with increased inflorescences, siliques, and lateral root density or reduced stature are traits that could affect plant yield or performance under certain environmental conditions. The regulatory genes affected in architectural traits may provide useful molecular targets for examination in other plants. PMID:19129166

  3. Transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to As (V) stress

    PubMed Central

    Abercrombie, Jason M; Halfhill, Matthew D; Ranjan, Priya; Rao, Murali R; Saxton, Arnold M; Yuan, Joshua S; Stewart, C Neal

    2008-01-01

    Background Arsenic is toxic to plants and a common environmental pollutant. There is a strong chemical similarity between arsenate [As (V)] and phosphate (Pi). Whole genome oligonucleotide microarrays were employed to investigate the transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to As (V) stress. Results Antioxidant-related genes (i.e. coding for superoxide dismutases and peroxidases) play prominent roles in response to arsenate. The microarray experiment revealed induction of chloroplast Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) (at2g28190), Cu/Zn SOD (at1g08830), as well as an SOD copper chaperone (at1g12520). On the other hand, Fe SODs were strongly repressed in response to As (V) stress. Non-parametric rank product statistics were used to detect differentially expressed genes. Arsenate stress resulted in the repression of numerous genes known to be induced by phosphate starvation. These observations were confirmed with qRT-PCR and SOD activity assays. Conclusion Microarray data suggest that As (V) induces genes involved in response to oxidative stress and represses transcription of genes induced by phosphate starvation. This study implicates As (V) as a phosphate mimic in the cell by repressing genes normally induced when available phosphate is scarce. Most importantly, these data reveal that arsenate stress affects the expression of several genes with little or unknown biological functions, thereby providing new putative gene targets for future research. PMID:18684332

  4. Phosphate transporters from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Muchhal, U S; Pardo, J M; Raghothama, K G

    1996-01-01

    Two cDNAs (AtPT1 and AtPT2) encoding plant phosphate transporters have been isolated from a library prepared with mRNA extracted from phosphate-starved Arabidopsis thaliana roots, The encoded polypeptides are 78% identical to each other and show high degree of amino acid sequence similarity with high-affinity phosphate transporters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Neurospora crassa, and the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus versiforme. The AtPT1 and AtPT2 polypeptides are integral membrane proteins predicted to contain 12 membrane-spanning domains separated into two groups of six by a large charged hydrophilic region. Upon expression, both AtPT1 and AtPT2 were able to complement the pho84 mutant phenotype of yeast strain NS219 lacking the high-affinity phosphate transport activity. AtPT1 and AtPT2 are representatives of two distinct, small gene families in A. thaliana. The transcripts of both genes are expressed in roots and are not detectable in leaves. The steady-state level of their mRNAs increases in response to phosphate starvation. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8927627

  5. Allyl isothiocyanate affects the cell cycle of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Åsberg, Signe E.; Bones, Atle M.; Øverby, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are degradation products of glucosinolates present in members of the Brassicaceae family acting as herbivore repellents and antimicrobial compounds. Recent results indicate that allyl ITC (AITC) has a role in defense responses such as glutathione depletion, ROS generation and stomatal closure. In this study we show that exposure to non-lethal concentrations of AITC causes a shift in the cell cycle distribution of Arabidopsis thaliana leading to accumulation of cells in S-phases and a reduced number of cells in non-replicating phases. Furthermore, transcriptional analysis revealed an AITC-induced up-regulation of the gene encoding cyclin-dependent kinase A while several genes encoding mitotic proteins were down-regulated, suggesting an inhibition of mitotic processes. Interestingly, visualization of DNA synthesis indicated that exposure to AITC reduced the rate of DNA replication. Taken together, these results indicate that non-lethal concentrations of AITC induce cells of A. thaliana to enter the cell cycle and accumulate in S-phases, presumably as a part of a defensive response. Thus, this study suggests that AITC has several roles in plant defense and add evidence to the growing data supporting a multifunctional role of glucosinolates and their degradation products in plants. PMID:26042144

  6. Targeted mutagenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana using engineered TAL effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Christian, Michelle; Qi, Yiping; Zhang, Yong; Voytas, Daniel F

    2013-10-01

    Custom TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) are increasingly used as reagents to manipulate genomes in vivo. Here, we used TALENs to modify the genome of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We engineered seven TALENs targeting five Arabidopsis genes, namely ADH1, TT4, MAPKKK1, DSK2B, and NATA2. In pooled seedlings expressing the TALENs, we observed somatic mutagenesis frequencies ranging from 2-15% at the intended targets for all seven TALENs. Somatic mutagenesis frequencies as high as 41-73% were observed in individual transgenic plant lines expressing the TALENs. Additionally, a TALEN pair targeting a tandemly duplicated gene induced a 4.4-kb deletion in somatic cells. For the most active TALEN pairs, namely those targeting ADH1 and NATA2, we found that TALEN-induced mutations were transmitted to the next generation at frequencies of 1.5-12%. Our work demonstrates that TALENs are useful reagents for achieving targeted mutagenesis in this important plant model. PMID:23979944

  7. Monitoring of isothiocyanates emanating from Arabidopsis thaliana upon paraquat spraying.

    PubMed

    Vercammen, J; Pham-Tuan, H; Arickx, I; Van der Straeten, D; Sandra, P

    2001-03-30

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants were sprayed with the superoxide-generating herbicide paraquat. The headspace of sprayed plants was characterized by a number of compounds, which were absent in the headspace of untreated plants. They were identified as isothiocyanates (ITCs) with 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate as main compound. After identification, a GC-system, based on PDMS sorption, was used to continuously monitor the ITC emissions. The specificity of isothiocyanate emission was also determined by subjecting the Arabidopsis thaliana plants to in vitro mechanical wounding. Again, 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate was the main component, but the emission profile was completely different since the compound was emitted immediately, i.e., during wounding itself. PMID:11307975

  8. The structure and NO binding properties of the nitrophorin-like heme-binding protein from Arabidopsis thaliana gene locus At1g79260.1

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Blouin, George C.; Bitto, Eduard; Olson, John S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-10-19

    The protein from Arabidopsis thaliana gene locus At1g79260.1 is comprised of 166-residues and is of previously unknown function. Initial structural studies by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) suggested that this protein might bind heme, and consequently, the crystal structures of apo and heme-bound forms were solved to near atomic resolution of 1.32 {angstrom} and 1.36 {angstrom}, respectively. The rate of hemin loss from the protein was measured to be 3.6 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}, demonstrating that it binds heme specifically and with high affinity. The protein forms a compact 10-stranded {beta}-barrel that is structurally similar to the lipocalins and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs). One group of lipocalins, the nitrophorins (NP), are heme proteins involved in nitric oxide (NO) transport and show both sequence and structural similarity to the protein from At1g79260.1 and two human homologues, all of which contain a proximal histidine capable of coordinating a heme iron. Rapid-mixing and laser photolysis techniques were used to determine the rate constants for carbon monoxide (CO) binding to the ferrous form of the protein (k{prime}{sub CO} = 0.23 {micro}M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, k{sub CO} = 0.050 s{sup -1}) and NO binding to the ferric form (k{prime}{sub NO} = 1.2 {micro}M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, k{sub NO} = 73 s{sup -1}). Based on both structural and functional similarity to the nitrophorins, we have named the protein nitrobindin and hypothesized that it plays a role in NO transport. However, one of the two human homologs of nitrobindin contains a THAP domain, implying a possible role in apoptosis.

  9. Cloning and Functional Characterization of a Vacuolar Na+/H+ Antiporter Gene from Mungbean (VrNHX1) and Its Ectopic Expression Enhanced Salt Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sagarika; Alavilli, Hemasundar; Lee, Byeong-ha; Panda, Sanjib Kumar; Sahoo, Lingaraj

    2014-01-01

    Plant vacuolar NHX exchangers play a significant role in adaption to salt stress by compartmentalizing excess cytosolic Na+ into vacuoles and maintaining cellular homeostasis and ionic equilibrium. We cloned an orthologue of the vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter gene, VrNHX1 from mungbean (Vigna radiata), an important Asiatic grain legume. The VrNHX1 (Genbank Accession number JN656211.1) contains 2095 nucleotides with an open reading frame of 1629 nucleotides encoding a predicted protein of 542 amino acids with a deduced molecular mass of 59.6 kDa. The consensus amiloride binding motif (84LFFIYLLPPI93) was observed in the third putative transmembrane domain of VrNHX1. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis clearly suggested that VrNHX1 had high similarity to those of orthologs belonging to Class-I clade of plant NHX exchangers in leguminous crops. VrNHX1 could be strongly induced by salt stress in mungbean as the expression in roots significantly increased in presence of 200 mM NaCl with concomitant accumulation of total [Na+]. Induction of VrNHX1 was also observed under cold and dehydration stress, indicating a possible cross talk between various abiotic stresses. Heterologous expression in salt sensitive yeast mutant AXT3 complemented for the loss of yeast vacuolar NHX1 under NaCl, KCl and LiCl stress indicating that VrNHX1 was the orthologue of ScNHX1. Further, AXT3 cells expressing VrNHX1 survived under low pH environment and displayed vacuolar alkalinization analyzed using pH sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF-AM. The constitutive and stress inducible expression of VrNHX1 resulted in enhanced salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines. Our work suggested that VrNHX1 was a salt tolerance determinant in mungbean. PMID:25350285

  10. AtSIG6 and other members of the sigma gene family jointly but differentially determine plastid target gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bock, Sylvia; Ortelt, Jennifer; Link, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Plants contain a nuclear gene family for plastid sigma factors, i.e., proteins that associate with the "bacterial-type" organellar RNA polymerase and confer the ability for correct promoter binding and transcription initiation. Questions that are still unresolved relate to the "division of labor" among members of the sigma family, both in terms of their range of target genes and their temporal and spatial activity during development. Clues to the in vivo role of individual sigma genes have mainly come from studies of sigma knockout lines. Despite its obvious strengths, however, this strategy does not necessarily trace-down causal relationships between mutant phenotype and a single sigma gene, if other family members act in a redundant and/or compensatory manner. We made efforts to reduce the complexity by genetic crosses of Arabidopsis single mutants (with focus on a chlorophyll-deficient sig6 line) to generate double knockout lines. The latter typically had a similar visible phenotype as the parental lines, but tended to be more strongly affected in the transcript patterns of both plastid and sigma genes. Because triple mutants were lethal under our growth conditions, we exploited a strategy of transformation of single and double mutants with RNAi constructs that contained sequences from the unconserved sigma region (UCR). These RNAi/knockout lines phenotypically resembled their parental lines, but were even more strongly affected in their plastid transcript patterns. Expression patterns of sigma genes revealed both similarities and differences compared to the parental lines, with transcripts at reduced or unchanged amounts and others that were found to be present in higher (perhaps compensatory) amounts. Together, our results reveal considerable flexibility of gene activity at the levels of both sigma and plastid gene expression. A (still viable) "basal state" seems to be reached, if 2-3 of the 6 Arabidopsis sigma genes are functionally compromised. PMID:25505479

  11. Adaptation response of Arabidopsis thaliana to random positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittang, A.-I.; Winge, P.; van Loon, J. J. W. A.; Bones, A. M.; Iversen, T.-H.

    2013-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings were exposed on a Random Positioning Machine (RPM) under light conditions for 16 h and the samples were analysed using microarray techniques as part of a preparation for a space experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). The results demonstrated a moderate to low regulation of 55 genes (<0.2% of the analysed genes). Genes encoding proteins associated with the chaperone system (e.g. heat shock proteins, HSPs) and enzymes in the flavonoid biosynthesis were induced. Most of the repressed genes were associated with light and sugar responses. Significant up-regulation of selected HSP genes was found by quantitative Real-Time PCR in 1 week old plants after the RPM exposure both in light and darkness. Higher quantity of DPBA (diphenylboric acid 2-amino-ethyl ester) staining was observed in the whole root and in the root elongation zone of the seedlings exposed on the RPM by use of fluorescent microscopy, indicating higher flavonoid content. The regulated genes and an increase of flavonoids are related to several stresses, but increased occurrence of HSPs and flavonoids are also representative for normal growth (e.g. gravitropism). The response could be a direct stress response or an integrated response of the two signal pathways of light and gravity resulting in an overall light response.

  12. Differentiation between MAMP Triggered Defenses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Madlen; Karasov, Talia L.; Bergelson, Joy

    2016-01-01

    A first line of defense against pathogen attack for both plants and animals involves the detection of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), followed by the induction of a complex immune response. Plants, like animals, encode several receptors that recognize different MAMPs. While these receptors are thought to function largely redundantly, the physiological responses to different MAMPs can differ in detail. Responses to MAMP exposure evolve quantitatively in natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana, perhaps in response to environment specific differences in microbial threat. Here, we sought to determine the extent to which the detection of two canonical MAMPs were evolving redundantly or distinctly within natural populations. Our results reveal negligible correlation in plant growth responses between the bacterial MAMPs EF-Tu and flagellin. Further investigation of the genetic bases of differences in seedling growth inhibition and validation of 11 candidate genes reveal substantial differences in the genetic loci that underlie variation in response to these two MAMPs. Our results indicate that natural variation in MAMP recognition is largely MAMP-specific, indicating an ability to differentially tailor responses to EF-Tu and flagellin in A. thaliana populations. PMID:27336582

  13. Exploring Arabidopsis thaliana Root Endophytes via Single-Cell Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, Derek; Woyke, Tanja; Tringe, Susannah; Dangl, Jeff

    2014-03-19

    Land plants grow in association with microbial communities both on their surfaces and inside the plant (endophytes). The relationships between microbes and their host can vary from pathogenic to mutualistic. Colonization of the endophyte compartment occurs in the presence of a sophisticated plant immune system, implying finely tuned discrimination of pathogens from mutualists and commensals. Despite the importance of the microbiome to the plant, relatively little is known about the specific interactions between plants and microbes, especially in the case of endophytes. The vast majority of microbes have not been grown in the lab, and thus one of the few ways of studying them is by examining their DNA. Although metagenomics is a powerful tool for examining microbial communities, its application to endophyte samples is technically difficult due to the presence of large amounts of host plant DNA in the sample. One method to address these difficulties is single-cell genomics where a single microbial cell is isolated from a sample, lysed, and its genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) to produce enough DNA for genome sequencing. This produces a single-cell amplified genome (SAG). We have applied this technology to study the endophytic microbes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Extensive 16S gene profiling of the microbial communities in the roots of multiple inbred A. thaliana strains has identified 164 OTUs as being significantly enriched in all the root endophyte samples compared to their presence in bulk soil.

  14. Editing of plastid RNA in Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Tillich, Michael; Funk, Helena T; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian; Poltnigg, Peter; Sabater, Bartolomé; Martin, Mercedes; Maier, Rainer M

    2005-09-01

    Post-transcriptional maturation of plastid-encoded mRNAs from land plants includes editing by making cytidine to uridine alterations at highly specific positions; this usually restores codon identities for conserved amino acids that are important for the proper function of the affected proteins. In contrast to the rather constant number of editing sites their location varies greatly, even between closely related taxa. Here, we experimentally determined the specific pattern of editing sites (the editotype) of the plastid genome of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia (Col-0). Based on phylogenetic analyses of plastid open reading frames, we identified 28 editing sites. Two editing events in the genes matK and ndhB seem to have evolved late during the evolution of flowering plants. Strikingly, they are embedded in almost identical sequence elements and seem to be phylogenetically co-processed. This suggests that the two sites are recognized by the same trans-factor, which could help to explain the hitherto enigmatic gain of editing sites in evolution. In order to trace variations in editotype at the subspecies level we examined two other A. thaliana accessions, Cape Verde Islands (Cvi-0) and Wassilewskija (Ws-2), for the Col-0 editing sites. Both Cvi-0 and Ws-2 possess and process the whole set of editing sites as determined in Col-0, but the consequences of RNA editing differ at one position between the ecotypes. PMID:16115067

  15. Differentiation between MAMP Triggered Defenses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Madlen; Karasov, Talia L; Bergelson, Joy

    2016-06-01

    A first line of defense against pathogen attack for both plants and animals involves the detection of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), followed by the induction of a complex immune response. Plants, like animals, encode several receptors that recognize different MAMPs. While these receptors are thought to function largely redundantly, the physiological responses to different MAMPs can differ in detail. Responses to MAMP exposure evolve quantitatively in natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana, perhaps in response to environment specific differences in microbial threat. Here, we sought to determine the extent to which the detection of two canonical MAMPs were evolving redundantly or distinctly within natural populations. Our results reveal negligible correlation in plant growth responses between the bacterial MAMPs EF-Tu and flagellin. Further investigation of the genetic bases of differences in seedling growth inhibition and validation of 11 candidate genes reveal substantial differences in the genetic loci that underlie variation in response to these two MAMPs. Our results indicate that natural variation in MAMP recognition is largely MAMP-specific, indicating an ability to differentially tailor responses to EF-Tu and flagellin in A. thaliana populations. PMID:27336582

  16. HOS3, an ELO-Like Gene, Inhibits Effects of ABA and Implicates a S-1-P/Ceramide Control System for Abiotic Stress Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Quist, Tanya M.; Sokolchik, Irina; Shi, Huazhong; Joly, Robert J.; Bressan, Ray A.; Maggio, Albino; Narsimhan, Meena; Li, Xia

    2009-01-01

    A hyper-osmotically sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, designated hos3-1 (high expression of osmotically responsive genes), was identified based on its hyper-luminescence of RD29A:LUC promoter fusion plants upon treatment with NaCl and ABA. These responses implicate the disrupted gene as a direct or indirect negative regulator of the RD29A stress-responsive pathway. By sequencing the flanking regions of the T-DNA borders, it was determined that the disrupted gene is at locus At4g36830, annotated as encoding a putative protein with high homology to CIG30 (ELO2/FEN1). CIG30 has been implicated in synthesis of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA), which are essential precursors for sphingolipids and ceramides. Altered stress responses characteristic of ABA-hypersensitivity, including reduced root growth inhibition and reduced germination with ABA treatment and reduced water loss from leaves, were exhibited by allelic hos3-1 and hos3-2 mutants. The hos3-2 mutant is partially suppressed in its transcript abundance and is inherited as a recessive trait. Further, the HOS3 ORF under the control of the 35SCaMV promoter restored wild-type NaCl- and ABA-root growth sensitivity as well as RD29A:LUC luminescence in mutant plants. We also show here that the HOS3 wild-type gene functionally complements the sensitivity of elo2 and elo3 yeast mutants to monensin. Furthermore, both hos3-1 and hos3-2 alleles shared increased sensitivity to the herbicide Metolachlor, which inhibits acyl chain elongation in synthesis of VLCFA, and HOS3 functionally complemented both elo2 and elo3 and restored levels of VLCFA. Together, these data establish that HOS3 inhibits ABA-mediated stress responses and implicate the VLCFA pathway and products as control points for several aspects of abiotic stress signaling and responses. The results also provide support for a role of ceramide in the control of stomatal behavior. PMID:19529829

  17. Gene expression profile of zeitlupe/lov kelch protein1 T-DNA insertion mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana: Downregulation of auxin-inducible genes in hypocotyls

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Aya; Takase, Tomoyuki; Kitaki, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kiyosue, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Elongation of hypocotyl cells has been studied as a model for elucidating the contribution of cellular expansion to plant organ growth. ZEITLUPE (ZTL) or LOV KELCH PROTEIN1 (LKP1) is a positive regulator of warmth-induced hypocotyl elongation under white light in Arabidopsis, although the molecular mechanisms by which it promotes hypocotyl cell elongation remain unknown. Microarray analysis showed that 134 genes were upregulated and 204 genes including 15 auxin-inducible genes were downregulated in the seedlings of 2 ztl T-DNA insertion mutants grown under warm conditions with continuous white light. Application of a polar auxin transport inhibitor, an auxin antagonist or an auxin biosynthesis inhibitor inhibited hypocotyl elongation of control seedlings to the level observed with the ztl mutant. Our data suggest the involvement of auxin and auxin-inducible genes in ZTL-mediated hypocotyl elongation. PMID:26237185

  18. The Arabidopsis TAC Position Viewer: a high-resolution map of transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC) clones aligned with the Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia-0 genome.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yoshitsugu; Suda, Kunihiro; Liu, Yao-Guang; Sato, Shusei; Nakamura, Yukino; Yokoyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Hanano, Shigeru; Takita, Eiji; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Kaneko, Takakazu; Yano, Kentaro; Tabata, Satoshi; Shibata, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    We present a high-resolution map of genomic transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC) clones extending over all Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) chromosomes. The Arabidopsis genomic TAC clones have been valuable genetic tools. Previously, we constructed an Arabidopsis genomic TAC library consisting of more than 10,000 TAC clones harboring large genomic DNA fragments extending over the whole Arabidopsis genome. Here, we determined 13,577 end sequences from 6987 Arabidopsis TAC clones and mapped 5937 TAC clones to precise locations, covering approximately 90% of the Arabidopsis chromosomes. We present the large-scale data set of TAC clones with high-resolution mapping information as a Java application tool, the Arabidopsis TAC Position Viewer, which provides ready-to-go transformable genomic DNA clones corresponding to certain loci on Arabidopsis chromosomes. The TAC clone resources will accelerate genomic DNA cloning, positional walking, complementation of mutants and DNA transformation for heterologous gene expression. PMID:26227242

  19. Proteomic Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings Treated with Ethylene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethylene (ET) is a volatile plant growth hormone that most famously modulates fruit ripening, but it also controls plant growth, development and stress responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ET is perceived by receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum, and a signal is transduced through a protein kinase,...

  20. VERMICULITE, A SOURCE OF METALS FOR 'ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. were grown in hydroponic systems using vermiculite as a growth medium at nutrition levels ranging from adequate to deficient. Plants grown on the low-total nutrient or low-iron nutrient contained more of iron, magnesium, and aluminum, fr...

  1. An Arabidopsis thaliana embryo arrest mutant exhibiting germination potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to initiate radicle elongation, or germination potential, occurs in developing embryos before the completion of seed maturation. Green embryos after walking-stick stage in developing Arabidopsis thaliana seeds germinate when excised from seeds and incubated in MS media containing 1 % suc...

  2. Light responses in Photoperiodism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony R. Cashmore

    2006-08-01

    ADO1: An Arabidopsis blue light photoreceptor We have reported the characterization of an Arabidopsis gene encoding the ADAGIO 1 (ADO1) protein (Jarillo et al., 2001a). ADO1 contains a LOV domain, similar to WHITE COLLAR 1 (WC1), a photoreceptor for entrainment of Neurospora circadian rhythms (Froehlich et al., 2002), as well as PHOT1 and PHOT2, the blue light photoreceptors for phototropism (Briggs et al., 2001; Christie et al., 1998; Jarillo et al., 2001b; Kinoshita et al., 2001). Loss of function ado1 mutants show an unusually long periodicity for their free running circadian rhythm (Jarillo et al., 2001a). This observation holds for plants grown under white light as well as blue light and surprisingly, plants grown under red light also show altered circadian properties. The similarity of the LOV domain of ADO1 to those of PHOT1, PHOT2 and WC1 (known flavoprotein photoreceptors) as well as the genetic and molecular properties of ADO1, indicate that ADO1 is likely a new class of blue light photoreceptor. Indeed, the LOV domain of the related FKF1/ADO3 has been shown to bind FMN, and exhibit the in vitro photochemistry characteristic of PHOT1 (Imaizumi et al., 2003). Furthermore, ZTL/ADO1 has been shown to participate in the circadian and proteasome mediated degradation of the Arabidopsis clock protein, TOC1 (Mas et al., 2003). We also showed that the ado1 mutation selectively confers hypersensitivity to red light — when grown under red light (but not blue light) the ado1 mutant possesses an unusually short hypocotyl. This red light hypersensivity is even more severe in a triple ado1 ado2 ado3 mutant — ADO2 and ADO3 being the two other members of this ADAGIO gene family. This finding of a mutant phenotype under red light is somewhat unexpected for a protein thought to function as a photoreceptor for blue light. We have pursued our studies of ADO1 by preparing a mutant gene for which we have altered the codon for the cysteine residue conserved in all LOV

  3. Involvement of cotton gene GhFPF1 in the regulation of shade avoidance responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Yu, Shuxun

    2015-01-01

    Phytochrome system perceives the reduction in the ratio of red to far-red light when plants are grown under dense canopy. This signal, regarded as a warning of competition, will trigger a series of phenotypic changes to avoid shade. Progress has been made for several phytochrome signaling intermediates acting as positive regulators of accelerated elongation growth and promotion of flowering in shade-avoidance has been identified. Recently, a FPF1 homolog GhFPF1 was identified in upland cotton. Our data supported that transgenic Arabidopsis of over-expressing GhFPF1 displayed a constitutive shade-avoiding phenotype resembling phyB mutants in several respects such as accelerated elongation of hypocotyl and petioles, upward of leaf movement, and promoted flowering. In this addendum, by dissection of GhFPF1 acting as a component of shade-avoidance responses we suppose that GhFPF1 might influence the timing of the floral transition independently of shade-mediated early flowering. Furthermore, the opposite changes of IAA content in transgenic leaves and stems suggested that alteration of IAA storage and release took place during shade-avoidance responses. PMID:26337193

  4. Involvement of cotton gene GhFPF1 in the regulation of shade avoidance responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Yu, Shuxun

    2015-01-01

    Phytochrome system perceives the reduction in the ratio of red to far-red light when plants are grown under dense canopy. This signal, regarded as a warning of competition, will trigger a series of phenotypic changes to avoid shade. Progress has been made for several phytochrome signaling intermediates acting as positive regulators of accelerated elongation growth and promotion of flowering in shade-avoidance has been identified. Recently, a FPF1 homolog GhFPF1 was identified in upland cotton. Our data supported that transgenic Arabidopsis of over-expressing GhFPF1 displayed a constitutive shade-avoiding phenotype resembling phyB mutants in several respects such as accelerated elongation of hypocotyl and petioles, upward of leaf movement, and promoted flowering. In this addendum, by dissection of GhFPF1 acting as a component of shade-avoidance responses we suppose that GhFPF1 might influence the timing of the floral transition independently of shade-mediated early flowering. Furthermore, the opposite changes of IAA content in transgenic leaves and stems suggested that alteration of IAA storage and release took place during shade-avoidance responses. PMID:26337193

  5. Overexpression of SAMDC1 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana increases expression of defense-related genes as well as resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis

    PubMed Central

    Marco, Francisco; Busó, Enrique; Carrasco, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    It has been previously described that elevation of endogenous spermine levels in Arabidopsis could be achieved by transgenic overexpression of S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) or Spermine synthase (SPMS). In both cases, spermine accumulation had an impact on the plant transcriptome, with up-regulation of a set of genes enriched in functional categories involved in defense-related processes against both biotic and abiotic stresses. In this work, the response of SAMDC1-overexpressing plants against bacterial and oomycete pathogens has been tested. The expression of several pathogen defense-related genes was induced in these plants as well as in wild type plants exposed to an exogenous supply of spermine. SAMDC1-overexpressing plants showed an increased tolerance to infection by Pseudomonas syringae and by Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Both results add more evidence to the hypothesis that spermine plays a key role in plant resistance to biotic stress. PMID:24734036

  6. Planting molecular functions in an ecological context with Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Ute

    2015-01-01

    The vascular plant Arabidopsis thaliana is a central genetic model and universal reference organism in plant and crop science. The successful integration of different fields of research in the study of A. thaliana has made a large contribution to our molecular understanding of key concepts in biology. The availability and active development of experimental tools and resources, in combination with the accessibility of a wealth of cumulatively acquired knowledge about this plant, support the most advanced systems biology approaches among all land plants. Research in molecular ecology and evolution has also brought the natural history of A. thaliana into the limelight. This article showcases our current knowledge of the natural history of A. thaliana from the perspective of the most closely related plant species, providing an evolutionary framework for interpreting novel findings and for developing new hypotheses based on our knowledge of this plant. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06100.001 PMID:25807084

  7. Genetic analysis of salt-tolerant mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, V; Ponce, M R; Micol, J L

    2000-01-01

    Stress caused by the increased salinity of irrigated fields impairs plant growth and is one of the major constraints that limits crop productivity in many important agricultural areas. As a contribution to solving such agronomic problems, we have carried out a large-scale screening for Arabidopsis thaliana mutants induced on different genetic backgrounds by EMS treatment, fast neutron bombardment, or T-DNA insertions. From the 675,500 seeds we screened, 17 mutant lines were isolated, all but one of which yielded 25-70% germination levels on 250 mm NaCl medium, a condition in which their ancestor ecotypes are unable to germinate. Monogenic recessive inheritance of NaCl-tolerant germination was displayed with incomplete penetrance by all the selected mutants, which fell into five complementation groups. These were named SALOBRENO (SAN) and mapped relative to polymorphic microsatellites, the map positions of three of them suggesting that they are novel genes. Strains carrying mutations in the SAN1-SAN4 genes display similar responses to both ionic effects and osmotic pressure, their germination being NaCl and mannitol tolerant but KCl and Na(2)SO(4) sensitive. In addition, NaCl-, KCl-, and mannitol-tolerant as well as abscisic-acid-insensitive germination was displayed by sañ5, whose genetic and molecular characterization indicates that it carries an extremely hypomorphic or null allele of the ABI4 gene, its deduced protein product lacking the APETALA2 DNA binding domain. PMID:10629000

  8. Spatial control of flowering by DELLA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Vinicius C; Horrer, Daniel; Küttner, Frank; Schmid, Markus

    2012-11-01

    The transition from vegetative to reproductive development is a central event in the plant life cycle. To time the induction of flowering correctly, plants integrate environmental and endogenous signals such as photoperiod, temperature and hormonal status. The hormone gibberellic acid (GA) has long been known to regulate flowering. However, the spatial contribution of GA signaling in flowering time control is poorly understood. Here we have analyzed the effect of tissue-specific misexpression of wild-type and GA-insensitive (dellaΔ17) DELLA proteins on the floral transition in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that under long days, GA affects the floral transition by promoting the expression of flowering time integrator genes such as FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) in leaves independently of CONSTANS (CO) and GIGANTEA (GI). In addition, GA signaling promotes flowering independently of photoperiod through the regulation of SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) genes in both the leaves and at the shoot meristem. Our data suggest that GA regulates flowering by controlling the spatial expression of floral regulatory genes throughout the plant in a day-length-specific manner. PMID:22992955

  9. Cis and trans-acting elements involved in the activation of Arabidopsis thaliana A1 gene encoding the translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Curie, C; Liboz, T; Bardet, C; Gander, E; Médale, C; Axelos, M; Lescure, B

    1991-03-25

    In A. thaliana the translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha is encoded by a small multigenic family of four members (A1-A4). The A1 gene promoter has been dissected and examined in a transient expression system using the GUS reporter gene. Deletion analysis has shown that several elements are involved in the activation process. One cis-acting domain, the TEF 1 box, has been accurately mapped 100 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. This domain is the target for trans-acting factors identified in nuclear extracts prepared from A. thaliana. Homologies are found between the TEF 1 box and sequences present at the same location within the A2, A3 and A4 promoters. This observation, together with those obtained from gel retardation assays performed using DNA fragments from the A4 promoter, suggest that the activation process mediated by the TEF 1 element is conserved among the A. thaliana EF-1 alpha genes. Analysis of nearly full length cDNA clones has shown that in addition to a single intron located within the coding region, the A1 gene contains a second intron located within the 5' non coding region. Such an intron is also present within the A2, A3 and A4 genes. This 5' intervening sequence appears to be essential to obtain a maximum GUS activity driven by the A1 gene promoter. PMID:1840652

  10. Cis and trans-acting elements involved in the activation of Arabidopsis thaliana A1 gene encoding the translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Curie, C; Liboz, T; Bardet, C; Gander, E; Médale, C; Axelos, M; Lescure, B

    1991-01-01

    In A. thaliana the translation elongation factor EF-1 alpha is encoded by a small multigenic family of four members (A1-A4). The A1 gene promoter has been dissected and examined in a transient expression system using the GUS reporter gene. Deletion analysis has shown that several elements are involved in the activation process. One cis-acting domain, the TEF 1 box, has been accurately mapped 100 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. This domain is the target for trans-acting factors identified in nuclear extracts prepared from A. thaliana. Homologies are found between the TEF 1 box and sequences present at the same location within the A2, A3 and A4 promoters. This observation, together with those obtained from gel retardation assays performed using DNA fragments from the A4 promoter, suggest that the activation process mediated by the TEF 1 element is conserved among the A. thaliana EF-1 alpha genes. Analysis of nearly full length cDNA clones has shown that in addition to a single intron located within the coding region, the A1 gene contains a second intron located within the 5' non coding region. Such an intron is also present within the A2, A3 and A4 genes. This 5' intervening sequence appears to be essential to obtain a maximum GUS activity driven by the A1 gene promoter. Images PMID:1840652

  11. Characterization of an AtCCX5 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana that involves in high-affinity K{sup +} uptake and Na{sup +} transport in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinxin; Zhang, Min; Takano, Tetsuo; Liu, Shenkui

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} The AtCCX5 protein coding a putative cation calcium exchanger was characterized. {yields} AtCCX5 expressed in yeast was localized in the plasma membrane and nuclear periphery. {yields} AtCCX5 protein did not show the same transport properties as the CAXs. {yields} AtCCX5 protein involves in mediating high-affinity K{sup +} uptake in yeast. {yields} AtCCX5 protein also involves in Na{sup +} transport in yeast. -- Abstract: The gene for a putative cation calcium exchanger (CCX) from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtCCX5, was cloned and its function was analyzed in yeast. Green fluorescent protein-tagged AtCCX5 expressed in yeast was localized in the plasma membrane and nuclear periphery. The yeast transformants expressing AtCCX5 were created and their growth in the presence of various cations (K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Li{sup +}) were analyzed. AtCCX5 expression was found to affect the response to K{sup +} and Na{sup +} in yeast. The AtCCX5 transformant also showed a little better growth to Zn{sup 2+}. The yeast mutant 9.3 expressing AtCCX5 restored growth of the mutant on medium with low K{sup +} (0.5 mM), and also suppressed its Na{sup +} sensitivity. Ion uptake experiments showed that AtCCX5 mediated relatively high-affinity K{sup +} uptake and was also involved in Na{sup +} transport in yeast. Taken together, these findings suggest that the AtCCX5 is a novel transport protein involves in mediating high-affinity K{sup +} uptake and Na{sup +} transport in yeast.

  12. DNA Gyrase Is the Target for the Quinolone Drug Ciprofloxacin in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Evans-Roberts, Katherine M.; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Wall, Melisa K.; Leroux, Julie; Mylne, Joshua S.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains four genes that were originally annotated as potentially encoding DNA gyrase: ATGYRA, ATGYRB1, ATGYRB2, and ATGYRB3. Although we subsequently showed that ATGYRB3 does not encode a gyrase subunit, the other three genes potentially encode subunits of a plant gyrase. We also showed evidence for the existence of supercoiling activity in A. thaliana and that the plant is sensitive to quinolone and aminocoumarin antibiotics, compounds that target DNA gyrase in bacteria. However, it was not possible at that time to show whether the A. thaliana genes encoded an active gyrase enzyme, nor whether that enzyme is indeed the target for the quinolone and aminocoumarin antibiotics. Here we show that an A. thaliana mutant resistant to the quinolone drug ciprofloxacin has a point mutation in ATGYRA. Moreover we show that, as in bacteria, the quinolone-sensitive (wild-type) allele is dominant to the resistant gene. Further we have heterologously expressed ATGYRA and ATGYRB2 in a baculovirus expression system and shown supercoiling activity of the partially purified enzyme. Expression/purification of the quinolone-resistant A. thaliana gyrase yields active enzyme that is resistant to ciprofloxacin. Taken together these experiments now show unequivocally that A. thaliana encodes an organelle-targeted DNA gyrase that is the target of the quinolone drug ciprofloxacin; this has important consequences for plant physiology and the development of herbicides. PMID:26663076

  13. DNA Gyrase Is the Target for the Quinolone Drug Ciprofloxacin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Evans-Roberts, Katherine M; Mitchenall, Lesley A; Wall, Melisa K; Leroux, Julie; Mylne, Joshua S; Maxwell, Anthony

    2016-02-12

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains four genes that were originally annotated as potentially encoding DNA gyrase: ATGYRA, ATGYRB1, ATGYRB2, and ATGYRB3. Although we subsequently showed that ATGYRB3 does not encode a gyrase subunit, the other three genes potentially encode subunits of a plant gyrase. We also showed evidence for the existence of supercoiling activity in A. thaliana and that the plant is sensitive to quinolone and aminocoumarin antibiotics, compounds that target DNA gyrase in bacteria. However, it was not possible at that time to show whether the A. thaliana genes encoded an active gyrase enzyme, nor whether that enzyme is indeed the target for the quinolone and aminocoumarin antibiotics. Here we show that an A. thaliana mutant resistant to the quinolone drug ciprofloxacin has a point mutation in ATGYRA. Moreover we show that, as in bacteria, the quinolone-sensitive (wild-type) allele is dominant to the resistant gene. Further we have heterologously expressed ATGYRA and ATGYRB2 in a baculovirus expression system and shown supercoiling activity of the partially purified enzyme. Expression/purification of the quinolone-resistant A. thaliana gyrase yields active enzyme that is resistant to ciprofloxacin. Taken together these experiments now show unequivocally that A. thaliana encodes an organelle-targeted DNA gyrase that is the target of the quinolone drug ciprofloxacin; this has important consequences for plant physiology and the development of herbicides. PMID:26663076

  14. Facile high-throughput forward chemical genetic screening by in situ monitoring of glucuronidase-based reporter gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Vivek; Kombrink, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The use of biologically active small molecules to perturb biological functions holds enormous potential for investigating complex signaling networks. However, in contrast to animal systems, the search for and application of chemical tools for basic discovery in the plant sciences, generally referred to as “chemical genetics,” has only recently gained momentum. In addition to cultured cells, the well-characterized, small-sized model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is suitable for cultivation in microplates, which allows employing diverse cell- or phenotype-based chemical screens. In such screens, a chemical's bioactivity is typically assessed either through scoring its impact on morphological traits or quantifying molecular attributes such as enzyme or reporter activities. Here, we describe a facile forward chemical screening methodology for intact Arabidopsis seedlings harboring the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter by directly quantifying GUS activity in situ with 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-glucuronide (4-MUG) as substrate. The quantitative nature of this screening assay has an obvious advantage over the also convenient histochemical GUS staining method, as it allows application of statistical procedures and unbiased hit selection based on threshold values as well as distinction between compounds with strong or weak bioactivity. At the same time, the in situ bioassay is very convenient requiring less effort and time for sample handling in comparison to the conventional quantitative in vitro GUS assay using 4-MUG, as validated with several Arabidopsis lines harboring different GUS reporter constructs. To demonstrate that the developed assays is particularly suitable for large-scale screening projects, we performed a pilot screen for chemical activators or inhibitors of salicylic acid-mediated defense signaling using the Arabidopsis PR1p::GUS line. Importantly, the screening methodology provided here can be adopted for any inducible GUS reporter line. PMID:25688251

  15. Epigenomic Diversity in a Global Collection of Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions.

    PubMed

    Kawakatsu, Taiji; Huang, Shao-Shan Carol; Jupe, Florian; Sasaki, Eriko; Schmitz, Robert J; Urich, Mark A; Castanon, Rosa; Nery, Joseph R; Barragan, Cesar; He, Yupeng; Chen, Huaming; Dubin, Manu; Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Wang, Congmao; Bemm, Felix; Becker, Claude; O'Neil, Ryan; O'Malley, Ronan C; Quarless, Danjuma X; Schork, Nicholas J; Weigel, Detlef; Nordborg, Magnus; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-07-14

    The epigenome orchestrates genome accessibility, functionality, and three-dimensional structure. Because epigenetic variation can impact transcription and thus phenotypes, it may contribute to adaptation. Here, we report 1,107 high-quality single-base resolution methylomes and 1,203 transcriptomes from the 1001 Genomes collection of Arabidopsis thaliana. Although the genetic basis of methylation variation is highly complex, geographic origin is a major predictor of genome-wide DNA methylation levels and of altered gene expression caused by epialleles. Comparison to cistrome and epicistrome datasets identifies associations between transcription factor binding sites, methylation, nucleotide variation, and co-expression modules. Physical maps for nine of the most diverse genomes reveal how transposons and other structural variants shape the epigenome, with dramatic effects on immunity genes. The 1001 Epigenomes Project provides a comprehensive resource for understanding how variation in DNA methylation contributes to molecular and non-molecular phenotypes in natural populations of the most studied model plant. PMID:27419873

  16. Induction of Anthocyanin Accumulation by Cytokinins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Deikman, J.; Hammer, P. E.

    1995-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants treated with exogenous cytokinins accumulate anthocyanin pigments. We have characterized this response because it is potentially useful as a genetic marker for cytokinin responsiveness. Levels of mRNAs for four genes of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway, phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1 (PAL1), chalcone synthase (CHS), chalcone isomerase (CHI), and dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) were shown to increase coordinately in response to benzyladenine (BA). However, nuclear run-on transcription experiments suggested that although CHS and DFR are controlled by BA at the transcriptional level, PAL1 and CHI are controlled by BA posttranscriptionally. CHS mRNA levels increased within 2 h of BA spray application, and peaked by 3 h. Levels of PAL1 mRNA did not increase within 6 h of BA spray. We also showed that PAL1, CHS, CHI, and DFR mRNA levels fluctuate during a 24-h period and appear to be controlled by a circadian clock. The relation between cytokinin regulation and light regulation of CHS gene transcription is discussed. PMID:12228453

  17. Genetics of water use physiology in locally adapted Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Julius P; Mullen, Jack; Lovell, John T; Monroe, J Grey; Paul, John R; Oakley, Christopher G; McKay, John K

    2016-10-01

    Identifying the genetic basis of adaptation to climate has long been a goal in evolutionary biology and has applications in agriculture. Adaptation to drought represents one important aspect of local adaptation, and drought is the major factor limiting agricultural yield. We examined local adaptation between Sweden and Italy Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes, which show contrasting levels of water availability in their local environments. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling water use physiology traits and adaptive trait QTL (genomic regions where trait QTL and fitness QTL colocalize), we performed QTL mapping on 374F9 recombinant inbred lines in well-watered and terminal drought conditions. We found 72 QTL (32 in well-watered, 31 in drought, 9 for plasticity) across five water use physiology traits: δ(13)C, rosette area, dry rosette weight, leaf water content and percent leaf nitrogen. Some of these genomic regions colocalize with fitness QTL and with other physiology QTL in defined hotspots. In addition, we found evidence of both constitutive and inducible water use physiology QTL. Finally, we identified highly divergent candidate genes, in silico. Our results suggest that many genes with minor effects may influence adaptation through water use physiology and that pleiotropic water use physiology QTL have fitness consequences. PMID:27593459

  18. The Important Positive and Negative Regulators of Feedback Loop of Circardian Clock are Conserved in Soybean and Exhibits Similar Diurnal Expression Pattern to Arabidopsis Thaliana Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flowering time is a characteristic of great agronomic importance. Relative to such model species as Arabidopsis and rice, little is known of the genetic mechanisms controlling flowering in soybean. Soybean breeders have identified a series of seven loci, known as the E genes that mediated by photope...

  19. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, William C.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional sodium doedocyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  20. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, W. C.; Brown, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional SDS PAGE and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  1. Phosphate Uptake and Allocation – A Closer Look at Arabidopsis thaliana L. and Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed Central

    Młodzińska, Ewa; Zboińska, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    This year marks the 20th anniversary of the discovery and characterization of the two Arabidopsis PHT1 genes encoding the phosphate transporter in Arabidopsis thaliana. So far, multiple inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters have been described, and the molecular basis of Pi acquisition by plants has been well-characterized. These genes are involved in Pi acquisition, allocation, and/or signal transduction. This review summarizes how Pi is taken up by the roots and further distributed within two plants: A. thaliana and Oryza sativa L. by plasma membrane phosphate transporters PHT1 and PHO1 as well as by intracellular transporters: PHO1, PHT2, PHT3, PHT4, PHT5 (VPT1), SPX-MFS and phosphate translocators family. We also describe the role of the PHT1 transporters in mycorrhizal roots of rice as an adaptive strategy to cope with limited phosphate availability in soil. PMID:27574525

  2. Phosphate Uptake and Allocation - A Closer Look at Arabidopsis thaliana L. and Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Młodzińska, Ewa; Zboińska, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    This year marks the 20th anniversary of the discovery and characterization of the two Arabidopsis PHT1 genes encoding the phosphate transporter in Arabidopsis thaliana. So far, multiple inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters have been described, and the molecular basis of Pi acquisition by plants has been well-characterized. These genes are involved in Pi acquisition, allocation, and/or signal transduction. This review summarizes how Pi is taken up by the roots and further distributed within two plants: A. thaliana and Oryza sativa L. by plasma membrane phosphate transporters PHT1 and PHO1 as well as by intracellular transporters: PHO1, PHT2, PHT3, PHT4, PHT5 (VPT1), SPX-MFS and phosphate translocators family. We also describe the role of the PHT1 transporters in mycorrhizal roots of rice as an adaptive strategy to cope with limited phosphate availability in soil. PMID:27574525

  3. A simple method for the addition of rotenone in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    PubMed Central

    Maliandi, María V; Rius, Sebastián P; Busi, María V; Gomez-Casati, Diego F

    2015-01-01

    A simple and reproducible method for the treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves with rotenone is presented. Rosette leaves were incubated with rotenone and Triton X-100 for at least 15 h. Treated leaves showed increased expression of COX19 and BCS1a, 2 genes known to be induced in Arabidopsis cell cultures after rotenone treatment. Moreover, rotenone/Triton X-100 incubated leaves presented an inhibition of oxygen uptake. The simplicity of the procedure shows this methodology is useful for studying the effect of the addition of rotenone to a photosynthetic tissue in situ. PMID:26357865

  4. A simple method for the addition of rotenone in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    PubMed

    Maliandi, María V; Rius, Sebastián P; Busi, María V; Gomez-Casati, Diego F

    2015-01-01

    A simple and reproducible method for the treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves with rotenone is presented. Rosette leaves were incubated with rotenone and Triton X-100 for at least 15 h. Treated leaves showed increased expression of COX19 and BCS1a, 2 genes known to be induced in Arabidopsis cell cultures after rotenone treatment. Moreover, rotenone/Triton X-100 incubated leaves presented an inhibition of oxygen uptake. The simplicity of the procedure shows this methodology is useful for studying the effect of the addition of rotenone to a photosynthetic tissue in situ. PMID:26357865

  5. Quantitative divergence of the bacterial root microbiota in Arabidopsis thaliana relatives

    PubMed Central

    Schlaeppi, Klaus; Dombrowski, Nina; Oter, Ruben Garrido; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Plants host at the contact zone with soil a distinctive root-associated bacterial microbiota believed to function in plant nutrition and health. We investigated the diversity of the root microbiota within a phylogenetic framework of hosts: three Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes along with its sister species Arabidopsis halleri and Arabidopsis lyrata, as well as Cardamine hirsuta, which diverged from the former ∼35 Mya. We surveyed their microbiota under controlled environmental conditions and of A. thaliana and C. hirsuta in two natural habitats. Deep 16S rRNA gene profiling of root and corresponding soil samples identified a total of 237 quantifiable bacterial ribotypes, of which an average of 73 community members were enriched in roots. The composition of this root microbiota depends more on interactions with the environment than with host species. Interhost species microbiota diversity is largely quantitative and is greater between the three Arabidopsis species than the three A. thaliana ecotypes. Host species-specific microbiota were identified at the levels of individual community members, taxonomic groups, and whole root communities. Most of these signatures were observed in the phylogenetically distant C. hirsuta. However, the branching order of host phylogeny is incongruent with interspecies root microbiota diversity, indicating that host phylogenetic distance alone cannot explain root microbiota diversification. Our work reveals within 35 My of host divergence a largely conserved and taxonomically narrow root microbiota, which comprises stable community members belonging to the Actinomycetales, Burkholderiales, and Flavobacteriales. PMID:24379374

  6. Gibberellins control fruit patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Girin, Thomas; Sorefan, Karim; Fuentes, Sara; Wood, Thomas A.; Lawrenson, Tom; Sablowski, Robert; Østergaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The Arabidopsis basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) proteins INDEHISCENT (IND) and ALCATRAZ (ALC) specify tissues required for fruit opening that have major roles in seed dispersal and plant domestication. Here, we show that synthesis of the phytohormone gibberellin is a direct and necessary target of IND, and that ALC interacts directly with DELLA repressors, which antagonize ALC function but are destabilized by gibberellin. Thus, the gibberellin/DELLA pathway has a key role in patterning the Arabidopsis fruit, and the interaction between DELLA and bHLH proteins, previously shown to connect gibberellin and light responses, is a versatile regulatory module also used in tissue patterning. PMID:20889713

  7. Gibberellins control fruit patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Girin, Thomas; Sorefan, Karim; Fuentes, Sara; Wood, Thomas A; Lawrenson, Tom; Sablowski, Robert; Østergaard, Lars

    2010-10-01

    The Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins INDEHISCENT (IND) and ALCATRAZ (ALC) specify tissues required for fruit opening that have major roles in seed dispersal and plant domestication. Here, we show that synthesis of the phytohormone gibberellin is a direct and necessary target of IND, and that ALC interacts directly with DELLA repressors, which antagonize ALC function but are destabilized by gibberellin. Thus, the gibberellin/DELLA pathway has a key role in patterning the Arabidopsis fruit, and the interaction between DELLA and bHLH proteins, previously shown to connect gibberellin and light responses, is a versatile regulatory module also used in tissue patterning. PMID:20889713

  8. AtCYP710A1 gene-mediated stigmasterol production plays a role in imparting temperature stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Wang, Keri; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2013-01-01

    Stigmasterol and sitosterol, important sterols present in plants, are known to influence permeability and fluidity characteristics of the plasma membrane and other organellar membranes. We had previously demonstrated that the Arabidopsis Atcyp710A1 gene, which catalyzes conversion of sitosterol into stigmasterol, plays a role in plasma membrane permeability, thus influencing leakage of cellular nutrients and ions into apoplast. In this study, we investigated the role of this gene in imparting various abiotic stress tolerances in Arabidopsis. By analyzing Atcyp710a1 mutant and AtCYP710A1 overexpressor lines, we found that the AtCYP710A1 gene plays a role in imparting low and high temperature tolerance. PMID:23299431

  9. A temperature-sensitive allele of a putative mRNA splicing helicase down-regulates many cell wall genes and causes radial swelling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Howles, Paul A; Gebbie, Leigh K; Collings, David A; Varsani, Arvind; Broad, Ronan C; Ohms, Stephen; Birch, Rosemary J; Cork, Ann H; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    The putative RNA helicase encoded by the Arabidopsis gene At1g32490 is a homolog of the yeast splicing RNA helicases Prp2 and Prp22. We isolated a temperature-sensitive allele (rsw12) of the gene in a screen for root radial swelling mutants. Plants containing this allele grown at the restrictive temperature showed weak radial swelling, were stunted with reduced root elongation, and contained reduced levels of cellulose. The role of the protein was further explored by microarray analysis. By using both fold change cutoffs and a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) to investigate coexpression of genes, we found that the radial swelling phenotype was not linked to genes usually associated with primary cell wall biosynthesis. Instead, the mutation has strong effects on expression of secondary cell wall related genes. Many genes potentially associated with secondary walls were present in the most significant WGCNA module, as were genes coding for arabinogalactans and proteins with GPI anchors. The proportion of up-regulated genes that possess introns in rsw12 was above that expected if splicing was unrelated to the activity of the RNA helicase, suggesting that the helicase does indeed play a role in splicing in Arabidopsis. The phenotype may be due to a change in the expression of one or more genes coding for cell wall proteins. PMID:27008640

  10. Demographic History of European Populations of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    François, Olivier; Blum, Michael G. B.; Jakobsson, Mattias; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2008-01-01

    The model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana is successful at colonizing land that has recently undergone human-mediated disturbance. To investigate the prehistoric spread of A. thaliana, we applied approximate Bayesian computation and explicit spatial modeling to 76 European accessions sequenced at 876 nuclear loci. We find evidence that a major migration wave occurred from east to west, affecting most of the sampled individuals. The longitudinal gradient appears to result from the plant having spread in Europe from the east ∼10,000 years ago, with a rate of westward spread of ∼0.9 km/year. This wave-of-advance model is consistent with a natural colonization from an eastern glacial refugium that overwhelmed ancient western lineages. However, the speed and time frame of the model also suggest that the migration of A. thaliana into Europe may have accompanied the spread of agriculture during the Neolithic transition. PMID:18483550

  11. The Arabidopsis Stress Responsive Gene Database

    PubMed Central

    Borkotoky, Subhomoi; Saravanan, Vijayakumar; Jaiswal, Amit; Das, Bipul; Selvaraj, Suresh; Murali, Ayaluru; Lakshmi, P. T. V.

