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Sample records for arbitrary time dependent

  1. Exactly solvable model for nonlinear light-matter interaction in an arbitrary time-dependent field

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. M.; Lotti, A.; Teleki, A.; Kolesik, M.

    2011-12-15

    Exact analytic expressions are derived for the dipole moment and nonlinear current of a one-dimensional quantum particle subject to a short-range attractive potential and an arbitrary time-dependent electric field. An efficient algorithm for the current evaluation is described and a robust implementation suitable for numerical simulations is demonstrated.

  2. A Hybrid Nodal Method for Time-Dependent Incompressible Flow in Two-Dimensional Arbitrary Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Toreja, A J; Uddin, R

    2002-10-21

    A hybrid nodal-integral/finite-analytic method (NI-FAM) is developed for time-dependent, incompressible flow in two-dimensional arbitrary geometries. In this hybrid approach, the computational domain is divided into parallelepiped and wedge-shaped space-time nodes (cells). The conventional nodal integral method (NIM) is applied to the interfaces between adjacent parallelepiped nodes (cells), while a finite analytic approach is applied to the interfaces between parallelepiped and wedge-shaped nodes (cells). In this paper, the hybrid method is formally developed and an application of the NI-FAM to fluid flow in an enclosed cavity is presented. Results are compared with those obtained using a commercial computational fluid dynamics code.

  3. Domain-wall motion in ferromagnetic nanowires driven by arbitrary time-dependent fields: an exact result.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Robbins, J M; Slastikov, Valeriy

    2010-04-01

    We address the dynamics of magnetic domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires under the influence of external time-dependent magnetic fields. We report a new exact spatiotemporal solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the case of soft ferromagnetic wires and nanostructures with uniaxial anisotropy. The solution holds for applied fields with arbitrary strength and time dependence. We further extend this solution to applied fields slowly varying in space and to multiple domain walls. PMID:20481956

  4. Evolution of Arbitrary States under Fock—Darwin Hamiltonian and a Time-Dependent Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-Fei; Yang, Tao; Zhai, Zhi-Yuan; Pan, Xiao-Yin

    2012-01-01

    The method of path integral is employed to calculate the time evolution of the eigenstates of a charged particle under the Fock—Darwin (FD) Hamiltonian subjected to a time-dependent electric field in the plane of the system. An exact analytical expression is established for the evolution of the eigenstates. This result then provides a general solution to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  5. Time-dependent Landauer—Büttiker formalism for superconducting junctions at arbitrary temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuovinen, Riku; van Leeuwen, Robert; Perfetto, Enrico; Stefanucci, Gianluca

    2016-03-01

    We discuss an extension of our earlier work on the time-dependent Landauer- Buttiker formalism for noninteracting electronic transport. The formalism can without complication be extended to superconducting central regions since the Green's functions in the Nambu representation satisfy the same equations of motion which, in turn, leads to the same closed expression for the equal-time lesser Green's function, i.e., for the time-dependent reduced one-particle density matrix. We further write the finite-temperature frequency integrals in terms of known special functions thereby considerably speeding up the computation. Simulations in simple normal metal - superconductor - normal metal junctions are also presented.

  6. First-passage-time statistics of a Brownian particle driven by an arbitrary unidimensional potential with a superimposed exponential time-dependent drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio

    2015-12-01

    In one-dimensional systems, the dynamics of a Brownian particle are governed by the force derived from a potential as well as by diffusion properties. In this work, we obtain the first-passage-time statistics of a Brownian particle driven by an arbitrary potential with an exponential temporally decaying superimposed field up to a prescribed threshold. The general system analyzed here describes the sub-threshold signal integration of integrate-and-fire neuron models, of any kind, supplemented by an adaptation-like current, whereas the first-passage-time corresponds to the declaration of a spike. Following our previous studies, we base our analysis on the backward Fokker-Planck equation and study the survival probability and the first-passage-time density function in the space of the initial condition. By proposing a series solution we obtain a system of recurrence equations, which given the specific structure of the exponential time-dependent drift, easily admit a simpler Laplace representation. Naturally, the present general derivation agrees with the explicit solution we found previously for the Wiener process in (2012 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45 185001). However, to demonstrate the generality of the approach, we further explicitly evaluate the first-passage-time statistics of the underlying Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. To test the validity of the series solution, we extensively compare theoretical expressions with the data obtained from numerical simulations in different regimes. As shown, agreement is precise whenever the series is truncated at an appropriate order. Beyond the fact that both the Wiener and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes have a direct interpretation in the context of neuronal models, given their ubiquity in different fields, our present results will be of interest in other settings where an additive state-independent temporal relaxation process is being developed as the particle diffuses.

  7. Simulating system dynamics with arbitrary time step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantorovich, L.

    2007-02-01

    We suggest a dynamic simulation method that allows efficient and realistic modeling of kinetic processes, such as atomic diffusion, in which time has its actual meaning. Our method is similar in spirit to widely used kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) techniques; however, in our approach, the time step can be chosen arbitrarily. This has an advantage in some cases, e.g., when the transition rates change with time sufficiently fast over the period of the KMC time step (e.g., due to time dependence of some external factors influencing kinetics such as moving scanning probe microscopy tip or external time-dependent field) or when the clock time is set by some external conditions, and it is convenient to use equal time steps instead of the random choice of the KMC algorithm in order to build up probability distribution functions. We show that an arbitrary choice of the time step can be afforded by building up the complete list of events including the “residence site” and multihop transitions. The idea of the method is illustrated in a simple “toy” model of a finite one-dimensional lattice of potential wells with unequal jump rates to either side, which can be studied analytically. We show that for any choice of the time step, our general kinetics method reproduces exactly the solution of the corresponding master equations for any choice of the time steps. The final kinetics also matches the standard KMC, and this allows better understanding of this algorithm, in which the time step is chosen in a certain way and the system always advances by a single hop.

  8. Adaptive Haar transforms with arbitrary time and scale splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egiazarian, Karen O.; Astola, Jaakko T.

    2001-05-01

    The Haar transform is generalized to the case of an arbitrary time and scale splitting. To any binary tree we associate an orthogonal system of Haar-type functions - tree-structured Haar (TSH) functions. Unified fast algorithm for computation of the introduced tree-structured Haar transforms is presented. It requires 2(N - 1) additions and 3N - 2 multiplications, where N is transform order or, equivalently, the number of leaves of the binary tree.

  9. Quantum optical arbitrary waveform manipulation and measurement in real time.

    PubMed

    Kowligy, Abijith S; Manurkar, Paritosh; Corzo, Neil V; Velev, Vesselin G; Silver, Michael; Scott, Ryan P; Yoo, S J B; Kumar, Prem; Kanter, Gregory S; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2014-11-17

    We describe a technique for dynamic quantum optical arbitrary-waveform generation and manipulation, which is capable of mode selectively operating on quantum signals without inducing significant loss or decoherence. It is built upon combining the developed tools of quantum frequency conversion and optical arbitrary waveform generation. Considering realistic parameters, we propose and analyze applications such as programmable reshaping of picosecond-scale temporal modes, selective frequency conversion of any one or superposition of those modes, and mode-resolved photon counting. We also report on experimental progress to distinguish two overlapping, orthogonal temporal modes, demonstrating over 8 dB extinction between picosecond-scale time-frequency modes, which agrees well with our theory. Our theoretical and experimental progress, as a whole, points to an enabling optical technique for various applications such as ultradense quantum coding, unity-efficiency cavity-atom quantum memories, and high-speed quantum computing. PMID:25402035

  10. Time-synchronized visualization of arbitrary data streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolano, Paul Z.

    2015-01-01

    Savors is a visualization framework that supports the ingestion of data streams created by arbitrary command pipelines. Multiple data streams can be shown synchronized by time in the same or different views, which can be arranged in any layout. These capabilities combined with a powerful parallelization mechanism and interaction models already familiar to administrators allows Savors to display complex visualizations of data streamed from many different systems with minimal effort. This paper presents the design and implementation of Savors and provides example use cases that illustrate many of the supported visualization types.

  11. Time reversed photonic beamforming of arbitrary waveform ladar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Joseph L.; Zmuda, Henry; Bussjaeger, Rebecca J.; Erdmann, Reinhard K.; Fanto, Michael L.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Malowicki, John E.

    2007-04-01

    Herein is described a novel approach of performing adaptive photonic beam forming of an array of optical fibers with the expressed purpose of performing laser ranging. The beam forming technique leverages the concepts of time reversal, previously implemented in the sonar community, and wherein photonic implementation has recently been described for use by beamforming of ultra-wideband radar arrays. Photonic beam forming is also capable of combining the optical output of several fiber lasers into a coherent source, exactly phase matched on a pre-determined target. By implementing electro-optically modulated pulses from frequency chirped femtosecond-scale laser pulses, ladar waveforms can be generated with arbitrary spectral and temporal characteristics within the limitations of the wide-band system. Also described is a means of generating angle/angle/range measurements of illuminated targets.

  12. Voter model with arbitrary degree dependence: clout, confidence and irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotouhi, Babak; Rabbat, Michael G.

    2014-03-01

    The voter model is widely used to model opinion dynamics in society. In this paper, we propose three modifications to incorporate heterogeneity into the model. We address the corresponding oversimplifications of the conventional voter model which are unrealistic. We first consider the voter model with popularity bias. The influence of each node on its neighbors depends on its degree. We find the consensus probabilities and expected consensus times for each of the states. We also find the fixation probability, which is the probability that a single node whose state differs from every other node imposes its state on the entire system. In addition, we find the expected fixation time. Then two other extensions to the model are proposed and the motivations behind them are discussed. The first one is confidence, where in addition to the states of neighbors, nodes take their own state into account at each update. We repeat the calculations for the augmented model and investigate the effects of adding confidence to the model. The second proposed extension is irreversibility, where one of the states is given the property that once nodes adopt it, they cannot switch back. This is motivated by applications where, agents take an irreversible action such as seeing a movie, purchasing a music album online, or buying a new product. The dynamics of densities, fixation times and consensus times are obtained.

  13. Realization of spin-dependent splitting with arbitrary intensity patterns based on all-dielectric metasurfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Yougang; Liu, Yachao; He, Yongli; Zhou, Junxiao; Luo, Hailu Wen, Shuangchun

    2015-07-27

    We report the realization of spin-dependent splitting with arbitrary intensity patterns based on all-dielectric metasurfaces. Compared with the plasmonic metasurfaces, the all-dielectric metasurface exhibits more high transmission efficiency and conversion efficiency, which makes it possible to achieve the spin-dependent splitting with arbitrary intensity patterns. Our findings suggest a way for generation and manipulation of spin photons, and thereby offer the possibility of developing spin-based nanophotonic applications.

  14. A simple method to calculate first-passage time densities with arbitrary initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyberg, Markus; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Lizana, Ludvig

    2016-06-01

    Numerous applications all the way from biology and physics to economics depend on the density of first crossings over a boundary. Motivated by the lack of general purpose analytical tools for computing first-passage time densities (FPTDs) for complex problems, we propose a new simple method based on the independent interval approximation (IIA). We generalise previous formulations of the IIA to include arbitrary initial conditions as well as to deal with discrete time and non-smooth continuous time processes. We derive a closed form expression for the FPTD in z and Laplace-transform space to a boundary in one dimension. Two classes of problems are analysed in detail: discrete time symmetric random walks (Markovian) and continuous time Gaussian stationary processes (Markovian and non-Markovian). Our results are in good agreement with Langevin dynamics simulations.

  15. Time-Dependent Reliability Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-10-27

    FRANTIC-3 was developed to evaluate system unreliability using time-dependent techniques. The code provides two major options: to evaluate standby system unavailability or, in addition to the unavailability to calculate the total system failure probability by including both the unavailability of the system on demand as well as the probability that it will operate for an arbitrary time period following the demand. The FRANTIC-3 time dependent reliability models provide a large selection of repair and testingmore » policies applicable to standby or continously operating systems consisting of periodically tested, monitored, and non-repairable (non-testable) components. Time-dependent and test frequency dependent failures, as well as demand stress related failure, test-caused degradation and wear-out, test associated human errors, test deficiencies, test override, unscheduled and scheduled maintenance, component renewal and replacement policies, and test strategies can be prescribed. The conditional system unavailabilities associated with the downtimes of the user specified failed component are also evaluated. Optionally, the code can perform a sensitivity study for system unavailability or total failure probability to the failure characteristics of the standby components.« less

  16. Time Dependent Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collyer, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the flow characteristics of thixotropic and negative thixotropic fluids; various theories underlying the thixotropic behavior; and thixotropic phenomena exhibited in drilling muds, commercial paints, pastes, and greases. Inconsistencies in the terminology used to label time dependent effects are revealed. (CC)

  17. Time dependent holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Diptarka

    One of the most important results emerging from string theory is the gauge gravity duality (AdS/CFT correspondence) which tells us that certain problems in particular gravitational backgrounds can be exactly mapped to a particular dual gauge theory a quantum theory very similar to the one explaining the interactions between fundamental subatomic particles. The chief merit of the duality is that a difficult problem in one theory can be mapped to a simpler and solvable problem in the other theory. The duality can be used both ways. Most of the current theoretical framework is suited to study equilibrium systems, or systems where time dependence is at most adiabatic. However in the real world, systems are almost always out of equilibrium. Generically these scenarios are described by quenches, where a parameter of the theory is made time dependent. In this dissertation I describe some of the work done in the context of studying quantum quench using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We recover certain universal scaling type of behavior as the quenching is done through a quantum critical point. Another question that has been explored in the dissertation is time dependence of the gravity theory. Present cosmological observations indicate that our universe is accelerating and is described by a spacetime called de-Sitter(dS). In 2011 there had been a speculation over a possible duality between de-Sitter gravity and a particular field theory (Euclidean SP(N) CFT). However a concrete realization of this proposition was still lacking. Here we explicitly derive the dS/CFT duality using well known methods in field theory. We discovered that the time dimension emerges naturally in the derivation. We also describe further applications and extensions of dS/CFT. KEYWORDS: Holography, AdS/CFT correspondence, Quantum Quench, dS/CFT correspondence, Chaos.

  18. Time dependent seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidoro, B.; Iervolino, I.; Chioccarelli, E.; Giorgio, M.

    2012-04-01

    Probabilistic seismic hazard is usually computed trough a homogeneous Poisson process that even though it is a time-independent process it is widely used for its very convenient properties. However, when a single fault is of concern and/or the time scale is different from that of the long term, time-dependent processes are required. In this paper, different time-dependent models are reviewed with working examples. In fact, the Paganica fault (in central Italy) has been considered to compute both the probability of occurrence of at least one event in the lifespan of the structure, as well as the seismic hazard expressed in terms of probability of exceedance of an intensity value in a given time frame causing the collapse of the structure. Several models, well known or novel application to engineering hazard have been considered, limitation and issues in their applications are also discussed. The Brownian Passage Time (BPT) model is based on a stochastic modification of the deterministic stick-slip oscillator model for characteristic earthquakes; i.e., based on the addition of random perturbations (a Gaussian white noise) to the deterministic load path predicted by elastic rebound theory. This model assumes that the load state is at some ground level immediately after an event, increases steadly over time, reaches a failure threshold and relaxes instantaneously back to the ground level. For this model also a variable threshold has been considered to take into account the uncertainty of the threshold value. For the slip-predictable model it is assumed that the stress accumulates at a constant rate starting from some initial stress level. Stress is assumed to accumulate for a random period of time until an earthquake occurs. The size of the earthquake is governed by the stress release and it is a function of the elapsed time since the last event. In the time-predictable model stress buildup occurs at a constant rate until the accumulated stress reaches a threshold

  19. General tracking control of arbitrary N-level quantum systems using piecewise time-independent potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delben, G. J.; da Luz, M. G. E.

    2016-05-01

    Here we propose a tracking quantum control protocol for arbitrary N-level systems. The goal is to make the expected value of an observable O to follow a predetermined trajectory S( t). For so, we drive the quantum state |\\varPsi (t) rangle evolution through an external potential V which depends on M_V tunable parameters (e.g., the amplitude and phase (thus M_V = 2) of a laser field in the dipolar condition). At instants t_n, these parameters can be rapidly switched to specific values and then kept constant during time intervals Δ t. The method determines which sets of parameters values can result in < \\varPsi (t) | O |\\varPsi (t) rangle = S(t). It is numerically robust (no intrinsic divergences) and relatively fast since we need to solve only nonlinear algebraic (instead of a system of coupled nonlinear differential) equations to obtain the parameters at the successive Δ t's. For a given S( t), the required minimum M_V = M_min 'degrees of freedom' of V attaining the control is a good figure of merit of the problem difficulty. For instance, the control cannot be unconditionally realizable if M_{min } > 2 and V is due to a laser field (the usual context in real applications). As it is discussed and exemplified, in these cases a possible procedure is to relax the control in certain problematic (but short) time intervals. Finally, when existing the approach can systematically access distinct possible solutions, thereby allowing a relatively simple way to search for the best implementation conditions. Illustrations for 3-, 4-, and 5-level systems and some comparisons with calculations in the literature are presented.

  20. Generalized shot noise model for time-reversal in multiple-scattering media allowing for arbitrary inputs and windowing

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Kevin J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical shot noise model to describe the output of a time-reversal experiment in a multiple-scattering medium is developed. This (non-wave equation based) model describes the following process. An arbitrary waveform is transmitted through a high-order multiple-scattering environment and recorded. The recorded signal is arbitrarily windowed and then time-reversed. The processed signal is retransmitted into the environment and the resulting signal recorded. The temporal and spatial signal and noise of this process is predicted statistically. It is found that the time when the noise is largest depends on the arbitrary windowing and this noise peak can occur at times outside the main lobe. To determine further trends, a common set of parameters is applied to the general result. It is seen that as the duration of the input function increases, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases (independent of signal bandwidth). It is also seen that longer persisting impulse responses result in increased main lobe amplitudes and SNR. Assumptions underpinning the generalized shot noise model are compared to an experimental realization of a multiple-scattering medium (a time-reversal chaotic cavity). Results from the model are compared to random number numerical simulation. PMID:19425655

  1. Extension of the Time-Spectral Approach to Overset Solvers for Arbitrary Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leffell, Joshua Isaac; Murman, Scott M.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    demonstrated marked success in reducing the computational costs associated with simulating periodic forced flows, but have yet to be fully applied to overset or Cartesian solvers for arbitrary motion with dynamic hole-cutting. Overset and Cartesian grid methodologies are versatile techniques capable of handling complex geometry configurations in practical engineering applications, and the combination of the Time-Spectral approach with this general capability potentially provides an enabling new design and analysis tool. In an arbitrary moving-body scenario for these approaches, a Lagrangian body moves through a fixed Eulerian mesh and mesh points in the Eulerian mesh interior to the solid body are removed (cut or blanked), leaving a hole in the Eulerian mesh. During the dynamic motion some gridpoints in the domain are blanked and do not have a complete set of time-samples preventing a direct implementation of the Time-Spectral method. Murman[6] demonstrated the Time-Spectral approach for a Cartesian solver with a rigid domain motion, wherein the hole cutting remains constant. Similarly, Custer et al. [15, 16] used the NASA overset OVERFLOW solver and limited the amount of relative motion to ensure static hole-cutting and interpolation. Recently, Mavriplis and Mundis[17] demonstrated a qualitative method for applying the Time-Spectral approach to an unstructured overset solver for arbitrary motion. The goal of the current work is to develop a robust and general method for handling arbitrary motion with the Time-Spectral approach within an overset or Cartesian mesh method, while still approaching the spectral convergence rate of the original Time-Spectral approach. The viscous OVERFLOW solver will be augmented with the new Time-Spectral algorithm and the capability of the method for benchmark problems in rotorcraft and turbomachinery will be demonstrated. This abstract begins with a brief synopsis of the Time-Spectral approach for overset grids and provides details of e current

  2. Asymmetry through time dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantzaris, Alexander V.; Higham, Desmond J.

    2016-03-01

    Given a single network of interactions, asymmetry arises when the links are directed. For example, if protein A upregulates protein B and protein B upregulates protein C, then (in the absence of any further relationships between them) A may affect C but not vice versa. This type of imbalance is reflected in the associated adjacency matrix, which will lack symmetry. A different type of imbalance can arise when interactions appear and disappear over time. If A meets B today and B meets C tomorrow, then (in the absence of any further relationships between them) A may pass a message or disease to C, but not vice versa. Hence, even when each interaction is a two-way exchange, the effect of time ordering can introduce asymmetry. This observation is very closely related to the fact that matrix multiplication is not commutative. In this work, we describe a method that has been designed to reveal asymmetry in static networks and show how it may be combined with a measure that summarizes the potential information flow between nodes in the temporal case. This results in a new method that quantifies the asymmetry arising through time ordering. We show by example that the new tool can be used to visualize and quantify the amount of asymmetry caused by the arrow of time.

  3. Direct space-to-time pulse shaping and applications in arbitrary electromagnetic waveform generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Jason Dwight

    2003-10-01

    Direct space-to-time (DST) pulse shaping, with its straightforward mapping of an input spatial pattern to an output temporal pattern, has been shown to be an effective method to create ultrafast optical data packets. To our knowledge, we introduce the first DST pulse shaper operating in the 1.5 mum lightwave communications band, which is compatible with high-speed (≥100 Gb/s) optical communication systems. Novel features of our pulse shaper include polarization-independent operation, utilization of diffractive optical elements for spatial pattern generation, and a telescopic, fiber-coupled configuration. These features collectively enable the creation of equal intensity optical pulse sequences over a time aperture in excess of 100 ps and at rates of ˜100 GHz. These pulse sequences enable us to overcome electrical limitations and generate arbitrary electromagnetic waveforms in the GHz to multiple tens of GHz range through a novel optical technique. Although creation of arbitrary optical waveforms is achievable through established methods---such as Fourier transform pulse shaping---arbitrary waveform generation capabilities in the microwave and millimeter-wave range are quite limited. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, cycle-by-cycle generation of broadband burst and continuous electromagnetic waveforms at center frequencies from ˜2--50 GHz. Our simple, reconfigurable method uses tailored optical pulse sequences from our 1.5 mum DST pulse shaper to drive a high-speed optical-to-electrical converter. By appropriately tailoring the input optical spatial pattern of the pulse shaper, arbitrarily phase- and frequency-modulated electromagnetic waveforms are achieved.

  4. Extending quantum control of time-independent systems to time-dependent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhenyu; Liu Renbao

    2011-06-15

    We establish that if a scheme can control a time-independent system arbitrarily coupled to a generic finite bath over a short period of time T with control precision O(T{sup N+1}), it can also realize the control with the same order of precision on smoothly time-dependent systems. This result extends the validity of various universal dynamical control schemes to arbitrary analytically time-dependent systems.

  5. Finite-time arbitrary-motion unsteady cascade airfoil theory for helicopter rotors in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinyavari, M. A. H.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1985-01-01

    A complete and detailed derivation of finite-time arbitrary-motion cascade theory is presented for both Laplace and frequency domains. This theory includes the effect of returning wakes for both single- and multibladed rotors. The generalized cascade lift-deficiency function (CLDF) is shown to be consistent with the generalized Theodorsen lift-deficiency function when the wake spacing approaches infinity or when the reduced frequency tends to infinity. This function predicts correct zero-reduced-frequency limit. Accurate and efficient numerical procedures are presented for the evaluation of the CLDF. Numerical examples comparing the CLDF with Loewy's lift deficiency function in frequency domain are presented. Accurate Pade approximants of the CLDF are constructed using a Bode-plot approach which allows for complex poles.

  6. Operator description for thermal quantum field theories on an arbitrary path in the real time formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ashok; Kalauni, Pushpa

    2016-06-01

    We develop an operator description, much like thermofield dynamics, for quantum field theories on a real time path with an arbitrary parameter σ (0 ≤σ ≤β ) . We point out new features which arise when σ ≠β/2 in that the Hilbert space develops a natural, modified inner product different from the standard Dirac inner product. We construct the Bogoliubov transformation which connects the doubled vacuum state at zero temperature to the thermal vacuum in this case. We obtain the thermal Green's function (propagator) for the real massive Klein-Gordon theory as an expectation value in this thermal vacuum (with a modified inner product). The factorization of the thermal Green's function follows from this analysis. We also discuss, in the main text as well as in two appendices, various other interesting features which arise in such a description.

  7. Nearly real-time visualization of arbitrary two-dimensional sections from three-dimensional acquisition.

    PubMed

    Capineri, L; Masotti, L; Rocchi, S; Andreuccetti, F; Cerofolini, M; Tondini, A

    1996-01-01

    This work presents a system for the reconstruction of cross-sections with arbitrary orientations derived from three-dimensional (3D) echographic scanners. The interest for this powerful diagnostic tool has prompted us to develop a low-cost processing board that inserts easily into a stand-alone echograph. The proposed system is able to reconstruct high-resolution cross-sections at one frame per second with a time lag of about 60 s due the 3D acquisition process. The board, based on three pipelined DSP devices, has been designed to process volumetric data collected with a commercial echograph by means a rotating probe synchronized with the ECG signal. The resolution of the reconstruction algorithm implemented on the processing unit has been evaluated both with synthetic 3D data and with experimental data from a phantom. PMID:8783464

  8. Time-dependent drift Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1983-03-01

    The lowest-order drift equations are given in a canonical magnetic coordinate form for time-dependent magnetic and electric fields. The advantages of the canonical Hamiltonian form are also discussed.

  9. Formation of the system indicators analytic dependence during bisubject qualimetric evaluation of arbitrary objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, A.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents an analytical model of calculating the values of parametric clusters, a matrix of the parameters compliance and a model of the analyzed parameter values calculation allowing to form an analytical matrix of the indicators system during bisubject qualimetric evaluation of arbitrary objects and to identify the quantitative relationship of the parameters values. The results are useful for solving problems of control over both technical and socio-economic systems for evaluating objects using parameter systems generated by different subjects taking into account their performance and priorities of decision-making.

  10. Unsteady aerodynamics in time and frequency domains for finite time arbitrary motion of rotary wings in hover and forward flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinyavari, M. A. H.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    Several incompressible finite-time arbitrary-motion airfoil theories suitable for coupled flap-lag-torsional aeroelastic analysis of helicopter rotors in hover and forward flight are derived. These theories include generalized Greenberg's theory, generalized Loewy's theory, and a staggered cascade theory. The generalized Greenberg's and staggered cascade theories were derived directly in Laplace domain considering the finite length of the wake and using operational methods. The load expressions are presented in Laplace, frequency, and time domains. Approximate time domain loads for the various generalized theories, discussed in the paper, are obtained by developing finite state models using the Pade approximant of the appropriate lift deficiency functions. Three different methods for constructing Pade approximants of the lift deficiency functions were considered and the more flexible one was used. Pade approximants of Loewy's lift deficiency function, for various wake spacing and radial location parameters of a helicopter typical rotor blade section, are presented.

