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Sample records for arabidopsis transmembrane bzip

  1. Identification of an Arabidopsis transmembrane bZIP transcription factor involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Hiromi; Iwata, Yuji; Iwano, Megumi; Takayama, Seiji; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2008-09-19

    Among 75 bZIP transcription factors identified in Arabidopsis, 3 (AtbZIP17, AtbZIP28, and AtbZIP49) possess a putative transmembrane domain (TMD) in addition to AtbZIP60, which was characterized previously. In the present study, cDNAs of AtbZIP17 and AtbZIP28 were isolated. Truncated forms of AtbZIP17 and AtbZIP28 lacking the C-terminal domain including TMD were examined as putative active forms. One of them, AtbZIP28{delta}C, activated BiP1 and BiP3 promoters through the cis-elements P-UPRE and ERSE responsible for the ER stress response. Subsequently, a fusion protein of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and AtbZIP28 was expressed in Arabidopsis cultured cells. Under non-stress conditions, GFP fluorescence localization almost overlapped with an ER marker; however, tunicamycin and dithiothreitol treatment clearly increased GFP fluorescence in the nucleus suggesting that the N-terminal fragment of AtbZIP28 translocates to the nucleus in response to ER stress.

  2. Arabidopsis IRE1 catalyses unconventional splicing of bZIP60 mRNA to produce the active transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Yukihiro; Mishiba, Kei-ichiro; Suzuki, Eiji; Shimada, Yukihisa; Iwata, Yuji; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2011-01-01

    IRE1 plays an essential role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in yeast and mammals. We found that a double mutant of Arabidopsis IRE1A and IRE1B (ire1a/ire1b) is more sensitive to the ER stress inducer tunicamycin than the wild-type. Transcriptome analysis revealed that genes whose induction was reduced in ire1a/ire1b largely overlapped those in the bzip60 mutant. We observed that the active form of bZIP60 protein detected in the wild-type was missing in ire1a/ire1b. We further demonstrated that bZIP60 mRNA is spliced by ER stress, removing 23 ribonucleotides and therefore causing a frameshift that replaces the C-terminal region of bZIP60 including the transmembrane domain (TMD) with a shorter region without a TMD. This splicing was detected in ire1a and ire1b single mutants, but not in the ire1a/ire1b double mutant. We conclude that IRE1A and IRE1B catalyse unconventional splicing of bZIP60 mRNA to produce the active transcription factor. PMID:22355548

  3. The Elucidation of the Interactome of 16 Arabidopsis bZIP Factors Reveals Three Independent Functional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Llorca, Carles Marco; Berendzen, Kenneth Wayne; Malik, Waqas Ahmed; Mahn, Stefan; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    The function of the bZIP transcription factors is strictly dependent on their ability to dimerize. Heterodimerization has proven to be highly specific and is postulated to operate as a combinatorial mechanism allowing the generation of a large variety of dimers with unique qualities by specifically combining a small set of monomers; an assumption that has not yet been tested systematically. Here, the interaction pattern and the transactivation properties of 16 Arabidopsis thaliana bZIPs are examined in transiently transformed Arabidopsis protoplasts to deliver a perspective on the relationship between bZIP dimerization and function. An interaction matrix of bZIPs belonging to the C, G, H, and S1 bZIP groups was resolved by Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) coupled to quantitative flow cytometric analysis, while an extensive GUS reporter gene assay was carried out to determine the effect of different bZIP pairs on the expression of four different known bZIP-targeted promoters. Statistical data treatment and complementary bioinformatic analysis were performed to substantiate the biological findings. According to these results, the 16 bZIPs interact in three isolated networks, within which their members dimerize non-specifically and exhibit a significant level of functional redundancy. A coherent explanation for these results is supported by in silico analysis of differences in the length, structure and composition of their leucine zippers and appears to explain their dimerization specificity and dynamics observed in vivo quite well. A model in which the bZIP networks act as functional units is proposed. PMID:26452049

  4. Crosstalk between Two bZIP Signaling Pathways Orchestrates Salt-Induced Metabolic Reprogramming in Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Laura; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Weiste, Christoph; Fekete, Agnes; Schierstaedt, Jasper; Göttler, Jasmin; Kempa, Stefan; Krischke, Markus; Dietrich, Katrin; Mueller, Martin J.; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesus; Hanson, Johannes; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinity increasingly causes crop losses worldwide. Although roots are the primary targets of salt stress, the signaling networks that facilitate metabolic reprogramming to induce stress tolerance are less understood than those in leaves. Here, a combination of transcriptomic and metabolic approaches was performed in salt-treated Arabidopsis thaliana roots, which revealed that the group S1 basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP1 and bZIP53 reprogram primary C- and N-metabolism. In particular, gluconeogenesis and amino acid catabolism are affected by these transcription factors. Importantly, bZIP1 expression reflects cellular stress and energy status in roots. In addition to the well-described abiotic stress response pathway initiated by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and executed by SnRK2 (Snf1-RELATED-PROTEIN-KINASE2) and AREB-like bZIP factors, we identify a structurally related ABA-independent signaling module consisting of SnRK1s and S1 bZIPs. Crosstalk between these signaling pathways recruits particular bZIP factor combinations to establish at least four distinct gene expression patterns. Understanding this signaling network provides a framework for securing future crop productivity. PMID:26276836

  5. Crosstalk between Two bZIP Signaling Pathways Orchestrates Salt-Induced Metabolic Reprogramming in Arabidopsis Roots.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Laura; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Weiste, Christoph; Fekete, Agnes; Schierstaedt, Jasper; Göttler, Jasmin; Kempa, Stefan; Krischke, Markus; Dietrich, Katrin; Mueller, Martin J; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesus; Hanson, Johannes; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    Soil salinity increasingly causes crop losses worldwide. Although roots are the primary targets of salt stress, the signaling networks that facilitate metabolic reprogramming to induce stress tolerance are less understood than those in leaves. Here, a combination of transcriptomic and metabolic approaches was performed in salt-treated Arabidopsis thaliana roots, which revealed that the group S1 basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP1 and bZIP53 reprogram primary C- and N-metabolism. In particular, gluconeogenesis and amino acid catabolism are affected by these transcription factors. Importantly, bZIP1 expression reflects cellular stress and energy status in roots. In addition to the well-described abiotic stress response pathway initiated by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and executed by SnRK2 (Snf1-RELATED-PROTEIN-KINASE2) and AREB-like bZIP factors, we identify a structurally related ABA-independent signaling module consisting of SnRK1s and S1 bZIPs. Crosstalk between these signaling pathways recruits particular bZIP factor combinations to establish at least four distinct gene expression patterns. Understanding this signaling network provides a framework for securing future crop productivity. PMID:26276836

  6. The bZIP Protein VIP1 Is Involved in Touch Responses in Arabidopsis Roots.

    PubMed

    Tsugama, Daisuke; Liu, Shenkui; Takano, Tetsuo

    2016-06-01

    VIP1 is a bZIP transcription factor in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). VIP1 transiently accumulates in the nucleus when cells are exposed to hypoosmotic conditions, but its physiological relevance is unclear. This is possibly because Arabidopsis has approximately 10 close homologs of VIP1 and they function redundantly. To examine their physiological roles, transgenic plants overexpressing a repression domain-fused form of VIP1 (VIP1-SRDXox plants), in which the gene activation mediated by VIP1 is expected to be repressed, were generated. Because hypoosmotic stress can mimic mechanical stimuli (e.g. touch), the touch-induced root-waving phenotypes and gene expression patterns in those transgenic plants were examined. VIP1-SRDXox plants exhibited more severe root waving and lower expression of putative VIP1 target genes. The expression of the VIP1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein partially suppressed the VIP1-SRDX-induced increase in root waving when expressed in the VIP1-SRDXox plants. These results suggest that VIP1 can suppress the touch-induced root waving. The VIP1-SRDX-induced increase in root waving was also suppressed when the synthetic auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid or the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, which is known to activate auxin biosynthesis, was present in the growth medium. Root cap cells with the auxin marker DR5rev::GFP were more abundant in the VIP1-SRDXox background than in the wild-type background. Auxin is transported via the root cap, and the conditions of outermost root cap layers were abnormal in VIP1-SRDXox plants. These results raise the possibility that VIP1 influences structures of the root cap and thereby regulates the local auxin responses in roots. PMID:27208231

  7. bZIP67 Regulates the Omega-3 Fatty Acid Content of Arabidopsis Seed Oil by Activating FATTY ACID DESATURASE3[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Ana; Kelly, Amélie A.; van Erp, Harrie; Shaw, Eve; Powers, Stephen J.; Kurup, Smita; Eastmond, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana seed maturation is accompanied by the deposition of storage oil, rich in the essential ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid α-linolenic acid (ALA). The synthesis of ALA is highly responsive to the level of FATTY ACID DESATURASE3 (FAD3) expression, which is strongly upregulated during embryogenesis. By screening mutants in LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1)–inducible transcription factors using fatty acid profiling, we identified two mutants (lec1-like and bzip67) with a seed lipid phenotype. Both mutants share a substantial reduction in seed ALA content. Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays, we show that bZIP67 binds G-boxes in the FAD3 promoter and enhances FAD3 expression but that activation is conditional on bZIP67 association with LEC1-LIKE (L1L) and NUCLEAR FACTOR-YC2 (NF-YC2). Although FUSCA3 and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 are required for L1L and bZIP67 expression, neither protein is necessary for [bZIP67:L1L:NF-YC2] to activate FAD3. We conclude that a transcriptional complex containing L1L, NF-YC2, and bZIP67 is induced by LEC1 during embryogenesis and specifies high levels of ALA production for storage oil by activating FAD3 expression. PMID:23995083

  8. The bZIP Protein VIP1 Is Involved in Touch Responses in Arabidopsis Roots1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shenkui; Takano, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    VIP1 is a bZIP transcription factor in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). VIP1 transiently accumulates in the nucleus when cells are exposed to hypoosmotic conditions, but its physiological relevance is unclear. This is possibly because Arabidopsis has approximately 10 close homologs of VIP1 and they function redundantly. To examine their physiological roles, transgenic plants overexpressing a repression domain-fused form of VIP1 (VIP1-SRDXox plants), in which the gene activation mediated by VIP1 is expected to be repressed, were generated. Because hypoosmotic stress can mimic mechanical stimuli (e.g. touch), the touch-induced root-waving phenotypes and gene expression patterns in those transgenic plants were examined. VIP1-SRDXox plants exhibited more severe root waving and lower expression of putative VIP1 target genes. The expression of the VIP1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein partially suppressed the VIP1-SRDX-induced increase in root waving when expressed in the VIP1-SRDXox plants. These results suggest that VIP1 can suppress the touch-induced root waving. The VIP1-SRDX-induced increase in root waving was also suppressed when the synthetic auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid or the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, which is known to activate auxin biosynthesis, was present in the growth medium. Root cap cells with the auxin marker DR5rev::GFP were more abundant in the VIP1-SRDXox background than in the wild-type background. Auxin is transported via the root cap, and the conditions of outermost root cap layers were abnormal in VIP1-SRDXox plants. These results raise the possibility that VIP1 influences structures of the root cap and thereby regulates the local auxin responses in roots. PMID:27208231

  9. Heterodimerization between light-regulated and ubiquitously expressed Arabidopsis GBF bZIP proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, U; Menkens, A E; Beckmann, H; Ecker, J R; Cashmore, A R

    1992-01-01

    The promoters of a variety of plant genes are characterized by the presence of a G-box (CCACGTGG) or closely related DNA motifs. These genes often exhibit quite diverse expression characteristics and in many cases the G-box sequence has been demonstrated to be essential for expression. The G-box of the Arabidopsis rbcS-1A gene is bound by a protein, GBF, identified in plant nuclear extracts. Here we report the isolation of three Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA clones encoding GBF proteins referred to as GBF1, GBF2 and GBF3. GBF1 and GBF2 mRNA is present in light and dark grown leaves as well as in roots. In contrast, GBF3 mRNA is found mainly in dark grown leaves and in roots. The deduced amino acid sequences of the three cDNAs indicate that each encodes a basic/leucine zipper protein. In addition, all three proteins are characterized by an N-terminal proline-rich domain. Homodimers of the three proteins specifically recognize the G-box motif, with GBF1 and GBF3 binding symmetrically to this palindromic sequence. In contrast, GBF2 binds to the symmetrical G-box sequence in such a way that the juxtaposition of the protein and the DNA element is clearly asymmetric and hence distinct from that observed for the other two proteins. The fact that GBF1, GBF2 and GBF3 possess both distinct DNA binding properties and expression characteristics prompt us to entertain the notion that these proteins may individually mediate distinct subclasses of expression properties assigned to the G-box. Furthermore, we demonstrate that GBF1, GBF2 and GBF3 heterodimerize and these heterodimers also interact with the G-box, suggesting a potential mechanism for generating additional diversity from these GBF proteins. Images PMID:1373374

  10. AtbZIP16 and AtbZIP68, two new members of GBFs, can interact with other G group bZIPs in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huaishun; Cao, Kaiming; Wang, Xiping

    2008-02-29

    AtbZIP16 and AtbZIP68 are two putative G group bZIP transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana, the other three members of G group bZIPs are GBF1-3 which can bind G-box. Members of G group have conservative protein structure: highly homological basic region and a proline-rich domain in the N-terminal region. Here, we report that AtbZIP16 and AtbZIP68 could bind cis elements with ACGT core, such as G-box, Hex, C-box and As-1, but with different binding affinities which from high to low were G-box > Hex > C-box > As-1; AtbZIP16 and AtbZIP68 could form homodimer and form heterodimer with other members of G group; N-terminal proline rich domain of AtbZIP16 had transactivation activity in yeast cells while that of AtbZIP68 did not; AtbZIP16 and AtbZIP68 GFP fusion protein localized in the nucleus of onion epidermal cells. These results indicated that AtbZIP16 and AtbZIP68 were two new members of GBFs. In Arabidopsis, AtbZIP16 and AtbZIP68 may also participate in light-responsive process in which GBF1-3 are involved. PMID:18315949

  11. Cloning and characterization of a maize bZIP transcription factor, ZmbZIP72, confers drought and salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ying, Sheng; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Fu, Jing; Shi, Yun-Su; Song, Yan-Chun; Wang, Tian-Yu; Li, Yu

    2012-02-01

    In plants, the bZIP (basic leucine zipper) transcription factors regulate diverse functions, including processes such as plant development and stress response. However, few have been functionally characterized in maize (Zea mays). In this study, we cloned ZmbZIP72, a bZIP transcription factor gene from maize, which had only one copy in the maize genome and harbored three introns. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of ZmbZIP72 revealed a highly conserved bZIP DNA-binding domain in its C-terminal region, and four conserved sequences distributed in N- or C-terminal region. The ZmbZIP72 gene expressed differentially in various organs of maize plants and was induced by abscisic acid, high salinity, and drought treatment in seedlings. Subcellular localization analysis in onion epidermal cells indicated that ZmbZIP72 was a nuclear protein. Transactivation assay in yeast demonstrated that ZmbZIP72 functioned as a transcriptional activator and its N terminus (amino acids 23-63) was necessary for the transactivation activity. Heterologous overexpression of ZmbZIP72 improved drought and partial salt tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis plants, as determined by physiological analyses of leaf water loss, electrolyte leakage, proline content, and survival rate under stress. In addition, the seeds of ZmbZIP72-overexpressing transgenic plants were hypersensitive to ABA and osmotic stress. Moreover, overexpression of ZmbZIP72 enhanced the expression of ABA-inducible genes such as RD29B, RAB18, and HIS1-3. These results suggest that the ZmbZIP72 protein functions as an ABA-dependent transcription factor in positive modulation of abiotic stress tolerance and may be a candidate gene with potential application in molecular breeding to enhance stress tolerance in crops. PMID:21866346

  12. Arabidopsis GARP transcriptional activators interact with the Pro-rich activation domain shared by G-box-binding bZIP factors.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Hiroki; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Meshi, Tetsuo

    2002-01-01

    The Pro-rich regions, found in a subset of plant bZIP transcription factors, including G-box-binding factors (GBFs) of Arabidopsis thaliana, are thought to be deeply involved in transcriptional regulation. However, the molecular mechanisms of the Pro-rich region-mediated transcriptional regulation are still largely unknown. Here we report evidence showing that two closely related Arabidopsis proteins, designated GPRI1 and GPRI2, containing a GARP DNA-binding domain, are likely partners of one or more GBFs. The results of yeast two-hybrid assays and in vitro binding assays indicated that GPRI1 can interact with the Pro-rich regions of GBF1 and GBF3. GPRI2 interacted with the Pro-rich region of GBF1. GPRI1 and GPRI2 transactivated transcription in yeast. In GPRI1 the region responsible for this activation was mapped in the N-terminal third of the protein. Transient assays showed that in Arabidopsis cells not only the N-terminal but also the C-terminal regions of GPRI1 can function as a separable activation domain. GPRI1 and GPRI2 may function in some promoters in concert with a GBF through interaction with its Pro-rich region to enhance the transcriptional level of the corresponding genes. PMID:11828027

  13. Hexokinase 1 is required for glucose-induced repression of bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Sabine; Gardeström, Per; Pesquet, Edouard; Kleczkowski, Leszek A.

    2015-01-01

    Simple sugars, like glucose (Glc) and sucrose (Suc), act as signals to modulate the expression of hundreds of genes in plants. Frequently, however, it remains unclear whether this regulation is induced by the sugars themselves or by their derivatives generated in the course of carbohydrate (CH) metabolism. In the present study, we tested the relevance of different CH metabolism and allocation pathways affecting expression patterns of five selected sugar-responsive genes (bZIP63, At5g22920, BT2, MGD2, and TPS9) in Arabidopsis thaliana. In general, the expression followed diurnal changes in the overall sugar availability. However, under steady growth conditions, this response was hardly impaired in the mutants for CH metabolizing/ transporting proteins (adg1, sex1, sus1-4, sus5/6, and tpt2), including also hexokinase1 (HXK1) loss- and gain-of-function plants—gin2.1 and oe3.2, respectively. In addition, transgenic plants carrying pbZIP63::GUS showed no changes in reporter-gene-expression when grown on sugar under steady-state conditions. In contrast, short-term treatments of agar-grown seedlings with 1% Glc or Suc induced pbZIP63::GUS repression, which became even more apparent in seedlings grown in liquid media. Subsequent analyses of liquid-grown gin2.1 and oe3.2 seedlings revealed that Glc -dependent regulation of the five selected genes was not affected in gin2.1, whereas it was enhanced in oe3.2 plants for bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2. The sugar treatments had no effect on ATP/ADP ratio, suggesting that changes in gene expression were not linked to cellular energy status. Overall, the data suggest that HXK1 does not act as Glc sensor controlling bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2 expression, but it is nevertheless required for the production of a downstream metabolic signal regulating their expression. PMID:26236323

  14. AtTGA4, a bZIP transcription factor, confers drought resistance by enhancing nitrate transport and assimilation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li; Chen, Dandan; Min, Donghong; Li, Weiwei; Xu, Zhaoshi; Zhou, Yongbin; Li, Liancheng; Chen, Ming; Ma, Youzhi

    2015-02-13

    To cope with environmental stress caused by global climate change and excessive nitrogen application, it is important to improve water and nitrogen use efficiencies in crop plants. It has been reported that higher nitrogen uptake could alleviate the damaging impact of drought stress. However, there is scant evidence to explain how nitrogen uptake affects drought resistance. In this study we observed that bZIP transcription factor AtTGA4 (TGACG motif-binding factor 4) was induced by both drought and low nitrogen stresses, and that overexpression of AtTGA4 simultaneously improved drought resistance and reduced nitrogen starvation in Arabidopsis. Following drought stress there were higher nitrogen and proline contents in transgenic AtTGA4 plants than in wild type controls, and activity of the key enzyme nitrite reductase (NIR) involved in nitrate assimilation processes was also higher. Expressions of the high-affinity nitrate transporter genes NRT2.1 and NRT2.2 and nitrate reductase genes NIA1 and NIA2 in transgenic plants were all higher than in wild type indicating that higher levels of nitrate transport and assimilation activity contributed to enhanced drought resistance of AtTGA4 transgenic plants. Thus genetic transformation with AtTGA4 may provide a new approach to simultaneously improve crop tolerance to drought and low nitrogen stresses. PMID:25596127

  15. The Arabidopsis bZIP Gene AtbZIP63 Is a Sensitive Integrator of Transient Abscisic Acid and Glucose Signals1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Matiolli, Cleverson Carlos; Tomaz, Juarez Pires; Duarte, Gustavo Turqueto; Prado, Fernanda Manso; Del Bem, Luiz Eduardo Vieira; Silveira, Amanda Bortolini; Gauer, Luciane; Corrêa, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Drumond, Rodrigo Duarte; Viana, Américo José Carvalho; Di Mascio, Paolo; Meyer, Christian; Vincentz, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Glucose modulates plant metabolism, growth, and development. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), Hexokinase1 (HXK1) is a glucose sensor that may trigger abscisic acid (ABA) synthesis and sensitivity to mediate glucose-induced inhibition of seedling development. Here, we show that the intensity of short-term responses to glucose can vary with ABA activity. We report that the transient (2 h/4 h) repression by 2% glucose of AtbZIP63, a gene encoding a basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor partially involved in the Snf1-related kinase KIN10-induced responses to energy limitation, is independent of HXK1 and is not mediated by changes in ABA levels. However, high-concentration (6%) glucose-mediated repression appears to be modulated by ABA, since full repression of AtbZIP63 requires a functional ABA biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, the combination of glucose and ABA was able to trigger a synergistic repression of AtbZIP63 and its homologue AtbZIP3, revealing a shared regulatory feature consisting of the modulation of glucose sensitivity by ABA. The synergistic regulation of AtbZIP63 was not reproduced by an AtbZIP63 promoter-5′-untranslated region::β-glucuronidase fusion, thus suggesting possible posttranscriptional control. A transcriptional inhibition assay with cordycepin provided further evidence for the regulation of mRNA decay in response to glucose plus ABA. Overall, these results indicate that AtbZIP63 is an important node of the glucose-ABA interaction network. The mechanisms by which AtbZIP63 may participate in the fine-tuning of ABA-mediated abiotic stress responses according to sugar availability (i.e., energy status) are discussed. PMID:21844310

  16. Orphan nuclear receptor Errγ induces C-reactive protein gene expression through induction of ER-bound Bzip transmembrane transcription factor CREBH.

    PubMed

    Misra, Jagannath; Chanda, Dipanjan; Kim, Don-Kyu; Cho, Seung-Rye; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Lee, Chul-Ho; Back, Sung Hoon; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2014-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor-γ (ERRγ) is a constitutively active transcription factor regulating genes involved in several important cellular processes, including hepatic glucose metabolism, alcohol metabolism, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. cAMP responsive element-binding protein H (CREBH) is an ER-bound bZIP family transcription factor that is activated upon ER stress and regulates genes encoding acute-phase proteins whose expression is increased in response to inflammation. Here, we report that ERRγ directly regulates CREBH gene expression in response to ER stress. ERRγ bound to the ERRγ response element (ERRE) in the CREBH promoter. Overexpression of ERRγ by adenovirus significantly increased expression of CREBH as well as C-reactive protein (CRP), whereas either knockdown of ERRγ or inhibition of ERRγ by ERRγ specific inverse agonist, GSK5182, substantially inhibited ER stress-mediated induction of CREBH and CRP. The transcriptional coactivator PGC1α was required for ERRγ mediated induction of the CREBH gene as demonstrated by the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showing binding of both ERRγ and PGC1α on the CREBH promoter. The ChIP assay also revealed that histone H3 and H4 acetylation occurred at the ERRγ and PGC1α binding site. Moreover, chronic alcoholic hepatosteatosis, as well as the diabetic obese condition significantly increased CRP gene expression, and this increase was significantly attenuated by GSK5182 treatment. We suggest that orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ directly regulates the ER-bound transcription factor CREBH in response to ER stress and other metabolic conditions. PMID:24466039

  17. Orphan Nuclear Receptor Errγ Induces C-Reactive Protein Gene Expression through Induction of ER-Bound Bzip Transmembrane Transcription Factor CREBH

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Jagannath; Chanda, Dipanjan; Kim, Don-Kyu; Cho, Seung-Rye; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Lee, Chul-Ho; Back, Sung Hoon; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2014-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor-γ (ERRγ) is a constitutively active transcription factor regulating genes involved in several important cellular processes, including hepatic glucose metabolism, alcohol metabolism, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. cAMP responsive element-binding protein H (CREBH) is an ER-bound bZIP family transcription factor that is activated upon ER stress and regulates genes encoding acute-phase proteins whose expression is increased in response to inflammation. Here, we report that ERRγ directly regulates CREBH gene expression in response to ER stress. ERRγ bound to the ERRγ response element (ERRE) in the CREBH promoter. Overexpression of ERRγ by adenovirus significantly increased expression of CREBH as well as C-reactive protein (CRP), whereas either knockdown of ERRγ or inhibition of ERRγ by ERRγ specific inverse agonist, GSK5182, substantially inhibited ER stress-mediated induction of CREBH and CRP. The transcriptional coactivator PGC1α was required for ERRγ mediated induction of the CREBH gene as demonstrated by the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showing binding of both ERRγ and PGC1α on the CREBH promoter. The ChIP assay also revealed that histone H3 and H4 acetylation occurred at the ERRγ and PGC1α binding site. Moreover, chronic alcoholic hepatosteatosis, as well as the diabetic obese condition significantly increased CRP gene expression, and this increase was significantly attenuated by GSK5182 treatment. We suggest that orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ directly regulates the ER-bound transcription factor CREBH in response to ER stress and other metabolic conditions. PMID:24466039

  18. Evidence for an unusual transmembrane configuration of AGG3, a Class C Gγ Subunit, of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wolfenstetter, Susanne; Chakravorty, David; Kula, Ryan; Urano, Daisuke; Trusov, Yuri; McCurdy, David W.; Assmann, Sarah M.; Jones, Alan M.; Botella, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Heterotrimeric G proteins are crucial for the perception of external signals and subsequent signal transduction in animal and plant cells. In both model systems, the complex is comprised of one Gα, one Gβ and one Gγ subunit. However, in addition to the canonical Gγ subunits (Class A), plants also possess two unusual, plant-specific classes of Gγ subunits (Classes B and C) not yet found in animals. These include Gγ subunits lacking the C-terminal CaaX motif (Class B) which is important for membrane anchoring of the protein, and thus give rise to a flexible subpopulation of Gβ/γ heterodimers that is not necessarily restricted to the plasma membrane. Even more interesting, plants also contain Class C Gγ subunits which are twice the size of canonical Gγs, with a predicted transmembrane domain, and a large cysteine-rich, extracellular C-terminus. However, neither the presence of the transmembrane domain nor the membrane topology has been unequivocally demonstrated. Here, we provide compelling evidence that AGG3, a Class C Ggamma subunit of Arabidopsis, contains a functional transmembrane domain, which is sufficient but not essential for plasma membrane localization, and that the cysteine-rich C-terminus is extracellular. PMID:25430066

  19. Trafficking of the bZIP transmembrane transcription factor CREB-H into alternate pathways of ERAD and stress-regulated intramembrane proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Daniel; Barreca, Cristina; O'Hare, Peter

    2007-12-01

    CREB-H is an ATF6-related, transmembrane transcription factor that, in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated stress, is cleaved by Golgi proteases and transported to the nucleus to effect appropriate adaptive responses. We characterize the ER processing and turnover of CREB-H with results which have important implications for ER stress regulation and signalling. We show that CREB-H is glycosylated and demonstrate that both the ER and nuclear forms of CREB-H have short half-lives. We also show that CREB-H is subject to cycles of retrotranslocation, deglycosylation and degradation through the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. Proteasome inhibition resulted in accumulation of a cytosolic intermediate but additionally, in contrast to inhibition of glycosylation, promoted specific cleavage of CREB-H and nuclear transport of the N-terminal-truncated product. Our data indicate that under normal conditions CREB-H is transported back from the ER to the cytosol, where it is subject to ERAD, but under conditions that repress proteasome function or promote load CREB-H is diverted from this pathway instead undergoing cleavage and nuclear transport. Finally, we identify a cytoplasmic determinant involved in CREB-H ER retention, deletion of which results in constitutive Golgi transport and corresponding cleavage. We present a model where cellular stresses may be sensed at different levels by different members of the basic and leucine zipper domain transmembrane proteins. PMID:17875199

  20. The IRE1/bZIP60 pathway and Bax inhibitor 1 suppress systemic accumulation of potyviruses and potexviruses in Arabidopsis and N. benthamiana plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inositol requiring enzyme (IRE1) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress sensor and when activated it splices the bZIP60 mRNA producing a truncated transcription factor that upregulates expression of genes involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR). Bax inhibitor 1 (BI-1) is another ER stre...

  1. Endocytosis of Seven-Transmembrane RGS Protein Activates G- protein Coupled Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Daisuke; Phan, Nguyen; Jones, Janice C.; Yang, Jing; Huang, Jirong; Grigston, Jeffrey; Taylor, J. Philip; Jones, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Signal transduction typically begins by ligand-dependent activation of a concomitant partner which is otherwise in its resting state. However, in cases where signal activation is constitutive by default, the mechanism of regulation is unknown. The Arabidopsis thaliana heterotrimeric Gα protein self-activates without accessory proteins, and is kept in its resting state by the negative regulator, AtRGS1 (Regulator of G protein Signaling 1), which is the prototype of a seven transmembrane receptor fused with an RGS domain. Endocytosis of AtRGS1 by ligand-dependent endocytosis physically uncouples the GTPase accelerating activity of AtRGS1 from the Gα protein, permitting sustained activation. Phosphorylation of AtRGS1 by AtWNK8 kinase causes AtRGS1 endocytosis, required both for G protein-mediated sugar signaling and cell proliferation. In animals, receptor endocytosis results in signal desensitization, whereas in plants, endocytosis results in signal activation. These findings reveal how different organisms rearrange a regulatory system to result in opposite outcomes using similar phosphorylation-dependent endocytosis. PMID:22940907

  2. Transmembrane Topologies of Ca2+-permeable Mechanosensitive Channels MCA1 and MCA2 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kamano, Shumpei; Kume, Shinichiro; Iida, Kazuko; Lei, Kai-Jian; Nakano, Masataka; Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Iida, Hidetoshi

    2015-12-25

    Sensing mechanical stresses, including touch, stretch, compression, and gravity, is crucial for growth and development in plants. A good mechanosensor candidate is the Ca(2+)-permeable mechanosensitive (MS) channel, the pore of which opens to permeate Ca(2+) in response to mechanical stresses. However, the structure-function relationships of plant MS channels are poorly understood. Arabidopsis MCA1 and MCA2 form a homotetramer and exhibit Ca(2+)-permeable MS channel activity; however, their structures have only been partially elucidated. The transmembrane topologies of these ion channels need to be determined in more detail to elucidate the underlying regulatory mechanisms. We herein determined the topologies of MCA1 and MCA2 using two independent methods, the Suc2C reporter and split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid methods, and found that both proteins are single-pass type I integral membrane proteins with extracellular N termini and intracellular C termini. These results imply that an EF hand-like motif, coiled-coil motif, and plac8 motif are all present in the cytoplasm. Thus, the activities of both channels can be regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) and protein interactions. PMID:26555262

  3. TOM1, an Arabidopsis gene required for efficient multiplication of a tobamovirus, encodes a putative transmembrane protein.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, T; Ohta, T; Takahashi, M; Meshi, T; Schmidt, R; Dean, C; Naito, S; Ishikawa, M

    2000-08-29

    Host-encoded factors play an important role in virus multiplication, acting in concert with virus-encoded factors. However, information regarding the host factors involved in this process is limited. Here we report the map-based cloning of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene, TOM1, which is necessary for the efficient multiplication of tobamoviruses, positive-strand RNA viruses infecting a wide variety of plants. The TOM1 mRNA is suggested to encode a 291-aa polypeptide that is predicted to be a multipass transmembrane protein. The Sos recruitment assay supported the hypothesis that TOM1 is associated with membranes, and in addition, that TOM1 interacts with the helicase domain of tobamovirus-encoded replication proteins. Taken into account that the tobamovirus replication complex is associated with membranes, we propose that TOM1 participates in the in vivo formation of the replication complex by serving as a membrane anchor. PMID:10944200

  4. The dynamic of the splicing of bZIP60 and the proteins encoded by the spliced and unspliced mRNAs reveals some unique features during the activation of UPR in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rojas, Juan; Moreno, Adrian A; Mitina, Irina; Orellana, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a signaling pathway that is activated when the workload of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is surpassed. IRE1 is a sensor involved in triggering the UPR and plays a key role in the unconventional splicing of an mRNA leading to the formation of a transcription factor that up-regulates the transcription of genes that play a role in restoring the homeostasis in the ER. In plants, bZIP60 is the substrate for IRE1; however, questions such as what is the dynamics of the splicing of bZIP60 and the fate of the proteins encoded by the spliced and unspliced forms of the mRNA, remain unanswered. In the present work, we analyzed the processing of bZIP60 by determining the levels of the spliced form mRNA in plants exposed to different conditions that trigger UPR. The results show that induction of ER stress increases the content of the spliced form of bZIP60 (bZIP60s) reaching a maximum, that depending on the stimuli, varied between 30 min or 2 hrs. In most cases, this was followed by a decrease in the content. In contrast to other eukaryotes, the splicing never occurred to full extent. The content of bZIP60s changed among different organs upon induction of the UPR suggesting that splicing is regulated differentially throughout the plant. In addition, we analyzed the distribution of a GFP-tagged version of bZIP60 when UPR was activated. A good correlation between splicing of bZIP60 and localization of the protein in the nucleus was observed. No fluorescence was observed under basal conditions, but interestingly, the fluorescence was recovered and found to co-localize with an ER marker upon treatment with an inhibitor of the proteasome. Our results indicate that the dynamics of bZIP60, both the mRNA and the protein, are highly dynamic processes which are tissue-specific and stimulus-dependent. PMID:25860807

  5. Biochemical and molecular analysis of a transmembrane protein kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana. Progress report, January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bleecker, A.B.

    1993-06-01

    We have isolated genomic and cDNA clones encoding a novel receptor-like protein kinase from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This kinase is being studied by combining biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches. Domain-specific antibodies immunodecorate a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 120,000 daltons in extracts of Arabidopsis, where it has been found in all portions of the plant examined including root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Cytochemical analysis and initial studies using the kinase promoter with the GUS reporter gene system also indicate that the kinase is present throughout the plant. The kinase is glycosylated, like animal receptor kinases, and has been partially purified from Arabidopsis by using lectin columns. The kinase has been expressed in E coli, purified, and found to autophosphorylate on serine and threonine residues, but not on tyrosine residues. As such, it belongs to the small family of receptor-like kinases with serine/threonine specificity. Transgenic plants are now being produced that either overexpress or carry altered forms of the protein kinase gene. These experiments will help determine the natural role the kinase plays in a pathway of signal transduction.

  6. Biochemical and molecular analysis of a transmembrane protein kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Bleecker, A.B.

    1993-01-01

    We have isolated genomic and cDNA clones encoding a novel receptor-like protein kinase from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This kinase is being studied by combining biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches. Domain-specific antibodies immunodecorate a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 120,000 daltons in extracts of Arabidopsis, where it has been found in all portions of the plant examined including root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Cytochemical analysis and initial studies using the kinase promoter with the GUS reporter gene system also indicate that the kinase is present throughout the plant. The kinase is glycosylated, like animal receptor kinases, and has been partially purified from Arabidopsis by using lectin columns. The kinase has been expressed in E coli, purified, and found to autophosphorylate on serine and threonine residues, but not on tyrosine residues. As such, it belongs to the small family of receptor-like kinases with serine/threonine specificity. Transgenic plants are now being produced that either overexpress or carry altered forms of the protein kinase gene. These experiments will help determine the natural role the kinase plays in a pathway of signal transduction.

  7. Membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease, antagonizes ABA signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun-Fan; Sun, Le; Valdés, Ana Elisa; Engström, Peter; Song, Ze-Ting; Lu, Sun-Jie; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Abscisic acid plays important roles in maintaining seed dormancy while gibberellins (GA) and other phytohormones antagonize ABA to promote germination. However, how ABA signaling is desensitized during the transition from dormancy to germination is still poorly understood. We functionally characterized the role of membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease (S2P), in ABA signaling during seed germination in Arabidopsis. Genetic analysis showed that loss-of-function of S2P conferred high ABA sensitivity during seed germination, and expression of the activated form of membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17, in which the transmembrane domain and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen-facing C-terminus were deleted, in the S2P mutant rescued its ABA-sensitive phenotype. MYC and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bZIP17 were processed and translocated from the ER to the nucleus in response to ABA treatment. Furthermore, genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling, such as the transcription factor ATHB7 and its target genes HAB1, HAB2, HAI1 and AHG3, were up-regulated in seeds of the wild-type upon ABA treatment; this up-regulation was impaired in seeds of S2P mutants. Our results suggest that S2P desensitizes ABA signaling during seed germination through regulating the activation of the membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17 and therefore controlling the expression level of genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:25919792

  8. Flying saucer1 is a transmembrane RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates the degree of pectin methylesterification in Arabidopsis seed mucilage.