    2013-01-01

    Plants in nature may face a wide range of favorable or unfavorable biotic and abiotic factors during their life cycle. Any of these factors may cause stress in plants; therefore, they have to be more adaptable to stressful environments and must acquire greater response to different stresses. The objective of this study is to retrieve and arrange data from the literature in a standardized electronic format for the development of information resources on potential stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. This provides a powerful mean for manipulation, comparison, search, and retrieval of records describing the nature of various stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. The database is based exclusively on published stress tolerance genes associated with plants. PMID:23573074

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana nucleosidase mutants provide new insights into nucleoside degradation

    PubMed Central

    Riegler, Heike; Geserick, Claudia; Zrenner, Rita

    2011-01-01

    A central step in nucleoside and nucleobase salvage pathways is the hydrolysis of nucleosides to their respective nucleobases. In plants this is solely accomplished by nucleosidases (EC 3.2.2.x). To elucidate the importance of nucleosidases for nucleoside degradation, general metabolism, and plant growth, thorough phenotypic and biochemical analyses were performed using Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion mutants lacking expression of the previously identified genes annotated as uridine ribohydrolases (URH1 and URH2). Comprehensive functional analyses of single and double mutants demonstrated that both isoforms are unimportant for seedling establishment and plant growth, while one participates in uridine degradation. Rather unexpectedly, nucleoside and nucleotide profiling and nucleosidase activity screening of soluble crude extracts revealed a deficiency of xanthosine and inosine hydrolysis in the single mutants, with substantial accumulation of xanthosine in one of them. Mixing of the two mutant extracts, and by in vitro activity reconstitution using a mixture of recombinant URH1 and URH2 proteins, both restored activity, thus providing biochemical evidence that at least these two isoforms are needed for inosine and xanthosine hydrolysis. This mutant study demonstrates the utility of in vivo systems for the examination of metabolic activities, with the discovery of the new substrate xanthosine and elucidation of a mechanism for expanding the nucleosidase substrate spectrum. PMID:21599668

  13. Mechanical induction of lateral root initiation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Ditengou, Franck Anicet; Teale, William D.; Kochersperger, Philip; Flittner, Karl Andreas; Kneuper, Irina; van der Graaff, Eric; Nziengui, Hugues; Pinosa, Francesco; Li, Xugang; Nitschke, Roland; Laux, Thomas; Palme, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Lateral roots are initiated postembryonically in response to environmental cues, enabling plants to explore efficiently their underground environment. However, the mechanisms by which the environment determines the position of lateral root formation are unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that in Arabidopsis thaliana lateral root initiation can be induced mechanically by either gravitropic curvature or by the transient bending of a root by hand. The plant hormone auxin accumulates at the site of lateral root induction before a primordium starts to form. Here we describe a subcellular relocalization of PIN1, an auxin transport protein, in a single protoxylem cell in response to gravitropic curvature. This relocalization precedes auxin-dependent gene transcription at the site of a new primordium. Auxin-dependent nuclear signaling is necessary for lateral root formation; arf7/19 double knock-out mutants normally form no lateral roots but do so upon bending when the root tip is removed. Signaling through arf7/19 can therefore be bypassed by root bending. These data support a model in which a root-tip-derived signal acts on downstream signaling molecules that specify lateral root identity. PMID:19033199

  14. Re-Evaluation of Reportedly Metal Tolerant Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions.

    PubMed

    Silva-Guzman, Macarena; Addo-Quaye, Charles; Dilkes, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    Santa Clara, Limeport, and Berkeley are Arabidopsis thaliana accessions previously identified as diversely metal resistant. Yet these same accessions were determined to be genetically indistinguishable from the metal sensitive Col-0. We robustly tested tolerance for Zn, Ni and Cu, and genetic relatedness by growing these accessions under a range of Ni, Zn and Cu concentrations for three durations in multiple replicates. Neither metal resistance nor variance in growth were detected between them and Col-0. We re-sequenced the genomes of these accessions and all stocks available for each accession. In all cases they were nearly indistinguishable from the standard laboratory accession Col-0. As Santa Clara was allegedly collected from the Jasper Ridge serpentine outcrop in California, USA we investigated the possibility of extant A. thaliana populations adapted to serpentine soils. Botanically vouchered Arabidopsis accessions in the Jepson database were overlaid with soil maps of California. This provided no evidence of A. thaliana collections from serpentine sites in California. Thus, our work demonstrates that the Santa Clara, Berkeley and Limeport accessions are not metal tolerant, not genetically distinct from Col-0, and that there are no known serpentine adapted populations or accessions of A. thaliana. PMID:27467746

  15. Re-Evaluation of Reportedly Metal Tolerant Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Guzman, Macarena; Addo-Quaye, Charles; Dilkes, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Santa Clara, Limeport, and Berkeley are Arabidopsis thaliana accessions previously identified as diversely metal resistant. Yet these same accessions were determined to be genetically indistinguishable from the metal sensitive Col-0. We robustly tested tolerance for Zn, Ni and Cu, and genetic relatedness by growing these accessions under a range of Ni, Zn and Cu concentrations for three durations in multiple replicates. Neither metal resistance nor variance in growth were detected between them and Col-0. We re-sequenced the genomes of these accessions and all stocks available for each accession. In all cases they were nearly indistinguishable from the standard laboratory accession Col-0. As Santa Clara was allegedly collected from the Jasper Ridge serpentine outcrop in California, USA we investigated the possibility of extant A. thaliana populations adapted to serpentine soils. Botanically vouchered Arabidopsis accessions in the Jepson database were overlaid with soil maps of California. This provided no evidence of A. thaliana collections from serpentine sites in California. Thus, our work demonstrates that the Santa Clara, Berkeley and Limeport accessions are not metal tolerant, not genetically distinct from Col-0, and that there are no known serpentine adapted populations or accessions of A. thaliana. PMID:27467746

  16. Conservation of two lineages of peroxisomal (Type I) 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolases in land plants, specialization of the genes in Brassicaceae, and characterization of their expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bussell, John D

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana has three genes encoding type I 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolases (KAT1, KAT2, and KAT5), one of which (KAT5) is alternatively transcribed to produce both peroxisomal and cytosolic proteins. To evaluate the potential importance of these four gene products, their evolutionary history in plants and their expression patterns in Arabidopsis were investigated. Land plants as a whole have gene lineages corresponding to KAT2 and KAT5, implying conservation of distinct functions for these two genes. By contrast, analysis of synteny shows that KAT1 arose by duplication of the KAT2 locus. KAT1 is found in the Brassicaceae family, including in the genera Arabidopsis, Capsella, Thellungiella (=Eutrema) and Brassica, but not in the more distantly related Caricaceae (order Brassicales), or other plants. Gene expression analysis using qRT-PCR and β-glucuronidase reporter genes showed strong expression of KAT2 during germination and in many plant tissues throughout the life cycle, consistent with its observed dominant function in fatty acid β-oxidation. KAT1 was expressed very weakly while KAT5 was most strongly expressed during flower development and in seedlings after germination. Isoform-specific qRT-PCR analysis and promoter β-glucuronidase reporters revealed that the two splicing variants of KAT5 have similar expression profiles. Alternative splicing of KAT5 to produce cytosolic and peroxisomal proteins is specific to and ubiquitous in the Brassicaceae, and possibly had an earlier origin in the order Brassicales. This implies that an additional function for KAT5 arose between 43 and 115 mybp. We speculate that this KAT5 mutation was recruited for a cytosolic function in secondary metabolism. PMID:23066143

  17. Genome-scale cold stress response regulatory networks in ten Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low temperature leads to major crop losses every year. Although several studies have been conducted focusing on diversity of cold tolerance level in multiple phenotypically divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, genome-scale molecular understanding is still lacking. Results In this study, we report genome-scale transcript response diversity of 10 A. thaliana ecotypes originating from different geographical locations to non-freezing cold stress (10°C). To analyze the transcriptional response diversity, we initially compared transcriptome changes in all 10 ecotypes using Arabidopsis NimbleGen ATH6 microarrays. In total 6061 transcripts were significantly cold regulated (p < 0.01) in 10 ecotypes, including 498 transcription factors and 315 transposable elements. The majority of the transcripts (75%) showed ecotype specific expression pattern. By using sequence data available from Arabidopsis thaliana 1001 genome project, we further investigated sequence polymorphisms in the core cold stress regulon genes. Significant numbers of non-synonymous amino acid changes were observed in the coding region of the CBF regulon genes. Considering the limited knowledge about regulatory interactions between transcription factors and their target genes in the model plant A. thaliana, we have adopted a powerful systems genetics approach- Network Component Analysis (NCA) to construct an in-silico transcriptional regulatory network model during response to cold stress. The resulting regulatory network contained 1,275 nodes and 7,720 connections, with 178 transcription factors and 1,331 target genes. Conclusions A. thaliana ecotypes exhibit considerable variation in transcriptome level responses to non-freezing cold stress treatment. Ecotype specific transcripts and related gene ontology (GO) categories were identified to delineate natural variation of cold stress regulated differential gene expression in the model plant A. thaliana. The predicted

  18. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Silvina; Gonzalez, Cintia Daniela; Petruccelli, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Transient assays provide a convenient alternative to stable transformation. Compared to the generation of stably transformed plants, agroinfiltration is more rapid, and samples can be analyzed a few days after inoculation. Nevertheless, at difference of tobacco and other plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana remains recalcitrant to routine transient assays. In this chapter, we describe a transient expression assay using simple infiltration of intact Arabidopsis leaves with Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying a plasmid expressing a reporter fluorescent protein. In this protocol, Agrobacterium aggressiveness was increased by a prolonged treatment in an induction medium deficient in nutrients and containing acetosyringone. Besides, Arabidopsis plants were cultivated in intermediate photoperiod (12 h light-12 h dark) to promote leaf growth. PMID:24057365

  19. Phosphorylation of plastoglobular proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lohscheider, Jens N; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2016-06-01

    Plastoglobules (PGs) are plastid lipid-protein particles with a small specialized proteome and metabolome. Among the 30 core PG proteins are six proteins of the ancient ABC1 atypical kinase (ABC1K) family and their locations in an Arabidopsis mRNA-based co-expression network suggested central regulatory roles. To identify candidate ABC1K targets and a possible ABC1K hierarchical phosphorylation network within the chloroplast PG proteome, we searched Arabidopsis phosphoproteomics data from publicly available sources. Evaluation of underlying spectra and/or associated information was challenging for a variety of reasons, but supported pSer sites and a few pThr sites in nine PG proteins, including five FIBRILLINS. PG phosphorylation motifs are discussed in the context of possible responsible kinases. The challenges of collection and evaluation of published Arabidopsis phosphorylation data are discussed, illustrating the importance of deposition of all mass spectrometry data in well-organized repositories such as PRIDE and ProteomeXchange. This study provides a starting point for experimental testing of phosho-sites in PG proteins and also suggests that phosphoproteomics studies specifically designed toward the PG proteome and its ABC1K are needed to understand phosphorylation networks in these specialized particles. PMID:26962209

  20. Phosphorylation of plastoglobular proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lohscheider, Jens N.; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2016-01-01

    Plastoglobules (PGs) are plastid lipid–protein particles with a small specialized proteome and metabolome. Among the 30 core PG proteins are six proteins of the ancient ABC1 atypical kinase (ABC1K) family and their locations in an Arabidopsis mRNA-based co-expression network suggested central regulatory roles. To identify candidate ABC1K targets and a possible ABC1K hierarchical phosphorylation network within the chloroplast PG proteome, we searched Arabidopsis phosphoproteomics data from publicly available sources. Evaluation of underlying spectra and/or associated information was challenging for a variety of reasons, but supported pSer sites and a few pThr sites in nine PG proteins, including five FIBRILLINS. PG phosphorylation motifs are discussed in the context of possible responsible kinases. The challenges of collection and evaluation of published Arabidopsis phosphorylation data are discussed, illustrating the importance of deposition of all mass spectrometry data in well-organized repositories such as PRIDE and ProteomeXchange. This study provides a starting point for experimental testing of phosho-sites in PG proteins and also suggests that phosphoproteomics studies specifically designed toward the PG proteome and its ABC1K are needed to understand phosphorylation networks in these specialized particles. PMID:26962209

  1. Spatiotemporal relationships between growth and microtubule orientation as revealed in living root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana transformed with green-fluorescent-protein gene construct GFP-MBD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, C. L.; Cyr, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transformed with GFP-MBD (J. Marc et al., Plant Cell 10: 1927-1939, 1998) under the control of a constitutive (35S) or copper-inducible promoter. GFP-specific fluorescence distributions, levels, and persistence were determined and found to vary with age, tissue type, transgenic line, and individual plant. With the exception of an increased frequency of abnormal roots of 35S GFP-MBD plants grown on kanamycin-containing media, expression of GFP-MBD does not appear to affect plant phenotype. The number of leaves, branches, bolts, and siliques as well as overall height, leaf size, and seed set are similar between wild-type and transgenic plants as is the rate of root growth. Thus, we conclude that the transgenic plants can serve as a living model system in which the dynamic behavior of microtubules can be visualized. Confocal microscopy was used to simultaneously monitor growth and microtubule behavior within individual cells as they passed through the elongation zone of the Arabidopsis root. Generally, microtubules reoriented from transverse to oblique or longitudinal orientations as growth declined. Microtubule reorientation initiated at the ends of the cell did not necessarily occur simultaneously in adjacent neighboring cells and did not involve complete disintegration and repolymerization of microtubule arrays. Although growth rates correlated with microtubule reorientation, the two processes were not tightly coupled in terms of their temporal relationships, suggesting that other factor(s) may be involved in regulating both events. Additionally, microtubule orientation was more defined in cells whose growth was accelerating and less stringent in cells whose growth was decelerating, indicating that microtubule-orienting factor(s) may be sensitive to growth acceleration, rather than growth per se.

  2. Mutations in circularly permuted GTPase family genes AtNOA1/RIF1/SVR10 and BPG2 suppress var2-mediated leaf variegation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yafei; Zhao, Jun; An, Rui; Zhang, Juan; Liang, Shuang; Shao, Jingxia; Liu, Xiayan; An, Lijun; Yu, Fei

    2016-03-01

    Leaf variegation mutants constitute a unique group of chloroplast development mutants and are ideal genetic materials to dissect the regulation of chloroplast development. We have utilized the Arabidopsis yellow variegated (var2) mutant and genetic suppressor analysis to probe the mechanisms of chloroplast development. Here we report the isolation of a new var2 suppressor locus SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION (SVR10). Genetic mapping and molecular complementation indicated that SVR10 encodes a circularly permuted GTPase that has been reported as Arabidopsis thaliana NITRIC OXIDE ASSOCIATED 1 (AtNOA1) and RESISTANT TO INHIBITION BY FOSMIDOMYCIN 1 (RIF1). Biochemical evidence showed that SVR10/AtNOA1/RIF1 likely localizes to the chloroplast stroma. We further demonstrate that the mutant of a close homologue of SVR10/AtNOA1/RIF1, BRASSINAZOLE INSENSITIVE PALE GREEN 2 (BPG2), can also suppress var2 leaf variegation. Mutants of SVR10 and BPG2 are impaired in photosynthesis and the accumulation of chloroplast proteins. Interestingly, two-dimensional blue native gel analysis showed that mutants of SVR10 and BPG2 display defects in the assembly of thylakoid membrane complexes including reduced levels of major photosynthetic complexes and the abnormal accumulation of a chlorophyll-protein supercomplex containing photosystem I. Taken together, our findings suggest that SVR10 and BPG2 are functionally related with VAR2, likely through their potential roles in regulating chloroplast protein homeostasis, and both SVR10 and BPG2 are required for efficient thylakoid protein complex assembly and photosynthesis. PMID:26435530

  3. Characterization of the yeast copper-inducible promoter system in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, C. L.; Cyr, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Inducible promoters or gene-switches are used to both spatially and temporally regulate gene expression. Such regulation can provide information concerning the function of a gene in a developmental context as well as avoid potential harmful effects due to overexpression. A gfp construct under the control of a copper-inducible promoter was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and the regulatory parameters of this inducible promoter were determined. Here, we describe the time-course of up- and down-regulation of GFP expression in response to copper level, the optimal regulatory levels of copper, and the tissue specificity of expression in three transgenic lines. We conclude that the copper-inducible promoter system may be useful in regulating the time and location of gene expression in A. thaliana.

  4. Impact of natural genetic variation on the transcriptome of autotetraploid Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zheng; Haberer, Georg; Matthes, Michaela; Rattei, Thomas; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Gierl, Alfons; Torres-Ruiz, Ramon A.

    2010-01-01

    Polyploidy, the presence of more than two complete sets of chromosomes in an organism, has significantly shaped the genomes of angiosperms during evolution. Two forms of polyploidy are often considered: allopolyploidy, which originates from interspecies hybrids, and autopolyploidy, which originates from intraspecies genome duplication events. Besides affecting genome organization, polyploidy generates other genetic effects. Synthetic allopolyploid plants exhibit considerable transcriptome alterations, part of which are likely caused by the reunion of previously diverged regulatory hierarchies. In contrast, autopolyploids have relatively uniform genomes, suggesting lower alteration of gene expression. To evaluate the impact of intraspecies genome duplication on the transcriptome, we generated a series of unique Arabidopsis thaliana autotetraploids by using different ecotypes. A. thaliana autotetraploids show transcriptome alterations that strongly depend on their parental genome composition and include changed expression of both new genes and gene groups previously described from allopolyploid Arabidopsis. Alterations in gene expression are stable, nonstochastic, developmentally specific, and associated with changes in DNA methylation. We propose that Arabidopsis possesses an inherent and heritable ability to sense and respond to elevated, yet balanced chromosome numbers. The impact of natural variation on alteration of autotetraploid gene expression stresses its potential importance in the evolution and breeding of plants. PMID:20876110

  5. Molecular Evolutionary Analysis of the Alfin-Like Protein Family in Arabidopsis lyrata, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Thellungiella halophila

    PubMed Central

    Kua, Chai-Shian; Liu, Jingxin; Cannon, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    In previous studies, the Alfin1 gene, a transcription factor, enhanced salt tolerance in alfalfa, primarily through altering gene expression levels in the root. Here, we examined the molecular evolution of the Alfin-like (AL) proteins in two Arabidopsis species (A. lyrata and A. thaliana) and a salt-tolerant close relative Thellungiella halophila. These AL-like proteins could be divided into four groups and the two known DUF3594 and PHD-finger domains had co-evolved within each group of genes, irrespective of species, due to gene duplication events in the common ancestor of all three species while gene loss was observed only in T. halophila. To detect whether natural selection acted in the evolution of AL genes, we calculated synonymous substitution ratios (dn/ds) and codon usage statistics, finding positive selection operated on four branches and significant differences in biased codon usage in the AL family between T. halophila and A. lyrata or A. thaliana. Distinctively, only the AL7 branch was under positive selection on the PHD-finger domain and the three members on the branch showed the smallest difference when codon bias was evaluated among the seven clusters. Functional analysis based on transgenic overexpression lines and T-DNA insertion mutants indicated that salt-stress-induced AtAL7 could play a negative role in salt tolerance of A. thaliana, suggesting that adaptive evolution occurred in the members of AL gene family. PMID:23840867

  6. Effects of dicer-like endoribonucleases 2 and 4 on infection of Arabidopsis thaliana by cucumber mosaic virus and a mutant virus lacking the 2b counter-defence protein gene.

    PubMed

    Ziebell, Heiko; Carr, John P

    2009-09-01

    In tobacco and Nicotiana benthamiana, limited cross-protection against cucumber mosaic virus strain Fny (Fny-CMV) was provided by prior inoculation with a deletion mutant lacking the 2b silencing-suppressor protein gene (Fny-CMVDelta2b). Cross-protection by Fny-CMVDelta2b did not result from induction of systemic RNA silencing. We investigated whether protection occurs through induction of localized RNA silencing by using Arabidopsis thaliana plants harbouring mutations in genes encoding the dicer-like (DCL) endoribonucleases 2, 3 and 4 involved in antiviral silencing. In wild-type A. thaliana (Col-0) plants, Fny-CMVDelta2b was symptomless and cross-protected against Fny-CMV infection. Cross-protection by Fny-CMVDelta2b against Fny-CMV infection was not abolished in dcl2, dcl3 or dcl4 mutant plants and was strongest in dcl2/4 double mutants, although in these plants and in dcl4 mutants, Fny-CMVDelta2b replicated to high levels and induced strong symptoms. The results suggest that Fny-CMVDelta2b/Fny-CMV cross-protection is not completely dependent on RNA silencing and also involves competition between these viruses. PMID:19474248

  7. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonsirichai, K.; Harrison, B.; Stanga, J.; Young, L.-S.; Neal, C.; Sabat, G.; Murthy, N.; Harms, A.; Sedbrook, J.; Masson, P.

    The primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings respond to gravity stimulation by developing a tip curvature that results from differential cellular elongation on opposite flanks of the elongation zone. This curvature appears modulated by a lateral gradient of auxin that originates in the gravity-perceiving cells (statocytes) of the root cap through an apparent lateral repositioning of a component the auxin efflux carrier complex within these cells (Friml et al, 2002, Nature 415: 806-809). Unfortunately, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that govern early phases of gravity perception and signal transduction within the root-cap statocytes. We have used a molecular genetic approach to uncover some of these mechanisms. Mutations in the Arabidopsis ARG1 and ARL2 genes, which encode J-domain proteins, resulted in specific alterations in root and hypocotyl gravitropism, without pleiotropic phenotypes. Interestingly, ARG1 and ARL2 appear to function in the same genetic pathway. A combination of molecular genetic, biochemical and cell-biological approaches were used to demonstrate that ARG1 functions in early phases of gravity signal transduction within the root and hypocotyl statocytes, and is needed for efficient lateral auxin transport within the cap. The ARG1 protein is associated with components of the secretory and/or endosomal pathways, suggesting its role in the recycling of components of the auxin efflux carrier complex between plasma membrane and endosome (Boonsirichai et al, 2003, Plant Cell 15:2612-2625). Genetic modifiers of arg1-2 were isolated and shown to enhance the gravitropic defect of arg1-2, while resulting in little or no gravitropic defects in a wild type ARG1 background. A slight tendency for arg1-2;mar1-1 and arg1-2;mar2-1 double-mutant organs to display an opposite gravitropic response compared to wild type suggests that all three genes contribute to the interpretation of the gravity-vector information by seedling organs. The

  8. Arsenic uptake and speciation in Arabidopsis thaliana under hydroponic conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hee; Han, Young-Soo; Seong, Hye Jin; Ahn, Joo Sung; Nam, In-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic (As) uptake and species in Arabidopsis thaliana were evaluated under hydroponic conditions. Plant nutrient solutions were treated with arsenite [As(III)] or arsenate [As(V)], and aqueous As speciation was conducted using a solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. Arabidopsis reduced As(V) to As(III) in the nutrient solution, possibly due to root exudates such as organic acids or the efflux of As(III) from plant roots after in vivo reduction of As(V) to As(III). Arsenic uptake by Arabidopsis was associated with increased levels of Ca and Fe, and decreased levels of K in plant tissues. Arsenic in Arabidopsis mainly occurred as As(III), which was coordinated with oxygen and sulfur based on XANES and EXAFS results. The existence of As(III)O and As(III)S in EXAFS indicates partial biotransformation of As(III)O to a sulfur-coordinated form because of limited amount of glutathione in plants. Further understanding the mechanism of As biotransformation in Arabidopsis may help to develop measures that can mitigate As toxicity via genetic engineering. PMID:27058920

  9. AtHD2D Gene Plays a Role in Plant Growth, Development, and Response to Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhaofen; Yu, Huimin; Zhao, Zhong; Hunter, David; Luo, Xinjuan; Duan, Jun; Tian, Lining

    2016-01-01

    The histone deacetylases play important roles in the regulation of gene expression and the subsequent control of a number of important biological processes, including those involved in the response to environmental stress. A specific group of histone deacetylase genes, HD2, is present in plants. In Arabidopsis, HD2s include HD2A, HD2B, HD2C, and HD2D. Previous research showed that HD2A, HD2B, and HD2C are more related in terms of expression and function, but not HD2D. In this report, we studied different aspects of AtHD2D in Arabidopsis with respect to plant response to drought and other abiotic stresses. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that HD2D is distantly related to other HD2 genes. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and stable expression in Arabidopsis of AtHD2D fused with gfp showed that AtHD2D was expressed in the nucleus. Overexpression of AtHD2D resulted in developmental changes including fewer main roots, more lateral roots, and a higher root:shoot ratio. Seed germination and plant flowering time were delayed in transgenic plants expressing AtHD2D, but these plants exhibited higher degrees of tolerance to abiotic stresses, including drought, salt, and cold stresses. Physiological studies indicated that the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was high in wild-type plants but in plants overexpressing HD2D the MDA level increased slowly in response to stress conditions of drought, cold, and salt stress. Furthermore, electrolyte leakage in leaf cells of wild type plants increased but remained stable in transgenic plants. Our results indicate that AtHD2D is unique among HD2 genes and it plays a role in plant growth and development regulation and these changes can modulate plant stress responses. PMID:27066015

  10. AtHD2D Gene Plays a Role in Plant Growth, Development, and Response to Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhaofen; Yu, Huimin; Zhao, Zhong; Hunter, David; Luo, Xinjuan; Duan, Jun; Tian, Lining

    2016-01-01

    The histone deacetylases play important roles in the regulation of gene expression and the subsequent control of a number of important biological processes, including those involved in the response to environmental stress. A specific group of histone deacetylase genes, HD2, is present in plants. In Arabidopsis, HD2s include HD2A, HD2B, HD2C, and HD2D. Previous research showed that HD2A, HD2B, and HD2C are more related in terms of expression and function, but not HD2D. In this report, we studied different aspects of AtHD2D in Arabidopsis with respect to plant response to drought and other abiotic stresses. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that HD2D is distantly related to other HD2 genes. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and stable expression in Arabidopsis of AtHD2D fused with gfp showed that AtHD2D was expressed in the nucleus. Overexpression of AtHD2D resulted in developmental changes including fewer main roots, more lateral roots, and a higher root:shoot ratio. Seed germination and plant flowering time were delayed in transgenic plants expressing AtHD2D, but these plants exhibited higher degrees of tolerance to abiotic stresses, including drought, salt, and cold stresses. Physiological studies indicated that the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was high in wild-type plants but in plants overexpressing HD2D the MDA level increased slowly in response to stress conditions of drought, cold, and salt stress. Furthermore, electrolyte leakage in leaf cells of wild type plants increased but remained stable in transgenic plants. Our results indicate that AtHD2D is unique among HD2 genes and it plays a role in plant growth and development regulation and these changes can modulate plant stress responses. PMID:27066015

  11. Expression of an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) peroxidase gene in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana enhances resistance to NaCl and H2O2.