  11. Stability Switches of Arbitrary High-Order Consensus in Multiagent Networks with Time Delays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    High-order consensus seeking, in which individual high-order dynamic agents share a consistent view of the objectives and the world in a distributed manner, finds its potential broad applications in the field of cooperative control. This paper presents stability switches analysis of arbitrary high-order consensus in multiagent networks with time delays. By employing a frequency domain method, we explicitly derive analytical equations that clarify a rigorous connection between the stability of general high-order consensus and the system parameters such as the network topology, communication time-delays, and feedback gains. Particularly, our results provide a general and a fairly precise notion of how increasing communication time-delay causes the stability switches of consensus. Furthermore, under communication constraints, the stability and robustness problems of consensus algorithms up to third order are discussed in details to illustrate our central results. Numerical examples and simulation results for fourth-order consensus are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results. PMID:24109207

  12. Gaze-contingent real-time simulation of arbitrary visual fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Jeffrey S.; Geisler, Wilson S.

    2002-06-01

    We describe an algorithm and software for creating variable resolution displays in real time, contingent upon the direction of gaze. The algorithm takes as input a video sequence and an arbitrary, real-valued, two-dimensional map that specifies a desired amount of filtering (blur) at each pixel location relative to direction of gaze. For each input video image the follow operations are performed: (1) the image is coded as a multi-resolution pyramid, (2) the gaze direction is measured, (3) the resolution map is shifted to the gaze direction, (4) the desired filtering at each pixel location is achieved by interpolating between levels of the pyramid using the resolution map, and (5) the interpolated image is displayed. The transfer function associated with each level of the pyramid is calibrated beforehand so that the interpolation produces exactly the desired amount of filtering at each pixel. This algorithm produces precision, artifact-free displays in 8-bit grayscale or 24-bit color. The software can process live or prerecorded video at over 60 frames per second on ordinary personal computers without special hardware. Direction of gaze for each processed video frame may be taken from an eye-tracker, from a sequence of directions saved on disk, or from another pointing device (such as a mouse). The software is demonstrated by simulating the visual fields of normals and of patients with low vision. We are currently using the software to precisely control retinal stimulation during complex tasks such as extended visual search.

  13. Time dependent view factor methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-03-01

    View factors have been used for treating radiation transport between opaque surfaces bounding a transparent medium for several decades. However, in recent years they have been applied to problems involving intense bursts of radiation in enclosed volumes such as in the laser fusion hohlraums. In these problems, several aspects require treatment of time dependence.

  14. Analytic Time Depending Galaxy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, F.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Considerando las hip6tesis de Chandrasekhar para el estudjo de la GalActicaq se han desarrollado varios modelos analiticos integrables con simetria axial y dependientes del . . By considering Chandrasekhar hypotheses +or the study o+ Galactic Dynamics, several integrable analytic axisymmetric time-depending galactic models have been developed. Ke ords; GALAXY-DYNAMICS - GALAXY-STRUCTURE

  15. Real-time aware rendering of scalable arbitrary-shaped MPEG-4 decoder for multiprocessor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastrnak, Milan; de With, Peter H. N.; van Meerbergen, Jef

    2007-02-01

    The MPEG-4 video standard extends the traditional frame-based processing with the option to compose several video objects (VO) superimposed on a background sprite image. In our previous work, we presented a distributed, multiprocessor based, scalable implementation of an MPEG-4 arbitrary-shaped decoder, which forms together with the background sprite decoder an essential part for further scene rendering. For control of the multiprocessor architecture, we have constructed a Quality-of-Service (QoS) management that monitors the availability of required data and distributes the processing of individual tasks with guaranteed or best-effort services of the platform. However, the proposed architecture with the combined guaranteed and best-effort services poses problems for real-time scene rendering. In this paper, we present a technique for proper run-time rendering of the final scene after decoding one VO Layer. The individual video-object monitors check the data availability and select the highest quality for the final scene rendering. The algorithm operates hierarchically both at the scene level and at the task level of the video object processing. Whereas the earlier work on scalable implementation concentrated only on guaranteed services, we now introduce a new element in the system architecture for the real-time control and fall back mechanism of the best-effort services. This element is based on first, controlling data availability at task level, and second, introducing the propagation service to QoS management. We present our simulation results in the comparison with the standard "frame-skipping" technique that is the only currently available solution to this type of rendering a scalable processing.

  16. An Efficient Format for Nearly Constant-Time Access to Arbitrary Time Intervals in Large Trace Files

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chan, Anthony; Gropp, William; Lusk, Ewing

    2008-01-01

    A powerful method to aid in understanding the performance of parallel applications uses log or trace files containing time-stamped events and states (pairs of events). These trace files can be very large, often hundreds or even thousands of megabytes. Because of the cost of accessing and displaying such files, other methods are often used that reduce the size of the tracefiles at the cost of sacrificing detail or other information. This paper describes a hierarchical trace file format that provides for display of an arbitrary time window in a time independent of the total size of the file andmore » roughly proportional to the number of events within the time window. This format eliminates the need to sacrifice data to achieve a smaller trace file size (since storage is inexpensive, it is necessary only to make efficient use of bandwidth to that storage). The format can be used to organize a trace file or to create a separate file of annotations that may be used with conventional trace files. We present an analysis of the time to access all of the events relevant to an interval of time and we describe experiments demonstrating the performance of this file format.« less

  17. Real-time arbitrary view synthesis method for ultra-HD auto-stereoscopic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yuanfa; Sang, Xinzhu; Duo, Chen; Zhao, Tianqi; Fan, Xin; Guo, Nan; Yu, Xunbo; Yan, Binbin

    2013-08-01

    An arbitrary view synthesis method from 2D-Plus-Depth image for real-time auto-stereoscopic display is presented. Traditional methods use depth image based rendering (DIBR) technology, which is a process of synthesizing "virtual" views of a scene from still or moving images and associated per-pixel depth information. All the virtual view images are generated and then the ultimate stereo-image is synthesized. DIBR can greatly decrease the number of reference images and is flexible and efficient as the depth images are used. However it causes some problems such as the appearance of holes in the rendered image, and the occurrence of depth discontinuity on the surface of the object at virtual image plane. Here, reversed disparity shift pixel rendering is used to generate the stereo-image directly, and the target image won't generate holes. To avoid duplication of calculation and also to be able to match with any specific three-dimensional display, a selecting table is designed to pick up appropriate virtual viewpoints for auto-stereoscopic display. According to the selecting table, only sub-pixels of the appropriate virtual viewpoints are calculated, so calculation amount is independent of the number of virtual viewpoints. In addition, 3D image warping technology is used to translate depth information to parallax between virtual viewpoints and parallax, and the viewer can adjust the zero-parallax-setting-plane (ZPS) and change parallax conveniently to suit his/her personal preferences. The proposed method is implemented with OPENGL and demonstrated on a laptop computer with a 2.3 GHz Intel Core i5 CPU and NVIDA GeForce GT540m GPU. We got a frame rate 30 frames per second with 4096×2340 video. High synthesis efficiency and good stereoscopic sense can be obtained. The presented method can meet the requirements of real-time ultra-HD super multi-view auto-stereoscopic display.

  18. Network-timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Delattre, Vincent; Keller, Daniel; Perich, Matthew; Markram, Henry; Muller, Eilif B

    2015-01-01

    Bursts of activity in networks of neurons are thought to convey salient information and drive synaptic plasticity. Here we report that network bursts also exert a profound effect on Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). In acute slices of juvenile rat somatosensory cortex we paired a network burst, which alone induced long-term depression (LTD), with STDP-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) and LTD. We observed that STDP-induced LTP was either unaffected, blocked or flipped into LTD by the network burst, and that STDP-induced LTD was either saturated or flipped into LTP, depending on the relative timing of the network burst with respect to spike coincidences of the STDP event. We hypothesized that network bursts flip STDP-induced LTP to LTD by depleting resources needed for LTP and therefore developed a resource-dependent STDP learning rule. In a model neural network under the influence of the proposed resource-dependent STDP rule, we found that excitatory synaptic coupling was homeostatically regulated to produce power law distributed burst amplitudes reflecting self-organized criticality, a state that ensures optimal information coding. PMID:26106298

  19. Network-timing-dependent plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Delattre, Vincent; Keller, Daniel; Perich, Matthew; Markram, Henry; Muller, Eilif B.

    2015-01-01

    Bursts of activity in networks of neurons are thought to convey salient information and drive synaptic plasticity. Here we report that network bursts also exert a profound effect on Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). In acute slices of juvenile rat somatosensory cortex we paired a network burst, which alone induced long-term depression (LTD), with STDP-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) and LTD. We observed that STDP-induced LTP was either unaffected, blocked or flipped into LTD by the network burst, and that STDP-induced LTD was either saturated or flipped into LTP, depending on the relative timing of the network burst with respect to spike coincidences of the STDP event. We hypothesized that network bursts flip STDP-induced LTP to LTD by depleting resources needed for LTP and therefore developed a resource-dependent STDP learning rule. In a model neural network under the influence of the proposed resource-dependent STDP rule, we found that excitatory synaptic coupling was homeostatically regulated to produce power law distributed burst amplitudes reflecting self-organized criticality, a state that ensures optimal information coding. PMID:26106298

  20. Time-dependent interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    Some current problems in interstellar chemistry are considered in the context of time-dependent calculations. The limitations of steady-state models of interstellar gas-phase chemistry are discussed, and attempts to chemically date interstellar clouds are reviewed. The importance of studying the physical and chemical properties of interstellar dust is emphasized. Finally, the results of a series of studies of collapsing clouds are described.

  1. Time-Dependent Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Natta, Antonella

    1995-01-01

    We present theoretical models of the time-dependent thermal and chemical structure of molecular gas suddenly exposed to far-ultraviolet (FUV) (6 eV less than hv less than 13.6 eV) radiation fields and the consequent time- dependent infrared emission of the gas. We focus on the response of molecular hydrogen for cloud densities ranging from n = 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 6)/cu cm and FUV fluxes G(sub 0) = 10(exp 3)-10(exp 6) times the local FUV interstellar flux. For G(sub 0)/n greater than 10(exp -2) cu cm, the emergent H(sub 2) vibrational line intensities are initially larger than the final equilibrium values. The H(sub 2) lines are excited by FUV fluorescence and by collisional excitation in warm gas. Most of the H(sub 2) intensity is generated at a characteristic hydrogen column density of N approximately 10(exp 21)/sq cm, which corresponds to an FUV optical depth of unity caused by dust opacity. The time dependence of the H(sub 2) intensities arises because the initial abundances of H(sub 2) at these depths is much higher than the equilibrium values, so that H(sub 2) initially competes more effectively with dust in absorbing FUV photons. Considerable column densities of warm (T approximately 1000) K H(sub 2) gas can be produced by the FUV pumping of H(sub 2) vibrational levels followed by collisional de-excitation, which transfers the energy to heat. In dense (n greater than or approximately 10(exp 5)/cu cm) gas exposed to high (G(sub 0) greater than or approximately 10(exp 4)) fluxes, this warm gas produces a 2-1 S(1)/1-0 S(l) H(sub 2) line ratio of approximately 0.1, which mimics the ratio found in shocked gas. In lower density regions, the FUV pumping produces a pure-fluorescent ratio of approximately 0.5. We also present calculations of the time dependence of the atomic hydrogen column densities and of the intensities of 0 I 6300 A, S II 6730 A, Fe II 1.64 microns, and rotational OH and H20 emission. Potential applications include star-forming regions, clouds

  2. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  3. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-08-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  4. Equation for disentangling time-ordered exponentials with arbitrary quadratic generators

    SciTech Connect

    Budanov, V.G.

    1987-12-01

    In many quantum-mechanical constructions, it is necessary to disentangle an operator-valued time-ordered exponential with time-dependent generators quadratic in the creation and annihilation operators. By disentangling, one understands the finding of the matrix elements of the time-ordered exponential or, in a more general formulation. The solution of the problem can also be reduced to calculation of a matrix time-ordered exponential that solves the corresponding classical problem. However, in either case the evolution equations in their usual form do not enable one to take into account explicitly the symmetry of the system. In this paper the methods of Weyl analysis are used to find an ordinary differential equation on a matrix Lie algebra that is invariant with respect to the adjoint action of the dynamical symmetry group of a quadratic Hamiltonian and replaces the operator evolution equation for the Green's function.

  5. Comparison of arbitrary definitions of circadian time periods with those determined by wrist actigraphy in analysis of ABPM data.

    PubMed

    Eissa, M A; Yetman, R J; Poffenbarger, T; Portman, R J

    1999-07-01

    Determining blood pressure (BP) values at different daily time periods is a well recognised measure to assess the risk of end-organ damage. However, the use of various definitions of these periods, eg, day vs night, sleep vs wake or arbitrary definitions, makes clinical decisions based on available data difficult. In the present study, we compared BP loads in actual sleep-wake periods to default day-night definition provided by the ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) software (day 06.00-22.00; night 22.00-06.00) as well as to an arbitrary definition of sleep-wake periods in children published in Journal of Pediatrics (Soergel et al, 1997) (awake 08.00-20:00 and sleep 00.00-06.00). We used an actigraph, an accelerometer, to define the actual sleep-wake periods in 46 patients with essential hypertension who are on various treatment regimens. BP data were obtained by using Spacelabs 90207 monitors for a full 24 hours. There were significant differences between actual sleep-wake and default definition for BP load. No similar findings were noted when arbitrary definition was used. The proportion of hypertensives was not significantly different when default and arbitrary definitions were used. Classification of dippers and non-dippers is greatly affected by the definition of sleep interval using the default method. Although some of the misclassifications were not statistically significant, their clinical importance must be considered. Determination of sleep and wake periods for analysis of ABPM data should be based on careful determination of actual periods. Using other definitions may not provide complete information or accommodate for individual variation. PMID:10449208

  6. Comparison of arbitrary definitions of circadian time periods with those determined by wrist actigraphy in analysis of ABPM data.

    PubMed

    Eissa, M A; Yetman, R J; Poffenbarger, T; Portman, R J

    1999-11-01

    Determining blood pressure (BP) values at different daily time periods is a well recognised measure to assess the risk of end-organ damage. However, the use of various definitions of these periods, eg, day vs night, sleep vs wake or arbitrary definitions, makes clinical decisions based on available data difficult. In the present study, we compared BP loads in actual sleep-wake periods to default day-night definition provided by the ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) software (day 06.00 to 22.00; night 22.00 to 06.00) as well as to an arbitrary definition of sleep-wake periods in children published in Soergel et al (J Pediatr 1997; 130: 178-184)1 (awake 08.00 to 20.00 and sleep 00.00 to 06.00. We used an actigraphy, an accelerometer, to define the actual sleep-wake periods in 46 patients with essential hypertension who are on various treatment regimens. BP data was obtained by using Spacelabs 90207 monitors for a full 24 h. There were significant differences between actual sleep-wake and default definition for BP load. No similar finding was noted when arbitrary definition was used. The proportion of hypertensives was not significantly different when default and arbitrary definitions were used. Classification of dippers and non-dippers is greatly affected by the definition of sleep interval using the default method. Although some of the misclassifications were not statistically significant, their clinical importance must be considered. Determination of sleep and wake periods for analysis of ABPM data should be based on careful determination of actual periods. Using other definitions may not provide complete information or accommodate for individual variation. PMID:10578220

  7. High-speed multi-frame dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W.; DeHope, William J.; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.

    2016-02-23

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses each being of a programmable pulse duration, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has a plurality of plates. A control system having a digital sequencer controls the laser and a plurality of switching components, synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to enable programmable pulse durations and programmable inter-pulse spacings.

  8. High-speed multiframe dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W.; Dehope, William J; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M

    2016-06-21

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses of a predefined pulse duration and waveform, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has two pairs of plates arranged perpendicular to one another. A control system controls the laser and a plurality of switching components synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to be provided with an independently set duration and independently set inter-pulse spacings.

  9. High-speed multiframe dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Bryan W.; DeHope, William J.; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.

    2015-10-20

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses of a predefined pulse duration and waveform, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has two pairs of plates arranged perpendicular to one another. A control system controls the laser and a plurality of switching components synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to be provided with an independently set duration and independently set inter-pulse spacings.

  10. Generalized Procedure for Improved Accuracy of Thermal Contact Resistance Measurements for Materials With Arbitrary Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, Robert A.

    2014-06-26

    Thermal contact resistance (TCR) is most commonly measured using one-dimensional steady-state calorimetric techniques. In the experimental methods we utilized, a temperature gradient is applied across two contacting beams and the temperature drop at the interface is inferred from the temperature profiles of the rods that are measured at discrete points. During data analysis, thermal conductivity of the beams is typically taken to be an average value over the temperature range imposed during the experiment. Our generalized theory is presented and accounts for temperature-dependent changes in thermal conductivity. The procedure presented enables accurate measurement of TCR for contacting materials whose thermal conductivity is any arbitrary function of temperature. For example, it is shown that the standard technique yields TCR values that are about 15% below the actual value for two specific examples of copper and silicon contacts. Conversely, the generalized technique predicts TCR values that are within 1% of the actual value. The method is exact when thermal conductivity is known exactly and no other errors are introduced to the system.

  11. Generalized Procedure for Improved Accuracy of Thermal Contact Resistance Measurements for Materials With Arbitrary Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sayer, Robert A.

    2014-06-26

    Thermal contact resistance (TCR) is most commonly measured using one-dimensional steady-state calorimetric techniques. In the experimental methods we utilized, a temperature gradient is applied across two contacting beams and the temperature drop at the interface is inferred from the temperature profiles of the rods that are measured at discrete points. During data analysis, thermal conductivity of the beams is typically taken to be an average value over the temperature range imposed during the experiment. Our generalized theory is presented and accounts for temperature-dependent changes in thermal conductivity. The procedure presented enables accurate measurement of TCR for contacting materials whose thermalmore » conductivity is any arbitrary function of temperature. For example, it is shown that the standard technique yields TCR values that are about 15% below the actual value for two specific examples of copper and silicon contacts. Conversely, the generalized technique predicts TCR values that are within 1% of the actual value. The method is exact when thermal conductivity is known exactly and no other errors are introduced to the system.« less

  12. Time-Dependent Coupled Harmonic Oscillators: Classical and Quantum Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, Diego Ximenes; Guedes, Ilde

    2015-10-01

    In this work we present the classical and quantum solutions for an arbitrary system of time-dependent coupled harmonic oscillators, where the masses (m), frequencies (ω) and coupling parameter (k) are functions of time. To obtain the classical solutions we use a coordinate and momentum transformations along with a canonical transformation to write the original Hamiltonian as the sum of two Hamiltonians of uncoupled harmonic oscillators with modified time-dependent frequencies and unitary masses. To obtain the exact quantum solutions we use a unitary transformation and the Lewis and Riesenfeld invariant method. The exact wave functions are obtained by solving the respective Milne-Pinney equation for each system. We obtain the solutions for the system with m1 = m2 = m0eγt, ω1 = ω01e-γt/2, ω2 = ω02e-γt/2 and k = k0.

  13. Time-dependent coupled harmonic oscillators: Classical and quantum solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, D. X.; Guedes, I.

    2014-08-01

    In this work we present the classical and quantum solutions for an arbitrary system of time-dependent coupled harmonic oscillators, where the masses (m), frequencies (ω) and coupling parameter (k) are functions of time. To obtain the classical solutions, we use a coordinate and momentum transformations along with a canonical transformation to write the original Hamiltonian as the sum of two Hamiltonians of uncoupled harmonic oscillators with modified time-dependent frequencies and unitary masses. To obtain the exact quantum solutions we use a unitary transformation and the Lewis and Riesenfeld (LR) invariant method. The exact wave functions are obtained by solving the respective Milne-Pinney (MP) equation for each system. We obtain the solutions for the system with m1 = m2 = m0eγt, ω1 = ω01e-γt/2, ω2 = ω02e-γt/2 and k = k0.

  14. The control of high-dimensional chaos in time-delay systems to an arbitrary goal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünner, M. J.

    1999-03-01

    We present the control of high-dimensional chaos, with possibly a large number of positive Lyapunov exponents, of unknown time-delay systems to an arbitrary goal dynamics. We give an existence-and-uniqueness theorem for the control force. In the case of an unknown system, a formula to compute a model-based control force is derived. We give an example by demonstrating the control of the Mackey-Glass system toward a fixed point and a Rössler dynamics.

  15. Time-dependent diffusive acceleration of test particles at shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, L. O'C.

    1991-07-01

    A theoretical description is developed for the acceleration of test particles at a steady plane nonrelativistic shock. The mean and the variance of the acceleration-time distribution are expressed analytically for the condition under which the diffusion coefficient is arbitrarily dependent on position and momentum. The formula for an acceleration rate with arbitrary spatial variation in the diffusion coefficient developed by Drury (1987) is supplemented by a general theory of time dependence. An approximation scheme is developed by means of the analysis which permits the description of the spectral cutoff resulting from the finite shock age. The formulas developed in the analysis are also of interest for analyzing the observations of heliospheric shocks made from spacecraft.

  16. Counterrotating prop-fan simulations which feature a relative-motion multiblock grid decomposition enabling arbitrary time-steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janus, J. Mark; Whitfield, David L.

    1990-01-01

    Improvements are presented of a computer algorithm developed for the time-accurate flow analysis of rotating machines. The flow model is a finite volume method utilizing a high-resolution approximate Riemann solver for interface flux definitions. The numerical scheme is a block LU implicit iterative-refinement method which possesses apparent unconditional stability. Multiblock composite gridding is used to orderly partition the field into a specified arrangement of blocks exhibiting varying degrees of similarity. Block-block relative motion is achieved using local grid distortion to reduce grid skewness and accommodate arbitrary time step selection. A general high-order numerical scheme is applied to satisfy the geometric conservation law. An even-blade-count counterrotating unducted fan configuration is chosen for a computational study comparing solutions resulting from altering parameters such as time step size and iteration count. The solutions are compared with measured data.

  17. Time-dependent seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Foulger, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    Of methods for measuring temporal changes in seismic-wave speeds in the Earth, seismic tomography is among those that offer the highest spatial resolution. 3-D tomographic methods are commonly applied in this context by inverting seismic wave arrival time data sets from different epochs independently and assuming that differences in the derived structures represent real temporal variations. This assumption is dangerous because the results of independent inversions would differ even if the structure in the Earth did not change, due to observational errors and differences in the seismic ray distributions. The latter effect may be especially severe when data sets include earthquake swarms or aftershock sequences, and may produce the appearance of correlation between structural changes and seismicity when the wave speeds are actually temporally invariant. A better approach, which makes it possible to assess what changes are truly required by the data, is to invert multiple data sets simultaneously, minimizing the difference between models for different epochs as well as the rms arrival-time residuals. This problem leads, in the case of two epochs, to a system of normal equations whose order is twice as great as for a single epoch. The direct solution of this system would require twice as much memory and four times as much computational effort as would independent inversions. We present an algorithm, tomo4d, that takes advantage of the structure and sparseness of the system to obtain the solution with essentially no more effort than independent inversions require. No claim to original US government works Journal compilation ?? 2010 RAS.

  18. Arbitrary eigenvalue assignments for linear time-varying multivariable control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of eigenvalue assignments for a class of linear time-varying multivariable systems is considered. Using matrix operators and canonical transformations, it is shown that a time-varying system that is 'lexicography-fixedly controllable' can be made via state feedback to be equivalent to a time-invariant system whose eigenvalues are arbitrarily assignable. A simple algorithm for the design of the state feedback is provided.

  19. Time dependent parallel viscosity and relaxation rate of poloidal rotation in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.T.; Shaing, K.C.; Gormley, R. )

    1994-01-01

    Time dependent ion parallel viscous force in the banana regime with arbitrary inverse aspect ratio [epsilon] is calculated using the eigenfunction approach. The flux surface averaged viscosity is then used to study the relaxation process of the poloidal rotation which leads to oscillatory relaxation behavior. The relaxation rate [nu][sub [ital p

  20. Time dependent solution for acceleration of tau-leaping

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Jin; Wu, Sheng; Petzold, Linda R.

    2013-02-15

    The tau-leaping method is often effective for speeding up discrete stochastic simulation of chemically reacting systems. However, when fast reactions are involved, the speed-up for this method can be quite limited. One way to address this is to apply a stochastic quasi-steady state assumption. However we must be careful when using this assumption. If the fast subsystem cannot reach a steady distribution fast enough, the quasi-steady-state assumption will propagate error into the simulation. To avoid these errors, we propose to use the time dependent solution rather than the quasi-steady-state. Generally speaking, the time dependent solution is not easy to derive for an arbitrary network. However, for some common motifs we do have time dependent solutions. We derive the time dependent solutions for these motifs, and then show how they can be used with tau-leaping to achieve substantial speed-ups, including for a realistic model of blood coagulation. Although the method is complicated, we have automated it.

  1. Adjoint-Based Methodology for Time-Dependent Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a discrete adjoint method for a broad class of time-dependent optimization problems. The time-dependent adjoint equations are derived in terms of the discrete residual of an arbitrary finite volume scheme which approximates unsteady conservation law equations. Although only the 2-D unsteady Euler equations are considered in the present analysis, this time-dependent adjoint method is applicable to the 3-D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with minor modifications. The discrete adjoint operators involving the derivatives of the discrete residual and the cost functional with respect to the flow variables are computed using a complex-variable approach, which provides discrete consistency and drastically reduces the implementation and debugging cycle. The implementation of the time-dependent adjoint method is validated by comparing the sensitivity derivative with that obtained by forward mode differentiation. Our numerical results show that O(10) optimization iterations of the steepest descent method are needed to reduce the objective functional by 3-6 orders of magnitude for test problems considered.

  2. Mapping gravitational-wave backgrounds of arbitrary polarisation using pulsar timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gair, Jonathan R.; Romano, Joseph D.; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2015-11-01

    We extend our previous work on mapping gravitational-wave backgrounds using techniques borrowed from the analysis of cosmic microwave background data to backgrounds which have non-general-relativity (non-GR) polarisations. Our analysis and results are presented in the context of pulsar timing array observations, but the overarching methods are general, and can be easily applied to LIGO or eLISA observations using appropriately modified response functions. Analytic expressions for the pulsar timing response to gravitational waves with non-GR polarisation are given for each mode of a spin-weighted spherical-harmonic decomposition of the background, which permit the signal to be mapped across the sky to any desired resolution. We also derive the pulsar timing overlap reduction functions for the various non-GR polarisations, finding analytic forms for anisotropic backgrounds with scalar-transverse ("breathing") and vector-longitudinal polarisations, and a semianalytic form for scalar-longitudinal backgrounds. Our results indicate that pulsar timing observations will be completely insensitive to scalar-transverse mode anisotropies in the polarisation amplitude beyond dipole, and anisotropies in the power beyond quadrupole. Analogous to our previous findings that pulsar timing observations lack sensitivity to tensor-curl modes for a transverse-traceless tensor background, we also find insensitivity to vector-curl modes for a vector-longitudinal background.