    PubMed

    Voiniciuc, Catalin; Dean, Gillian H; Griffiths, Jonathan S; Kirchsteiger, Kerstin; Hwang, Yeen Ting; Gillett, Alan; Dow, Graham; Western, Tamara L; Estelle, Mark; Haughn, George W

    2013-03-01

    Pectins are complex polysaccharides that form the gel matrix of the primary cell wall and are abundant in the middle lamella that holds plant cells together. Their degree of methylesterification (DM) impacts wall strength and cell adhesion since unesterified pectin regions can cross-link via Ca(2+) ions to form stronger gels. Here, we characterize flying saucer1 (fly1), a novel Arabidopsis thaliana seed coat mutant, which displays primary wall detachment, reduced mucilage extrusion, and increased mucilage adherence. These defects appear to result from a lower DM in mucilage and are enhanced by the addition of Ca(2+) or completely rescued using alkaline Ca(2+) chelators. FLY1 encodes a transmembrane protein with a RING-H2 domain that has in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. FLY1 is orthologous to TRANSMEMBRANE UBIQUITIN LIGASE1, a Golgi-localized E3 ligase involved in the quality control of membrane proteins in yeast. However, FLY1-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusions are localized in punctae that are predominantly distinct from the Golgi and the trans-Golgi network/early endosome in the seed coat epidermis. Wortmannin treatment, which induces the fusion of late endosomes in plants, resulted in enlarged FLY1-YFP bodies. We propose that FLY1 regulates the DM of pectin in mucilage, potentially by recycling pectin methylesterase enzymes in the endomembrane system of seed coat epidermal cells. PMID:23482858

  9. FLYING SAUCER1 Is a Transmembrane RING E3 Ubiquitin Ligase That Regulates the Degree of Pectin Methylesterification in Arabidopsis Seed Mucilage[W

    PubMed Central

    Voiniciuc, Cătălin; Dean, Gillian H.; Griffiths, Jonathan S.; Kirchsteiger, Kerstin; Hwang, Yeen Ting; Gillett, Alan; Dow, Graham; Western, Tamara L.; Estelle, Mark; Haughn, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Pectins are complex polysaccharides that form the gel matrix of the primary cell wall and are abundant in the middle lamella that holds plant cells together. Their degree of methylesterification (DM) impacts wall strength and cell adhesion since unesterified pectin regions can cross-link via Ca2+ ions to form stronger gels. Here, we characterize flying saucer1 (fly1), a novel Arabidopsis thaliana seed coat mutant, which displays primary wall detachment, reduced mucilage extrusion, and increased mucilage adherence. These defects appear to result from a lower DM in mucilage and are enhanced by the addition of Ca2+ or completely rescued using alkaline Ca2+ chelators. FLY1 encodes a transmembrane protein with a RING-H2 domain that has in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. FLY1 is orthologous to TRANSMEMBRANE UBIQUITIN LIGASE1, a Golgi-localized E3 ligase involved in the quality control of membrane proteins in yeast. However, FLY1–yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusions are localized in punctae that are predominantly distinct from the Golgi and the trans-Golgi network/early endosome in the seed coat epidermis. Wortmannin treatment, which induces the fusion of late endosomes in plants, resulted in enlarged FLY1-YFP bodies. We propose that FLY1 regulates the DM of pectin in mucilage, potentially by recycling pectin methylesterase enzymes in the endomembrane system of seed coat epidermal cells. PMID:23482858

  10. IRE1/bZIP60-Mediated Unfolded Protein Response Plays Distinct Roles in Plant Immunity and Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Francisca; Boatwright, Jon Lucas; Moreno, Ignacio; Jordan, Melissa R.; Chen, Yani; Brandizzi, Federica; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated protein secretion and quality control have been shown to play an important role in immune responses in both animals and plants. In mammals, the ER membrane-located IRE1 kinase/endoribonuclease, a key regulator of unfolded protein response (UPR), is required for plasma cell development to accommodate massive secretion of immunoglobulins. Plant cells can secrete the so-called pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins with antimicrobial activities upon pathogen challenge. However, whether IRE1 plays any role in plant immunity is not known. Arabidopsis thaliana has two copies of IRE1, IRE1a and IRE1b. Here, we show that both IRE1a and IRE1b are transcriptionally induced during chemically-induced ER stress, bacterial pathogen infection and treatment with the immune signal salicylic acid (SA). However, we found that IRE1a plays a predominant role in the secretion of PR proteins upon SA treatment. Consequently, the ire1a mutant plants show enhanced susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen and are deficient in establishing systemic acquired resistance (SAR), whereas ire1b is unaffected in these responses. We further demonstrate that the immune deficiency in ire1a is due to a defect in SA- and pathogen-triggered, IRE1-mediated cytoplasmic splicing of the bZIP60 mRNA, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the expression of UPR-responsive genes. Consistently, IRE1a is preferentially required for bZIP60 splicing upon pathogen infection, while IRE1b plays a major role in bZIP60 processing upon Tunicamycin (Tm)-induced stress. We also show that SA-dependent induction of UPR-responsive genes is altered in the bzip60 mutant resulting in a moderate susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen. These results indicate that the IRE1/bZIP60 branch of UPR is a part of the plant response to pathogens for which the two Arabidopsis IRE1 isoforms play only partially overlapping roles and that IRE1 has both bZIP60-dependent and bZIP60-independent functions in

  11. SnRK1-triggered switch of bZIP63 dimerization mediates the low-energy response in plants

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Andrea; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Anrather, Dorothea; Simeunovic, Andrea; Weiste, Christoph; Valerio, Concetta; Dietrich, Katrin; Kirchler, Tobias; Nägele, Thomas; Vicente Carbajosa, Jesús; Hanson, Johannes; Baena-González, Elena; Chaban, Christina; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang; Teige, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic adjustment to changing environmental conditions, particularly balancing of growth and defense responses, is crucial for all organisms to survive. The evolutionary conserved AMPK/Snf1/SnRK1 kinases are well-known metabolic master regulators in the low-energy response in animals, yeast and plants. They act at two different levels: by modulating the activity of key metabolic enzymes, and by massive transcriptional reprogramming. While the first part is well established, the latter function is only partially understood in animals and not at all in plants. Here we identified the Arabidopsis transcription factor bZIP63 as key regulator of the starvation response and direct target of the SnRK1 kinase. Phosphorylation of bZIP63 by SnRK1 changed its dimerization preference, thereby affecting target gene expression and ultimately primary metabolism. A bzip63 knock-out mutant exhibited starvation-related phenotypes, which could be functionally complemented by wild type bZIP63, but not by a version harboring point mutations in the identified SnRK1 target sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05828.001 PMID:26263501

  12. Transcriptome analysis of newly classified bZIP transcription factors of Brassica rapa in cold stress response.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Indeok; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Yang, Tae-Jin; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2014-09-01

    Plant bZIP transcription factors play crucial roles in biological processes. In this study, 136 putative bZIP transcription members were identified in Brassica rapa. The bZIP family can be divided into nine groups according to the specific amino acid rich domain in B. rapa and Arabidopsis thaliana. To screen the cold stress responsive BrbZIP genes, we evaluated whether the transcription patterns of the BrbZIP genes were enhanced by cold treatment in the inbred lines, Chiifu and Kenshin, by microarray data analysis and qRT-PCR. The expression level of six genes increased significantly in Kenshin, but these genes were unchanged in Chiifu. These findings suggest that the six genes that encoded proteins containing N-rich regions might be involved in cold stress response. The results presented herein provide valuable information regarding the molecular basis of the bZIP transcription factors and their potential function in regulation growth and development, particularly in cold stress response. PMID:25075938

  13. Phosphorylation Affects DNA-Binding of the Senescence-Regulating bZIP Transcription Factor GBF1

    PubMed Central

    Smykowski, Anja; Fischer, Stefan M.; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Massive changes in the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana during onset and progression of leaf senescence imply a central role for transcription factors. While many transcription factors are themselves up- or down-regulated during senescence, the bZIP transcription factor G-box-binding factor 1 (GBF1/bZIP41) is constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis leaf tissue but at the same time triggers the onset of leaf senescence, suggesting posttranscriptional mechanisms for senescence-specific GBF1 activation. Here we show that GBF1 is phosphorylated by the threonine/serine CASEIN KINASE II (CKII) in vitro and that CKII phosphorylation had a negative effect on GBF1 DNA-binding to G-boxes of two direct target genes, CATALASE2 and RBSCS1a. Phosphorylation mimicry at three serine positions in the basic region of GBF1 also had a negative effect on DNA-binding. Kinase assays revealed that CKII phosphorylates at least one serine in the basic domain but has additional phosphorylation sites outside this domain. Two different ckII α subunit1 and one α subunit2 T-DNA insertion lines showed no visible senescence phenotype, but in all lines the expression of the senescence marker gene SAG12 was remarkably diminished. A model is presented suggesting that senescence-specific GBF1 activation might be achieved by lowering the phosphorylation of GBF1 by CKII. PMID:27135347

  14. Homology modeling of major intrinsic proteins in rice, maize and Arabidopsis: comparative analysis of transmembrane helix association and aromatic/arginine selectivity filters

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Anjali; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2007-01-01

    Background The major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) facilitate the transport of water and neutral solutes across the lipid bilayers. Plant MIPs are believed to be important in cell division and expansion and in water transport properties in response to environmental conditions. More than 30 MIP sequences have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, maize and rice. Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), Nod26-like intrinsic protein (NIPs) and small and basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs) are subfamilies of plant MIPs. Despite sequence diversity, all the experimentally determined structures belonging to the MIP superfamily have the same "hour-glass" fold. Results We have structurally characterized 39 rice and 31 maize MIPs and compared them with that of Arabidopsis. Homology models of 105 MIPs from all three plant species were built. Structure-based sequence alignments were generated and the residues in the helix-helix interfaces were analyzed. Small residues (Gly/Ala/Ser/Thr) are found to be highly conserved as a group in the helix-helix interface of MIP structures. Individual families sometimes prefer one or another of the residues from this group. The narrow aromatic/arginine (ar/R) selectivity filter in MIPs has been shown to provide an important constriction for solute permeability. Ar/R regions were analyzed and compared between the three plant species. Seventeen TIP, NIP and SIP members from rice and maize have ar/R signatures that are not found in Arabidopsis. A subgroup of rice and maize NIPs has small residues in three of the four positions in the ar/R tetrad, resulting in a wider constriction. These MIP members could transport larger solute molecules. Conclusion Small residues are group-conserved in the helix-helix interface of MIP structures and they seem to be important for close helix-helix interactions. Such conservation might help to preserve the hour-glass fold in MIP structures. Analysis and comparison of ar

  15. The Transmembrane Region of Guard Cell SLAC1 Channels Perceives CO2 Signals via an ABA-Independent Pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiko; Negi, Juntaro; Wang, Cun; Isogai, Yasuhiro; Schroeder, Julian I; Iba, Koh

    2016-02-01

    The guard cell S-type anion channel, SLOW ANION CHANNEL1 (SLAC1), a key component in the control of stomatal movements, is activated in response to CO2 and abscisic acid (ABA). Several amino acids existing in the N-terminal region of SLAC1 are involved in regulating its activity via phosphorylation in the ABA response. However, little is known about sites involved in CO2 signal perception. To dissect sites that are necessary for the stomatal CO2 response, we performed slac1 complementation experiments using transgenic plants expressing truncated SLAC1 proteins. Measurements of gas exchange and stomatal apertures in the truncated transgenic lines in response to CO2 and ABA revealed that sites involved in the stomatal CO2 response exist in the transmembrane region and do not require the SLAC1 N and C termini. CO2 and ABA regulation of S-type anion channel activity in guard cells of the transgenic lines confirmed these results. In vivo site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeted to amino acids within the transmembrane region of SLAC1 raise the possibility that two tyrosine residues exposed on the membrane are involved in the stomatal CO2 response. PMID:26764376

  16. Identification of Important Regions for Ethylene Binding and Signaling in the Transmembrane Domain of the ETR1 Ethylene Receptor of Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wuyi; Esch, Jeff J.; Shiu, Shin-Han; Agula, Hasi; Binder, Brad M.; Chang, Caren; Patterson, Sara E.; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2006-01-01

    The ethylene binding domain (EBD) of the Arabidopsis thaliana ETR1 receptor is modeled as three membrane-spanning helices. We surveyed ethylene binding activity in different kingdoms and performed a bioinformatic analysis of the EBD. Ethylene binding is confined to land plants, Chara, and a group of cyanobacteria but is largely absent in other organisms, consistent with our finding that EBD-like sequences are overrepresented among plant and cyanobacterial species. We made amino acid substitutions in 37 partially or completely conserved residues of the EBD and assayed their effects on ethylene binding and signaling. Mutations primarily in residues in Helices I and II midregions eliminated ethylene binding and conferred constitutive signaling, consistent with the inverse-agonist model of ethylene receptor signaling and indicating that these residues define the ethylene binding pocket. The largest class of mutations, clustered near the cytoplasmic ends of Helices I and III, gave normal ethylene binding activity yet still conferred constitutive signaling. Therefore, these residues may play a role in turning off the signal transmitter domain of the receptor. By contrast, only two mutations were loss of function with respect to signaling. These findings yield insight into the structure and function of the EBD and suggest a conserved role of the EBD as a negative regulator of the signal transmitter domain. PMID:17189345

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis of the bZIP Gene Family Identifies Two ABI5-Like bZIP Transcription Factors, BrABI5a and BrABI5b, as Positive Modulators of ABA Signalling in Chinese Cabbage.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yili; Zhu, Wenbo; Hu, Xiaochen; Sun, Congcong; Li, Yanlin; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Qinhu; Pei, Guoliang; Zhang, Yanfeng; Guo, Aiguang; Zhao, Huixian; Lu, Haibin; Mu, Xiaoqian; Hu, Jingjiang; Zhou, Xiaona; Xie, Chang Gen

    2016-01-01

    bZIP (basic leucine zipper) transcription factors coordinate plant growth and development and control responses to environmental stimuli. The genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) encodes 136 putative bZIP transcription factors. The bZIP transcription factors in Brassica rapa (BrbZIP) are classified into 10 subfamilies. Phylogenetic relationship analysis reveals that subfamily A consists of 23 BrbZIPs. Two BrbZIPs within subfamily A, Bra005287 and Bra017251, display high similarity to ABI5 (ABA Insensitive 5). Expression of subfamily A BrbZIPs, like BrABI5a (Bra005287/BrbZIP14) and BrABI5b (Bra017251/BrbZIP13), are significantly induced by the plant hormone ABA. Subcellular localization assay reveal that both BrABI5a and BrABI5b have a nuclear localization. BrABI5a and BrABI5b could directly stimulate ABA Responsive Element-driven HIS (a HIS3 reporter gene, which confers His prototrophy) or LUC (LUCIFERASE) expression in yeast and Arabidopsis protoplast. Deletion of the bZIP motif abolished BrABI5a and BrABI5b transcriptional activity. The ABA insensitive phenotype of Arabidopsis abi5-1 is completely suppressed in transgenic lines expressing BrABI5a or BrABI5b. Overall, these results suggest that ABI5 orthologs, BrABI5a and BrABI5b, have key roles in ABA signalling in Chinese cabbage. PMID:27414644

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of the bZIP Gene Family Identifies Two ABI5-Like bZIP Transcription Factors, BrABI5a and BrABI5b, as Positive Modulators of ABA Signalling in Chinese Cabbage

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaochen; Sun, Congcong; Li, Yanlin; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Qinhu; Pei, Guoliang; Zhang, Yanfeng; Guo, Aiguang; Zhao, Huixian; Lu, Haibin; Mu, Xiaoqian; Hu, Jingjiang; Zhou, Xiaona; Xie, Chang Gen

    2016-01-01

    bZIP (basic leucine zipper) transcription factors coordinate plant growth and development and control responses to environmental stimuli. The genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) encodes 136 putative bZIP transcription factors. The bZIP transcription factors in Brassica rapa (BrbZIP) are classified into 10 subfamilies. Phylogenetic relationship analysis reveals that subfamily A consists of 23 BrbZIPs. Two BrbZIPs within subfamily A, Bra005287 and Bra017251, display high similarity to ABI5 (ABA Insensitive 5). Expression of subfamily A BrbZIPs, like BrABI5a (Bra005287/BrbZIP14) and BrABI5b (Bra017251/BrbZIP13), are significantly induced by the plant hormone ABA. Subcellular localization assay reveal that both BrABI5a and BrABI5b have a nuclear localization. BrABI5a and BrABI5b could directly stimulate ABA Responsive Element-driven HIS (a HIS3 reporter gene, which confers His prototrophy) or LUC (LUCIFERASE) expression in yeast and Arabidopsis protoplast. Deletion of the bZIP motif abolished BrABI5a and BrABI5b transcriptional activity. The ABA insensitive phenotype of Arabidopsis abi5-1 is completely suppressed in transgenic lines expressing BrABI5a or BrABI5b. Overall, these results suggest that ABI5 orthologs, BrABI5a and BrABI5b, have key roles in ABA signalling in Chinese cabbage. PMID:27414644

  19. bZIPs and WRKYs: two large transcription factor families executing two different functional strategies

    PubMed Central

    Llorca, Carles M.; Potschin, Maren; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    bZIPs and WRKYs are two important plant transcription factor (TF) families regulating diverse developmental and stress-related processes. Since a partial overlap in these biological processes is obvious, it can be speculated that they fulfill non-redundant functions in a complex regulatory network. Here, we focus on the regulatory mechanisms that are so far described for bZIPs and WRKYs. bZIP factors need to heterodimerize for DNA-binding and regulation of transcription, and based on a bioinformatics approach, bZIPs can build up more than the double of protein interactions than WRKYs. In contrast, an enrichment of the WRKY DNA-binding motifs can be found in WRKY promoters, a phenomenon which is not observed for the bZIP family. Thus, the two TF families follow two different functional strategies in which WRKYs regulate each other’s transcription in a transcriptional network whereas bZIP action relies on intensive heterodimerization. PMID:24817872

  20. Identification of Two bZIP Transcription Factors Interacting with the Promoter of Soybean Rubisco Activase Gene (GmRCAα)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinyu; Du, Hongyang; Chao, Maoni; Yin, Zhitong; Yang, Hui; Li, Yakai; Huang, Fang; Yu, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA), a key photosynthetic protein, catalyses the activation of Rubisco and thus plays an important role in photosynthesis. Although the RCA gene has been characterized in a variety of species, the molecular mechanism regulating its transcription remains unclear. Our previous studies on RCA gene expression in soybean suggested that expression of this gene is regulated by trans-acting factors. In the present study, we verified activity of the GmRCAα promoter in both soybean and Arabidopsis and used a yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) system for screening a leaf cDNA expression library to identify transcription factors (TFs) interacting with the GmRCAα promoter. Four basic leucine zipper (bZIP) TFs, GmbZIP04g, GmbZIP07g, GmbZIP1, and GmbZIP71, were isolated, and GmbZIP04g and GmbZIP07g were confirmed as able to bind to a 21-nt G-box-containing sequence. Additionally, the expression patterns of GmbZIP04g, GmbZIp07g, and GmRCAα were analyzed in response to abiotic stresses and during a 24-h period. Our study will help to advance elucidation of the network regulating GmRCAα transcription. PMID:27242832

  1. FASCIATED EAR4 encodes a bZIP transcription factor that regulates shoot meristem size in maize.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Michael; Eveland, Andrea L; LaRue, Therese; Yang, Fang; Weeks, Rebecca; Lunde, China; Je, Byoung Il; Meeley, Robert; Komatsu, Mai; Vollbrecht, Erik; Sakai, Hajime; Jackson, David

    2015-01-01

    Plant architecture is dictated by precise control of meristematic activity. In the shoot, an imbalance in positive or negative maintenance signals can result in a fasciated or enlarged meristem phenotype. fasciated ear4 (fea4) is a semidwarfed mutant with fasciated ears and tassels as well as greatly enlarged vegetative and inflorescence meristems. We identified FEA4 as a bZIP transcription factor, orthologous to Arabidopsis thaliana PERIANTHIA. FEA4 was expressed in the peripheral zone of the vegetative shoot apical meristem and in the vasculature of immature leaves and conspicuously excluded from the stem cell niche at the tip of the shoot apical meristem and from incipient leaf primordia. Following the transition to reproductive fate, FEA4 was expressed throughout the entire inflorescence and floral meristems. Native expression of a functional YFP:FEA4 fusion recapitulated this pattern of expression. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing to identify 4060 genes proximal to FEA4 binding sites, including ones that were potentially bound and modulated by FEA4 based on transcriptional changes in fea4 mutant ears. Our results suggest that FEA4 promotes differentiation in the meristem periphery by regulating auxin-based responses and genes associated with leaf differentiation and polarity, potentially in opposition to factors such as KNOTTED1 and WUSCHEL. PMID:25616871

  2. System-wide characterization of bZIP transcription factor proteins involved in infection-related morphogenesis of Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wei; Ru, Yanyan; Hong, Li; Zhu, Qian; Zuo, Rongfang; Guo, Xianxian; Wang, Jingzhen; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2014-01-01

    The basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) domain-containing transcription factors (TFs) function as key regulators of cellular growth and differentiation in eukaryotic organisms including fungi. We have previously identified MoAp1 and MoAtf1 as bZIP TFs in Magnaporthe oryzae and demonstrated that they regulate the oxidative stress response and are critical in conidiogenesis and pathogenicity. Studies of bZIP proteins could provide a novel strategy for controlling rice blast, but a systematic examination of the bZIP proteins has not been carried out. Here, we identified 19 additional bZIP TFs and characterized their functions. We found that the majority of these TFs exhibit active functions, most notably, in conidiogenesis. We showed that MoHac1 regulates the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress response through a conserved unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, MoMetR controls amino acid metabolism to govern growth and differentiation, and MoBzip10 governs appressorium function and invasive hyphal growth. Moreover, MoBzip5 participates in appressorium formation through a pathway distinct from that MoBzip10, and MoMeaB appears to exert a regulatory role through nutrient uptake and nitrogen utilization. Collectively, our results provide insights into shared and specific functions associated with each of these TFs and link the regulatory roles to the fungal growth, conidiation, appressorium formation, host penetration, and pathogenicity. PMID:25186614

  3. VIP1 is very important/interesting protein 1 regulating touch responses of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tsugama, Daisuke; Liu, Shenkui; Takano, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT VIP1 (VIRE2-INTERACTING PROTEIN 1) is a bZIP transcription factor in Arabidopsis thaliana. VIP1 and its close homologs (i.e., Arabidopsis group I bZIP proteins) are present in the cytoplasm under steady conditions, but are transiently localized to the nucleus when cells are exposed to hypo-osmotic conditions, which mimic mechanical stimuli such as touch. Recently we have reported that overexpression of a repression domain-fused form of VIP1 represses the expression of some touch-responsive genes, changes structures and/or local auxin responses of the root cap cells, and enhances the touch-induced root waving. This raises the possibility that VIP1 suppresses touch-induced responses. VIP1 should be useful to further characterize touch responses of plants. Here we discuss 2 seemingly interesting perspectives about VIP1: (1) What factors are involved in regulating the nuclear localization of VIP1?; (2) What can be done to further characterize the physiological functions of VIP1 and other Arabidopsis group I bZIP proteins? PMID:27171129

  4. Expression and Functional Roles of the Pepper Pathogen-Induced bZIP Transcription Factor CabZIP2 in Enhanced Disease Resistance to Bacterial Pathogen Infection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Baek, Woonhee; Lim, Sohee; Han, Sang-Wook; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-07-01

    A pepper bZIP transcription factor gene, CabZIP2, was isolated from pepper leaves infected with a virulent strain of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. Transient expression analysis of the CabZIP2-GFP fusion protein in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed that the CabZIP2 protein is localized in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus. The acidic domain in the N-terminal region of CabZIP2 that is fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain is required to activate the transcription of reporter genes in yeast. Transcription of CabZIP2 is induced in pepper plants inoculated with virulent or avirulent strains of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. The CabZIP2 gene is also induced by defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethylene. To elucidate the in vivo function of the CabZIP2 gene in plant defense, virus-induced gene silencing in pepper and overexpression in Arabidopsis were used. CabZIP2-silenced pepper plants were susceptible to infection by the virulent strain of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, which was accompanied by reduced expression of defense-related genes such as CaBPR1 and CaAMP1. CabZIP2 overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants conferred enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Together, these results suggest that CabZIP2 is involved in bacterial disease resistance. PMID:25738319

  5. Data-Driven Prediction and Design of bZIP Coiled-Coil Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Vladimir; Kaplan, Jenifer B.; Keating, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Selective dimerization of the basic-region leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factors presents a vivid example of how a high degree of interaction specificity can be achieved within a family of structurally similar proteins. The coiled-coil motif that mediates homo- or hetero-dimerization of the bZIP proteins has been intensively studied, and a variety of methods have been proposed to predict these interactions from sequence data. In this work, we used a large quantitative set of 4,549 bZIP coiled-coil interactions to develop a predictive model that exploits knowledge of structurally conserved residue-residue interactions in the coiled-coil motif. Our model, which expresses interaction energies as a sum of interpretable residue-pair and triplet terms, achieves a correlation with experimental binding free energies of R = 0.68 and significantly out-performs other scoring functions. To use our model in protein design applications, we devised a strategy in which synthetic peptides are built by assembling 7-residue native-protein heptad modules into new combinations. An integer linear program was used to find the optimal combination of heptads to bind selectively to a target human bZIP coiled coil, but not to target paralogs. Using this approach, we designed peptides to interact with the bZIP domains from human JUN, XBP1, ATF4 and ATF5. Testing more than 132 candidate protein complexes using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay confirmed the formation of tight and selective heterodimers between the designed peptides and their targets. This approach can be used to make inhibitors of native proteins, or to develop novel peptides for applications in synthetic biology or nanotechnology. PMID:25695764

  6. The Role of bZIP Transcription Factors in Green Plant Evolution: Adaptive Features Emerging from Four Founder Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schrago, Carlos Guerra; dos Santos, Renato Vicentini; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Vincentz, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Background Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control important processes in all eukaryotes. In plants, bZIPs are regulators of many central developmental and physiological processes including photomorphogenesis, leaf and seed formation, energy homeostasis, and abiotic and biotic stress responses. Here we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bZIP genes from algae, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified 13 groups of bZIP homologues in angiosperms, three more than known before, that represent 34 Possible Groups of Orthologues (PoGOs). The 34 PoGOs may correspond to the complete set of ancestral angiosperm bZIP genes that participated in the diversification of flowering plants. Homologous genes dedicated to seed-related processes and ABA-mediated stress responses originated in the common ancestor of seed plants, and three groups of homologues emerged in the angiosperm lineage, of which one group plays a role in optimizing the use of energy. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that the ancestor of green plants possessed four bZIP genes functionally involved in oxidative stress and unfolded protein responses that are bZIP-mediated processes in all eukaryotes, but also in light-dependent regulations. The four founder genes amplified and diverged significantly, generating traits that benefited the colonization of new environments. PMID:18698409

  7. Novel DNA binding specificities of a putative herpesvirus bZIP oncoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Z; Brunovskis, P; Lee, L; Vogt, P K; Kung, H J

    1996-01-01

    Marek's disease virus is a highly oncogenic herpesvirus that can cause T lymphomas and peripheral nerve demyelination in chickens. meq, a candidate oncogene of Marek's disease virus, encodes a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor which contains a large proline-rich domain in its C terminus. On the basis of its bZIP structural homology, meq is perhaps the only member of the jun-fos gene family completely viral in origin. We previously showed that Meq's C-terminal domain has potent transactivation activity and that its bZIP domain can dimerize with itself and with c-Jun also. In an effort to identify viral and cellular targets of Meq, we have determined the optimal binding sites for Meq-Jun heterodimers and Meq-Meq homodimers. By a PCR-based approach using cyclic amplification of selected targets, Meq-Jun heterodimers were found to optimally bind tetradecanoylphorbol acetate response element (TRE) and cyclic AMP response element (CRE) consensus sequences. This result was consistent with the results of our previous functional analysis implicating Meq-Jun heterodimers in the transactivation of the Meq promoter through a TRE- or CRE-like sequence. Interestingly, Meq-Meq homodimers were found to bind two distinct motif elements. The first [GAGTGATG AC(G)TCATC] has a consensus which includes a TRE or CRE core flanked by additional nucleotides critical for tight binding. Methylation interference and mutational analyses confirmed the importance of the flanking residues. The sequences of a subset of TRE and CRE sites selected by Meq-Meq are closely related to the binding motif of Maf, another bZIP oncoprotein. The second putative Meq binding site (RACACACAY) bears a completely different consensus not shared by other bZIP proteins. Binding to this consensus sequence also requires secondary structure characteristics associated with DNA bending. CACA motifs are known to promote DNA curvature and function in a number of special biological processes. Our results lend

  8. Wheat Transcription Factor TaAREB3 Participates in Drought and Freezing Tolerances in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Li, Qian; Mao, Xinguo; Li, Ang; Jing, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    AREB (ABA response element binding) proteins in plants play direct regulatory roles in response to multiple stresses, but their functions in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are not clear. In the present study, TaAREB3, a new member of the AREB transcription factor family, was isolated from wheat. Sequence analysis showed that the TaAREB3 protein is composed of three parts, a conserved N-terminal, a variable M region, and a conserved C-terminal with a bZIP domain. It belongs to the group A subfamily of bZIP transcription factors. TaAREB3 was constitutively expressed in stems, leaves, florets, anthers, pistils, seeds, and most highly, in roots. TaAREB3 gene expression was induced with abscisic acid (ABA) and low temperature stress, and its protein was localized in the nucleus when transiently expressed in tobacco epidermal cells and stably expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. TaAREB3 protein has transcriptional activation activity, and can bind to the ABRE cis-element in vitro. Overexpression of TaAREB3 in Arabidopsis not only enhanced ABA sensitivity, but also strengthened drought and freezing tolerances. TaAREB3 also activated RD29A, RD29B, COR15A, and COR47 by binding to their promoter regions in transgenic Arabidopsis. These results demonstrated that TaAREB3 plays an important role in drought and freezing tolerances in Arabidopsis. PMID:26884722

  9. Wheat Transcription Factor TaAREB3 Participates in Drought and Freezing Tolerances in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Li, Qian; Mao, Xinguo; Li, Ang; Jing, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    AREB (ABA response element binding) proteins in plants play direct regulatory roles in response to multiple stresses, but their functions in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are not clear. In the present study, TaAREB3, a new member of the AREB transcription factor family, was isolated from wheat. Sequence analysis showed that the TaAREB3 protein is composed of three parts, a conserved N-terminal, a variable M region, and a conserved C-terminal with a bZIP domain. It belongs to the group A subfamily of bZIP transcription factors. TaAREB3 was constitutively expressed in stems, leaves, florets, anthers, pistils, seeds, and most highly, in roots. TaAREB3 gene expression was induced with abscisic acid (ABA) and low temperature stress, and its protein was localized in the nucleus when transiently expressed in tobacco epidermal cells and stably expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. TaAREB3 protein has transcriptional activation activity, and can bind to the ABRE cis-element in vitro. Overexpression of TaAREB3 in Arabidopsis not only enhanced ABA sensitivity, but also strengthened drought and freezing tolerances. TaAREB3 also activated RD29A, RD29B, COR15A, and COR47 by binding to their promoter regions in transgenic Arabidopsis. These results demonstrated that TaAREB3 plays an important role in drought and freezing tolerances in Arabidopsis. PMID:26884722

  10. Calcium-dependent protein kinases responsible for the phosphorylation of a bZIP transcription factor FD crucial for the florigen complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Nozomi; Sasabe, Michiko; Endo, Motomu; Machida, Yasunori; Araki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate timing of flowering is critical for reproductive success and necessarily involves complex genetic regulatory networks. A mobile floral signal, called florigen, is a key molecule in this process, and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) protein is its major component in Arabidopsis. FT is produced in leaves, but promotes the floral transition in the shoot apex, where it forms a complex with a basic region/leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factor, FD. Formation of the florigen complex depends on the supposed phosphorylation of FD; hitherto, however, the responsible protein kinase(s) have not been identified. In this study, we prepared protein extracts from shoot apices of plants around the floral transition, and detected a protein kinase activity that phosphorylates a threonine residue at position 282 of FD (FD T282), which is a crucial residue for the complex formation with FT via 14-3-3. The kinase activity was calcium-dependent. Subsequent biochemical, cellular, and genetic analyses showed that three calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) efficiently phosphorylate FD T282. Two of them (CPK6 and CPK33) are expressed in shoot apical meristem and directly interact with FD, suggesting they have redundant functions. The loss of function of one CDPK (CPK33) resulted in a weak but significant late-flowering phenotype. PMID:25661797

  11. Transmembrane heme delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Barry S.; Beck, David L.; Monika, Elizabeth M.; Kranz, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Heme proteins play pivotal roles in a wealth of biological processes. Despite this, the molecular mechanisms by which heme traverses bilayer membranes for use in biosynthetic reactions are unknown. The biosynthesis of c-type cytochromes requires that heme is transported to the bacterial periplasm or mitochondrial intermembrane space where it is covalently ligated to two reduced cysteinyl residues of the apocytochrome. Results herein suggest that a family of integral membrane proteins in prokaryotes, protozoans, and plants act as transmembrane heme delivery systems for the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes. The complete topology of a representative from each of the three subfamilies was experimentally determined. Key histidinyl residues and a conserved tryptophan-rich region (designated the WWD domain) are positioned at the site of cytochrome c assembly for all three subfamilies. These histidinyl residues were shown to be essential for function in one of the subfamilies, an ABC transporter encoded by helABCD. We believe that a directed heme delivery pathway is vital for the synthesis of cytochromes c, whereby heme iron is protected from oxidation via ligation to histidinyl residues within the delivery proteins. PMID:9560218

  12. Expression analysis of bZIP transcription factor encoding genes in response to water deficit stress in rice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Kishwar; Rai, R D; Tyagi, Aruna

    2016-05-01

    In plants, basic region/leucine zipper motif (bZIP) transcription factors regulate several developmental processes and activate genes in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Role of stress responsive bZIP transcription factors was studied in paddy in relation to different stages of development and water deficit stress (WDS) in a drought tolerant cultivar N22 and susceptible IR 64. Further, relative water content (RWC), membrane stability index (MSI) and abscisic acid (ABA) content were measured as indices of WDS at different stages of development and levels of stress. Expression of stress responsive bZIP transcription factors was directly correlated to developmental stage and WDS and indirectly to RWC, MSI and ABA content. PMID:27319052

  13. Disordered regions in transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Tusnády, Gábor E; Dobson, László; Tompa, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The functions of transmembrane proteins in living cells are widespread; they range from various transport processes to energy production, from cell-cell adhesion to communication. Structurally, they are highly ordered in their membrane-spanning regions, but may contain disordered regions in the cytosolic and extra-cytosolic parts. In this study, we have investigated the disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by a stringent definition of disordered residues on the currently available largest experimental dataset, and show a significant correlation between the spatial distributions of positively charged residues and disordered regions. This finding suggests a new role of disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by providing structural flexibility for stabilizing interactions with negatively charged head groups of the lipid molecules. We also find a preference of structural disorder in the terminal--as opposed to loop--regions in transmembrane proteins, and survey the respective functions involved in recruiting other proteins or mediating allosteric signaling effects. Finally, we critically compare disorder prediction methods on our transmembrane protein set. While there are no major differences between these methods using the usual statistics, such as per residue accuracies, Matthew's correlation coefficients, etc.; substantial differences can be found regarding the spatial distribution of the predicted disordered regions. We conclude that a predictor optimized for transmembrane proteins would be of high value to the field of structural disorder. PMID:26275590

  14. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  15. Coupling of folding and DNA-binding in the bZIP domains of Jun-Fos heterodimeric transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Seldeen, Kenneth L; McDonald, Caleb B; Deegan, Brian J; Farooq, Amjad

    2008-05-01

    In response to mitogenic stimuli, the heterodimeric transcription factor Jun-Fos binds to the promoters of a diverse array of genes involved in critical cellular responses such as cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle regulation, embryogenic development and cancer. In so doing, Jun-Fos heterodimer regulates gene expression central to physiology and pathology of the cell in a specific and timely manner. Here, using the technique of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we report detailed thermodynamics of the bZIP domains of Jun-Fos heterodimer to synthetic dsDNA oligos containing the TRE and CRE consensus promoter elements. Our data suggest that binding of the bZIP domains to both TRE and CRE is under enthalpic control and accompanied by entropic penalty at physiological temperatures. Although the bZIP domains bind to both TRE and CRE with very similar affinities, the enthalpic contributions to the free energy of binding to CRE are more favorable than TRE, while the entropic penalty to the free energy of binding to TRE is smaller than CRE. Despite such differences in their thermodynamic signatures, enthalpy and entropy of binding of the bZIP domains to both TRE and CRE are highly temperature-dependent and largely compensate each other resulting in negligible effect of temperature on the free energy of binding. From the plot of enthalpy change versus temperature, the magnitude of heat capacity change determined is much larger than that expected from the direct association of bZIP domains with DNA. This observation is interpreted to suggest that the basic regions in the bZIP domains are largely unstructured in the absence of DNA and only become structured upon interaction with DNA in a coupled folding and binding manner. Our new findings are rationalized in the context of 3D structural models of bZIP domains of Jun-Fos heterodimer in complex with dsDNA oligos containing the TRE and CRE consensus sequences. Taken together, our study demonstrates that enthalpy is