    PubMed

    Teng, K; Xiao, G Z; Guo, W E; Yuan, J B; Li, J; Chao, Y H; Han, L B

    2016-01-01

    Peroxidases (PODs) are enzymes that play important roles in catalyzing the reduction of H2O2 and the oxidation of various substrates. They function in many different and important biological processes, such as defense mechanisms, immune responses, and pathogeny. The POD genes have been cloned and identified in many plants, but their function in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is not known, to date. Based on the POD gene sequence (GenBank accession No. L36157.1), we cloned the POD gene in alfalfa, which was named MsPOD. MsPOD expression increased with increasing H2O2. The gene was expressed in all of the tissues, including the roots, stems, leaves, and flowers, particularly in stems and leaves under light/dark conditions. A subcellular analysis showed that MsPOD was localized outside the cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis with MsPOD exhibited increased resistance to H2O2 and NaCl. Moreover, POD activity in the transgenic plants was significantly higher than that in wild-type Arabidopsis. These results show that MsPOD plays an important role in resistance to H2O2 and NaCl. PMID:27323080

  12. Expression of aspartyl protease and C3HC4-type RING zinc finger genes are responsive to ascorbic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yongshun; Nishikawa, Hitoshi; Badejo, Adebanjo Ayobamidele; Shibata, Hitoshi; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Maruta, Takanori; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ishikawa, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Ascorbate (AsA) is a redox buffer and enzyme cofactor with various proposed functions in stress responses and growth. The aim was to identify genes whose transcript levels respond to changes in leaf AsA. The AsA-deficient Arabidopsis mutant vtc2-1 was incubated with the AsA precursor L-galactono-1,4-lactone (L-GalL) to increase leaf AsA concentration. Differentially expressed genes screened by DNA microarray were further characterized for AsA responsiveness in wild-type plants. The analysis of 14 candidates by real-time PCR identified an aspartyl protease gene (ASP, At1g66180) and a C3HC4-type RING zinc finger gene (AtATL15, At1g22500) whose transcripts were rapidly responsive to increases in AsA pool size caused by L-GalL and AsA supplementation and light. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing an AtATL15 promoter::luciferase reporter confirmed that the promoter is L-GalL, AsA, and light responsive. The expression patterns of ASP and AtATL15 suggest they have roles in growth regulation. The promoter of AtATL15 is responsive to AsA status and will provide a tool to investigate the functions of AsA in plants further. PMID:21421703

  13. Expression of aspartyl protease and C3HC4-type RING zinc finger genes are responsive to ascorbic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongshun; Nishikawa, Hitoshi; Badejo, Adebanjo Ayobamidele; Shibata, Hitoshi; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Maruta, Takanori; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ishikawa, Takahiro

    2011-06-01

    Ascorbate (AsA) is a redox buffer and enzyme cofactor with various proposed functions in stress responses and growth. The aim was to identify genes whose transcript levels respond to changes in leaf AsA. The AsA-deficient Arabidopsis mutant vtc2-1 was incubated with the AsA precursor L-galactono-1,4-lactone (L-GalL) to increase leaf AsA concentration. Differentially expressed genes screened by DNA microarray were further characterized for AsA responsiveness in wild-type plants. The analysis of 14 candidates by real-time PCR identified an aspartyl protease gene (ASP, At1g66180) and a C3HC4-type RING zinc finger gene (AtATL15, At1g22500) whose transcripts were rapidly responsive to increases in AsA pool size caused by L-GalL and AsA supplementation and light. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing an AtATL15 promoter::luciferase reporter confirmed that the promoter is L-GalL, AsA, and light responsive. The expression patterns of ASP and AtATL15 suggest they have roles in growth regulation. The promoter of AtATL15 is responsive to AsA status and will provide a tool to investigate the functions of AsA in plants further. PMID:21421703

  14. Drought Stress Predominantly Endures Arabidopsis thaliana to Pseudomonas syringae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aarti; Dixit, Sandeep K.; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa

    2016-01-01

    Plant responses to a combination of drought and bacterial pathogen infection, an agronomically important and altogether a new stress, are not well-studied. While occurring concurrently, these two stresses can lead to synergistic or antagonistic effects on plants due to stress-interaction. It is reported that plant responses to the stress combinations consist of both strategies, unique to combined stress and those shared between combined and individual stresses. However, the combined stress response mechanisms governing stress interaction and net impact are largely unknown. In order to study these adaptive strategies, an accurate and convenient methodology is lacking even in model plants like Arabidopsis thaliana. The gradual nature of drought stress imposition protocol poses a hindrance in simultaneously applying pathogen infection under laboratory conditions to achieve combined stress. In present study we aimed to establish systematic combined stress protocol and to study physiological responses of the plants to various degrees of combined stress. Here, we have comprehensively studied the impact of combined drought and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 infection on A. thaliana. Further, by employing different permutations of drought and pathogen stress intensities, an attempt was made to dissect the contribution of each individual stress effects during their concurrence. We hereby present two main aspects of combined stress viz., stress interaction and net impact of the stress on plants. Mainly, this study established a systematic protocol to assess the impact of combined drought and bacterial pathogen stress. It was observed that as a result of net impact, some physiological responses under combined stress are tailored when compared to the plants exposed to individual stresses. We also infer that plant responses under combined stress in this study are predominantly influenced by the drought stress. Our results show that pathogen multiplication was reduced by

  15. Drought Stress Predominantly Endures Arabidopsis thaliana to Pseudomonas syringae Infection.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aarti; Dixit, Sandeep K; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa

    2016-01-01

    Plant responses to a combination of drought and bacterial pathogen infection, an agronomically important and altogether a new stress, are not well-studied. While occurring concurrently, these two stresses can lead to synergistic or antagonistic effects on plants due to stress-interaction. It is reported that plant responses to the stress combinations consist of both strategies, unique to combined stress and those shared between combined and individual stresses. However, the combined stress response mechanisms governing stress interaction and net impact are largely unknown. In order to study these adaptive strategies, an accurate and convenient methodology is lacking even in model plants like Arabidopsis thaliana. The gradual nature of drought stress imposition protocol poses a hindrance in simultaneously applying pathogen infection under laboratory conditions to achieve combined stress. In present study we aimed to establish systematic combined stress protocol and to study physiological responses of the plants to various degrees of combined stress. Here, we have comprehensively studied the impact of combined drought and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 infection on A. thaliana. Further, by employing different permutations of drought and pathogen stress intensities, an attempt was made to dissect the contribution of each individual stress effects during their concurrence. We hereby present two main aspects of combined stress viz., stress interaction and net impact of the stress on plants. Mainly, this study established a systematic protocol to assess the impact of combined drought and bacterial pathogen stress. It was observed that as a result of net impact, some physiological responses under combined stress are tailored when compared to the plants exposed to individual stresses. We also infer that plant responses under combined stress in this study are predominantly influenced by the drought stress. Our results show that pathogen multiplication was reduced by

  16. Photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. A. M.; Klein, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    Arabidopsis seeds were germinated on sterile mineral agar supplemented with 1% glucose and cultured under continuous light regimes. With 4-hour incandescent plus 20-hour monochromatic illumination in the region from 400 to 485 nanometers there was effective floral induction at an intensity of 100 microwatts per square centimeter. Exclusion of far red wave lengths from the 4-hour incandescent period sharply reduced the effectiveness of subsequent monochromatic blue light in promoting floral induction. Delayed floral induction occurred under continuous incandescent light lacking far red and was attributable to the blue wave lengths. Continuous 485 nanometer (100 microwatts per square centimeter) exposure without any white light treatment during the postgermination growth period was ineffective in floral induction and meristem development. Light at 730 nanometers under the same conditions was partially effective, whereas energy between 500 and 700 nanometers was completely ineffective. When continuous monochromatic light at a 3-fold higher energy level was administered, all photomorphogenic responses were accomplished with 485 nanometer light, including germination and 100% floral induction without any white light treatment at any time during the experiment. Almost equal quantum effectiveness was calculated when equivalent quantum flux densities in the region from 710 to 740 nanometers or at 485 nanometers were used. It is postulated that floral induction in Arabidopsis may be the result of a continuous excitation of a stable form of far red-absorbing phytochrome localized in or on a membrane, and that excitation can be either by direct absorption of energy by far red-absorbing phytochrome or by transfer from an accessory pigment. Images PMID:16657629

  17. An in silico assessment of gene function and organization of the phenylpropanoid pathway metabolic networks in Arabidopsis thaliana and limitations thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Michael A.; Collins, R. Eric; Anterola, Aldwin M.; Cochrane, Fiona C.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2003-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome sequencing in 2000 gave to science the first blueprint of a vascular plant. Its successful completion also prompted the US National Science Foundation to launch the Arabidopsis 2010 initiative, the goal of which is to identify the function of each gene by 2010. In this study, an exhaustive analysis of The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) and The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) databases, together with all currently compiled EST sequence data, was carried out in order to determine to what extent the various metabolic networks from phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) to the monolignols were organized and/or could be predicted. In these databases, there are some 65 genes which have been annotated as encoding putative enzymatic steps in monolignol biosynthesis, although many of them have only very low homology to monolignol pathway genes of known function in other plant systems. Our detailed analysis revealed that presently only 13 genes (two PALs, a cinnamate-4-hydroxylase, a p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase, a ferulate-5-hydroxylase, three 4-coumarate-CoA ligases, a cinnamic acid O-methyl transferase, two cinnamoyl-CoA reductases) and two cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases can be classified as having a bona fide (definitive) function; the remaining 52 genes currently have undetermined physiological roles. The EST database entries for this particular set of genes also provided little new insight into how the monolignol pathway was organized in the different tissues and organs, this being perhaps a consequence of both limitations in how tissue samples were collected and in the incomplete nature of the EST collections. This analysis thus underscores the fact that even with genomic sequencing, presumed to provide the entire suite of putative genes in the monolignol-forming pathway, a very large effort needs to be conducted to establish actual catalytic roles (including enzyme versatility), as well as the physiological function(s) for each member

  18. Sequence and analysis of chromosome 3 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Salanoubat, M; Lemcke, K; Rieger, M; Ansorge, W; Unseld, M; Fartmann, B; Valle, G; Blöcker, H; Perez-Alonso, M; Obermaier, B; Delseny, M; Boutry, M; Grivell, L A; Mache, R; Puigdomènech, P; De Simone, V; Choisne, N; Artiguenave, F; Robert, C; Brottier, P; Wincker, P; Cattolico, L; Weissenbach, J; Saurin, W; Quétier, F; Schäfer, M; Müller-Auer, S; Gabel, C; Fuchs, M; Benes, V; Wurmbach, E; Drzonek, H; Erfle, H; Jordan, N; Bangert, S; Wiedelmann, R; Kranz, H; Voss, H; Holland, R; Brandt, P; Nyakatura, G; Vezzi, A; D'Angelo, M; Pallavicini, A; Toppo, S; Simionati, B; Conrad, A; Hornischer, K; Kauer, G; Löhnert, T H; Nordsiek, G; Reichelt, J; Scharfe, M; Schön, O; Bargues, M; Terol, J; Climent, J; Navarro, P; Collado, C; Perez-Perez, A; Ottenwälder, B; Duchemin, D; Cooke, R; Laudie, M; Berger-Llauro, C; Purnelle, B; Masuy, D; de Haan, M; Maarse, A C; Alcaraz, J P; Cottet, A; Casacuberta, E; Monfort, A; Argiriou, A; flores, M; Liguori, R; Vitale, D; Mannhaupt, G; Haase, D; Schoof, H; Rudd, S; Zaccaria, P; Mewes, H W; Mayer, K F; Kaul, S; Town, C D; Koo, H L; Tallon, L J; Jenkins, J; Rooney, T; Rizzo, M; Walts, A; Utterback, T; Fujii, C Y; Shea, T P; Creasy, T H; Haas, B; Maiti, R; Wu, D; Peterson, J; Van Aken, S; Pai, G; Militscher, J; Sellers, P; Gill, J E; Feldblyum, T V; Preuss, D; Lin, X; Nierman, W C; Salzberg, S L; White, O; Venter, J C; Fraser, C M; Kaneko, T; Nakamura, Y; Sato, S; Kato, T; Asamizu, E; Sasamoto, S; Kimura, T; Idesawa, K; Kawashima, K; Kishida, Y; Kiyokawa, C; Kohara, M; Matsumoto, M; Matsuno, A; Muraki, A; Nakayama, S; Nakazaki, N; Shinpo, S; Takeuchi, C; Wada, T; Watanabe, A; Yamada, M; Yasuda, M; Tabata, S

    2000-12-14

    Arabidopsis thaliana is an important model system for plant biologists. In 1996 an international collaboration (the Arabidopsis Genome Initiative) was formed to sequence the whole genome of Arabidopsis and in 1999 the sequence of the first two chromosomes was reported. The sequence of the last three chromosomes and an analysis of the whole genome are reported in this issue. Here we present the sequence of chromosome 3, organized into four sequence segments (contigs). The two largest (13.5 and 9.2 Mb) correspond to the top (long) and the bottom (short) arms of chromosome 3, and the two small contigs are located in the genetically defined centromere. This chromosome encodes 5,220 of the roughly 25,500 predicted protein-coding genes in the genome. About 20% of the predicted proteins have significant homology to proteins in eukaryotic genomes for which the complete sequence is available, pointing to important conserved cellular functions among eukaryotes. PMID:11130713

  19. Chrysanthemum transcription factor CmLBD1 direct lateral root formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lu; Zheng, Chen; Liu, Ruixia; Song, Aiping; Zhang, Zhaohe; Xin, Jingjing; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Zhang, Fei; Fang, Weimin; Chen, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    The plant-specific LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) genes are important regulators of growth and development. Here, a chrysanthemum class I LBD transcription factor gene, designated CmLBD1, was isolated and its function verified. CmLBD1 was transcribed in both the root and stem, but not in the leaf. The gene responded to auxin and was shown to participate in the process of adventitious root primordium formation. Its heterologous expression in Arabidopsis thaliana increased the number of lateral roots formed. When provided with exogenous auxin, lateral root emergence was promoted. CmLBD1 expression also favored callus formation from A. thaliana root explants in the absence of exogenously supplied phytohormones. In planta, CmLBD1 probably acts as a positive regulator of the response to auxin fluctuations and connects auxin signaling with lateral root formation. PMID:26819087

  20. Chrysanthemum transcription factor CmLBD1 direct lateral root formation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lu; Zheng, Chen; Liu, Ruixia; Song, Aiping; Zhang, Zhaohe; Xin, Jingjing; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Zhang, Fei; Fang, Weimin; Chen, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    The plant-specific LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) genes are important regulators of growth and development. Here, a chrysanthemum class I LBD transcription factor gene, designated CmLBD1, was isolated and its function verified. CmLBD1 was transcribed in both the root and stem, but not in the leaf. The gene responded to auxin and was shown to participate in the process of adventitious root primordium formation. Its heterologous expression in Arabidopsis thaliana increased the number of lateral roots formed. When provided with exogenous auxin, lateral root emergence was promoted. CmLBD1 expression also favored callus formation from A. thaliana root explants in the absence of exogenously supplied phytohormones. In planta, CmLBD1 probably acts as a positive regulator of the response to auxin fluctuations and connects auxin signaling with lateral root formation. PMID:26819087

  1. Expression, purification and characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana acetohydroxyacid synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, A K; Duggleby, R G

    1997-01-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (EC 4.1.3.18) is the enzyme that catalyses the first step in the synthesis of the branched-chain amino acids valine, leucine and isoleucine. The AHAS gene from Arabidopsis thaliana with part of the chloroplast transit sequence removed was cloned into the bacterial expression vector pT7-7 and expressed in the Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3). The expressed enzyme was purified by an extensive procedure involving (NH4)2SO4 fractionation followed by hydrophobic and anion-exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme appears as a single band on SDS/PAGE with a molecular mass of about 61 kDa. On gel filtration the enzyme is a dimer, migrating as a single peak with molecular masses of 109 and 113 kDa in the absence and presence of FAD respectively. Ion spray MS analysis yielded a mass of 63864 Da. The enzyme has optimum activity in the pH range 6.5-8.5 and exhibits absolute dependence on the three cofactors FAD, Mg2+ and thiamine diphosphate for activity. It displays negatively co-operative kinetics with respect to pyruvate concentration. A model was derived to explain the non-hyperbolic substrate-saturation curve, involving interaction between the active sites of the dimer. The Km for the first active site was found to be 8.01 +/- 0.66 mM; the Km for the second active site could not be accurately determined but was estimated to be approx. 100 mM. The enzyme is insensitive to valine, leucine and isoleucine but is strongly inhibited by the sulphonylurea herbicide, chlorsulphuron, and the imidazolinone herbicide, imazapyr. Inhibition by both herbicides exhibits slow-binding kinetics, whereas chlorsulphuron also shows tight-binding inhibition. PMID:9355748

  2. GFP Loss-of-Function Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jason L.; Kanno, Tatsuo; Liang, Shih-Chieh; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2015-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and related fluorescent proteins are widely used in biological research to monitor gene expression and protein localization in living cells. The GFP chromophore is generated spontaneously in the presence of oxygen by a multi-step reaction involving cyclization of the internal tripeptide Ser65 (or Thr65)-Tyr66-Gly67, which is embedded in the center of an 11-stranded β-barrel structure. Random and site-specific mutagenesis has been used to optimize GFP fluorescence and create derivatives with novel properties. However, loss-of-function mutations that would aid in understanding GFP protein folding and chromophore formation have not been fully cataloged. Here we report a collection of ethyl methansulfonate–induced GFP loss-of-function mutations in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutations that alter residues important for chromophore maturation, such as Arg96 and Ser205, greatly reduce or extinguish fluorescence without dramatically altering GFP protein accumulation. By contrast, other loss-of-fluorescence mutations substantially diminish the amount of GFP protein, suggesting that they compromise protein stability. Many mutations in this category generate substitutions of highly conserved glycine residues, including the following: Gly67 in the chromogenic tripeptide; Gly31, Gly33, and Gly35 in the second β-strand; and Gly20, Gly91, and Gly127 in the lids of the β-barrel scaffold. Our genetic analysis supports conclusions from structural and biochemical studies and demonstrates a critical role for multiple, highly conserved glycine residues in GFP protein stability. PMID:26153075

  3. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  4. Ligand migration in nonsymbiotic hemoglobin AHb1 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Grandi, Elena; Bruno, Stefano; Faggiano, Serena; Spyrakis, Francesca; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Cacciatori, Elena; Dominici, Paola; Viappiani, Cristiano

    2007-11-01

    AHb1 is a hexacoordinated type 1 nonsymbiotic hemoglobin recently discovered in Arabidopsis thaliana. To gain insight into the ligand migration inside the protein, we studied the CO rebinding kinetics of AHb1 encapsulated in silica gels, in the presence of glycerol. The CO rebinding kinetics after nanosecond laser flash photolysis exhibits complex ligand migration patterns, consistent with the existence of discrete docking sites in which ligands can temporarily be stored before rebinding to the heme at different times. This finding may be of relevance to the physiological NO dioxygenase activity of this protein, which requires sequential binding of two substrates, NO and O2, to the heme. PMID:17924689

  5. Purification, Crystallization, and Preliminary Crystallographic Analysis of Deoxyuridine Triphosphate Nucleotidohydrolase from Arabidopsis Thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj,M.; Moriyama, H.

    2007-01-01

    The deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana was expressed and the gene product was purified. Crystallization was performed by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 298 K using 2 M ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Angstroms resolution using Cu K{alpha} radiation. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.90, b = 70.86 Angstroms, c = 75.55 Angstroms . Assuming the presence of a trimer in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content was 30%, with a VM of 1.8 Angstroms 3 Da-1.

  6. Microgravity effects on Arabidopsis thaliana energy pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrota, C.; Piso, M. I.; Banciu, H.; Keul, A.

    The flexibility of plant bioenergetics helps plants to acclimate to environmental stresses Our work is focused on standard free energy changes for PPi and ATP hydrolysis in order to assess the relative importance of PPi versus ATP as an energy donor in the plant cytosol of Arabidopsis plants exposed to microgravity The results indicated that PPi would be particularly favored as a phosphoryl donor relative to ATP under cytosolic conditions known to accompany stresses Recent researches showed that besides its functions inside the cell ATP may be released to the extracellular milieu where it functions as the primary signaling molecule of a diverse range of physiological processes It seems that extracellular ATP is essential for maintaining plant cell viability We intend to study how the production and the release of ATP is influenced by the microgravity References begin enumerate item Chivasaa S Bongani K Ndimbab W Simonc J Lindseyc K and Slabasc A 2005 Extracellular ATP Functions as an Endogenous External Metabolite Regulating Plant Cell Viability The Plant Cell 17 3019-3034 item Palma D A Blumwald E and Plaxton W C 2000 Upregulation of vacuolar H -translocating pyrophosphatase by phosphate starvation of Brassica napus rapeseed suspension cell cultures FEBS Letters 486 155-158 item Plaxton W C 2004 Plant response to stress Biochemical adaptations to phosphate deficiency In R Goodman ed Encyclopedia of Plant and Crop Science Marcel Dekker Inc N Y end enumerate

  7. A reference map of the Arabidopsis thaliana mature pollen proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Noir, Sandra; Braeutigam, Anne; Colby, Thomas; Schmidt, Juergen; Panstruga, Ralph . E-mail: panstrug@mpiz-koeln.mpg.de

    2005-12-02

    The male gametophyte (or pollen) plays an obligatory role during sexual reproduction of higher plants. The extremely reduced complexity of this organ renders pollen a valuable experimental system for studying fundamental aspects of plant biology such as cell fate determination, cell-cell interactions, cell polarity, and tip-growth. Here, we present the first reference map of the mature pollen proteome of the dicotyledonous model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana. Based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight, and electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we reproducibly identified 121 different proteins in 145 individual spots. The presence, subcellular localization, and functional classification of the identified proteins are discussed in relation to the pollen transcriptome and the full protein complement encoded by the nuclear Arabidopsis genome.

  8. The phenotype of Arabidopsis thaliana det1 mutants suggest a role for cytokinins in greening

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, J.; Aguilar, N.; Peto, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    When grown in the absence of light, the det1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana develop characteristics of light-grown plants by morphological, cellular, and molecular criteria. Further, in light-grown plants, mutations in the DET1 gene affect cell-type-specific expression of light-regulated genes and the chloroplast developmental program. Here we show that the addition of exogenously added cytokinins (either 2-isopentenyl adenine, kinetin, or benzyladenine) to the growth medium of dark-germinated wild-type seedlings results in seedlings that resemble det1 mutants, instead of having the normal etiolated morphology. Like det1 mutants, these dark-grown seedlings now contain chloroplasts and have high levels of expression of genes that are normally light''-regulated. These results suggest an important role for cytokinins during greening of Arabidopsis, and may implicate cytokinin levels or an increased sensitivity to cytokinins as explanations for some of the observed phenotypes of det1 mutants.