  3. Spectral methods for time dependent problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1990-01-01

    Spectral approximations are reviewed for time dependent problems. Some basic ingredients from the spectral Fourier and Chebyshev approximations theory are discussed. A brief survey was made of hyperbolic and parabolic time dependent problems which are dealt with by both the energy method and the related Fourier analysis. The ideas presented above are combined in the study of accuracy stability and convergence of the spectral Fourier approximation to time dependent problems.

  4. The necking time of gas bubbles in liquids of arbitrary viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaños-Jiménez, R.; Sevilla, A.; Martínez-Bazán, C.

    2016-04-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the collapse time of a gas bubble injected into an otherwise stagnant liquid under quasi-static conditions and for a wide range of liquid viscosities. The experiments were performed by injecting a constant flow rate of air through a needle with inner radius a into several water/glycerine mixtures, providing a viscosity range of 20 cP ≲ μ ≲ 1500 cP. By analyzing the temporal evolution of the neck radius, R0(t), the collapse time has been extracted for three different stages during the collapse process, namely, Ri/a = 0.6, 0.4, and 0.2, being Ri = R0(t = 0) the initial neck radius. The collapse time is shown to monotonically increase with both Ri/a and with the Ohnesorge number, Oh = μ / √{ ρ σ R i } , where ρ and σ represent the liquid density and the surface tension coefficient, respectively. The theoretical approach is based on the cylindrical Rayleigh-Plesset equation for the radial liquid flow around the neck, which is the appropriate leading-order representation of the collapse dynamics, thanks to the slenderness condition R0(t) r1(t) ≪ 1, where r1(t) is half the axial curvature of the interface evaluated at the neck. The Rayleigh-Plesset equation can be integrated numerically to obtain the collapse time, τcol, which is made dimensionless using the capillary time, t σ = √{ ρ Ri 3 / σ } . We present a novel scaling law for τcol as a function of Ri/a and Oh that closely follows the experimental data for the entire range of both parameters, and provide analytical expressions in the inviscid and Stokes regimes, i.e., τ col ( Oh → 0 ) → √{ 2 ln C } and τcol(Oh → ∞) → 2Oh, respectively, where C is a constant of order unity that increases with Ri/a.

  5. Electromagnetic interaction of arbitrary radial-dependent anisotropic spheres and improved invisibility for nonlinear-transformation-based cloaks.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Novitsky, Andrey; Ma, Hua; Qu, Shaobo

    2009-07-01

    An analytical method of electromagnetic wave interactions with a general radially anisotropic cloak is established. It is able to deal with arbitrary parameters [ epsilon r (r) , mu r (r) , epsilon t (r) , and mu t (r) ] of a radially anisotropic inhomogeneous shell. The general cloaking condition is proposed from the wave relations, in contrast to the method of transformation optics. Spherical metamaterial cloaks with improved invisibility performance are achieved with optimal nonlinearity in transformation and core-shell ratio. PMID:19658829

  6. Prospective Real-Time Correction for Arbitrary Head Motion Using Active Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Melvyn B.; Krueger, Sascha; Thomas, William J.; Swaminathan, Srirama V.; Brown, Truman R.

    2011-01-01

    Patient motion during an MRI exam can result in major degradation of image quality, and is of increasing concern due to the aging population and its associated diseases. This work presents a general strategy for real-time, intra-image compensation of rigid-body motion that is compatible with multiple imaging sequences. Image quality improvements are established for structural brain MRI acquired during volunteer motion. A headband integrated with three active markers is secured to the forehead. Prospective correction is achieved by interleaving a rapid track-and-update module into the imaging sequence. For every repetition of this module, a short tracking pulse-sequence re-measures the marker positions; during head motion, the rigid-body transformation that realigns the markers to their initial positions is fed back to adaptively update the image-plane – maintaining it at a fixed orientation relative to the head – before the next imaging segment of k-space is acquired. In cases of extreme motion, corrupted lines of k-space are rejected and re-acquired with the updated geometry. High precision tracking measurements (0.01 mm) and corrections are accomplished in a temporal resolution (37 ms) suitable for real-time application. The correction package requires minimal additional hardware and is fully integrated into the standard user interface, promoting transferability to clinical practice. PMID:19488989

  7. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  8. Birefringence in time-dependent moving media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shirong; Zhang, Ruoyang; Zhai, Yanwang; Wei, Jianye; Zhao, Qing

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic wave propagation in one- and two-dimensional time-dependent moving media is investigated in this paper. We identify another origin of linear birefringence caused by the component of the flow perpendicular to the wave vector. Previously, birefringence is induced by applying external electric and magnetic fields to non-crystalline material. Here it is shown that the time-varying velocity field also contributes to such a phenomenon. Our results indicate that the parallel component, time-dependent or not, will not yield birefringence. Furthermore, the time-dependent flow also results in a frequency shift. One-dimensional simulation is conducted to demonstrate these effects.

  9. Focusing waves at arbitrary locations in a ray-chaotic enclosure using time-reversed synthetic sonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bo; Antonsen, Thomas M.; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M.

    2016-05-01

    Time-reversal methods are widely used to achieve wave focusing in acoustics and electromagnetics. Past time-reversal experiments typically require that a transmitter be initially present at the target focusing point, which limits the application of this technique. In this paper, we propose a method to focus waves at an arbitrary location inside a complex enclosure using a numerically calculated wave excitation signal. We use a semiclassical ray algorithm to calculate the signal that would be received at a transceiver port resulting from the injection of a short pulse at the desired target location. The time-reversed version of this signal is then injected into the transceiver port, and an approximate reconstruction of the short pulse is created at the target. The quality of the pulse reconstruction is quantified in three different ways, and the values of these metrics are shown to be predicted by the statistics of the scattering parameter | S21|2 between the transceiver and target points in the enclosure over the bandwidth of the pulse. We demonstrate the method experimentally using a flat microwave billiard, and we quantify the reconstruction quality as a function of enclosure loss, port coupling, and other considerations.

  10. String pair production in a time-dependent gravitational field

    SciTech Connect

    Tolley, Andrew J.; Wesley, Daniel H.

    2005-12-15

    We study the pair creation of point particles and strings in a time-dependent, weak gravitational field. We find that, for massive string states, there are surprising and significant differences between the string and point-particle results. Central to our approach is the fact that a weakly curved spacetime can be represented by a coherent state of gravitons, and therefore we employ standard techniques in string perturbation theory. String and point-particle pairs are created through tree-level interactions between the background gravitons. In particular, we focus on the production of excited string states and perform explicit calculations of the production of a set of string states of arbitrary excitation level. The differences between the string and point-particle results may contain important lessons for the pair production of strings in the strong gravitational fields of interest in cosmology and black hole physics.

  11. Quick Time-dependent Ionization Calculations Depending on MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chengcai; Raymond, John C.; Murphy, Nicholas Arnold

    2014-06-01

    Time-dependent ionization is important in astrophysical environments where the thermodynamic time scale is shorter than ionization time scale. In this work, we report a FORTRAN program that performs fast non-equilibrium ionization calculations based on parallel computing. Using MHD simulation results, we trace the movements of plasma in a Lagrangian framework, and obtain evolutionary history of temperature and electron density. Then the time-dependent ionization equations are solved using the eigenvalue method. For any complex temperature and density histories, we introduce a advanced time-step strategy to improve the computational efficiency. Our tests show that this program has advantages of high numerical stability and high accuracy. In addition, it is also easy to integrate this solver with the other MHD routines.

  12. Topic 5: Time-Dependent Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Tanabe, Tada-aki

    1991-12-31

    This chapter is a report of the material presented at the International Workshop on Finite Element Analysis of Reinforced Concrete, Session 4 -- Time Dependent Behavior, held at Columbia University, New York on June 3--6, 1991. Dr. P.A. Pfeiffer presented recent developments in time-dependent behavior of concrete and Professor T. Tanabe presented a review of research in Japan on time-dependent behavior of concrete. The chapter discusses the recent research of time-dependent behavior of concrete in the past few years in both the USA-European and Japanese communities. The author appreciates the valuable information provided by Zdenek P. Bazant in preparing the USA-European Research section.

  13. Cumulative beam breakup in linear accelerators with time-dependent parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen

    2004-10-01

    A formalism presented in a previous paper for the analysis of cumulative beam breakup (BBU) with arbitrary time dependence of the beam current and with misalignment of the cavities and focusing elements [J. R. Delayen, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 6, 084402 (2003)] is extended to include time dependence of the focusing and coupling between the beam and the dipole modes. Such time dependence, which could result from an energy chirp imposed on the beam or from rf focusing, is known to be effective in reducing BBU-induced instabilities and emittance growth. The analytical results are presented and applied to practical accelerator configurations and compared to numerical simulations.

  14. Time dependent breakdown in silicon dioxide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svensson, C.; Shumka, A.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted regarding the possible existence of a time-dependent breakdown mechanism in thermal oxides of the type used as gate oxide in MOS circuits. Questions of device fabrication are discussed along with details concerning breakdown measurements and the determination of C-V characteristics. A relatively large prebreakdown current observed in one of the cases is related to the time-dependent breakdown.

  15. Wave function for time-dependent harmonically confined electrons in a time-dependent electric field.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Qi; Pan, Xiao-Yin; Sahni, Viraht

    2013-09-21

    The many-body wave function of a system of interacting particles confined by a time-dependent harmonic potential and perturbed by a time-dependent spatially homogeneous electric field is derived via the Feynman path-integral method. The wave function is comprised of a phase factor times the solution to the unperturbed time-dependent Schrödinger equation with the latter being translated by a time-dependent value that satisfies the classical driven equation of motion. The wave function reduces to that of the Harmonic Potential Theorem wave function for the case of the time-independent harmonic confining potential. PMID:24070284

  16. Time-dependent oral absorption models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higaki, K.; Yamashita, S.; Amidon, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma concentration-time profiles following oral administration of drugs are often irregular and cannot be interpreted easily with conventional models based on first- or zero-order absorption kinetics and lag time. Six new models were developed using a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), wherein the time dependency was varied to account for the dynamic processes such as changes in fluid absorption or secretion, in absorption surface area, and in motility with time, in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, the plasma concentration profiles of propranolol obtained in human subjects following oral dosing were analyzed using the newly derived models based on mass balance and compared with the conventional models. Nonlinear regression analysis indicated that the conventional compartment model including lag time (CLAG model) could not predict the rapid initial increase in plasma concentration after dosing and the predicted Cmax values were much lower than that observed. On the other hand, all models with the time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), were superior to the CLAG model in predicting plasma concentration profiles. Based on Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), the fluid absorption model without lag time (FA model) exhibited the best overall fit to the data. The two-phase model including lag time, TPLAG model was also found to be a good model judging from the values of sum of squares. This model also described the irregular profiles of plasma concentration with time and frequently predicted Cmax values satisfactorily. A comparison of the absorption rate profiles also suggested that the TPLAG model is better at prediction of irregular absorption kinetics than the FA model. In conclusion, the incorporation of a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient ka(t) allows the prediction of nonlinear absorption characteristics in a more reliable manner.

  17. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  18. Time-Dependent Molecular Reaction Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Oehrn, Yngve

    2007-11-29

    This paper is a brief review of a time-dependent, direct, nonadiabatic theory of molecular processes called Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END). This approach to the study of molecular reaction dynamics is a hierarchical theory that can be applied at various levels of approximation. The simplest level of END uses classical nuclei and represents all electrons by a single, complex, determinantal wave function. The wave function parameters such as average nuclear positions and momenta, and molecular orbital coefcients carry the time dependence and serve as dynamical variables. Examples of application are given of the simplest level of END to ion-atom and ion-molecule reactions.

  19. Time-dependent corona models - Scaling laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korevaar, P.; Martens, P. C. H.

    1989-01-01

    Scaling laws are derived for the one-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations that describe the evolution of a spherically symmetric stellar atmosphere. With these scaling laws the results of the time-dependent calculations by Korevaar (1989) obtained for one star are applicable over the whole Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and even to elliptic galaxies. The scaling is exact for stars with the same M/R-ratio and a good approximation for stars with a different M/R-ratio. The global relaxation oscillation found by Korevaar (1989) is scaled to main sequence stars, a solar coronal hole, cool giants and elliptic galaxies.

  20. Time Circular Birefringence in Time-Dependent Magnetoelectric Media

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhai, Yan-Wang; Lin, Shi-Rong; Zhao, Qing; Wen, Weijia; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Light traveling in time-dependent media has many extraordinary properties which can be utilized to convert frequency, achieve temporal cloaking, and simulate cosmological phenomena. In this paper, we focus on time-dependent axion-type magnetoelectric (ME) media, and prove that light in these media always has two degenerate modes with opposite circular polarizations corresponding to one wave vector , and name this effect “time circular birefringence” (TCB). By interchanging the status of space and time, the pair of TCB modes can appear simultaneously via “time refraction” and “time reflection” of a linear polarized incident wave at a time interface of ME media. The superposition of the two TCB modes causes the “time Faraday effect”, namely the globally unified polarization axes rotate with time. A circularly polarized Gaussian pulse traversing a time interface is also studied. If the wave-vector spectrum of a pulse mainly concentrates in the non-traveling-wave band, the pulse will be trapped with nearly fixed center while its intensity will grow rapidly. In addition, we propose an experimental scheme of using molecular fluid with external time-varying electric and magnetic fields both parallel to the direction of light to realize these phenomena in practice. PMID:26329928

  1. Time Circular Birefringence in Time-Dependent Magnetoelectric Media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhai, Yan-Wang; Lin, Shi-Rong; Zhao, Qing; Wen, Weijia; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Light traveling in time-dependent media has many extraordinary properties which can be utilized to convert frequency, achieve temporal cloaking, and simulate cosmological phenomena. In this paper, we focus on time-dependent axion-type magnetoelectric (ME) media, and prove that light in these media always has two degenerate modes with opposite circular polarizations corresponding to one wave vector , and name this effect "time circular birefringence" (TCB). By interchanging the status of space and time, the pair of TCB modes can appear simultaneously via "time refraction" and "time reflection" of a linear polarized incident wave at a time interface of ME media. The superposition of the two TCB modes causes the "time Faraday effect", namely the globally unified polarization axes rotate with time. A circularly polarized Gaussian pulse traversing a time interface is also studied. If the wave-vector spectrum of a pulse mainly concentrates in the non-traveling-wave band, the pulse will be trapped with nearly fixed center while its intensity will grow rapidly. In addition, we propose an experimental scheme of using molecular fluid with external time-varying electric and magnetic fields both parallel to the direction of light to realize these phenomena in practice. PMID:26329928

  2. Time-dependent closure relations for relativistic collisionless fluid equations.

    PubMed

    Bendib-Kalache, K; Bendib, A; El Hadj, K Mohammed

    2010-11-01

    Linear fluid equations for relativistic and collisionless plasmas are derived. Closure relations for the fluid equations are analytically computed from the relativistic Vlasov equation in the Fourier space (ω,k), where ω and k are the conjugate variables of time t and space x variables, respectively. The mathematical method used is based on the projection operator techniques and the continued fraction mathematical tools. The generalized heat flux and stress tensor are calculated for arbitrary parameter ω/kc where c is the speed of light, and for arbitrary relativistic parameter z=mc²/T , where m is the particle rest mass and T, the plasma temperature in energy units. PMID:21230596

  3. Time-dependent closure relations for relativistic collisionless fluid equations

    SciTech Connect

    Bendib-Kalache, K.; Bendib, A.; El Hadj, K. Mohammed

    2010-11-15

    Linear fluid equations for relativistic and collisionless plasmas are derived. Closure relations for the fluid equations are analytically computed from the relativistic Vlasov equation in the Fourier space ({omega},k), where {omega} and k are the conjugate variables of time t and space x variables, respectively. The mathematical method used is based on the projection operator techniques and the continued fraction mathematical tools. The generalized heat flux and stress tensor are calculated for arbitrary parameter {omega}/kc where c is the speed of light, and for arbitrary relativistic parameter z=mc{sup 2}/T, where m is the particle rest mass and T, the plasma temperature in energy units.

  4. Time-Dependent Erosion of Ion Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E.; Anderson, John R.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.

    2008-01-01

    The accurate prediction of thruster life requires time-dependent erosion estimates for the ion optics assembly. Such information is critical to end-of-life mechanisms such as electron backstreaming. CEX2D was recently modified to handle time-dependent erosion, double ions, and multiple throttle conditions in a single run. The modified code is called "CEX2D-t". Comparisons of CEX2D-t results with LDT and ELT post-tests results show good agreement for both screen and accel grid erosion including important erosion features such as chamfering of the downstream end of the accel grid and reduced rate of accel grid aperture enlargement with time.

  5. Time-dependent nanomechanics of cartilage.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin; Frank, Eliot H; Greene, Jacqueline J; Lee, Hsu-Yi; Hung, Han-Hwa K; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-04-01

    In this study, atomic force microscopy-based dynamic oscillatory and force-relaxation indentation was employed to quantify the time-dependent nanomechanics of native (untreated) and proteoglycan (PG)-depleted cartilage disks, including indentation modulus E(ind), force-relaxation time constant τ, magnitude of dynamic complex modulus |E(∗)|, phase angle δ between force and indentation depth, storage modulus E', and loss modulus E″. At ∼2 nm dynamic deformation amplitude, |E(∗)| increased significantly with frequency from 0.22 ± 0.02 MPa (1 Hz) to 0.77 ± 0.10 MPa (316 Hz), accompanied by an increase in δ (energy dissipation). At this length scale, the energy dissipation mechanisms were deconvoluted: the dynamic frequency dependence was primarily governed by the fluid-flow-induced poroelasticity, whereas the long-time force relaxation reflected flow-independent viscoelasticity. After PG depletion, the change in the frequency response of |E(∗)| and δ was consistent with an increase in cartilage local hydraulic permeability. Although untreated disks showed only slight dynamic amplitude-dependent behavior, PG-depleted disks showed great amplitude-enhanced energy dissipation, possibly due to additional viscoelastic mechanisms. Hence, in addition to functioning as a primary determinant of cartilage compressive stiffness and hydraulic permeability, the presence of aggrecan minimized the amplitude dependence of |E(∗)| at nanometer-scale deformation. PMID:21463599

  6. Time-Dependent Nanomechanics of Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lin; Frank, Eliot H.; Greene, Jacqueline J.; Lee, Hsu-Yi; Hung, Han-Hwa K.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-01-01

    In this study, atomic force microscopy-based dynamic oscillatory and force-relaxation indentation was employed to quantify the time-dependent nanomechanics of native (untreated) and proteoglycan (PG)-depleted cartilage disks, including indentation modulus Eind, force-relaxation time constant τ, magnitude of dynamic complex modulus |E∗|, phase angle δ between force and indentation depth, storage modulus E′, and loss modulus E″. At ∼2 nm dynamic deformation amplitude, |E∗| increased significantly with frequency from 0.22 ± 0.02 MPa (1 Hz) to 0.77 ± 0.10 MPa (316 Hz), accompanied by an increase in δ (energy dissipation). At this length scale, the energy dissipation mechanisms were deconvoluted: the dynamic frequency dependence was primarily governed by the fluid-flow-induced poroelasticity, whereas the long-time force relaxation reflected flow-independent viscoelasticity. After PG depletion, the change in the frequency response of |E∗| and δ was consistent with an increase in cartilage local hydraulic permeability. Although untreated disks showed only slight dynamic amplitude-dependent behavior, PG-depleted disks showed great amplitude-enhanced energy dissipation, possibly due to additional viscoelastic mechanisms. Hence, in addition to functioning as a primary determinant of cartilage compressive stiffness and hydraulic permeability, the presence of aggrecan minimized the amplitude dependence of |E∗| at nanometer-scale deformation. PMID:21463599

  7. Time Dependent Behavior in the Weissenberg Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degen, Michael M.; Andereck, C. David

    1997-03-01

    The Weissenberg effect is the climb of a non-Newtonian fluid up a rotating rod. We have found novel transitional effects in the behavior of a particular climbing fluid, STP(STP Oil Treatment distributed by First Brands Corporation.). The first state is a time-independent axisymmetric concave climb. As the rotation rate of the rod is increased, the first transition is to an axisymmetric climb with an ``onion dome'' shape. At higher rotation rates, the flow undergoes a symmetry breaking bifurcation to a time-dependent state. This time-dependent state exhibits an oscillation with a single frequency. Upon further increase of the rod rotation rate, the oscillation becomes modulated by a second frequency. The nature of each transition will be characterized, including the measurement of oscillation amplitudes and the frequency (or frequencies) of the time dependent states. These results will be compared with previous work.(G.S. Beavers, D.D. Joseph, J. Fluid Mech. 69), 475 (1975).(D.D. Joseph, R.L. Fosdick, Arch. Rational Mech. 49), 321 (1973).

  8. Solution of a time-dependent equation of transfer by the F(n)-method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanjai, S.; Biswas, G.

    1986-10-01

    A solution of the time-dependent transfer equation for a finite, plane-parallel, nonradiating, and isotropically-scattering atmosphere of arbitrary stratification is presented. The method uses the orthogonality properties of the eigenfunctions introduced by Case (1960), Bowden (1963), and Bowden and Williams (1964) in solving the neutron transport problem to convert the Laplace-transformed time-dependent equation of transfer to singular integral equations. Then, the F(n)-method of Siewert and Benoist (1979) is used to solve these singular integral equations.

  9. Time-dependent diffusion in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecian, G.; Stift, M. J.; Dorfi, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical peculiarities of Ap stars are due to abundance stratifications produced by atomic diffusion in their outer layers. Theoretical models can predict such stratifications, but so far only provide equilibrium solutions which correspond to the maximum depth-dependent abundances for each element that can be supported by the radiation field. However, these stratifications are actually built up through a non-linear, time-dependent process which has never been modelled for realistic stellar atmospheres. Here, we present the first numerical simulations of time-dependent diffusion. We solve the continuity equation after having computed, as accurately as possible, atomic diffusion velocities (with and without a magnetic field) for a simplified fictitious - but still realistic - chemical element: cloudium. The direct comparison with existing observations is not the immediate aim of this work but rather a general understanding of how the stratification build-up proceeds in time and space. Our results raise serious questions as to the relevance of equilibrium solutions and reinforce the suspicion that certain accumulations of chemical elements might prove unstable.

  10. Time-dependent projected Hartree-Fock

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-03-28

    Projected Hartree-Fock (PHF) has recently emerged as an alternative approach to describing degenerate systems where static correlation is abundant, when the spin-symmetry is projected. Here, we derive a set of linearized time-dependent equations for PHF in order to be able to access excited states. The close connection of such linear-response time-dependent PHF (TDPHF) to the stability condition of a PHF wave function is discussed. Expanding this analysis also makes it possible to give analytical expressions for the projected coupling terms of Hamiltonian and overlaps between excited Slater determinants. TDPHF with spin-projection (TDSUHF) and its Tamm-Dancoff approximation are benchmarked for several electronically degenerate molecules including the dissociating H{sub 2}, F{sub 2} and O{sub 3} at equilibrium, and the distorted ethylene. It is shown that they give consistently better descriptions of excited states than does time-dependent HF (TDHF). Furthermore, we demonstrate that they offer not only singly but also doubly excited states, which naturally arise upon spin-projection. We also address the thermodynamic limit of TDSUHF, using non-interacting He gas. While TDPHF singly excited states tend to converge to those of HF with the size of the system due to the lack of size-extensivity of PHF, doubly excited states remain reasonable even at the thermodynamic limit. We find that the overall performance of our method is systematically better than the regular TDHF in many cases at the same computational scaling.

  11. Time-dependent projected Hartree-Fock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-03-01

    Projected Hartree-Fock (PHF) has recently emerged as an alternative approach to describing degenerate systems where static correlation is abundant, when the spin-symmetry is projected. Here, we derive a set of linearized time-dependent equations for PHF in order to be able to access excited states. The close connection of such linear-response time-dependent PHF (TDPHF) to the stability condition of a PHF wave function is discussed. Expanding this analysis also makes it possible to give analytical expressions for the projected coupling terms of Hamiltonian and overlaps between excited Slater determinants. TDPHF with spin-projection (TDSUHF) and its Tamm-Dancoff approximation are benchmarked for several electronically degenerate molecules including the dissociating H2, F2 and O3 at equilibrium, and the distorted ethylene. It is shown that they give consistently better descriptions of excited states than does time-dependent HF (TDHF). Furthermore, we demonstrate that they offer not only singly but also doubly excited states, which naturally arise upon spin-projection. We also address the thermodynamic limit of TDSUHF, using non-interacting He gas. While TDPHF singly excited states tend to converge to those of HF with the size of the system due to the lack of size-extensivity of PHF, doubly excited states remain reasonable even at the thermodynamic limit. We find that the overall performance of our method is systematically better than the regular TDHF in many cases at the same computational scaling.

  12. Shear-rate-dependent viscosities of nematic and disc-like particles perfectly aligned in arbitrary relative directions to the shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Hyearn-Maw

    2016-07-01

    The shear-rate-dependent viscosity coefficients of hard ellipsoids are derived for arbitrary relative orientations to the shear flow geometry. Each of the nine components of the coefficients scaled by the Newtonian shear viscosity agrees with the previous result for the viscosity in the zero-shear-rate limit. Among the components, the shear viscosity is graphically displayed for nematic ellipsoids with an axis ratio greater than 1 and for disc-like ellipsoids with an axis ratio less than 1 over the whole range of relative orientations of the axis of ellipsoid to the plane shear layer. As the primary axis of the ellipsoid rotates from the x-axis to the y-axis in the x-y plane, the shear viscosity increases or decreases for nematic or disc-like ellipsolids, respectively.