  16. Functional dissection of a small anaerobically induced bZIP transcription factor from tomato.

    PubMed

    Sell, Simone; Hehl, Reinhard

    2004-11-01

    A small anaerobically induced tomato transcription factor was isolated from a subtractive library. This factor, designated ABZ1 (anaerobic basic leucine zipper), is anaerobically induced in fruits, leaves and roots and encodes a nuclear localized protein. ABZ1 shares close structural and sequence homology with the S-family of small basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors that are implicated in stress response. Nuclear localization of ABZ1 is mediated by the basic region and occurs under normoxic conditions. ABZ1 binds to G-box-like target sites as a dimer. Binding can be abolished by heterodimerization with a truncated protein retaining the leucine zipper but lacking the DNA binding domain. The protein binds in a sequence specific manner to the CaMV 35S promoter which is down regulated when ABZ1 is coexpressed. This correlates with the anaerobic down regulation of the 35S promoter in tomato and tobacco. These results may suggest that small bZIP proteins are involved in the negative regulation of gene expression under anaerobic conditions. PMID:15560794

  17. The THERMOSENSITIVE MALE STERILE 1 Interacts with the BiPs via DnaJ Domain and Stimulates Their ATPase Enzyme Activities in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhao-Xia; Leng, Ya-Jun; Chen, Guang-Xia; Zhou, Peng-Min; Ye, De; Chen, Li-Qun

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TMS1 encodes a heat shock protein identical to the Hsp40 protein AtERdj3A and plays important roles in the thermotolerance of pollen tubes and other plant tissues. Despite its importance to plant growth and reproduction, little has been known about its mechanisms underlying thermotolerance of plants. In this study, the relationship between TMS1 and the Hsp70 proteins, Binding Immunoglobulin Proteins (BiPs) was explored to understand the molecular mechanisms of TMS1 in thermotolerance of plants. The expression of TMS1 was induced not only by heat shock, but also by dithiothreitol (DTT) and L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (AZC), similarly to the three BiP genes, indicating that TMS1 may be involved in unfolded protein response (UPR). The firefly luciferase complementary imaging (LCI), GST pull-down and ATPase enzyme activity assays demonstrated that the DnaJ domain of TMS1 could interact with BiP1 and BiP3, and could stimulate their ATPase enzyme activities. In addition, the expression level of TMS1 was reduced in the bzip28 bzip60 double mutant. These results suggest that TMS1 may function at the downstream of bZIP28 and bZIP60 and be involved in termotolerance of plants, possibly by participating in refolding or degradation of unfolded and misfolded proteins through interaction with the BiPs. PMID:26186593

  18. The THERMOSENSITIVE MALE STERILE 1 Interacts with the BiPs via DnaJ Domain and Stimulates Their ATPase Enzyme Activities in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhao-Xia; Leng, Ya-Jun; Chen, Guang-Xia; Zhou, Peng-Min; Ye, De; Chen, Li-Qun

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TMS1 encodes a heat shock protein identical to the Hsp40 protein AtERdj3A and plays important roles in the thermotolerance of pollen tubes and other plant tissues. Despite its importance to plant growth and reproduction, little has been known about its mechanisms underlying thermotolerance of plants. In this study, the relationship between TMS1 and the Hsp70 proteins, Binding Immunoglobulin Proteins (BiPs) was explored to understand the molecular mechanisms of TMS1 in thermotolerance of plants. The expression of TMS1 was induced not only by heat shock, but also by dithiothreitol (DTT) and L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (AZC), similarly to the three BiP genes, indicating that TMS1 may be involved in unfolded protein response (UPR). The firefly luciferase complementary imaging (LCI), GST pull-down and ATPase enzyme activity assays demonstrated that the DnaJ domain of TMS1 could interact with BiP1 and BiP3, and could stimulate their ATPase enzyme activities. In addition, the expression level of TMS1 was reduced in the bzip28 bzip60 double mutant. These results suggest that TMS1 may function at the downstream of bZIP28 and bZIP60 and be involved in termotolerance of plants, possibly by participating in refolding or degradation of unfolded and misfolded proteins through interaction with the BiPs. PMID:26186593

  19. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT). The conservation of both C/S1 bZIP interactions and SIRT remains poorly characterized in non-model species, leaving their evolutionary origin uncertain and limiting crop research. In this work, we explored recently published plant sequencing data to establish a detailed phylogeny of C and S1 bZIPs, investigating their intertwined role in plant evolution, and the origin of SIRT. Our analyses clarified C and S1 bZIP orthology relationships in angiosperms, and identified S1 sequences in gymnosperms. We experimentally showed that the gymnosperm orthologs are regulated by SIRT, tracing back the origin of this unique regulatory mechanism to the ancestor of seed plants. Additionally, we discovered an earlier S ortholog in the charophyte algae Klebsormidium flaccidum, together with a C ortholog. This suggests that C and S groups originated by duplication from a single algal proto-C/S ancestor. Based on our observations, we propose a model wherein the C/S1 bZIP dimer network evolved in seed plants from pre-existing C/S bZIP interactions. PMID:27457880

  20. Divergence of the bZIP Gene Family in Strawberry, Peach, and Apple Suggests Multiple Modes of Gene Evolution after Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Long; Zhong, Yan; Cheng, Zong-Ming; Xiong, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors are the most diverse members of dimerizing transcription factors. In the present study, 50, 116, and 47 bZIP genes were identified in Malus domestica (apple), Prunus persica (peach), and Fragaria vesca (strawberry), respectively. Species-specific duplication was the main contributor to the large number of bZIPs observed in apple. After WGD in apple genome, orthologous bZIP genes corresponding to strawberry on duplicated regions in apple genome were retained. However, in peach ancestor, these syntenic regions were quickly lost or deleted. Maybe the positive selection contributed to the expansion of clade S to adapt to the development and environment stresses. In addition, purifying selection was mainly responsible for bZIP sequence-specific DNA binding. The analysis of orthologous pairs between chromosomes indicates that these orthologs derived from one gene duplication located on one of the nine ancient chromosomes in the Rosaceae. The comparative analysis of bZIP genes in three species provides information on the evolutionary fate of bZIP genes in apple and peach after they diverged from strawberry. PMID:26770968

  1. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts.

    PubMed

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT). The conservation of both C/S1 bZIP interactions and SIRT remains poorly characterized in non-model species, leaving their evolutionary origin uncertain and limiting crop research. In this work, we explored recently published plant sequencing data to establish a detailed phylogeny of C and S1 bZIPs, investigating their intertwined role in plant evolution, and the origin of SIRT. Our analyses clarified C and S1 bZIP orthology relationships in angiosperms, and identified S1 sequences in gymnosperms. We experimentally showed that the gymnosperm orthologs are regulated by SIRT, tracing back the origin of this unique regulatory mechanism to the ancestor of seed plants. Additionally, we discovered an earlier S ortholog in the charophyte algae Klebsormidium flaccidum, together with a C ortholog. This suggests that C and S groups originated by duplication from a single algal proto-C/S ancestor. Based on our observations, we propose a model wherein the C/S1 bZIP dimer network evolved in seed plants from pre-existing C/S bZIP interactions. PMID:27457880

  2. Divergence of the bZIP Gene Family in Strawberry, Peach, and Apple Suggests Multiple Modes of Gene Evolution after Duplication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Long; Zhong, Yan; Cheng, Zong-Ming; Xiong, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors are the most diverse members of dimerizing transcription factors. In the present study, 50, 116, and 47 bZIP genes were identified in Malus domestica (apple), Prunus persica (peach), and Fragaria vesca (strawberry), respectively. Species-specific duplication was the main contributor to the large number of bZIPs observed in apple. After WGD in apple genome, orthologous bZIP genes corresponding to strawberry on duplicated regions in apple genome were retained. However, in peach ancestor, these syntenic regions were quickly lost or deleted. Maybe the positive selection contributed to the expansion of clade S to adapt to the development and environment stresses. In addition, purifying selection was mainly responsible for bZIP sequence-specific DNA binding. The analysis of orthologous pairs between chromosomes indicates that these orthologs derived from one gene duplication located on one of the nine ancient chromosomes in the Rosaceae. The comparative analysis of bZIP genes in three species provides information on the evolutionary fate of bZIP genes in apple and peach after they diverged from strawberry. PMID:26770968

  3. An Aspergillus nidulans bZIP response pathway hardwired for defensive secondary metabolism operates through aflR

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenbing; Amaike, Saori; Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Wang, Clay C.; Bok, JinWoo; Rohlfs, Marko; Keller, Nancy P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic bZIP transcription factors are critical players in organismal response to environmental challenges. In fungi, the production of secondary metabolites (SMs) is hypothesized as one of the responses to environmental insults, e.g. attack by fungivorous insects, yet little data to support this hypothesis exists. Here we establish a mechanism of bZIP regulation of SMs through RsmA, a recently discovered YAP-like bZIP protein. RsmA greatly increases SM production by binding to two sites in the A. nidulans AflR promoter region, a C6 transcription factor known for activating production of the carcinogenic and anti-predation SM, sterigmatocystin (ST). Deletion of aflR in an overexpression rsmA (OE::rsmA) background not only eliminates ST production but also significantly reduces asperthecin synthesis. Furthermore, the fungivore, Folsomia candida, exhibited a distinct preference for feeding on wild type rather than an OE::rsmA strain. RsmA may thus have a critical function in mediating direct chemical resistance against predation. Taken together, these results suggest RsmA represents a bZIP pathway hardwired for defensive SM production. PMID:22283524

  4. A novel strategy to produce sweeter tomato fruits with high sugar contents by fruit-specific expression of a single bZIP transcription factor gene.

    PubMed

    Sagor, G H M; Berberich, Thomas; Tanaka, Shun; Nishiyama, Manabu; Kanayama, Yoshinori; Kojima, Seiji; Muramoto, Koji; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2016-04-01

    Enhancement of sugar content and sweetness is desirable in some vegetables and in almost all fruits; however, biotechnological methods to increase sugar content are limited. Here, a completely novel methodological approach is presented that produces sweeter tomato fruits but does not have any negative effects on plant growth. Sucrose-induced repression of translation (SIRT), which is mediated by upstream open reading frames (uORFs), was initially reported in Arabidopsis AtbZIP11, a class S basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor gene. Here, two AtbZIP11 orthologous genes, SlbZIP1 and SlbZIP2, were identified in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). SlbZIP1 and SlbZIP2 contained four and three uORFs, respectively, in the cDNA 5'-leader regions. The second uORFs from the 5' cDNA end were conserved and involved in SIRT. Tomato plants were transformed with binary vectors in which only the main open reading frames (ORFs) of SlbZIP1 and SlbZIP2, without the SIRT-responsive uORFs, were placed under the control of the fruit-specific E8 promoter. Growth and morphology of the resulting transgenic tomato plants were comparable to those of wild-type plants. Transgenic fruits were approximately 1.5-fold higher in sugar content (sucrose/glucose/fructose) than nontransgenic tomato fruits. In addition, the levels of several amino acids, such as asparagine and glutamine, were higher in transgenic fruits than in wild-type fruits. This was expected because SlbZIP transactivates the asparagine synthase and proline dehydrogenase genes. This 'sweetening' technology is broadly applicable to other plants that utilize sucrose as a major translocation sugar. PMID:26402509

  5. bZIP Transcription Factors in the Oomycete Phytophthora infestans with Novel DNA-Binding Domains Are Involved in Defense against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Huerta, Apolonio I.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control development and stress responses in eukaryotes. To date, only one bZIP has been described in any oomycete; oomycetes are members of the stramenopile kingdom. In this study, we describe the identification of 38 bZIPs from the Phytophthora infestans genome. Half contain novel substitutions in the DNA-binding domain at a site that in other eukaryotes is reported to always be Asn. Interspecific comparisons indicated that the novel substitutions (usually Cys, but also Val and Tyr) arose after oomycetes diverged from other stramenopiles. About two-thirds of P. infestans bZIPs show dynamic changes in mRNA levels during the life cycle, with many of the genes being upregulated in sporangia, zoospores, or germinated zoospore cysts. One bZIP with the novel Cys substitution was shown to reside in the nucleus throughout growth and development. Using stable gene silencing, the functions of eight bZIPs with the Cys substitution were tested. All but one were found to play roles in protecting P. infestans from hydrogen peroxide-induced injury, and it is proposed that the novel Cys substitution serves as a redox sensor. A ninth bZIP lacking the novel Asn-to-Cys substitution, but having Cys nearby, was also shown through silencing to contribute to defense against peroxide. Little effect on asexual development, plant pathogenesis, or resistance to osmotic stress was observed in transformants silenced for any of the nine bZIPs. PMID:23975888

  6. A SAL1 Loss-of-Function Arabidopsis Mutant Exhibits Enhanced Cadmium Tolerance in Association with Alleviation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Xi, Hongmei; Xu, Hua; Xu, Wenxiu; He, Zhenyan; Xu, Wenzhong; Ma, Mi

    2016-06-01

    SAL1, as a negative regulator of stress response signaling, has been studied extensively for its role in plant response to environmental stresses. However, the role of SAL1 in cadmium (Cd) stress response and the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using an Arabidopsis thaliana loss-of-function mutant of SAL1, we assessed Cd resistance and further explored the Cd toxicity mechanism through analysis of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. The loss of SAL1 function greatly improved Cd tolerance and significantly attenuated ER stress in Arabidopsis. Exposure to Cd induced an ER stress response in Arabidopsis as evidenced by unconventional splicing of AtbZIP60 and up-regulation of ER stress-responsive genes. Damage caused by Cd was markedly reduced in the ER stress response double mutant bzip28 bzip60 or by application of the ER stress-alleviating chemical agents, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) and 4-phenyl butyric acid (4-PBA), in wild-type plants. The Cd-induced ER stress in Arabidopsis was also alleviated by loss of function of SAL1. These results identified SAL1 as a new component mediating Cd toxicity and established the role of the ER stress response in Cd toxicity. Additionally, the attenuated ER stress in the sal1 mutant might also shed new light on the mechanism of diverse abiotic stress resistance in the SAL1 loss-of-function mutants. PMID:27044671

  7. Molecular cloning of a putative novel human bZIP transcription factor on chromosome 17q22

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, L.; Johnsen, O.; Skartlien, A.H.

    1994-08-01

    We have cloned and characterized cDNA clones representing several mRNA isoforms generated by alternative splicing of a single gene localized to chromosome 17q22. Sequence analysis showed that the predicted translational product of the longest open reading frame (2316 nucleotides, 772 amino acids) is related to transcription factors of the basic elucine zipper (bZIP) class. The sequence contained several regions characteristic of transcriptional regulatory domains. A cluster of amino acids flanking the bZIP region on both sides was highly conserved between TCF11 and p45 NF-E2, a subunit of the human globin locus control region-binding protein, NF-E2. These same regions showed remarkable homology to two invertebrate proteins, CNC and skn-1, postulated to regulate embryonic development in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, respectively. 46 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Divergence and Conservation of the Major UPR Branch IRE1-bZIP Signaling Pathway across Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingrui; Zhang, Changwei; Wang, Aiming

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is crucial to life by regulating the cellular response to the stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) imposed by abiotic and biotic cues such as heat shock and viral infection. The inositol requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) signaling pathway activated by the IRE1-mediated unconventional splicing of HAC1 in yeast, bZIP60 in plants and XBP1 in metazoans, is the most ancient branch of the UPR. In this study, we systematically examined yeast IRE1p-HAC1, plant IRE1A/IRE1B-bZIP60 and human hIRE1-XBP1 pairs. We found that, unlike bZIP60, XBP1 is unable to functionally swap HAC1p in yeast, and that the inter-species heterotypic interactions among HAC1p, bZIP60 and XBP1 are not permitted. These data demonstrate evolutionary divergence of the downstream signaling of IRE1-bZIP. We also discovered that the dual cytosolic domains of plant IRE1s act in vivo in a mechanism consistent with IRE1p and hIRE1, and that plant IRE1B not only interacts with IRE1p but also forms typical IRE1 dynamic foci in yeast. Thus, the upstream components of the IRE1 signaling branch including IRE1 activation and action mechanisms are highly conserved. Taken together these data advance the molecular understanding of evolutionary divergence and conservation of the IRE1 signaling pathway across kingdoms. PMID:27256815

  9. DNA binding of Jun and Fos bZip domains: homodimers and heterodimers induce a DNA conformational change in solution.

    PubMed Central

    John, M; Leppik, R; Busch, S J; Granger-Schnarr, M; Schnarr, M

    1996-01-01

    We constructed plasmids encoding the sequences for the bZip modules of c-Jun and c-Fos which could then be expressed as soluble proteins in Escherichia coli. The purified bZip modules were tested for their binding capacities of synthetic oligonucleotides containing either TRE or CRE recognition sites in electrophoretic mobility shift assays and circular dichroism (CD). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that bZip Jun homodimers and bZip Jun/Fos heterodimers bind a collagenase-like TRE (CTGACTCAT) with dissociation constants of respectively 1.4 x 10(-7) M and 5 x 10(-8) M. As reported earlier [Patel et al. (1990) Nature 347, 572-575], DNA binding induces a marked change of the protein structure. However, we found that the DNA also undergoes a conformational change. This is most clearly seen with small oligonucleotides of 13 or 14 bp harboring respectively a TRE (TGACTCA) or a CRE (TGACGTCA) sequence. In this case, the positive DNA CD signal at 280 nm increases almost two-fold with a concomitant blue-shift of 3-4 nm. Within experimental error the same spectral changes are observed for TRE and CRE containing DNA fragments. The spectral changes observed with a non-specific DNA fragment are weaker and the signal of free DNA is recovered upon addition of much smaller salt concentrations than required for a specific DNA fragment. Surprisingly the spectral changes induced by Jun/Jun homodimers are not identical to those induced by Jun/Fos heterodimers. However, in both cases the increase of the positive CD band and the concomitant blue shift would be compatible with a B to A-transition of part of the binding site or a DNA conformation intermediate between the canonical A and B structures. PMID:8948639

  10. Divergence and Conservation of the Major UPR Branch IRE1-bZIP Signaling Pathway across Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingrui; Zhang, Changwei; Wang, Aiming

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is crucial to life by regulating the cellular response to the stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) imposed by abiotic and biotic cues such as heat shock and viral infection. The inositol requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) signaling pathway activated by the IRE1-mediated unconventional splicing of HAC1 in yeast, bZIP60 in plants and XBP1 in metazoans, is the most ancient branch of the UPR. In this study, we systematically examined yeast IRE1p-HAC1, plant IRE1A/IRE1B-bZIP60 and human hIRE1-XBP1 pairs. We found that, unlike bZIP60, XBP1 is unable to functionally swap HAC1p in yeast, and that the inter-species heterotypic interactions among HAC1p, bZIP60 and XBP1 are not permitted. These data demonstrate evolutionary divergence of the downstream signaling of IRE1-bZIP. We also discovered that the dual cytosolic domains of plant IRE1s act in vivo in a mechanism consistent with IRE1p and hIRE1, and that plant IRE1B not only interacts with IRE1p but also forms typical IRE1 dynamic foci in yeast. Thus, the upstream components of the IRE1 signaling branch including IRE1 activation and action mechanisms are highly conserved. Taken together these data advance the molecular understanding of evolutionary divergence and conservation of the IRE1 signaling pathway across kingdoms. PMID:27256815

  11. Genomic identification of group A bZIP transcription factors and their responses to abiotic stress in carrot.

    PubMed

    Que, F; Wang, G L; Huang, Y; Xu, Z S; Wang, F; Xiong, A S

    2015-01-01

    The basic-region/leucine-zipper (bZIP) family is one of the major transcription factor (TF) families associated with responses to abiotic stresses. Many members of group A in this family have been extensively examined and are reported to perform significant functions in ABA signaling as well as in responses to abiotic stresses. In this study, 10 bZIP factors in carrot were classified into group A based on their DNA-binding domains. The cis-acting regulatory elements and folding states of these 10 factors were analyzed. Evolutionary analysis of the group A members suggested their importance during the course of evolution in plants. In addition, cis-acting elements and the folding state of proteins were important for DNA binding and could affect gene expression. Quantitative RT-PCR was conducted to investigate the stress response of 10 genes encoding the group A factors. Six genes showed responses to abiotic stresses, while four genes showed other special phenomenon. The current analysis on group A bZIP family TFs in carrot is the first to investigate the TFs of Apiaceae via genome analysis. These results provide new information for future studies on carrot. PMID:26535641

  12. Genome-wide characterization and analysis of bZIP transcription factor gene family related to abiotic stress in cassava.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Yang, Hubiao; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Zuo, Jiao; Peng, Ming; Li, Kaimian

    2016-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor family plays crucial roles in various aspects of biological processes. Currently, no information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important tropical crop cassava. Herein, 77 bZIP genes were identified from cassava. Evolutionary analysis indicated that MebZIPs could be divided into 10 subfamilies, which was further supported by conserved motif and gene structure analyses. Global expression analysis suggested that MebZIPs showed similar or distinct expression patterns in different tissues between cultivated variety and wild subspecies. Transcriptome analysis of three cassava genotypes revealed that many MebZIP genes were activated by drought in the root of W14 subspecies, indicating the involvement of these genes in the strong resistance of cassava to drought. Expression analysis of selected MebZIP genes in response to osmotic, salt, cold, ABA, and H2O2 suggested that they might participate in distinct signaling pathways. Our systematic analysis of MebZIPs reveals constitutive, tissue-specific and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MebZIP genes for further functional characterization in planta, yields new insights into transcriptional regulation of MebZIP genes, and lays a foundation for understanding of bZIP-mediated abiotic stress response. PMID:26947924

  13. Genome-wide characterization and analysis of bZIP transcription factor gene family related to abiotic stress in cassava

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Yang, Hubiao; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Zuo, Jiao; Peng, Ming; Li, Kaimian

    2016-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor family plays crucial roles in various aspects of biological processes. Currently, no information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important tropical crop cassava. Herein, 77 bZIP genes were identified from cassava. Evolutionary analysis indicated that MebZIPs could be divided into 10 subfamilies, which was further supported by conserved motif and gene structure analyses. Global expression analysis suggested that MebZIPs showed similar or distinct expression patterns in different tissues between cultivated variety and wild subspecies. Transcriptome analysis of three cassava genotypes revealed that many MebZIP genes were activated by drought in the root of W14 subspecies, indicating the involvement of these genes in the strong resistance of cassava to drought. Expression analysis of selected MebZIP genes in response to osmotic, salt, cold, ABA, and H2O2 suggested that they might participate in distinct signaling pathways. Our systematic analysis of MebZIPs reveals constitutive, tissue-specific and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MebZIP genes for further functional characterization in planta, yields new insights into transcriptional regulation of MebZIP genes, and lays a foundation for understanding of bZIP-mediated abiotic stress response. PMID:26947924

  14. Nucleolar and nuclear localization properties of a herpesvirus bZIP oncoprotein, MEQ.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J L; Lee, L F; Ye, Y; Qian, Z; Kung, H J

    1997-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is one of the most oncogenic herpesviruses and induces T lymphomas in chickens within weeks after infection. Only a limited number of viral transcripts are detected in MDV tumor samples and cell lines. One of the major transcripts encodes MEQ, a 339-amino-acid bZIP protein which is homologous to the Jun/Fos family of transcription factors. The C-terminal half of MEQ contains proline-rich repeats and, when fused to the DNA-binding domain of a yeast transcription factor, Gal4 (residues 1 to 147), exhibits transactivation function. MEQ can dimerize with itself and with c-Jun. The MEQ-c-Jun heterodimers bind to an AP-1-like enhancer within the MEQ promoter region with greater affinity than do homodimers of either protein, and they transactivate MEQ expression. Here we show that MEQ is expressed in the nucleus but, interestingly, with a predominant fraction in the nucleoli and coiled bodies. This makes MEQ the first bZIP protein to be identified in the nucleoli. MEQ contains two stretches of basic residues, designated basic region 1 (BR1) and basic region 2 (BR2). Using a series of deletion mutants, we have mapped the primary nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the sole nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) to the BR2 region. BR1 was shown to provide an auxiliary signal in nuclear translocation. To demonstrate that BR2 is an authentic NoLS, BR2 was fused to cytoplasmic v-Raf (delta gag) kinase. The BR2-Raf fusion protein was observed to migrate into the nucleoplasm and the nucleolus. The BR2 region can be further divided into two long arginine-lysine stretches, BR2N and BR2C, which are separated by the five amino acids Asn-Arg-Asp-Ala-Ala (NRDAA). We provide evidence that the requirement for nuclear translocation is less stringent than that for nucleolar translocation, as either BR2N or BR2C alone is sufficient to translocate the cytoplasmic v-Raf (delta gag) into the nucleus, but only in combination can they translocate v-Raf (delta gag

  15. Stomatal Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pillitteri, Lynn Jo; Dong, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Stomata consist of two guard cells that function as turgor-operated valves that regulate gas exchange in plants. In Arabidopsis, a dedicated cell lineage is initiated and undergoes a series of cell divisions and cell-state transitions to produce a stoma. A set of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulates the transition and differentiation events through the lineage, while the placement of stomata relative to each other is controlled by intercellular signaling via peptide ligands, transmembrane receptors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) modules. Some genes involved in regulating stomatal differentiation or density are also involved in hormonal and environmental stress responses, which may provide a link between modulation of stomatal development or function in response to changes in the environment. Premitotic polarlylocalized proteins provide an added layer of regulation, which can be addressed more thoroughly with the identification of additional proteins in this pathway. Linking the networks that control stomatal development promises to bring advances to our understanding of signal transduction, cell polarity, and cell-fate specification in plants. PMID:23864836

  16. The bZIP Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA: A Multifunctional Hub for Meristem Control

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Annette T.; Stehling-Sun, Sandra; Offenburger, Sarah-Lena; Lohmann, Jan U.

    2011-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to extreme variations in environmental conditions over the course of their lives. Since plants grow and initiate new organs continuously, they have to modulate the underlying developmental program accordingly to cope with this challenge. At the heart of this extraordinary developmental plasticity are pluripotent stem cells, which are maintained during the entire life-cycle of the plant and that are embedded within dynamic stem cell niches. While the complex regulatory principles of plant stem cell control under artificial constant growth conditions begin to emerge, virtually nothing is known about how this circuit adapts to variations in the environment. In addition to the local feedback system constituted by the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) and the CLAVATA signaling cascade in the center of the shoot apical meristem (SAM), the bZIP transcription factor PERIANTHIA (PAN) not only has a broader expression domain in SAM and flowers, but also carries out more diverse functions in meristem maintenance: pan mutants show alterations in environmental response, shoot meristem size, floral organ number, and exhibit severe defects in termination of floral stem cells in an environment dependent fashion. Genetic and genomic analyses indicate that PAN interacts with a plethora of developmental pathways including light, plant hormone, and meristem control systems, suggesting that PAN is as an important regulatory node in the network of plant stem cell control. PMID:22645551

  17. An Autonomously Reciprocating Transmembrane Nanoactuator.

    PubMed

    Watson, Matthew A; Cockroft, Scott L

    2016-01-22

    Biological molecular machines operate far from equilibrium by coupling chemical potential to repeated cycles of dissipative nanomechanical motion. This principle has been exploited in supramolecular systems that exhibit true machine behavior in solution and on surfaces. However, designed membrane-spanning assemblies developed to date have been limited to simple switches or stochastic shuttles, and true machine behavior has remained elusive. Herein, we present a transmembrane nanoactuator that turns over chemical fuel to drive autonomous reciprocating (back-and-forth) nanomechanical motion. Ratcheted reciprocating motion of a DNA/PEG copolymer threaded through a single α-hemolysin pore was induced by a combination of DNA strand displacement processes and enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Ion-current recordings revealed saw-tooth patterns, indicating that the assemblies operated in autonomous, asymmetric cycles of conformational change at rates of up to one cycle per minute. PMID:26661295

  18. Functional analysis of a light-responsive plant bZIP transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Feldbrügge, M; Sprenger, M; Dinkelbach, M; Yazaki, K; Harter, K; Weisshaar, B

    1994-01-01

    Common plant regulatory factor 1 (CPRF1) is a parsley basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor that recognizes specific nucleotide sequences containing ACGT cores. Such a sequence is contained within LRU1, the composite light regulatory unit that is necessary and sufficient for light-dependent activity of the parsley chalcone synthase (CHS) promoter. After light treatment of both etiolated and green seedlings, CPRF1 mRNA levels increased prior to CHS mRNA accumulation. The change in CPRF1 mRNA leads to a light-responsive increase in CPRF1 protein. Transient expression analysis in parsley protoplasts using the CPRF1 promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) open reading frame indicated that light-dependent CPRF1 mRNA accumulation was under transcriptional control. The 5' untranslated region of the CPRF1 gene includes a cis-acting nucleotide sequence that contains two ACGT elements at a distance of 12 bp between their palindromic centers. This feature is reminiscent of as-1 and octopine synthase (ocs) elements identified in promoters from plant pathogens. This double ACGT Element element, designated dACECPRF1, stimulated transcription when placed 5' to a heterologous core promoter. CPRF1 bound to dACECPRF1 DNA as well as to the ACGT element from the CHS promoter in vitro. Cotransfection experiments demonstrated that CPRF1 interacts with these elements in vivo and that overexpression of CPRF1 actually reduced light-dependent transcription from the CHS promoter. CPRF1 thus appears to contribute to the regulation of the CPRF1 gene and to interfere with the activities of light-regulated promoters. PMID:7827494

  19. Cooperative Transmembrane Penetration of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haizhen; Ji, Qiuju; Huang, Changjin; Zhang, Sulin; Yuan, Bing; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Physical penetration of lipid bilayer membranes presents an alternative pathway for cellular delivery of nanoparticles (NPs) besides endocytosis. NPs delivered through this pathway could reach the cytoplasm, thereby opening the possibility of organelle-specific targeting. Herein we perform dissipative particle dynamics simulations to elucidate the transmembrane penetration mechanisms of multiple NPs. Our simulations demonstrate that NPs’ translocation proceeds in a cooperative manner, where the interplay of the quantity and surface chemistry of the NPs regulates the translocation efficiency. For NPs with hydrophilic surfaces, the increase of particle quantity facilitates penetration, while for NPs with partly or totally hydrophobic surfaces, the opposite highly possibly holds. Moreover, a set of interesting cooperative ways, such as aggregation, aggregation-dispersion, and aggregation-dispersion-reaggregation of the NPs, are observed during the penetration process. We find that the penetration behaviors of multiple NPs are mostly dominated by the changes of the NP-membrane force components in the membrane plane direction, in addition to that in the penetration direction, suggesting a different interaction mechanism between the multiple NPs and the membrane compared with the one-NP case. These results provide a fundamental understanding in the underlying mechanisms of cooperative penetration of NPs, and shed light on the NP-based drug and gene delivery. PMID:26013284

  20. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of bZIP Transcription Factors in Brassica oleracea under Cold Stress.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Indeok; Manoharan, Ranjith Kumar; Kang, Jong-Goo; Chung, Mi-Young; Kim, Young-Wook; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Cabbages (Brassica oleracea L.) are an important vegetable crop around world, and cold temperature is among the most significant abiotic stresses causing agricultural losses, especially in cabbage crops. Plant bZIP transcription factors play diverse roles in biotic/abiotic stress responses. In this study, 119 putative BolbZIP transcription factors were identified using amino acid sequences from several bZIP domain consensus sequences. The BolbZIP members were classified into 63 categories based on amino acid sequence similarity and were also compared with BrbZIP and AtbZIP transcription factors. Based on this BolbZIP identification and classification, cold stress-responsive BolbZIP genes were screened in inbred lines, BN106 and BN107, using RNA sequencing data and qRT-PCR. The expression level of the 3 genes, Bol008071, Bol033132, and Bol042729, was significantly increased in BN107 under cold conditions and was unchanged in BN106. The upregulation of these genes in BN107, a cold-susceptible inbred line, suggests that they might be significant components in the cold response. Among three identified genes, Bol033132 has 97% sequence similarity to Bra020735, which was identified in a screen for cold-related genes in B. rapa and a protein containing N-rich regions in LCRs. The results obtained in this study provide valuable information for understanding the potential function of BolbZIP transcription factors in cold stress responses. PMID:27314020

  1. Genomic surveys and expression analysis of bZIP gene family in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhengwei; Xu, Wei; Liu, Aizhong

    2014-02-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors comprise a family of transcriptional regulators present extensively in plants, involved in regulating diverse biological processes such as flower and vascular development, seed maturation, stress signaling and pathogen defense. Castor bean (Ricinus communis L. Euphorbiaceae) is one of the most important non-edible oilseed crops and its seed oil is broadly used for industrial applications. We performed a comprehensive genome-wide identification and analysis of the bZIP transcription factors that exist in the castor bean genome in this study. In total, 49 RcbZIP transcription factors were identified, characterized and categorized into 11 groups (I-XI) based on their gene structure, DNA-binding sites, conserved motifs, and phylogenetic relationships. The dimerization properties of 49 RcbZIP proteins were predicted on the basis of the characteristic features in the leucine zipper. Global expression profiles of 49 RcbZIP genes among different tissues were examined using high-throughput sequencing of digital gene expression profiles, and resulted in diverse expression patterns that may provide basic information to further reveal the function of the 49 RcbZIP genes in castor bean. The results obtained from this study would provide valuable information in understanding the molecular basis of the RcbZIP transcription factor family and their potential function in regulating the growth and development, particularly in seed filling of castor bean. PMID:24165825

  2. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of bZIP Transcription Factors in Brassica oleracea under Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Indeok; Manoharan, Ranjith Kumar; Kang, Jong-Goo; Chung, Mi-Young; Kim, Young-Wook; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Cabbages (Brassica oleracea L.) are an important vegetable crop around world, and cold temperature is among the most significant abiotic stresses causing agricultural losses, especially in cabbage crops. Plant bZIP transcription factors play diverse roles in biotic/abiotic stress responses. In this study, 119 putative BolbZIP transcription factors were identified using amino acid sequences from several bZIP domain consensus sequences. The BolbZIP members were classified into 63 categories based on amino acid sequence similarity and were also compared with BrbZIP and AtbZIP transcription factors. Based on this BolbZIP identification and classification, cold stress-responsive BolbZIP genes were screened in inbred lines, BN106 and BN107, using RNA sequencing data and qRT-PCR. The expression level of the 3 genes, Bol008071, Bol033132, and Bol042729, was significantly increased in BN107 under cold conditions and was unchanged in BN106. The upregulation of these genes in BN107, a cold-susceptible inbred line, suggests that they might be significant components in the cold response. Among three identified genes, Bol033132 has 97% sequence similarity to Bra020735, which was identified in a screen for cold-related genes in B. rapa and a protein containing N-rich regions in LCRs. The results obtained in this study provide valuable information for understanding the potential function of BolbZIP transcription factors in cold stress responses. PMID:27314020

  3. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen S.; Steinle, Erich D.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Dawson, David C.