  9. The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling gene AtCHR12 mediates temporary growth arrest in Arabidopsis thaliana upon perceiving environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Mlynárová, Ludmila; Nap, Jan-Peter; Bisseling, Ton

    2007-09-01

    One of the earliest responses of plants to environmental stress is establishing a temporary growth arrest that allows adaptation to adverse conditions. The response to abiotic stress requires the modulation of gene expression, which may be mediated by the alteration of chromatin structures. This alteration can be accomplished with the help of chromatin-remodeling enzymes, such as the various SWI/SNF classes of ATPases. Here, we investigate the role of the Arabidopsis SNF2/Brahma-type AtCHR12 chromatin-remodeling gene in plant growth and development in reaction to adverse environmental conditions. We show that the AtCHR12 chromatin-remodeling gene plays a vital role in mediating the temporary growth arrest of Arabidopsis that is induced upon perception of stress. Exposing an AtCHR12 overexpressing mutant to stress conditions leads to growth arrest of normally active primary buds, as well as to reduced growth of the primary stem. In contrast, the AtCHR12 knockout mutant shows less growth arrest than the wild-type when exposed to moderate stress. Without stress, mutant plants are indistinguishable from the wild-type, and the growth arrest response seems to depend on the severity of the stress applied. Modulation of AtCHR12 expression correlates with changes in expression of dormancy-associated genes. This is in agreement with the concept of AtCHR12 participation in priming the plants for the growth arrest response. Our data indicate that AtCHR12-associated growth arrest differs from DELLA-mediated growth restraint. This establishes AtCHR12 as a novel gene involved in the response repertoire of plants that permits flexible modulation of growth in adverse and/or otherwise limiting environments. PMID:17605754

  10. The Arabidopsis thaliana MYB60 promoter provides a tool for the spatio-temporal control of gene expression in stomatal guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Priscilla; Cominelli, Eleonora; Galbiati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Plants have evolved different strategies to resist drought, of which the best understood is the abscisic acid (ABA)-induced closure of stomatal pores to reduce water loss by transpiration. The availability of useful promoters that allow for precise spatial and temporal control of gene expression in stomata is essential both for investigating stomatal regulation in model systems and for biotechnological applications in field crops. Previous work indicated that the regulatory region of the transcription factor AtMYB60 specifically drives gene expression in guard cells of Arabidopsis, although its activity is rapidly down-regulated by ABA. Here, the activity of the full-length and minimal AtMYB60 promoters is reported in rice (Oryza sativa), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), using a reporter gene approach. In rice, the activity of both promoters was completely abolished, whereas it was spatially restricted to guard cells in tobacco and tomato. To overcome the negative effect of ABA on the AtMYB60 promoter, a chimeric inducible system was developed, which combined the cellular specificity of the AtMYB60 minimal promoter with the positive responsiveness to dehydration and ABA of the rd29A promoter. Remarkably, the synthetic module specifically up-regulated gene expression in guard cells of Arabidopsis, tobacco, and tomato in response to dehydration or ABA. The comparative analysis of different native and synthetic regulatory modules derived from the AtMYB60 promoter offers new insights into the functional conservation of the cis-mechanisms that mediate gene expression in guard cells in distantly related dicotyledonous species and provides novel tools for modulating stomatal activity in plants. PMID:23828545

  11. AtDOF5.4/OBP4, a DOF Transcription Factor Gene that Negatively Regulates Cell Cycle Progression and Cell Expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peipei; Chen, Haiying; Ying, Lu; Cai, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to animals, plant development involves continuous organ formation, which requires strict regulation of cell proliferation. The core cell cycle machinery is conserved across plants and animals, but plants have developed new mechanisms that precisely regulate cell proliferation in response to internal and external stimuli. Here, we report that the DOF transcription factor OBP4 negatively regulates cell proliferation and expansion. OBP4 is a nuclear protein. Constitutive and inducible overexpression of OBP4 reduced the cell size and number, resulting in dwarf plants. Inducible overexpression of OBP4 in Arabidopsis also promoted early endocycle onset and inhibited cell expansion, while inducible overexpression of OBP4 fused to the VP16 activation domain in Arabidopsis delayed endocycle onset and promoted plant growth. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that cell cycle regulators and cell wall expansion factors were largely down-regulated in the OBP4 overexpression lines. Short-term inducible analysis coupled with in vivo ChIP assays indicated that OBP4 targets the CyclinB1;1, CDKB1;1 and XTH genes. These results strongly suggest that OBP4 is a negative regulator of cell cycle progression and cell growth. These findings increase our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle in plants. PMID:27297966

  12. AtDOF5.4/OBP4, a DOF Transcription Factor Gene that Negatively Regulates Cell Cycle Progression and Cell Expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peipei; Chen, Haiying; Ying, Lu; Cai, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to animals, plant development involves continuous organ formation, which requires strict regulation of cell proliferation. The core cell cycle machinery is conserved across plants and animals, but plants have developed new mechanisms that precisely regulate cell proliferation in response to internal and external stimuli. Here, we report that the DOF transcription factor OBP4 negatively regulates cell proliferation and expansion. OBP4 is a nuclear protein. Constitutive and inducible overexpression of OBP4 reduced the cell size and number, resulting in dwarf plants. Inducible overexpression of OBP4 in Arabidopsis also promoted early endocycle onset and inhibited cell expansion, while inducible overexpression of OBP4 fused to the VP16 activation domain in Arabidopsis delayed endocycle onset and promoted plant growth. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that cell cycle regulators and cell wall expansion factors were largely down-regulated in the OBP4 overexpression lines. Short-term inducible analysis coupled with in vivo ChIP assays indicated that OBP4 targets the CyclinB1;1, CDKB1;1 and XTH genes. These results strongly suggest that OBP4 is a negative regulator of cell cycle progression and cell growth. These findings increase our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle in plants. PMID:27297966

  13. Genome-wide analysis of local chromatin packing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congmao; Roqueiro, Damian; Grimm, Dominik; Schwab, Rebecca; Becker, Claude; Lanz, Christa

    2015-01-01

    The spatial arrangement of interphase chromosomes in the nucleus is important for gene expression and genome function in animals and in plants. The recently developed Hi-C technology is an efficacious method to investigate genome packing. Here we present a detailed Hi-C map of the three-dimensional genome organization of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We find that local chromatin packing differs from the patterns seen in animals, with kilobasepair-sized segments that have much higher intrachromosome interaction rates than neighboring regions, representing a dominant local structural feature of genome conformation in A. thaliana. These regions, which appear as positive strips on two-dimensional representations of chromatin interaction, are enriched in epigenetic marks H3K27me3, H3.1, and H3.3. We also identify more than 400 insulator-like regions. Furthermore, although topologically associating domains (TADs), which are prominent in animals, are not an obvious feature of A. thaliana genome packing, we found more than 1000 regions that have properties of TAD boundaries, and a similar number of regions analogous to the interior of TADs. The insulator-like, TAD-boundary-like, and TAD-interior-like regions are each enriched for distinct epigenetic marks and are each correlated with different gene expression levels. We conclude that epigenetic modifications, gene density, and transcriptional activity combine to shape the local packing of the A. thaliana nuclear genome. PMID:25367294

  14. Raphanusanin-mediated resistance to pathogens is light dependent in radish and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Moehninsi; Miura, Kenji; Yamada, Kosumi; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2014-09-01

    Raphanusanin (Ra) is a light-induced inhibitor of hypocotyl growth that responds to unilateral blue light illumination in radish seedlings. We have previously shown that Ra regulates genes that are involved in common defense mechanisms. Many genes that are induced by Ra are also positively regulated by early blue light. To extend the understanding of the role of Ra in pathogen defense, we evaluated the effects of Ra on radish and Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) infected with the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea) and biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae (P. syringae). Radish and A. thaliana were found to be resistant to both pathogens when treated with Ra, depending on the concentration used. Interestingly, Ra-mediated resistance to P. syringae is dependent on light because Ra-treated seedlings exhibited enhanced susceptibility to P. syringae infection when grown in the dark. In addition to regulating the biotic defense response, Ra inhibited seed germination and root elongation and enhanced the growth of root hairs in the presence of light in radish and A. thaliana. Our data suggest that Ra regulates the expression of a set of genes involved in defense signaling pathways and plays a role in pathogen defense and plant development. Our results show that light may be generally required not only for the accumulation of Ra but also for its activation during the pathogen defense response. PMID:24923677

  15. Transcriptome analysis of various flower and silique development stages indicates a set of class III peroxidase genes potentially involved in pod shattering in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant class III peroxidases exist as a large multigenic family involved in numerous functions suggesting a functional specialization of each gene. However, few genes have been linked with a specific function. Consequently total peroxidase activity is still used in numerous studies although its relevance is questionable. Transcriptome analysis seems to be a promising tool to overcome the difficulties associated with the study of this family. Nevertheless available microarrays are not completely reliable for this purpose. We therefore used a macroarray dedicated to the 73 class III peroxidase genes of A. thaliana to identify genes potentially involved in flower and fruit development. Results The observed increase of total peroxidase activity during development was actually correlated with the induction of only a few class III peroxidase genes which supports the existence of a functional specialization of these proteins. We identified peroxidase genes that are predominantly expressed in one development stage and are probable components of the complex gene networks involved in the reproductive phase. An attempt has been made to gain insight into plausible functions of these genes by collecting and analyzing the expression data of different studies in plants. Peroxidase activity was additionally observed in situ in the silique dehiscence zone known to be involved in pod shattering. Because treatment with a peroxidase inhibitor delayed pod shattering, we subsequently studied mutants of transcription factors (TF) controlling this mechanism. Three peroxidases genes -AtPrx13, AtPrx30 and AtPrx55- were altered by the TFs involved in pod shatter. Conclusions Our data illustrated the problems caused by linking only an increase in total peroxidase activity to any specific development stage or function. The activity or involvement of specific class III peroxidase genes needs to be assessed. Several genes identified in our study had not been linked to any particular

  16. Branched-Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Valine, leucine and isoleucine form the small group of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) classified by their small branched hydrocarbon residues. Unlike animals, plants are able to de novo synthesize these amino acids from pyruvate, 2-oxobutanoate and acetyl-CoA. In plants, biosynthesis follows the typical reaction pathways established for the formation of these amino acids in microorganisms. Val and Ile are synthesized in two parallel pathways using a single set of enzymes. The pathway to Leu branches of from the final intermediate of Val biosynthesis. The formation of this amino acid requires a three-step pathway generating a 2-oxoacid elongated by a methylene group. In Arabidopsis thaliana and other Brassicaceae, a homologous three-step pathway is also involved in Met chain elongation required for the biosynthesis of aliphatic glucosinolates, an important class of specialized metabolites in Brassicaceae. This is a prime example for the evolutionary relationship of pathways from primary and specialized metabolism. Similar to animals, plants also have the ability to degrade BCAAs. The importance of BCAA turnover has long been unclear, but now it seems apparent that the breakdown process might by relevant under certain environmental conditions. In this review, I summarize the current knowledge about BCAA metabolism, its regulation and its particular features in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:22303262

  17. Indole Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Limits Phenylpropanoid Accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce an array of metabolites (including lignin monomers and soluble UV-protective metabolites) from phenylalanine through the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway. A subset of plants, including many related to Arabidopsis thaliana, synthesizes glucosinolates, nitrogen- and sulfur-containing secondary metabolites that serve as components of a plant defense system that deters herbivores and pathogens. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana reduced epidermal fluorescence5 (ref5-1) mutant, identified in a screen for plants with defects in soluble phenylpropanoid accumulation, has a missense mutation in CYP83B1 and displays defects in glucosinolate biosynthesis and in phenylpropanoid accumulation. CYP79B2 and CYP79B3 are responsible for the production of the CYP83B1 substrate indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOx), and we found that the phenylpropanoid content of cyp79b2 cyp79b3 and ref5-1 cyp79b2 cyp79b3 plants is increased compared with the wild type. These data suggest that levels of IAOx or a subsequent metabolite negatively influence phenylpropanoid accumulation in ref5 and more importantly that this crosstalk is relevant in the wild type. Additional biochemical and genetic evidence indicates that this inhibition impacts the early steps of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway and restoration of phenylpropanoid accumulation in a ref5-1 med5a/b triple mutant suggests that the function of the Mediator complex is required for the crosstalk. PMID:25944103

  18. Piriformospora indica Stimulates Root Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Strehmel, Nadine; Mönchgesang, Susann; Herklotz, Siska; Krüger, Sylvia; Ziegler, Jörg; Scheel, Dierk

    2016-01-01

    Piriformospora indica is a root-colonizing fungus, which interacts with a variety of plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction has been considered as mutualistic leading to growth promotion of the host. So far, only indolic glucosinolates and phytohormones have been identified as key players. In a comprehensive non-targeted metabolite profiling study, we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana's roots, root exudates, and leaves of inoculated and non-inoculated plants by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/(ESI)-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-QMS), and identified further biomarkers. Among them, the concentration of nucleosides, dipeptides, oligolignols, and glucosinolate degradation products was affected in the exudates. In the root profiles, nearly all metabolite levels increased upon co-cultivation, like carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, glucosinolates, oligolignols, and flavonoids. In the leaf profiles, we detected by far less significant changes. We only observed an increased concentration of organic acids, carbohydrates, ascorbate, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids, and a decreased concentration of nitrogen-rich amino acids in inoculated plants. These findings contribute to the understanding of symbiotic interactions between plant roots and fungi of the order of Sebacinales and are a valid source for follow-up mechanistic studies, because these symbioses are particular and clearly different from interactions of roots with mycorrhizal fungi or dark septate endophytes. PMID:27399695

  19. Characterization of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) and functional validation of selected genes for abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, B; Sekhar, K; Sunita, T; Reddy, V D; Rao, Khareedu Venkateswara

    2010-03-01

    Pigeonpea, a major grain legume crop with remarkable drought tolerance traits, has been used for the isolation of stress-responsive genes. Herein, we report generation of ESTs, transcript profiles of selected genes and validation of candidate genes obtained from the subtracted cDNA libraries of pigeonpea plants subjected to PEG/water-deficit stress conditions. Cluster analysis of 124 selected ESTs yielded 75 high-quality ESTs. Homology searches disclosed that 55 ESTs share significant similarity with the known/putative proteins or ESTs available in the databases. These ESTs were characterized and genes relevant to the specific physiological processes were identified. Of the 75 ESTs obtained from the cDNA libraries of drought-stressed plants, 20 ESTs proved to be unique to the pigeonpea. These sequences are envisaged to serve as a potential source of stress-inducible genes of the drought stress-response transcriptome, and hence may be used for deciphering the mechanism of drought tolerance of the pigeonpea. Expression profiles of selected genes revealed increased levels of m-RNA transcripts in pigeonpea plants subjected to different abiotic stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines, expressing Cajanus cajan hybrid-proline-rich protein (CcHyPRP), C. cajan cyclophilin (CcCYP) and C. cajan cold and drought regulatory (CcCDR) genes, exhibited marked tolerance, increased plant biomass and enhanced photosynthetic rates under PEG/NaCl/cold/heat stress conditions. This study represents the first report dealing with the isolation of drought-specific ESTs, transcriptome analysis and functional validation of drought-responsive genes of the pigeonpea. These genes, as such, hold promise for engineering crop plants bestowed with tolerance to major abiotic stresses. PMID:20131066

  20. Characterization of a glutamine synthetase gene DvGS1 from Dunaliella viridis and investigation of the impact on expression of DvGS1 in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenguang; Fan, Qianlan; Wang, Wei; Shen, Chunlei; Wang, Peipei; Meng, Xiangzong; Tang, Yuanping; Mei, Bing; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2014-01-01

    A novel glutamine synthetase (GS) gene DvGS1 showing highest amino acid sequence identity of 78 % with the other homologous GS proteins from green algae, was isolated and characterized from Dunaliella viridis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that DvGS1 occupied an independent phylogenetic position which was different with the GSs from higher plants, animals and microbes. Functional complement in E. coli mutant confirmed that the DvGS1 encoded functional GS enzyme. Real-time PCR analysis of DvGS1 in D. viridis cells under nitrogen starvation revealed that the mRNA level of DvGS1 was positively up-regulated in 12 h. The DvGS1 levels at the points of 12 and 24 h were separately twofold and fourfold of the level before nitrogen starvation. In order to investigate the potential application of DvGS1 in higher plants, the transgenic study of DvGS1 in Arabidopsis thaliana was carried out. Phenotype identification demonstrated that all three transgenic lines of T3 generation showed obviously enhanced root length (26 %), fresh weight (22-46 % at two concentrations of nitrate supplies), stem length (26 %), leaf size (29 %) and silique number (30 %) compared with the wild-type Arabidopsis. Biochemical analysis confirmed that all three transgenic lines had higher total nitrogen content, soluble protein concentration, total amino acid content and the leaf GS activity than the wild type plants. The free NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) concentration in fresh leaves of three transgenic lines were reduced by 17-26 % and 14-15 % separately (at two concentrations of nitrate supplies) compared with those of the wild types. All the results indicated that over-expression of DvGS1 in Arabidopsis significantly results in the improvement of growth phenotype and the host's nitrogen use efficiency. PMID:24307252

  1. Genomic analysis of the Hsp70 superfamily in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bai-Ling; Wang, Jang-Shiun; Liu, Hung-Chi; Chen, Rung-Wu; Meyer, Yves; Barakat, Abdellalli; Delseny, Michel

    2001-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome contains at least 18 genes encoding members of the 70-kilodalton heat shock protein (Hsp70) family, 14 in the DnaK subfamily and 4 in the Hsp110/SSE subfamily. While the Hsp70s are highly conserved, a phylogenetic analysis including all members of this family in Arabidopsis and in yeast indicates the homology of Hsp70s in the subgroups, such as those predicted to localize in the same subcellular compartment and those similar to the mammalian Hsp110 and Grp170. Gene structure and genome organization suggest duplication in the origin of some genes. The Arabidopsis hsp70s exhibit distinct expression profiles; representative genes of the subgroups are expressed at relatively high levels during specific developmental stages and under thermal stress. PMID:11599561

  2. The quiescent center and the stem cell niche in the adventitious roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Della Rovere, Federica; Fattorini, Laura; Ronzan, Marilena; Falasca, Giuseppina; Altamura, Maria Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adventitious rooting is essential for the survival of numerous species from vascular cryptogams to monocots, and is required for successful micropropagation. The tissues involved in AR initiation may differ in planta and in in vitro systems. For example, in Arabidopsis thaliana, ARs originate from the hypocotyl pericycle in planta and the stem endodermis in in vitro cultured thin cell layers. The formation of adventitious roots (ARs) depends on numerous factors, among which the hormones, auxin, in particular. In both primary and lateral roots, growth depends on a functional stem cell niche in the apex, maintained by an active quiescent center (QC), and involving the expression of genes controlled by auxin and cytokinin. This review summarizes current knowledge about auxin and cytokinin control on genes involved in the definition and maintenance of QC, and stem cell niche, in the apex of Arabidopsis ARs in planta and in longitudinal thin cell layers. PMID:27089118

  3. 1 L-myo-Inositol 1-Phosphate Synthase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. D.; Sussex, I. M.

    1995-01-01

    A recombinant phage containing an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA sequence encoding a protein with 1L-myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase (EC 5.5.1.4) activity has been isolated and used for transcriptional and translational studies. The identification of the recombinant phage relied on the observations that (a) the clone complements a mutation in the structural gene for 1L-myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, (b) the in vitro synthesized polypeptide enzymatically converts glucose 6-phosphate into inositol 1-phosphate, (c) in vitro transcription and translation of this cDNA sequence produces a polypeptide that is recognized by anti-yeast myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase antiserum, and (d) inositol regulates the expression of the corresponding gene in Arabidopsis. PMID:12228386

  4. The quiescent center and the stem cell niche in the adventitious roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Rovere, Federica Della; Fattorini, Laura; Ronzan, Marilena; Falasca, Giuseppina; Altamura, Maria Maddalena

    2016-05-01

    Adventitious rooting is essential for the survival of numerous species from vascular cryptogams to monocots, and is required for successful micropropagation. The tissues involved in AR initiation may differ in planta and in in vitro systems. For example, in Arabidopsis thaliana, ARs originate from the hypocotyl pericycle in planta and the stem endodermis in in vitro cultured thin cell layers. The formation of adventitious roots (ARs) depends on numerous factors, among which the hormones, auxin, in particular. In both primary and lateral roots, growth depends on a functional stem cell niche in the apex, maintained by an active quiescent center (QC), and involving the expression of genes controlled by auxin and cytokinin. This review summarizes current knowledge about auxin and cytokinin control on genes involved in the definition and maintenance of QC, and stem cell niche, in the apex of Arabidopsis ARs in planta and in longitudinal thin cell layers. PMID:27089118

  5. Aneuploidy and Genetic Variation in the Arabidopsis thaliana Triploid Response

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Isabelle M.; Dilkes, Brian P.; Young, Kim; Watson, Brian; Wu, Helen; Comai, Luca

    2005-01-01

    Polyploidy, the inheritance of more than two genome copies per cell, has played a major role in the evolution of higher plants. Little is known about the transition from diploidy to polyploidy but in some species, triploids are thought to function as intermediates in this transition. In contrast, in other species triploidy is viewed as a block. We investigated the responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to triploidy. The role of genetic variability was tested by comparing triploids generated from crosses between Col-0, a diploid, and either a natural autotetraploid (Wa-1) or an induced tetraploid of Col-0. In this study, we demonstrate that triploids of A. thaliana are fertile, producing a swarm of different aneuploids. Propagation of the progeny of a triploid for a few generations resulted in diploid and tetraploid cohorts. This demonstrated that, in A. thaliana, triploids can readily form tetraploids and function as bridges between euploid types. Genetic analysis of recombinant inbred lines produced from a triploid identified a locus on chromosome I exhibiting allelic bias in the tetraploid lines but not in the diploid lines. Thus, genetic variation was subject to selection contingent on the final ploidy and possibly acting during the protracted aneuploid phase. PMID:15944363

  6. Independent FLC Mutations as Causes of Flowering-Time Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana and Capsella rubella

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ya-Long; Todesco, Marco; Hagmann, Jörg; Das, Sandip; Weigel, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Capsella rubella is an inbreeding annual forb closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana, a model species widely used for studying natural variation in adaptive traits such as flowering time. Although mutations in dozens of genes can affect flowering of A. thaliana in the laboratory, only a handful of such genes vary in natural populations. Chief among these are FRIGIDA (FRI) and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Common and rare FRI mutations along with rare FLC mutations explain a large fraction of flowering-time variation in A. thaliana. Here we document flowering time under different conditions in 20 C. rubella accessions from across the species’ range. Similar to A. thaliana, vernalization, long photoperiods and elevated ambient temperature generally promote flowering. In this collection of C. rubella accessions, we did not find any obvious loss-of-function FRI alleles. Using mapping-by-sequencing with two strains that have contrasting flowering behaviors, we identified a splice-site mutation in FLC as the likely cause of early flowering in accession 1408. However, other similarly early C. rubella accessions did not share this mutation. We conclude that the genetic basis of flowering-time variation in C. rubella is complex, despite this very young species having undergone an extreme genetic bottleneck when it split from C. grandiflora a few tens of thousands of years ago. PMID:22865739

  7. REGIA, an EU project on functional genomics of transcription factors from Arabidopsis Thaliana.

    PubMed

    Paz-Ares, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are regulatory proteins that have played a pivotal role in the evolution of eukaryotes and that also have great biotechnological potential. REGIA (REgulatory Gene Initiative in Arabidopsis) is an EU-funded project involving 29 European laboratories with the objective of determining the function of virtually all transcription factors from the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. REGIA involves: 1. the definition of TF gene expression patterns in Arabidopsis; 2. the identification of mutations at TF loci; 3. the ectopic expression of TFs (or derivatives) in Arabidopsis and in crop plants; 4. phenotypic analysis of the mutants and mis-expression lines, including both RNA and metabolic profiling; 5. the systematic analysis of interactions between TFs; and 6. the generation of a bioinformatics infrastructure to access and integrate all this information. We expect that this programme will establish the full biotechnological potential of plant TFs, and provide insights into hierarchies, redundancies, and interdependencies, and their evolution. The project involves the preparation of both a TF gene array for expression analysis and a normalised full length open reading frame (ORF) library of TFs in a yeast two hybrid vector; the applications of these resources should extend beyond the scope of this programme. PMID:18628849

  8. REGIA, An EU Project on Functional Genomics of Transcription Factors From Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    The REGIA Consortium

    2002-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are regulatory proteins that have played a pivotal role in the evolution of eukaryotes and that also have great biotechnological potential. REGIA (REgulatory Gene Initiative in Arabidopsis) is an EU-funded project involving 29 European laboratories with the objective of determining the function of virtually all transcription factors from the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. REGIA involves: 1. the definition of TF gene expression patterns in Arabidopsis; 2. the identification of mutations at TF loci; 3. the ectopic expression of TFs (or derivatives) in Arabidopsis and in crop plants; 4. phenotypic analysis of the mutants and mis-expression lines, including both RNA and metabolic profiling; 5. the systematic analysis of interactions between TFs; and 6. the generation of a bioinformatics infrastructure to access and integrate all this information. We expect that this programme will establish the full biotechnological potential of plant TFs, and provide insights into hierarchies, redundancies, and interdependencies, and their evolution. The project involves the preparation of both a TF gene array for expression analysis and a normalised full length open reading frame (ORF) library of TFs in a yeast two hybrid vector; the applications of these resources should extend beyond the scope of this programme. PMID:18628849

  9. A glycolate dehydrogenase in the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bari, Rafijul; Kebeish, Rashad; Kalamajka, Rainer; Rademacher, Thomas; Peterhänsel, Christoph

    2004-03-01

    The fixation of molecular O2 by the oxygenase activity of Rubisco leads to the formation of phosphoglycolate in the chloroplast that is further metabolized in the process of photorespiration. The initial step of this pathway is the oxidation of glycolate to glyoxylate. Whereas in higher plants this reaction takes place in peroxisomes and is dependent on oxygen as a co-factor, most algae oxidize glycolate in the mitochondria using organic co-factors. The identification and characterization of a novel glycolate dehydrogenase in Arabidopsis thaliana is reported here. The enzyme is dependent on organic co-factors and resembles algal glycolate dehydrogenases in its enzymatic properties. Mutants of E. coli incapable of glycolate oxidation can be complemented by overexpression of the Arabidopsis open reading frame. The corresponding RNA accumulates preferentially in illuminated leaves, but was also found in other tissues investigated. A fusion of the N-terminal part of the Arabidopsis glycolate dehydrogenase to red fluorescent protein accumulates in mitochondria when overexpressed in the homologous system. Based on these results it is proposed that the basic photorespiratory system of algae is conserved in higher plants. PMID:14966218

  10. Genome Wide Association Mapping for the Tolerance to the Polyamine Oxidase Inhibitor Guazatine in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Kostadin E; Barboza-Barquero, Luis; Tiburcio, Antonio F; Alcázar, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Guazatine is a potent inhibitor of polyamine oxidase (PAO) activity. In agriculture, guazatine is used as non-systemic contact fungicide efficient in the protection of cereals and citrus fruits against disease. The composition of guazatine is complex, mainly constituted by a mixture of synthetic guanidated polyamines (polyaminoguanidines). Here, we have studied the effects from exposure to guazatine in the weed Arabidopsis thaliana. We report that micromolar concentrations of guazatine are sufficient to inhibit growth of Arabidopsis seedlings and induce chlorosis, whereas germination is barely affected. We observed the occurrence of quantitative variation in the response to guazatine between 107 randomly chosen Arabidopsis accessions. This enabled us to undertake genome-wide association (GWA) mapping that identified a locus on chromosome one associated with guazatine tolerance. CHLOROPHYLLASE 1 (CLH1) within this locus was studied as candidate gene, together with its paralog (CLH2). The analysis of independent clh1-2, clh1-3, clh2-3, clh2-2, and double clh1-2 clh2-3 mutant alleles indicated that CLH1 and/or CLH2 loss-of-function or expression down-regulation promote guazatine tolerance in Arabidopsis. We report a natural mechanism by which Arabidopsis populations can overcome toxicity by the fungicide guazatine. PMID:27092150

  11. Genome Wide Association Mapping for the Tolerance to the Polyamine Oxidase Inhibitor Guazatine in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Kostadin E.; Barboza-Barquero, Luis; Tiburcio, Antonio F.; Alcázar, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Guazatine is a potent inhibitor of polyamine oxidase (PAO) activity. In agriculture, guazatine is used as non-systemic contact fungicide efficient in the protection of cereals and citrus fruits against disease. The composition of guazatine is complex, mainly constituted by a mixture of synthetic guanidated polyamines (polyaminoguanidines). Here, we have studied the effects from exposure to guazatine in the weed Arabidopsis thaliana. We report that micromolar concentrations of guazatine are sufficient to inhibit growth of Arabidopsis seedlings and induce chlorosis, whereas germination is barely affected. We observed the occurrence of quantitative variation in the response to guazatine between 107 randomly chosen Arabidopsis accessions. This enabled us to undertake genome-wide association (GWA) mapping that identified a locus on chromosome one associated with guazatine tolerance. CHLOROPHYLLASE 1 (CLH1) within this locus was studied as candidate gene, together with its paralog (CLH2). The analysis of independent clh1-2, clh1-3, clh2-3, clh2-2, and double clh1-2 clh2-3 mutant alleles indicated that CLH1 and/or CLH2 loss-of-function or expression down-regulation promote guazatine tolerance in Arabidopsis. We report a natural mechanism by which Arabidopsis populations can overcome toxicity by the fungicide guazatine. PMID:27092150

  12. The BURP domain protein AtUSPL1 of Arabidopsis thaliana is destined to the protein storage vacuoles and overexpression of the cognate gene distorts seed development.