  13. Time-dependent Dyson orbital theory.

    PubMed

    Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2016-08-21

    Although time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the tool of choice for real-time propagation of the electron density ρ(N)(t) of N-electron systems, it also encounters problems in this application. The first problem is the neglect of memory effects stemming from the, in TDDFT virtually unavoidable, adiabatic approximation, the second problem is the reliable evaluation of the probabilities P(n)(t) of multiple photoinduced ionization, while the third problem (which TDDFT shares with other approaches) is the reliable description of continuum states of the electrons ejected in the process of ionization. In this paper time-dependent Dyson orbital theory (TDDOT) is proposed. Exact TDDOT equations of motion (EOMs) for time-dependent Dyson orbitals are derived, which are linear differential equations with just static, feasible potentials of the electron-electron interaction. No adiabatic approximation is used, which formally resolves the first TDDFT problem. TDDOT offers formally exact expressions for the complete evolution in time of the wavefunction of the outgoing electron. This leads to the correlated probability of single ionization P(1)(t) as well as the probabilities of no ionization (P(0)(t)) and multiple ionization of n electrons, P(n)(t), which formally solves the second problem of TDDFT. For two-electron systems a proper description of the required continuum states appears to be rather straightforward, and both P(1)(t) and P(2)(t) can be calculated. Because of the exact formulation, TDDOT is expected to reproduce a notorious memory effect, the "knee structure" of the non-sequential double ionization of the He atom. PMID:26987972

  14. Stochastic analysis of immiscible displacement of the fluids with arbitrary viscosities and its dependence on support scale of hydrological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Meakin, Paul; Huang, Hai

    2004-12-01

    Stochastic analysis is commonly used to address uncertainty in the modeling of flow and transport in porous media. In the stochastic approach, the properties of porous media are treated as random functions with statistics obtained from field measurements. Several studies indicate that hydrological properties depend on the scale of measurements or support scales, but most stochastic analysis does not address the effects of support scale on stochastic predictions of subsurface processes. In this work we propose a new approach to study the scale dependence of stochastic predictions. We present a stochastic analysis of immiscible fluid-fluid displacement in randomly heterogeneous porous media. While existing solutions are applicable only to systems in which the viscosity of one phase is negligible compare with the viscosity of the other (water-air systems for example), our solutions can be applied to the immiscible displacement of fluids having arbitrarily viscosities such as NAPL-water and water-oil. Treating intrinsic permeability as a random field with statistics dependant on the permeability support scale (scale of measurements) we obtained, for one-dimensional systems, analytical solutions for the first moments characterizing unbiased predictions (estimates) of system variables, such as the pressure and fluid-fluid interface position, and we also obtained second moments, which characterize the uncertainties associated with such predictions. Next we obtained empirically scale dependent exponential correlation function of the intrinsic permeability that allowed us to study solutions of stochastic equations as a function of the support scale. We found that the first and second moments converge to asymptotic values as the support scale decreases. In our examples, the statistical moments reached asymptotic values for support scale that were approximately 1/10000 of the flow domain size. We show that analytical moment solutions compare well with the results of Monte

  15. Heating liquid dielectrics by time dependent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalife, A.; Pathak, U.; Richert, R.

    2011-10-01

    Steady state and time-resolved dielectric relaxation experiments are performed at high fields on viscous glycerol and the effects of energy absorption from the electric field are studied. Time resolution is obtained by a sinusoidal field whose amplitude is switched from a low to a high level and by recording voltage and current traces with an oscilloscope during this transition. Based on their distinct time and frequency dependences, three sources of modifying the dynamics and dielectric loss via an increase in the effective temperature can be distinguished: electrode temperature, real sample temperature, and configurational temperatures of the modes that absorbed the energy. Isothermal conditions that are desired for focusing on the configurational temperature changes (as in dielectric hole burning and related techniques) are maintained only for very thin samples and for moderate power levels. For high frequencies, say ν > 1 MHz, changes of the real temperature will exceed the effects of configurational temperatures in the case of macroscopic samples. Regarding microwave chemistry, heating via cell phone use, and related situations in which materials are subject to fields involving frequencies beyond the MHz regime, we conclude that changes in the configurational (or fictive) temperatures remain negligible compared with the increase of the real temperature. This simplifies the assessment of how time dependent electric fields modify the properties of materials.

  16. Subsystem real-time time dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtal, Alisa; Ceresoli, Davide; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-04-01

    We present the extension of Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) formulation of subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) to real-time Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (rt-TDDFT). FDE is a DFT-in-DFT embedding method that allows to partition a larger Kohn-Sham system into a set of smaller, coupled Kohn-Sham systems. Additional to the computational advantage, FDE provides physical insight into the properties of embedded systems and the coupling interactions between them. The extension to rt-TDDFT is done straightforwardly by evolving the Kohn-Sham subsystems in time simultaneously, while updating the embedding potential between the systems at every time step. Two main applications are presented: the explicit excitation energy transfer in real time between subsystems is demonstrated for the case of the Na4 cluster and the effect of the embedding on optical spectra of coupled chromophores. In particular, the importance of including the full dynamic response in the embedding potential is demonstrated.

  17. Pulsar Electrodynamics: a Time-dependent View

    SciTech Connect

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-10

    Pulsar spindown forms a reliable yet enigmatic prototype for the energy loss processes in many astrophysical objects including accretion disks and back holes. In this paper we review the physics of pulsar magnetospheres, concentrating on recent developments in force-free modeling of the magnetospheric structure. In particular, we discuss a new method for solving the equations of time-dependent force-free relativistic MHD in application to pulsars. This method allows to dynamically study the formation of the magnetosphere and its response to perturbations, opening a qualitatively new window on pulsar phenomena. Applications of the method to other magnetized rotators, such as magnetars and accretion disks, are also discussed.

  18. Topologically nontrivial time-dependent chiral condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, M.

    1996-11-01

    Topologically nontrivial time-dependent solutions of the classical nonlinear {sigma} model are studied as candidates of the disoriented chiral condensate (DCC) in 3+1 dimensions. Unlike the analytic solutions so far discussed, these solutions cannot be transformed into isospin-uniform ones by chiral rotations. If they are produced as DCC{close_quote}s, they can be detected by a distinct pattern in the angle-rapidity distribution of the neutral-to-charged pion ratio. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Time-dependent treatment of scattering - Integral equation approaches using the time-dependent amplitude density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David K.; Sharafeddin, Omar; Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent form of the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation is used as the basis of several new wave packet propagation schemes. These can be formulated in terms of either the time-dependent wave function or a time-dependent amplitude density. The latter is nonzero only in the region of configuratiaon space for which the potential is nonzero, thereby in principle obviating the necessity of large grids or the use of complex absorbing potentials when resonances cause long collision times (leading, consequently, to long propagation times). Transition amplitudes are obtained in terms of Fourier transforms of the amplitude density from the time to the energy domain. The approach is illustrated by an application to a standard potential scattering model problem where, as in previous studies, the action of the kinetic energy operator is evaluated by fast Fourier transform (FFT) techniques.

  20. Pseudospectral time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Chaehyuk; Malick, David K.; Braden, Dale A.; Friesner, Richard A.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2008-03-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is implemented within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) using a pseudospectral approach to evaluate two-electron repulsion integrals. The pseudospectral approximation uses a split representation with both spectral basis functions and a physical space grid to achieve a reduction in the scaling behavior of electronic structure methods. We demonstrate here that exceptionally sparse grids may be used in the excitation energy calculation, following earlier work employing the pseudospectral approximation for determining correlation energies in wavefunction-based methods with similar conclusions. The pseudospectral TDA-TDDFT method is shown to be up to ten times faster than a conventional algorithm for hybrid functionals without sacrificing chemical accuracy.

  1. Dosing time-dependent actions of psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Manev, H; Uz, T

    2009-01-01

    The concept of the dosing time-dependent (DTD) actions of drugs has been used to describe the effects of diurnal rhythms on pharmacological responsiveness. Notwithstanding the importance of diurnal variability in drug pharmacokinetics and bioavailability, it appears that in the central nervous system (CNS), the DTD actions of psychotropic drugs involve diurnal changes in the CNS-specific expression of genes encoding for psychotropic drug targets and transcription factors known as clock genes. In this review, we focused our discussion on the DTD effects of the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines. Both cocaine and amphetamines produce differential lasting behavioral alterations, that is, locomotor sensitization, depending on the time of the day they are administered. This exemplifies a DTD action of these drugs. The DTD effects of these psychostimulants correlate with diurnal changes in the system of transcription factors termed clock genes, for example, Period 1, and with changes in the availability of certain subtypes of dopamine receptors, for example, D2 and D3. Diurnal synthesis and release of the pineal hormone melatonin influence the DTD behavioral actions of cocaine and amphetamines. The molecular mechanism of melatonin's effects on the responsiveness of CNS to psychostimulants appears to involve melatonin receptors and clock genes. It is proposed that the DTD characteristics of psychostimulant action and the contributions of the melatonergic system may have clinical implications that include treatments for the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and possibly neurotoxicity/neuroprotection. PMID:19897073

  2. The time-dependent Gutzwiller approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrizio, Michele

    2015-03-01

    The time-dependent Gutzwiller Approximation (t-GA) is shown to be capable of tracking the off-equilibrium evolution both of coherent quasiparticles and of incoherent Hubbard bands. The method is used to demonstrate that the sharp dynamical crossover observed by time-dependent DMFT in the quench-dynamics of a half-filled Hubbard model can be identified within the t-GA as a genuine dynamical transition separating two distinct physical phases. This result, strictly variational for lattices of infinite coordination number, is intriguing as it actually questions the occurrence of thermalization. Next, we shall present how t-GA works in a multi-band model for V2O3 that displays a first-order Mott transition. We shall show that a physically accessible excitation pathway is able to collapse the Mott gap down and drive off-equilibrium the insulator into a metastable metal phase. Work supported by the European Union, Seventh Framework Programme, under the project GO FAST, Grant Agreement No. 280555.

  3. General exact solution for homogeneous time-dependent self-gravitating perfect fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, Patricio; Hojman, Roberto

    1990-01-01

    A procedure to obtain the general exact solution of Einstein equations for a self-gravitating spherically symmetric static perfect fluid obeying an arbitrary equation of state is applied to time-dependent Kantowski-Sachs line elements (with spherical, planar, and hyperbolic symmetry). As in the static case, the solution is generated by an arbitrary function of the independent variable and its first derivative. To illustrate the results, the whole family of (plane-symmetric) solutions with a ``gamma-law'' equation of state is explicitly obtained in terms of simple known functions. It is also shown that, while in the static plane-symmetric line element, every metric is in one to one correspondence with a ``partner metric'' (both originated from the same generatrix function); in this case every generatrix function uniquely determines one metric.

  4. General exact solution for homogeneous time-dependent self-gravitating perfect fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, Patricio; Hojman, Roberto

    1988-06-01

    A procedure to obtain the general exact solution of Einstein equations for a self-gravitating spherically symmetric static perfect fluid obeying an arbitrary equation of state, is applied to time dependent Kantowsky-Sachs line elements (with spherical, planar and hyperbolic symmetry). As in the static case, the solution is generated by an arbitrary function of the independent variable and its first derivative. To illustrate the results, the whole family of (plane-symmetric) solutions with a gamma-law equation of state is explicity obtained in terms of simple known functions. It is also shown that, while in the static plane-symmetric line elements, every metric is in one to one correspondence with a partner-metric (both originated from the same generatrix function), in this case every generatrix function univocally determines one metric.

  5. Time dependent friction in a free gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Cristiano; Sisti, Francesco; Stagno, Gabriele V.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a body moving in a perfect gas, described by the mean-field approximation and interacting elastically with the body, we study the friction exerted by the gas on the body fixed at constant velocities. The time evolution of the body in this setting was studied in Caprino et al. [Math. Phys. 264, 167-189 (2006)], Caprino et al. [Math. Models Methods Appl. Sci. 17, 1369-1403 (2007)], and Cavallaro [Rend. Mat. Appl. 27, 123-145 (2007)] for object with simple shape; the first study where a simple kind of concavity was considered was in Sisti and Ricciuti [SIAM J. Math. Anal. 46, 3759-3611 (2014)], showing new features in the dynamic but not in the friction term. The case of more general shape of the body was left out for further difficulties, and we believe indeed that there are actually non-trivial issues to be faced for these more general cases. To show this and in the spirit of getting a more realistic perspective in the study of friction problems, in this paper, we focused our attention on the friction term itself, studying its behavior on a body with a more general kind of concavity and fixed at constant velocities. We derive the expression of the friction term for constant velocities, we show how it is time dependent, and we give its exact estimate in time. Finally, we use this result to show the absence of a constant velocity in the actual dynamic of such a body.

  6. Stable recovery of the time-dependent source term from one measurement for the wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashedi, Kamal; Sini, Mourad

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we discuss the inverse problem which consists of the determination of an unknown time-dependent force function from one time-dependent measurement collected in any space point for the one-dimensional wave equation. This problem is motivated by the question of estimating the time-dependent body force which needs to be exerted on a given string to reach a desired shape at the final time. We prove its unique solvability using as data a linear combination of displacement and flux measured at one arbitrary fixed point of the string. We also derive a conditional Hölder stability estimate of this inverse problem. The numerical solution of the problem is investigated by means of the Ritz--Galerkin technique along with the application of the satisfier function to obtain cost-effective and stable results. Some numerical examples are provided to show the performance of the proposed scheme.

  7. Use and Abuse of a Fractional Fokker-Planck Dynamics for Time-Dependent Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinsalu, E.; Patriarca, M.; Goychuk, I.; Hänggi, P.

    2007-09-01

    We investigate a subdiffusive, fractional Fokker-Planck dynamics occurring in time-varying potential landscapes and thereby disclose the failure of the fractional Fokker-Planck equation (FFPE) in its commonly used form when generalized in an ad hoc manner to time-dependent forces. A modified FFPE (MFFPE) is rigorously derived, being valid for a family of dichotomously alternating force fields. This MFFPE is numerically validated for a rectangular time-dependent force with zero average bias. For this case, subdiffusion is shown to become enhanced as compared to the force free case. We question, however, the existence of any physically valid FFPE for arbitrary varying time-dependent fields that differ from this dichotomous varying family.

  8. Subsystem real-time time dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Krishtal, Alisa; Ceresoli, Davide; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-04-21

    We present the extension of Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) formulation of subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) to real-time Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (rt-TDDFT). FDE is a DFT-in-DFT embedding method that allows to partition a larger Kohn-Sham system into a set of smaller, coupled Kohn-Sham systems. Additional to the computational advantage, FDE provides physical insight into the properties of embedded systems and the coupling interactions between them. The extension to rt-TDDFT is done straightforwardly by evolving the Kohn-Sham subsystems in time simultaneously, while updating the embedding potential between the systems at every time step. Two main applications are presented: the explicit excitation energy transfer in real time between subsystems is demonstrated for the case of the Na4 cluster and the effect of the embedding on optical spectra of coupled chromophores. In particular, the importance of including the full dynamic response in the embedding potential is demonstrated. PMID:25903875

  9. Infrared Blobs : Time-dependent Flags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, P. R.; Mack, J.; Dulude, M.; Hilbert, B.

    2014-10-01

    We describe the creation of time-dependent flags for pixels associated with "blobs" on the WFC3 IR detector. We detect the blobs on flat fields obtained by repeated observations of the night side of the Earth. We provide the most complete census of IR blobs' positions, radii, and times of first appearance. In aggregate, a set of 46 blobs, 27 "strong" and 19 "medium" in their effective scattering cross section, affect slightly less than 1% of the pixels of the detector. A second set of 81 "weak" (and typically smaller) blobs affect another 1% of the pixels. In the past, the "blob" flag, bit 9 (i.e. value = 512) in the data quality (DQ) array described in Table 2.5 of the WFC3 Data Handbook (Rajan et al. 2010) has been a static 2-D array; henceforth a set of such arrays, each associated with a "use after" date corresponding to the appearance of one or more new blobs, can be used. We prepared such DQ arrays using the 46 "strong" and "medium" blobs and discuss why we did not include the fainter blobs therein. As an added data product, we create and test a blob flat field that corrects the effects of blobs on extended emission; however, it should not be applied if stellar photometry is the goal.

  10. Tunable Time-Dependent Colloidal Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Andrew M.; Rogers, W. Benjamin; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    Self-assembly of colloidal particles can be driven by changes in temperature, density, or the concentration of solutes, and it is even possible to program the thermal response and equilibrium phase transitions of such systems. It is still difficult, however, to tune how the self-assembly process varies in time. We demonstrate control over the time-dependence of colloidal interactions, using DNA-functionalized colloidal particles with binding energies that are set by the concentration of a free linker strand in solution. We control the rate at which this free strand is consumed using a catalytic DNA reaction, whose rate is governed by the concentration of a catalyst strand. Varying the concentration of the linker, its competitor, and the catalyst at a fixed temperature, we can tune the rate and degree of the formation of colloidal aggregates and their following disassembly. Close to the colloidal melting point, the timescales of these out-of-equilibrium assembly and disassembly processes are determined by the rate of the catalytic reaction. Far below the colloidal melting point, however, the effects from varying our linker and competitor concentrations dominate.

  11. Time dependence of Hawking radiation entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Don N.

    2013-09-01

    If a black hole starts in a pure quantum state and evaporates completely by a unitary process, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation initially increases and then decreases back to zero when the black hole has disappeared. Here numerical results are given for an approximation to the time dependence of the radiation entropy under an assumption of fast scrambling, for large nonrotating black holes that emit essentially only photons and gravitons. The maximum of the von Neumann entropy then occurs after about 53.81% of the evaporation time, when the black hole has lost about 40.25% of its original Bekenstein-Hawking (BH) entropy (an upper bound for its von Neumann entropy) and then has a BH entropy that equals the entropy in the radiation, which is about 59.75% of the original BH entropy 4πM{sub 0}{sup 2}, or about 7.509M{sub 0}{sup 2} ≈ 6.268 × 10{sup 76}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, using my 1976 calculations that the photon and graviton emission process into empty space gives about 1.4847 times the BH entropy loss of the black hole. Results are also given for black holes in initially impure states. If the black hole starts in a maximally mixed state, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation increases from zero up to a maximum of about 119.51% of the original BH entropy, or about 15.018M{sub 0}{sup 2} ≈ 1.254 × 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, and then decreases back down to 4πM{sub 0}{sup 2} = 1.049 × 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}.

  12. Time dependence of Hawking radiation entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Don N.

    2013-09-01

    If a black hole starts in a pure quantum state and evaporates completely by a unitary process, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation initially increases and then decreases back to zero when the black hole has disappeared. Here numerical results are given for an approximation to the time dependence of the radiation entropy under an assumption of fast scrambling, for large nonrotating black holes that emit essentially only photons and gravitons. The maximum of the von Neumann entropy then occurs after about 53.81% of the evaporation time, when the black hole has lost about 40.25% of its original Bekenstein-Hawking (BH) entropy (an upper bound for its von Neumann entropy) and then has a BH entropy that equals the entropy in the radiation, which is about 59.75% of the original BH entropy 4πM02, or about 7.509M02 ≈ 6.268 × 1076(M0/Msolar)2, using my 1976 calculations that the photon and graviton emission process into empty space gives about 1.4847 times the BH entropy loss of the black hole. Results are also given for black holes in initially impure states. If the black hole starts in a maximally mixed state, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation increases from zero up to a maximum of about 119.51% of the original BH entropy, or about 15.018M02 ≈ 1.254 × 1077(M0/Msolar)2, and then decreases back down to 4πM02 = 1.049 × 1077(M0/Msolar)2.

  13. Time-Dependent Rate Phenomenon in Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Aiewsakun, Pakorn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Among the most fundamental questions in viral evolutionary biology are how fast viruses evolve and how evolutionary rates differ among viruses and fluctuate through time. Traditionally, viruses are loosely classed into two groups: slow-evolving DNA viruses and fast-evolving RNA viruses. As viral evolutionary rate estimates become more available, it appears that the rates are negatively correlated with the measurement timescales and that the boundary between the rates of DNA and RNA viruses might not be as clear as previously thought. In this study, we collected 396 viral evolutionary rate estimates across almost all viral genome types and replication strategies, and we examined their rate dynamics. We showed that the time-dependent rate phenomenon exists across multiple levels of viral taxonomy, from the Baltimore classification viral groups to genera. We also showed that, by taking the rate decay dynamics into account, a clear division between the rates of DNA and RNA viruses as well as reverse-transcribing viruses could be recovered. Surprisingly, despite large differences in their biology, our analyses suggested that the rate decay speed is independent of viral types and thus might be useful for better estimation of the evolutionary time scale of any virus. To illustrate this, we used our model to reestimate the evolutionary timescales of extant lentiviruses, which were previously suggested to be very young by standard phylogenetic analyses. Our analyses suggested that these viruses are millions of years old, in agreement with paleovirological evidence, and therefore, for the first time, reconciled molecular analyses of ancient and extant viruses. IMPORTANCE This work provides direct evidence that viral evolutionary rate estimates decay with their measurement timescales and that the rate decay speeds do not differ significantly among viruses despite the vast differences in their molecular features. After adjustment for the rate decay dynamics, the

  14. What makes polymer crystallization depend on time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccarolo, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Here we report a series of objections to the mechanism of polymer crystallization by secondary nucleation plausible for very mild cooling conditions, i.e. when solidification time is long enough or when the molecular weight, M, is not too large, conditions not preventing segregation at the growth front to take place. With a manichean approach, if otherwise time is controlling, e.g. in polymer processing, or M is large, segregation is precluded and accumulation of topological defects takes place in the amorphous phase preventing sequential growth of crystalline domains. A non crystalline phase forms very much departed from equilibrium, constrained by the crystalline domains and frozen to an extent dependent on the morphology developed. Consequences are discussed, themselves a proof that segregation simplifies topology when crystallization conditions are mild. A situation responsible for the often reported memory effects as well as for mechanical and rheological properties. Results collected from our own experimental evidence by the originally developed Continuous Cooling Transformation are discussed within this framework and related to the broad, albeit often overlooked, literature on subjects intimately connected to crystallization and therefore spanning different fields of polymer science. We focus our attention on two recent results opening the way to this new perspective on polymer crystallization: the onset of the nodular morphology in iPP also in the presence of the stable a-monoclinic phase and the extended crystallization behaviour of polyester blends once local mobility is enhanced. Observing that demixing at the growth front controls crystallization under processing conditions we speculate that the high cooling rate solidification experiment is but a peculiar transient rheological measurement. Implications of this view are far reaching as the crucial role of the melt before solidification is evident.

  15. Alternative time-dependent optimized effective potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    The OEP is known as a single-particle potential minimizing the expectation value of a many-body Hamiltonian on the set of eigen-functions of a single-particle Hamiltonian. The time-dependent (TD) OEP can be constructed with the TD quantum stationary-action principle. Very useful conceptually in DFT and TDDFT, both OEPs are not practicable due to the complexity of their implementations. Here we report a TDOEP by minimizing the difference of LHS and RHS of the TD Schrödinger equation. If the orbitals are varied, then the TD Hartree-Fock equations are reproduced. Similarly, we now find the OEP. New OMP does not involve the inversion of the density-response function χs, which greatly facilitates implementations. Accordingly, the exchange-correlation kernel fxc involves of χs- 1 only, not its quadratic counterpart. To show the power of this method, we work out the fxch (q , ω) of the homogeneous electron gas to be used with the nearly-free electrons theory, where fxch is the main input. Partial support from National Science Council, Taiwan, Grant No. 100-2112-M-001-025-MY3 is acknowledged.

  16. Time-dependence in mixture toxicity prediction

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Douglas A.; Allen, Erin M.G.; Allen, Joshua L.; Baumann, Hannah J.; Bensinger, Heather M.; Genco, Nicole; Guinn, Daphne; Hull, Michael W.; Il'Giovine, Zachary J.; Kaminski, Chelsea M.; Peyton, Jennifer R.; Schultz, T. Wayne; Pöch, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    The value of time-dependent toxicity (TDT) data in predicting mixture toxicity was examined. Single chemical (A and B) and mixture (A + B) toxicity tests using Microtox® were conducted with inhibition of bioluminescence (Vibrio fischeri) being quantified after 15, 30 and 45-min of exposure. Single chemical and mixture tests for 25 sham (A1:A2) and 125 true (A:B) combinations had a minimum of seven duplicated concentrations with a duplicated control treatment for each test. Concentration/response (x/y) data were fitted to sigmoid curves using the five-parameter logistic minus one parameter (5PL-1P) function, from which slope, EC25, EC50, EC75, asymmetry, maximum effect, and r2 values were obtained for each chemical and mixture at each exposure duration. Toxicity data were used to calculate percentage-based TDT values for each individual chemical and mixture of each combination. Predicted TDT values for each mixture were calculated by averaging the TDT values of the individual components and regressed against the observed TDT values obtained in testing, resulting in strong correlations for both sham (r2 = 0.989, n = 25) and true mixtures (r2 = 0.944, n = 125). Additionally, regression analyses confirmed that observed mixture TDT values calculated for the 50% effect level were somewhat better correlated with predicted mixture TDT values than at the 25 and 75% effect levels. Single chemical and mixture TDT values were classified into five levels in order to discern trends. The results suggested that the ability to predict mixture TDT by averaging the TDT of the single agents was modestly reduced when one agent of the combination had a positive TDT value and the other had a minimal or negative TDT value. PMID:25446331

  17. Time-Dependent Electronic Populations in Fragment-Based Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Martín A; Wasserman, Adam

    2015-08-11

    Conceiving a molecule as being composed of smaller molecular fragments, or subunits, is one of the pillars of the chemical and physical sciences and leads to productive methods in quantum chemistry. Using a fragmentation scheme, efficient algorithms can be proposed to address problems in the description of chemical bond formation and breaking. We present a formally exact time-dependent density functional theory for the electronic dynamics of molecular fragments with a variable number of electrons. This new formalism is an extension of previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 023001 (2013)]. We also introduce a stable density-inversion method that is applicable to time-dependent and ground-state density functional theories and their extensions, including those discussed in this work. PMID:26574438

  18. An analytical solution of the time-independent Schrödinger equation for the Woods-Saxon potential for arbitrary angular momentum l states

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P. Rajesh; Wong, B. R.

    2015-04-24

    The Woods-Saxon potential is probably the most studied and widely used short range potential in all of nuclear physics. For the angular momentum l= 0 case, Flügge had devised a method to obtain an analytical expression for the bound state energies of the radial time-independent Schrödinger equation for a neutron confined in a Woods-Saxon potential well. In this study, we extend Flügge's method to solve the radial Schrödinger equation for a neutron within the Woods-Saxon potential and the centrifugal potential for arbitrary values of l. Here, the Pekeris method is used to deal with the centrifugal term. We obtain an analytical expression for the bound states, valid for arbitrary angular momentum, and show that our expression reduces to that of Flügge, which applies to the l= 0 case. The numerical computations performed also show very good agreement with our analytical expression.