    1999-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl channel exhibits lyotropic anion selectivity. Anions that are more readily dehydrated than Cl exhibit permeability ratios (PS/PCl) greater than unity and also bind more tightly in the channel. We compared the selectivity of CFTR to that of a synthetic anion-selective membrane [poly(vinyl chloride)–tridodecylmethylammonium chloride; PVC-TDMAC] for which the nature of the physical process that governs the anion-selective response is more readily apparent. The permeability and binding selectivity patterns of CFTR differed only by a multiplicative constant from that of the PVC-TDMAC membrane; and a continuum electrostatic model suggested that both patterns could be understood in terms of the differences in the relative stabilization of anions by water and the polarizable interior of the channel or synthetic membrane. The calculated energies of anion–channel interaction, derived from measurements of either permeability or binding, varied as a linear function of inverse ionic radius (1/r), as expected from a Born-type model of ion charging in a medium characterized by an effective dielectric constant of 19. The model predicts that large anions, like SCN, although they experience weaker interactions (relative to Cl) with water and also with the channel, are more permeant than Cl because anion–water energy is a steeper function of 1/r than is the anion–channel energy. These large anions also bind more tightly for the same reason: the reduced energy of hydration allows the net transfer energy (the well depth) to be more negative. This simple selectivity mechanism that governs permeability and binding acts to optimize the function of CFTR as a Cl filter. Anions that are smaller (more difficult to dehydrate) than Cl are energetically retarded from entering the channel, while the larger (more readily dehydrated) anions are retarded in their passage by “sticking” within the channel. PMID:10578016

  4. Spatial organization of transmembrane receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Bethani, Ioanna; Skånland, Sigrid S; Dikic, Ivan; Acker-Palmer, Amparo

    2010-01-01

    The spatial organization of transmembrane receptors is a critical step in signal transduction and receptor trafficking in cells. Transmembrane receptors engage in lateral homotypic and heterotypic cis-interactions as well as intercellular trans-interactions that result in the formation of signalling foci for the initiation of different signalling networks. Several aspects of ligand-induced receptor clustering and association with signalling proteins are also influenced by the lipid composition of membranes. Thus, lipid microdomains have a function in tuning the activity of many transmembrane receptors by positively or negatively affecting receptor clustering and signal transduction. We review the current knowledge about the functions of clustering of transmembrane receptors and lipid–protein interactions important for the spatial organization of signalling at the membrane. PMID:20717138

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress triggers ROS signalling, changes the redox state, and regulates the antioxidant defence of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Turkan, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Inefficient chaperone activity in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes accumulation of unfolded proteins and is called ER stress, which triggers the unfolded protein response. For proper oxidative protein folding, reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 are produced in the ER. Although the role of ROS during abiotic stresses such as salinity is well documented, the role of ER-related ROS production and its signalling is not yet known. Moreover, how H2O2 production, redox regulation, and antioxidant defence are affected in salt-treated plants when ER protein-folding machinery is impaired needs to be elucidated. For this aim, changes in NADPH-oxidase-dependent ROS signalling and H2O2 content at sequential time intervals and after 48h of ER stress, induced by tunicamycin (Tm), salinity, and their combination were determined in Arabidopsis thaliana. The main root growth was inhibited by ER stress, while low levels of Tm caused an increase in lateral root density. Salt stress and Tm induced the expression of ER-stress-related genes (bZIP17, bZIP28, bZIP60, TIN1, BiP1, BiP3) and ERO1. Tm induced expression of RBOHD and RBOHF, which led to an early increase in H2O2 and triggered ROS signalling. This study is the first report that ER stress induces the antioxidant system and the Asada–Halliwell pathway of A. thaliana in a similar way to salinity. ER stress caused oxidative damage, as evident by increased H2O2 accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation. As a result, this study shows that ER stress triggers ROS signalling, changes the redox state, and regulates the antioxidant defence of A. thaliana. PMID:24558072

  6. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  7. Transmembrane START domain proteins: in silico identification, characterization and expression analysis under stress conditions in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Satheesh, Viswanathan; Chidambaranathan, Parameswaran; Jagannadham, Prasanth Tejkumar; Kumar, Vajinder; Jain, Pradeep K.; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Bhat, Shripad R.; Srinivasan, R.

    2016-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory related transfer (StART) proteins that are involved in transport of lipid molecules, play a myriad of functions in insects, mammals and plants. These proteins consist of a modular START domain of approximately 200 amino acids which binds and transfers the lipids. In the present study we have performed a genome-wide search for all START domain proteins in chickpea. The search identified 36 chickpea genes belonging to the START domain family. Through a phylogenetic tree reconstructed with Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and soybean START proteins, we were able to identify four transmembrane START (TM-START) proteins in chickpea. These four proteins are homologous to the highly conserved mammalian phosphatidylcholine transfer proteins. Multiple sequence alignment of all the transmembrane containing START proteins from Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and soybean revealed that the amino acid residues to which phosphatidylcholine binds in mammals, is also conserved in all these plant species, implying an important functional role and a very similar mode of action of all these proteins across dicots and monocots. This study characterizes a few of the not so well studied transmembrane START superfamily genes that may be involved in stress signaling. Expression analysis in various tissues showed that these genes are predominantly expressed in flowers and roots of chickpea. Three of the chickpea TM-START genes showed induced expression in response to drought, salt, wound and heat stress, suggesting their role in stress response. PMID:26445326

  8. Transmembrane START domain proteins: in silico identification, characterization and expression analysis under stress conditions in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Satheesh, Viswanathan; Chidambaranathan, Parameswaran; Jagannadham, Prasanth Tejkumar; Kumar, Vajinder; Jain, Pradeep K; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Bhat, Shripad R; Srinivasan, R

    2016-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory related transfer (StART) proteins that are involved in transport of lipid molecules, play a myriad of functions in insects, mammals and plants. These proteins consist of a modular START domain of approximately 200 amino acids which binds and transfers the lipids. In the present study we have performed a genome-wide search for all START domain proteins in chickpea. The search identified 36 chickpea genes belonging to the START domain family. Through a phylogenetic tree reconstructed with Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and soybean START proteins, we were able to identify four transmembrane START (TM-START) proteins in chickpea. These four proteins are homologous to the highly conserved mammalian phosphatidylcholine transfer proteins. Multiple sequence alignment of all the transmembrane containing START proteins from Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and soybean revealed that the amino acid residues to which phosphatidylcholine binds in mammals, is also conserved in all these plant species, implying an important functional role and a very similar mode of action of all these proteins across dicots and monocots. This study characterizes a few of the not so well studied transmembrane START superfamily genes that may be involved in stress signaling. Expression analysis in various tissues showed that these genes are predominantly expressed in flowers and roots of chickpea. Three of the chickpea TM-START genes showed induced expression in response to drought, salt, wound and heat stress, suggesting their role in stress response. PMID:26445326

  9. Phenylene vinylene macrocycles as artificial transmembrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyu; Yu, Chao; D Okochi, Kenji; Jin, Yinghua; Liu, Zhenning; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-30

    A series of rigid phenylene vinylene macrocycles and phenylene ethynylene macrocycles with various substituents have been investigated as transmembrane ion channels. The length and polarity of the substituents have a significant effect on the ion channel formation and the mass transport efficiency. Macrocycles with strong aggregation facilitate ion passage across lipid bilayers. PMID:27048875

  10. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes

    PubMed Central

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A.

    2011-01-01

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation. PMID:21825128

  11. The bZIP transcription factor PfZipA regulates secondary metabolism and oxidative stress response in the plant endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis fici.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuna; Wu, Fan; Liu, Ling; Liu, Xingzhong; Che, Yongsheng; Keller, Nancy P; Guo, Liyun; Yin, Wen-Bing

    2015-08-01

    The bZIP transcription factors are conserved in all eukaryotes and play critical roles in organismal responses to environmental challenges. In filamentous fungi, several lines of evidence indicate that secondary metabolism (SM) is associated with oxidative stress mediated by bZIP proteins. Here we uncover a connection with a bZIP protein and oxidative stress induction of SM in the plant endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis fici. A homology search of the P. fici genome with the bZIP protein RsmA, involved in SM and the oxidative stress response in Aspergillus nidulans, identified PfZipA. Deletion of PfzipA resulted in a strain that displayed resistant to the oxidative reagents tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBOOH), diamide, and menadione sodium bisulfite (MSB), but increased sensitivity to H2O2 as compared to wild type (WT). Secondary metabolite production presented a complex pattern dependent on PfzipA and oxidative reagents. Without oxidative treatment, the ΔPfzipA strain produced less isosulochrin and ficipyroneA than WT; addition of tBOOH further decreased production of iso-A82775C and pestaloficiol M in ΔPfzipA; diamide treatment resulted in equivalent production of isosulochrin and ficipyroneA in the two strains; MSB treatment further decreased production of RES1214-1 and iso-A82775C but increased pestaloficiol M production in the mutant; and H2O2 treatment resulted in enhanced production of isosulochrin, RES1214-1 and pestheic acid but decreased ficipyroneA and pestaloficiol M in ΔPfzipA compared to WT. Our results suggest that PfZipA regulation of SM is modified by oxidative stress pathways and provide insights into a possible role of PfZipA in mediating SM synthesis in the endophytic lifestyle of P. fici. PMID:25847004

  12. The vrille gene of Drosophila is a maternal enhancer of decapentaplegic and encodes a new member of the bZIP family of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    George, H; Terracol, R

    1997-08-01

    We report here the genetical and molecular characterization of a new Drosophila zygotic lethal locus, vrille (vri). Vri alleles act not only as dominant maternal enhancers of embryonic dorsoventral patterning defects caused by easter and decapentaplegic (dpp) mutations, but also as dominant zygotic enhancers of dpp alleles for phenotypes in wing. The vri gene encodes a new member of the bZIP family of transcription factors closely related to gene 9 of Xenopus laevis, induced by thyroid hormone during the tadpole tail resorption program, and NF-IL3A, a human T cell transcription factor that transactivates the interleukin-3 promoter. NF-IL3A shares 93% similarity and 60% identity with Vri for a stretch of 68 amino acids that includes the bZIP domain. Although all the alleles tested behave like antimorphs, the dominant enhancement is also seen with a nonsense mutation allele that prevents translation of the bZIP domain. Because of the strong domainant enhancement of dpp phenotypes by vri alleles in both embryo and wing, and also the similarity between the wing vein phenotypes caused by the vri and shortvein dpp alleles, we postulate that vri interacts either directly or indirectly with certain components of the dpp (a TGF beta homologue) signal transduction pathway. PMID:9258679

  13. The bZIP repressor proteins, c-Jun dimerization protein 2 and activating transcription factor 3, recruit multiple HDAC members to the ATF3 promoter.

    PubMed

    Darlyuk-Saadon, Ilona; Weidenfeld-Baranboim, Keren; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Hai, Tsonwin; Aronheim, Ami

    2012-01-01

    JDP2, is a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) protein displaying a high degree of homology with the stress inducible transcription factor, ATF3. Both proteins bind to cAMP and TPA response elements and repress transcription by multiple mechanisms. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a key role in gene inactivation by deacetylating lysine residues on histones. Here we describe the association of JDP2 and ATF3 with HDACs 1, 2-6 and 10. Association of HDAC3 and HDAC6 with JDP2 and ATF3 occurs via direct protein-protein interactions. Only part of the N-terminal bZIP motif of JDP2 and ATF3 basic domain is necessary and sufficient for the interaction with HDACs in a manner that is independent of coiled-coil dimerization. Class I HDACs associate with the bZIP repressors via the DAC conserved domain whereas the Class IIb HDAC6 associates through its C-terminal unique binder of ubiquitin Zn finger domain. Both JDP2 and ATF3 are known to bind and repress the ATF3 promoter. MEF cells treated with histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA) display enhanced ATF3 transcription. ATF3 enhanced transcription is significantly reduced in MEF cells lacking both ATF3 and JDP2. Collectively, we propose that the recruitment of multiple HDAC members to JDP2 and ATF3 is part of their transcription repression mechanism. PMID:22989952

  14. A light-regulated bZIP module, photozipper, induces the binding of fused proteins to the target DNA sequence in a blue light-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Osamu; Furuya, Keigo

    2015-11-01

    Aureochrome-1 (AUREO1) has been identified as a blue light (BL) receptor responsible for the BL-induced blanching of a stramenopile alga, Vaucheria frigida. BL induces the dimerization of monomeric AUREO1, which subsequently increases its affinity for the target sequence. We made a synthetic gene encoding N-terminally truncated monomeric AUREO1 (Photozipper protein) containing a basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) domain and a light-oxygen-voltage-sensing domain. In the present study, yellow fluorescent protein or mCherry protein was fused with the Photozipper (PZ) protein, and their oligomeric structures and DNA-binding were compared in the dark and light states. Dynamic light scattering and size exclusion chromatography demonstrated that the hydrodynamic radii and molecular masses of the fusion proteins increased upon BL illumination, suggesting that fusion PZs underwent BL-induced dimerization. Moreover, BL-induced dimerization enhanced their affinities for the target sequence. Taken together, PZ likely functions as a BL-regulated bZIP module in fusion proteins, and can possibly provide a new approach for controlling bZIP transcription factors. PMID:26441326

  15. Genome-wide analyses of the bZIP family reveal their involvement in the development, ripening and abiotic stress response in banana

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Wang, Lianzhe; Tie, Weiwei; Yan, Yan; Ding, Zehong; Liu, Juhua; Li, Meiying; Peng, Ming; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play important roles in multiple biological processes. However, less information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important fruit crop banana. In this study, 121 bZIP transcription factor genes were identified in the banana genome. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MabZIPs were classified into 11 subfamilies. The majority of MabZIP genes in the same subfamily shared similar gene structures and conserved motifs. The comprehensive transcriptome analysis of two banana genotypes revealed the differential expression patterns of MabZIP genes in different organs, in various stages of fruit development and ripening, and in responses to abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, and salt. Interaction networks and co-expression assays showed that group A MabZIP-mediated networks participated in various stress signaling, which was strongly activated in Musa ABB Pisang Awak. This study provided new insights into the complicated transcriptional control of MabZIP genes and provided robust tissue-specific, development-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MabZIP genes for potential applications in the genetic improvement of banana cultivars. PMID:27445085

  16. Genome-wide analyses of the bZIP family reveal their involvement in the development, ripening and abiotic stress response in banana.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Wang, Lianzhe; Tie, Weiwei; Yan, Yan; Ding, Zehong; Liu, Juhua; Li, Meiying; Peng, Ming; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play important roles in multiple biological processes. However, less information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important fruit crop banana. In this study, 121 bZIP transcription factor genes were identified in the banana genome. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MabZIPs were classified into 11 subfamilies. The majority of MabZIP genes in the same subfamily shared similar gene structures and conserved motifs. The comprehensive transcriptome analysis of two banana genotypes revealed the differential expression patterns of MabZIP genes in different organs, in various stages of fruit development and ripening, and in responses to abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, and salt. Interaction networks and co-expression assays showed that group A MabZIP-mediated networks participated in various stress signaling, which was strongly activated in Musa ABB Pisang Awak. This study provided new insights into the complicated transcriptional control of MabZIP genes and provided robust tissue-specific, development-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MabZIP genes for potential applications in the genetic improvement of banana cultivars. PMID:27445085

  17. Ion fluxes through nanopores and transmembrane channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordin, J. R.; Diehl, A.; Barbosa, M. C.; Levin, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We introduce an implicit solvent Molecular Dynamics approach for calculating ionic fluxes through narrow nanopores and transmembrane channels. The method relies on a dual-control-volume grand-canonical molecular dynamics (DCV-GCMD) simulation and the analytical solution for the electrostatic potential inside a cylindrical nanopore recently obtained by Levin [Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/epl/i2006-10240-4 76, 163 (2006)]. The theory is used to calculate the ionic fluxes through an artificial transmembrane channel which mimics the antibacterial gramicidin A channel. Both current-voltage and current-concentration relations are calculated under various experimental conditions. We show that our results are comparable to the characteristics associated to the gramicidin A pore, especially the existence of two binding sites inside the pore and the observed saturation in the current-concentration profiles.

  18. Crystallizing Transmembrane Peptides in Lipidic Mesophases

    SciTech Connect

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-09-28

    Structure determination of membrane proteins by crystallographic means has been facilitated by crystallization in lipidic mesophases. It has been suggested, however, that this so-called in meso method, as originally implemented, would not apply to small protein targets having {le}4 transmembrane crossings. In our study, the hypothesis that the inherent flexibility of the mesophase would enable crystallogenesis of small proteins was tested using a transmembrane pentadecapeptide, linear gramicidin, which produced structure-grade crystals. This result suggests that the in meso method should be considered as a viable means for high-resolution structure determination of integral membrane peptides, many of which are predicted to be coded for in the human genome.

  19. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of “rational” approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287–288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287–288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  20. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Mark F.; O'Ryan, Liam P.; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A.; Riordan, John R.; Ford, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified regions in the CFTR map, not accounted for by Sav1866, which were potential locations for the regulatory region as well as the channel gate. In this analysis, we were aided by the fact that the unit cell was composed of two molecules not related by crystallographic symmetry. We also identified regions in the fitted Sav1866 model that were missing from the map, hence regions that were either disordered in CFTR or differently organized compared with Sav1866. Apart from the N and C termini, this indicated that in CFTR, the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5/11 and its associated loop could be partly disordered (or alternatively located). PMID:21931164

  1. The Arabidopsis Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. Robertson; Salomé, Patrice A.; Michael, Todd P.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythms with periods of approximately 24 hr are widespread in nature. Those that persist in constant conditions are termed circadian rhythms and reflect the activity of an endogenous biological clock. Plants, including Arabidopsis, are richly rhythmic. Expression analysis, most recently on a genomic scale, indicates that the Arabidopsis circadian clock regulates a number of key metabolic pathways and stress responses. A number of sensitive and high-throughput assays have been developed to monitor the Arabidopsis clock. These assays have facilitated the identification of components of plant circadian systems through genetic and molecular biological studies. Although much remains to be learned, the framework of the Arabidopsis circadian system is coming into focus. Dedication This review is dedicated to the memory of DeLill Nasser, a wonderful mentor and an unwavering advocate of both Arabidopsis and circadian rhythms research. PMID:22303209

  2. Rite of passage: a bZIP transcription factor must transit the cell apex to become competent.

    PubMed

    Momany, Michelle

    2015-11-01

    In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans BrlA triggers the central developmental pathway that controls the transition from vegetative growth to asexual reproduction. Upstream regulators including the bZIP transcription factor FlbB activate the expression of brlA. Previous work has established that FlbB localizes to both the apex of the hypha, where it interacts with and is anchored by FlbE, and to nuclei, with highest levels in the nucleus closest to the apex and successively lower levels in nuclei further away from the apex. In this issue, Herrero-Garcia et al. dissect the roles of these two FlbB pools and the mechanisms underlying their localization and activity. Using a photoactivatable tag, they demonstrate that FlbB moves from the tip into the apical nucleus. Through a series of deletion constructs, they show that import of FlbB into the nucleus requires a bipartite NLS, that FlbB localization at the tip requires actin and that the FlbB tip-high gradient appears to be mass action dependent as the gradient is lost with FlbB constitutive upregulation. They show that while the pool of FlbB at the apex is required for triggering asexual development, the tip high nuclear gradient is not required. PMID:26387769

  3. bZIP transcription factor zip-2 mediates an early response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Estes, Kathleen A.; Dunbar, Tiffany L.; Powell, Jennifer R.; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Troemel, Emily R.

    2010-01-01

    Very little is known about how animals discriminate pathogens from innocuous microbes. To address this question, we examined infection-response gene induction in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We focused on genes that are induced in C. elegans by infection with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but are not induced by an isogenic attenuated gacA mutant. Most of these genes are induced independently of known immunity pathways. We generated a GFP reporter for one of these genes, infection response gene 1 (irg-1), which is induced strongly by wild-type P. aeruginosa strain PA14, but not by other C. elegans pathogens or by other wild-type P. aeruginosa strains that are weakly pathogenic to C. elegans. To identify components of the pathway that induces irg-1 in response to infection, we performed an RNA interference screen of C. elegans transcription factors. This screen identified zip-2, a bZIP transcription factor that is required for inducing irg-1, as well as several other genes, and is important for defense against infection by P. aeruginosa. These data indicate that zip-2 is part of a specialized pathogen response pathway that is induced by virulent strains of P. aeruginosa and provides defense against this pathogen. PMID:20133860

  4. Nuclear Import of the Parsley bZIP Transcription Factor CPRF2 Is Regulated by Phytochrome Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Stefan; Wellmer, Frank; Nick, Peter; Rügner, Alexander; Schäfer, Eberhard; Harter, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    In plants, light perception by photoreceptors leads to differential expression of an enormous number of genes. An important step for differential gene expression is the regulation of transcription factor activities. To understand these processes in light signal transduction we analyzed the three well-known members of the common plant regulatory factor (CPRF) family from parsley (Petroselinum crispum). Here, we demonstrate that these CPRFs, which belong to the basic- region leucine-zipper (bZIP) domain-containing transcription factors, are differentially distributed within parsley cells, indicating different regulatory functions within the regulatory networks of the plant cell. In particular, we show by cell fractionation and immunolocalization approaches that CPRF2 is transported from the cytosol into the nucleus upon irradiation due to action of phytochrome photoreceptors. Two NH2-terminal domains responsible for cytoplasmic localization of CPRF2 in the dark were characterized by deletion analysis using a set of CPRF2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fusion constructs transiently expressed in parsley protoplasts. We suggest that light-induced nuclear import of CPRF2 is an essential step in phytochrome signal transduction. PMID:9922448

  5. Identification of Novel Components of the Unfolded Protein Response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Amir; Henríquez-Valencia, Carlos; Gómez-Páez, Marcela; Medina, Joaquín; Orellana, Ariel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús; Zouhar, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Unfavorable environmental and developmental conditions may cause disturbances in protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are recognized and counteracted by components of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) signaling pathways. The early cellular responses include transcriptional changes to increase the folding and processing capacity of the ER. In this study, we systematically screened a collection of inducible transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a library of transcription factors for resistance toward UPR-inducing chemicals. We identified 23 candidate genes that may function as novel regulators of the UPR and of which only three genes (bZIP10, TBF1, and NF-YB3) were previously associated with the UPR. The putative role of identified candidate genes in the UPR signaling is supported by favorable expression patterns in both developmental and stress transcriptional analyses. We demonstrated that WRKY75 is a genuine regulator of the ER-stress cellular responses as its expression was found to be directly responding to ER stress-inducing chemicals. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing WRKY75 showed resistance toward salt stress, connecting abiotic and ER-stress responses. PMID:27242851

  6. Screen Identifying Arabidopsis Transcription Factors Involved in the Response to 9-Lipoxygenase-Derived Oxylipins

    PubMed Central

    Walper, Elisabeth; Weiste, Christoph; Mueller, Martin J.; Hamberg, Mats; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    13-Lipoxygenase-derived oxylipins, such as jasmonates act as potent signaling molecules in plants. Although experimental evidence supports the impact of oxylipins generated by the 9-Lipoxygenase (9-LOX) pathway in root development and pathogen defense, their signaling function in plants remains largely elusive. Based on the root growth inhibiting properties of the 9-LOX-oxylipin 9-HOT (9-hydroxy-10,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid), we established a screening approach aiming at identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in signaling and/or metabolism of this oxylipin. Making use of the AtTORF-Ex (Arabidopsis thaliana Transcription Factor Open Reading Frame Expression) collection of plant lines overexpressing TF genes, we screened for those TFs which restore root growth on 9-HOT. Out of 6,000 lines, eight TFs were recovered at least three times and were therefore selected for detailed analysis. Overexpression of the basic leucine Zipper (bZIP) TF TGA5 and its target, the monoxygenase CYP81D11 reduced the effect of added 9-HOT, presumably due to activation of a detoxification pathway. The highly related ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs ERF106 and ERF107 induce a broad detoxification response towards 9-LOX-oxylipins and xenobiotic compounds. From a set of 18 related group S-bZIP factors isolated in the screen, bZIP11 is known to participate in auxin-mediated root growth and may connect oxylipins to root meristem function. The TF candidates isolated in this screen provide starting points for further attempts to dissect putative signaling pathways involving 9-LOX-derived oxylipins. PMID:27073862

  7. Stress-related function of bHLH109 in somatic embryo induction in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Gaj, Małgorzata D

    2016-04-01

    The bHLH109 gene of the bHLH family was identified among the transcription factor encoding genes that were differentially expressed in an embryogenic culture of Arabidopsis. A strong activation of bHLH109 expression was found to be associated with somatic embryogenesis (SE) induction. Several pieces of evidence suggested the involvement of bHLH109 in SE, including the high stimulation of the gene expression in SE-induced explants, which contrasts to the drastically lower level of the gene transcripts in the non-embryogenic callus and in tissue that is induced towards shoot regeneration via organogenesis. Moreover, in contrast to the overexpression of bHLH109, which has been indicated to enhance SE induction in a culture, the bhlh109 knock-out mutation was found to impair the embryogenic potential of explants. In order to identify the genes interacting with the bHLH109, the candidate co-expressed genes were identified in a yeast one hybrid assay. The in vitro regulatory interactions that were identified were verified through mutant and expression analysis. The results suggest that in SE bHLH109 acts as an activator of ECP63, a member of the LEA (LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT) family. Among the potential regulators of bHLH109, three candidates (At5g61620, bZIP4 and bZIP43) were indicated to possibly control bHLH109. The functions of all of the genes that are assumed to interact with bHLH109 are annotated to stress responses. Collectively, the results of the study provide new evidence that cell responses to stress that is imposed under in vitro conditions underlies the promotion of SE. bHLH109 may play a central role in the stress-related mechanism of SE induction via an increased accumulation of the LEA protein (ECP63), which results in the enhanced tolerance of the cells to stress. PMID:26973252

  8. Screen Identifying Arabidopsis Transcription Factors Involved in the Response to 9-Lipoxygenase-Derived Oxylipins.

    PubMed

    Walper, Elisabeth; Weiste, Christoph; Mueller, Martin J; Hamberg, Mats; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    13-Lipoxygenase-derived oxylipins, such as jasmonates act as potent signaling molecules in plants. Although experimental evidence supports the impact of oxylipins generated by the 9-Lipoxygenase (9-LOX) pathway in root development and pathogen defense, their signaling function in plants remains largely elusive. Based on the root growth inhibiting properties of the 9-LOX-oxylipin 9-HOT (9-hydroxy-10,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid), we established a screening approach aiming at identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in signaling and/or metabolism of this oxylipin. Making use of the AtTORF-Ex (Arabidopsis thaliana Transcription Factor Open Reading Frame Expression) collection of plant lines overexpressing TF genes, we screened for those TFs which restore root growth on 9-HOT. Out of 6,000 lines, eight TFs were recovered at least three times and were therefore selected for detailed analysis. Overexpression of the basic leucine Zipper (bZIP) TF TGA5 and its target, the monoxygenase CYP81D11 reduced the effect of added 9-HOT, presumably due to activation of a detoxification pathway. The highly related ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs ERF106 and ERF107 induce a broad detoxification response towards 9-LOX-oxylipins and xenobiotic compounds. From a set of 18 related group S-bZIP factors isolated in the screen, bZIP11 is known to participate in auxin-mediated root growth and may connect oxylipins to root meristem function. The TF candidates isolated in this screen provide starting points for further attempts to dissect putative signaling pathways involving 9-LOX-derived oxylipins. PMID:27073862

  9. Structure and mechanism of a eukaryotic transmembrane ascorbate-dependent oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Peilong; Ma, Dan; Yan, Chuangye; Gong, Xinqi; Du, Mingjian; Shi, Yigong

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C, also known as ascorbate, is required in numerous essential metabolic reactions in eukaryotes. The eukaryotic ascorbate-dependent oxidoreductase cytochrome b561 (Cyt b561), a family of highly conserved transmembrane enzymes, plays an important role in ascorbate recycling and iron absorption. Although Cyt b561 was identified four decades ago, its atomic structure and functional mechanism remain largely unknown. Here, we report the high-resolution crystal structures of cytochrome b561 from Arabidopsis thaliana in both substrate-free and substrate-bound states. Cyt b561 forms a homodimer, with each protomer consisting of six transmembrane helices and two heme groups. The negatively charged substrate ascorbate, or monodehydroascorbate, is enclosed in a positively charged pocket on either side of the membrane. Two highly conserved amino acids, Lys81 and His106, play an essential role in substrate recognition and catalysis. Our structural and biochemical analyses allow the proposition of a general electron transfer mechanism for members of the Cyt b561 family. PMID:24449903

  10. Asymmetric structure of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore suggested by mutagenesis of the twelfth transmembrane region.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J; Evagelidis, A; Hanrahan, J W; Linsdell, P

    2001-06-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel contains 12 membrane-spanning regions which are presumed to form the transmembrane pore. Although a number of findings have suggested that the sixth transmembrane region plays a key role in forming the pore and determining its functional properties, the role of other transmembrane regions is currently not well established. Here we assess the functional importance of the twelfth transmembrane region, which occupies a homologous position in the carboxy terminal half of the CFTR molecule to that of the sixth transmembrane region in the amino terminal half. Five residues in potentially important regions of the twelfth transmembrane region were mutated individually to alanines, and the function of the mutant channels was examined using patch clamp recording following expression in mammalian cell lines. Three of the five mutations significantly weakened block of unitary Cl(-) currents by SCN(-), implying a partial disruption of anion binding within the pore. Two of these mutations also caused a large reduction in the steady-state channel mean open probability, suggesting a role for the twelfth transmembrane region in channel gating. However, in direct contrast to analogous mutations in the sixth transmembrane region, all mutants studied here had negligible effects on the anion selectivity and unitary Cl(-) conductance of the channel. The relatively minor effects of these five mutations on channel permeation properties suggests that, despite their symmetrical positions within the CFTR protein, the sixth and twelfth transmembrane regions make highly asymmetric contributions to the functional properties of the pore. PMID:11380256

  11. Interferon-induced Transmembrane Protein 3 Is a Type II Transmembrane Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Charles C.; Kondur, Hema R.; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins are a family of small membrane proteins that inhibit the cellular entry of several genera of viruses. These proteins had been predicted to adopt a two-pass, type III transmembrane topology with an intracellular loop, two transmembrane helices (TM1 and TM2), and extracellular N and C termini. Recent work, however, supports an intramembrane topology for the helices with cytosolic orientation of both termini. Here we determined the topology of murine Ifitm3. We found that the N terminus of Ifitm3 could be stained by antibodies at the cell surface but that this conformation was cell type-dependent and represented a minority of the total plasma membrane pool. In contrast, the C terminus was readily accessible to antibodies at the cell surface and extracellular C termini comprised most or all of those present at the plasma membrane. The addition of a C-terminal KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention motif to Ifitm3 resulted in sequestration of Ifitm3 in the ER, demonstrating an ER-luminal orientation of the C terminus. C-terminal, but not N-terminal, epitope tags were also degraded within lysosomes, consistent with their luminal orientation. Furthermore, epitope-tagged Ifitm3 TM2 functioned as a signal anchor sequence when expressed in isolation. Collectively, our results demonstrate a type II transmembrane topology for Ifitm3 and will provide insight into its interaction with potential targets and cofactors. PMID:24067232

  12. Predicting transmembrane beta-barrels in proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Bigelow, Henry R.; Petrey, Donald S.; Liu, Jinfeng; Przybylski, Dariusz; Rost, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    Very few methods address the problem of predicting beta-barrel membrane proteins directly from sequence. One reason is that only very few high-resolution structures for transmembrane beta-barrel (TMB) proteins have been determined thus far. Here we introduced the design, statistics and results of a novel profile-based hidden Markov model for the prediction and discrimination of TMBs. The method carefully attempts to avoid over-fitting the sparse experimental data. While our model training and scoring procedures were very similar to a recently published work, the architecture and structure-based labelling were significantly different. In particular, we introduced a new definition of beta- hairpin motifs, explicit state modelling of transmembrane strands, and a log-odds whole-protein discrimination score. The resulting method reached an overall four-state (up-, down-strand, periplasmic-, outer-loop) accuracy as high as 86%. Furthermore, accurately discriminated TMB from non-TMB proteins (45% coverage at 100% accuracy). This high precision enabled the application to 72 entirely sequenced Gram-negative bacteria. We found over 164 previously uncharacterized TMB proteins at high confidence. Database searches did not implicate any of these proteins with membranes. We challenge that the vast majority of our 164 predictions will eventually be verified experimentally. All proteome predictions and the PROFtmb prediction method are available at http://www.rostlab.org/services/PROFtmb/. PMID:15141026

  13. A conserved proline residue in the leucine zipper region of AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 in Arabidopsis thaliana interferes with the formation of homodimer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huaishun; Cao, Kaiming; Wang, Xiping

    2007-10-19

    Two putative Arabidopsis E group bZIP transcript factors, AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61, are nuclear-localized and their transcriptional activation domain is in their N-terminal region. By searching GenBank, we found other eight plant homologues of AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61. All of them have a proline residue in the third heptad of zipper region. Yeast two-hybrid assay and EMSA showed that AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 could not form homodimer while their mutant forms, AtbZIP34m and AtbZIP61m, which the proline residue was replaced by an alanine residue in the zipper region, could form homodimer and bind G-box element. These results suggest that the conserved proline residue interferes with the homodimer formation. However, both AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 could form heterodimers with members of I group and S group transcription factors in which some members involved in vascular development. So we speculate that AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 may participate in plant development via interacting with other group bZIP transcription factors. PMID:17719007

  14. A conserved proline residue in the leucine zipper region of AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 in Arabidopsis thaliana interferes with the formation of homodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Huaishun; Cao Kaiming; Wang Xiping

    2007-10-19

    Two putative Arabidopsis E group bZIP transcript factors, AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61, are nuclear-localized and their transcriptional activation domain is in their N-terminal region. By searching GenBank, we found other eight plant homologues of AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61. All of them have a proline residue in the third heptad of zipper region. Yeast two-hybrid assay and EMSA showed that AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 could not form homodimer while their mutant forms, AtbZIP34m and AtbZIP61m, which the proline residue was replaced by an alanine residue in the zipper region, could form homodimer and bind G-box element. These results suggest that the conserved proline residue interferes with the homodimer formation. However, both AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 could form heterodimers with members of I group and S group transcription factors in which some members involved in vascular development. So we speculate that AtbZIP34 and AtbZIP61 may participate in plant development via interacting with other group bZIP transcription factors.

  15. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor RNA and Protein Impart Distinct Functions on T-cell Proliferation and Survival.

    PubMed

    Mitobe, Yuichi; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Furuta, Rie; Matsuoka, Masao

    2015-10-01

    Infection of T cells with human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) induces clonal proliferation and is closely associated with the onset of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) and inflammatory diseases. Although Tax expression is frequently suppressed in HTLV-1-infected cells, the accessory gene, HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), is continuously expressed and has been implicated in HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Here, we report that transduction of mouse T cells with specific mutants of HBZ that distinguish between its RNA and protein activity results in differential effects on T-cell proliferation and survival. HBZ RNA increased cell number by attenuating apoptosis, whereas HBZ protein induced apoptosis. However, both HBZ RNA and protein promoted S-phase entry of T cells. We further identified that the first 50 bp of the HBZ coding sequence are required for RNA-mediated cell survival. Transcriptional profiling of T cells expressing wild-type HBZ, RNA, or protein revealed that HBZ RNA is associated with genes involved in cell cycle, proliferation, and survival, while HBZ protein is more closely related to immunological properties of T cells. Specifically, HBZ RNA enhances the promoter activity of survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis, to upregulate its expression. Inhibition of survivin using YM155 resulted in impaired proliferation of several ATL cell lines as well as a T-cell line expressing HBZ RNA. The distinct functions of HBZ RNA and protein may have several implications for the development of strategies to control the proliferation and survival mechanisms associated with HTLV-1 infection and ATL. PMID:26383166

  16. Multiple PAR and E4BP4 bZIP transcription factors in zebrafish: diverse spatial and temporal expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Ben-Moshe, Zohar; Vatine, Gad; Alon, Shahar; Tovin, Adi; Mracek, Philipp; Foulkes, Nicholas S; Gothilf, Yoav

    2010-09-01

    Circadian rhythms of physiology and behavior are generated by an autonomous circadian oscillator that is synchronized daily with the environment, mainly by light input. The PAR subfamily of transcriptional activators and the related E4BP4 repressor belonging to the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family are clock-controlled genes that are suggested to mediate downstream circadian clock processes and to feedback onto the core oscillator. Here, the authors report the characterization of these genes in the zebrafish, an increasingly important model in the field of chronobiology. Five novel PAR and six novel e4bp4 zebrafish homolog genes were identified using bioinformatic tools and their coding sequences were cloned. Based on their evolutionary relationships, these genes were annotated as ztef2, zhlf1 and zhlf2, zdbp1 and zdbp2, and ze4bp4-1 to -6. The spatial and temporal mRNA expression pattern of each of these factors was characterized in zebrafish embryos in the context of a functional circadian clock and regulation by light. Nine of the factors exhibited augmented and rhythmic expression in the pineal gland, a central clock organ in zebrafish. Moreover, these genes were found to be regulated, to variable extents, by the circadian clock and/or by light. Differential expression patterns of multiple paralogs in zebrafish suggest multiple roles for these factors within the vertebrate circadian clock. This study, in the genetically accessible zebrafish model, lays the foundation for further research regarding the involvement and specific roles of PAR and E4BP4 transcription factors in the vertebrate circadian clock mechanism. PMID:20854132

  17. The transmembrane domain of N –acetylglucosaminyltransferase I is the key determinant for its Golgi subcompartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Schoberer, Jennifer; Liebminger, Eva; Vavra, Ulrike; Veit, Christiane; Castilho, Alexandra; Dicker, Martina; Maresch, Daniel; Altmann, Friedrich; Hawes, Chris; Botchway, Stanley W; Strasser, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Golgi-resident type–II membrane proteins are asymmetrically distributed across the Golgi stack. The intrinsic features of the protein that determine its subcompartment-specific concentration are still largely unknown. Here, we used a series of chimeric proteins to investigate the contribution of the cytoplasmic, transmembrane and stem region of Nicotiana benthamiana N–acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnTI) for its cis/medial-Golgi localization and for protein–protein interaction in the Golgi. The individual GnTI protein domains were replaced with those from the well-known trans-Golgi enzyme α2,6–sialyltransferase (ST) and transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Using co-localization analysis and N–glycan profiling, we show that the transmembrane domain of GnTI is the major determinant for its cis/medial-Golgi localization. By contrast, the stem region of GnTI contributes predominately to homomeric and heteromeric protein complex formation. Importantly, in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, a chimeric GnTI variant with altered sub-Golgi localization was not able to complement the GnTI-dependent glycosylation defect. Our results suggest that sequence-specific features in the transmembrane domain of GnTI account for its steady-state distribution in the cis/medial-Golgi in plants, which is a prerequisite for efficient N–glycan processing in vivo. PMID:25230686

  18. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    PubMed Central

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; González, B. Solana; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L. W.