    PubMed

    Van Son, Le; Tiedemann, Jens; Rutten, Twan; Hillmer, Stefan; Hinz, Giselbert; Zank, Thorsten; Manteuffel, Renate; Bäumlein, Helmut

    2009-11-01

    BURP domain proteins comprise a broadly distributed, plant-specific family of functionally poorly understood proteins. VfUSP (Vicia faba Unknown Seed Protein) is the founding member of this family. The BURP proteins are characterized by a highly conserved C-terminal protein domain with a characteristic cysteine-histidine pattern. The Arabidopsis genome contains five BURP-domain encoding genes. Three of them are similar to the non-catalytic beta-subunit of the polygalacturonase of tomato and form a distinct subgroup. The remaining two genes are AtRD22 and AtUSPL1. The deduced product of AtUSPL1 is similar in size and sequence to VfUSP and that of the Brassica napus BNM2 gene which is expressed during microspore-derived embryogenesis. The protein products of BURP genes have not been found, especially that of VfUSP despite a great deal of interest arising from copious transcription of the gene in seeds. Here, we demonstrate that VfUSP and AtUSPL1 occur in cellular compartments essential for seed protein synthesis and storage, like the Golgi cisternae, dense vesicles, prevaculoar vesicles and the protein storage vacuoles in the parenchyma cells of cotyledons. Ectopic expression of AtUSPL1 leads to a shrunken seed phenotype; these seeds show structural alterations in their protein storage vacuoles and lipid vesicles. Furthermore, there is a reduction in the storage protein content and a perturbation in the seed fatty acid composition. However, loss of AtUSP1 gene function due to T-DNA insertions does not lead to a phenotypic change under laboratory conditions even though the seeds have less storage proteins. Thus, USP is pertinent to seed development but its role is likely shared by other proteins that function well enough under the laboratory growth conditions. PMID:19639386

  13. Phosphatidic acid is a major phospholipid class in reproductive organs of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yunus, Ian Sofian; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Liu, Yu-chi; Lin, Ying-Chen; Wenk, Markus R; Nakamura, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids are the crucial components of biological membranes and signal transduction. Among different tissues, flower phospholipids are one of the least characterized features of plant lipidome. Here, we report that floral reproductive organs of Arabidopsis thaliana contain high levels of phosphatidic acid (PA), a known lipid second messenger. By using floral homeotic mutants enriched with specific floral organs, lipidomics study showed increased levels of PA species in ap3-3 mutant with enriched pistils. Accompanied gene expression study for 7 diacylglycerol kinases and 11 PA phosphatases revealed distinct floral organ specificity, suggesting an active phosphorylation/dephosphorylation between PA and diacylglycerol in flowers. Our results suggest that PA is a major phospholipid class in floral reproductive organs of A. thaliana. PMID:26179579

  14. Genome-wide association study of Arabidopsis thaliana's leaf microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Matthew W.; Bodenhausen, Natacha; Beilsmith, Kathleen; Meng, Dazhe; Muegge, Brian D.; Subramanian, Sathish; Vetter, M. Madlen; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J.; Nordborg, Magnus; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Bergelson, Joy

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the factors that influence the outcome of host-microbial interactions is critical to protecting biodiversity, minimizing agricultural losses, and improving human health. A few genes that determine symbiosis or resistance to infectious disease have been identified in model species, but a comprehensive examination of how a host's genotype influences the structure of its microbial community is lacking. Here we report the results of a field experiment with the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to identify the fungi and bacteria that colonize its leaves and the host loci that influence the microbes’ numbers. The composition of this community differs among accessions of A. thaliana. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) suggest that plant loci responsible for defense and cell wall integrity affect variation in this community. Furthermore, species richness in the bacterial community is shaped by host genetic variation, notably at loci that also influence the reproduction of viruses, trichome branching and morphogenesis. PMID:25382143

  15. Genome wide transcriptional profiling of acclimation to photoperiod in high-latitude accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska-Sabat, Anna Monika; Winge, Per; Fjellheim, Siri; Dørum, Guro; Bones, Atle Magnar; Rognli, Odd Arne

    2012-04-01

    Three Arabidopsis thaliana accessions originating from the northernmost boundary of the species distribution in Norway (59-68°N) were used to study global wide transcriptional responses to 16 and 24 h photoperiods during flower initiation. Significant analysis of microarrays (SAM), analyses of statistically overrepresented gene ontologies (GOstat) and gene set enrichment analyses (GSEA) were used to identify candidate genes and genetic pathways underlying phenotypic adaptations of accessions to different photoperiods. Statistical analyses identified 732 and 258 differentially expressed genes between accessions in 16 and 24 h photoperiod, respectively. Among significantly expressed genes, ethylene mediated signaling pathway was significantly overrepresented in 16 h photoperiod, while genes involved in response to auxin stimulus were found to be significantly overrepresented in 24 h photoperiod. Several gene sets were found to be differentially expressed among accessions, e.g. cold acclimation, dehydration response, phytochrome signaling, vernalization response and circadian clock regulated flowering time genes. These results revealed several candidate genes and pathways likely involved in transcriptional control of photoperiodic response. In particular, ethylene and auxin signaling pathway may represent candidate genes contributing to local adaptation of high-latitude accessions of A. thaliana. PMID:22325875

  16. Proteomic alterations in root tips of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under altered gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H. Q.; Wang, H.

    Gravity has a profound influence on plant growth and development Removed the influence of gravitational acceleration by spaceflight caused a wide range of cellular changes in plant Whole seedling that germinated and grown on clinostats showed the absent of gravitropism At the cellular level clinostat treatment has specific effects on plant cells such as induce alterations in cell wall composition increase production of heat-soluble proteins impact on the cellular energy metabolism facilitate a uniform distribution of plastids amyloplasts and increase number and volume of nucleoli A number of recent studies have shown that the exposure of Arabidopsis seedlings and callus cells to gravity stimulation hyper g-forces or clinostat rotation induces alterations in gene expression In our previous study the proteome of the Arabidopsis thaliana callus cells were separated by high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis 2-DE Image analysis revealed that 80 protein spots showed quantitative and qualitative variations after exposure to clinostat rotation treatment We report here a systematic proteomic approach to investigate the altered gravity responsive proteins in root tip of Arabidopsis thaliana cv Landsberg erecta Three-day-old seedlings were exposed for 12h to a horizontal clinostat rotation H simulated weightlessness altered g-forces by centrifugation 7g hypergravity a vertical clinostat rotation V clinostat control or a stationary control grown conditions Total proteins of roots were extracted

  17. Changes in biosynthesis and metabolism of glutathione upon ochratoxin A stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhao, Weiwei; Hao, Junran; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Wu, Weihong; Yang, Zhuojun; Liang, Zhihong; Huang, Kunlun

    2014-06-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most toxic mycotoxins, which is toxic to plants and simulates oxidative stress. Glutathione is an important antioxidant in plants and is closely associated with detoxification in cells. We have previously shown that OTA exposure induces obvious expression differences in genes associated with glutathione metabolism. To characterize glutathione metabolism and understand its role in OTA phytotoxicity, we observed the accumulation of GSH in the detached leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana under OTA treatment. OTA stimulated a defense response through enhancing glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase activities, and the transcript levels of these enzymes were increased to maintain the total glutathione content. Moreover, the level of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) was increased and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle fluctuated in response to OTA. The depletion of glutathione using buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, inhibitor of glutamate-cysteine ligase) had no profound effect on OTA toxicity, as glutathione was regenerated through the ascorbate-glutathione cycle to maintain the total glutathione content. The ROS, MDA and GSH accumulation was significantly affected in the mutant gsh1, gr1 and gpx2 after treatment with OTA, which indicated that glutathione metabolism is directly involved in the oxidative stress response of Arabidopsis thaliana subjected to OTA. In conclusion, date demonstrate that glutathione-associated metabolism is closely related with OTA stress and glutathione play a role in resistance of Arabidopsis subjected to OTA. PMID:24662377

  18. Expression of a nuclear-encoded psbH gene complements the plastidic RNA processing defect in the PSII mutant hcf107 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Levey, Tatjana; Westhoff, Peter; Meierhoff, Karin

    2014-10-01

    The helical-repeat RNA-binding protein HCF107 is required for processing, stabilization and translation of plastid-encoded psbH mRNA. The psbH gene encodes a small, hydrophilic subunit of the PSII complex and is part of the plastidic psbB-psbT-psbH-petB-petD transcription unit. In Arabidopsis hcf107 mutants, only trace amounts of PSII proteins can be detected. Beside drastically reduced synthesis of PsbH, the synthesis of CP47 was also reduced in these mutants, although the corresponding psbB transcripts accumulate to wild type levels. This situation raises the question, whether the reduction of CP47 is a direct consequence of the mutation, based on targeting of HCF107 to the psbB mRNA, or a secondary affect due to the absent PsbH. To clarify this issue we introduced a chimeric psbH construct comprising a sequence encoding a chloroplast transit peptide into the hcf107-2 background. We found that the nucleus-localized psbH was able to complement the mutant defect resulting in photoautotrophic plants. The PSII proteins CP47 and D1 accumulated to barely half of the wild type level. Further experiments showed that cytosolically synthesized PsbH was imported into chloroplasts and assembled into PSII complexes. Using this approach, we showed that the tetratricopeptide repeat protein HCF107 of Arabidopsis is only responsible for expression of PsbH and not for synthesis of CP47. In addition the data suggest the necessity of the small, one-helix membrane spanning protein PsbH for the accumulation of CP47 in higher plants. PMID:25081859

  19. Transcriptional and metabolomic analysis of Ascophyllum nodosum mediated freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that lipophilic components (LPC) of the brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum (ANE) improved freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the mechanism(s) of this induced freezing stress tolerance is largely unknown. Here, we investigated LPC induced changes in the transcriptome and metabolome of A. thaliana undergoing freezing stress. Results Gene expression studies revealed that the accumulation of proline was mediated by an increase in the expression of the proline synthesis genes P5CS1 and P5CS2 and a marginal reduction in the expression of the proline dehydrogenase (ProDH) gene. Moreover, LPC application significantly increased the concentration of total soluble sugars in the cytosol in response to freezing stress. Arabidopsis sfr4 mutant plants, defective in the accumulation of free sugars, treated with LPC, exhibited freezing sensitivity similar to that of untreated controls. The 1H NMR metabolite profile of LPC-treated Arabidopsis plants exposed to freezing stress revealed a spectrum dominated by chemical shifts (δ) representing soluble sugars, sugar alcohols, organic acids and lipophilic components like fatty acids, as compared to control plants. Additionally, 2D NMR spectra suggested an increase in the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids in LPC treated plants under freezing stress. These results were supported by global transcriptome analysis. Transcriptome analysis revealed that LPC treatment altered the expression of 1113 genes (5%) in comparison with untreated plants. A total of 463 genes (2%) were up regulated while 650 genes (3%) were down regulated. Conclusion Taken together, the results of the experiments presented in this paper provide evidence to support LPC mediated freezing tolerance enhancement through a combination of the priming of plants for the increased accumulation of osmoprotectants and alteration of cellular fatty acid composition. PMID:23171218

  20. Pseudomonas syringae type III effector AvrRpt2 alters Arabidopsis thaliana auxin physiology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongying; Agnew, Jennifer L.; Cohen, Jerry D.; He, Ping; Shan, Libo; Sheen, Jen; Kunkel, Barbara N.

    2007-01-01

    The Pseudomonas syringae type III effector AvrRpt2 promotes bacterial virulence on Arabidopsis thaliana plants lacking a functional RPS2 gene (rps2 mutant plants). To investigate the mechanisms underlying the virulence activity of AvrRpt2, we examined the phenotypes of transgenic A. thaliana rps2 seedlings constitutively expressing AvrRpt2. These seedlings exhibited phenotypes reminiscent of A. thaliana mutants with altered auxin physiology, including longer primary roots, increased number of lateral roots, and increased sensitivity to exogenous auxin. They also had increased levels of free indole acetic acid (IAA). The presence of AvrRpt2 also was correlated with a further increase in free IAA levels during infection with P. syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (PstDC3000). These results indicate that AvrRpt2 alters A. thaliana auxin physiology. Application of the auxin analog 1-naphthaleneacetic acid promoted disease symptom development in PstDC3000-infected plants, suggesting that elevated auxin levels within host tissue promote PstDC3000 virulence. Thus, AvrRpt2 may be among the virulence factors of P. syringae that modulate host auxin physiology to promote disease. PMID:18056646

  1. The origin of populations of Arabidopsis thaliana in China, based on the chloroplast DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the studies incorporating worldwide sampling of A. thaliana populations, the samples from East Asia, especially from China, were very scattered; and the studies focused on global patterns of cpDNA genetic variation among accessions of A. thaliana are very few. In this study, chloroplast DNA sequence variability was used to infer phylogenetic relationships among Arabidopsis thaliana accessions from around the world, with the emphasis on samples from China. Results A data set comprising 77 accessions of A. thaliana, including 19 field-collected Chinese accessions together with three related species (A. arenosa, A. suecica, and Olimarabidopsis cabulica) as the out-group, was compiled. The analysis of the nucleotide sequences showed that the 77 accessions of A. thaliana were partitioned into two major differentiated haplotype classes (MDHCs). The estimated divergence time of the two MDHCs was about 0.39 mya. Forty-nine haplotypes were detected among the 77 accessions, which exhibited nucleotide diversity (π) of 0.00169. The Chinese populations along the Yangtze River were characterized by five haplotypes, and the two accessions collected from the middle range of the Altai Mountains in China shared six specific variable sites. Conclusions The dimorphism in the chloroplast DNA could be due to founder effects during late Pleistocene glaciations and interglacial periods, although introgression cannot be ruled out. The Chinese populations along the Yangtze River may have dispersed eastwards to their present-day locations from the Himalayas. These populations originated from a common ancestor, and a rapid demographic expansion began approximately 90,000 years ago. Two accessions collected from the middle range of the Altai Mountains in China may have survived in a local refugium during late Pleistocene glaciations. The natural populations from China with specific genetic characteristics enriched the gene pools of global A. thaliana collections. PMID:20141622

  2. AtMYB12 regulates flavonoids accumulation and abiotic stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feibing; Kong, Weili; Wong, Gary; Fu, Lifeng; Peng, Rihe; Li, Zhenjun; Yao, Quanhong

    2016-08-01

    In plants, transcriptional regulation is the most important tool for modulating flavonoid biosynthesis. The AtMYB12 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana has been shown to regulate the expression of key enzyme genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis, leading to the increased accumulation of flavonoids. In this study, the codon-optimized AtMYB12 gene was chemically synthesized. Subcellular localization analysis in onion epidermal cells indicated that AtMYB12 was localized to the nucleus. Its overexpression significantly increased accumulation of flavonoids and enhanced salt and drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that overexpression of AtMYB12 resulted in the up-regulation of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis, abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis, proline biosynthesis, stress responses and ROS scavenging under salt and drought stresses. Further analyses under salt and drought stresses showed significant increases of ABA, proline content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities, as well as significant reduction of H2O2 and malonaldehyde (MDA) content. The results demonstrate the explicit role of AtMYB12 in conferring salt and drought tolerance by increasing the levels of flavonoids and ABA in transgenic Arabidopsis. The AtMYB12 gene has the potential to be used to enhance tolerance to abiotic stresses in plants. PMID:27033553

  3. Polyamine Resistance Is Increased by Mutations in a Nitrate Transporter Gene NRT1.3 (AtNPF6.4) in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wurina; Imai, Akihiro; Tabata, Ryo; Shigenobu, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Yamada, Masashi; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Sawa, Shinichiro; Motose, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines are small basic compounds present in all living organisms and act in a variety of biological processes. However, the mechanism of polyamine sensing, signaling and response in relation to other metabolic pathways remains to be fully addressed in plant cells. As one approach, we isolated Arabidopsis mutants that show increased resistance to spermine in terms of chlorosis. We show here that two of the mutants have a point mutation in a nitrate transporter gene of the NRT1/PTR family (NPF), NRT1.3 (AtNPF6.4). These mutants also exhibit increased resistance to putrescine and spermidine while loss-of-function mutants of the two closest homologs of NRT1.3, root-specific NRT1.1 (AtNPF6.3) and petiole-specific NRT1.4 (AtNPF6.2), were shown to have a normal sensitivity to polyamines. When the GUS reporter gene was expressed under the control of the NRT1.3 promoter, GUS staining was observed in leaf mesophyll cells and stem cortex cells but not in the epidermis, suggesting that NRT1.3 specifically functions in parenchymal tissues. We further found that the aerial part of the mutant seedling has normal levels of polyamines but shows reduced uptake of norspermidine compared with the wild type. These results suggest that polyamine transport or metabolism is associated with nitrate transport in the parenchymal tissue of the shoot. PMID:27379127

  4. NO3- and ClO3- fluxes in the chl1-5 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana. Does the CHL1-5 gene encode a low-affinity NO3- transporter?

    PubMed Central

    Touraine, B; Glass, A D

    1997-01-01

    The CHL1 gene is considered to encode a low-affinity transport system (LATS) for NO3- in Arabidopsis thaliana (Y.-F. Tsay, J.I. Schroeder, K.A. Feldmann, N.M. Crawford [1993] Cell 72: 705-713). However, the anticipated reduced NO3- uptake by the LATS associated with loss of CHL1 gene activity in chl1-5 deletion mutants was evident only when plants were grown on NH4NO3. When KNO3 was the sole N source, NO3- accumulation and short-term tracer influx (using 13NO3- and 15NO3-) in leaves and roots of wild-type and mutant plants were essentially identical. Nevertheless, root uptake of 36CIO3- by the LATS and CIO3- accumulation in roots and shoots of mutant plants were significantly lower than in wild-type plants when grown on KNO3. One explanation for these results is that a second LATS is able to compensate for the chl1-5 deficiency in KNO3-grown plants. Growth on NH4NO3 may down-regulate the second LATS enough that the anticipated difference in NO3- uptake becomes apparent. PMID:9159946

  5. Effects of elevated CO2 on levels of primary metabolites and transcripts of genes encoding respiratory enzymes and their diurnal patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana: possible relationships with respiratory rates.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Chihiro K; Sato, Shigeru; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Uesono, Yukifumi; Terashima, Ichiro; Noguchi, Ko

    2014-02-01

    Elevated CO2 affects plant growth and photosynthesis, which results in changes in plant respiration. However, the mechanisms underlying the responses of plant respiration to elevated CO2 are poorly understood. In this study, we measured diurnal changes in the transcript levels of genes encoding respiratory enzymes, the maximal activities of the enzymes and primary metabolite levels in shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under moderate or elevated CO2 conditions (390 or 780 parts per million by volume CO2, respectively). We examined the relationships between these changes and respiratory rates. Under elevated CO2, the transcript levels of several genes encoding respiratory enzymes increased at the end of the light period, but these increases did not result in changes in the maximal activities of the corresponding enzymes. The levels of some primary metabolites such as starch and sugar phosphates increased under elevated CO2, particularly at the end of the light period. The O2 uptake rate at the end of the dark period was higher under elevated CO2 than under moderate CO2, but higher under moderate CO2 than under elevated CO2 at the end of the light period. These results indicate that the changes in O2 uptake rates are not directly related to changes in maximal enzyme activities and primary metabolite levels. Instead, elevated CO2 may affect anabolic processes that consume respiratory ATP, thereby affecting O2 uptake rates. PMID:24319073

  6. Effects of Elevated CO2 on Levels of Primary Metabolites and Transcripts of Genes Encoding Respiratory Enzymes and Their Diurnal Patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana: Possible Relationships with Respiratory Rates

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chihiro K.; Sato, Shigeru; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Uesono, Yukifumi; Terashima, Ichiro; Noguchi, Ko

    2014-01-01

    Elevated CO2 affects plant growth and photosynthesis, which results in changes in plant respiration. However, the mechanisms underlying the responses of plant respiration to elevated CO2 are poorly understood. In this study, we measured diurnal changes in the transcript levels of genes encoding respiratory enzymes, the maximal activities of the enzymes and primary metabolite levels in shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under moderate or elevated CO2 conditions (390 or 780 parts per million by volume CO2, respectively). We examined the relationships between these changes and respiratory rates. Under elevated CO2, the transcript levels of several genes encoding respiratory enzymes increased at the end of the light period, but these increases did not result in changes in the maximal activities of the corresponding enzymes. The levels of some primary metabolites such as starch and sugar phosphates increased under elevated CO2, particularly at the end of the light period. The O2 uptake rate at the end of the dark period was higher under elevated CO2 than under moderate CO2, but higher under moderate CO2 than under elevated CO2 at the end of the light period. These results indicate that the changes in O2 uptake rates are not directly related to changes in maximal enzyme activities and primary metabolite levels. Instead, elevated CO2 may affect anabolic processes that consume respiratory ATP, thereby affecting O2 uptake rates. PMID:24319073

  7. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  8. Phytoremediation of the organic Xenobiotic simazine by p450-1a2 transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    PubMed

    Azab, Ehab; Hegazy, Ahmad K; El-Sharnouby, Mohamed E; Abd Elsalam, Hassan E

    2016-07-01

    The potential use of human P450-transgenic plants for phytoremediation of pesticide contaminated soils was tested in laboratory and greenhouse experiments. The transgenic P450 CYP1A2 gene Arabidopsis thaliana plants metabolize number of herbicides, insecticides and industrial chemicals. The P450 isozymes CYP1A2 expressed in A. thaliana were examined regarding the herbicide simazine (SIM). Transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing CYP1A2 gene showed significant resistance to SIM supplemented either in plant growth medium or sprayed on foliar parts. The results showed that SIM produces harmful effect on both rosette diameter and primary root length of the wild type (WT) plants. In transgenic A. thaliana lines, the rosette diameter and primary root length were not affected by SIM concentrations used in this experiment. The results indicate that CYP1A2 can be used as a selectable marker for plant transformation, allowing efficient selection of transgenic lines in growth medium and/or in soil-grown plants. The transgenic A. thaliana plants exhibited a healthy growth using doses of up to 250 μmol SIM treatments, while the non-transgenic A. thaliana plants were severely damaged with doses above 50 μmol SIM treatments. The transgenic A. thaliana plants can be used as phytoremediator of environmental SIM contaminants. PMID:26771455

  9. A mutational analysis of leaf morphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Berná, G; Robles, P; Micol, J L

    1999-01-01

    As a contribution to a better understanding of the developmental processes that are specific to plants, we have begun a genetic analysis of leaf ontogeny in the model system Arabidopsis thaliana by performing a large-scale screening for mutants with abnormal leaves. After screening 46,159 M2 individuals, arising from 5770 M1 parental seeds exposed to EMS, we isolated 1926 M2 putative leaf mutants, 853 of which yielded viable M3 inbred progeny. Mutant phenotypes were transmitted with complete penetrance and small variations in expressivity in 255 lines. Most of them were inherited as recessive monogenic traits, belonging to 94 complementation groups, which suggests that we did not reach saturation of the genome. We discuss the nature of the processes presumably perturbed in the phenotypic classes defined among our mutants. PMID:10353913

  10. Kinetics for phototropic curvature by etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orbovic, V.; Poff, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    An infrared-imaging system has been used to study the influence of gravity on the kinetics of first positive phototropism. The development of phototropic curvature of etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana was measured in the absence of visible radiation. Following a pulse of blue light, stationary seedlings curved to a maximum of approximately 16 degrees about 80 minutes after stimulation. The seedlings then curved upward again or straightened by about 6 degrees during the subsequent 100 minutes. Seedlings rotated on a clinostat reached a similar maximum curvature following photostimulation. These seedlings maintained that curvature for 30 to 40 minutes before subsequently straightening to the same extent as the stationary seedlings. It is concluded that straightening is not a consequence of gravitropism, although gravity has some effect on the phototropism kinetics.

  11. A phospholipid uptake system in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Lisbeth R; López-Marqués, Rosa L; Pedas, Pai R; McDowell, Stephen C; Brown, Elizabeth; Kunze, Reinhard; Harper, Jeffrey F; Pomorski, Thomas G; Palmgren, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Plants use solar energy to produce lipids directly from inorganic elements and are not thought to require molecular systems for lipid uptake from the environment. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana Aminophospholipid ATPase10 (ALA10) is a P4-type ATPase flippase that internalizes exogenous phospholipids across the plasma membrane, after which they are rapidly metabolized. ALA10 expression and phospholipid uptake are high in the epidermal cells of the root tip and in guard cells, the latter of which regulate the size of stomatal apertures to modulate gas exchange. ALA10-knockout mutants exhibit reduced phospholipid uptake at the root tips and guard cells and are affected in growth and transpiration. The presence of a phospholipid uptake system in plants is surprising. Our results suggest that one possible physiological role of this system is to internalize lysophosphatidylcholine, a signalling lipid involved in root development and stomatal control. PMID:26212235

  12. Mutagenesis of Arabidopsis Thaliana by N+ Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Genfa; Shi, Xiaoming; Nie, Yanli; Jiang, Shan; Zhou, Hongyu; Lu, Ting; Zhang, Jun

    2006-05-01

    Ion implantation, as a new biophysically mutagenic technique, has shown a great potential for crop breeding. By analyzing polymorphisms of genomic DNA through RAPD-based DNA analysis, we compared the frequency and efficiency of somatic and germ-line mutations of Arabidopsis thaliana treated with N+ ion implantation and γ-rays radiation. Our data support the following conclusions: (1) N+ ion implantation can induce a much wider spectrum of mutations than γ-rays radiation does; (2) Unlike the linear correlation between the doses and their effect in γ-rays radiation, the dose-effect correlation in N+ ion implantation is nonlinear; (3) Like γ-rays radiation, both somatic and germ-line mutations could be induced by N+ ion implantation; and (4) RAPD deletion patterns are usually seen in N+ ion implantation induced mutation.