  19. An analytical approximation for the orientation-dependent excluded volume of tangent hard sphere chains of arbitrary chain length and flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Westen, Thijs; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Gross, Joachim

    2012-07-01

    Onsager-like theories are commonly used to describe the phase behavior of nematic (only orientationally ordered) liquid crystals. A key ingredient in such theories is the orientation-dependent excluded volume of two molecules. Although for hard convex molecular models this is generally known in analytical form, for more realistic molecular models that incorporate intramolecular flexibility, one has to rely on approximations or on computationally expensive Monte Carlo techniques. In this work, we provide a general correlation for the excluded volume of tangent hard-sphere chains of arbitrary chain length and flexibility. The flexibility is introduced by means of the rod-coil model. The resulting correlation is of simple analytical form and accurately covers a wide range of pure component excluded volume data obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of two-chain molecules. The extension to mixtures follows naturally by applying simple combining rules for the parameters involved. The results for mixtures are also in good agreement with data from Monte Carlo simulations. We have expressed the excluded volume as a second order power series in sin (γ), where γ is the angle between the molecular axes. Such a representation is appealing since the solution of the Onsager Helmholtz energy functional usually involves an expansion of the excluded volume in Legendre coefficients. Both for pure components and mixtures, the correlation reduces to an exact expression in the limit of completely linear chains. The expression for mixtures, as derived in this work, is thereby an exact extension of the pure component result of Williamson and Jackson [Mol. Phys. 86, 819-836 (1995)], 10.1080/00268979500102391.

  20. Arbitrary shaped, liquid filled reverberators with non-resonant transducers for broadband focusing of ultrasound using Time Reversed Acoustics.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, A; Fillinger, L

    2009-03-01

    The ability to generate short focused ultrasonic pulses with duration on the order of one period of carrier frequency depends on the bandwidth of the transmitter as the pulse duration is inversely proportional to the bandwidth. Conventional focusing arrays used for focusing ultrasound have limited bandwidth due to the resonant nature of the piezoelements generating ultrasound. Theoretically it is possible to build a broadband phased array composed of "non-resonant" elements: wedge-shaped or flat-concave piezotransducers, though there are numerous technical difficulties in designing arrays with hundreds of elements of complex shape. This task is much easier to realize in an alternative technique of ultrasound focusing based on the principles of Time Reversed Acoustics (TRA) because in TRA systems, effective focusing can be achieved with just a few, or even one, transducers. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the possibility of broadband focusing of ultrasonic waves using a TRA system with non-resonant transducers and to explore the factors affecting the performance of such a system. A new type of TRA reverberators, such as water-filled thin-wall plastic vessels, which can be used with the submersible piezotransducers fixed internally in the reverberator, are proposed and tested. The experiments are conducted in a water tank with the walls and bottom covered by a sound absorbing lining. A needle hydrophone mounted on a 3D positioning system is used as a beacon for the TRA focusing and then for measuring the spatial distribution of the focused ultrasound field. The bandwidth and spatial distribution of the signal focused by the TRA system using a single channel with the resonant versus non-resonant transducers have been analyzed. Two types of non-resonant transducers were tested: a flat-concave transducer with a diameter of 30 mm, and a thickness varying from 2 mm in the center to 11 mm at the edge, and a specially designed submersible transducer having an

  1. Logistic equation of arbitrary order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Franciszek

    2010-08-01

    The paper is concerned with the new logistic equation of arbitrary order which describes the performance of complex executive systems X vs. number of tasks N, operating at limited resources K, at non-extensive, heterogeneous self-organization processes characterized by parameter f. In contrast to the classical logistic equation which exclusively relates to the special case of sub-extensive homogeneous self-organization processes at f=1, the proposed model concerns both homogeneous and heterogeneous processes in sub-extensive and super-extensive areas. The parameter of arbitrary order f, where -∞depends on both the coefficient of external resource utilization u=N/K, where 0time of serving the task by the ith component, and Z is the think time of a given process. In the general case of complex system, parameters Vi, Si, i and Z can have values in the range from 0 to +∞. In this way the new equation includes all possible cases of a complex executive system’s operation. Furthermore, it allows us to define the optimal matching point between X and N with f as the parameter. It also helps to balance the load in complex systems and to equip artificial systems with self-optimization mechanisms similar to those observed in natural systems.

  2. Generalization of the time-dependent numerical renormalization group method to finite temperatures and general pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, H. T. M.; Costi, T. A.

    2014-02-01

    The time-dependent numerical renormalization group (TDNRG) method [Anders et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 196801 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.95.196801] offers the prospect of investigating in a nonperturbative manner the time dependence of local observables of interacting quantum impurity models at all time scales following a quantum quench. Here, we present a generalization of this method to arbitrary finite temperature by making use of the full density matrix approach [Weichselbaum et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 076402 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.076402]. We show that all terms in the projected full density matrix ρi →f=ρ+++ρ--+ρ+-+ρ-+ appearing in the time evolution of a local observable may be evaluated in closed form at finite temperature, with ρ+-=ρ-+=0. The expression for ρ-- is shown to be finite at finite temperature, becoming negligible only in the limit of vanishing temperatures. We prove that this approach recovers the short-time limit for the expectation value of a local observable exactly at arbitrary temperatures. In contrast, the corresponding long-time limit is recovered exactly only for a continuous bath, i.e., when the logarithmic discretization parameter Λ →1+. Since the numerical renormalization group approach breaks down in this limit, and calculations have to be carried out at Λ >1, the long-time behavior following an arbitrary quantum quench has a finite error, which poses an obstacle for the method, e.g., in its application to the scattering-states numerical renormalization group method for describing steady-state nonequilibrium transport through correlated impurities [Anders, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 066804 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.066804]. We suggest a way to overcome this problem by noting that the time dependence, in general, and the long-time limit, in particular, become increasingly more accurate on reducing the size of the quantum quench. This suggests an improved generalized TDNRG approach in which the system is time

  3. Time dependency of strainrange partitioning life relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, S.; Manson, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of exposure time (or creep rate) on the CP life relationship is established by conducting isothermal CP tests at varying exposure times on 316 Ss at 1300 and 1500 F. A reduction in the CP cycle life is observed with an increase in the exposure time of the CP test at a given inelastic strain-range. This phenomenon is characterized by modifying the Manson-Coffin type of CP relationship. Two new life relationships: (1) the Steady State Creep Rate (SSRC) Modified CP life relationship, and (2) the Failure Time (FT) Modified CP life relationship, are developed in this report. They account for the effect of creep rate and exposure time within the CP type of waveform. The reduction in CP cyclic life in the long exposure time tests is attributed to oxidation and the precipitation of carbides along the grain boundaries.

  4. Exact Solutions to Time-dependent Mdps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyan, Justin A.; Littman, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    We describe an extension of the Markov decision process model in which a continuous time dimension is included in the state space. This allows for the representation and exact solution of a wide range of problems in which transitions or rewards vary over time. We examine problems based on route planning with public transportation and telescope observation scheduling.

  5. Diffusion under time-dependent resetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Arnab; Kundu, Anupam; Evans, Martin R.

    2016-06-01

    We study a Brownian particle diffusing under a time-modulated stochastic resetting mechanism to a fixed position. The rate of resetting r(t) is a function of the time t since the last reset event. We derive a sufficient condition on r(t) for a steady-state probability distribution of the position of the particle to exist. We derive the form of the steady-state distributions under some particular choices of r(t) and also consider the late time relaxation behavior of the probability distribution. We consider first passage time properties for the Brownian particle to reach the origin and derive a formula for the mean first passage time (MFPT). Finally, we study optimal properties of the MFPT and show that a threshold function is at least locally optimal for the problem of minimizing the MFPT.

  6. Studies of spuriously shifting resonances in time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kai; Fuks, Johanna I; Maitra, Neepa T

    2016-07-28

    Adiabatic approximations in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) will in general yield unphysical time-dependent shifts in the resonance positions of a system driven far from its ground-state. This spurious time-dependence is explained in Fuks et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 183002 (2015)] in terms of the violation of an exact condition by the non-equilibrium exchange-correlation kernel of TDDFT. Here we give details on the derivation and discuss reformulations of the exact condition that apply in special cases. In its most general form, the condition states that when a system is left in an arbitrary state, the TDDFT resonance position for a given transition in the absence of time-dependent external fields and ionic motion is independent of the state. Special cases include the invariance of TDDFT resonances computed with respect to any reference interacting stationary state of a fixed potential, and with respect to any choice of appropriate stationary Kohn-Sham reference state. We then present several case studies, including one that utilizes the adiabatically exact approximation, that illustrate the conditions and the impact of their violation on the accuracy of the ensuing dynamics. In particular, charge-transfer across a long-range molecule is hampered, and we show how adjusting the frequency of a driving field to match the time-dependent shift in the charge-transfer resonance frequency results in a larger charge transfer over time. PMID:27475342

  7. Studies of spuriously shifting resonances in time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Kai; Fuks, Johanna I.; Maitra, Neepa T.

    2016-07-01

    Adiabatic approximations in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) will in general yield unphysical time-dependent shifts in the resonance positions of a system driven far from its ground-state. This spurious time-dependence is explained in Fuks et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 183002 (2015)] in terms of the violation of an exact condition by the non-equilibrium exchange-correlation kernel of TDDFT. Here we give details on the derivation and discuss reformulations of the exact condition that apply in special cases. In its most general form, the condition states that when a system is left in an arbitrary state, the TDDFT resonance position for a given transition in the absence of time-dependent external fields and ionic motion is independent of the state. Special cases include the invariance of TDDFT resonances computed with respect to any reference interacting stationary state of a fixed potential, and with respect to any choice of appropriate stationary Kohn-Sham reference state. We then present several case studies, including one that utilizes the adiabatically exact approximation, that illustrate the conditions and the impact of their violation on the accuracy of the ensuing dynamics. In particular, charge-transfer across a long-range molecule is hampered, and we show how adjusting the frequency of a driving field to match the time-dependent shift in the charge-transfer resonance frequency results in a larger charge transfer over time.

  8. Time-dependent generalized polynomial chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritsma, Marc; Steen, Jan-Bart van der; Vos, Peter; Karniadakis, George

    2010-11-01

    Generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) has non-uniform convergence and tends to break down for long-time integration. The reason is that the probability density distribution (PDF) of the solution evolves as a function of time. The set of orthogonal polynomials associated with the initial distribution will therefore not be optimal at later times, thus causing the reduced efficiency of the method for long-time integration. Adaptation of the set of orthogonal polynomials with respect to the changing PDF removes the error with respect to long-time integration. In this method new stochastic variables and orthogonal polynomials are constructed as time progresses. In the new stochastic variable the solution can be represented exactly by linear functions. This allows the method to use only low order polynomial approximations with high accuracy. The method is illustrated with a simple decay model for which an analytic solution is available and subsequently applied to the three mode Kraichnan-Orszag problem with favorable results.

  9. Time scale separation leads to position-dependent diffusion along a slow coordinate

    PubMed Central

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander; Szabo, Attila

    2011-01-01

    When there is a separation of time scales, an effective description of the dynamics of the slow variables can be obtained by adiabatic elimination of fast ones. For example, for anisotropic Langevin dynamics in two dimensions, the conventional procedure leads to a Langevin equation for the slow coordinate that involves the potential of the mean force. The friction constant along this coordinate remains unchanged. Here, we show that a more accurate, but still Markovian, description of the slow dynamics can be obtained by using position-dependent friction that is related to the time integral of the autocorrelation function of the difference between the actual force and the mean force by a Kirkwood-like formula. The result is generalized to many dimensions, where the slow or reaction coordinate is an arbitrary function of the Cartesian coordinates. When the fast variables are effectively one-dimensional, the additional friction along the slow coordinate can be expressed in closed form for an arbitrary potential. For a cylindrically symmetric channel of varying cross section with winding centerline, our analytical expression immediately yields the multidimensional version of the Zwanzig-Bradley formula for the position-dependent diffusion coefficient. PMID:21861557

  10. Characterization of the startup transient electrokinetic flow in rectangular channels of arbitrary dimensions, zeta potential distribution, and time-varying pressure gradient.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Villegas, Arturo; Diez, F Javier

    2015-03-01

    The solution to the startup transient EOF in an arbitrary rectangular microchannel is derived analytically and validated experimentally. This full 2D transient solution describes the evolution of the flow through five distinct periods until reaching a final steady state. The derived analytical velocity solution is validated experimentally for different channel sizes and aspect ratios under time-varying pressure gradients. The experiments used a time resolved micro particle image velocimetry technique to calculate the startup transient velocity profiles. The measurements captured the effect of time-varying pressure gradient fields derived in the analytical solutions. This is tested by using small reservoirs at both ends of the channel which allowed a time-varying pressure gradient to develop with a time scale on the order of the transient EOF. Results showed that under these common conditions, the effect of the pressure build up in the reservoirs on the temporal development of the transient startup EOF in the channels cannot be neglected. The measurements also captured the analytical predictions for channel walls made of different materials (i.e., zeta potentials). This was tested in channels that had three PDMS and one quartz wall, resulting in a flow with an asymmetric velocity profile due to variations in the zeta potential between the walls. PMID:25502599

  11. Time-dependent study of bit reset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiuchiú, D.

    2015-02-01

    In its most conservative formulation, the Landauer principle states that at least k_BT\\ln2 of heat must be produced to reset one bit. Theoretical derivations of this result for practical systems require complex mathematical tools; additionally, real experiments are sophisticated and sensitive. In the literature, it's then common practice to look for a global heat production of k_BT\\ln2 without further concern for heat exchanges at intermediate times. In this paper we want to recover such kind of description: we take a Brownian particle that moves in a bistable potential as bit. We then consider a reset protocol with a net heat production of k_BT\\ln{2} and study the time evolution of internal energy, work and heat. In particular, we show that these quantities are fully characterized by the changes that the protocol induces over the wells of the bistable potential.

  12. Temporal motifs in time-dependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovanen, Lauri; Karsai, Márton; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János; Saramäki, Jari

    2011-11-01

    Temporal networks are commonly used to represent systems where connections between elements are active only for restricted periods of time, such as telecommunication, neural signal processing, biochemical reaction and human social interaction networks. We introduce the framework of temporal motifs to study the mesoscale topological-temporal structure of temporal networks in which the events of nodes do not overlap in time. Temporal motifs are classes of similar event sequences, where the similarity refers not only to topology but also to the temporal order of the events. We provide a mapping from event sequences to coloured directed graphs that enables an efficient algorithm for identifying temporal motifs. We discuss some aspects of temporal motifs, including causality and null models, and present basic statistics of temporal motifs in a large mobile call network.

  13. Time-dependent accident sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    One problem of the current event tree methodology is that the transitions between accident sequences are not modeled. The causes of transitions are mostly due to operator actions during an accident. A model for such transitions is presented. A generalized algorithm is used for quantification. In the more realistic accident analysis, the progression of the physical processes, which determines the time available for proper operators response, is modeled. Furthermore, the uncertainty associated with the physical modeling is considered. As an example, the approach is applied to analyze TMI-type accidents. Statistical evidence is collected and used in assessing the frequency of stuck-open pressure operated relief valve at B and W plants as well as the frequency of misdiagnosis. Statistical data are also used in modeling the timing of operator actions during the accident. A thermal code (CUT) is developed to determine the time at which the core uncovery occurs. A response surface is used to propagate the uncertainty associated with the thermal code.

  14. An inverse problem for a wave equation with arbitrary initial values and a finite time of observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipolatti, Rolci; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2011-09-01

    We consider a solution u(p, g, a, b) to an initial value-boundary value problem for a wave equation: \\fl \\partial _t^2 u(x,t) = \\Delta u(x,t) + p(x)u(x,t), \\qquad x \\in \\Omega,\\qquad \\thinspace 0 < t < T\\\\ \\fl u(x,0) = a(x), \\qquad \\partial _tu(x,0) = b(x), \\qquad x \\in \\Omega,\\\\ \\fl u(x,t) = g(x,t), \\qquad x \\in \\partial \\Omega,\\qquad 0 < t < T, and we discuss an inverse problem of determining a coefficient p(x) and a, b by observations of u(p, g, a, b)(x, t) in a neighbourhood ω of ∂Ω over a time interval (0, T) and ∂itu(p, g, a, b)(x, T0), x in Ω, i = 0, 1, with T0 < T. We prove that if T - T0 and T0 are larger than the diameter of Ω, then we can choose a finite number of Dirichlet boundary inputs g1, ..., gN, so that the mapping \\fl \\lbrace u(p,g_j,a_j,b_j)\\vert _{\\omega \\times (0,T)}, \\partial _t^iu(p,g_j,a_j,b_j)(\\cdot,T_0)\\rbrace _{i=0,1, 1\\le j\\le N}\

  15. Time-dependent semiclassics for ultracold bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Lena; Strunz, Walter T.

    2014-05-01

    We study the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of ultracold bosons in a double- and triple-well potential within the Bose-Hubbard model by means of the semiclassical Herman-Kluk propagator and compare the results to the frequently applied "classical dynamics" calculation in terms of the truncated Wigner approximation (TWA). For the double-well system we find the semiclassical results in excellent agreement with the numerically exact ones, while the TWA is not able to reproduce any revivals of the wave function. The triple-well system turns out to be more difficult to handle due to the irregularity of the corresponding classical phase space. Here, deviations of the TWA from the exact dynamics appear even for short times, while better agreement is obtained using the semiclassical approach presented in this article.

  16. Time-dependent onshore tsunami response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apotsos, Alex; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    While bulk measures of the onshore impact of a tsunami, including the maximum run-up elevation and inundation distance, are important for hazard planning, the temporal evolution of the onshore flow dynamics likely controls the extent of the onshore destruction and the erosion and deposition of sediment that occurs. However, the time-varying dynamics of actual tsunamis are even more difficult to measure in situ than the bulk parameters. Here, a numerical model based on the non-linear shallow water equations is used to examine the effects variations in the wave characteristics, bed slope, and bottom roughness have on the temporal evolution of the onshore flow. Model results indicate that the onshore flow dynamics vary significantly over the parameter space examined. For example, the flow dynamics over steep, smooth morphologies tend to be temporally symmetric, with similar magnitude velocities generated during the run-up and run-down phases of inundation. Conversely, on shallow, rough onshore topographies the flow dynamics tend to be temporally skewed toward the run-down phase of inundation, with the magnitude of the flow velocities during run-up and run-down being significantly different. Furthermore, for near-breaking tsunami waves inundating over steep topography, the flow velocity tends to accelerate almost instantaneously to a maximum and then decrease monotonically. Conversely, when very long waves inundate over shallow topography, the flow accelerates more slowly and can remain steady for a period of time before beginning to decelerate. These results indicate that a single set of assumptions concerning the onshore flow dynamics cannot be applied to all tsunamis, and site specific analyses may be required.

  17. Global paths of time-periodic solutions of the Benjamin-Ono equation connecting arbitrary traveling waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, David M.; Wilkening, Jon

    2008-12-11

    We classify all bifurcations from traveling waves to non-trivial time-periodic solutions of the Benjamin-Ono equation that are predicted by linearization. We use a spectrally accurate numerical continuation method to study several paths of non-trivial solutions beyond the realm of linear theory. These paths are found to either re-connect with a different traveling wave or to blow up. In the latter case, as the bifurcation parameter approaches a critical value, the amplitude of the initial condition grows without bound and the period approaches zero. We propose a conjecture that gives the mapping from one bifurcation to its counterpart on the other side of the path of non-trivial solutions. By experimentation with data fitting, we identify the form of the exact solutions on the path connecting two traveling waves, which represents the Fourier coefficients of the solution as power sums of a finite number of particle positions whose elementary symmetric functions execute simple orbits in the complex plane (circles or epicycles). We then solve a system of algebraic equations to express the unknown constants in the new representation in terms of the mean, a spatial phase, a temporal phase, four integers (enumerating the bifurcation at each end of the path) and one additional bifurcation parameter. We also find examples of interior bifurcations from these paths of already non-trivial solutions, but we do not attempt to analyze their algebraic structure.

  18. A Deterministic-Monte Carlo Hybrid Method for Time-Dependent Neutron Transport Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Justin Pounders; Farzad Rahnema

    2001-10-01

    A new deterministic-Monte Carlo hybrid solution technique is derived for the time-dependent transport equation. This new approach is based on dividing the time domain into a number of coarse intervals and expanding the transport solution in a series of polynomials within each interval. The solutions within each interval can be represented in terms of arbitrary source terms by using precomputed response functions. In the current work, the time-dependent response function computations are performed using the Monte Carlo method, while the global time-step march is performed deterministically. This work extends previous work by coupling the time-dependent expansions to space- and angle-dependent expansions to fully characterize the 1D transport response/solution. More generally, this approach represents and incremental extension of the steady-state coarse-mesh transport method that is based on global-local decompositions of large neutron transport problems. An example of a homogeneous slab is discussed as an example of the new developments.

  19. Modeling choice and reaction time during arbitrary visuomotor learning through the coordination of adaptive working memory and reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Viejo, Guillaume; Khamassi, Mehdi; Brovelli, Andrea; Girard, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Current learning theory provides a comprehensive description of how humans and other animals learn, and places behavioral flexibility and automaticity at heart of adaptive behaviors. However, the computations supporting the interactions between goal-directed and habitual decision-making systems are still poorly understood. Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results suggest that the brain hosts complementary computations that may differentially support goal-directed and habitual processes in the form of a dynamical interplay rather than a serial recruitment of strategies. To better elucidate the computations underlying flexible behavior, we develop a dual-system computational model that can predict both performance (i.e., participants' choices) and modulations in reaction times during learning of a stimulus-response association task. The habitual system is modeled with a simple Q-Learning algorithm (QL). For the goal-directed system, we propose a new Bayesian Working Memory (BWM) model that searches for information in the history of previous trials in order to minimize Shannon entropy. We propose a model for QL and BWM coordination such that the expensive memory manipulation is under control of, among others, the level of convergence of the habitual learning. We test the ability of QL or BWM alone to explain human behavior, and compare them with the performance of model combinations, to highlight the need for such combinations to explain behavior. Two of the tested combination models are derived from the literature, and the latter being our new proposal. In conclusion, all subjects were better explained by model combinations, and the majority of them are explained by our new coordination proposal. PMID:26379518

  20. Modeling choice and reaction time during arbitrary visuomotor learning through the coordination of adaptive working memory and reinforcement learning

    PubMed Central

    Viejo, Guillaume; Khamassi, Mehdi; Brovelli, Andrea; Girard, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Current learning theory provides a comprehensive description of how humans and other animals learn, and places behavioral flexibility and automaticity at heart of adaptive behaviors. However, the computations supporting the interactions between goal-directed and habitual decision-making systems are still poorly understood. Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results suggest that the brain hosts complementary computations that may differentially support goal-directed and habitual processes in the form of a dynamical interplay rather than a serial recruitment of strategies. To better elucidate the computations underlying flexible behavior, we develop a dual-system computational model that can predict both performance (i.e., participants' choices) and modulations in reaction times during learning of a stimulus–response association task. The habitual system is modeled with a simple Q-Learning algorithm (QL). For the goal-directed system, we propose a new Bayesian Working Memory (BWM) model that searches for information in the history of previous trials in order to minimize Shannon entropy. We propose a model for QL and BWM coordination such that the expensive memory manipulation is under control of, among others, the level of convergence of the habitual learning. We test the ability of QL or BWM alone to explain human behavior, and compare them with the performance of model combinations, to highlight the need for such combinations to explain behavior. Two of the tested combination models are derived from the literature, and the latter being our new proposal. In conclusion, all subjects were better explained by model combinations, and the majority of them are explained by our new coordination proposal. PMID:26379518

  1. Arbitrary Metrics in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Hart; Jaccard, James

    2006-01-01

    Many psychological tests have arbitrary metrics but are appropriate for testing psychological theories. Metric arbitrariness is a concern, however, when researchers wish to draw inferences about the true, absolute standing of a group or individual on the latent psychological dimension being measured. The authors illustrate this in the context of 2…

  2. Time-dependence of the holographic spectral function: diverse routes to thermalisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Souvik; Ishii, Takaaki; Joshi, Lata Kh; Mukhopadhyay, Ayan; Ramadevi, P.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a new method for computing the holographic retarded propagator in generic (non-)equilibrium states using the state/geometry map. We check that our method reproduces the thermal spectral function given by the Son-Starinets prescription. The time-dependence of the spectral function of a relevant scalar operator is studied in a class of non-equilibrium states. The latter are represented by AdS-Vaidya geometries with an arbitrary parameter characterising the timescale for the dual state to transit from an initial thermal equilibrium to another due to a homogeneous quench. For long quench duration, the spectral function indeed follows the thermal form at the instantaneous effective temperature adiabatically, although with a slight initial time delay and a bit premature thermalisation. At shorter quench durations, several new non-adiabatic features appear: (i) time-dependence of the spectral function is seen much before than that in the effective temperature (advanced time-dependence), (ii) a big transfer of spectral weight to frequencies greater than the initial temperature occurs at an intermediate time (kink formation) and (iii) new peaks with decreasing amplitudes but in greater numbers appear even after the effective temperature has stabilised (persistent oscillations). We find four broad routes to thermalisation for lower values of spatial momenta. At higher values of spatial momenta, kink formations and persistent oscillations are suppressed, and thermalisation time decreases. The general thermalisation pattern is globally top-down, but a closer look reveals complexities.

  3. Lagrangian and Eulerian analysis of transport and mixing in the three dimensional, time dependent Hill's spherical vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlhany, Kevin L.; Guth, Stephen; Wiggins, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we extend the notion of Eulerian indicators (EIs), previously developed for two dimensional time dependent flows, to three dimensional time dependent flows, where the time dependence can be arbitrary. These are applied to a study of transport and mixing in the Hill's spherical vortex subject to a linear strain rate field. We consider the axisymmetric case and the fully three dimensional case with different types of time dependence. We develop a Lagrangian characterization of transport and mixing appropriate for open three dimensional flows and we show that the EIs provide a detailed description of the flow structure that can be correlated with the Lagrangian transport and mixing results. The EIs yield results consistent with the dynamics of the Hill's vortex flow characteristics, correlation with transverse shear, and anti-correlation with transversality.

  4. Solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using time-dependent basis functions.

    PubMed

    Varga, Kálmán

    2012-01-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved by using an explicitly time-dependent basis. This approach allows efficient reflection-free time propagation of the wave function. The applicability of the method is illustrated by solving various time-dependent problems including the calculation of the above threshold ionization of a model atom and the optical absorption spectrum of a sodium dimer. PMID:22400699

  5. Symmetry-, time-, and temperature-dependent strength of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrica, Traian; Hua, Ming; Yakobson, Boris I.

    2006-01-01

    Although the strength of carbon nanotubes has been of great interest, their ideal value has remained elusive both experimentally and theoretically. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of underlying atomic mechanisms and evaluate the yield strain for arbitrary nanotubes at realistic conditions. For this purpose, we combine detailed quantum mechanical computations of failure nucleation and transition-state barriers with the probabilistic approach of the rate theory. The numerical results are then summarized in a concise set of equations for the breaking strain. We reveal a competition between two alternative routes of brittle bond breaking and plastic relaxation, determine the domains of their dominance, and map the nanotube strength as a function of chiral symmetry, tensile test time, and temperature. PMID:16581906

  6. Numerical solution of the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    This study presents three numerical algorithms to solve the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics. The algorithms have been developed taking into account delayed neutrons and they have been implemented into the novel MCART code, which solves the neutron transport equation for two-dimensional geometry and an arbitrary number of energy groups. The MCART code uses regular mesh for the representation of the spatial domain, it models up-scattering, and takes advantage of OPENMP and OPENGL algorithms for parallel computing and plotting, respectively. The code has been benchmarked with the multiplication factor results of a Boiling Water Reactor, with the analytical results for a prompt jump transient in an infinite medium, and with PARTISN and TDTORT results for cross section and source transients. The numerical simulations have shown that only two numerical algorithms are stable for small time steps.