    2015-01-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization. PMID:26522943

  19. Notch Transmembrane Domain: Secondary Structure and Topology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is critical in development, neuronal maintenance, and hematopoiesis. An obligate step in the activation of this pathway is cleavage of its transmembrane (TM) domain by γ-secretase. While the soluble domains have been extensively studied, little has been done to characterize its TM and flanking juxtamembrane (JM) segments. Here, we present the results of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of the human Notch1 TM/JM domain. The TM domain is largely α-helical. While the flanking JM segments do not adopt regular secondary structure, they interact with the membrane surface, suggesting membrane interactions may play a role in modulating its cleavage by γ-secretase and subsequent NOTCH signaling function. PMID:26023825

  20. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; González, B. Solana; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L. W.

    2015-11-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization.

  1. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator correctors and potentiators.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Steven M; Verkman, Alan S

    2013-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a cAMP-regulated anion channel expressed primarily at the apical plasma membrane of secretory epithelia. Nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene have been identified that cause disease by impairing its translation, cellular processing, and/or chloride channel gating. The fundamental premise of CFTR corrector and potentiator therapy for CF is that addressing the underlying defects in the cellular processing and chloride channel function of CF-causing mutant CFTR alleles will result in clinical benefit by addressing the basic defect underlying CF. Correctors are principally targeted at F508del cellular misprocessing, whereas potentiators are intended to restore cAMP-dependent chloride channel activity to mutant CFTRs at the cell surface. This article reviews the discovery of CFTR potentiators and correctors, what is known regarding their mechanistic basis, and encouraging results achieved in clinical testing. PMID:23818513

  2. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Correctors and Potentiators

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M.; Verkman, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a cAMP-regulated anion channel expressed primarily at the apical plasma membrane of secretory epithelia. Nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene have been identified that cause disease by impairing its translation, cellular processing, and/or chloride channel gating. The fundamental premise of CFTR corrector and potentiator therapy for CF is that addressing the underlying defects in the cellular processing and chloride channel function of CF-causing mutant CFTR alleles will result in clinical benefit by addressing the basic defect underlying CF. Correctors are principally targeted at F508del cellular misprocessing, whereas potentiators are intended to restore cAMP-dependent chloride channel activity to mutant CFTRs at the cell surface. This article reviews the discovery of CFTR potentiators and correctors, what is known regarding their mechanistic basis, and encouraging results achieved in clinical testing. PMID:23818513

  3. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients

    PubMed Central

    Gunner, M.R.; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side. PMID:23507617

  4. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side. PMID:23507617

  5. Tight Interconnection and Multi-Level Control of Arabidopsis MYB44 in MAPK Cascade Signalling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abiotic stress poses a huge, ever-increasing problem to plants and agriculture. The dissection of signalling pathways mediating stress tolerance is a prerequisite to develop more resistant plant species. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are universal signalling modules. In Arabidopsis, the MAPK MPK3 and its upstream regulator MAPK kinase MKK4 initiate the adaptation response to numerous abiotic and biotic stresses. Yet, molecular steps directly linked with MKK4 – MPK3 activation are largely unknown. Starting with a yeast-two-hybrid screen for interacting partners of MKK4, we identified a transcription factor, MYB44. MYB44 is controlled at multiple levels by and strongly inter-connected with MAPK signalling. As we had shown earlier, stress-induced expression of the MYB44 gene is regulated by a MPK3-targeted bZIP transcription factor VIP1. At the protein level, MYB44 interacts with MPK3 in vivo. MYB44 is phosphorylated by MPK3 in vitro at a single residue, Ser145. Although replacement of Ser145 by a non-phosphorylatable (S145A) or phosphomimetic (S145D) residue did not alter MYB44 subcellular localisation, dimerization behaviour nor DNA-binding characteristics, abiotic stress tolerance tests in stable transgenic Arabidopsis plants clearly related S145 phosphorylation to MYB44 function: Compared to Arabidopsis wild type plants, MYB44 overexpressing lines exhibit an enhanced tolerance to osmotic stress and are slightly more sensitive to abscisic acid. Interestingly, overexpression of the S145A variant revealed that impaired phosphorylation does not render the MYB44 protein non-functional. Instead, S145A lines are highly sensitive to abiotic stress, and thereby remarkably similar to mpk3-deficient plants. Its in vivo interaction with the nuclear sub-pools of both MPK3 and MKK4 renders MYB44 the first plant transcription factor to have a second function as putative MAPK cascade scaffolding protein. PMID:23437396

  6. N-terminal segments modulate the α-helical propensities of the intrinsically disordered basic regions of bZIP proteins.

    PubMed

    Das, Rahul K; Crick, Scott L; Pappu, Rohit V

    2012-02-17

    Basic region leucine zippers (bZIPs) are modular transcription factors that play key roles in eukaryotic gene regulation. The basic regions of bZIPs (bZIP-bRs) are necessary and sufficient for DNA binding and specificity. Bioinformatic predictions and spectroscopic studies suggest that unbound monomeric bZIP-bRs are uniformly disordered as isolated domains. Here, we test this assumption through a comparative characterization of conformational ensembles for 15 different bZIP-bRs using a combination of atomistic simulations and circular dichroism measurements. We find that bZIP-bRs have quantifiable preferences for α-helical conformations in their unbound monomeric forms. This helicity varies from one bZIP-bR to another despite a significant sequence similarity of the DNA binding motifs (DBMs). Our analysis reveals that intramolecular interactions between DBMs and eight-residue segments directly N-terminal to DBMs are the primary modulators of bZIP-bR helicities. We test the accuracy of this inference by designing chimeras of bZIP-bRs to have either increased or decreased overall helicities. Our results yield quantitative insights regarding the relationship between sequence and the degree of intrinsic disorder within bZIP-bRs, and might have general implications for other intrinsically disordered proteins. Understanding how natural sequence variations lead to modulation of disorder is likely to be important for understanding the evolution of specificity in molecular recognition through intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). PMID:22226835

  7. An Arabidopsis peptide transporter is a member of a new class of membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, H Y; Song, W; Zhang, L; Naider, F; Becker, J M; Stacey, G

    1994-01-01

    An Arabidopsis peptide transport gene was cloned from an Arabidopsis cDNA library by functionally complementing a yeast peptide transport mutant. The Arabidopsis plant peptide transporter (AtPTR2) allowed growth of yeast cells on dipeptides and tripeptides but not peptides four residues and higher. The plant peptide transporter also conferred sensitivity to a number of ethionine-containing, toxic peptides of chain length three or less and restored the ability to take up radiolabeled dileucine at levels similar to that of the wild type. Dileucine uptake was reduced by the addition of a variety of growth-promoting peptides. The sequence of a cDNA insert of 2.8 kb indicated an open reading frame encoding a 610-amino acid polypeptide (67.5 kD). Hydropathy analysis predicted a highly hydrophobic protein with a number of potential transmembrane segments. At the amino acid level, the Arabidopsis plant peptide transporter shows 24.6, 28.5, and 45.2% identity to the Arabidopsis nitrate-inducible nitrate transporter (CHL1), the rabbit small intestine oligopeptide transporter (PepT1), and the yeast peptide transporter (Ptr2p), respectively, but little identity to other proteins known to be involved in peptide transport. Root growth of Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to ethionine-containing toxic peptides was inhibited, and growth was restored by the addition of certain peptides shown to compete with dileucine uptake in yeast expressing the Arabidopsis transport gene. Consistent with the observed inhibition of root growth by toxic peptides, the peptide transporter is expressed in the roots of Arabidopsis seedlings. This study represents the characterization of a plant peptide transporter that is a member of a new class of related membrane transport proteins. PMID:7919993

  8. The Arabidopsis ESCRT protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Mojgan; Richter, Klaus; Keshavaiah, Channa; Sabovljevic, Aneta; Huelskamp, Martin; Schellmann, Swen

    2011-05-01

    In yeast, endosomal sorting of monoubiquitylated transmembrane proteins is performed by a subset of the 19 "class E vacuolar protein sorting" proteins. The core machinery consists of 11 proteins that are organised in three complexes termed ESCRT I-III (endosomal sorting complex required for transport I-III) and is conserved in eukaryotic cells. While the pathway is well understood in yeast and animals, the plant ESCRT system is largely unexplored. At least one sequence homolog for each ESCRT component can be found in the Arabidopsis genome. Generally, sequence conservation between yeast/animals and the Arabidopsis proteins is low. To understand details about participating proteins and complex organization we have performed a systematic pairwise yeast two hybrid analysis of all Arabidopsis proteins showing homology to the ESCRT core machinery. Positive interactions were validated using bimolecular fluorescence complementation. In our experiments, most putative ESCRT components exhibited interactions with other ESCRT components that could be shown to occur on endosomes suggesting that despite their low homology to their yeast and animal counterparts they represent functional components of the plant ESCRT pathway. PMID:21442383

  9. The Origins of Transmembrane Ion Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Even though membrane proteins that mediate transport of ions and small molecules across cell walls are among the largest and least understood biopolymers in contemporary cells, it is still possible to shed light on their origins and early evolution. The central observation is that transmembrane portions of most ion channels are simply bundles of -helices. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and natural channels, mostly of non-genomic origin, we show that the emergence of -helical channels was protobiologically plausible, and did not require highly specific amino acid sequences. Despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. Specifically, we explain how the antiamoebin channels, which are made of identical helices, 16 amino acids in length, achieve efficiency comparable to that of highly evolved channels. We further show that antiamoebin channels are extremely flexible, compared to modern, genetically coded channels. On the basis of our results, we propose that channels evolved further towards high structural complexity because they needed to acquire stable rigid structures and mechanisms for precise regulation rather than improve efficiency. In general, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during evolution.

  10. The infrared dichroism of transmembrane helical polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, P H; Kaufman, B K; McElhaney, R N; Lewis, R N

    1995-01-01

    Polarized attenuated total internal reflectance techniques were applied to study the infrared dichroism of the amide I transition moment in two membrane-bound peptides that are known to form oriented transmembrane helices: gramicidin A in a supported phospholipid monolayer and Ac-Lys2-Leu24-Lys2-amide (L24) in oriented multibilayers. These studies were performed to test the ability of these techniques to determine the orientation of these peptides, to verify the value of optical parameters used to calculate electric field strengths, to examine the common assumptions regarding the amide I transition moment orientation, and to ascertain the effect of surface imperfections on molecular disorder. The two peptides exhibit marked differences in the shape and frequency of their amide I absorption bands. Yet both peptides are highly ordered and oriented with their helical axes perpendicular to the membrane surface. In the alpha-helix formed by L24, there is evidence for a mode with type E1 symmetry contributing to amide I, and the amide I transition moment must be more closely aligned with the peptide C=O (< 34 degrees) than earlier studies have suggested. These results indicate that long-standing assumptions about the orientation of amide I in a peptide require some revision, but that in general, infrared spectroscopy yields reliable information about the orientation of membrane-bound helical peptides. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8599683

  11. Molecular Signatures in Arabidopsis thaliana in Response to Insect Attack and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Barah, Pankaj; Winge, Per; Kusnierczyk, Anna; Tran, Diem Hong; Bones, Atle M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Under the threat of global climatic change and food shortages, it is essential to take the initiative to obtain a comprehensive understanding of common and specific defence mechanisms existing in plant systems for protection against different types of biotic invaders. We have implemented an integrated approach to analyse the overall transcriptomic reprogramming and systems-level defence responses in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana henceforth) during insect Brevicoryne brassicae (B. brassicae henceforth) and bacterial Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (P. syringae henceforth) attacks. The main aim of this study was to identify the attacker-specific and general defence response signatures in A. thaliana when attacked by phloem-feeding aphids or pathogenic bacteria. Results The obtained annotated networks of differentially expressed transcripts indicated that members of transcription factor families, such as WRKY, MYB, ERF, BHLH and bZIP, could be crucial for stress-specific defence regulation in Arabidopsis during aphid and P. syringae attack. The defence response pathways, signalling pathways and metabolic processes associated with aphid attack and P. syringae infection partially overlapped. Components of several important biosynthesis and signalling pathways, such as salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (ET) and glucosinolates, were differentially affected during the two the treatments. Several stress-regulated transcription factors were known to be associated with stress-inducible microRNAs. The differentially regulated gene sets included many signature transcription factors, and our co-expression analysis showed that they were also strongly co-expressed during 69 other biotic stress experiments. Conclusions Defence responses and functional networks that were unique and specific to aphid or P. syringae stresses were identified. Furthermore, our analysis revealed a probable link between biotic stress and

  12. Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is the major non-structural carbohydrate in plants. It serves as an important store of carbon that fuels plant metabolism and growth when they are unable to photosynthesise. This storage can be in leaves and other green tissues, where it is degraded during the night, or in heterotrophic tissues such as roots, seeds and tubers, where it is stored over longer time periods. Arabidopsis accumulates starch in many of its tissues, but mostly in its leaves during the day. It has proven to be a powerful genetic system for discovering how starch is synthesised and degraded, and new proteins and processes have been discovered. Such work has major significance for our starch crops, whose yield and quality could be improved by the application of this knowledge. Research into Arabidopsis starch metabolism has begun to reveal how its daily turnover is integrated into the rest of metabolism and adapted to the environmental conditions. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutant lines deficient in starch metabolism have been employed as tools to study other biological processes ranging from sugar sensing to gravitropism and flowering time control. This review gives a detailed account of the use of Arabidopsis to study starch metabolism. It describes the major discoveries made and presents an overview of our understanding today, together with some as-yet unresolved questions. PMID:23393426

  13. Virus-encoded 7 transmembrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Oliveira, Martha Trindade; Farrell, Helen Elizabeth; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are an ancient group which have exploited gene capture of multiple cellular modulators of the immune response. Viral homologues of 7 transmembrane receptors (v7TMRs) are a consistent feature of beta- and gammaherpesviruses; the majority of the v7TMRs are homologous to cellular chemokine receptors (CKRs). Conserved families of v7TMRs distinguish between beta- versus gammaherpesviruses; furthermore, significant divisions within these subfamilies, such as between genera of the gammaherpesviruses or between the primate and rodent cytomegaloviruses, coincide with specific v7TMR gene families. Divergence of functional properties between the viral 7TMR and their cellular counterparts is likely, therefore, to reflect adaptation supporting various aspects of the viral lifecycle with concomitant effects upon viral pathogenesis. Consistent with their long evolutionary history, the v7TMRs have acquired a range of distinctive characteristics. This chapter reviews key features of the v7TMRs which are likely to impact upon their functional roles: trafficking properties, ligand specificity, and signaling capacity. Rapid, constitutive endocytosis, reminiscent of cellular "scavenger" receptors, may provide a mechanism for immune evasion, or alternatively relate to virion assembly, including incorporation of v7TMRs within the virion envelope. Some v7TMRs display relatively broad chemokine-binding specificity, whereas others remain "orphan" and may be completely independent of ligand activation. Indeed, many of the v7TMRs have been shown to signal constitutively, associated in some cases with notable divergence of highly conserved regulatory elements such as the "DRY" motif of TMIII. The availability of rodent models for v7TMR functional studies has provided evidence for important biological roles, including cellular transformation, tissue tropism, and viral persistence. Recent studies addressing signaling pathways critical to these phenotypes will be discussed, with

  14. Molecular mechanisms of intercellular communication: transmembrane signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.W.; George, J.S.; Siegel, H.N.; McGregor, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    This short discussion of transmembrane signaling depicts a particular class of signaling devices whose functional characteristics may well be representative of broader classes of membrane switches. These multicomponent aggregates are characterized by tight organization of interacting components which function by conformational interactions to provide sensitive, amplified, rapid, and modulated responses. It is clear that the essential role of such switches in cell-cell interactions necessitated their appearance early in the history of the development of multicellular organisms. It also seems clear that once such devices made their appearance, the conformationally interactive moieties were firmly locked into a regulatory relationship. Since modification of interacting components could perturb or interfere with the functional integrity of the whole switch, genetic drift was only permitted at the input and outflow extremes. However, the GTP binding moiety and its interacting protein domains on contiguous portions of the receptor and readout components were highly conserved. The observed stringent evolutionary conservation of the molecular features of these membrane switches thus applies primarily to the central (GTP binding) elements. An extraordinary degree of variation was permitted within the domains of signal recognition and enzymatic output. Thus, time and evolution have adapted the central logic of the regulatory algorithm to serve a great variety of cellular purposes and to recognize a great variety of chemical and physical signals. This is exemplified by the richness of the hormonal and cellular dialogues found in primates such as man. Here the wealth of intercellular communiation can support the composition and performance of symphonies and the study of cellular immunology.

  15. Are Aquaporins the Missing Transmembrane Osmosensors?

    PubMed

    Hill, A E; Shachar-Hill, Y

    2015-08-01

    Regulation of cell volume is central to homeostasis. It is assumed to begin with the detection of a change in water potential across the bounding membrane, but it is not clear how this is accomplished. While examples of general osmoreceptors (which sense osmotic pressure in one phase) and stretch-activated ion channels (which require swelling of a cell or organelle) are known, effective volume regulation requires true transmembrane osmosensors (TMOs) which directly detect a water potential difference spanning a membrane. At present, no TMO molecule has been unambiguously identified, and clear evidence for mammalian TMOs is notably lacking. In this paper, we set out a theory of TMOs which requires a water channel spanning the membrane that excludes the major osmotic solutes, responds directly without the need for any other process such as swelling, and signals to other molecules associated with the magnitude of changing osmotic differences. The most likely molecules that are fit for this purpose and which are also ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells are aquaporins (AQPs). We review experimental evidence from several systems which indicates that AQPs are essential elements in regulation and may be functioning as TMOs; i.e. the first step in an osmosensing sequence that signals osmotic imbalance in a cell or organelle. We extend this concept to several systems of current interest in which the cellular involvement of AQPs as simple water channels is puzzling or counter-intuitive. We suggest that, apart from regulatory volume changes in cells, AQPs may also be acting as TMOs in red cells, secretory granules and microorganisms. PMID:25791748

  16. TOPPER: Topology Prediction of Transmembrane Protein Based on Evidential Reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xinyang; Liu, Qi; Hu, Yong; Deng, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The topology prediction of transmembrane protein is a hot research field in bioinformatics and molecular biology. It is a typical pattern recognition problem. Various prediction algorithms are developed to predict the transmembrane protein topology since the experimental techniques have been restricted by many stringent conditions. Usually, these individual prediction algorithms depend on various principles such as the hydrophobicity or charges of residues. In this paper, an evidential topology prediction method for transmembrane protein is proposed based on evidential reasoning, which is called TOPPER (topology prediction of transmembrane protein based on evidential reasoning). In the proposed method, the prediction results of multiple individual prediction algorithms can be transformed into BPAs (basic probability assignments) according to the confusion matrix. Then, the final prediction result can be obtained by the combination of each individual prediction base on Dempster's rule of combination. The experimental results show that the proposed method is superior to the individual prediction algorithms, which illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:23401665

  17. The role of palmitoylation and transmembrane domain in sorting of transmembrane adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Chum, Tomáš; Glatzová, Daniela; Kvíčalová, Zuzana; Malínský, Jan; Brdička, Tomáš; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins synthesised at the endoplasmic reticulum are delivered to the cell surface via sorting pathways. Hydrophobic mismatch theory based on the length of the transmembrane domain (TMD) dominates discussion about determinants required for protein sorting to the plasma membrane. Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAP) are involved in signalling events which take place at the plasma membrane. Members of this protein family have TMDs of varying length. We were interested in whether palmitoylation or other motifs contribute to the effective sorting of TRAP proteins. We found that palmitoylation is essential for some, but not all, TRAP proteins independent of their TMD length. We also provide evidence that palmitoylation and proximal sequences can modulate sorting of artificial proteins with TMDs of suboptimal length. Our observations point to a unique character of each TMD defined by its primary amino acid sequence and its impact on membrane protein localisation. We conclude that, in addition to the TMD length, secondary sorting determinants such as palmitoylation or flanking sequences have evolved for the localisation of membrane proteins. PMID:26585312

  18. A deterministic algorithm for constrained enumeration of transmembrane protein folds.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William Michael; Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Schoeniger, Joseph S.

    2004-07-01

    A deterministic algorithm for enumeration of transmembrane protein folds is presented. Using a set of sparse pairwise atomic distance constraints (such as those obtained from chemical cross-linking, FRET, or dipolar EPR experiments), the algorithm performs an exhaustive search of secondary structure element packing conformations distributed throughout the entire conformational space. The end result is a set of distinct protein conformations, which can be scored and refined as part of a process designed for computational elucidation of transmembrane protein structures.

  19. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  20. Molecular Mechanism of Photozipper, a Light-Regulated Dimerizing Module Consisting of the bZIP and LOV Domains of Aureochrome-1.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Yoichi; Hisatomi, Osamu

    2015-06-01

    Aureochrome-1 (AUREO1) is a blue light (BL) receptor responsible for the BL-induced blanching of a stramenopile alga, Vaucheria frigida. The AUREO1 protein contains a central basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) domain, and a C-terminal light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) domain. BL induces the dimerization of monomeric AUREO1, which subsequently increases the affinity of this transcription factor for its target DNA [Hisatomi, O., et al. (2014) J. Biol. Chem. 289, 17379-17391]. We constructed a synthetic gene encoding N-terminally truncated monomeric AUREO1 (designated Photozipper) to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this BL-regulated transcription factor and to develop it as an optogenetic tool. In this study, four different Photozipper (PZ) protein constructs were prepared comprising different N-terminal truncations. The monomer-dimer equilibria of the PZ constructs were investigated in the dark and light states. Dynamic light scattering and size-exclusion chromatography analyses revealed that the apparent dissociation constants of PZ dimers with and without the ZIP region were ~100 and 30 μM, respectively, indicating that the ZIP region stabilized the monomeric form in the dark state. In the light state, fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses demonstrated that deletion of the ZIP region increased the dissociation constant from ~0.15 to 0.6 μM, suggesting that intermolecular LOV-LOV and ZIP-ZIP interactions stabilized the dimeric forms. Our results suggest that synergistic interactions between the LOV and bZIP domains stabilize the monomeric form in the dark state and the dimeric form in the light state, which possibly contributes to the function of PZ as a BL-regulated molecular switch. PMID:25932652

  1. AtTMEM18 plays important roles in pollen tube and vegetative growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiao-Ying; Yang, Ke-Zhen; Ma, Zhao-Xia; Chen, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Qin; Bai, Jin-Rong; Ye, De

    2016-07-01

    In flowering plants, pollen tube growth is essential for delivery of male gametes into the female gametophyte or embryo sac for double fertilization. Although many genes have been identified as being involved in the process, the molecular mechanisms of pollen tube growth remains poorly understood. In this study, we identified that the Arabidopsis Transmembrane Protein 18 (AtTMEM18) gene played important roles in pollen tube growth. The AtTMEM18 shares a high similarity with the Transmembrane 18 proteins (TMEM18s) that are conserved in most eukaryotes and may play important roles in obesity in humans. Mutation in the AtTMEM18 by a Ds insertion caused abnormal callose deposition in the pollen grains and had a significant impact on pollen germination and pollen tube growth. AtTMEM18 is expressed in pollen grains, pollen tubes, root tips and other vegetative tissues. The pollen-rescued assays showed that the mutation in AtTMEM18 also caused defects in roots, stems, leaves and transmitting tracts. AtTMEM18-GFP was located around the nuclei. Genetic assays demonstrated that the localization of AtTMEM18 around the nuclei in the generative cells of pollen grains was essential for the male fertility. Furthermore, expression of the rice TMEM18-homologous protein (OsTMEM18) driven by LAT52 promoter could recover the fertility of the Arabidopsis attmem18 mutant. These results suggested that the TMEM18 is important for plant growth in Arabidopsis. PMID:26699939

  2. Temporal kinetics of the transcriptional response to carbon depletion and sucrose readdition in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Sarah Jane; Yadav, Umesh Prasad; Klie, Sebastian; Morcuende, Rosa; Usadel, Björn; Lunn, John Edward; Stitt, Mark

    2016-04-01

    To investigate whether the transcriptional response to carbon (C) depletion and sucrose resupply depends on the duration and severity of the C depletion, Arabidopsis seedlings were grown in liquid culture and harvested 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after removing sucrose from the medium and 30 min after resupplying sucrose at each time. Expression profiling revealed early transcriptional inhibition of cell wall synthesis and remodelling of signalling, followed by induction of C recycling and photosynthesis and general inhibition of growth. The temporal sequence differed from the published response to progressive exhaustion of C during a night and extended night in vegetatively growing plants. The response to sucrose readdition was conserved across the C-depletion time course. Intriguingly, the vast majority of rapidly responding transcripts decreased rather than increased. The majority of transcripts that respond rapidly to sucrose and many transcripts that respond during C depletion also decrease after treating seedlings with the transcriptional inhibitor cordycepin A. Comparison with published responses to overexpression of otsA, AKIN10 and bZIP11 revealed that many genes that respond to C depletion, and especially sucrose resupply, respond to one or more of these C-signalling components. Thus, multiple factors contribute to C responsiveness, including many signalling components, transcriptional regulation and transcript turnover. PMID:26386165

  3. Trichome morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, B; Folkers, U; Ilgenfritz, H; Hülskamp, M

    2000-01-01

    Trichomes (plant hairs) in Arabidopsis thaliana are large non-secreting epidermal cells with a characteristic three-dimensional architecture. Because trichomes are easily accessible to a combination of genetic, cell biological and molecular methods they have become an ideal model system to study various aspects of plant cell morphogenesis. In this review we will summarize recent progress in the understanding of trichome morphogenesis. PMID:11128981

  4. The Fifth Transmembrane Segment of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Contributes to Its Anion Permeation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyao; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2015-06-23

    Previous studies have identified several transmembrane segments (TMs), including TM1, TM3, TM6, TM9, TM11, and TM12, as pore-lining segments in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), but the role of TM5 in pore construction remains controversial. In this study, we employed substituted cysteine accessibility methodology (SCAM) to screen the entire TM5 defined by the original topology model and its cytoplasmic extension in a Cysless background. We found six positions (A299, R303, N306, S307, F310, and F311) where engineered cysteines react to intracellular 2-sulfonatoethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSES⁻). Quantification of the modification rate of engineered cysteines in the presence or absence of ATP suggests that these six residues are accessible in both the open and closed states. Whole-cell experiments with external MTSES⁻ identified only two positive positions (L323 and A326), resulting in a segment containing 11 consecutive amino acids, where substituted cysteines respond to neither internal nor external MTSES⁻, a unique feature not seen previously in CFTR's pore-lining segments. The observation that these positions are inaccessible to channel-permeant thiol-specific reagent [Au(CN)₂]⁻ suggests that this segment of TM5 between F311 and L323 is concealed from the pore by other TMs and/or lipid bilayers. In addition, our data support the idea that the positively charged arginine at position 303 poses a pure electrostatic action in determining the single-channel current amplitude of CFTR and the effect of an open-channel blocker glibencalmide. Collectively, we conclude that the cytoplasmic portion of CFTR's TM5 lines the pore. Our functional data are remarkably consistent with predicted structural arrangements of TM5 in some homology models of CFTR. PMID:26024338

  5. Metabolomic analysis reveals the relationship between AZI1 and sugar signaling in systemic acquired resistance of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Dian-Zhen; Li, Qi; Ma, Yan-Qin; Yao, Jing-Wen; Huang, Xuan; Xu, Zi-Qin

    2016-10-01

    The function of AZI1 in systemic acquired resistance of Arabidopsis was confirmed by investigation of the phenotypic features of wild-type Col-0, AZI1 T-DNA knockout and AZI1 overexpressing plants after infection with virulent and avirulent Pseudomonas syringae. Real-time quantitative PCR and Northern blotting analyses showed that the transcript abundances of PR genes increased significantly in local and systemic leaves of wild-type Col-0 and AZI1 overexpressing plants challenged with avirulent P. syringae, whereas the mRNA accumulation of PR genes was obviously attenuated in local and systemic leaves of AZI1 T-DNA knockout plants after localized infiltration with avirulent Psm avrRpm1. The changes of metabolomic profiles in distal leaves of three types of materials infected with avirulent P. syringae were determined by (1)H NMR spectrometry and data mining showed that the soluble carbonhydrates might function as signal substances in the systemic immunity of Arabidopsis. At the same time, the expression of the sugar signaling genes in local and distal leaves after infection of avirulent P. syringae was compared. As a result, it was found that the transcript abundances of sugar signaling genes, including SUS1, SUS2, SUS3, SUS6, SUT1, HXK1, HXK2, SNRK1.2, ERD6, TPS1, TOR, SNRK1.1, SNRK1.3 and bZIP11, were obviously changed in distal leaves of different materials with the modulated AZI1 activities, indicating sugar-related genes are involved in regulation of the systemic immunity mediated by AZI1. These results also illustrated that the immune system associated with sugar molecules probably was an important part of the systemic acquired resistance in Arabidopsis. PMID:27337039

  6. Topology of transmembrane channel-like gene 1 protein.

    PubMed

    Labay, Valentina; Weichert, Rachel M; Makishima, Tomoko; Griffith, Andrew J

    2010-10-01

    Mutations of transmembrane channel-like gene 1 (TMC1) cause hearing loss in humans and mice. TMC1 is the founding member of a family of genes encoding proteins of unknown function that are predicted to contain multiple transmembrane domains. The goal of our study was to define the topology of mouse TMC1 expressed heterologously in tissue culture cells. TMC1 was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane of five tissue culture cell lines that we tested. We used anti-TMC1 and anti-HA antibodies to probe the topologic orientation of three native epitopes and seven HA epitope tags along full-length TMC1 after selective or complete permeabilization of transfected cells with digitonin or Triton X-100, respectively. TMC1 was present within the ER as an integral membrane protein containing six transmembrane domains and cytosolic N- and C-termini. There is a large cytoplasmic loop, between the fourth and fifth transmembrane domains, with two highly conserved hydrophobic regions that might associate with or penetrate, but do not span, the plasma membrane. Our study is the first to demonstrate that TMC1 is a transmembrane protein. The topologic organization revealed by this study shares some features with that of the shaker-TRP superfamily of ion channels. PMID:20672865

  7. Maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS Proteins Interact with Ethylene Receptor Signaling Complex, Supporting a Regulatory Role for ARGOS in Ethylene Signal Transduction[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jinrui; Wang, Hongyu; Habben, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene regulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to environmental cues. ARGOS genes reduce plant sensitivity to ethylene when overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). A previous genetic study suggested that the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-localized maize ARGOS1 targets the ethylene signal transduction components at or upstream of CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, but the mechanism of ARGOS modulating ethylene signaling is unknown. Here, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis that ZmARGOS1, as well as the Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1, physically interacts with Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), an ethylene receptor interacting protein that regulates the activity of ETHYLENE RESPONSE1. The protein-protein interaction was also detected with the yeast split-ubiquitin two-hybrid system. Using the same yeast assay, we found that maize RTE1 homolog REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 LIKE4 (ZmRTL4) and ZmRTL2 also interact with maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS proteins. Like AtRTE1 in Arabidopsis, ZmRTL4 and ZmRTL2 reduce ethylene responses when overexpressed in maize, indicating a similar mechanism for ARGOS regulating ethylene signaling in maize. A polypeptide fragment derived from ZmARGOS8, consisting of a Pro-rich motif flanked by two transmembrane helices that are conserved among members of the ARGOS family, can interact with AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins in Arabidopsis. The conserved domain is necessary and sufficient to reduce ethylene sensitivity in Arabidopsis and maize. Overall, these results suggest a physical association between ARGOS and the ethylene receptor signaling complex via AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins, supporting a role for ARGOS in regulating ethylene perception and the early steps of signal transduction in Arabidopsis and maize. PMID:27268962

  8. Molecular responses of rat tracheal epithelial cells to transmembrane pressure.

    PubMed

    Ressler, B; Lee, R T; Randell, S H; Drazen, J M; Kamm, R D

    2000-06-01

    Smooth muscle constriction in asthma causes the airway to buckle into a rosette pattern, folding the epithelium into deep crevasses. The epithelial cells in these folds are pushed up against each other and thereby experience compressive stresses. To study the epithelial cell response to compressive stress, we subjected primary cultures of rat tracheal epithelial cells to constant elevated pressures on their apical surface (i.e., a transmembrane pressure) and examined changes in the expression of genes that are important for extracellular matrix production and maintenance of smooth muscle activation. Northern blot analysis of RNA extracted from cells subjected to transmembrane pressure showed induction of early growth response-1 (Egr-1), endothelin-1, and transforming growth factor-beta1 in a pressure-dependent and time-dependent manner. Increases in Egr-1 protein were detected by immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate that airway epithelial cells respond rapidly to compressive stresses. Potential transduction mechanisms of transmembrane pressure were also investigated. PMID:10835333

  9. GTPase acceleration as the rate-limiting step in Arabidopsis G protein-coupled sugar signaling.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christopher A; Taylor, J Philip; Gao, Yajun; Kimple, Adam J; Grigston, Jeffrey C; Chen, Jin-Gui; Siderovski, David P; Jones, Alan M; Willard, Francis S

    2007-10-30

    Heterotrimeric G protein signaling is important for cell-proliferative and glucose-sensing signal transduction pathways in the model plant organism Arabidopsis thaliana. AtRGS1 is a seven-transmembrane, RGS domain-containing protein that is a putative membrane receptor for d-glucose. Here we show, by using FRET, that d-glucose alters the interaction between the AtGPA1 and AtRGS1 in vivo. AtGPA1 is a unique heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit that is constitutively GTP-bound given its high spontaneous nucleotide exchange coupled with slow GTP hydrolysis. Analysis of a point mutation in AtRGS1 that abrogates GTPase-accelerating activity demonstrates that the regulation of AtGPA1 GTP hydrolysis mediates sugar signal transduction during Arabidopsis development, in contrast to animals where nucleotide exchange is the limiting step in the heterotrimeric G protein nucleotide cycle. PMID:17951432

  10. Alternating access to the transmembrane domain of the ATP-binding cassette protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ABCC7).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-03-23

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family, most members of which act as active transporters. Actively transporting ABC proteins are thought to alternate between "outwardly facing" and "inwardly facing" conformations of the transmembrane substrate pathway. In CFTR, it is assumed that the outwardly facing conformation corresponds to the channel open state, based on homology with other ABC proteins. We have used patch clamp recording to quantify the rate of access of cysteine-reactive probes to cysteines introduced into two different transmembrane regions of CFTR from both the intracellular and extracellular solutions. Two probes, the large [2-sulfonatoethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) molecule and permeant Au(CN)(2)(-) ions, were applied to either side of the membrane to modify cysteines substituted for Leu-102 (first transmembrane region) and Thr-338 (sixth transmembrane region). Channel opening and closing were altered by mutations in the nucleotide binding domains of the channel. We find that, for both MTSES and Au(CN)(2)(-), access to these two cysteines from the cytoplasmic side is faster in open channels, whereas access to these same sites from the extracellular side is faster in closed channels. These results are consistent with alternating access to the transmembrane regions, however with the open state facing inwardly and the closed state facing outwardly. Our findings therefore prompt revision of current CFTR structural and mechanistic models, as well as having broader implications for transport mechanisms in all ABC proteins. Our results also suggest possible locations of both functional and dysfunctional ("vestigial") gates within the CFTR permeation pathway. PMID:22303012

  11. Alternating Access to the Transmembrane Domain of the ATP-binding Cassette Protein Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (ABCC7)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family, most members of which act as active transporters. Actively transporting ABC proteins are thought to alternate between “outwardly facing” and “inwardly facing” conformations of the transmembrane substrate pathway. In CFTR, it is assumed that the outwardly facing conformation corresponds to the channel open state, based on homology with other ABC proteins. We have used patch clamp recording to quantify the rate of access of cysteine-reactive probes to cysteines introduced into two different transmembrane regions of CFTR from both the intracellular and extracellular solutions. Two probes, the large [2-sulfonatoethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) molecule and permeant Au(CN)2− ions, were applied to either side of the membrane to modify cysteines substituted for Leu-102 (first transmembrane region) and Thr-338 (sixth transmembrane region). Channel opening and closing were altered by mutations in the nucleotide binding domains of the channel. We find that, for both MTSES and Au(CN)2−, access to these two cysteines from the cytoplasmic side is faster in open channels, whereas access to these same sites from the extracellular side is faster in closed channels. These results are consistent with alternating access to the transmembrane regions, however with the open state facing inwardly and the closed state facing outwardly. Our findings therefore prompt revision of current CFTR structural and mechanistic models, as well as having broader implications for transport mechanisms in all ABC proteins. Our results also suggest possible locations of both functional and dysfunctional (“vestigial”) gates within the CFTR permeation pathway. PMID:22303012

  12. Maize ABP9 enhances tolerance to multiple stresses in transgenic Arabidopsis by modulating ABA signaling and cellular levels of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Wang, Lei; Meng, Hui; Wen, Hongtao; Fan, Yunliu; Zhao, Jun

    2011-03-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play critical roles in mediating abiotic stress responses in plants. It is well known that ABA is involved in the modulation of ROS levels by regulating ROS-producing and ROS-scavenging genes, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation are poorly understood. Here we show that the expression of maize ABP9 gene, which encodes a bZIP transcription factor capable of binding to the ABRE2 motif in the maize Cat1 promoter, is induced by ABA, H(2)O(2), drought and salt. Constitutive expression of ABP9 in transgenic Arabidopsis leads to remarkably enhanced tolerance to multiple stresses including drought, high salt, freezing temperature and oxidative stresses. ABP9 expressing Arabidopsis plants also exhibit increased sensitivity to exogenously applied ABA during seed germination, root growth and stomatal closure and improved water-conserving capacity. Moreover, constitutive expression of ABP9 causes reduced cellular levels of ROS, alleviated oxidative damage and reduced cell death, accompanied by elevated expression of many stress/ABA responsive genes including those for scavenging and regulating ROS. Taken together, these results suggest that ABP9 may play a pivotal role in plant tolerance to abiotic stresses by fine tuning ABA signaling and control of ROS accumulation. PMID:21327835

  13. Arabidopsis peroxisome proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Bussell, John D.; Behrens, Christof; Ecke, Wiebke; Eubel, Holger

    2013-01-01

    The analytical depth of investigation of the peroxisomal proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has not yet reached that of other major cellular organelles such as chloroplasts or mitochondria. This is primarily due to the difficulties associated with isolating and obtaining purified samples of peroxisomes from Arabidopsis. So far only a handful of research groups have been successful in obtaining such fractions. To make things worse, enriched peroxisome fractions frequently suffer from significant organellar contamination, lowering confidence in localization assignment of the identified proteins. As with other cellular compartments, identification of peroxisomal proteins forms the basis for investigations of the dynamics of the peroxisomal proteome. It is therefore not surprising that, in terms of functional analyses by proteomic means, peroxisomes are lagging considerably behind chloroplasts or mitochondria. Alternative strategies are needed to overcome the obstacle of hard-to-obtain organellar fractions. This will help to close the knowledge gap between peroxisomes and other organelles and provide a full picture of the physiological pathways shared between organelles. In this review, we briefly summarize the status quo and discuss some of the methodological alternatives to classic organelle proteomic approaches. PMID:23630535

  14. Molecular genetics of root gravitropism and waving in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedbrook, J.; Boonsirichai, K.; Chen, R.; Hilson, P.; Pearlman, R.; Rosen, E.; Rutherford, R.; Batiza, A.; Carroll, K.; Schulz, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    When Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grow embedded in an agar-based medium, their roots grow vertically downward. This reflects their ability to sense the gravity vector and to position their tip parallel to it (gravitropism). We have isolated a number of mutations affecting root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. One of these mutations, named arg1, affects root and hypocotyl gravitropism without promoting defects in starch content or in the ability of seedlings' organs to respond to plant hormones. The ARG1 gene was cloned and shown to code for a protein with a J domain at its amino terminus and a second sequence motif found in several cytoskeleton binding proteins. Mutations in the AGR1 locus promote a strong defect in root gravitropism. Some alleles also confer an increased root resistance to exogenous ethylene and an increased sensitivity to auxin. AGR1 was cloned and found to encode a putative transmembrane protein which might be involved in polar auxin transport, or in regulating the differential growth response to gravistimulation. When Arabidopsis seedlings grow on the surface of agar-based media tilted backward, their roots wave. That wavy pattern of root growth derives from a combined response to gravity, touch and other surface-derived stimuli. It is accompanied by a reversible rotation of the root tip about its axis. A number of mutations affect the presence or the shape of root waves on tilted agar-based surfaces. One of them, wvc1, promotes the formation of compressed root waves under these conditions. The physiological and molecular analyses of this mutant suggest that a tryptophan-derived molecule other than IAA might be an important regulator of the curvature responsible for root waving.