  13. Mild ammonium stress increases chlorophyll content in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Zabala, Joseba; González-Murua, Carmen; Marino, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3−) and ammonium (NH4+) are the main forms of nitrogen available in the soil for plants. Excessive NH4+ accumulation in tissues is toxic for plants and exclusive NH4+-based nutrition enhances this effect. Ammonium toxicity syndrome commonly includes growth impairment, ion imbalance and chlorosis among others. In this work, we observed high intraspecific variability in chlorophyll content in 47 Arabidopsis thaliana natural accessions grown under 1 mM NH4+ or 1 mM NO3− as N-source. Interestingly, chlorophyll content increased in every accession upon ammonium nutrition. Moreover, this increase was independent of ammonium tolerance capacity. Thus, chlorosis seems to be an exclusive effect of severe ammonium toxicity while mild ammonium stress induces chlorophyll accumulation. PMID:25853545

  14. Growth Distribution during Phototropism of Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Orbovic, V.; Poff, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    The elongation rates of two opposite sides of hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings were measured during phototropism by using an infrared imaging system. In first positive phototropism, second positive phototropism, and red light-enhanced first positive phototropism, curvature toward the light source was the result of an increase in the rate of elongation of the shaded side and a decrease in the rate of elongation of the lighted side of the seedlings. The phase of straightening that followed maximum curvature resulted from a decrease in the elongation rate of the shaded side and an increase in the elongation rate of the lighted side. These data for the three types of blue light-induced phototropism tested in this study and for the phase of straightening are all clearly consistent with the growth rate changes predicted by the Cholodny-Went theory. PMID:12231922

  15. Arabidopsis thaliana is an asymptomatic host of Alfalfa mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Muthukumar; Ibrahim, Amr; Kim, Bong-Suk; Loesch-Fries, L Sue

    2006-11-01

    The susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes to infection by Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) was evaluated. Thirty-nine ecotypes supported both local and systemic infection, 26 ecotypes supported only local infection, and three ecotypes could not be infected. No obvious symptoms characteristic of virus infection developed on the susceptible ecotypes under standard conditions of culture. Parameters of AMV infection were characterized in ecotype Col-0, which supported systemic infection and accumulated higher levels of AMV than the symptomatic host Nicotiana tabacum. The formation of infectious AMV particles in infected Col-0 was confirmed by infectivity assays on a hypersensitive host and by electron microscopy of purified virions. Replication and transcription of AMV was confirmed by de novo synthesis of AMV subgenomic RNA in Col-0 protoplasts transfected with AMV RNA or plasmids harboring AMV cDNAs. PMID:16875753

  16. DIRECT AND RESIDUAL EFFECTS OF CADMIUM ON THE GROWTH AND ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION OF 'ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted to determine the direct (first generation) and residual (second generation) phytotoxicity of a range of cadmium concentrations on Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants were grown under greenhouse conditions in double-container, vermiculite-hydroponic plot-cultur...

  17. Transcriptomic Profiling Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Treated with Exogenous Myo-Inositol.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenxing; Ren, Weibo; Kong, Lingqi; Zhang, Wanjun; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Myo-insositol (MI) is a crucial substance in the growth and developmental processes in plants. It is commonly added to the culture medium to promote adventitious shoot development. In our previous work, MI was found in influencing Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. In this report, a high-throughput RNA sequencing technique (RNA-Seq) was used to investigate differently expressed genes in one-month-old Arabidopsis seedling grown on MI free or MI supplemented culture medium. The results showed that 21,288 and 21,299 genes were detected with and without MI treatment, respectively. The detected genes included 184 new genes that were not annotated in the Arabidopsis thaliana reference genome. Additionally, 183 differentially expressed genes were identified (DEGs, FDR ≤0.05, log2 FC≥1), including 93 up-regulated genes and 90 down-regulated genes. The DEGs were involved in multiple pathways, such as cell wall biosynthesis, biotic and abiotic stress response, chromosome modification, and substrate transportation. Some significantly differently expressed genes provided us with valuable information for exploring the functions of exogenous MI. RNA-Seq results showed that exogenous MI could alter gene expression and signaling transduction in plant cells. These results provided a systematic understanding of the functions of exogenous MI in detail and provided a foundation for future studies. PMID:27603208

  18. Gene expression in arabidopsis shoot tips after liquid nitrogen exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arabidopsis thaliana shoot tips can be successfully cryopreserved using either Plant Vitrification Solution 2 (PVS2) or Plant Vitrification Solution 3 (PVS3) as the cryoprotectant. We used this model system to identify suites of genes that were either upregulated or downregulated as shoot tips recov...

  19. VIZARD: analysis of Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Affymetrix GeneChip Arabidopsis genome array has proved to be a very powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, the most commonly studied plant model organism. VIZARD is a Java program created at the University of California, Berkeley, to facilitate analysis of Arabidopsis GeneChip data. It includes several integrated tools for filtering, sorting, clustering and visualization of gene expression data as well as tools for the discovery of regulatory motifs in upstream sequences. VIZARD also includes annotation and upstream sequence databases for the majority of genes represented on the Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip array. AVAILABILITY: VIZARD is available free of charge for educational, research, and not-for-profit purposes, and can be downloaded at http://www.anm.f2s.com/research/vizard/ CONTACT: moseyko@uclink4.berkeley.edu.

  20. Functional Analysis of Sporophytic Transcripts Repressed by the Female Gametophyte in the Ovule of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Armenta-Medina, Alma; Huanca-Mamani, Wilson; Sanchez-León, Nidia; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the genetic and molecular regulation that the female gametophyte could exert over neighboring sporophytic regions of the ovule, we performed a quantitative comparison of global expression in wild-type and nozzle/sporocyteless (spl) ovules of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), using Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS). This comparison resulted in 1517 genes showing at least 3-fold increased expression in ovules lacking a female gametophyte, including those encoding 89 transcription factors, 50 kinases, 25 proteins containing a RNA-recognition motif (RRM), and 20 WD40 repeat proteins. We confirmed that eleven of these genes are either preferentially expressed or exclusive of spl ovules lacking a female gametophyte as compared to wild-type, and showed that six are also upregulated in determinant infertile1 (dif1), a meiotic mutant affected in a REC8-like cohesin that is also devoided of female gametophytes. The sporophytic misexpression of IOREMPTE, a WD40/transducin repeat gene that is preferentially expressed in the L1 layer of spl ovules, caused the arrest of female gametogenesis after differentiation of a functional megaspore. Our results show that in Arabidopsis, the sporophytic-gametophytic cross talk includes a negative regulation of the female gametophyte over specific genes that are detrimental for its growth and development, demonstrating its potential to exert a repressive control over neighboring regions in the ovule. PMID:24194852

  1. Functional analysis of sporophytic transcripts repressed by the female gametophyte in the ovule of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Armenta-Medina, Alma; Huanca-Mamani, Wilson; Sanchez-León, Nidia; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the genetic and molecular regulation that the female gametophyte could exert over neighboring sporophytic regions of the ovule, we performed a quantitative comparison of global expression in wild-type and nozzle/sporocyteless (spl) ovules of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), using Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS). This comparison resulted in 1517 genes showing at least 3-fold increased expression in ovules lacking a female gametophyte, including those encoding 89 transcription factors, 50 kinases, 25 proteins containing a RNA-recognition motif (RRM), and 20 WD40 repeat proteins. We confirmed that eleven of these genes are either preferentially expressed or exclusive of spl ovules lacking a female gametophyte as compared to wild-type, and showed that six are also upregulated in determinant infertile1 (dif1), a meiotic mutant affected in a REC8-like cohesin that is also devoided of female gametophytes. The sporophytic misexpression of IOREMPTE, a WD40/transducin repeat gene that is preferentially expressed in the L1 layer of spl ovules, caused the arrest of female gametogenesis after differentiation of a functional megaspore. Our results show that in Arabidopsis, the sporophytic-gametophytic cross talk includes a negative regulation of the female gametophyte over specific genes that are detrimental for its growth and development, demonstrating its potential to exert a repressive control over neighboring regions in the ovule. PMID:24194852

  2. Nuclear micro-probe analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ager, F. J.; Ynsa, M. D.; Domínguez-Solís, J. R.; López-Martín, M. C.; Gotor, C.; Romero, L. C.

    2003-09-01

    Phytoremediation is a cost-effective plant-based approach for remediation of soils and waters which takes advantage of the remarkable ability of some plants to concentrate elements and compounds from the environment and to metabolize various molecules in their tissues, such as toxic heavy metals and organic pollutants. Nowadays, phytoremediation technology is becoming of paramount importance when environmental decontamination is concerned, due to the emerging knowledge of its physiological and molecular mechanisms and the new biological and engineering strategies designed to optimize and improve it. In addition, the feasibility of using plants for environmental cleanup has been confirmed by many different trials around the world. Arabidopsis thaliana plants can be used for basic studies to improve the technology on phytoremediation. Making use of nuclear microscopy techniques, in this paper we study leaves of wild type and transgenic A. thaliana plants grown in a cadmium-rich environment under different conditions. Micro-PIXE, RBS and SEM analyses, performed on the scanning proton micro-probe at the CNA in Seville (Spain), prove that cadmium is preferentially sequestered in the central region of epidermal trichome and allow comparing the effects of genetic modifications.

  3. Iron acquisition from Fe-pyoverdine by Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vansuyt, Gérard; Robin, Agnès; Briat, Jean-François; Curie, Catherine; Lemanceau, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    Taking into account the strong iron competition in the rhizosphere and the high affinity of pyoverdines for Fe(III), these molecules are expected to interfere with the iron nutrition of plants, as they do with rhizospheric microbes. The impact of Fe-pyoverdine on iron content of Arabidopsis thaliana was compared with that of Fe-EDTA. Iron chelated to pyoverdine was incorporated in a more efficient way than when chelated to EDTA, leading to increased plant growth of the wild type. A transgenic line of A. thaliana overexpressing ferritin showed a higher iron content than the wild type when supplemented with Fe-EDTA but a lower iron content when supplemented with Fe-pyoverdine despite its increased reductase activity, suggesting that this activity was not involved in the iron uptake from pyoverdine. A mutant knock-out iron transporter IRT1 showed lower iron and chlorophyll contents when supplemented with Fe-EDTA than the wild type but not when supplemented with Fe-pyoverdine, indicating that, in contrast to iron from EDTA, iron from pyoverdine was not incorporated through the IRT1 transporter. Altogether these data suggest that iron from Fe-pyoverdine was not incorporated in planta through the strategy I, which is based on reductase activity and IRT1 transporter. This is supported by the presence of pyoverdine in planta as shown by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by tracing 15N of 15N-pyoverdine. PMID:17427814

  4. Modification of reproductive development in Arabidopsis thaliana under spaceflight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, A.; Musgrave, M. E.; Matthews, S. W.

    1996-01-01

    Reproductive development in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. cv. Columbia plants was investigated under spaceflight conditions on shuttle mission STS-51. Plants launched just prior to initiation of the reproductive phase developed flowers and siliques during the 10-d flight. Approximately 500 flowers were produced in total by the 12 plants in both the ground control and spaceflight material, and there was no significant difference in the number of flowers in each size class. The flower buds and siliques of the spaceflight plants were not morphologically different from the ground controls. Pollen viability tests immediately post-flight using fluorescein diacetate indicated that about 35% of the pollen was viable in the spaceflight material. Light-microscopy observations on this material showed that the female gametophytes also had developed normally to maturity. However, siliques from the spaceflight plants contained empty, shrunken ovules, and no evidence of pollen transfer to stigmatic papillae was found by light microscopy immediately post-flight or by scanning electron microscopy on fixed material. Short stamen length and indehiscent anthers were observed in the spaceflight material, and a film-like substance inside the anther that connected to the tapetum appeared to restrict the release of pollen from the anthers. These observations indicate that given appropriate growing conditions, early reproductive development in A. thaliana can occur normally under spaceflight conditions. On STS-51, reproductive development aborted due to obstacles in pollination or fertilization.

  5. Reconstruction and analysis of nutrient-induced phosphorylation networks in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Guangyou; Walther, Dirk; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the dynamics of molecular processes in living organisms in response to external perturbations is a central goal in modern systems biology. We investigated the dynamics of protein phosphorylation events in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to changing nutrient conditions. Phosphopeptide expression levels were detected at five consecutive time points over a time interval of 30 min after nutrient resupply following prior starvation. The three tested inorganic, ionic nutrients NH+4, NO−3, PO3−4 elicited similar phosphosignaling responses that were distinguishable from those invoked by the sugars mannitol, sucrose. When embedded in the protein–protein interaction network of Arabidopsis thaliana, phosphoproteins were found to exhibit a higher degree compared to average proteins. Based on the time-series data, we reconstructed a network of regulatory interactions mediated by phosphorylation. The performance of different network inference methods was evaluated by the observed likelihood of physical interactions within and across different subcellular compartments and based on gene ontology semantic similarity. The dynamic phosphorylation network was then reconstructed using a Pearson correlation method with added directionality based on partial variance differences. The topology of the inferred integrated network corresponds to an information dissemination architecture, in which the phosphorylation signal is passed on to an increasing number of phosphoproteins stratified into an initiation, processing, and effector layer. Specific phosphorylation peptide motifs associated with the distinct layers were identified indicating the action of layer-specific kinases. Despite the limited temporal resolution, combined with information on subcellular location, the available time-series data proved useful for reconstructing the dynamics of the molecular signaling cascade in response to nutrient stress conditions in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:24400017

  6. A study on the influence of different promoter and 5'UTR (URM) cassettes from Arabidopsis thaliana on the expression level of the reporter gene β glucuronidase in tobacco and cotton.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Parul; Garg, Varsha; Gautam, Taru; Pillai, Beena; Kanoria, Shaveta; Burma, Pradeep Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Several reports of promoters from plants, viral and artificial origin that confer high constitutive expression are known. Among these the CaMV 35S promoter is used extensively for transgene expression in plants. We identified candidate promoters from Arabidopsis based on their transcript levels (meta-analysis of available microarray control datasets) to test their activity in comparison to the CaMV 35S promoter. A set of 11 candidate genes were identified which showed high transcript levels in the aerial tissue (i.e. leaf, shoot, flower and stem). In the initial part of the study binary vectors were developed wherein the promoter and 5'UTR region of these candidate genes (Upstream Regulatory Module, URM) were cloned upstream to the reporter gene β glucuronidase (gus). The promoter strengths were tested in transformed callus of Nicotiana tabacum and Gossypium hirsutum. On the basis of the results obtained from the callus, the influence of the URM cassettes on transgene expression was tested in transgenic tobacco. The URM regions of the genes encoding a subunit of photosystem I (PHOTO) and geranyl geranyl reductase (GGR) in A. thaliana genome showed significantly high levels of GUS activity in comparison to the CaMV 35S promoter. Further, when the 5'UTRs of both the genes were placed downstream to the CaMV 35S promoter it led to a substantial increase in GUS activity in transgenic tobacco lines and cotton callus. The enhancement observed was even higher to that observed with the viral leader sequences like Ω and AMV, known translational enhancers. Our results indicate that the two URM cassettes or the 5'UTR regions of PHOTO and GGR when placed downstream to the CaMV 35S promoter can be used to drive high levels of transgene expression in dicotyledons. PMID:24072400

  7. Copper-induced hydrogen peroxide upregulation of a metallothionein gene, OsMT2c, from Oryza sativa L. confers copper tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Shi, Xiaoting; Qian, Meng; Zheng, Luqing; Lian, Chunlan; Xia, Yan; Shen, Zhenguo

    2015-08-30

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich metal-binding proteins found in numerous genera and species, but their functions in abiotic stress tolerance remain unclear. Here, a MT gene from Oryza sativa, OsMT2c, was isolated and characterized, encoding a type 2 MT, and observed expression in the roots, leaf sheathes, and leaves, but only weak expression in seeds. OsMT2c was upregulated by copper (Cu) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatments. Excessive Cu elicited a rapid and sustained production and release of H2O2 in rice, and exogenous H2O2 scavengers N,N'-dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and ascorbic acid (Asc) decreased H2O2 production and OsMT2c expression. Furthermore, the expression of OsMT2c increased in the osapx2 mutant in which the H2O2 levels were higher than in wild-type (WT) plants. These results showed that Cu increased MT2c expression through the production and accumulation of Cu-induced H2O2 in O. sativa. In addition, the transgenic OsMT2c-overexpressing Arabidopsis displayed improved tolerance to Cu stress and exhibited increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability compared to WT and empty-vector (Ev) seedlings. PMID:25867584

  8. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Marondedze, Claudius; Thomas, Ludivine; Serrano, Natalia L; Lilley, Kathryn S; Gehring, Chris

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category 'RNA-binding', have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses. PMID:27405932

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana root growth kinetics and lunisolar tidal acceleration.

    PubMed

    Fisahn, Joachim; Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Klingele, Emile; Barlow, Peter

    2012-07-01

    • All living organisms on Earth are continually exposed to diurnal variations in the gravitational tidal force due to the Sun and Moon. • Elongation of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings maintained at a constant temperature was monitored for periods of up to 14 d using high temporal- and spatial-resolution video imaging. The time-course of the half-hourly elongation rates exhibited an oscillation which was maintained when the roots were placed in the free-running condition of continuous illumination. • Correlation between the root growth kinetics collected from seedlings initially raised under several light protocols but whose roots were subsequently in the free-running condition and the lunisolar tidal profiles enabled us to identify that the latter is the probable exogenous determinant of the rhythmic variation in root elongation rate. Similar observations and correlations using roots of Arabidopsis starch mutants suggest a central function of starch metabolism in the response to the lunisolar tide. The periodicity of the lunisolar tidal signal and the concomitant adjustments in root growth rate indicate that an exogenous timer exists for the modulation of root growth and development. • We propose that, in addition to the sensitivity to Earthly 1G gravity, which is inherent to all animals and plants, there is another type of responsiveness which is attuned to the natural diurnal variations of the lunisolar tidal force. PMID:22583121

  10. Metabolic footprint of epiphytic bacteria on Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    PubMed

    Ryffel, Florian; Helfrich, Eric J N; Kiefer, Patrick; Peyriga, Lindsay; Portais, Jean-Charles; Piel, Jörn; Vorholt, Julia A

    2016-03-01

    The phyllosphere, which is defined as the parts of terrestrial plants above the ground, is a large habitat for different microorganisms that show a high extent of adaption to their environment. A number of hypotheses were generated by culture-independent functional genomics studies to explain the competitiveness of specialized bacteria in the phyllosphere. In contrast, in situ data at the metabolome level as a function of bacterial colonization are lacking. Here, we aimed to obtain new insights into the metabolic interplay between host and epiphytes upon colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves in a controlled laboratory setting using environmental metabolomics approaches. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and imaging high-resolution mass spectrometry (IMS) methods were used to identify Arabidopsis leaf surface compounds and their possible involvement in the epiphytic lifestyle by relative changes in compound pools. The dominant carbohydrates on the leaf surfaces were sucrose, fructose and glucose. These sugars were significantly and specifically altered after epiphytic leaf colonization by the organoheterotroph Sphingomonas melonis or the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, but only to a minor extent by the methylotroph Methylobacterium extorquens. In addition to carbohydrates, IMS revealed surprising alterations in arginine metabolism and phytoalexin biosynthesis that were dependent on the presence of bacteria, which might reflect the consequences of bacterial activity and the recognition of not only pathogens but also commensals by the plant. These results highlight the power of environmental metabolomics to aid in elucidating the molecular basis underlying plant-epiphyte interactions in situ. PMID:26305156

  11. Determination of Arabidopsis thaliana telomere length by PCR.

    PubMed

    Vaquero-Sedas, María I; Vega-Palas, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    In humans, telomere length studies have acquired great relevance because the length of telomeres has been related to natural processes like disease, aging and cancer. However, very little is known about the influence of telomere length on the biology of wild type plants. The length of plant telomeres has been usually studied by Terminal Restriction Fragment (TRF) analyses. This technique requires high amounts of tissue, including multiple cell types, which might be the reason why very little is known about the influence of telomere length on plant natural processes. In contrast, many of the human telomere length studies have focused on homogenous cell populations. Most of these studies have been performed by PCR, using telomeric degenerated primers, which allow the determination of telomere length from small amounts of human cells. Here, we have adapted the human PCR procedure to analyze the length of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres. This PCR approach will facilitate the analysis of telomere length from low amounts of tissue. We have used it to determine that CG and non CG DNA methylation positively regulates Arabidopsis telomere length. PMID:24986269

  12. Determination of Arabidopsis thaliana telomere length by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Sedas, María I.; Vega-Palas, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    In humans, telomere length studies have acquired great relevance because the length of telomeres has been related to natural processes like disease, aging and cancer. However, very little is known about the influence of telomere length on the biology of wild type plants. The length of plant telomeres has been usually studied by Terminal Restriction Fragment (TRF) analyses. This technique requires high amounts of tissue, including multiple cell types, which might be the reason why very little is known about the influence of telomere length on plant natural processes. In contrast, many of the human telomere length studies have focused on homogenous cell populations. Most of these studies have been performed by PCR, using telomeric degenerated primers, which allow the determination of telomere length from small amounts of human cells. Here, we have adapted the human PCR procedure to analyze the length of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres. This PCR approach will facilitate the analysis of telomere length from low amounts of tissue. We have used it to determine that CG and non CG DNA methylation positively regulates Arabidopsis telomere length. PMID:24986269

  13. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Marondedze, Claudius; Thomas, Ludivine; Serrano, Natalia L.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Gehring, Chris

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category ‘RNA-binding’, have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses. PMID:27405932

  14. Piriformospora indica Stimulates Root Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Strehmel, Nadine; Mönchgesang, Susann; Herklotz, Siska; Krüger, Sylvia; Ziegler, Jörg; Scheel, Dierk

    2016-01-01

    Piriformospora indica is a root-colonizing fungus, which interacts with a variety of plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction has been considered as mutualistic leading to growth promotion of the host. So far, only indolic glucosinolates and phytohormones have been identified as key players. In a comprehensive non-targeted metabolite profiling study, we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana’s roots, root exudates, and leaves of inoculated and non-inoculated plants by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/(ESI)-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-QMS), and identified further biomarkers. Among them, the concentration of nucleosides, dipeptides, oligolignols, and glucosinolate degradation products was affected in the exudates. In the root profiles, nearly all metabolite levels increased upon co-cultivation, like carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, glucosinolates, oligolignols, and flavonoids. In the leaf profiles, we detected by far less significant changes. We only observed an increased concentration of organic acids, carbohydrates, ascorbate, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids, and a decreased concentration of nitrogen-rich amino acids in inoculated plants. These findings contribute to the understanding of symbiotic interactions between plant roots and fungi of the order of Sebacinales and are a valid source for follow-up mechanistic studies, because these symbioses are particular and clearly different from interactions of roots with mycorrhizal fungi or dark septate endophytes PMID:27399695

  15. Role of the penetration-resistance genes PEN1, PEN2 and PEN3 in the hypersensitive response and race-specific resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Oskar N; Fantozzi, Elena; Fahlberg, Per; Nilsson, Anders K; Buhot, Nathalie; Tör, Mahmut; Andersson, Mats X

    2014-08-01

    Plants are highly capable of recognizing and defending themselves against invading microbes. Adapted plant pathogens secrete effector molecules to suppress the host's immune system. These molecules may be recognized by host-encoded resistance proteins, which then trigger defense in the form of the hypersensitive response (HR) leading to programmed cell death of the host tissue at the infection site. The three proteins PEN1, PEN2 and PEN3 have been found to act as central components in cell wall-based defense against the non-adapted powdery mildew Blumeria graminis fsp. hordei (Bgh). We found that loss of function mutations in any of the three PEN genes cause decreased hypersensitive cell death triggered by recognition of effectors from oomycete and bacterial pathogens in Arabidopsis. There were considerable additive effects of the mutations. The HR induced by recognition of AvrRpm1 was almost completely abolished in the pen2 pen3 and pen1 pen3 double mutants and the loss of cell death could be linked to indole glucosinolate breakdown products. However, the loss of the HR in pen double mutants did not affect the plants' ability to restrict bacterial growth, whereas resistance to avirulent isolates of the oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis was strongly compromised. In contrast, the double and triple mutants demonstrated varying degrees of run-away cell death in response to Bgh. Taken together, our results indicate that the three genes PEN1, PEN2 and PEN3 extend in functionality beyond their previously recognized functions in cell wall-based defense against non-host pathogens. PMID:24889055

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of immunophilin-like FKBP42 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Eckhoff, Andreas; Granzin, Joachim; Kamphausen, Thilo; Büldt, Georg; Schulz, Burkhard; Weiergräber, Oliver H.

    2005-04-01

    The crystallization of FKBP42, a multi-domain member of the FK506-binding protein family, from the plant A. thaliana is reported. Two fragments of FKBP42 from Arabidopsis thaliana covering differing lengths of the molecule have been expressed, purified and crystallized. For each construct, crystals belonging to two different space groups were obtained and subjected to preliminary X-ray analysis.

  17. An autophosphorylation site database for leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted a family-wide study to identify and characterize sites of autophosphorylation in 73 representative LRR RLKs of the 223 member LRR RLK family in Arabidopsis thaliana. His-tagged constructs of intact cytoplasmic domains (CDs) for 73 of 223 A. thaliana LRR RLKs were cloned into E. coli BL-...