  7. Fresnel integrals and irreversible energy transfer in an oscillatory system with time-dependent parameters.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Agnessa; Manevitch, Leonid I; Kosevich, Yuriy A

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate that in significant limiting cases the problem of irreversible energy transfer in an oscillatory system with time-dependent parameters can be efficiently solved in terms of the Fresnel integrals. For definiteness, we consider a system of two weakly coupled linear oscillators in which the first oscillator with constant parameters is excited by an initial impulse, whereas the coupled oscillator with a slowly varying frequency is initially at rest but then acts as an energy trap. We show that the evolution equations of the slow passage through resonance are identical to the equations of the Landau-Zener tunneling problem, and therefore, the suggested asymptotic solution of the classical problem provides a simple analytic description of the quantum Landau-Zener tunneling with arbitrary initial conditions over a finite time interval. A correctness of approximations is confirmed by numerical simulations. PMID:21405919

  8. Development of a time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes solver based on a fractional-step method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Moshe

    1990-01-01

    The development, validation and application of a fractional step solution method of the time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized coordinate systems are discussed. A solution method that combines a finite-volume discretization with a novel choice of the dependent variables and a fractional step splitting to obtain accurate solutions in arbitrary geometries was previously developed for fixed-grids. In the present research effort, this solution method is extended to include more general situations, including cases with moving grids. The numerical techniques are enhanced to gain efficiency and generality.

  9. Synchronization of rigid microrotors by time-dependent hydrodynamic interactions.

    PubMed

    Theers, Mario; Winkler, Roland G

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the emergent dynamical behavior of hydrodynamically coupled microrotors. The two rotors are confined in a plane and move along circles driven by active forces. The three-dimensional fluid is described by the linearized, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations instead of the usually adopted Stokes equations. We demonstrate that time-dependent hydrodynamic interactions lead to synchronization of the rotational motion. The time dependence of the phase difference between the rotors is determined and synchronization times are extracted for various external torques and rotor separations by solving the underlaying integrodifferential equations numerically. In addition, an analytical expression is provided for the synchronization time. PMID:24032929

  10. Sandia's Arbitrary Waveform MEMO Actuator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-08-07

    SAMA is a multichannel, arbitrary waveform generator program for driving microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). It allows the user to piece together twelve available wave parts, thereby permitting the user to create practically any waveform, or upload a previously constructed signal. The waveforms (bundled together as a signal) may simultaneously be output through four different channels to actuate MEMS devices, and the number of output channels may be increased depending on the DAQ card or instrument utilized.more » Additionally, real-time changes may be made to the frequency and amplitude. The signal may be paused temporarily. The waveform may be saved to file for future uploading. Recent work for this version has focused on modifications that will allow loading previously generated arbitrary waveforms, independent channel waveform amplification, adding a pause function, separating the "modify waveform: and "end program" functions, and simplifying the user interface by adding test blocks with statements to help the user program and output the desired signals. The program was developed in an effort to alleviate some of the limitations of Micro Driver. For example, Micro Driver will not allow the user to select a segment of a sine wave, but rather the user is limited to choosing either a whole or half sine wave pattern. It therefore becomes quite difficult ot construct partial sine wave patterns out of a "ramp" waveparts for several reasons. First, one must determine on paper how many data points each ramp will cover, and what the slopes of these ramps will be. Second, from what was observed, Micro Driver has difficulty processing more than six distinct waveparts during sequencing. The program will allow the user to input the various waves into the desired sequence; however, it will not allow the user to compile them (by clicking "ok" and returning to the main screen). Third, should the user decide that they want to increase the amplitute of the output signal

  11. Cosmological evolution of cosmic strings with time-dependent tension

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2005-08-15

    We discuss the cosmological evolution of cosmic strings with time-dependent tension. We show that, in the case that the tension changes as a power of time, the cosmic string network obeys the scaling solution: the characteristic scale of the string network grows with the time. But due to the time dependence of the tension, the ratio of the energy density of infinite strings to that of the background universe is not necessarily constant.

  12. Time-dependent behavior of positrons in noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Wadehra, J.M. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Drallos, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium behaviors of positrons in several noble gases are reviewed. Our novel procedure for obtaining the time-dependent behavior of various swarm parameters -- such as the positron drift velocity, average positron energy, positron annihilation rate (or equivalently Z{sub eff}) etc. -- for positrons in pure ambient gases subjected to external electrostatic fields is described. Summaries of time-dependent as well as electric field-dependent results for positron swarms in various noble gases are presented. New time-dependent results for positron swarms in neon are also described in detail. 36 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Dirac equation with some time-dependent electromagnetic terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedi, K.; Zarrinkamar, S.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2016-07-01

    We study the motion of relativistic fermions in a time-dependent electromagnetic field within the framework of Dirac equation. We consider the time-dependent scalar potential of the exponential form and the vector potential of linear form. We obtain the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues.

  14. Asymptotic derivation and numerical investigation of time-dependent simplified PN equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbrant, E.; Larsen, E. W.; Frank, M.; Seibold, B.

    2013-04-01

    The steady-state simplified PN (SPN) approximations to the linear Boltzmann equation have been proven to be asymptotically higher-order corrections to the diffusion equation in certain physical systems. In this paper, we present an asymptotic analysis for the time-dependent simplified PN equations up to N=3. Additionally, SPN equations of arbitrary order are derived in an ad hoc way. The resulting SPN equations are hyperbolic and differ from those investigated in a previous work by some of the authors. In two space dimensions, numerical calculations for the PN and SPN equations are performed. We simulate neutron distributions of a moving rod and present results for a benchmark problem, known as the checkerboard problem. The SPN equations are demonstrated to yield significantly more accurate results than diffusion approximations. In addition, for sufficiently low values of N, they are shown to be more efficient than PN models of comparable cost.

  15. Lifshitz black holes with a time-dependent scalar field in a Horndeski theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, Moisés Bravo; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2014-05-01

    In arbitrary dimensions, we consider a particular Horndeski action given by the Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian with a cosmological constant term, while the source part is described by a real scalar field with its usual kinetic term together with a nonminimal kinetic coupling. In order to evade the no-hair theorem, we look for solutions where the radial component of the conserved current vanishes identically. Under this hypothesis, we prove that this model cannot accommodate Lifshitz solutions with a radial scalar field. This problem is finally circumvented by turning on the time dependence of the scalar field, and we obtain a Lifshitz black hole solution with a fixed value of the dynamical exponent z=1/3. The same metric is also shown to satisfy the field equations arising only from the variation of the matter source.

  16. Invariant exchange perturbation theory for multicenter systems: Time-dependent perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Orlenko, E. V. Evstafev, A. V.; Orlenko, F. E.

    2015-02-15

    A formalism of exchange perturbation theory (EPT) is developed for the case of interactions that explicitly depend on time. Corrections to the wave function obtained in any order of perturbation theory and represented in an invariant form include exchange contributions due to intercenter electron permutations in complex multicenter systems. For collisions of atomic systems with an arbitrary type of interaction, general expressions are obtained for the transfer (T) and scattering (S) matrices in which intercenter electron permutations between overlapping nonorthogonal states belonging to different centers (atoms) are consistently taken into account. The problem of collision of alpha particles with lithium atoms accompanied by the redistribution of electrons between centers is considered. The differential and total charge-exchange cross sections of lithium are calculated.

  17. Information theories for time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Daeyeoul; Maamache, Mustapha; Menouar, Salah; Nahm, In Hyun

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Information theories for the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator based on invariant operator method. > Time dependence of entropies and entropic uncertainty relation. > Characteristics of Shannon information and Fisher information. > Application of information theories to particular systems that have time-dependent behavior. - Abstract: Information theories for the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator are described on the basis of invariant operator method. We obtained entropic uncertainty relation of the system and discussed whether it is always larger than or equal to the physically allowed minimum value. Shannon information and Fisher information are derived by means of density operator that satisfies Liouville-von Neumann equation and their characteristics are investigated. Shannon information is independent of time, but Fisher information is explicitly dependent on time as the time functions of the Hamiltonian vary. We can regard that the Fisher information is a local measure since its time behavior is largely affected by local arrangements of the density, whilst the Shannon information plays the role of a global measure of the spreading of density. To promote the understanding, our theory is applied to special systems, the so-called quantum oscillator with time-dependent frequency and strongly pulsating mass system.

  18. Time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chen; Libisch, Florian; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-03-28

    We introduce a time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory (TD-PFET), in which atoms are grouped into subsystems. In TD-PFET, subsystems can be propagated by different suitable time-dependent quantum mechanical methods and their interactions can be treated in a seamless, first-principles manner. TD-PFET is formulated based on the time-dependent quantum mechanics variational principle. The action of the total quantum system is written as a functional of the time-dependent embedding potential, i.e., a potential-functional formulation. By exploiting the Runge-Gross theorem, we prove the uniqueness of the time-dependent embedding potential under the constraint that all subsystems share a common embedding potential. We derive the integral equation that such an embedding potential needs to satisfy. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate TD-PFET for a Na{sub 4} cluster, in which each Na atom is treated as one subsystem and propagated by time-dependent Kohn-Sham density functional theory (TDDFT) using the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA). Our results agree well with a direct TDDFT calculation on the whole Na{sub 4} cluster using ALDA. We envision that TD-PFET will ultimately be useful for studying ultrafast quantum dynamics in condensed matter, where key regions are solved by highly accurate time-dependent quantum mechanics methods, and unimportant regions are solved by faster, less accurate methods.

  19. Time Dependence of Joint Entropy of Oscillating Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Özgür; Aktürk, Ethem; Sever, Ramazan

    2008-12-01

    The time dependent entropy (or Leipnik’s entropy) of harmonic and damped harmonic oscillator systems is studied by using time dependent wave function obtained by the Feynman path integral method. The Leipnik entropy and its envelope change as a function of time, angular frequency and damping factor. Our results for simple harmonic oscillator are in agreement with the literature. However, the joint entropy of damped harmonic oscillator shows remarkable discontinuity with time for certain values of damping factor. The envelope of the joint entropy curve increases with time monotonically. These results show the general properties of the envelope of the joint entropy curve for quantum systems.

  20. Time-dependent manipulation of ultracold ion bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijnders, M. P.; Debernardi, N.; van der Geer, S. B.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; Vredenbregt, E. J. D.; Luiten, O. J.

    2011-02-01

    The combination of an ultracold ion source based on photoionization of a laser-cooled gas and time-dependent acceleration fields enables precise manipulation of ion beams. We demonstrate reduction in the longitudinal energy spread and transverse (de)focusing of the beam by applying time-dependent acceleration voltages. In addition, we show how time-dependent acceleration fields can be used to control both the sign and strength of the spherical aberrations. The experimental results are in close agreement with detailed charged particle tracking simulations and can be explained in terms of a simple analytical model.

  1. Relativistic calculations of angle-dependent photoemission time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheifets, Anatoli; Mandal, Ankur; Deshmukh, Pranawa C.; Dolmatov, Valeriy K.; Keating, David A.; Manson, Steven T.

    2016-07-01

    Angular dependence of photoemission time delay for the valence n p3 /2 and n p1 /2 subshells of Ar, Kr, and Xe is studied in the dipole relativistic random phase approximation. Strong angular anisotropy of the time delay is reproduced near respective Cooper minima while the spin-orbit splitting affects the time delay near threshold.

  2. Time-Dependent Earthquake Forecasts on a Global Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Holliday, J. R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Graves, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    We develop and implement a new type of global earthquake forecast. Our forecast is a perturbation on a smoothed seismicity (Relative Intensity) spatial forecast combined with a temporal time-averaged ("Poisson") forecast. A variety of statistical and fault-system models have been discussed for use in computing forecast probabilities. An example is the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, which has been using fault-based models to compute conditional probabilities in California since 1988. An example of a forecast is the Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS), which is based on the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) magnitude-frequency law, the Omori aftershock law, and Poisson statistics. The method discussed in this talk is based on the observation that GR statistics characterize seismicity for all space and time. Small magnitude event counts (quake counts) are used as "markers" for the approach of large events. More specifically, if the GR b-value = 1, then for every 1000 M>3 earthquakes, one expects 1 M>6 earthquake. So if ~1000 M>3 events have occurred in a spatial region since the last M>6 earthquake, another M>6 earthquake should be expected soon. In physics, event count models have been called natural time models, since counts of small events represent a physical or natural time scale characterizing the system dynamics. In a previous research, we used conditional Weibull statistics to convert event counts into a temporal probability for a given fixed region. In the present paper, we move belyond a fixed region, and develop a method to compute these Natural Time Weibull (NTW) forecasts on a global scale, using an internally consistent method, in regions of arbitrary shape and size. We develop and implement these methods on a modern web-service computing platform, which can be found at www.openhazards.com and www.quakesim.org. We also discuss constraints on the User Interface (UI) that follow from practical considerations of site usability.

  3. Angular dependence of Wigner time delay: Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, A.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Manson, S. T.; Kkeifets, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Laser assisted photoionization time delay mainly consists of two parts: Wigner time delay, and time delay in continuum-continuum transition. Wigner time delay results from the energy derivative of the phase of the photoionization amplitude (matrix element). In general, the photoionization time delay is not the same in all directions relative to the incident photon polarization, although when a single transition dominates the amplitude, the resultant time delay is essentially isotropic. The relativistic-random-phase approximation is employed to determine the Wigner time delay in photoionization from the outer np subshells of the noble gas atoms, Ne through Xe. The time delay is found to significantly depend on angle, as well as energy. The angular dependence of the time delay is found to be quite sensitive to atomic dynamics and relativistic effects, and exhibit strong energy and angular variation in the neighborhood of Cooper minima. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences and DST (India).

  4. First passage times in homogeneous nucleation: Dependence on the total number of particles.

    PubMed

    Yvinec, Romain; Bernard, Samuel; Hingant, Erwan; Pujo-Menjouet, Laurent

    2016-01-21

    Motivated by nucleation and molecular aggregation in physical, chemical, and biological settings, we present an extension to a thorough analysis of the stochastic self-assembly of a fixed number of identical particles in a finite volume. We study the statistics of times required for maximal clusters to be completed, starting from a pure-monomeric particle configuration. For finite volumes, we extend previous analytical approaches to the case of arbitrary size-dependent aggregation and fragmentation kinetic rates. For larger volumes, we develop a scaling framework to study the first assembly time behavior as a function of the total quantity of particles. We find that the mean time to first completion of a maximum-sized cluster may have a surprisingly weak dependence on the total number of particles. We highlight how higher statistics (variance, distribution) of the first passage time may nevertheless help to infer key parameters, such as the size of the maximum cluster. Finally, we present a framework to quantify formation of macroscopic sized clusters, which are (asymptotically) very unlikely and occur as a large deviation phenomenon from the mean-field limit. We argue that this framework is suitable to describe phase transition phenomena, as inherent infrequent stochastic processes, in contrast to classical nucleation theory. PMID:26801019

  5. VERTICAL STRUCTURE OF TIME-DEPENDENT FLOW FOR VISCOSITY THAT DEPENDS ON BOTH DEPTH AND TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    A previously developed eigenfunction expansion, that describes horizontal current as a function of depth and time, is extended to include any eddy viscosity given as a product of a function of depth and a function of time. (Copyright (c) 1982 American Meteorological Society.)

  6. Time-dependent {P} {T}-symmetric quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jiangbin; Wang, Qing-hai

    2013-12-01

    The parity-time-reversal ( {P} {T})-symmetric quantum mechanics (QM) (PTQM) has developed into a noteworthy area of research. However, to date, most known studies of PTQM focused on the spectral properties of non-Hermitian Hamiltonian operators. In this work, we propose an axiom in PTQM in order to study general time-dependent problems in PTQM, e.g., those with a time-dependent {P} {T}-symmetric Hamiltonian and with a time-dependent metric. We illuminate our proposal by examining a proper mapping from a time-dependent Schrödinger-like equation of motion for PTQM to the familiar time-dependent Schrödinger equation in conventional QM. The rich structure of the proper mapping hints that time-dependent PTQM can be a fruitful extension of conventional QM. Under our proposed framework, we further study in detail the Berry-phase generation in a class of {P} {T}-symmetric two-level systems. It is found that a closed path in the parameter space of PTQM is often associated with an open path in a properly mapped problem in conventional QM. In one interesting case, we further interpret the Berry phase as the flux of a continuously tunable fictitious magnetic monopole, thus highlighting the difference between PTQM and conventional QM despite the existence of a proper mapping between them.

  7. Functional differentiability in time-dependent quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Penz, Markus Ruggenthaler, Michael

    2015-03-28

    In this work, we investigate the functional differentiability of the time-dependent many-body wave function and of derived quantities with respect to time-dependent potentials. For properly chosen Banach spaces of potentials and wave functions, Fréchet differentiability is proven. From this follows an estimate for the difference of two solutions to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation that evolve under the influence of different potentials. Such results can be applied directly to the one-particle density and to bounded operators, and present a rigorous formulation of non-equilibrium linear-response theory where the usual Lehmann representation of the linear-response kernel is not valid. Further, the Fréchet differentiability of the wave function provides a new route towards proving basic properties of time-dependent density-functional theory.

  8. Time-dependent rheological behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Kuśmierczyk, Piotr; Liu, Changqing; Yang, Guang; Sevostianov, Igor; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on time-dependent rheological behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel. Due to its ideal biocompatibility, BC hydrogel could be employed in biomedical applications. Considering the complexity of loading conditions in human body environment, time-dependent behaviour under relevant conditions should be understood. BC specimens are produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582 at static-culture conditions. Time-dependent behaviour of specimens at several stress levels is experimentally determined by uniaxial tensile creep tests. We use fraction-exponential operators to model the rheological behaviour. Such a representation allows combination of good accuracy in analytical description of viscoelastic behaviour of real materials and simplicity in solving boundary value problems. The obtained material parameters allow us to identify time-dependent behaviour of BC hydrogel at high stress level with sufficient accuracy. PMID:26478298

  9. Time-Dependent Behaviors of Granite: Loading-Rate Dependence, Creep, and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiba, K.; Fukui, K.

    2016-07-01

    To assess the long-term stability of underground structures, it is important to understand the time-dependent behaviors of rocks, such as their loading-rate dependence, creep, and relaxation. However, there have been fewer studies on crystalline rocks than on tuff, mudstone, and rock salt, because the high strength of crystalline rocks makes the detection of their time-dependent behaviors much more difficult. Moreover, studies on the relaxation, temporal change of stress and strain (TCSS) conditions, and relations between various time-dependent behaviors are scarce for not only granites, but also other rocks. In this study, previous reports on the time-dependent behaviors of granites were reviewed and various laboratory tests were conducted using Toki granite. These tests included an alternating-loading-rate test, creep test, relaxation test, and TCSS test. The results showed that the degree of time dependence of Toki granite is similar to other granites, and that the TCSS resembles the stress-relaxation curve and creep-strain curve. A viscoelastic constitutive model, proposed in a previous study, was modified to investigate the relations between the time-dependent behaviors in the pre- and post-peak regions. The modified model reproduced the stress-strain curve, creep, relaxation, and the results of the TCSS test. Based on a comparison of the results of the laboratory tests and numerical simulations, close relations between the time-dependent behaviors were revealed quantitatively.

  10. Shape evolution and collective dynamics of quasifission in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E.; Simenel, C.

    2015-08-01

    Background: At energies near the Coulomb barrier, capture reactions in heavy-ion collisions result either in fusion or in quasifission. The former produces a compound nucleus in statistical equilibrium, while the second leads to a reseparation of the fragments after partial mass equilibration without formation of a compound nucleus. Extracting the compound nucleus formation probability is crucial to predict superheavy-element formation cross sections. It requires a good knowledge of the fragment angular distribution which itself depends on quantities such as moments of inertia and excitation energies which have so far been somewhat arbitrary for the quasifission contribution. Purpose: Our main goal is to utilize the time-dependent Hartee-Fock (TDHF) approach to extract ingredients of the formula used in the analysis of experimental angular distributions. These include the moment-of-inertia and temperature. Methods: We investigate the evolution of the nuclear density in TDHF calculations leading to quasifission. We study the dependence of the relevant quantities on various initial conditions of the reaction process. Results: The evolution of the moment of inertia is clearly nontrivial and depends strongly on the characteristics of the collision. The temperature rises quickly when the kinetic energy is transformed into internal excitation. Then, it rises slowly during mass transfer. Conclusions: Fully microscopic theories are useful to predict the complex evolution of quantities required in macroscopic models of quasifission.

  11. Choice of Variables and Preconditioning for Time Dependent Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, Eli; Vatsa, Verr N.

    2003-01-01

    We consider the use of low speed preconditioning for time dependent problems. These are solved using a dual time step approach. We consider the effect of this dual time step on the parameter of the low speed preconditioning. In addition, we compare the use of two sets of variables, conservation and primitive variables, to solve the system. We show the effect of these choices on both the convergence to a steady state and the accuracy of the numerical solutions for low Mach number steady state and time dependent flows.

  12. Time-Dependent Delayed Signatures from Energetic Photon Interrogations

    SciTech Connect

    Daren R. Norman; James L. Jones; Brandon W. Blackburn; Kevin J. Haskell; James T. Johnson; Scott M. Watson; Alan W. Hunt; Randy Spaulding; Frank Harmon

    2007-08-01

    Pulsed photonuclear interrogation environments generated by 8–24 MeV electron linac are rich with time-dependent, material-specific, radiation signatures. Nitrogen-based explosives and nuclear materials can be detected by exploiting these signatures in different delayed-time regions. Numerical and experimental results presented in this paper show the unique time and energy dependence of these signatures. It is shown that appropriate delayed-time windows are essential to acquire material-specific signatures in pulsed photonuclear assessment environments. These developments demonstrate that pulsed, high-energy, photon-inspection environments can be exploited for time-dependent, material-specific signatures through the proper operation of specialized detectors and detection methods.

  13. Time-Dependent Delayed Signatures from Energetic Photon Interrogations

    SciTech Connect

    Daren R. Norman; James L. Jones; Brandon W. Blackburn; Kevin J. Haskell; James T. Johnson; Scott M. Watson; Alan W. Hunt; Randy Spaulding; Frank Harmon

    2007-08-01

    Pulsed photonuclear interrogation environments generated by 8–24 MeV electron linac are rich with time-dependent, material-specific, radiation signatures. Nitrogen-based explosives and nuclear materials can be detected by exploiting these signatures in different delayed-time regions. Numerical and experimental results presented in this paper show the unique time and energy dependence of these signatures. It is shown that appropriate delayed-time windows are essential to acquire material-specific signatures in the pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) environments. These developments demonstrate that pulsed, high-energy, photon- inspection environments can be exploited for time-dependent, material-specific signatures through the proper operation of specialized detectors and detection methods.

  14. Measuring Waves and Erosion in Underwater Oil Blobs and Monitoring Other Arbitrary Surfaces with a Kinect v2 Time-of-Flight Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkiewicz, T.

    2014-12-01

    We developed free software that enables researchers to utilize Microsoft's new Kinect for Windows v2 sensor for a range of coastal and ocean mapping applications, as well as monitoring and measuring experimental scenes. While the original Kinect device used structured light and had very poor resolution, many geophysical researchers found uses for it in their experiments. The new next generation of this sensor uses time-of-flight technology, and can produce higher resolution depth measurements with an order of magnitude more accuracy. It also is capable of measurement through and under water. An analysis tool in our application lets users quickly select any arbitrary surface in the sensor's view. The tools automatically scans the surface, then calibrates and aligns a measurement volume to it. Depth readings from the sensor are converted into 3D point clouds, and points falling within this volume are projected into surface coordinates. Raster images can be output which consist of height fields aligned to the surface, generated from these projected measurements and interpolations between them. Images have a simple 1 pixel = 1 mm resolution and intensity values representing mm in height from the base-plane, which enables easy measurement and calculations to be conducted on the images in other analysis packages. Single snapshots can be taken manually on demand, or the software can monitor the surface automatically, capturing frames at preset intervals. This produces time lapse animations of dynamically changing surfaces. We apply this analysis tool to an experiment studying the behavior of underwater oil in response to flowing water of different speeds and temperatures. Blobs of viscous oils are placed in a flume apparatus, which circulates water past them. Over the course of a couple hours, the oil blobs spread out, waves slowly ripple across their surfaces, and erosions occur as smaller blobs break off from the main blob. All of this can be captured in 3D, with mm

  15. Fermion Mass Renormalization Using Time-dependent Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutnink, Timothy; Santrach, Amelia; Hocket, Sarah; Barcus, Scott; Petridis, Athanasios

    2015-10-01

    The time-dependent electromagnetically self-coupled Dirac equation is solved numerically by means of the staggered-leap-frog algorithm with refcecting boundary conditions. The stability region of the method versus the interaction strength and the spatial-grid size over time-step ratio is established. The expectation values of several dynamic operators are then evaluated as functions of time. These include the fermion and electromagnetic energies and the fermion dynamic mass, as the self-interacting spinors are no longer mass-eigenfunctions. There is a characteristic, non-exponential, oscillatory dependence leading to asymptotic constants of these expectation values. In the case of the fermion mass this amounts to renormalization. The dependence of the expectation values on the spatial-grid size is evaluated in detail. Statistical regularization is proposed to remove the grid-size dependence.