  15. Computational approaches to detect allosteric pathways in transmembrane molecular machines.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Michino, Mayako; LeVine, Michael V; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Many of the functions of transmembrane proteins involved in signal processing and transduction across the cell membrane are determined by allosteric couplings that propagate the functional effects well beyond the original site of activation. Data gathered from breakthroughs in biochemistry, crystallography, and single molecule fluorescence have established a rich basis of information for the study of molecular mechanisms in the allosteric couplings of such transmembrane proteins. The mechanistic details of these couplings, many of which have therapeutic implications, however, have only become accessible in synergy with molecular modeling and simulations. Here, we review some recent computational approaches that analyze allosteric coupling networks (ACNs) in transmembrane proteins, and in particular the recently developed Protein Interaction Analyzer (PIA) designed to study ACNs in the structural ensembles sampled by molecular dynamics simulations. The power of these computational approaches in interrogating the functional mechanisms of transmembrane proteins is illustrated with selected examples of recent experimental and computational studies pursued synergistically in the investigation of secondary active transporters and GPCRs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26806157

  16. Marginally hydrophobic transmembrane α-helices shaping membrane protein folding

    PubMed Central

    De Marothy, Minttu T; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cells have developed an incredible machinery to facilitate the insertion of membrane proteins into the membrane. While we have a fairly good understanding of the mechanism and determinants of membrane integration, more data is needed to understand the insertion of membrane proteins with more complex insertion and folding pathways. This review will focus on marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices and their influence on membrane protein folding. These weakly hydrophobic transmembrane segments are by themselves not recognized by the translocon and therefore rely on local sequence context for membrane integration. How can such segments reside within the membrane? We will discuss this in the light of features found in the protein itself as well as the environment it resides in. Several characteristics in proteins have been described to influence the insertion of marginally hydrophobic helices. Additionally, the influence of biological membranes is significant. To begin with, the actual cost for having polar groups within the membrane may not be as high as expected; the presence of proteins in the membrane as well as characteristics of some amino acids may enable a transmembrane helix to harbor a charged residue. The lipid environment has also been shown to directly influence the topology as well as membrane boundaries of transmembrane helices—implying a dynamic relationship between membrane proteins and their environment. PMID:25970811

  17. A Genome-Wide Functional Investigation into the Roles of Receptor-Like Proteins in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guodong; Ellendorff, Ursula; Kemp, Ben; Mansfield, John W.; Forsyth, Alec; Mitchell, Kathy; Bastas, Kubilay; Liu, Chun-Ming; Woods-Tör, Alison; Zipfel, Cyril; de Wit, Pierre J.G.M.; Jones, Jonathan D.G.; Tör, Mahmut; Thomma, Bart P.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Receptor-like proteins (RLPs) are cell surface receptors that typically consist of an extracellular leucine-rich repeat domain, a transmembrane domain, and a short cytoplasmatic tail. In several plant species, RLPs have been found to play a role in disease resistance, such as the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Cf and Ve proteins and the apple (Malus domestica) HcrVf2 protein that mediate resistance against the fungal pathogens Cladosporium fulvum, Verticillium spp., and Venturia inaequalis, respectively. In addition, RLPs play a role in plant development; Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM) regulates stomatal distribution, while Arabidopsis CLAVATA2 (CLV2) and its functional maize (Zea mays) ortholog FASCINATED EAR2 regulate meristem maintenance. In total, 57 RLP genes have been identified in the Arabidopsis genome and a genome-wide collection of T-DNA insertion lines was assembled. This collection was functionally analyzed with respect to plant growth and development and sensitivity to various stress responses, including susceptibility toward pathogens. A number of novel developmental phenotypes were revealed for our CLV2 and TMM insertion mutants. In addition, one AtRLP gene was found to mediate abscisic acid sensitivity and another AtRLP gene was found to influence nonhost resistance toward Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola. This genome-wide collection of Arabidopsis RLP gene T-DNA insertion mutants provides a tool for future investigations into the biological roles of RLPs. PMID:18434605

  18. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  19. Role of the C-terminal domains of rice (Oryza sativa L.) bZIP proteins RF2a and RF2b in regulating transcription

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Shunhong; Beachy, Roger N.

    2007-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) transcription factors RF2a and RF2b are bZIP (basic leucine zipper) proteins that interact with, and activate transcription from the RTBV (rice tungro bacilliform virus) promoter. Here we characterize the C-terminal domains of RF2a and RF2b: these domains are rich in glutamine and proline/glutamine, respectively. Affinity pull-down assays demonstrated that the C-terminal domains of RF2a and RF2b can associate to form either homodimers or heterodimers; however, they do not interact with other domains of RF2a or RF2b. Results of in vitro transcription assays using a rice whole-cell extract demonstrate that the C-terminal domains of both RF2a and RF2b activate transcription from the RTBV promoter. In addition, dimerization of the RF2a C-terminal domain is involved in regulating the transcription activation function of RF2a. The predicted helical region within the RF2a C-terminal glutamine-rich domain was determined to be involved in inter-molecular dimerization, and contributed to the regulatory functions of RF2a in these assays. PMID:17371296

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of a tomato cDNA encoding a systemically wound-inducible bZIP DNA-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankovic, B.; Vian, A.; Henry-Vian, C.; Davies, E.

    2000-01-01

    Localized wounding of one leaf in intact tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants triggers rapid systemic transcriptional responses that might be involved in defense. To better understand the mechanism(s) of intercellular signal transmission in wounded tomatoes, and to identify the array of genes systemically up-regulated by wounding, a subtractive cDNA library for wounded tomato leaves was constructed. A novel cDNA clone (designated LebZIP1) encoding a DNA-binding protein was isolated and identified. This clone appears to be encoded by a single gene, and belongs to the family of basic leucine zipper domain (bZIP) transcription factors shown to be up-regulated by cold and dark treatments. Analysis of the mRNA levels suggests that the transcript for LebZIP1 is both organ-specific and up-regulated by wounding. In wounded wild-type tomatoes, the LebZIP1 mRNA levels in distant tissue were maximally up-regulated within only 5 min following localized wounding. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) prevented the rapid wound-induced increase in LebZIP1 mRNA levels, while the basal levels of LebZIP1 transcripts were higher in the ABA mutants notabilis (not), sitiens (sit), and flacca (flc), and wound-induced increases were greater in the ABA-deficient mutants. Together, these results suggest that ABA acts to curtail the wound-induced synthesis of LebZIP1 mRNA.

  1. Influence of the Valine Zipper Region on the Structure and Aggregation of the Basic Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Domain of Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5)

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Natalie A.; Reynolds, T. Steele; Middaugh, C. Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and non-reducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of alpha-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation. PMID:23067245

  2. Basic Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Domain Transcription Factor MBZ1 Regulates Cell Wall Integrity, Spore Adherence, and Virulence in Metarhizium robertsii *

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Shang, Yanfang; Chen, Peilin; Cen, Kai; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) containing the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain are widely distributed in eukaryotes and display an array of distinct functions. In this study, a bZIP-type TF gene (MBZ1) was deleted and functionally characterized in the insect pathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii. The deletion mutant (ΔMBZ1) showed defects in cell wall integrity, adhesion to hydrophobic surfaces, and topical infection of insects. Relative to the WT, ΔMBZ1 was also impaired in growth and conidiogenesis. Examination of putative target gene expression indicated that the genes involved in chitin biosynthesis were differentially transcribed in ΔMBZ1 compared with the WT, which led to the accumulation of a higher level of chitin in mutant cell walls. MBZ1 exhibited negative regulation of subtilisin proteases, but positive control of an adhesin gene, which is consistent with the observation of effects on cell autolysis and a reduction in spore adherence to hydrophobic surfaces in ΔMBZ1. Promoter binding assays indicated that MBZ1 can bind to different target genes and suggested the possibility of heterodimer formation to increase the diversity of the MBZ1 regulatory network. The results of this study advance our understanding of the divergence of bZIP-type TFs at both intra- and interspecific levels. PMID:25673695

  3. In vivo binding of hot pepper bZIP transcription factor CabZIP1 to the G-box region of pathogenesis-related protein 1 promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Paek, Kyung-Hee . E-mail: khpaek95@korea.ac.kr

    2006-05-26

    We find that salicylic acid and ethephon treatment in hot pepper increases the expression of a putative basic/leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor gene, CabZIP1. CabZIP1 mRNA is expressed ubiquitously in various organs. The green fluorescent protein-fused transcription factor, CabZIP1::GFP, can be specifically localized to the nucleus, an action that is consistent with the presence of a nuclear localization signal in its protein sequence. Transient overexpression of the CabZIP1 transcription factor results in an increase in PR-1 transcripts level in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate that CabZIP1 binds to the G-box elements in native promoter of the hot pepper pathogenesis-related protein 1 (CaPR-1) gene in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that CabZIP1 plays a role as a transcriptional regulator of the CaPR-1 gene.

  4. A tobacco bZip transcription activator (TAF-1) binds to a G-box-like motif conserved in plant genes.

    PubMed Central

    Oeda, K; Salinas, J; Chua, N H

    1991-01-01

    Tobacco nuclear extract contains a factor that binds specifically to the motif I sequence (5'-GTACGTGGCG-3') conserved among rice rab genes and cotton lea genes. We isolated from a tobacco cDNA expression library, a partial cDNA clone encoding a truncated derivative of a protein designated as TAF-1. The truncated TAF-1 (Mr = 26,000) contains an acidic region at its N-terminus and a bZip motif at its C-terminus. Using a panel of motif I mutants as probes, we showed that the truncated TAF-1 and the tobacco nuclear factor for motif I have similar, it not identical, binding specificities. In particular, both show high-affinity binding to the perfect palindrome 5'-GCCACGTGGC-3' which is also known as the G-box motif. TAF-1 mRNA is highly expressed in root, but the level is at least 10 times lower in stem and leaf. Consistent with this observation, we found that a motif I tetramer, when fused to the -90 derivative of the CaMV 35S promoter, is inactive in leaf of transgenic tobacco. The activity, however, can be elevated by transient expression of the truncated TAF-1. We conclude from these results that TAF-1 can bind to the G-box and related motifs and that it functions as a transcription activator. Images PMID:2050116

  5. An Arabidopsis callose synthase.

    PubMed

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2002-08-01

    Beta-1,3-glucan polymers are major structural components of fungal cell walls, while cellulosic beta-1,4-glucan is the predominant polysaccharide in plant cell walls. Plant beta-1,3-glucan, called callose, is produced in pollen and in response to pathogen attack and wounding, but it has been unclear whether callose synthases can also produce cellulose and whether plant cellulose synthases may also produce beta-1,3-glucans. We describe here an Arabidopsis gene, AtGsl5, encoding a plasma membrane-localized protein homologous to yeast beta-1,3-glucan synthase whose expression partially complements a yeast beta-1,3-glucan synthase mutant. AtGsl5 is developmentally expressed at highest levels in flowers, consistent with flowers having high beta-1,3-glucan synthase activities for deposition of callose in pollen. A role for AtGsl5 in callose synthesis is also indicated by AtGsl5 expression in the Arabidopsis mpk4 mutant which exhibits systemic acquired resistance (SAR), elevated beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity, and increased callose levels. In addition, AtGsl5 is a likely target of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR, since AtGsl5 mRNA accumulation is induced by SA in wild-type plants, while expression of the nahG salicylate hydroxylase reduces AtGsl5 mRNA levels in the mpk4 mutant. These results indicate that AtGsl5 is likely involved in callose synthesis in flowering tissues and in the mpk4 mutant. PMID:12081364

  6. Molecular parameters and transmembrane transport mechanism of imidazolium-functionalized binols.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Marc; Schmitzer, Andreea

    2014-08-01

    We describe the molecular parameters governing the transmembrane activity of imidazolium-functionalized anion transporters and present a detailed mechanistic study. These ionophores adopt a mobile-carrier mechanism for short methyl and butyl chains, a combined mobile-carrier/transmembrane-pore mechanism for octyl and dodecyl chains, and form transmembrane aggregates for hexadecyl chains. PMID:25043746

  7. Alignment of transmembrane regions in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wuyang; El Hiani, Yassine

    2011-01-01

    Different transmembrane (TM) α helices are known to line the pore of the cystic fibrosis TM conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel. However, the relative alignment of these TMs in the three-dimensional structure of the pore is not known. We have used patch-clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cytoplasmically applied cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced along the length of the pore-lining first TM (TM1) of a cysteine-less variant of CFTR. We find that methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents irreversibly modify cysteines substituted for TM1 residues K95, Q98, P99, and L102 when applied to the cytoplasmic side of open channels. Residues closer to the intracellular end of TM1 (Y84–T94) were not apparently modified by MTS reagents, suggesting that this part of TM1 does not line the pore. None of the internal MTS reagent-reactive cysteines was modified by extracellular [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] MTS. Only K95C, closest to the putative intracellular end of TM1, was apparently modified by intracellular [2-sulfonatoethyl] MTS before channel activation. Comparison of these results with recent work on CFTR-TM6 suggests a relative alignment of these two important TMs along the axis of the pore. This alignment was tested experimentally by formation of disulfide bridges between pairs of cysteines introduced into these two TMs. Currents carried by the double mutants K95C/I344C and Q98C/I344C, but not by the corresponding single-site mutants, were inhibited by the oxidizing agent copper(II)-o-phenanthroline. This inhibition was irreversible on washing but could be reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting disulfide bond formation between the introduced cysteine side chains. These results allow us to develop a model of the relative positions, functional contributions, and alignment of two important TMs lining the CFTR pore. Such functional information is necessary to understand and interpret the three-dimensional structure of the

  8. Alignment of transmembrane regions in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Different transmembrane (TM) α helices are known to line the pore of the cystic fibrosis TM conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel. However, the relative alignment of these TMs in the three-dimensional structure of the pore is not known. We have used patch-clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cytoplasmically applied cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced along the length of the pore-lining first TM (TM1) of a cysteine-less variant of CFTR. We find that methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents irreversibly modify cysteines substituted for TM1 residues K95, Q98, P99, and L102 when applied to the cytoplasmic side of open channels. Residues closer to the intracellular end of TM1 (Y84-T94) were not apparently modified by MTS reagents, suggesting that this part of TM1 does not line the pore. None of the internal MTS reagent-reactive cysteines was modified by extracellular [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] MTS. Only K95C, closest to the putative intracellular end of TM1, was apparently modified by intracellular [2-sulfonatoethyl] MTS before channel activation. Comparison of these results with recent work on CFTR-TM6 suggests a relative alignment of these two important TMs along the axis of the pore. This alignment was tested experimentally by formation of disulfide bridges between pairs of cysteines introduced into these two TMs. Currents carried by the double mutants K95C/I344C and Q98C/I344C, but not by the corresponding single-site mutants, were inhibited by the oxidizing agent copper(II)-o-phenanthroline. This inhibition was irreversible on washing but could be reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting disulfide bond formation between the introduced cysteine side chains. These results allow us to develop a model of the relative positions, functional contributions, and alignment of two important TMs lining the CFTR pore. Such functional information is necessary to understand and interpret the three-dimensional structure of the pore

  9. The Golgi-Localized Arabidopsis Endomembrane Protein12 Contains Both Endoplasmic Reticulum Export and Golgi Retention Signals at Its C Terminus[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Caiji; Yu, Christine K.Y.; Qu, Song; San, Melody Wan Yan; Li, Kwun Yee; Lo, Sze Wan; Jiang, Liwen

    2012-01-01

    Endomembrane proteins (EMPs), belonging to the evolutionarily conserved transmembrane nine superfamily in yeast and mammalian cells, are characterized by the presence of a large lumenal N terminus, nine transmembrane domains, and a short cytoplasmic tail. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains 12 EMP members (EMP1 to EMP12), but little is known about their protein subcellular localization and function. Here, we studied the subcellular localization and targeting mechanism of EMP12 in Arabidopsis and demonstrated that (1) both endogenous EMP12 (detected by EMP12 antibodies) and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-EMP12 fusion localized to the Golgi apparatus in transgenic Arabidopsis plants; (2) GFP fusion at the C terminus of EMP12 caused mislocalization of EMP12-GFP to reach post-Golgi compartments and vacuoles for degradation in Arabidopsis cells; (3) the EMP12 cytoplasmic tail contained dual sorting signals (i.e., an endoplasmic reticulum export motif and a Golgi retention signal that interacted with COPII and COPI subunits, respectively); and (4) the Golgi retention motif of EMP12 retained several post-Golgi membrane proteins within the Golgi apparatus in gain-of-function analysis. These sorting signals are highly conserved in all plant EMP isoforms and, thus, likely represent a general mechanism for EMP targeting in plant cells. PMID:22570441

  10. Biological insertion of computationally designed short transmembrane segments.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Delgado, Carlos; von Heijne, Gunnar; Marti-Renom, Marc A; Mingarro, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    The great majority of helical membrane proteins are inserted co-translationally into the ER membrane through a continuous ribosome-translocon channel. The efficiency of membrane insertion depends on transmembrane (TM) helix amino acid composition, the helix length and the position of the amino acids within the helix. In this work, we conducted a computational analysis of the composition and location of amino acids in transmembrane helices found in membrane proteins of known structure to obtain an extensive set of designed polypeptide segments with naturally occurring amino acid distributions. Then, using an in vitro translation system in the presence of biological membranes, we experimentally validated our predictions by analyzing its membrane integration capacity. Coupled with known strategies to control membrane protein topology, these findings may pave the way to de novo membrane protein design. PMID:26987712

  11. Biological insertion of computationally designed short transmembrane segments

    PubMed Central

    Baeza-Delgado, Carlos; von Heijne, Gunnar; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; Mingarro, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    The great majority of helical membrane proteins are inserted co-translationally into the ER membrane through a continuous ribosome-translocon channel. The efficiency of membrane insertion depends on transmembrane (TM) helix amino acid composition, the helix length and the position of the amino acids within the helix. In this work, we conducted a computational analysis of the composition and location of amino acids in transmembrane helices found in membrane proteins of known structure to obtain an extensive set of designed polypeptide segments with naturally occurring amino acid distributions. Then, using an in vitro translation system in the presence of biological membranes, we experimentally validated our predictions by analyzing its membrane integration capacity. Coupled with known strategies to control membrane protein topology, these findings may pave the way to de novo membrane protein design. PMID:26987712

  12. CREST - a large and diverse superfamily of putative transmembrane hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of membrane-spanning proteins possess enzymatic activity and catalyze important reactions involving proteins, lipids or other substrates located within or near lipid bilayers. Alkaline ceramidases are seven-transmembrane proteins that hydrolyze the amide bond in ceramide to form sphingosine. Recently, a group of putative transmembrane receptors called progestin and adipoQ receptors (PAQRs) were found to be distantly related to alkaline ceramidases, raising the possibility that they may also function as membrane enzymes. Results Using sensitive similarity search methods, we identified statistically significant sequence similarities among several transmembrane protein families including alkaline ceramidases and PAQRs. They were unified into a large and diverse superfamily of putative membrane-bound hydrolases called CREST (alkaline ceramidase, PAQR receptor, Per1, SID-1 and TMEM8). The CREST superfamily embraces a plethora of cellular functions and biochemical activities, including putative lipid-modifying enzymes such as ceramidases and the Per1 family of putative phospholipases involved in lipid remodeling of GPI-anchored proteins, putative hormone receptors, bacterial hemolysins, the TMEM8 family of putative tumor suppressors, and the SID-1 family of putative double-stranded RNA transporters involved in RNA interference. Extensive similarity searches and clustering analysis also revealed several groups of proteins with unknown function in the CREST superfamily. Members of the CREST superfamily share seven predicted core transmembrane segments with several conserved sequence motifs. Conclusions Universal conservation of a set of histidine and aspartate residues across all groups in the CREST superfamily, coupled with independent discoveries of hydrolase activities in alkaline ceramidases and the Per1 family as well as results from previous mutational studies of Per1, suggests that the majority of CREST members are metal-dependent hydrolases

  13. Transmembrane Current Imaging in the Heart during Pacing and Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Richard A.; Mashburn, David N.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; Roth, Bradley J.; Pathmanathan, Pras; Wikswo, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we described a method to quantify the time course of total transmembrane current (Im) and the relative role of its two components, a capacitive current (Ic) and a resistive current (Iion), corresponding to the cardiac action potential during stable propagation. That approach involved recording high-fidelity (200 kHz) transmembrane potential (Vm) signals with glass microelectrodes at one site using a spatiotemporal coordinate transformation via measured conduction velocity. Here we extend our method to compute these transmembrane currents during stable and unstable propagation from fluorescence signals of Vm at thousands of sites (3 kHz), thereby introducing transmembrane current imaging. In contrast to commonly used linear Laplacians of extracellular potential (Ve) to compute Im, we utilized nonlinear image processing to compute the required second spatial derivatives of Vm. We quantified the dynamic spatial patterns of current density of Im and Iion for both depolarization and repolarization during pacing (including nonplanar patterns) by calibrating data with the microelectrode signals. Compared to planar propagation, we found that the magnitude of Iion was significantly reduced at sites of wave collision during depolarization but not repolarization. Finally, we present uncalibrated dynamic patterns of Im during ventricular fibrillation and show that Im at singularity sites was monophasic and positive with a significant nonzero charge (Im integrated over 10 ms) in contrast with nonsingularity sites. Our approach should greatly enhance the understanding of the relative roles of functional (e.g., rate-dependent membrane dynamics and propagation patterns) and static spatial heterogeneities (e.g., spatial differences in tissue resistance) via recordings during normal and compromised propagation, including arrhythmias. PMID:24094412

  14. Transmembrane current imaging in the heart during pacing and fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Gray, Richard A; Mashburn, David N; Sidorov, Veniamin Y; Roth, Bradley J; Pathmanathan, Pras; Wikswo, John P

    2013-10-01

    Recently, we described a method to quantify the time course of total transmembrane current (Im) and the relative role of its two components, a capacitive current (Ic) and a resistive current (Iion), corresponding to the cardiac action potential during stable propagation. That approach involved recording high-fidelity (200 kHz) transmembrane potential (Vm) signals with glass microelectrodes at one site using a spatiotemporal coordinate transformation via measured conduction velocity. Here we extend our method to compute these transmembrane currents during stable and unstable propagation from fluorescence signals of Vm at thousands of sites (3 kHz), thereby introducing transmembrane current imaging. In contrast to commonly used linear Laplacians of extracellular potential (Ve) to compute Im, we utilized nonlinear image processing to compute the required second spatial derivatives of Vm. We quantified the dynamic spatial patterns of current density of Im and Iion for both depolarization and repolarization during pacing (including nonplanar patterns) by calibrating data with the microelectrode signals. Compared to planar propagation, we found that the magnitude of Iion was significantly reduced at sites of wave collision during depolarization but not repolarization. Finally, we present uncalibrated dynamic patterns of Im during ventricular fibrillation and show that Im at singularity sites was monophasic and positive with a significant nonzero charge (Im integrated over 10 ms) in contrast with nonsingularity sites. Our approach should greatly enhance the understanding of the relative roles of functional (e.g., rate-dependent membrane dynamics and propagation patterns) and static spatial heterogeneities (e.g., spatial differences in tissue resistance) via recordings during normal and compromised propagation, including arrhythmias. PMID:24094412

  15. Quantification of structural distortions in the transmembrane helices of GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Deupi, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    A substantial part of the structural and much of the functional information about G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comes from studies on rhodopsin. Thus, analysis tools for detailed structure comparison are key to see to what extent this information can be extended to other GPCRs. Among the methods to evaluate protein structures and, in particular, helix distortions, HELANAL has the advantage that it provides data (local bend and twist angles) that can be easily translated to structural effects, as a local opening/tightening of the helix.In this work I show how HELANAL can be used to extract detailed structural information of the transmembrane bundle of GPCRs, and I provide some examples on how these data can be interpreted to study basic principles of protein structure, to compare homologous proteins and to study mechanisms of receptor activation. Also, I show how in combination with the sequence analysis tools provided by the program GMoS, distortions in individual receptors can be put in the context of the whole Class A GPCR family. Specifically, quantification of the strong proline-induced distortions in the transmembrane bundle of rhodopsin shows that they are not standard proline kinks. Moreover, the helix distortions in transmembrane helix (TMH) 5 and TMH 6 of rhodopsin are also present in the rest of GPCR crystal structures obtained so far, and thus, rhodopsin-based homology models have modeled correctly these strongly distorted helices. While in some cases the inherent "rhodopsin bias" of many of the GPCR models to date has not been a disadvantage, the availability of more templates will clearly result in better homology models. This type of analysis can be, of course, applied to any protein, and it may be particularly useful for the structural analysis of other membrane proteins. A detailed knowledge of the local structural changes related to ligand binding and how they are translated into larger-scale movements of transmembrane domains is key to

  16. Detecting pore-lining regions in transmembrane protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alpha-helical transmembrane channel and transporter proteins play vital roles in a diverse range of essential biological processes and are crucial in facilitating the passage of ions and molecules across the lipid bilayer. However, the experimental difficulties associated with obtaining high quality crystals has led to their significant under-representation in structural databases. Computational methods that can identify structural features from sequence alone are therefore of high importance. Results We present a method capable of automatically identifying pore-lining regions in transmembrane proteins from sequence information alone, which can then be used to determine the pore stoichiometry. By labelling pore-lining residues in crystal structures using geometric criteria, we have trained a support vector machine classifier to predict the likelihood of a transmembrane helix being involved in pore formation. Results from testing this approach under stringent cross-validation indicate that prediction accuracy of 72% is possible, while a support vector regression model is able to predict the number of subunits participating in the pore with 62% accuracy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first tool capable of identifying pore-lining regions in proteins and we present the results of applying it to a data set of sequences with available crystal structures. Our method provides a way to characterise pores in transmembrane proteins and may even provide a starting point for discovering novel routes of therapeutic intervention in a number of important diseases. This software is freely available as source code from: http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/downloads/memsat-svm/. PMID:22805427

  17. Protein S-Acyltransferase 14: A Specific Role for Palmitoylation in Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaxiao; Scott, Rod; Doughty, James; Grant, Murray; Qi, Baoxiu

    2016-01-01

    The Asp-His-His-Cys-Cys-rich domain-containing Protein S-Acyl Transferases (PATs) are multipass transmembrane proteins that catalyze S-acylation (commonly known as S-palmitoylation), the reversible posttranslational lipid modification of proteins. Palmitoylation enhances the hydrophobicity of proteins, contributes to their membrane association, and plays roles in protein trafficking and signaling. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), there are at least 24 PATs; previous studies on two PATs established important roles in growth, development, and stress responses. In this study, we identified a, to our knowledge, novel PAT, AtPAT14, in Arabidopsis. Complementation studies in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Arabidopsis demonstrate that AtPAT14 possesses PAT enzyme activity. Disruption of AtPAT14 by T-DNA insertion resulted in an accelerated senescence phenotype. This coincided with increased transcript levels of some senescence-specific and pathogen-resistant marker genes. We show that early senescence of pat14 does not involve the signaling molecules jasmonic acid and abscisic acid, or autophagy, but associates with salicylic acid homeostasis and signaling. This strongly suggests that AtPAT14 plays a pivotal role in regulating senescence via salicylic acid pathways. Senescence is a complex process required for normal plant growth and development and requires the coordination of many genes and signaling pathways. However, precocious senescence results in loss of biomass and seed production. The negative regulation of leaf senescence by AtPAT14 in Arabidopsis highlights, to our knowledge for the first time, a specific role for palmitoylation in leaf senescence. PMID:26537563

  18. Probing transmembrane mechanical coupling and cytomechanics using magnetic twisting cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    We recently developed a magnetic twisting cytometry technique that allows us to apply controlled mechanical stresses to specific cell surface receptors using ligand-coated ferromagnetic microbeads and to simultaneously measure the mechanical response in living cells. Using this technique, we have previously shown the following: (i) beta 1 integrin receptors mediate mechanical force transfer across the cell surface and to the cytoskeleton, whereas other transmembrane receptors (e.g., scavenger receptors) do not; (ii) cytoskeletal stiffness increases in direct proportion to the level of stress applied to integrins; and (iii) the slope of this linear stiffening response differs depending on the shape of the cell. We now show that different integrins (beta 1, alpha V beta 3, alpha V, alpha 5, alpha 2) and other transmembrane receptors (scavenger receptor, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule) differ in their ability to mediate force transfer across the cell surface. In addition, the linear stiffening behavior previously observed in endothelial cells was found to be shared by other cell types. Finally, we demonstrate that dynamic changes in cell shape that occur during both cell spreading and retraction are accompanied by coordinate changes in cytoskeletal stiffness. Taken together, these results suggest that the magnetic twisting cytometry technique may be a powerful and versatile tool for studies analyzing the molecular basis of transmembrane mechanical coupling to the cytoskeleton as well as dynamic relations between changes in cytoskeletal structure and alterations in cell form and function.

  19. Transcriptome analysis reveals transmembrane targets on transplantable midbrain dopamine progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Marie E.; Björklund, Anders; Parish, Clare L.; Thompson, Lachlan H.