  18. Altered invertase activities of symptomatic tissues on Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) infected Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungan; Kim, Soyeon; Choi, Eunseok; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Park, Jong-Bum; Kim, Dong-Giun; Chung, Young-Jae; Lee, Taek-Kyun; Lee, Sukchan

    2013-09-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana infected with Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) exhibits systemic symptoms such as stunting of plant growth, callus induction on shoot tips, and curling of leaves and shoot tips. The regulation of sucrose metabolism is essential for obtaining the energy required for viral replication and the development of symptoms in BSCTV-infected A. thaliana. We evaluated the changed transcript level and enzyme activity of invertases in the inflorescence stems of BSCTV-infected A. thaliana. These results were consistent with the increased pattern of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity and photosynthetic pigment concentration in virus-infected plants to supply more energy for BSCTV multiplication. The altered gene expression of invertases during symptom development was functionally correlated with the differential expression patterns of D-type cyclins, E2F isoforms, and invertase-related genes. Taken together, our results indicate that sucrose sensing by BSCTV infection may regulate the expression of sucrose metabolism and result in the subsequent development of viral symptoms in relation with activation of cell cycle regulation. PMID:23589148

  19. Unique features of the m6A methylome in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guan-Zheng; MacQueen, Alice; Zheng, Guanqun; Duan, Hongchao; Dore, Louis C; Lu, Zhike; Liu, Jun; Chen, Kai; Jia, Guifang; Bergelson, Joy; He, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries of reversible N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) methylation on messenger RNA (mRNA) and mapping of m(6)A methylomes in mammals and yeast have revealed potential regulatory functions of this RNA modification. In plants, defects in m(6)A methyltransferase cause an embryo-lethal phenotype, suggesting a critical role of m(6)A in plant development. Here, we profile m(6)A transcriptome-wide in two accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana and reveal that m(6)A is a highly conserved modification of mRNA in plants. Distinct from mammals, m(6)A in A. thaliana is enriched not only around the stop codon and within 3'-untranslated regions, but also around the start codon. Gene ontology analysis indicates that the unique distribution pattern of m(6)A in A. thaliana is associated with plant-specific pathways involving the chloroplast. We also discover a positive correlation between m(6)A deposition and mRNA abundance, suggesting a regulatory role of m(6)A in plant gene expression. PMID:25430002

  20. Unique Features of the m6A Methylome in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Hongchao; Dore, Louis C; Lu, Zhike; Liu, Jun; Chen, Kai; Jia, Guifang; Bergelson, Joy; He, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries of reversible N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation on messenger RNA (mRNA) and mapping of m6A methylomes in mammals and yeast have revealed potential regulatory functions of this RNA modification. In plants, defects in m6A methyltransferase cause an embryo-lethal phenotype, suggesting a critical role of m6A in plant development. Here, we profile m6A transcriptome-wide in two accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana and reveal that m6A is a highly conserved modification of mRNA in plants. Distinct from mammals, m6A in A. thaliana is enriched not only around the stop codon and within 3′ untranslated regions (3′ UTRs), but also around the start codon. Gene ontology analysis indicates that the unique distribution pattern of m6A in A. thaliana is associated with plant-specific pathways involving the chloroplast. We also discover a positive correlation between m6A deposition and the mRNA abundance, suggesting a regulatory role of m6A in plant gene expression. PMID:25430002

  1. CYP85A1 is required for the initiation of female gametogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-España, Victor Hugo; Sánchez-León, Nidia

    2011-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroid-like hormones essential for plant growth and development. The most active forms of brassinosteroids are Brassinolide (BL) and Castasterone (CS), which are catalyzed by members of the CYP85A family of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are two CYP85A gene members: CYP85A1 and CYP85A2. Unlike CYP85A1, CYP85A2 mediates the conversion of CS to BL. In contrast to mutations in CYP85A2 that result in severe dwarfism, cyp85a1 mutants do not show any obvious morphological phenotype during vegetative or floral development. By analyzing large-scale transcriptional activity in the ovule of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), we determined that CYP85A1 is abundantly expressed in wild-type, but not in sporocyteless (spl) ovules lacking a female gametophyte. Insertional T-DNA lines defective in the activity of CYP85A1 exhibit a semi-sterile phenotype, suggesting a role for the corresponding enzyme acting at the gametophytic level. The CYP85A1 mRNA is localized in the female gametophyte and its neighboring sporophytic cells; however, translational fusions of the CYP85A1 promoter to uidA (GUS) showed GUS expression restricted to the female gametophyte, suggesting that within the ovule the corresponding protein is mostly active in gametophytic cells. A cytological analysis of heterozygous cyp85a1/+ individuals showed that close to 50% of female gametophytes are arrested before the first nuclear mitotic division of the haploid functional megaspore. Our results indicate that BR biosynthesis is required for the initiation of megagametogenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:21364326

  2. CYP85A1 is required for the initiation of female gametogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pérez-España, Victor Hugo; Sánchez-León, Nidia; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2011-03-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroid-like hormones essential for plant growth and development. The most active forms of brassinosteroids are Brassinolide (BL) and Castasterone (CS), which are catalyzed by members of the CYP85A family of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are two CYP85A gene members: CYP85A1 and CYP85A2. Unlike CYP85A1, CYP85A2 mediates the conversion of CS to BL. In contrast to mutations in CYP85A2 that result in severe dwarfism, cyp85a1 mutants do not show any obvious morphological phenotype during vegetative or floral development. By analyzing large-scale transcriptional activity in the ovule of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), we determined that CYP85A1 is abundantly expressed in wild-type but not in sporocyteless (spl) ovules lacking a female gametophyte. Insertional T-DNA lines defective in the activity of CYP85A1 exhibit a semi-sterile phenotype, suggesting a role for the corresponding enzyme acting at the gametophytic level. The CYP85A1 mRNA is localized in the female gametophyte and its neighboring sporophytic cells; however, translational fusions of the CYP85A1 promoter to uidA (GUS) showed GUS expression restricted to the female gametophyte, suggesting that within the ovule the corresponding protein is mostly active in gametophytic cells. A cytological analysis of heterozygous cyp85a1/+ individuals showed that close to 50% of female gametophytes are arrested before the first nuclear mitotic division of the haploid functional megaspore. Our results indicate that BR biosynthesis is required for the initiation of megagametogenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:21364326

  3. Homologous electron transport components fail to increase fatty acid hydroxylation in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Laura L.; Browse, John

    2013-01-01

    Ricinoleic acid, a hydroxylated fatty acid (HFA) present in castor ( Ricinus communis) seeds, is an important industrial commodity used in products ranging from inks and paints to polymers and fuels. However, due to the deadly toxin ricin and allergens also present in castor, it would be advantageous to produce ricinoleic acid in a different agricultural crop. Unfortunately, repeated efforts at heterologous expression of the castor fatty acid hydroxylase (RcFAH12) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have produced only 17-19% HFA in the seed triacylglycerols (TAG), whereas castor seeds accumulate up to 90% ricinoleic acid in the endosperm TAG. RcFAH12 requires an electron supply from NADH:cytochrome b5 reductase (CBR1) and cytochrome b5 (Cb5) to synthesize ricinoleic acid. Previously, our laboratory found a mutation in the Arabidopsis CBR1 gene, cbr1-1, that caused an 85% decrease in HFA levels in the RcFAH12 Arabidopsis line. These results raise the possibility that electron supply to the heterologous RcFAH12 may limit the production of HFA. Therefore, we hypothesized that by heterologously expressing RcCb5, the reductant supply to RcFAH12 would be improved and lead to increased HFA accumulation in Arabidopsis seeds. Contrary to this proposal, heterologous expression of the top three RcCb5 candidates did not increase HFA accumulation. Furthermore, coexpression of RcCBR1 and RcCb5 in RcFAH12 Arabidopsis also did not increase in HFA levels compared to the parental lines. These results demonstrate that the Arabidopsis electron transfer system is supplying sufficient reductant to RcFAH12 and that there must be other bottlenecks limiting the accumulation of HFA. PMID:24555099

  4. Molecular Signatures in Arabidopsis thaliana in Response to Insect Attack and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Barah, Pankaj; Winge, Per; Kusnierczyk, Anna; Tran, Diem Hong; Bones, Atle M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Under the threat of global climatic change and food shortages, it is essential to take the initiative to obtain a comprehensive understanding of common and specific defence mechanisms existing in plant systems for protection against different types of biotic invaders. We have implemented an integrated approach to analyse the overall transcriptomic reprogramming and systems-level defence responses in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana henceforth) during insect Brevicoryne brassicae (B. brassicae henceforth) and bacterial Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (P. syringae henceforth) attacks. The main aim of this study was to identify the attacker-specific and general defence response signatures in A. thaliana when attacked by phloem-feeding aphids or pathogenic bacteria. Results The obtained annotated networks of differentially expressed transcripts indicated that members of transcription factor families, such as WRKY, MYB, ERF, BHLH and bZIP, could be crucial for stress-specific defence regulation in Arabidopsis during aphid and P. syringae attack. The defence response pathways, signalling pathways and metabolic processes associated with aphid attack and P. syringae infection partially overlapped. Components of several important biosynthesis and signalling pathways, such as salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (ET) and glucosinolates, were differentially affected during the two the treatments. Several stress-regulated transcription factors were known to be associated with stress-inducible microRNAs. The differentially regulated gene sets included many signature transcription factors, and our co-expression analysis showed that they were also strongly co-expressed during 69 other biotic stress experiments. Conclusions Defence responses and functional networks that were unique and specific to aphid or P. syringae stresses were identified. Furthermore, our analysis revealed a probable link between biotic stress and

  5. Seed coat mucilage cells of Arabidopsis thaliana as a model for plant cell wall research.

    PubMed

    Arsovski, Andrej A; Haughn, George W; Western, Tamara L

    2010-07-01

    Plant cells are encased within a complex polysaccharide wall that strengthens the cell and has key roles in all aspects of plant cell growth, differentiation, and interaction with the environment. This dynamic structure is under continual modification during plant development, and its synthesis and modification require the activity of a myriad of enzymes. The mucilage secretory cells (MSCs) of the Arabidopsis thaliana seed coat provide a model for the discovery of novel genes involved in the synthesis, secretion and modification of cell wall components, particularly pectin. These cells synthesize copious amounts of pectinaceous mucilage during development and, upon hydration of the desiccated seed, the mucilage rapidly swells, bursts from the MSCs and surrounds the seed in a gelatinous capsule. Several genes affecting MSC differentiation, pectin synthesis, and mucilage release have been identified and additional genes involved in these and related processes including pectin secretion and the mechanical alteration of cell walls await to be discovered. PMID:20505351

  6. Regulation of the S-Locus Receptor Kinase and Self-Incompatibility in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Strickler, Susan R.; Tantikanjana, Titima; Nasrallah, June B.

    2013-01-01

    Intraspecific mate selectivity often is enforced by self-incompatibility (SI), a barrier to self-pollination that inhibits productive pollen-pistil interactions. In the Brassicaceae, SI specificity is determined by two highly-polymorphic proteins: the stigmatic S-locus receptor kinase (SRK) and its pollen coat-localized ligand, the S-locus cysteine-rich protein (SCR). Arabidopsis thaliana is self fertile, but several of its accessions can be made to express SI, albeit to various degrees, by transformation with functional SRK-SCR gene pairs isolated from its close self-incompatible relative, Arabidopsis lyrata. Here, we use a newly identified induced mutation that suppresses the SI phenotype in stigmas of SRK-SCR transformants of the Col-0 accession to investigate the regulation of SI and the SRK transgene. This mutation disrupts NRPD1a, a gene that encodes a plant-specific nuclear RNA polymerase required for genomic methylation and production of some types of silencing RNAs. We show that NRPD1a, along with the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is required for SI in some A. thaliana accessions. We also show that Col-0 nrpd1a mutants exhibit decreased accumulation of SRK transcripts in stigmas, which is not, however, responsible for loss of SI in these plants. Together, our analysis of the nrpd1a mutation and of SRK promoter activity in various accessions reveals that the SRK transgene is subject to several levels of regulation, which vary substantially by tissue type and by accession. This study thus helps explain the well-documented differences in expression of SI exhibited by SRK-SCR transformants of different A. thaliana accessions. PMID:23390607

  7. Extreme Thermophilic Enzyme CelB-m Efficiently Degrades the Cellulose in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiandong; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Ruoxue

    2015-09-01

    Agricultural and forestry wastes abundant in the plant biomass are an important resource of green energy. However, little is known about how to exploit efficiently the resource. In this study, we isolated the CelB gene that encodes the extremely thermophilic cellulose-degrading enzyme from Thermotoga maritime. The enzyme-encoding gene CelB was optimized and reconstructed in N' codes by the code adaptability in Arabidopsis thaliana. Then, the optimized gene (CelB-m) or the recombinant gene (CBD-CelB) was fused with the plant binary vector which harbors the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene that was transferred into Arabidopsis, respectively. GUS assay results showed CelB gene ubiquitous expression in transgenic plants. The enzyme-activity assays exhibited that the cellulase activity in the leaves of CelB-m transgenic plants were significantly higher than that of wild-type plants. The highest amount of enzymatic activity obtained was 131.2 U for every gram of fresh leaves in CBD-CelB plants. In addition, the enzymatic activity was stable at the temperature of 90 °C. These results suggested that the ectopic expression of pertinent biomass-degrading enzymes in transgenic plants can degrade effectively the plant biomass and lay a foundation on the application for the transgenic technique to crops. PMID:26186956

  8. Does Arabidopsis thaliana DREAM of cell cycle control?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-08-01

    Strict temporal control of cell cycle gene expression is essential for all eukaryotes including animals and plants. DREAM complexes have been identified in worm, fly, and mammals, linking several distinct transcription factors to coordinate gene expression throughout the cell cycle. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Kobayashi et al (2015) identify distinct activator and repressor complexes for genes expressed during the G2 and M phases in Arabidopsis that can be temporarily separated during proliferating and post‐mitotic stages of development. The complexes incorporate specific activator and repressor MYB and E2F transcription factors and indicate the possibility of the existence of multiple DREAM complexes in plants. PMID:26089020

  9. Effector-Triggered Immune Response in Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Quantitative Trait

    PubMed Central

    Iakovidis, Michail; Teixeira, Paulo J. P. L.; Exposito-Alonso, Moises; Cowper, Matthew G.; Law, Theresa F.; Liu, Qingli; Vu, Minh Chau; Dang, Troy Minh; Corwin, Jason A.; Weigel, Detlef; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Grant, Sarah R.

    2016-01-01

    We identified loci responsible for natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) responses to a bacterial pathogen virulence factor, HopAM1. HopAM1 is a type III effector protein secreted by the virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain Pto DC3000. Delivery of HopAM1 from disarmed Pseudomonas strains leads to local cell death, meristem chlorosis, or both, with varying intensities in different Arabidopsis accessions. These phenotypes are not associated with differences in bacterial growth restriction. We treated the two phenotypes as quantitative traits to identify host loci controlling responses to HopAM1. Genome-wide association (GWA) of 64 Arabidopsis accessions identified independent variants highly correlated with response to each phenotype. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in a recombinant inbred population between Bur-0 and Col-0 accessions revealed genetic linkage to regions distinct from the top GWA hits. Two major QTL associated with HopAM1-induced cell death were also associated with HopAM1-induced chlorosis. HopAM1-induced changes in Arabidopsis gene expression showed that rapid HopAM1-dependent cell death in Bur-0 is correlated with effector-triggered immune responses. Studies of the effect of mutations in known plant immune system genes showed, surprisingly, that both cell death and chlorosis phenotypes are enhanced by loss of EDS1, a regulatory hub in the plant immune-signaling network. Our results reveal complex genetic architecture for response to this particular type III virulence effector, in contrast to the typical monogenic control of cell death and disease resistance triggered by most type III effectors. PMID:27412712

  10. Phospholipase D affects translocation of NPR1 to the nucleus in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Martin; Šašek, Vladimír; Chmelařová, Hana; Andrejch, Jan; Nováková, Miroslava; Hajšlová, Jana; Burketová, Lenka; Valentová, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) is a crucial component of plant-induced defense against biotrophic pathogens. Although the key players of the SA pathway are known, there are still gaps in the understanding of the molecular mechanism and the regulation of particular steps. In our previous research, we showed in Arabidopsis suspension cells that n-butanol, which specifically modulates phospholipase D activity, significantly suppresses the transcription of the pathogenesis related (PR-1) gene, which is generally accepted as the SA pathway marker. In the presented study, we have investigated the site of n-butanol action in the SA pathway. We were able to show in Arabidopsis plants treated with SA that n-butanol inhibits the transcription of defense genes (PR-1, WRKY38). Fluorescence microscopy of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants expressing 35S::NPR1-GFP (nonexpressor pathogenesis related 1) revealed significantly decreased nuclear localization of NPR1 in the presence of n-butanol. On the other hand, n-butanol did not decrease the nuclear localization of NPR1 in 35S::npr1C82A-GFP and 35S::npr1C216A-GFP mutants constitutively expressing NPR1 monomers. Mass spectrometric analysis of plant extracts showed that n-butanol significantly changes the metabolic fingerprinting while t-butanol had no effect. We found groups of the plant metabolites, influenced differently by SA and n-butanol treatment. Thus, we proposed several metabolites as markers for n-butanol action. PMID:25741350

  11. Phospholipase D affects translocation of NPR1 to the nucleus in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Janda, Martin; Šašek, Vladimír; Chmelařová, Hana; Andrejch, Jan; Nováková, Miroslava; Hajšlová, Jana; Burketová, Lenka; Valentová, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) is a crucial component of plant-induced defense against biotrophic pathogens. Although the key players of the SA pathway are known, there are still gaps in the understanding of the molecular mechanism and the regulation of particular steps. In our previous research, we showed in Arabidopsis suspension cells that n-butanol, which specifically modulates phospholipase D activity, significantly suppresses the transcription of the pathogenesis related (PR-1) gene, which is generally accepted as the SA pathway marker. In the presented study, we have investigated the site of n-butanol action in the SA pathway. We were able to show in Arabidopsis plants treated with SA that n-butanol inhibits the transcription of defense genes (PR-1, WRKY38). Fluorescence microscopy of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants expressing 35S::NPR1-GFP (nonexpressor pathogenesis related 1) revealed significantly decreased nuclear localization of NPR1 in the presence of n-butanol. On the other hand, n-butanol did not decrease the nuclear localization of NPR1 in 35S::npr1C82A-GFP and 35S::npr1C216A-GFP mutants constitutively expressing NPR1 monomers. Mass spectrometric analysis of plant extracts showed that n-butanol significantly changes the metabolic fingerprinting while t-butanol had no effect. We found groups of the plant metabolites, influenced differently by SA and n-butanol treatment. Thus, we proposed several metabolites as markers for n-butanol action. PMID:25741350

  12. Biochemical and molecular analysis of a transmembrane protein kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana. Progress report, January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bleecker, A.B.

    1993-06-01

    We have isolated genomic and cDNA clones encoding a novel receptor-like protein kinase from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This kinase is being studied by combining biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches. Domain-specific antibodies immunodecorate a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 120,000 daltons in extracts of Arabidopsis, where it has been found in all portions of the plant examined including root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Cytochemical analysis and initial studies using the kinase promoter with the GUS reporter gene system also indicate that the kinase is present throughout the plant. The kinase is glycosylated, like animal receptor kinases, and has been partially purified from Arabidopsis by using lectin columns. The kinase has been expressed in E coli, purified, and found to autophosphorylate on serine and threonine residues, but not on tyrosine residues. As such, it belongs to the small family of receptor-like kinases with serine/threonine specificity. Transgenic plants are now being produced that either overexpress or carry altered forms of the protein kinase gene. These experiments will help determine the natural role the kinase plays in a pathway of signal transduction.

  13. Biochemical and molecular analysis of a transmembrane protein kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Bleecker, A.B.

    1993-01-01

    We have isolated genomic and cDNA clones encoding a novel receptor-like protein kinase from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This kinase is being studied by combining biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches. Domain-specific antibodies immunodecorate a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 120,000 daltons in extracts of Arabidopsis, where it has been found in all portions of the plant examined including root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Cytochemical analysis and initial studies using the kinase promoter with the GUS reporter gene system also indicate that the kinase is present throughout the plant. The kinase is glycosylated, like animal receptor kinases, and has been partially purified from Arabidopsis by using lectin columns. The kinase has been expressed in E coli, purified, and found to autophosphorylate on serine and threonine residues, but not on tyrosine residues. As such, it belongs to the small family of receptor-like kinases with serine/threonine specificity. Transgenic plants are now being produced that either overexpress or carry altered forms of the protein kinase gene. These experiments will help determine the natural role the kinase plays in a pathway of signal transduction.

  14. Phytotoxicity of chiral herbicide bromacil: Enantioselectivity of photosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Jia; Li, Meichao; Wen, Yuezhong

    2016-04-01

    With the wide application of chiral herbicides and the frequent detection of photosystem II (PSII) herbicides, it is of great importance to assess the direct effects of PSII herbicides on photosynthesis in an enantiomeric level. In the present study, the enantioselective phytotoxicity of bromacil (BRO), typical photosynthesis inhibition herbicide, on Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. The results showed that S-BRO exhibited a greater inhibition of electron transmission in photosystem I (PSI) of A. thaliana than R-BRO by inhibiting the transcription of fnr 1. S-BRO also changed the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Y (II), Y (NO), and Y (NPQ) to a greater extent than R-Bro. Transcription of genes psbO2, Lhcb3 and Lhcb6 was down-regulated in an enantioselective rhythm and S-BRO caused more serious influence, indicating that S-BRO did worse damage to the photosystem II (PSII) of A. thaliana than R-BRO. This study suggested that S-BRO disturbed the photosynthesis of plants to a larger extent than R-BRO and provided a new sight to evaluate the phytotoxicity of chiral herbicides. PMID:26802342

  15. Reverse-engineering the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptional network under changing environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Javier; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Elena, Santiago F

    2009-01-01

    Background Understanding the molecular mechanisms plants have evolved to adapt their biological activities to a constantly changing environment is an intriguing question and one that requires a systems biology approach. Here we present a network analysis of genome-wide expression data combined with reverse-engineering network modeling to dissect the transcriptional control of Arabidopsis thaliana. The regulatory network is inferred by using an assembly of microarray data containing steady-state RNA expression levels from several growth conditions, developmental stages, biotic and abiotic stresses, and a variety of mutant genotypes. Results We show that the A. thaliana regulatory network has the characteristic properties of hierarchical networks. We successfully applied our quantitative network model to predict the full transcriptome of the plant for a set of microarray experiments not included in the training dataset. We also used our model to analyze the robustness in expression levels conferred by network motifs such as the coherent feed-forward loop. In addition, the meta-analysis presented here has allowed us to identify regulatory and robust genetic structures. Conclusions These data suggest that A. thaliana has evolved high connectivity in terms of transcriptional regulation among cellular functions involved in response and adaptation to changing environments, while gene networks constitutively expressed or less related to stress response are characterized by a lower connectivity. Taken together, these findings suggest conserved regulatory strategies that have been selected during the evolutionary history of this eukaryote. PMID:19754933

  16. RNA G-Quadruplexes in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana: prevalence and possible functional roles

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Melissa A.; Olson, Kalee J.; Dallaire, Paul; Major, François; Assmann, Sarah M.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Tandem stretches of guanines can associate in hydrogen-bonded arrays to form G-quadruplexes, which are stabilized by K+ ions. Using computational methods, we searched for G-Quadruplex Sequence (GQS) patterns in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. We found ∼1200 GQS with a G3 repeat sequence motif, most of which are located in the intergenic region. Using a Markov modeled genome, we determined that GQS are significantly underrepresented in the genome. Additionally, we found ∼43 000 GQS with a G2 repeat sequence motif; notably, 80% of these were located in genic regions, suggesting that these sequences may fold at the RNA level. Gene Ontology functional analysis revealed that GQS are overrepresented in genes encoding proteins of certain functional categories, including enzyme activity. Conversely, GQS are underrepresented in other categories of genes, notably those for non-coding RNAs such as tRNAs and rRNAs. We also find that genes that are differentially regulated by drought are significantly more likely to contain a GQS. CD-detected K+ titrations performed on representative RNAs verified formation of quadruplexes at physiological K+ concentrations. Overall, this study indicates that GQS are present at unique locations in Arabidopsis and that folding of RNA GQS may play important roles in regulating gene expression. PMID:20860998

  17. Uncovering microRNA-mediated response to SO2 stress in Arabidopsis thaliana by deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Lihong; Xue, Meizhao; Yi, Huilan

    2016-10-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a major air pollutant and has significant impacts on plants. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of gene expression regulators that play important roles in response to environmental stresses. In this study, deep sequencing was used for genome-wide identification of miRNAs and their expression profiles in response to SO2 stress in Arabidopsis thaliana shoots. A total of 27 conserved miRNAs and 5 novel miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed under SO2 stress. qRT-PCR analysis showed mostly negative correlation between miRNA accumulation and target gene mRNA abundance, suggesting regulatory roles of these miRNAs during SO2 exposure. The target genes of SO2-responsive miRNAs encode transcription factors and proteins that regulate auxin signaling and stress response, and the miRNAs-mediated suppression of these genes could improve plant resistance to SO2 stress. Promoter sequence analysis of genes encoding SO2-responsive miRNAs showed that stress-responsive and phytohormone-related cis-regulatory elements occurred frequently, providing additional evidence of the involvement of miRNAs in adaption to SO2 stress. This study represents a comprehensive expression profiling of SO2-responsive miRNAs in Arabidopsis and broads our perspective on the ubiquitous regulatory roles of miRNAs under stress conditions. PMID:27232729

  18. Structural diversity and transcription of class III peroxidases from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Welinder, Karen G; Justesen, Annemarie F; Kjaersgård, Inger V H; Jensen, Rikke B; Rasmussen, Søren K; Jespersen, Hans M; Duroux, Laurent

    2002-12-01

    Understanding peroxidase function in plants is complicated by the lack of substrate specificity, the high number of genes, their diversity in structure and our limited knowledge of peroxidase gene transcription and translation. In the present study we sequenced expressed sequence tags (ESTs) encoding novel heme-containing class III peroxidases from Arabidopsis thaliana and annotated 73 full-length genes identified in the genome. In total, transcripts of 58 of these genes have now been observed. The expression of individual peroxidase genes was assessed in organ-specific EST libraries and compared to the expression of 33 peroxidase genes which we analyzed in whole plants 3, 6, 15, 35 and 59 days after sowing. Expression was assessed in root, rosette leaf, stem, cauline leaf, flower bud and cell culture tissues using the gene-specific and highly sensitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We predicted that 71 genes could yield stable proteins folded similarly to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The putative mature peroxidases derived from these genes showed 28-94% amino acid sequence identity and were all targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum by N-terminal signal peptides. In 20 peroxidases these signal peptides were followed by various N-terminal extensions of unknown function which are not present in HRP. Ten peroxidases showed a C-terminal extension indicating vacuolar targeting. We found that the majority of peroxidase genes were expressed in root. In total, class III peroxidases accounted for an impressive 2.2% of root ESTs. Rather few peroxidases showed organ specificity. Most importantly, genes expressed constitutively in all organs and genes with a preference for root represented structurally diverse peroxidases (< 70% sequence identity). Furthermore, genes appearing in tandem showed distinct expression profiles. The alignment of 73 Arabidopsis peroxidase sequences provides an easy access to the identification of orthologous peroxidases

  19. EDS1 contributes to nonhost resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Manon; Degrave, Alexandre; Vedel, Régine; Bitton, Frédérique; Patrit, Oriane; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Barny, Marie-Anne; Fagard, Mathilde

    2012-03-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight in rosaceous plants. In nonhost Arabidopsis thaliana, E. amylovora triggers necrotic symptoms associated with transient bacterial multiplication, suggesting either that A. thaliana lacks a susceptibility factor or that it actively restricts E. amylovora growth. Inhibiting plant protein synthesis at the time of infection led to an increase in necrosis and bacterial multiplication and reduced ca