  16. Student Understanding of Time Dependence in Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emigh, Paul J.; Passante, Gina; Shaffer, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The time evolution of quantum states is arguably one of the more difficult ideas in quantum mechanics. In this article, we report on results from an investigation of student understanding of this topic after lecture instruction. We demonstrate specific problems that students have in applying time dependence to quantum systems and in recognizing…

  17. Handling Time-dependent Variables: Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Price, L Silvia; Frencken, Jos F; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-06-15

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods, antibiotics constitute time-dependent exposures. Cox regression models are suited for determining such associations. After explaining the concepts of hazard, hazard ratio, and proportional hazards, the effects of treating antibiotic exposure as fixed or time-dependent variables are illustrated and discussed. Wider acceptance of these techniques will improve quantification of the effects of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance development and provide better evidence for guideline recommendations. PMID:27025824

  18. Memory Retention and Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Guy; van Rossum, Mark C. W.

    2009-01-01

    Memory systems should be plastic to allow for learning; however, they should also retain earlier memories. Here we explore how synaptic weights and memories are retained in models of single neurons and networks equipped with spike-timing-dependent plasticity. We show that for single neuron models, the precise learning rule has a strong effect on the memory retention time. In particular, a soft-bound, weight-dependent learning rule has a very short retention time as compared with a learning rule that is independent of the synaptic weights. Next, we explore how the retention time is reflected in receptive field stability in networks. As in the single neuron case, the weight-dependent learning rule yields less stable receptive fields than a weight-independent rule. However, receptive fields stabilize in the presence of sufficient lateral inhibition, demonstrating that plasticity in networks can be regulated by inhibition and suggesting a novel role for inhibition in neural circuits. PMID:19297513

  19. The computational foundations of time dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, James

    2014-03-01

    The mathematical foundations of TDDFT are established through the formal existence of a fictitious non-interacting system (known as the Kohn-Sham system), which can reproduce the one-electron reduced probability density of the actual system. We build upon these works and show that on the interior of the domain of existence, the Kohn-Sham system can be efficiently obtained given the time-dependent density. Since a quantum computer can efficiently produce such time-dependent densities, we present a polynomial time quantum algorithm to generate the time-dependent Kohn-Sham potential with controllable error bounds. Further, we find that systems do not immediately become non-representable but rather become ill-representable as one approaches this boundary. A representability parameter is defined in our work which quantifies the distance to the boundary of representability and the computational difficulty of finding the Kohn-Sham system.

  20. Computational complexity of time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, J. D.; Yung, M.-H.; Tempel, D. G.; Boixo, S.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.

    2014-08-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is rapidly emerging as a premier method for solving dynamical many-body problems in physics and chemistry. The mathematical foundations of TDDFT are established through the formal existence of a fictitious non-interacting system (known as the Kohn-Sham system), which can reproduce the one-electron reduced probability density of the actual system. We build upon these works and show that on the interior of the domain of existence, the Kohn-Sham system can be efficiently obtained given the time-dependent density. We introduce a V-representability parameter which diverges at the boundary of the existence domain and serves to quantify the numerical difficulty of constructing the Kohn-Sham potential. For bounded values of V-representability, we present a polynomial time quantum algorithm to generate the time-dependent Kohn-Sham potential with controllable error bounds.

  1. Spectral method for efficient computation of time-dependent phenomena in complex lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, O.; Makris, K. G.; Türeci, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Studying time-dependent behavior in lasers is analytically difficult due to the saturating nonlinearity inherent in the Maxwell-Bloch equations and numerically demanding because of the computational resources needed to discretize both time and space in conventional finite-difference time-domain approaches. We describe here an efficient spectral method to overcome these shortcomings in complex lasers of arbitrary shape, gain medium distribution, and pumping profile. We apply this approach to a quasidegenerate two-mode laser in different dynamical regimes and compare the results in the long-time limit to the steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT), which is also built on a spectral method but makes a more specific ansatz about the long-time dynamical evolution of the semiclassical laser equations. Analyzing a parameter regime outside the known domain of validity of the stationary inversion approximation, we find that for only a narrow regime of pump powers the inversion is not stationary, and that this, as pump power is further increased, triggers a synchronization transition upon which the inversion becomes stationary again. We provide a detailed analysis of mode synchronization (also known as cooperative frequency locking), revealing interesting dynamical features of such a laser system in the vicinity of the synchronization threshold.

  2. Time-dependent MOS breakdown. [of Na contaminated capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. P.; Bates, E. T.; Maserjian, J.

    1976-01-01

    A general model for time-dependent breakdown in metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) structures is developed and related to experimental measurements on samples deliberately contaminated with Na. A statistical method is used for measuring the breakdown probability as a function of log time and applied field. It is shown that three time regions of breakdown can be explained respectively in terms of silicon surface defects, ion emission from the metal interface, and lateral ion diffusion at the silicon interface.

  3. Time-dependent induced potentials in convoy electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acuña, G. P.; Miraglia, J. E.

    2006-11-01

    We study the time-dependent induced potentials at the convoy electron position due to the self-interaction with a metal surface and to the shock wave created by the positive hole (vacancy) left. The time evolution of these potentials are calculated using the linear response theory. Results obtained are fitted with simple functions. We find that those two potentials nearly cancel each other in the first ten atomic units of time.

  4. Time dependent turbulence modeling and analytical theories of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, R.

    1993-01-01

    By simplifying the direct interaction approximation (DIA) for turbulent shear flow, time dependent formulas are derived for the Reynolds stresses which can be included in two equation models. The Green's function is treated phenomenologically, however, following Smith and Yakhot, we insist on the short and long time limits required by DIA. For small strain rates, perturbative evaluation of the correlation function yields a time dependent theory which includes normal stress effects in simple shear flows. From this standpoint, the phenomenological Launder-Reece-Rodi model is obtained by replacing the Green's function by its long time limit. Eddy damping corrections to short time behavior initiate too quickly in this model; in contrast, the present theory exhibits strong suppression of eddy damping at short times. A time dependent theory for large strain rates is proposed in which large scales are governed by rapid distortion theory while small scales are governed by Kolmogorov inertial range dynamics. At short times and large strain rates, the theory closely matches rapid distortion theory, but at long times it relaxes to an eddy damping model.

  5. Efficient photoheating algorithms in time-dependent photoionization simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kai-Yan; Mellema, Garrelt; Lundqvist, Peter

    2016-02-01

    We present an extension to the time-dependent photoionization code C2-RAY to calculate photoheating in an efficient and accurate way. In C2-RAY, the thermal calculation demands relatively small time-steps for accurate results. We describe two novel methods to reduce the computational cost associated with small time-steps, namely, an adaptive time-step algorithm and an asynchronous evolution approach. The adaptive time-step algorithm determines an optimal time-step for the next computational step. It uses a fast ray-tracing scheme to quickly locate the relevant cells for this determination and only use these cells for the calculation of the time-step. Asynchronous evolution allows different cells to evolve with different time-steps. The asynchronized clocks of the cells are synchronized at the times where outputs are produced. By only evolving cells which may require short time-steps with these short time-steps instead of imposing them to the whole grid, the computational cost of the calculation can be substantially reduced. We show that our methods work well for several cosmologically relevant test problems and validate our results by comparing to the results of another time-dependent photoionization code.

  6. Dynamic structure evolution of time-dependent network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Beibei; Zhou, Yadong; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dai; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we research the long-voided problem of formulating the time-dependent network structure evolution scheme, it focus not only on finding new emerging vertices in evolving communities and new emerging communities over the specified time range but also formulating the complex network structure evolution schematic. Previous approaches basically applied to community detection on time static networks and thus failed to consider the potentially crucial and useful information latently embedded in the dynamic structure evolution process of time-dependent network. To address these problems and to tackle the network non-scalability dilemma, we propose the dynamic hierarchical method for detecting and revealing structure evolution schematic of the time-dependent network. In practice and specificity, we propose an explicit hierarchical network evolution uncovering algorithm framework originated from and widely expanded from time-dependent and dynamic spectral optimization theory. Our method yields preferable results compared with previous approaches on a vast variety of test network data, including both real on-line networks and computer generated complex networks.

  7. Spike-timing-dependent BDNF secretion and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Park, Hyungju; Poo, Mu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    In acute hippocampal slices, we found that the presence of extracellular brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for the induction of spike-timing-dependent long-term potentiation (tLTP). To determine whether BDNF could be secreted from postsynaptic dendrites in a spike-timing-dependent manner, we used a reduced system of dissociated hippocampal neurons in culture. Repetitive pairing of iontophoretically applied glutamate pulses at the dendrite with neuronal spikes could induce persistent alterations of glutamate-induced responses at the same dendritic site in a manner that mimics spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP)-the glutamate-induced responses were potentiated and depressed when the glutamate pulses were applied 20 ms before and after neuronal spiking, respectively. By monitoring changes in the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence at the dendrite of hippocampal neurons expressing GFP-tagged BDNF, we found that pairing of iontophoretic glutamate pulses with neuronal spiking resulted in BDNF secretion from the dendrite at the iontophoretic site only when the glutamate pulses were applied within a time window of approximately 40 ms prior to neuronal spiking, consistent with the timing requirement of synaptic potentiation via STDP. Thus, BDNF is required for tLTP and BDNF secretion could be triggered in a spike-timing-dependent manner from the postsynaptic dendrite. PMID:24298135

  8. Sublinear scaling for time-dependent stochastic density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Roi; Rabani, Eran

    2015-01-21

    A stochastic approach to time-dependent density functional theory is developed for computing the absorption cross section and the random phase approximation (RPA) correlation energy. The core idea of the approach involves time-propagation of a small set of stochastic orbitals which are first projected on the occupied space and then propagated in time according to the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations. The evolving electron density is exactly represented when the number of random orbitals is infinite, but even a small number (≈16) of such orbitals is enough to obtain meaningful results for absorption spectrum and the RPA correlation energy per electron. We implement the approach for silicon nanocrystals using real-space grids and find that the overall scaling of the algorithm is sublinear with computational time and memory.

  9. Progress in the Simulation of Steady and Time-Dependent Flows with 3D Parallel Unstructured Cartesian Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Murman, S. M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The proposed paper will present recent extensions in the development of an efficient Euler solver for adaptively-refined Cartesian meshes with embedded boundaries. The paper will focus on extensions of the basic method to include solution adaptation, time-dependent flow simulation, and arbitrary rigid domain motion. The parallel multilevel method makes use of on-the-fly parallel domain decomposition to achieve extremely good scalability on large numbers of processors, and is coupled with an automatic coarse mesh generation algorithm for efficient processing by a multigrid smoother. Numerical results are presented demonstrating parallel speed-ups of up to 435 on 512 processors. Solution-based adaptation may be keyed off truncation error estimates using tau-extrapolation or a variety of feature detection based refinement parameters. The multigrid method is extended to for time-dependent flows through the use of a dual-time approach. The extension to rigid domain motion uses an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerlarian (ALE) formulation, and results will be presented for a variety of two- and three-dimensional example problems with both simple and complex geometry.

  10. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2014-06-15

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. Stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  11. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2014-06-26

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. The stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  12. Time-dependent gravitating solitons in five-dimensional warped space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2007-12-15

    Time-dependent soliton solutions are explicitly derived in a five-dimensional theory endowed with one (warped) extra dimension. Some of the obtained geometries, everywhere well defined and technically regular, smoothly interpolate between two five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space-times for a fixed value of the conformal time coordinate. Time-dependent solutions containing both topological and nontopological sectors are also obtained. Supplementary degrees of freedom can be also included and, in this case, the resulting multisoliton solutions may describe time-dependent kink-antikink system000.

  13. Temperature Dependence of Radiative and Nonradiative Rates from Time-Dependent Correlation Function Methods.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Baiardi, Alberto; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2016-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate constants in radiative and nonradiative decays from excited electronic states has been studied using a time-dependent correlation function approach in the framework of the adiabatic representation and the harmonic oscillator approximation. The present work analyzes the vibrational aspect of the processes, which gives rise to the temperature dependence, with the inclusion of mode-mixing, as well as of frequency change effects. The temperature dependence of the rate constants shows a contrasting nature, depending on whether the process has been addressed within the Franck-Condon approximation or beyond it. The calculation of the Duschinsky matrix and the shift vector between the normal modes of the two states can be done in Cartesian and/or internal coordinates, depending on the flexibility of the investigated molecule. A new computational code has been developed to calculate the rates of intersystem crossing, internal conversion, and fluorescence for selected molecules as functions of temperature. PMID:26683207

  14. Particle creation in a time-dependent electric field revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Gaurang

    2009-02-15

    We adopt the general formalism for analyzing evolution of gaussian states of quantized fields in time-dependent backgrounds in the Schrodinger picture (presented in detail in Mahajan and Padmanabhan [G. Mahajan, T. Padmanabhan, Gen. Rel. Grav. 40 (2008) 661]) to study the example of a spatially uniform electric field background (in a time-dependent gauge) which is kept turned on for a finite duration of time. In particular, we study the time-dependent particle content, defined in terms of the concept of instantaneous eigenstates, and describe how it captures the time evolution of the quantized field modes. The actual particle creation process occurs over a relatively short interval in time, and the particle content saturates rather quickly. We also compare the power spectrum of the field modes, computed in the asymptotic limit, with the corresponding situation in a cosmological de Sitter background. Particle creation under the influence of a spiked electric field localized in time, as a particular limiting case of the above general model, is also considered.

  15. Particle creation in a time-dependent electric field revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Gaurang

    2009-02-01

    We adopt the general formalism for analyzing evolution of gaussian states of quantized fields in time-dependent backgrounds in the Schrodinger picture (presented in detail in Mahajan and Padmanabhan [G. Mahajan, T. Padmanabhan, Gen. Rel. Grav. 40 (2008) 661]) to study the example of a spatially uniform electric field background (in a time-dependent gauge) which is kept turned on for a finite duration of time. In particular, we study the time-dependent particle content, defined in terms of the concept of instantaneous eigenstates, and describe how it captures the time evolution of the quantized field modes. The actual particle creation process occurs over a relatively short interval in time, and the particle content saturates rather quickly. We also compare the power spectrum of the field modes, computed in the asymptotic limit, with the corresponding situation in a cosmological de Sitter background. Particle creation under the influence of a spiked electric field localized in time, as a particular limiting case of the above general model, is also considered.

  16. Statistical time-dependent model for the interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerola, H.; Kafatos, M.; Mccray, R.

    1974-01-01

    We present models for temperature and ionization structure of low, uniform-density (approximately 0.3 per cu cm) interstellar gas in a galactic disk which is exposed to soft X rays from supernova outbursts occurring randomly in space and time. The structure was calculated by computing the time record of temperature and ionization at a given point by Monte Carlo simulation. The calculation yields probability distribution functions for ionized fraction, temperature, and their various observable moments. These time-dependent models predict a bimodal temperature distribution of the gas that agrees with various observations. Cold regions in the low-density gas may have the appearance of clouds in 21-cm absorption. The time-dependent model, in contrast to the steady-state model, predicts large fluctuations in ionization rate and the existence of cold (approximately 30 K), ionized (ionized fraction equal to about 0.1) regions.

  17. Tokamak power reactor ignition and time dependent fractional power operation

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E.L.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-06-01

    A flexible time-dependent and zero-dimensional plasma burn code with radial profiles was developed and employed to study the fractional power operation and the thermal burn control options for an INTOR-sized tokamak reactor. The code includes alpha thermalization and a time-dependent transport loss which can be represented by any one of several currently popular scaling laws for energy confinement time. Ignition parameters were found to vary widely in density-temperature (n-T) space for the range of scaling laws examined. Critical ignition issues were found to include the extent of confinement time degradation by alpha heating, the ratio of ion to electron transport power loss, and effect of auxiliary heating on confinement. Feedback control of the auxiliary power and ion fuel sources are shown to provide thermal stability near the ignition curve.

  18. Time-dependent nonlinear cosmic ray shocks confirming abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfi, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical studies of time dependent cosmic ray shock structures in planar geometry are interesting because analytical time-independent solutions are available which include the non-linear reactions on the plasma flow. A feature of these time asymptotic solutions is that for higher Mach numbers (M approximately 5) and for a low cosmic ray upstream pressure the solution is not uniquely determined by the usual conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy. These numerical solutions clearly indicate that much work needs to be done before we understand shock acceleration as a time dependent process. The slowness of the process is possibly due to the fact that there is a diffusive flux into the downstream region in addition to the usual advective losses. Analytic investigations of thie phenomenon are required.

  19. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Cuntz, M. Heidelberg Universitaet )

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  20. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  1. Time-dependent response of filamentary composite spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel is modeled as a pseudoisotropic (or transversely isotropic) composite shell, with the effects of the liner and fill tubes omitted. Equations of elasticity, macromechanical and micromechanical formulations, and laminate properties are derived for the application of an internally pressured spherical composite vessel. Viscoelastic properties for the composite matrix are used to characterize time-dependent behavior. Using the maximum strain theory of failure, burst pressure and critical strain equations are formulated, solved in the Laplace domain with an associated elastic solution, and inverted back into the time domain using the method of collocation. Viscoelastic properties of HBFR-55 resin are experimentally determined and a Kevlar/HBFR-55 system is evaluated with a FORTRAN program. The computed reduction in burst pressure with respect to time indicates that the analysis employed may be used to predict the time-dependent response of a filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel.

  2. Relating Time-Dependent Acceleration and Height Using an Elevator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinser, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    A simple experiment in relating a time-dependent linear acceleration function to height is explored through the use of a smartphone and an elevator. Given acceleration as a function of time, a(t), the velocity function and position functions are determined through integration as in v(t)=? a(t) dt (1) and x(t)=? v(t) dt. Mobile devices such as…

  3. Analytic controllability of time-dependent quantum control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chunhua; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong; Chi, Quo-Shin; Clark, John W.

    2005-05-01

    The question of controllability is investigated for a quantum control system in which the Hamiltonian operator components carry explicit time dependence which is not under the control of an external agent. We consider the general situation in which the state moves in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space, a drift term is present, and the operators driving the state evolution may be unbounded. However, considerations are restricted by the assumption that there exists an analytic domain, dense in the state space, on which solutions of the controlled Schrödinger equation may be expressed globally in exponential form. The issue of controllability then naturally focuses on the ability to steer the quantum state on a finite-dimensional submanifold of the unit sphere in Hilbert space—and thus on analytic controllability. A relatively straightforward strategy allows the extension of Lie-algebraic conditions for strong analytic controllability derived earlier for the simpler, time-independent system in which the drift Hamiltonian and the interaction Hamiltonian have no intrinsic time dependence. Enlarging the state space by one dimension corresponding to the time variable, we construct an augmented control system that can be treated as time independent. Methods developed by Kunita can then be implemented to establish controllability conditions for the one-dimension-reduced system defined by the original time-dependent Schrödinger control problem. The applicability of the resulting theorem is illustrated with selected examples.

  4. Time-dependent buoyant puff model for explosive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kansa, E.J.

    1997-01-01

    Several models exist to predict the time dependent behavior of bouyant puffs that result from explosions. This paper presents a new model that is derived from the strong conservative form of the conservation partial differential equations that are integrated over space to yield a coupled system of time dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations. This model permits the cloud to evolve from an intial spherical shape not an ellipsoidal shape. It ignores the Boussinesq approximation, and treats the turbulence that is generated by the puff itself and the ambient atmospheric tubulence as separate mechanisms in determining the puff history. The puff cloud rise history was found to depend no only on the mass and initial temperature of the explosion, but also upon the stability conditions of the ambient atmosphere. This model was calibrated by comparison with the Roller Coaster experiments.

  5. Polymer dynamics in time-dependent periodic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauttonen, Janne; Merikoski, Juha; Pulkkinen, Otto

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of a discrete polymer in time-dependent external potentials is studied with the master equation approach. We consider both stochastic and deterministic switching mechanisms for the potential states and give the essential equations for computing the stationary-state properties of molecules with internal structure in time-dependent periodic potentials on a lattice. As an example, we consider standard and modified Rubinstein-Duke polymers and calculate their mean drift and effective diffusion coefficient in the two-state nonsymmetric flashing potential and symmetric traveling potential. Rich nonlinear behavior of these observables is found. By varying the polymer length, we find current inversions caused by the rebound effect that is only present for molecules with internal structure. These results depend strongly on the polymer type. We also notice increased transport coherence for longer polymers.

  6. Simulating transient dynamics of the time-dependent time fractional Fokker-Planck systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yan-Mei

    2016-09-01

    For a physically realistic type of time-dependent time fractional Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, derived as the continuous limit of the continuous time random walk with time-modulated Boltzmann jumping weight, a semi-analytic iteration scheme based on the truncated (generalized) Fourier series is presented to simulate the resultant transient dynamics when the external time modulation is a piece-wise constant signal. At first, the iteration scheme is demonstrated with a simple time-dependent time fractional FP equation on finite interval with two absorbing boundaries, and then it is generalized to the more general time-dependent Smoluchowski-type time fractional Fokker-Planck equation. The numerical examples verify the efficiency and accuracy of the iteration method, and some novel dynamical phenomena including polarized motion orientations and periodic response death are discussed.

  7. Time-Dependent Interfacial Properties and DNAPL Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-03-10

    Interfacial properties play a major role in governing where and how dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) move in the subsurface. Interfacial tension and contact angle measurements were obtained for a simple, single component DNAPL (tetrachloroethene, PCE), complex laboratory DNAPLs (PCE plus Sudan IV dye), and a field DNAPL from the Savannah River Site (SRS) M-Area DNAPL (PCE, trichloroethene [TCE], and maching oils). Interfacial properties for complex DNAPLs were time-dependent, a phenomenon not observed for PCE alone. Drainage capillary pressure-saturation curves are strongly influenced by interfacial properties. Therefore time-dependence will alter the nature of DNAPL migration and penetration. Results indicate that the time-dependence of PCE with relatively high Sudan IV dye concentrations is comparable to that of the field DNAPL. Previous DNAPL mobility experiments in which the DNAPL was dyed should be reviewed to determine whether time-dependent properties influenced the resutls. Dyes appear to make DNAPL more complex, and therefore a more realistic analog for field DNAPLs than single component DNAPLs.

  8. Pedagogical Aspects of Time-Dependent Rotation Operators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leubner, C.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the reformulation of a classical magnetic moment interacting with various magnetic field configurations in terms of coordinate-free, time-dependent rotation operators. This approach provides useful exercises for the manipulation of three-dimensional rotation operators and provides examples for a number of quantum-mechanics related…

  9. Time- and temperature-dependent failures of a bonded joint

    SciTech Connect

    Sihn, Sangwook; Miyano, Yasushi; Tsai, S.W.

    1997-07-01

    Time and temperature dependent properties of a tubular lap bonded joint are reported. The joint bonds a cast iron rod and a composite pipe together with an epoxy type of an adhesive material containing chopped glass fiber. A new fabrication method is proposed.

  10. Time-dependent radiation dose simulations during interplanetary space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Li, Ju

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation is one of the main concerns in planning long-term interplanetary human space missions. There are two main types of hazardous radiation - Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). Their intensities and evolution depend on the solar activity. GCR activity is most enhanced during solar minimum, while the most intense SEPs usually occur during the solar maximum. SEPs are better shielded with thick shields, while GCR dose is less behind think shields. Time and thickness dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when radiation intensity and dose of SEP and GCR would be minimized. In this study we combine state-of-the-art space environment models with GEANT4 simulations to determine the optimal shielding, geometry of the spacecraft, and launch time with respect to the phase of the solar cycle. The radiation environment was described by the time-dependent GCR model, and the SEP spectra that were measured during the period from 1990 to 2010. We included gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and 27 fully ionized elements from hydrogen to nickel. We calculated the astronaut's radiation doses during interplanetary flights using the Monte-Carlo code that accounts for the primary and the secondary radiation. We also performed sensitivity simulations for the assumed spacecraft size and thickness to find an optimal shielding. In conclusion, we present the dependences of the radiation dose as a function of launch date from 1990 to 2010, for flight durations of up to 3 years.

  11. Acceleration in a nonplanar time-dependent billiard.

    PubMed

    Raeisi, Sedighe; Eslami, Parvin

    2016-08-01

    We study the dynamical properties of a particle in a nonplanar square billiard. The plane of the billiard has a sinusoidal shape. We consider both the static and time-dependent plane. We study the affect of different parameters that control the geometry of the billiard in this model. We consider variations of different parameters of the model and describe how the particle trajectory is affected by these parameters. We also investigate the dynamical behavior of the system in the static condition using its reduced phase plot and show that the dynamics of the particle inside the billiard may be regular, mixed, or chaotic. Finally, the problem of the particle energy growth is studied in the billiard with the time-dependent plane. We show that when in the static case, the billiard is chaotic, then the particle energy in the time-dependent billiard grows for a small number of collisions, and then it starts to saturate. But when the dynamics of the static case is regular, then the particle average energy in the time-dependent situation stays constant. PMID:27627308

  12. Time Dependent Relative Risks in Life Insurance Medical Underwriting.

    PubMed

    Kneepkens, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Introduction .- Life insurance medicine focuses on mortality hazards in specified periods. People are free to insure their lives for shorter or longer terms. Because the chosen terms range from 1 year to a life time, life insurers have to take into account the fact that the predictive value of risk indicators can and will change over time. The time a risk indicator keeps its predictive value, will be dependent on its biological effects, volatility, and treatability. For a given applicant this implies that the relative hazard (RH) calculated for his/her medical condition should be dependent on the term of the insurance. The main objective of this study is to determine if some commonly used risk indicators - previously used to study age dependency of relative risks - have a predictive value that increases with the observation period. (1) Methods .- This population-based cohort study uses NHANES-data files from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) and the NHANES Linked Mortality Files 2010. Only participants aged 20 to 69 that were examined in mobile examination centers, without a history of some prevalent high risk diseases were included. The observed mortality was compared to the expected mortality in a Generalized Linear Model (GLM) with Poisson error structure with two reference populations, which both can serve as preferred reference for life insurers: The United States Life Tables 2008 (USLT) and the 2008 Valuation Basic Tables (VBT) based on the insured population of 35 US Life insurers. The time dependency of the RHs of the systolic blood pressure (SBP), aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum albumin and albuminuria, was assessed, with correction for ethnicity, household income, history of diabetes mellitus, BMI and serum cholesterol. To be able to compare the results with the results of the Age Dependency Study (ADS), the same data, risk indicators, statistical analysis method, and the

  13. The American Foreign Exchange Option in Time-Dependent One-Dimensional Diffusion Model for Exchange Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Nasir Shashiashvili, Malkhaz

    2009-06-15

    The classical Garman-Kohlhagen model for the currency exchange assumes that the domestic and foreign currency risk-free interest rates are constant and the exchange rate follows a log-normal diffusion process.In this paper we consider the general case, when exchange rate evolves according to arbitrary one-dimensional diffusion process with local volatility that is the function of time and the current exchange rate and where the domestic and foreign currency risk-free interest rates may be arbitrary continuous functions of time. First non-trivial problem we encounter in time-dependent case is the continuity in time argument of the value function of the American put option and the regularity properties of the optimal exercise boundary. We establish these properties based on systematic use of the monotonicity in volatility for the value functions of the American as well as European options with convex payoffs together with the Dynamic Programming Principle and we obtain certain type of comparison result for the value functions and corresponding exercise boundaries for the American puts with different strikes, maturities and volatilities.Starting from the latter fact that the optimal exercise boundary curve is left continuous with right-hand limits we give a mathematically rigorous and transparent derivation of the significant early exercise premium representation for the value function of the American foreign exchange put option as the sum of the European put option value function and the early exercise premium.The proof essentially relies on the particular property of the stochastic integral with respect to arbitrary continuous semimartingale over the predictable subsets of its zeros. We derive from the latter the nonlinear integral equation for the optimal exercise boundary which can be studied by numerical methods.