    2015-01-01

    An important challenge for the continued development of cell therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the establishment of procedures that better standardize cell preparations for use in transplantation. Although cell sorting has been an anticipated strategy, its application has been limited by lack of knowledge regarding transmembrane proteins that can be used to target and isolate progenitors for midbrain dopamine (mDA) neurons. We used a “FACS-array” approach to identify 18 genes for transmembrane proteins with high expression in mDA progenitors and describe the utility of four of these targets (Alcam, Chl1, Gfra1, and Igsf8) for isolating mDA progenitors from rat primary ventral mesencephalon through flow cytometry. Alcam and Chl1 facilitated a significant enrichment of mDA neurons following transplantation, while targeting of Gfra1 allowed for robust separation of dopamine and serotonin neurons. Importantly, we also show that mDA progenitors isolated on the basis of transmembrane proteins are capable of extensive, functional innervation of the host striatum and correction of motor impairment in a unilateral model of PD. These results are highly relevant for current efforts to establish safe and effective stem cell-based procedures for PD, where clinical translation will almost certainly require safety and standardization measures in order to deliver well-characterized cell preparations. PMID:25775569

  20. Splice isoform estrogen receptors as integral transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Toomre, Derek; Bender, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to enhancing or repressing transcription, steroid hormone receptors rapidly transduce kinase activation signals. On ligand engagement, an N-terminus–truncated splice isoform of estrogen receptor (ER) α, ER46, triggers membrane-initiated signals, resulting in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and endothelial NO production. The orientation of ER46 at the plasma membrane is incompletely defined. With the use of ecliptic pHluorin-fused ER46, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in live human endothelial cells illustrates that ER46 can topologically conform to a type I transmembrane protein structure. Mutation of isoleucine-386 at the center of ER46's transmembrane hydrophobic core prevents membrane spanning, obscures the N-terminal ectodomain, and effects a marked reduction in membrane-impermeant estrogen binding with diminished rapid eNOS activation and NO production, despite maintained genomic induction of an estrogen response element–luciferase reporter. Thus there exist pools of transmembrane steroid hormone receptors that are efficient signaling molecules and potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:21937726

  1. Transmembrane Helix Assembly by Max-Min Ant System Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sujaree, Kanon; Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Supunyabut, Chirayut; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid progress in biochemical and structural studies of membrane proteins, considerable attention has been given on developing efficient computational methods for solving low-to-medium resolution structures using sparse structural data. In this study, we demonstrate a novel algorithm, max-min ant system (MMAS), designed to find an assembly of α-helical transmembrane proteins using a rigid helix arrangement guided by distance constraints. The new algorithm generates a large variety with finite number of orientations of transmembrane helix bundle and finds the solution that is matched with the provided distance constraints based on the behavior of ants to search for the shortest possible path between their nest and the food source. To demonstrate the efficiency of the novel search algorithm, MMAS is applied to determine the transmembrane packing of KcsA and MscL ion channels from a limited distance information extracted from the crystal structures, and the packing of KvAP voltage sensor domain using a set of 10 experimentally determined constraints, and the results are compared with those of two popular used stochastic methods, simulated annealing Monte Carlo method and genetic algorithm. PMID:26058409

  2. Basic amino-acid side chains regulate transmembrane integrin signalling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chungho; Schmidt, Thomas; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Ye, Feng; Ulmer, Tobias S; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2012-01-12

    Side chains of Lys/Arg near transmembrane domain (TMD) membrane-water interfaces can 'snorkel', placing their positive charge near negatively charged phospholipid head groups; however, snorkelling's functional effects are obscure. Integrin β TMDs have such conserved basic amino acids. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to show that integrin β(3)(Lys 716) helps determine β(3) TMD topography. The α(ΙΙb)β(3) TMD structure indicates that precise β(3) TMD crossing angles enable the assembly of outer and inner membrane 'clasps' that hold the αβ TMD together to limit transmembrane signalling. Mutation of β(3)(Lys 716) caused dissociation of α(ΙΙb)β(3) TMDs and integrin activation. To confirm that altered topography of β(3)(Lys 716) mutants activated α(ΙΙb)β(3), we used directed evolution of β(3)(K716A) to identify substitutions restoring default state. Introduction of Pro(711) at the midpoint of β(3) TMD (A711P) increased α(ΙΙb)β(3) TMD association and inactivated integrin α(ΙΙb)β(3)(A711P,K716A). β(3)(Pro 711) introduced a TMD kink of 30 ± 1° precisely at the border of the outer and inner membrane clasps, thereby decoupling the tilt between these segments. Thus, widely occurring snorkelling residues in TMDs can help maintain TMD topography and membrane-embedding, thereby regulating transmembrane signalling. PMID:22178926

  3. Transmembrane allosteric coupling of the gates in a potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Bhate, Manasi P.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that transmembrane allostery is the basis for inactivation of the potassium channel KcsA: opening the intracellular gate is spontaneously followed by ion expulsion at the extracellular selectivity filter. This suggests a corollary: following ion expulsion at neutral pH, a spontaneous global conformation change of the transmembrane helices, similar to the motion involved in opening, is expected. Consequently, both the low potassium state and the low pH state of the system could provide useful models for the inactivated state. Unique NMR studies of full-length KcsA in hydrated bilayers provide strong evidence for such a mutual coupling across the bilayer: namely, upon removing ambient potassium ions, changes are seen in the NMR shifts of carboxylates E118 and E120 in the pH gate in the hinges of the inner transmembrane helix (98–103), and in the selectivity filter, all of which resemble changes seen upon acid-induced opening and inhibition and suggest that ion release can trigger channel helix opening. PMID:24344306

  4. Structural Basis of p75 Transmembrane Domain Dimerization.

    PubMed

    Nadezhdin, Kirill D; García-Carpio, Irmina; Goncharuk, Sergey A; Mineev, Konstantin S; Arseniev, Alexander S; Vilar, Marçal

    2016-06-01

    Dimerization of single span transmembrane receptors underlies their mechanism of activation. p75 neurotrophin receptor plays an important role in the nervous system, but the understanding of p75 activation mechanism is still incomplete. The transmembrane (TM) domain of p75 stabilizes the receptor dimers through a disulfide bond, essential for the NGF signaling. Here we solved by NMR the three-dimensional structure of the p75-TM-WT and the functionally inactive p75-TM-C257A dimers. Upon reconstitution in lipid micelles, p75-TM-WT forms the disulfide-linked dimers spontaneously. Under reducing conditions, p75-TM-WT is in a monomer-dimer equilibrium with the Cys(257) residue located on the dimer interface. In contrast, p75-TM-C257A forms dimers through the AXXXG motif on the opposite face of the α-helix. Biochemical and cross-linking experiments indicate that AXXXG motif is not on the dimer interface of p75-TM-WT, suggesting that the conformation of p75-TM-C257A may be not functionally relevant. However, rather than mediating p75 homodimerization, mutagenesis of the AXXXG motif reveals its functional role in the regulated intramembrane proteolysis of p75 catalyzed by the γ-secretase complex. Our structural data provide an insight into the key role of the Cys(257) in stabilization of the weak transmembrane dimer in a conformation required for the NGF signaling. PMID:27056327

  5. The DNA-binding domain of two bZIP transcription factors, the Epstein-Barr virus switch gene product EB1 and Jun, is a bipartite nuclear targeting sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Mikaélian, I; Drouet, E; Marechal, V; Denoyel, G; Nicolas, J C; Sergeant, A

    1993-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 gene product EB1 (also called ZEBRA and Zta), is a transcription factor belonging to the bZIP (basic domain leucine zipper) family of nuclear proteins. Translocation to the nucleus of EB1 (J. Becker, U. Leser, M. Marschall, A. Langford, W. Jilg, H. Gelderblom, P. Reichart, and H. Wolf, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88:8332-8336, 1991) and of two other bZIP proteins, c-Jun and c-Fos (P. Roux, J.-M. Blanchard, A. Fernandez, N. Lamb, P. Jeanteur, and M. Piechaczyk, Cell 63:341-351, 1990), has been shown to be subject to regulation. We show here that for both EB1 and Jun the nuclear targeting signals (NTS) in the proteins' primary sequences are two clusters of positively charged amino acids. These clusters, called BRA and BRB, are necessary and sufficient to direct beta-galactosidase to the nuclear compartment and act as a bipartite NTS. They are conserved among all the bZIP proteins, and although they are not identical, they probably share the same function. Site-directed mutagenesis studies made on these basic clusters suggest that they also act as a bipartite NTS in the EB1 protein. Our results also demonstrate that in EB1 and Jun, these bipartite NTS are superimposed with bipartite DNA-binding domains, since BRA and BRB are required in vitro for direct and specific contact between these proteins and their DNA-binding sites. Images PMID:8380464

  6. HTLV-1 bZIP factor protein targets the Rb/E2F-1 pathway to promote proliferation and apoptosis of primary CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Kawatsuki, A; Yasunaga, J-I; Mitobe, Y; Green, P L; Matsuoka, M

    2016-08-25

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus that induces a fatal T-cell malignancy, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Among several regulatory/accessory genes in HTLV-1, HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) is the only viral gene constitutively expressed in infected cells. Our previous study showed that HBZ functions in two different molecular forms, HBZ protein and HBZ RNA. In this study, we show that HBZ protein targets retinoblastoma protein (Rb), which is a critical tumor suppressor in many types of cancers. HBZ protein interacts with the Rb/E2F-1 complex and activates the transcription of E2F-target genes associated with cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Mouse primary CD4(+) T cells transduced with HBZ show accelerated G1/S transition and apoptosis, and importantly, T cells from HBZ transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice also demonstrate enhanced cell proliferation and apoptosis. To evaluate the functions of HBZ protein alone in vivo, we generated a new transgenic mouse strain that expresses HBZ mRNA altered by silent mutations but encoding intact protein. In these mice, the numbers of effector/memory and Foxp3(+) T cells were increased, and genes associated with proliferation and apoptosis were upregulated. This study shows that HBZ protein promotes cell proliferation and apoptosis in primary CD4(+) T cells through activation of the Rb/E2F pathway, and that HBZ protein also confers onto CD4(+) T-cell immunophenotype similar to those of ATL cells, suggesting that HBZ protein has important roles in dysregulation of CD4(+) T cells infected with HTLV-1. PMID:26804169

  7. Overexpression of the bZIP transcription factor OsbZIP79 suppresses the production of diterpenoid phytoalexin in rice cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Koji; Nishizawa, Yoko; Minami, Eiichi; Nojiri, Hideaki; Yamane, Hisakazu; Okada, Kazunori

    2015-01-15

    Phytoalexins are antimicrobial specialised metabolites that are produced by plants in response to pathogen attack. Momilactones and phytocassanes are major diterpenoid phytoalexins in rice that are synthesised from geranylgeranyl diphosphate that is derived from the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. We have previously reported that rice cells overexpressing the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor OsTGAP1 exhibit a hyperaccumulation of momilactones and phytocassanes, with hyperinductive expression of momilactone and phytocassane biosynthetic genes and MEP pathway genes, upon response to a chitin oligosaccharide elicitor. For a better understanding of OsTGAP1-mediated regulation of diterpenoid phytoalexin production, we identified OsTGAP1-interacting proteins using yeast two-hybrid screening. Among the OsTGAP1-interacting protein candidates, a TGA factor OsbZIP79 was investigated to verify its physical interaction with OsTGAP1 and involvement in the regulation of phytoalexin production. An in vitro pull-down assay demonstrated that OsTGAP1 and OsbZIP79 exhibited a heterodimeric as well as a homodimeric interaction. A bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis also showed the interaction between OsTGAP1 and OsbZIP79 in vivo. Intriguingly, whereas OsbZIP79 transactivation activity was observed in a transient reporter assay, the overexpression of OsbZIP79 resulted in suppression of the elicitor-inducible expression of diterpenoid phytoalexin biosynthetic genes, and thus caused a decrease in the accumulation of phytoalexin in rice cells. These results suggest that OsbZIP79 functions as a negative regulator of phytoalexin production triggered by a chitin oligosaccharide elicitor in rice cells, although it remains open under which conditions OsbZIP79 can work with OsTGAP1. PMID:25462074

  8. Interferon-γ Promotes Inflammation and Development of T-Cell Lymphoma in HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mitagami, Yu; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Kinosada, Haruka; Ohshima, Koichi; Matsuoka, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an etiological agent of several inflammatory diseases and a T-cell malignancy, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) is the only viral gene that is constitutively expressed in HTLV-1-infected cells, and it has multiple functions on T-cell signaling pathways. HBZ has important roles in HTLV-1-mediated pathogenesis, since HBZ transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice develop systemic inflammation and T-cell lymphomas, which are similar phenotypes to HTLV-1-associated diseases. We showed previously that in HBZ-Tg mice, HBZ causes unstable Foxp3 expression, leading to an increase in regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the consequent induction of IFN-γ-producing cells, which in turn leads to the development of inflammation in the mice. In this study, we show that the severity of inflammation is correlated with the development of lymphomas in HBZ-Tg mice, suggesting that HBZ-mediated inflammation is closely linked to oncogenesis in CD4+ T cells. In addition, we found that IFN-γ-producing cells enhance HBZ-mediated inflammation, since knocking out IFN-γ significantly reduced the incidence of dermatitis as well as lymphoma. Recent studies show the critical roles of the intestinal microbiota in the development of Tregs in vivo. We found that even germ-free HBZ-Tg mice still had an increased number of Tregs and IFN-γ-producing cells, and developed dermatitis, indicating that an intrinsic activity of HBZ evokes aberrant T-cell differentiation and consequently causes inflammation. These results show that immunomodulation by HBZ is implicated in both inflammation and oncogenesis, and suggest a causal connection between HTLV-1-associated inflammation and ATL. PMID:26296091

  9. A novel bZIP transcription factor ClrC positively regulates multiple stress responses, conidiation and cellulase expression in Penicillium oxalicum.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yunfeng; Liu, Guodong; Yao, Guangshan; Li, Zhonghai; Qin, Yuqi; Qu, Yinbo

    2016-06-01

    Cellulase production in filamentous fungi is largely regulated at the transcriptional level, and several transcription factors have been reported to be involved in this process. In this study, we identified ClrC, a novel transcription factor in cellulase production in Penicillium oxalicum. ClrC and its orthologs have a highly conserved basic leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domain, and their biological functions have not been explored. Deletion of clrC resulted in pleiotropic effects, including altered growth, reduced conidiation and increased sensitivity to oxidative and cell wall stresses. In particular, the clrC deletion mutant ΔclrC showed 46.1% ± 8.1% and 58.0% ± 8.7% decreases in production of filter paper enzyme and xylanase activities in cellulose medium, respectively. In contrast, 57.4% ± 10.0% and 70.9% ± 19.4% increased production of filter paper enzyme, and xylanase was observed in the clrC overexpressing strain, respectively. The transcription levels of major cellulase genes, as well as two cellulase transcriptional activator genes, clrB and xlnR, were significantly downregulated in ΔclrC, but substantially upregulated in clrC overexpressing strains. Furthermore, we observed that the absence of ClrC reduced full induction of cellulase expression even in the clrB overexpressing strain. These results indicated that ClrC is a novel and efficient engineering target for improving cellulolytic enzyme production in filamentous fungi. PMID:27012606

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana—Aphid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Joe; Singh, Vijay; Shah, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Aphids are important pests of plants that use their stylets to tap into the sieve elements to consume phloem sap. Besides the removal of photosynthates, aphid infestation also alters source-sink patterns. Most aphids also vector viral diseases. In this chapter, we will summarize on recent significant findings in plant-aphid interaction, and how studies involving Arabidopsis thaliana and Myzus persicae (Sülzer), more commonly known as the green peach aphid (GPA), are beginning to provide important insights into the molecular basis of plant defense and susceptibility to aphids. The recent demonstration that expression of dsRNA in Arabidopsis can be used to silence expression of genes in GPA has further expanded the utility of Arabidopsis for evaluating the contribution of the aphid genome-encoded proteins to this interaction. PMID:22666177

  11. Salt-Induced Remodeling of Spatially Restricted Clathrin-Independent Endocytic Pathways in Arabidopsis Root

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Anirban; Irani, Niloufer G.; Fujimoto, Masaru; Nakano, Akihiko; Mayor, Satyajit; Mathew, M.K.

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis is a ubiquitous cellular process that is characterized well in animal cells in culture but poorly across intact, functioning tissue. Here, we analyze endocytosis throughout the Arabidopsis thaliana root using three classes of probes: a lipophilic dye, tagged transmembrane proteins, and a lipid-anchored protein. We observe a stratified distribution of endocytic processes. A clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway that internalizes transmembrane proteins functions in all cell layers, while a sterol-dependent, clathrin-independent pathway that takes up lipid and lipid-anchored proteins but not transmembrane proteins is restricted to the epidermal layer. Saline stress induces a third pathway that is clathrin-independent, nondiscriminatory in its choice of cargo, and operates across all layers of the root. Concomitantly, small acidic compartments in inner cell layers expand to form larger vacuole-like structures. Plants lacking function of the Rab-GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor) VPS9a (vacuolar protein sorting 9A) neither induce the third endocytic pathway nor expand the vacuolar system in response to salt stress. The plants are also hypersensitive to salt. Thus, saline stress reconfigures clathrin-independent endocytosis and remodels endomembrane systems, forming large vacuoles in the inner cell layers, both processes correlated by the requirement of VPS9a activity. PMID:25901088

  12. No primexine and plasma membrane undulation is essential for primexine deposition and plasma membrane undulation during microsporogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hai-Shuang; Zhang, Cheng; Chang, Yu-Hua; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Shi, Zhi-Hao; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Xu, Ling; Huang, Hai; Zhang, Sen; Yang, Zhong-Nan

    2012-01-01

    Primexine deposition and plasma membrane undulation are the initial steps of pollen wall formation. However, little is known about the genes involved in this important biological process. Here, we report a novel gene, NO PRIMEXINE AND PLASMA MEMBRANE UNDULATION (NPU), which functions in the early stage of pollen wall development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Loss of NPU function causes male sterility due to a defect in callose synthesis and sporopollenin deposition, resulting in disrupted pollen in npu mutants. Transmission electronic microscopy observation demonstrated that primexine deposition and plasma membrane undulation are completely absent in the npu mutants. NPU encodes a membrane protein with two transmembrane domains and one intracellular domain. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that NPU is strongly expressed in microspores and the tapetum during the tetrad stage. All these results together indicate that NPU plays a vital role in primexine deposition and plasma membrane undulation during early pollen wall development. PMID:22100644

  13. The Arabidopsis elch mutant reveals functions of an ESCRT component in cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Christoph; Schellmann, Swen; Sabovljevic, Aneta; Shahriari, Mojgan; Keshavaiah, Channa; Bechtold, Nicole; Herzog, Michel; Müller, Stefan; Hanisch, Franz-Georg; Hülskamp, Martin

    2006-12-01

    Recently, an alternative route to the proteasomal protein-degradation pathway was discovered that specifically targets transmembrane proteins marked with a single ubiquitin to the endosomal multivesicular body (MVB) and, subsequently, to the vacuole (yeast) or lysosome (animals), where they are degraded by proteases. Vps23p/TSG101 is a key component of the ESCRT I-III machinery in yeast and animals that recognizes mono-ubiquitylated proteins and sorts them into the MVB. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis ELCH (ELC) gene encodes a Vps23p/TSG101 homolog, and that homologs of all known ESCRT I-III components are present in the Arabidopsis genome. As with its animal and yeast counterparts, ELC binds ubiquitin and localizes to endosomes. Gel-filtration experiments indicate that ELC is a component of a high-molecular-weight complex. Yeast two-hybrid and immunoprecipitation assays showed that ELC interacts with Arabidopsis homologs of the ESCRT I complex. The elc mutant shows multiple nuclei in various cell types, indicating a role in cytokinesis. Double-mutant analysis with kaktus shows that increased ploidy levels do not influence the cytokinesis effect of elc mutants, suggesting that ELC is only important during the first endoreduplication cycle. Double mutants with tubulin folding cofactor a mutants show a synergistic phenotype, suggesting that ELC regulates cytokinesis through the microtubule cytoskeleton. PMID:17090720

  14. Molecular Insights into the Transmembrane Domain of the Thyrotropin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chantreau, Vanessa; Taddese, Bruck; Munier, Mathilde; Gourdin, Louis; Henrion, Daniel; Rodien, Patrice; Chabbert, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is member of the leucine-rich repeat subfamily (LGR). In the absence of crystal structure, the success of rational design of ligands targeting the receptor internal cavity depends on the quality of the TSHR models built. In this subfamily, transmembrane helices (TM) 2 and 5 are characterized by the absence of proline compared to most receptors, raising the question of the structural conformation of these helices. To gain insight into the structural properties of these helices, we carried out bioinformatics and experimental studies. Evolutionary analysis of the LGR family revealed a deletion in TM5 but provided no information on TM2. Wild type residues at positions 2.58, 2.59 or 2.60 in TM2 and/or at position 5.50 in TM5 were substituted to proline. Depending on the position of the proline substitution, different effects were observed on membrane expression, glycosylation, constitutive cAMP activity and responses to thyrotropin. Only proline substitution at position 2.59 maintained complex glycosylation and high membrane expression, supporting occurrence of a bulged TM2. The TSHR transmembrane domain was modeled by homology with the orexin 2 receptor, using a protocol that forced the deletion of one residue in the TM5 bulge of the template. The stability of the model was assessed by molecular dynamics simulations. TM5 straightened during the equilibration phase and was stable for the remainder of the simulations. Our data support a structural model of the TSHR transmembrane domain with a bulged TM2 and a straight TM5 that is specific of glycoprotein hormone receptors. PMID:26545118

  15. A novel superfamily of transporters for allantoin and other oxo derivatives of nitrogen heterocyclic compounds in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Desimone, Marcelo; Catoni, Elisabetta; Ludewig, Uwe; Hilpert, Melanie; Schneider, Anja; Kunze, Reinhard; Tegeder, Mechthild; Frommer, Wolf Bernd; Schumacher, Karin

    2002-04-01

    A wide spectrum of soil heterocyclic nitrogen compounds are potential nutrients for plants. Here, it is shown that Arabidopsis plants are able to use allantoin as sole nitrogen source. By functional complementation of a yeast mutant defective in allantoin uptake, an Arabidopsis transporter, AtUPS1 (Arabidopsis thaliana ureide permease 1), was identified. AtUPS1 belongs to a novel superfamily of plant membrane proteins with five open reading frames in Arabidopsis (identity, 64 to 82%). UPS proteins have 10 putative transmembrane domains with a large cytosolic central domain containing a "Walker A" motif. Transport of (14)C-labeled allantoin by AtUPS1 in yeast exhibited saturation kinetics (K(m) approximately 52 microM), was dependent on Glc and a proton gradient, and was stimulated by acidic pH. AtUPS1 transports uric acid and xanthine, besides allantoin, but not adenine. Protons are cosubstrates in allantoin transport by AtUPS1, as demonstrated by expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In plants, AtUPS1 gene expression was dependent on the nitrogen source. Therefore, AtUPS1 presumably is involved in the uptake of allantoin and other purine degradation products when primary sources are limiting. PMID:11971139

  16. A sweet cycle for Arabidopsis G-proteins: Recent discoveries and controversies in plant G-protein signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christopher A; Willard, Melinda D; Kimple, Adam J; Siderovski, David P; Willard, Francis S

    2008-12-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are a class of signal transduction proteins highly conserved throughout evolution that serve as dynamic molecular switches regulating the intracellular communication initiated by extracellular signals including sensory information. This property is achieved by a guanine nucleotide cycle wherein the inactive, signaling-incompetent Galpha subunit is normally bound to GDP; activation to signaling-competent Galpha occurs through the exchange of GDP for GTP (typically catalyzed via seven-transmembrane domain G-protein coupled receptors [GPCRs]), which dissociates the Gbetagamma dimer from Galpha-GTP and initiates signal transduction. The hydrolysis of GTP, greatly accelerated by "Regulator of G-protein Signaling" (RGS) proteins, returns Galpha to its inactive GDP-bound form and terminates signaling. Through extensive characterization of mammalian Galpha isoforms, the rate-limiting step in this cycle is currently considered to be the GDP/GTP exchange rate, which can be orders of magnitude slower than the GTP hydrolysis rate. However, we have recently demonstrated that, in Arabidopsis, the guanine nucleotide cycle appears to be limited by the rate of GTP hydrolysis rather than nucleotide exchange. This finding has important implications for the mechanism of sugar sensing in Arabidopsis. We also discuss these data on Arabidopsis G-protein nucleotide cycling in relation to recent reports of putative plant GPCRs and heterotrimeric G-protein effectors in Arabidopsis. PMID:19513240

  17. Araport: the Arabidopsis Information Portal

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Hanlon, Matthew R.; Contrino, Sergio; Ferlanti, Erik S.; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D.; Cheng, Chia-Yi; Moreira, Walter; Mock, Stephen A.; Stubbs, Joseph; Sullivan, Julie M.; Krampis, Konstantinos; Miller, Jason R.; Micklem, Gos; Vaughn, Matthew; Town, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Information Portal (https://www.araport.org) is a new online resource for plant biology research. It houses the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence and associated annotation. It was conceived as a framework that allows the research community to develop and release ‘modules’ that integrate, analyze and visualize Arabidopsis data that may reside at remote sites. The current implementation provides an indexed database of core genomic information. These data are made available through feature-rich web applications that provide search, data mining, and genome browser functionality, and also by bulk download and web services. Araport uses software from the InterMine and JBrowse projects to expose curated data from TAIR, GO, BAR, EBI, UniProt, PubMed and EPIC CoGe. The site also hosts ‘science apps,’ developed as prototypes for community modules that use dynamic web pages to present data obtained on-demand from third-party servers via RESTful web services. Designed for sustainability, the Arabidopsis Information Portal strategy exploits existing scientific computing infrastructure, adopts a practical mixture of data integration technologies and encourages collaborative enhancement of the resource by its user community. PMID:25414324

  18. The Phenylpropanoid Pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Christopher M.; Chapple, Clint

    2011-01-01

    The phenylpropanoid pathway serves as a rich source of metabolites in plants, being required for the biosynthesis of lignin, and serving as a starting point for the production of many other important compounds, such as the flavonoids, coumarins, and lignans. In spite of the fact that the phenylpropanoids and their derivatives are sometimes classified as secondary metabolites, their relevance to plant survival has been made clear via the study of Arabidopsis and other plant species. As a model system, Arabidopsis has helped to elucidate many details of the phenylpropanoid pathway, its enzymes and intermediates, and the interconnectedness of the pathway with plant metabolism as a whole. These advances in our understanding have been made possible in large part by the relative ease with which mutations can be generated, identified, and studied in Arabidopsis. Herein, we provide an overview of the research progress that has been made in recent years, emphasizing both the genes (and gene families) associated with the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis, and the end products that have contributed to the identification of many mutants deficient in the phenylpropanoid metabolism: the sinapate esters. PMID:22303276

  19. Araport: the Arabidopsis information portal.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Hanlon, Matthew R; Contrino, Sergio; Ferlanti, Erik S; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D; Cheng, Chia-Yi; Moreira, Walter; Mock, Stephen A; Stubbs, Joseph; Sullivan, Julie M; Krampis, Konstantinos; Miller, Jason R; Micklem, Gos; Vaughn, Matthew; Town, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Information Portal (https://www.araport.org) is a new online resource for plant biology research. It houses the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence and associated annotation. It was conceived as a framework that allows the research community to develop and release 'modules' that integrate, analyze and visualize Arabidopsis data that may reside at remote sites. The current implementation provides an indexed database of core genomic information. These data are made available through feature-rich web applications that provide search, data mining, and genome browser functionality, and also by bulk download and web services. Araport uses software from the InterMine and JBrowse projects to expose curated data from TAIR, GO, BAR, EBI, UniProt, PubMed and EPIC CoGe. The site also hosts 'science apps,' developed as prototypes for community modules that use dynamic web pages to present data obtained on-demand from third-party servers via RESTful web services. Designed for sustainability, the Arabidopsis Information Portal strategy exploits existing scientific computing infrastructure, adopts a practical mixture of data integration technologies and encourages collaborative enhancement of the resource by its user community. PMID:25414324

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana CML25 mediates the Ca(2+) regulation of K(+) transmembrane trafficking during pollen germination and tube elongation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang-Shuang; Diao, Wen-Zhu; Yang, Xue; Qiao, Zhu; Wang, Mei; Acharya, Biswa R; Zhang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    The concentration alteration of cytosolic-free calcium ([Ca(2+) ]cyt ) is a well-known secondary messenger in plants and plays important roles during pollen grain germination and tube elongation. Here we demonstrate that CML25, a member of calmodulin-like proteins, has Ca(2+) -binding activity and plays a role in pollen grain germination, tube elongation and seed setting. CML25 transcript was abundant in mature pollen grains and pollen tubes, and its product CML25 protein was primarily directed to the cytoplasm. Two independent CML25 loss-of-function T-DNA insertion mutants suffered a major reduction in both the rate of pollen germination and the elongation of the pollen tube. Also, pollen grains of cml25 mutants were less sensitive to the external K(+) and Ca(2+) concentration than wild-type pollen. The disruption of CML25 increased the [Ca(2+) ]cyt in both the pollen grain and the pollen tube, which in turn impaired the Ca(2+) -dependent inhibition of whole-cell inward K(+) currents in protoplasts prepared from these materials (pollen grain and pollen tube). Complementation of cml25-1 mutant resulted in the recovery of wild-type phenotype. Our findings indicate that CML25 is an important transducer in the Ca(2+) -mediated regulation of K(+) influx during pollen germination and tube elongation. PMID:25923414

  1. Interactions between the transmembrane domains of CD39: identification of interacting residues by yeast selection

    PubMed Central

    Paavilainen, Sari; Guidotti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Rat CD39, a membrane-bound ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleoside tri- and diphosphates, is anchored to the membrane by two transmembrane domains at the two ends of the molecule. The transmembrane domains are important for enzymatic activity, as mutants lacking one or both of these domains have a fraction of the enzymatic activity of the wild-type CD39. We investigated the interactions between the transmembrane domains by using a strain of yeast that requires surface expression of CD39 for growth. Random mutagenesis of selected amino acid residues in the N-terminal transmembrane domain revealed that the presence of charged amino acids at these positions prevents expression of functional protein. Rescue of the growth of these mutants by complementary mutations on selected residues of the C-terminal transmembrane domain indicates that there is contact between particular faces of the transmembrane domains. PMID:26258004

  2. Transmembrane structure predictions with hydropathy index/charge two-dimensional trajectories of stochastic dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Kaburagi, Takashi; Muramatsu, Daigo; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2007-06-01

    A novel algorithm is proposed for predicting transmembrane protein secondary structure from two-dimensional vector trajectories consisting of a hydropathy index and formal charge of a test amino acid sequence using stochastic dynamical system models. Two prediction problems are discussed. One is the prediction of transmembrane region counts; another is that of transmembrane regions, i.e. predicting whether or not each amino acid belongs to a transmembrane region. The prediction accuracies, using a collection of well-characterized transmembrane protein sequences and benchmarking sequences, suggest that the proposed algorithm performs reasonably well. An experiment was performed with a glutamate transporter homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii. The predicted transmembrane regions of the five human glutamate transporter sequences and observations based on the computed likelihood are reported. PMID:17688311

  3. Transmembrane topography of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor delta subunit.

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, P D; Popot, J L; Engelman, D M

    1987-01-01

    Current folding models for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) predict either four or five transmembrane segments per subunit. The N-terminus of each subunit is almost certainly extracellular. We have tested folding models by determining biochemically the cellular location of an intermolecular disulfide bridge thought to lie at the delta subunit C-terminus. Dimers of AChR linked through the delta-delta bridge were prepared from Torpedo marmorata and T.californica electric organ. The disulfide's accessibility to hydrophilic reductants was tested in a reconstituted vesicle system. In right-side-out vesicles (greater than 95% ACh binding sites outwards), the bridge was equally accessible whether or not vesicles had been disrupted by freeze--thawing or by detergents. Control experiments based on the rate of reduction of entrapped diphtheria toxin and measurements of radioactive reductant efflux demonstrated that the vesicles provide an adequate permeability barrier. In reconstituted vesicles containing AChR dimers in scrambled orientations, right-side-out dimers were reduced to monomers three times more rapidly than inside-out dimers, consistent with the measured rate of reductant permeation. These observations indicate that in reconstituted vesicles the delta-delta disulfide bridge lies in the same aqueous space as the ACh binding sites. They are most easily reconciled with folding models that propose an even number of transmembrane crossing per subunit. PMID:3428268

  4. Rigidity of transmembrane proteins determines their cluster shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarinia, Hamidreza; Khoshnood, Atefeh; Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation in cell membrane is vital for the majority of biological functions. Recent experimental results suggest that transmembrane domains of proteins such as α -helices and β -sheets have different structural rigidities. We use molecular dynamics simulation of a coarse-grained model of protein-embedded lipid membranes to investigate the mechanisms of protein clustering. For a variety of protein concentrations, our simulations under thermal equilibrium conditions reveal that the structural rigidity of transmembrane domains dramatically affects interactions and changes the shape of the cluster. We have observed stable large aggregates even in the absence of hydrophobic mismatch, which has been previously proposed as the mechanism of protein aggregation. According to our results, semiflexible proteins aggregate to form two-dimensional clusters, while rigid proteins, by contrast, form one-dimensional string-like structures. By assuming two probable scenarios for the formation of a two-dimensional triangular structure, we calculate the lipid density around protein clusters and find that the difference in lipid distribution around rigid and semiflexible proteins determines the one- or two-dimensional nature of aggregates. It is found that lipids move faster around semiflexible proteins than rigid ones. The aggregation mechanism suggested in this paper can be tested by current state-of-the-art experimental facilities.

  5. Transmembrane topography of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor delta subunit.

    PubMed

    McCrea, P D; Popot, J L; Engelman, D M

    1987-12-01

    Current folding models for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) predict either four or five transmembrane segments per subunit. The N-terminus of each subunit is almost certainly extracellular. We have tested folding models by determining biochemically the cellular location of an intermolecular disulfide bridge thought to lie at the delta subunit C-terminus. Dimers of AChR linked through the delta-delta bridge were prepared from Torpedo marmorata and T.californica electric organ. The disulfide's accessibility to hydrophilic reductants was tested in a reconstituted vesicle system. In right-side-out vesicles (greater than 95% ACh binding sites outwards), the bridge was equally accessible whether or not vesicles had been disrupted by freeze--thawing or by detergents. Control experiments based on the rate of reduction of entrapped diphtheria toxin and measurements of radioactive reductant efflux demonstrated that the vesicles provide an adequate permeability barrier. In reconstituted vesicles containing AChR dimers in scrambled orientations, right-side-out dimers were reduced to monomers three times more rapidly than inside-out dimers, consistent with the measured rate of reductant permeation. These observations indicate that in reconstituted vesicles the delta-delta disulfide bridge lies in the same aqueous space as the ACh binding sites. They are most easily reconciled with folding models that propose an even number of transmembrane crossing per subunit. PMID:3428268

  6. Stability analysis of the inverse transmembrane potential problem in electrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Martin; Mardal, Kent-André; Nielsen, Bjørn Fredrik

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we study some mathematical properties of an inverse problem arising in connection with electrocardiograms (ECGs). More specifically, we analyze the possibility for recovering the transmembrane potential in the heart from ECG recordings, a challenge currently investigated by a growing number of groups. Our approach is based on the bidomain model for the electrical activity in the myocardium, and leads to a parameter identification problem for elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). It turns out that this challenge can be split into two subproblems: the task of recovering the potential at the heart surface from body surface recordings; the problem of computing the transmembrane potential inside the heart from the potential determined at the heart surface. Problem (1), which can be formulated as the Cauchy problem for an elliptic PDE, has been extensively studied and is well known to be severely ill-posed. The main purpose of this paper is to prove that problem (2) is stable and well posed if a suitable prior is available. Moreover, our theoretical findings are illuminated by a series of numerical experiments. Finally, we discuss some aspects of uniqueness related to the anisotropy in the heart.

  7. Transmembrane proteins--Mining the cattle tick transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Richards, Sabine A; Stutzer, Christian; Bosman, Anna-Mari; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2015-09-01

    Managing the spread and load of pathogen-transmitting ticks is an important task worldwide. The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, not only impacts the economy through losses in dairy and meat production, but also raises concerns for human health in regards to the potential of certain transmitted pathogens becoming zoonotic. However, novel strategies to control R. microplus are hindered by lack of understanding tick biology and the discovery of suitable vaccine or acaricide targets. The importance of transmembrane proteins as vaccine targets are well known, as is the case in tick vaccines with Bm86 as antigen. In this study, we describe the localization and functional annotation of 878 putative transmembrane proteins. Thirty proteins could be confirmed in the R. microplus gut using LC-MS/MS analysis and their roles in tick biology are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, 19 targets have not been reported before in any proteomics study in various tick species and the possibility of using the identified proteins as targets for tick control are discussed. Although tissue expression of identified putative proteins through expansive proteomics is necessary, this study demonstrates the possibility of using bioinformatics for the identification of targets for further evaluation in tick control strategies. PMID:26096851

  8. Bioenergetics and mitochondrial transmembrane potential during differentiation of cultured osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komarova, S. V.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.; Globus, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between osteoblast differentiation and bioenergetics, cultured primary osteoblasts from fetal rat calvaria were grown in medium supplemented with ascorbate to induce differentiation. Before ascorbate treatment, the rate of glucose consumption was 320 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), respiration was 40 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), and the ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption was approximately 2, indicating that glycolysis was the main energy source for immature osteoblasts. Ascorbate treatment for 14 days led to a fourfold increase in respiration, a threefold increase in ATP production, and a fivefold increase in ATP content compared with that shown in immature cells. Confocal imaging of mitochondria stained with a transmembrane potential-sensitive vital dye showed that mature cells possessed abundant amounts of high-transmembrane-potential mitochondria, which were concentrated near the culture medium-facing surface. Acute treatment of mature osteoblasts with metabolic inhibitors showed that the rate of glycolysis rose to maintain the cellular energy supply constant. Thus progressive differentiation coincided with changes in cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activity, which are likely to play key roles in osteoblast function.

  9. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Stine C.; Siupka, Piotr; Nielsen, Morten S.

    2015-01-01

    Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN) constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer’s disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN. PMID:26154780

  10. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Stine C; Siupka, Piotr; Nielsen, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN) constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer's disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN. PMID:26154780

  11. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Kol, Matthijs; Swiezewska, Ewa; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2007-05-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced by the presence of single spanning helical transmembrane peptides that facilitate transbilayer movement of membrane phospholipids. MurG catalysed synthesis of Lipid II from Lipid I in lipid vesicles also did not result in membrane translocation of Lipid II. These findings demonstrate that a specialized protein machinery is needed for transmembrane movement of Lipid II. In line with this, we could demonstrate Lipid II translocation in isolated Escherichia coli inner membrane vesicles and this transport could be uncoupled from the synthesis of Lipid II at low temperatures. The transport process appeared to be independent from an energy source (ATP or proton motive force). Additionally, our studies indicate that translocation of Lipid II is coupled to transglycosylation activity on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. PMID:17501931

  12. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Impairs Anti-viral Immunity by Inducing Co-inhibitory Molecule, T Cell Immunoglobulin and ITIM Domain (TIGIT).

    PubMed

    Yasuma, Keiko; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Takemoto, Keiko; Sugata, Kenji; Mitobe, Yuichi; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Nakagawa, Masanori; Suzuki, Yutaka; Matsuoka, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects CD4+ T cells and induces proliferation of infected cells in vivo, which leads to the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) in some infected individuals. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) gene, which is encoded in the minus strand of HTLV-1, plays critical roles in pathogenesis. In this study, RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses using HBZ transduced T cells revealed that HBZ upregulates the expression and promoter acetylation levels of a co-inhibitory molecule, T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT), in addition to those of regulatory T cells related genes, Foxp3 and Ccr4. TIGIT was expressed on CD4+ T cells from HBZ-transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice, and on ATL cells and HTLV-1 infected CD4+ T cells of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in vivo. Expression of Blimp1 and IL-10 was upregulated in TIGIT+CD4+ cells of HBZ-Tg mice compared with TIGIT-CD4+ T cells, suggesting the correlation between TIGIT expression and IL-10 production. When CD4+ T cells from HBZ-Tg mice were stimulated with TIGIT's ligand, CD155, their production of the inhibitory cytokine IL-10 was enhanced. Furthermore, dendritic cells from HBZ-Tg mice produced high levels of IL-10 after stimulation. These data suggest that HBZ alters immune system to suppressive state via TIGIT and IL-10. Importantly, TIGIT suppressed T-cell responses to another HTLV-1 virus protein, Tax, in vitro. Blocking of TIGIT and PD-1 slightly increased anti-Tax T-cell activity in some HAM/TSP patients. These results suggest that HBZ-induced TIGIT on HTLV-1 infected cells impairs T-cell responses to viral antigens. This study shows that HBZ-induced TIGIT plays a pivotal role in attenuating host immune responses and shaping a microenvironment favorable to HTLV-1. PMID:26735971

  13. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Impairs Anti-viral Immunity by Inducing Co-inhibitory Molecule, T Cell Immunoglobulin and ITIM Domain (TIGIT)

    PubMed Central

    Yasuma, Keiko; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Takemoto, Keiko; Sugata, Kenji; Mitobe, Yuichi; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Nakagawa, Masanori; Suzuki, Yutaka; Matsuoka, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects CD4+ T cells and induces proliferation of infected cells in vivo, which leads to the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) in some infected individuals. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) gene, which is encoded in the minus strand of HTLV-1, plays critical roles in pathogenesis. In this study, RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses using HBZ transduced T cells revealed that HBZ upregulates the expression and promoter acetylation levels of a co-inhibitory molecule, T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT), in addition to those of regulatory T cells related genes, Foxp3 and Ccr4. TIGIT was expressed on CD4+ T cells from HBZ-transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice, and on ATL cells and HTLV-1 infected CD4+ T cells of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in vivo. Expression of Blimp1 and IL-10 was upregulated in TIGIT+CD4+ cells of HBZ-Tg mice compared with TIGIT-CD4+ T cells, suggesting the correlation between TIGIT expression and IL-10 production. When CD4+ T cells from HBZ-Tg mice were stimulated with TIGIT’s ligand, CD155, their production of the inhibitory cytokine IL-10 was enhanced. Furthermore, dendritic cells from HBZ-Tg mice produced high levels of IL-10 after stimulation. These data suggest that HBZ alters immune system to suppressive state via TIGIT and IL-10. Importantly, TIGIT suppressed T-cell responses to another HTLV-1 virus protein, Tax, in vitro. Blocking of TIGIT and PD-1 slightly increased anti-Tax T-cell activity in some HAM/TSP patients. These results suggest that HBZ-induced TIGIT on HTLV-1 infected cells impairs T-cell responses to viral antigens. This study shows that HBZ-induced TIGIT plays a pivotal role in attenuating host immune responses and shaping a microenvironment favorable to HTLV-1. PMID:26735971

  14. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA proteins interact in the nucleus with land plant-specific glutaredoxins, which may alter their activities posttranslationally. Here, we investigated the DNA-binding of PAN to the AAGAAT motif under different redox-conditions. The AAGAAT motif is localized in the second intron of the floral homeotic regulator AGAMOUS (AG), which controls stamen and carpel development as well as floral determinacy. Whereas PAN protein binds to this regulatory cis-element under reducing conditions, the interaction is strongly reduced under oxidizing conditions in EMSA studies. The redox-sensitive DNA-binding is mediated via a special PAN N-terminus, which is not present in other Arabidopsis TGA TFs and comprises five cysteines. Two N-terminal PAN cysteines, Cys68 and Cys87, were shown to form a disulfide bridge and Cys340, localized in a C-terminal putative transactivation domain, can be S-glutathionylated. Comparative land plant analyses revealed that the AAGAAT motif exists in asterid and rosid plant species. TGA TFs with N-terminal extensions of variable length were identified in all analyzed seed plants. However, a PAN-like N-terminus exists only in the rosids and exclusively Brassicaceae homologs comprise four to five of the PAN N-terminal cysteines. Redox-dependent modifications of TGA cysteines are known to regulate the activity of stress-related TGA TFs. Here, we show that the N-terminal PAN cysteines participate in a redox-dependent control of the PAN interaction with a highly conserved

  15. Metal Bridges Illuminate Transmembrane Domain Movements during Gating of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel*

    PubMed Central

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis by the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains. Different conformational changes in the channel pore have been described during channel opening and closing; however, the relative importance of these changes to the process of gating the pore is not known. We have used patch clamp recording to identify high affinity Cd2+ bridges formed between pairs of pore-lining cysteine residues introduced into different transmembrane α-helices (TMs). Seven Cd2+ bridges were identified forming between cysteines in TMs 6 and 12. Interestingly, each of these Cd2+ bridges apparently formed only in closed channels, and their formation stabilized the closed state. In contrast, a single Cd2+ bridge identified between cysteines in TMs 1 and 12 stabilized the channel open state. Analysis of the pattern of Cd2+ bridge formation in different channel states suggests that lateral separation and convergence of different TMs, rather than relative rotation or translation of different TMs, is the key conformational change that causes the channel pore to open and close. PMID:25143385

  16. Metal bridges illuminate transmembrane domain movements during gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-10-10

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis by the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains. Different conformational changes in the channel pore have been described during channel opening and closing; however, the relative importance of these changes to the process of gating the pore is not known. We have used patch clamp recording to identify high affinity Cd(2+) bridges formed between pairs of pore-lining cysteine residues introduced into different transmembrane α-helices (TMs). Seven Cd(2+) bridges were identified forming between cysteines in TMs 6 and 12. Interestingly, each of these Cd(2+) bridges apparently formed only in closed channels, and their formation stabilized the closed state. In contrast, a single Cd(2+) bridge identified between cysteines in TMs 1 and 12 stabilized the channel open state. Analysis of the pattern of Cd(2+) bridge formation in different channel states suggests that lateral separation and convergence of different TMs, rather than relative rotation or translation of different TMs, is the key conformational change that causes the channel pore to open and close. PMID:25143385

  17. Asparagine Metabolic Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gaufichon, Laure; Rothstein, Steven J; Suzuki, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic nitrogen in the form of ammonium is assimilated into asparagine via multiple steps involving glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) and asparagine synthetase (AS) in Arabidopsis. The asparagine amide group is liberated by the reaction catalyzed by asparaginase (ASPG) and also the amino group of asparagine is released by asparagine aminotransferase (AsnAT) for use in the biosynthesis of amino acids. Asparagine plays a primary role in nitrogen recycling, storage and transport in developing and germinating seeds, as well as in vegetative and senescence organs. A small multigene family encodes isoenzymes of each step of asparagine metabolism in Arabidopsis, except for asparagine aminotransferase encoded by a single gene. The aim of this study is to highlight the structure of the genes and encoded enzyme proteins involved in asparagine metabolic pathways; the regulation and role of different isogenes; and kinetic and physiological properties of encoded enzymes in different tissues and developmental stages. PMID:26628609

  18. Molecular analysis of ethylene-insensitive mutants in arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerowitz, E.

    1991-01-01

    The subject of this study is the biochemical basis of ethylene reception. The Arabidopsis thaliana ETR gene codes for the ethylene receptor or is involved in transduction of the ethylene-generated signal. We have cloned an etr mutation which results in a decrease in the ethylene response of the plant, with a decrease in ethylene binding of about five-fold. Two genes have been found in the cloned region which confer resistance. By sequence analysis, the first protein contains three distinct regions: a transmembrane region, a serine/threonine protein kinase region, and a control region similar to the RAS-binding region of yeast adenylate cyclase. The second protein contains a zinc-finger; since sequence of the first protein shows no mutant-dependent changes, and transition metals have been implicated in ethylene binding, this protein could be the ETR gene product. However, no mutant dependent differences have been found in this protein, either. The mutation could be upstream of the coding region of either gene and involve regulatory elements, so we are continuing to sequence. (MHB)

  19. The first transmembrane domain (TM1) of β2-subunit binds to the transmembrane domain S1 of α-subunit in BK potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Morera, Francisco J.; Alioua, Abderrahmane; Kundu, Pallob; Salazar, Marcelo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Agustin D.; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The BK channel is one of the most broadly expressed ion channels in mammals. In many tissues, the BK channel pore-forming α-subunit is associated to an auxiliary β-subunit that modulates the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the channel. Structural components present in β-subunits that are important for the physical association with the α-subunit are yet unknown. Here, we show through co-immunoprecipitation that the intracellular C-terminus, the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and the extracellular loop of the β2-subunit are dispensable for association with the α-subunit pointing transmembrane domain 1 (TM1) as responsible for the interaction. Indeed, the TOXCAT assay for transmembrane protein–protein interactions demonstrated for the first time that TM1 of the β2-subunit physically binds to the transmembrane S1 domain of the α-subunit. PMID:22710124

  20. Confinement of transmembrane cell receptors in tunable stripe micropatterns.

    PubMed

    Purrucker, Oliver; Förtig, Anton; Lüdtke, Karin; Jordan, Rainer; Tanaka, Motomu

    2005-02-01

    We report a simple method to confine transmembrane cell receptors in stripe micropatterns of a lipid/lipopolymer monolayer, which are formed as result of the transfer onto a solid substrate. The stripes are aligned perpendicular to the meniscus, whose periodicity can systematically be tuned by the transfer velocity. This strongly suggests the dominant role of the cooperative interaction between the film and substrate. Selective fluorescence labeling of lipids and lipopolymers confirms that the observed patterns coincide with the demixing of two species. Covalent coupling of polymer headgroups enables us to use the stripe patterns as a support for a lipid bilayer membrane. Spreading of lipid vesicles with platelet integrin alphaIIbbeta3 on a self-assembled membrane micropattern demonstrates that cell adhesion receptors are selectively incorporated into the lipopolymer-rich region. The method established here provides us with a tunable template for the confinement of receptor proteins to geometrically control the cell adhesion. PMID:15669865

  1. The transmembrane channel-like protein family and human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jaime S; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by increased sensitivity to infection by the β-subtype of human papillomaviruses (β-HPVs), causing persistent, tinea versicolor-like dermal lesions. In a majority of affected individuals, these macular lesions progress to invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) in sun-exposed areas. While mutations in transmembrane channel-like 6 (TMC6 / EVER1) and 8 (TMC8 / EVER2) have been causally linked to EV, their molecular functions are unclear. It is likely that their protective effects involve regulation of the β-HPV life cycle, host keratinocyte apoptosis vs. survival balance and/or T-cell interaction with infected host cells. PMID:24800179

  2. Teaching old receptors new tricks: biasing seven-transmembrane receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Rajagopal, Keshava; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs; also known as G protein-coupled receptors) are the largest class of receptors in the human genome and are common targets for therapeutics. Originally identified as mediators of 7TMR desensitization, β-arrestins (arrestin 2 and arrestin 3) are now recognized as true adaptor proteins that transduce signals to multiple effector pathways. Signalling that is mediated by β-arrestins has distinct biochemical and functional consequences from those mediated by G proteins, and several biased ligands and receptors have been identified that preferentially signal through either G protein- or β-arrestin-mediated pathways. These ligands are not only useful tools for investigating the biochemistry of 7TMR signalling, they also have the potential to be developed into new classes of therapeutics. PMID:20431569

  3. Rubidium (Potassium) Uptake by Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Polley, L. David; Hopkins, Johns W.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments are reported in which the uptake of 86Rb+, used as an analog of K+, into cultured cells of Arabidopsis thaliana is investigated. A single transport system is found with Km = 0.34 millimolar and Vmax = 14 nmoles per milligram of protein per hour. This system is blocked by the metabolic inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) and by cold. At high concentrations of external K+ (above 1 millimolar), a significant fraction of total uptake is energy-independent. No evidence is found for more than one energy-dependent uptake system or for concentration-dependent modifications of a carrier as postulated in multiphasic transport models. Rb+ uptake was also examined in cultured cells derived from an “osmotic mutant” of Arabidopsis. The system closely resembles that found in wild type cells with the exception that the Michaelis-Menten constants are higher: Km = 1 millimolar and Vmax = 32 nanomoles per milligram of protein per hour. The possibility that these results are artifacts associated with use of cultured cells was checked by examining 86Rb+ uptake by roots of intact seedlings of wild type Arabidopsis. A single energy-dependent transport system is found with Km = 0.42 millimolar which is not significantly different from the Km of cultured cells. There is also energy-independent uptake at high external ion concentration. PMID:16660969

  4. Enhanced Inter-helical Residue Contact Prediction in Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Y.; Floudas, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, based on a recent work by McAllister and Floudas who developed a mathematical optimization model to predict the contacts in transmembrane alpha-helical proteins from a limited protein data set [1], we have enhanced this method by 1) building a more comprehensive data set for transmembrane alpha-helical proteins and this enhanced data set is then used to construct the probability sets, MIN-1N and MIN-2N, for residue contact prediction, 2) enhancing the mathematical model via modifications of several important physical constraints and 3) applying a new blind contact prediction scheme on different protein sets proposed from analyzing the contact prediction on 65 proteins from Fuchs et al. [2]. The blind contact prediction scheme has been tested on two different membrane protein sets. Firstly it is applied to five carefully selected proteins from the training set. The contact prediction of these five proteins uses probability sets built by excluding the target protein from the training set, and an average accuracy of 56% was obtained. Secondly, it is applied to six independent membrane proteins with complicated topologies, and the prediction accuracies are 73% for 2ZY9A, 21% for 3KCUA, 46% for 2W1PA, 64% for 3CN5A, 77% for 3IXZA and 83% for 3K3FA. The average prediction accuracy for the six proteins is 60.7%. The proposed approach is also compared with a support vector machine method (TMhit [3]) and it is shown that it exhibits better prediction accuracy. PMID:21892227

  5. Synergistic transmembrane alignment of the antimicrobial heterodimer PGLa/magainin.

    PubMed

    Tremouilhac, Pierre; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2006-10-27

    The antimicrobial activity of amphipathic alpha-helical peptides is usually attributed to the formation of pores in bacterial membranes, but direct structural information about such a membrane-bound state is sparse. Solid state (2)H-NMR has previously shown that the antimicrobial peptide PGLa undergoes a concentration-dependent realignment from a surface-bound S-state to a tilted T-state. The corresponding change in helix tilt angle from 98 to 125 degrees was interpreted as the formation of PGLa/magainin heterodimers residing on the bilayer surface. Under no conditions so far, has an upright membrane-inserted I-state been observed in which a transmembrane helix alignment would be expected. Here, we have demonstrated that PGLa is able to assume such an I-state in a 1:1 mixture with magainin 2 at a peptide-to-lipid ratio as low as 1:100 in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol model membranes. This (2)H-NMR analysis is based on seven orientational constraints from Ala-3,3,3-d(3) substituted in a non-perturbing manner for four native Ala residues as well as two Ile and one Gly. The observed helix tilt of 158 degrees is rationalized by the formation of heterodimers. This structurally synergistic effect between the two related peptides from the skin of Xenopus laevis correlates very well with their known functional synergistic mode of action. To our knowledge, this example of PGLa is the first case where an alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide is directly shown to assume a transmembrane state that is compatible with the postulated toroidal wormhole pore structure. PMID:16877761

  6. Transmembrane Pores Formed by Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Human LL-37 is a multifunctional cathelicidin peptide that has shown a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity by permeabilizing microbial membranes similar to other antimicrobial peptides; however, its molecular mechanism has not been clarified. Two independent experiments revealed LL-37 bound to membranes in the {alpha}-helical form with the axis lying in the plane of membrane. This led to the conclusion that membrane permeabilization by LL-37 is a nonpore carpet-like mechanism of action. Here we report the detection of transmembrane pores induced by LL-37. The pore formation coincided with LL-37 helices aligning approximately normal to the plane of the membrane. We observed an unusual phenomenon of LL-37 embedded in stacked membranes, which are commonly used in peptide orientation studies. The membrane-bound LL-37 was found in the normal orientation only when the membrane spacing in the multilayers exceeded its fully hydrated value. This was achieved by swelling the stacked membranes with excessive water to a swollen state. The transmembrane pores were detected and investigated in swollen states by means of oriented circular dichroism, neutron in-plane scattering, and x-ray lamellar diffraction. The results are consistent with the effect of LL-37 on giant unilamellar vesicles. The detected pores had a water channel of radius 2333 {angstrom}. The molecular mechanism of pore formation by LL-37 is consistent with the two-state model exhibited by magainin and other small pore-forming peptides. The discovery that peptide-membrane interactions in swollen states are different from those in less hydrated states may have implications for other large membrane-active peptides and proteins studied in stacked membranes.

  7. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  8. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D; Brownell, William E

    2008-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 μm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400–800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons. PMID:16705263

  9. AT14A mediates the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum in Arabidopsis thaliana cells.

    PubMed

    Lü, Bing; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Hongcheng; Liang, Jiansheng; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-06-01

    AT14A has a small domain that has sequence similarities to integrins from animals. Integrins serve as a transmembrane linker between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton, which play critical roles in a variety of biological processes. Because the function of AT14A is unknown, Arabidopsis thaliana AT14A, which is a transmembrane receptor for cell adhesion molecules and a middle member of the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum in plants, has been described. AT14A, co-expressed with green fluorescent protein (GFP), was found to localize mainly to the plasma membrane. The mutant Arabidopsis at14a-1 cells exhibit various phenotypes with cell shape, cell cluster size, thickness, and cellulose content of cell wall, the adhesion between cells, and the adhesion of plasma membrane to cell wall varied by plasmolysis. Using direct staining of filamentous actin and indirect immunofluorescence staining of microtubules, cortical actin filaments and microtubules arrays were significantly altered in cells, either where AT14A was absent or over-expressed. It is concluded that AT14A may be a substantial middle member of the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum and play an important role in the continuum by regulating cell wall and cortical cytoskeleton organization. PMID:22456678

  10. Protein S-Acyltransferase 14: A Specific Role for Palmitoylation in Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaxiao; Scott, Rod; Doughty, James; Grant, Murray

    2016-01-01

    The Asp-His-His-Cys-Cys-rich domain-containing Protein S-Acyl Transferases (PATs) are multipass transmembrane proteins that catalyze S-acylation (commonly known as S-palmitoylation), the reversible posttranslational lipid modification of proteins. Palmitoylation enhances the hydrophobicity of proteins, contributes to their membrane association, and plays roles in protein trafficking and signaling. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), there are at least 24 PATs; previous studies on two PATs established important roles in growth, development, and stress responses. In this study, we identified a, to our knowledge, novel PAT, AtPAT14, in Arabidopsis. Complementation studies in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Arabidopsis demonstrate that AtPAT14 possesses PAT enzyme activity. Disruption of AtPAT14 by T-DNA insertion resulted in an accelerated senescence phenotype. This coincided with increased transcript levels of some senescence-specific and pathogen-resistant marker genes. We show that early senescence of pat14 does not involve the signaling molecules jasmonic acid and abscisic acid, or autophagy, but associates with salicylic acid homeostasis and signaling. This strongly suggests that AtPAT14 plays a pivotal role in regulating senescence via salicylic acid pathways. Senescence is a complex process required for normal plant growth and development and requires the coordination of many genes and signaling pathways. However, precocious senescence results in loss of biomass and seed production. The negative regulation of leaf senescence by AtPAT14 in Arabidopsis highlights, to our knowledge for the first time, a specific role for palmitoylation in leaf senescence. PMID:26537563

  11. An International Bioinformatics Infrastructure to Underpin the Arabidopsis Community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The future bioinformatics needs of the Arabidopsis community as well as those of other scientific communities that depend on Arabidopsis resources were discussed at a pair of recent meetings held by the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) and the North American Arabidopsis Steering C...

  12. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR RLK) genetic…

  13. Assignment of Oriented Sample NMR Resonances from a Three Transmembrane Helix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. T.; Hung, I.; Cross, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Oriented sample solid state NMR techniques have been routinely employed to determine the structures of membrane proteins with one or two transmembrane helices. For larger proteins the technique has been limited by spectral resolution and lack of assignment strategies. Here, a strategy for resonance assignment is devised and applied to a three transmembrane helix protein. Sequence specific assignments for all labeled transmembrane amino acid sites are obtained, which provide a set of orientational restraints and helix orientation in the bilayer. Our experiments expand the utility of solid state NMR in membrane protein structure characterization to three transmembrane helix proteins and represent a straightforward strategy for routinely characterizing multiple transmembrane helix protein structures. PMID:24509383

  14. Assignment of oriented sample NMR resonances from a three transmembrane helix protein.

    PubMed

    Murray, D T; Hung, I; Cross, T A

    2014-03-01

    Oriented sample solid state NMR techniques have been routinely employed to determine the structures of membrane proteins with one or two transmembrane helices. For larger proteins the technique has been limited by spectral resolution and lack of assignment strategies. Here, a strategy for resonance assignment is devised and applied to a three transmembrane helix protein. Sequence specific assignments for all labeled transmembrane amino acid sites are obtained, which provide a set of orientational restraints and helix orientations in the bilayer. Our experiments expand the utility of solid state NMR in membrane protein structure characterization to three transmembrane helix proteins and represent a straightforward strategy for routinely characterizing multiple transmembrane helix protein structures. PMID:24509383

  15. Structural organization and interactions of transmembrane domains in tetraspanin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Metcalf, Douglas G; DeGrado, William F; Hemler, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins of the tetraspanin family contain four transmembrane domains (TM1-4) linked by two extracellular loops and a short intracellular loop, and have short intracellular N- and C-termini. While structure and function analysis of the larger extracellular loop has been performed, the organization and role of transmembrane domains have not been systematically assessed. Results Among 28 human tetraspanin proteins, the TM1-3 sequences display a distinct heptad repeat motif (abcdefg)n. In TM1, position a is occupied by structurally conserved bulky residues and position d contains highly conserved Asn and Gly residues. In TM2, position a is occupied by conserved small residues (Gly/Ala/Thr), and position d has a conserved Gly and two bulky aliphatic residues. In TM3, three a positions of the heptad repeat are filled by two leucines and a glutamate/glutamine residue, and two d positions are occupied by either Phe/Tyr or Val/Ile/Leu residues. No heptad motif is apparent in TM4 sequences. Mutations of conserved glycines in human CD9 (Gly25 and Gly32 in TM1; Gly67 and Gly74 in TM2) caused aggregation of mutant proteins inside the cell. Modeling of the TM1-TM2 interface in CD9, using a novel algorithm, predicts tight packing of conserved bulky residues against conserved Gly residues along the two helices. The homodimeric interface of CD9 was mapped, by disulfide cross-linking of single-cysteine mutants, to the vicinity of residues Leu14 and Phe17 in TM1 (positions g and c) and Gly77, Gly80 and Ala81 in TM2 (positions d, g and a, respectively). Mutations of a and d residues in both TM1 and TM2 (Gly25, Gly32, Gly67 and Gly74), involved in intramolecular TM1-TM2 interaction, also strongly diminished intermolecular interaction, as assessed by cross-linking of Cys80. Conclusion Our results suggest that tetraspanin intra- and intermolecular interactions are mediated by conserved residues in adjacent, but distinct regions of TM1 and TM2. A key structural element that

  16. Expression of the ZNT1 Zinc Transporter from the Metal Hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens Confers Enhanced Zinc and Cadmium Tolerance and Accumulation to Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Fen; Hassan, Zeshan; Talukdar, Sangita; Schat, Henk; Aarts, Mark G M

    2016-01-01

    Prompt regulation of transition metal transporters is crucial for plant zinc homeostasis. NcZNT1 is one of such transporters, found in the metal hyperaccumulator Brassicaceae species Noccaea caerulescens. It is orthologous to AtZIP4 from Arabidopsis thaliana, an important actor in Zn homeostasis. We examined if the NcZNT1 function contributes to the metal hyperaccumulation of N. caerulescens. NcZNT1 was found to be a plasma-membrane located metal transporter. Constitutive overexpression of NcZNT1 in A. thaliana conferred enhanced tolerance to exposure to excess Zn and Cd supply, as well as increased accumulation of Zn and Cd and induction of the Fe deficiency response, when compared to non-transformed wild-type plants. Promoters of both genes were induced by Zn deficiency in roots and shoots of A. thaliana. In A. thaliana, the AtZIP4 and NcZNT1 promoters were mainly active in cortex, endodermis and pericycle cells under Zn deficient conditions. In N. caerulescens, the promoters were active in the same tissues, though the activity of the NcZNT1 promoter was higher and not limited to Zn deficient conditions. Common cis elements were identified in both promoters by 5' deletion analysis. These correspond to the previously determined Zinc Deficiency Responsive Elements found in A. thaliana to interact with two redundantly acting transcription factors, bZIP19 and bZIP23, controlling the Zn deficiency response. In conclusion, these results suggest that NcZNT1 is an important factor in contributing to Zn and Cd hyperaccumulation in N. caerulescens. Differences in cis- and trans-regulators are likely to account for the differences in expression between A. thaliana and N. caerulescens. The high, constitutive NcZNT1 expression in the stele of N. caerulescens roots implicates its involvement in long distance root-to-shoot metal transport by maintaining a Zn/Cd influx into cells responsible for xylem loading. PMID:26930473

  17. Expression of the ZNT1 Zinc Transporter from the Metal Hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens Confers Enhanced Zinc and Cadmium Tolerance and Accumulation to Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Schat, Henk; Aarts, Mark G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Prompt regulation of transition metal transporters is crucial for plant zinc homeostasis. NcZNT1 is one of such transporters, found in the metal hyperaccumulator Brassicaceae species Noccaea caerulescens. It is orthologous to AtZIP4 from Arabidopsis thaliana, an important actor in Zn homeostasis. We examined if the NcZNT1 function contributes to the metal hyperaccumulation of N. caerulescens. NcZNT1 was found to be a plasma-membrane located metal transporter. Constitutive overexpression of NcZNT1 in A. thaliana conferred enhanced tolerance to exposure to excess Zn and Cd supply, as well as increased accumulation of Zn and Cd and induction of the Fe deficiency response, when compared to non-transformed wild-type plants. Promoters of both genes were induced by Zn deficiency in roots and shoots of A. thaliana. In A. thaliana, the AtZIP4 and NcZNT1 promoters were mainly active in cortex, endodermis and pericycle cells under Zn deficient conditions. In N. caerulescens, the promoters were active in the same tissues, though the activity of the NcZNT1 promoter was higher and not limited to Zn deficient conditions. Common cis elements were identified in both promoters by 5’ deletion analysis. These correspond to the previously determined Zinc Deficiency Responsive Elements found in A. thaliana to interact with two redundantly acting transcription factors, bZIP19 and bZIP23, controlling the Zn deficiency response. In conclusion, these results suggest that NcZNT1 is an important factor in contributing to Zn and Cd hyperaccumulation in N. caerulescens. Differences in cis- and trans-regulators are likely to account for the differences in expression between A. thaliana and N. caerulescens. The high, constitutive NcZNT1 expression in the stele of N. caerulescens roots implicates its involvement in long distance root-to-shoot metal transport by maintaining a Zn/Cd influx into cells responsible for xylem loading. PMID:26930473

  18. Transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene regulates Drosophila larval locomotion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanmeng; Wang, Yuping; Zhang, Wei; Meltzer, Shan; Zanini, Damiano; Yu, Yue; Li, Jiefu; Cheng, Tong; Guo, Zhenhao; Wang, Qingxiu; Jacobs, Julie S; Sharma, Yashoda; Eberl, Daniel F; Göpfert, Martin C; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung; Wang, Zuoren

    2016-06-28

    Drosophila larval locomotion, which entails rhythmic body contractions, is controlled by sensory feedback from proprioceptors. The molecular mechanisms mediating this feedback are little understood. By using genetic knock-in and immunostaining, we found that the Drosophila melanogaster transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene is expressed in the larval class I and class II dendritic arborization (da) neurons and bipolar dendrite (bd) neurons, both of which are known to provide sensory feedback for larval locomotion. Larvae with knockdown or loss of tmc function displayed reduced crawling speeds, increased head cast frequencies, and enhanced backward locomotion. Expressing Drosophila TMC or mammalian TMC1 and/or TMC2 in the tmc-positive neurons rescued these mutant phenotypes. Bending of the larval body activated the tmc-positive neurons, and in tmc mutants this bending response was impaired. This implicates TMC's roles in Drosophila proprioception and the sensory control of larval locomotion. It also provides evidence for a functional conservation between Drosophila and mammalian TMCs. PMID:27298354

  19. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakage assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.

  20. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakagemore » assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.« less

  1. Topological Analysis of Hedgehog Acyltransferase, a Multipalmitoylated Transmembrane Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Konitsiotis, Antonio D.; Jovanović, Biljana; Ciepla, Paulina; Spitaler, Martin; Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Tate, Edward W.; Magee, Anthony I.

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog proteins are secreted morphogens that play critical roles in development and disease. During maturation of the proteins through the secretory pathway, they are modified by the addition of N-terminal palmitic acid and C-terminal cholesterol moieties, both of which are critical for their correct function and localization. Hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT) is the enzyme in the endoplasmic reticulum that palmitoylates Hedgehog proteins, is a member of a small subfamily of membrane-bound O-acyltransferase proteins that acylate secreted proteins, and is an important drug target in cancer. However, little is known about HHAT structure and mode of function. We show that HHAT is comprised of ten transmembrane domains and two reentrant loops with the critical His and Asp residues on opposite sides of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We further show that HHAT is palmitoylated on multiple cytosolic cysteines that maintain protein structure within the membrane. Finally, we provide evidence that mutation of the conserved His residue in the hypothesized catalytic domain results in a complete loss of HHAT palmitoylation, providing novel insights into how the protein may function in vivo. PMID:25505265

  2. Topological analysis of Hedgehog acyltransferase, a multipalmitoylated transmembrane protein.

    PubMed

    Konitsiotis, Antonio D; Jovanović, Biljana; Ciepla, Paulina; Spitaler, Martin; Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Tate, Edward W; Magee, Anthony I

    2015-02-01

    Hedgehog proteins are secreted morphogens that play critical roles in development and disease. During maturation of the proteins through the secretory pathway, they are modified by the addition of N-terminal palmitic acid and C-terminal cholesterol moieties, both of which are critical for their correct function and localization. Hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT) is the enzyme in the endoplasmic reticulum that palmitoylates Hedgehog proteins, is a member of a small subfamily of membrane-bound O-acyltransferase proteins that acylate secreted proteins, and is an important drug target in cancer. However, little is known about HHAT structure and mode of function. We show that HHAT is comprised of ten transmembrane domains and two reentrant loops with the critical His and Asp residues on opposite sides of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We further show that HHAT is palmitoylated on multiple cytosolic cysteines that maintain protein structure within the membrane. Finally, we provide evidence that mutation of the conserved His residue in the hypothesized catalytic domain results in a complete loss of HHAT palmitoylation, providing novel insights into how the protein may function in vivo. PMID:25505265

  3. Role of GxxxG Motifs in Transmembrane Domain Interactions.

    PubMed

    Teese, Mark G; Langosch, Dieter

    2015-08-25

    Transmembrane (TM) helices of integral membrane proteins can facilitate strong and specific noncovalent protein-protein interactions. Mutagenesis and structural analyses have revealed numerous examples in which the interaction between TM helices of single-pass membrane proteins is dependent on a GxxxG or (small)xxx(small) motif. It is therefore tempting to use the presence of these simple motifs as an indicator of TM helix interactions. In this Current Topic review, we point out that these motifs are quite common, with more than 50% of single-pass TM domains containing a (small)xxx(small) motif. However, the actual interaction strength of motif-containing helices depends strongly on sequence context and membrane properties. In addition, recent studies have revealed several GxxxG-containing TM domains that interact via alternative interfaces involving hydrophobic, polar, aromatic, or even ionizable residues that do not form recognizable motifs. In multipass membrane proteins, GxxxG motifs can be important for protein folding, and not just oligomerization. Our current knowledge thus suggests that the presence of a GxxxG motif alone is a weak predictor of protein dimerization in the membrane. PMID:26244771

  4. LINKIN, a new transmembrane protein necessary for cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mihoko; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Yu, Collin Z; DeModena, John; Sternberg, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    In epithelial collective migration, leader and follower cells migrate while maintaining cell–cell adhesion and tissue polarity. We have identified a conserved protein and interactors required for maintaining cell adhesion during a simple collective migration in the developing C. elegans male gonad. LINKIN is a previously uncharacterized, transmembrane protein conserved throughout Metazoa. We identified seven atypical FG–GAP domains in the extracellular domain, which potentially folds into a β-propeller structure resembling the α-integrin ligand-binding domain. C. elegans LNKN-1 localizes to the plasma membrane of all gonadal cells, with apical and lateral bias. We identified the LINKIN interactors RUVBL1, RUVBL2, and α-tubulin by using SILAC mass spectrometry on human HEK 293T cells and testing candidates for lnkn-1-like function in C. elegans male gonad. We propose that LINKIN promotes adhesion between neighboring cells through its extracellular domain and regulates microtubule dynamics through RUVBL proteins at its intracellular domain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04449.001 PMID:25437307

  5. MemBrain: Improving the Accuracy of Predicting Transmembrane Helices

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongbin; Chou, James J.

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of transmembrane helices (TMH) in α helical membrane proteins provides valuable information about the protein topology when the high resolution structures are not available. Many predictors have been developed based on either amino acid hydrophobicity scale or pure statistical approaches. While these predictors perform reasonably well in identifying the number of TMHs in a protein, they are generally inaccurate in predicting the ends of TMHs, or TMHs of unusual length. To improve the accuracy of TMH detection, we developed a machine-learning based predictor, MemBrain, which integrates a number of modern bioinformatics approaches including sequence representation by multiple sequence alignment matrix, the optimized evidence-theoretic K-nearest neighbor prediction algorithm, fusion of multiple prediction window sizes, and classification by dynamic threshold. MemBrain demonstrates an overall improvement of about 20% in prediction accuracy, particularly, in predicting the ends of TMHs and TMHs that are shorter than 15 residues. It also has the capability to detect N-terminal signal peptides. The MemBrain predictor is a useful sequence-based analysis tool for functional and structural characterization of helical membrane proteins; it is freely available at http://chou.med.harvard.edu/bioinf/MemBrain/. PMID:18545655

  6. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Tobias M.; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C.N.; Young, Janet M.; Malik, Harmit S.; Gage, Fred H.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo–cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for “soluble Pom121”) that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components. PMID:27198230

  7. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin.

    PubMed

    Franks, Tobias M; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C N; Young, Janet M; Malik, Harmit S; Gage, Fred H; Hetzer, Martin W

    2016-05-15

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for "soluble Pom121") that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components. PMID:27198230

  8. Mediation of opioid analgesia by a truncated 6-transmembrane GPCR

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhigang; Xu, Jin; Rossi, Grace C.; Majumdar, Susruta; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2015-01-01

    The generation of potent opioid analgesics that lack the side effects of traditional opioids may be possible by targeting truncated splice variants of the μ-opioid receptor. μ-Opioids act through GPCRs that are generated from the Oprm1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. The most abundant set of Oprm1 variants encode classical full-length 7 transmembrane domain (7TM) μ-opioid receptors that mediate the actions of the traditional μ-opioid drugs morphine and methadone. In contrast, 3-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic against thermal, inflammatory, and neuropathic pain that acts independently of 7TM μ-opioid receptors but has no activity in mice lacking a set of 6TM truncated μ-opioid receptor splice variants. Unlike traditional opioids, IBNtxA does not depress respiration or result in physical dependence or reward behavior, suggesting it acts through an alternative μ-opioid receptor target. Here we demonstrated that a truncated 6TM splice variant, mMOR-1G, can rescue IBNtxA analgesia in a μ-opioid receptor–deficient mouse that lacks all Oprm1 splice variants, ablating μ-opioid activity in these animals. Intrathecal administration of lentivirus containing the 6TM variant mMOR-1G restored IBNtxA, but not morphine, analgesia in Oprm1-deficient animals. Together, these results confirm that a truncated 6TM GPCR is both necessary and sufficient for IBNtxA analgesia. PMID:26011641

  9. Curcumin stimulates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel activity.

    PubMed

    Berger, Allan L; Randak, Christoph O; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Karp, Philip H; Vermeer, Daniel W; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-02-18

    Compounds that enhance either the function or biosynthetic processing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel may be of value in developing new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF). Previous studies suggested that the herbal extract curcumin might affect the processing of a common CF mutant, CFTR-DeltaF508. Here, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin influences channel function. Curcumin increased CFTR channel activity in excised, inside-out membrane patches by reducing channel closed time and prolonging the time channels remained open. Stimulation was dose-dependent, reversible, and greater than that observed with genistein, another compound that stimulates CFTR. Curcumin-dependent stimulation required phosphorylated channels and the presence of ATP. We found that curcumin increased the activity of both wild-type and DeltaF508 channels. Adding curcumin also increased Cl(-) transport in differentiated non-CF airway epithelia but not in CF epithelia. These results suggest that curcumin may directly stimulate CFTR Cl(-) channels. PMID:15582996

  10. Role of the Transmembrane Potential in the Membrane Proton Leak

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Anne; Sokolenko, Elena A.; Beck, Valeri; Ninnemann, Olaf; Jaburek, Martin; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Klishin, Sergey S.; Jezek, Petr; Skulachev, Vladimir P.; Pohl, Elena E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The molecular mechanism responsible for the regulation of the mitochondrial membrane proton conductance (G) is not clearly understood. This study investigates the role of the transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) using planar membranes, reconstituted with purified uncoupling proteins (UCP1 and UCP2) and/or unsaturated FA. We show that high ΔΨm (similar to ΔΨm in mitochondrial State IV) significantly activates the protonophoric function of UCPs in the presence of FA. The proton conductance increases nonlinearly with ΔΨm. The application of ΔΨm up to 220 mV leads to the overriding of the protein inhibition at a constant ATP concentration. Both, the exposure of FA-containing bilayers to high ΔΨm and the increase of FA membrane concentration bring about the significant exponential Gm increase, implying the contribution of FA in proton leak. Quantitative analysis of the energy barrier for the transport of FA anions in the presence and absence of protein suggests that FA− remain exposed to membrane lipids while crossing the UCP-containing membrane. We believe this study shows that UCPs and FA decrease ΔΨm more effectively if it is sufficiently high. Thus, the tight regulation of proton conductance and/or FA concentration by ΔΨm may be key in mitochondrial respiration and metabolism. PMID:20409469