  14. Adaptive and phase selective spike timing dependent plasticity in synaptically coupled neuronal oscillators.

    PubMed

    Kazantsev, Victor; Tyukin, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    We consider and analyze the influence of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) on homeostatic states in synaptically coupled neuronal oscillators. In contrast to conventional models of STDP in which spike-timing affects weights of synaptic connections, we consider a model of STDP in which the time lags between pre- and/or post-synaptic spikes change internal state of pre- and/or post-synaptic neurons respectively. The analysis reveals that STDP processes of this type, modeled by a single ordinary differential equation, may ensure efficient, yet coarse, phase-locking of spikes in the system to a given reference phase. Precision of the phase locking, i.e. the amplitude of relative phase deviations from the reference, depends on the values of natural frequencies of oscillators and, additionally, on parameters of the STDP law. These deviations can be optimized by appropriate tuning of gains (i.e. sensitivity to spike-timing mismatches) of the STDP mechanism. However, as we demonstrate, such deviations can not be made arbitrarily small neither by mere tuning of STDP gains nor by adjusting synaptic weights. Thus if accurate phase-locking in the system is required then an additional tuning mechanism is generally needed. We found that adding a very simple adaptation dynamics in the form of slow fluctuations of the base line in the STDP mechanism enables accurate phase tuning in the system with arbitrary high precision. Adaptation operating at a slow time scale may be associated with extracellular matter such as matrix and glia. Thus the findings may suggest a possible role of the latter in regulating synaptic transmission in neuronal circuits. PMID:22412830

  15. Adaptive and Phase Selective Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity in Synaptically Coupled Neuronal Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Kazantsev, Victor; Tyukin, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    We consider and analyze the influence of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) on homeostatic states in synaptically coupled neuronal oscillators. In contrast to conventional models of STDP in which spike-timing affects weights of synaptic connections, we consider a model of STDP in which the time lags between pre- and/or post-synaptic spikes change internal state of pre- and/or post-synaptic neurons respectively. The analysis reveals that STDP processes of this type, modeled by a single ordinary differential equation, may ensure efficient, yet coarse, phase-locking of spikes in the system to a given reference phase. Precision of the phase locking, i.e. the amplitude of relative phase deviations from the reference, depends on the values of natural frequencies of oscillators and, additionally, on parameters of the STDP law. These deviations can be optimized by appropriate tuning of gains (i.e. sensitivity to spike-timing mismatches) of the STDP mechanism. However, as we demonstrate, such deviations can not be made arbitrarily small neither by mere tuning of STDP gains nor by adjusting synaptic weights. Thus if accurate phase-locking in the system is required then an additional tuning mechanism is generally needed. We found that adding a very simple adaptation dynamics in the form of slow fluctuations of the base line in the STDP mechanism enables accurate phase tuning in the system with arbitrary high precision. Adaptation operating at a slow time scale may be associated with extracellular matter such as matrix and glia. Thus the findings may suggest a possible role of the latter in regulating synaptic transmission in neuronal circuits. PMID:22412830

  16. Time-dependent Brittle Deformation in Darley Dale Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.

    2008-12-01

    The characterization of time-dependent brittle rock deformation is fundamental to understanding the long- term evolution and dynamics of the Earth's upper crust. The chemical influence of water promotes time- dependent deformation through stress corrosion cracking that allows rocks to deform at stresses far below their short-term failure strength. Here we report results from a study of time-dependent brittle creep in water- saturated samples of Darley Dale sandstone (initial porosity of 13%). Conventional creep experiments (or 'static fatigue' tests) show that time to failure decreases dramatically with the imposed deviatoric stress. They also suggest the existence of a critical level of damage beyond which localized failure develops. Sample variability results however in significant scattering in the experimental data and numerous tests are needed to clearly define a relation between the strain rate and the applied stress. We show here that stress-stepping experiments provide a means to overcome this problem and that it is possible this way to obtain the strain rate dependence on applied stress with a single test. This allows to study in details the impact of various thermodynamical conditions on brittle creep. The influence of effective stress was investigated in stress-stepping experiments with effective confining pressures of 10, 30 and 50 MPa (whilst maintaining a constant pore fluid pressure of 20 MPa). In addition to the expected purely mechanical influence of an elevated effective stress our results also demonstrate that stress corrosion appears to be inhibited at higher effective stresses. The influence of doubling the pore fluid pressure however, whilst maintaining a constant effective stress, is shown to have no effect on the rate of stress corrosion. We then discuss the results in light of acoustic emission hypocentre location data and optical microscope analysis and use our experimental data to validate proposed macroscopic creep laws. Finally, using

  17. Arbitrary p-form Galileons

    SciTech Connect

    Deffayet, C.; Deser, S.; Esposito-Farese, G.

    2010-09-15

    We show that scalar, 0-form, Galileon actions--models whose field equations contain only second derivatives--can be generalized to arbitrary even p-forms. More generally, they need not even depend on a single form, but may involve mixed p combinations, including equal p multiplets, where odd p fields are also permitted: We construct, for given dimension D, general actions depending on scalars, vectors, and higher p-form field strengths, whose field equations are of exactly second derivative order. We also discuss and illustrate their curved-space generalizations, especially the delicate nonminimal couplings required to maintain this order. Concrete examples of pure and mixed actions, field equations, and their curved-space extensions are presented.

  18. Exact time-dependent solutions for the thin accretion disc equation: boundary conditions at finite radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takamitsu

    2011-01-01

    We discuss Green's function solutions of the equation for a geometrically thin, axisymmetric Keplerian accretion disc with a viscosity prescription ν∝Rn. The mathematical problem was solved by Lynden-Bell & Pringle for the special cases with boundary conditions of zero-viscous torque and zero mass flow at the disc centre. While it has been widely established that the observational appearance of astrophysical discs depends on the physical size of the central object(s), exact time-dependent solutions with boundary conditions imposed at finite radius have not been published for a general value of the power-law index n. We derive exact Green's function solutions that satisfy either a zero-torque or a zero-flux condition at a non-zero inner boundary Rin > 0, for an arbitrary initial surface density profile. Whereas the viscously dissipated power diverges at the disc centre for the previously known solutions with Rin= 0, the new solutions with Rin > 0 have finite expressions for the disc luminosity that agree, in the limit t→∞, with standard expressions for steady-state disc luminosities. The new solutions are applicable to the evolution of the innermost regions of thin accretion discs.

  19. Time-dependent dynamic behavior of light diffraction in ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Min-Feng; Chou, S. E.; Fu, Chao-Ming

    2012-04-01

    The time-dependent dynamic behavior of diffraction patterns induced by external magnetic field in a suspension of nano-sized magnetic particles (Fe3O4) in a water-based magnetic fluid was investigated. It was observed that the diffraction pattern changed with time as the magnetic field was applied. In the absence of applied magnetic field, there was no diffraction pattern in the screen. When the magnetic field was applied, the transmitted light was perpendicular to the magnetic field, and the diffraction pattern was unstable. There were many small lines and points moving with time. After one minute, the diffraction pattern turned stable, and the small lines became longer. This time-dependent behavior helps us to understand the evolution of the forming chains of magnetic nanoparticles. Moreover, we have measured the other diffraction pattern, the transmitted light propagating parallel to the applied field. These time-dependent diffraction patterns give a new point to understand the dynamic three-dimensional structure of magnetic fluid under a dc magnetic field.

  20. Time-Dependent Delayed Signatures From Energetic Photon Interrogations

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Norman; J. L. Jones; B. W. Blackburn; S. M. Watson; K. J. Haskell

    2006-08-01

    A pulsed photonuclear interrogation environment is rich with time-dependent, material specific, radiation signatures. Exploitation of these signatures in the delayed time regime (>1us after the photon flash) has been explored through various detection schemes to identify both shielded nuclear material and nitrogen-based explosives. Prompt emission may also be invaluable for these detection methods. Numerical and experimental results, which utilize specially modified neutron and HpGe detectors, are presented which illustrate the efficacy of utilizing these time-dependent signatures. Optimal selection of the appropriate delayed time window is essential to these pulsed inspection systems. For explosive (ANFO surrogate) detection, both numerical models and experimental results illustrate that nearly all 14N(n,y) reactions have occurred within l00 us after the flash. In contrast, however, gamma-ray and neutron signals for nuclear material detection require a delay of several milliseconds after the photon pulse. In this case, any data collected too close to the photon flash results in a spectrum dominated by high energy signals which make it difficult to discern signatures from nuclear material. Specifically, two short-lived, high-energy fission fragments (97Ag(T1/2=5.1 s) and 94Sr(T1/2=75.2 s)) were measured and identified as indicators of the presence of fissionable material. These developments demonstrate that a photon inspection environment can be exploited for time-dependent, material specific signatures through the proper operation of specially modified detectors.

  1. Time-dependent coupled-cluster method for atomic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pigg, David A; Hagen, Gaute; Nam, Hai Ah; Papenbrock, Thomas F

    2012-01-01

    We study time-dependent coupled-cluster theory in the framework of nuclear physics. Based on Kvaal's bi-variational formulation of this method [S. Kvaal, arXiv:1201.5548], we explicitly demonstrate that observables that commute with the Hamiltonian are conserved under time evolution. We explore the role of the energy and of the similarity-transformed Hamiltonian under real and imaginary time evolution and relate the latter to similarity renormalization group transformations. Proof-of-principle computations of He-4 and O-16 in small model spaces, and computations of the Lipkin model illustrate the capabilities of the method

  2. Time-dependent resonant scattering: an analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, J M; Kirrander, Adam; Jungen, Ch

    2013-10-28

    A time-dependent description is given of a scattering process involving a single resonance embedded in a set of flat continua. An analytical approach is presented which starts from an incident free particle wave packet and yields the Breit-Wigner cross-section formula at infinite times. We show that at intermediate times the so-called Wigner-Weisskopf approximation is equivalent to a scattering process involving a contact potential. Applications in cold-atom scattering and resonance enhanced desorption of molecules are discussed. PMID:24182008

  3. Time-dependent resonant scattering: An analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecomte, J. M.; Kirrander, Adam; Jungen, Ch.

    2013-10-01

    A time-dependent description is given of a scattering process involving a single resonance embedded in a set of flat continua. An analytical approach is presented which starts from an incident free particle wave packet and yields the Breit-Wigner cross-section formula at infinite times. We show that at intermediate times the so-called Wigner-Weisskopf approximation is equivalent to a scattering process involving a contact potential. Applications in cold-atom scattering and resonance enhanced desorption of molecules are discussed.

  4. A time dependent theory of crazing behavior in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, S. S.; Hsiao, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    The development of crazing is not only a function of stress, but also a function of time. Under a simple state of tension, a craze opening displacement is closely associated with the viscoelastic behavior of the original bulk polymer medium in which individual crazes initiate and develop. Within each craze region, molecular orientation takes place when conditions permit, and a new phase of rearranged molecules governs its local behavior. Based upon a time-dependent viscoelastic two-dimensional model, using a computer program the craze opening displacement field has been calculated, time-dependent craze length was also computed by taking into consideration the molecular orientation mechanism and large deformations in the craze region. Examples are given for simple viscoelastic media with simplified stress distributions. It is interesting to find out that the occurrence of crazing may be interpreted in terms of the stability or instability of the constitutive behavior of the bulk polymer.

  5. Student understanding of time dependence in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emigh, Paul J.; Passante, Gina; Shaffer, Peter S.

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] The time evolution of quantum states is arguably one of the more difficult ideas in quantum mechanics. In this article, we report on results from an investigation of student understanding of this topic after lecture instruction. We demonstrate specific problems that students have in applying time dependence to quantum systems and in recognizing the key role of the energy eigenbasis in determining the time dependence of wave functions. Through analysis of student responses to a set of four interrelated tasks, we categorize some of the difficulties that underlie common errors. The conceptual and reasoning difficulties that have been identified are illustrated through student responses to four sets of questions administered at different points in a junior-level course on quantum mechanics. Evidence is also given that the problems persist throughout undergraduate instruction and into the graduate level.

  6. Physics in space-time with scale-dependent metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.

    2013-10-01

    We construct three-dimensional space Rγ3 with the scale-dependent metric and the corresponding Minkowski space-time Mγ,β4 with the scale-dependent fractal (DH) and spectral (DS) dimensions. The local derivatives based on scale-dependent metrics are defined and differential vector calculus in Rγ3 is developed. We state that Mγ,β4 provides a unified phenomenological framework for dimensional flow observed in quite different models of quantum gravity. Nevertheless, the main attention is focused on the special case of flat space-time M1/3,14 with the scale-dependent Cantor-dust-like distribution of admissible states, such that DH increases from DH=2 on the scale ≪ℓ0 to DH=4 in the infrared limit ≫ℓ0, where ℓ0 is the characteristic length (e.g. the Planck length, or characteristic size of multi-fractal features in heterogeneous medium), whereas DS≡4 in all scales. Possible applications of approach based on the scale-dependent metric to systems of different nature are briefly discussed.

  7. Time-dependent behavior of passive skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamed, T.; Rubin, M. B.; Trimmer, B. A.; Dorfmann, L.

    2016-03-01

    An isotropic three-dimensional nonlinear viscoelastic model is developed to simulate the time-dependent behavior of passive skeletal muscle. The development of the model is stimulated by experimental data that characterize the response during simple uniaxial stress cyclic loading and unloading. Of particular interest is the rate-dependent response, the recovery of muscle properties from the preconditioned to the unconditioned state and stress relaxation at constant stretch during loading and unloading. The model considers the material to be a composite of a nonlinear hyperelastic component in parallel with a nonlinear dissipative component. The strain energy and the corresponding stress measures are separated additively into hyperelastic and dissipative parts. In contrast to standard nonlinear inelastic models, here the dissipative component is modeled using an evolution equation that combines rate-independent and rate-dependent responses smoothly with no finite elastic range. Large deformation evolution equations for the distortional deformations in the elastic and in the dissipative component are presented. A robust, strongly objective numerical integration algorithm is used to model rate-dependent and rate-independent inelastic responses. The constitutive formulation is specialized to simulate the experimental data. The nonlinear viscoelastic model accurately represents the time-dependent passive response of skeletal muscle.

  8. Shoulder pain and time dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion variability.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Chandrasekaran; Moon, Yaejin; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2016-07-01

    Manual wheelchair propulsion places considerable repetitive mechanical strain on the upper limbs leading to shoulder injury and pain. While recent research indicates that the amount of variability in wheelchair propulsion and shoulder pain may be related. There has been minimal inquiry into the fluctuation over time (i.e. time-dependent structure) in wheelchair propulsion variability. Consequently the purpose of this investigation was to examine if the time-dependent structure in the wheelchair propulsion parameters are related to shoulder pain. 27 experienced wheelchair users manually propelled their own wheelchair fitted with a SMARTWheel on a roller at 1.1m/s for 3min. Time-dependent structure of cycle-to-cycle fluctuations in contact angle and inter push time interval was quantified using sample entropy (SampEn) and compared between the groups with/without shoulder pain using non-parametric statistics. Overall findings were, (1) variability observed in contact angle fluctuations during manual wheelchair propulsion is structured (Z=3.15;p<0.05), (2) individuals with shoulder pain exhibited higher SampEn magnitude for contact angle during wheelchair propulsion than those without pain (χ(2)(1)=6.12;p<0.05); and (3) SampEn of contact angle correlated significantly with self-reported shoulder pain (rs (WUSPI) =0.41;rs (VAS)=0.56;p<0.05). It was concluded that the time-dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion may provide novel information for tracking and monitoring shoulder pain. PMID:27134151

  9. Time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkin, V. G.; Lyon, J. G.; Lario, D.; Arge, C. N.; Henney, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents results from a simulation study exploring heliospheric consequences of time-dependent changes at the Sun. We selected a 2 month period in the beginning of year 2008 that was characterized by very low solar activity. The heliosphere in the equatorial region was dominated by two coronal holes whose changing structure created temporal variations distorting the classical steady state picture of the heliosphere. We used the Air Force Data Assimilate Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) model to obtain daily updated photospheric magnetograms and drive the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model of the corona. This leads to a formulation of a time-dependent boundary condition for our three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, LFM-helio, which is the heliospheric adaptation of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry MHD simulation code. The time-dependent coronal conditions were propagated throughout the inner heliosphere, and the simulation results were compared with the spacecraft located near 1 astronomical unit (AU) heliocentric distance: Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO-A and STEREO-B), and the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft that was in cruise phase measuring the heliospheric magnetic field between 0.35 and 0.6 AU. In addition, during the selected interval MESSENGER and ACE aligned radially allowing minimization of the effects of temporal variation at the Sun versus radial evolution of structures. Our simulations show that time-dependent simulationsreproduce the gross-scale structure of the heliosphere with higher fidelity, while on smaller spatial and faster time scales (e.g., 1 day) they provide important insights for interpretation of the data. The simulations suggest that moving boundaries of slow-fast wind transitions at 0.1 AU may result in the formation of inverted magnetic fields near pseudostreamers which is an intrinsically time-dependent process

  10. Advances in time-dependent current-density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Arjan

    In this work we solve the problem of the gauge dependence of molecular magnetic properties (magnetizabilities, circular dichroism) using time-dependent current-density functional theory [1]. We also present a new functional that accurately describes the optical absorption spectra of insulators, semiconductors and metals [2] N. Raimbault, P.L. de Boeij, P. Romaniello, and J.A. Berger Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 066404 (2015) J.A. Berger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 137402 (2015) This study has been partially supported through the Grant NEXT No. ANR-10-LABX-0037 in the framework of the Programme des Investissements d'Avenir.

  11. Brownian motion of electrons in time-dependent magnetic fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, G. J.; Williams, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    The behavior of a weakly ionized plasma in slowly varying time-dependent magnetic fields is studied through an extension of Williamson's stochastic theory. In particular, attention is focused on the properties of electron diffusion in the plane perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field, when the field strength is large. It is shown that, in the strong field limit, the classical 1/B-squared dependence of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient is obtained for two models in which the field B(t) is monotonic in t and for two models in which B(t) possesses at least one turning point.

  12. A variational formulation for time-dependent climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    A variational principle for time dependent diffusion problems is presented and is demonstrated by applying it to simple seasonal climate models. Two cases are treated. The first, a North-Coakley-type model with constant properties, is used as a tutorial example for the application of the technique. For the second case, heat capacity and thermal conductivity are considered to be latitude dependent in order to treat the effects of land/ocean distribution on the seasonal temperature distribution over the earth. The variational equations are derived and approximate analytical solutions are developed which delineate the influences of the physical asymmetries of the hemispheres in producing an asymmetric annual cycle.

  13. XDAMP. Experimental Time-Dependent Data Analysis, Manipulation, Visualization GUI

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.

    1995-04-01

    XDAMP is a graphical user interface (GUI) designed to allow the user to manipulate two-dimensional waveforms (data vs. time) that typically are generated during transient response experiments. A typical single data set from these facilities may generate more than 100 time-dependent waveforms. XDAMP can manipulate waveforms both in time and in amplitude. Typical operations are: time shifting, truncating before or after a specific time, adding, multiplying, integrating, and averaging. The software automatically maintains an audit trail for operations performed on each waveform. Annotation can be added to the overall file so that the data set contains full documentation. PostScript printing graphics and annotation is supported. Data are saved using the Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) from the National Center for Supercomputing Applications.

  14. Designing for time-dependent material response in spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Oleksuk, Lynda L. S.; Bowles, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    To study the influence on overall deformations of the time-dependent constitutive properties of fiber-reinforced polymeric matrix composite materials being considered for use in orbiting precision segmented reflectors, simple sandwich beam models are developed. The beam models include layers representing the face sheets, the core, and the adhesive bonding of the face sheets to the core. A three-layer model lumps the adhesive layers with the face sheets or core, while a five-layer model considers the adhesive layers explicitly. The deformation response of the three-layer and five-layer sandwich beam models to a midspan point load is studied. This elementary loading leads to a simple analysis, and it is easy to create this loading in the laboratory. Using the correspondence principle of viscoelasticity, the models representing the elastic behavior of the two beams are transformed into time-dependent models. Representative cases of time-dependent material behavior for the facesheet material, the core material, and the adhesive are used to evaluate the influence of these constituents being time-dependent on the deformations of the beam. As an example of the results presented, if it assumed that, as a worst case, the polymer-dominated shear properties of the core behave as a Maxwell fluid such that under constant shear stress the shear strain increases by a factor of 10 in 20 years, then it is shown that the beam deflection increases by a factor of 1.4 during that time. In addition to quantitative conclusions, several assumptions are discussed which simplify the analyses for use with more complicated material models. Finally, it is shown that the simpler three-layer model suffices in many situations.

  15. Maintaining tetrahedral mesh quality in response to time-dependent topological and geometrical deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.; George, D.

    1998-12-01

    When modeling deformation of geometrically complex regions, unstructured tetrahedral meshes provide the flexibility necessary to track interfaces as they change geometrically and topologically. In the class of time-dependent simulations considered in this paper, multimaterial interfaces are represented by sets of triangular facets, and motion of the interfaces is controlled by physical considerations. The motion of interior points in the conforming tetrahedral mesh (i.e., points not on interfaces) is arbitrary and may be chosen to produce good element shapes. In the context of specified boundary motion driven by physical considerations, they have found that a rather large glossary of mesh changes is required to allow the simulation to survive all the transitions of interface geometry and topology that occur during time evolution. This paper will describe mesh changes required to maintain good element quality as the geometry evolves, as well as mesh changes required to capture changes i n topology that occur when material regions collapse or pinch off. This paper will present a detailed description of mesh changes necessary for capturing the aforementioned geometrical and topological changes, as implemented in the code GRAIN3D, and will provide examples from a metallic grain growth simulation in which the normal velocity of the grain boundary is proportional to mean curvature.

  16. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Time Dependent Allowables

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Julie Knibloe

    2015-06-01

    Time dependent allowable stresses are required in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for design of components in the temperature range where time dependent deformation (i.e., creep) is expected to become significant. There are time dependent allowable stresses in Section IID of the Code for use in the non-nuclear construction codes, however, there are additional criteria that must be considered in developing time dependent allowables for nuclear components. These criteria are specified in Section III NH. St is defined as the lesser of three quantities: 100% of the average stress required to obtain a total (elastic, plastic, primary and secondary creep) strain of 1%; 67% of the minimum stress to cause rupture; and 80% of the minimum stress to cause the initiation of tertiary creep. The values are reported for a range of temperatures and for time increments up to 100,000 hours. These values are determined from uniaxial creep tests, which involve the elevated temperature application of a constant load which is relatively small, resulting in deformation over a long time period prior to rupture. The stress which is the minimum resulting from these criteria is the time dependent allowable stress St. In this report data from a large number of creep and creep-rupture tests on Alloy 617 are analyzed using the ASME Section III NH criteria. Data which are used in the analysis are from the ongoing DOE sponsored high temperature materials program, form Korea Atomic Energy Institute through the Generation IV VHTR Materials Program and historical data from previous HTR research and vendor data generated in developing the alloy. It is found that the tertiary creep criterion determines St at highest temperatures, while the stress to cause 1% total strain controls at low temperatures. The ASME Section III Working Group on Allowable Stress Criteria has recommended that the uncertainties associated with determining the onset of tertiary creep and the lack of significant

  17. Hot Jupiter breezes: time-dependent outflows from extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Adams, Fred C.

    2016-03-01

    We explore the dynamics of magnetically controlled outflows from hot Jupiters, where these flows are driven by UV heating from the central star. In these systems, some of the open field lines do not allow the flow to pass smoothly through the sonic point, so that steady-state solutions do not exist in general. This paper focuses on this type of magnetic field configuration, where the resulting flow becomes manifestly time-dependent. We consider the case of both steady heating and time-variable heating, and find the time-scales for the corresponding time variations of the outflow. Because the flow cannot pass through the sonic transition, it remains subsonic and leads to so-called breeze solutions. One manifestation of the time variability is that the flow samples a collection of different breeze solutions over time, and the mass outflow rate varies in quasi-periodic fashion. Because the flow is subsonic, information can propagate inwards from the outer boundary, which determines, in part, the time-scale of the flow variability. This work finds the relationship between the outer boundary scale and the time-scale of flow variations. In practice, the location of the outer boundary is set by the extent of the sphere of influence of the planet. The measured time variability can be used, in principle, to constrain the parameters of the system (e.g. the strengths of the surface magnetic fields).

  18. Frequency-dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency2). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ˜ 4 × 10-5 pc cm-3 for pulsars at ˜1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm-3 but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  19. Time and 'angular' dependent backgrounds from stationary axisymmetric solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Obregon, Octavio; Quevedo, Hernando; Ryan, Michael P.

    2004-09-15

    Backgrounds depending on time and on angular variable, namely, polarized and unpolarized S{sup 1}xS{sup 2} Gowdy models, are generated as the sector inside the horizons of the manifold corresponding to axisymmetric solutions. As is known, an analytical continuation of ordinary D-branes, iD-branes allow one to find S-brane solutions. Simple models have been constructed by means of analytic continuation of the Schwarzschild and the Kerr metrics. The possibility of studying the i-Gowdy models obtained here is outlined with an eye toward seeing if they could represent some kind of generalized S-branes depending not only on time but also on an angular variable.

  20. The Time-Dependent Structure of the Electron Reconnection Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji; Kuznetsova, Masha; Klimas, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Collisionless magnetic reconnection is often associated with time-dependent behavior. Specifically, current layers in the diffusion region can become unstable to tearing-type instabilities on one hand, or to instabilities with current-aligned wave vectors on the other. In the former case, the growth of tearing instabilities typically leads to the production of magnetic islands, which potentially provide feedback on the reconnection process itself, as well as on the rate of reconnection. The second class of instabilities tend to modulate the current layer along the direction of the current flow, for instance generating kink-type perturbations, or smaller-scale turbulence with the potential to broaden the current layer. All of these processes contribute to rendering magnetic reconnection time-dependent. In this presentation, we will provide a summary of these effects, and a discussion of how much they contribute to the overall magnetic reconnection rate.

  1. Boosting thermoelectric efficiency using time-dependent control

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hangbo; Thingna, Juzar; Hänggi, Peter; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Li, Baowen

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric efficiency is defined as the ratio of power delivered to the load of a device to the rate of heat flow from the source. Till date, it has been studied in presence of thermodynamic constraints set by the Onsager reciprocal relation and the second law of thermodynamics that severely bottleneck the thermoelectric efficiency. In this study, we propose a pathway to bypass these constraints using a time-dependent control and present a theoretical framework to study dynamic thermoelectric transport in the far from equilibrium regime. The presence of a control yields the sought after substantial efficiency enhancement and importantly a significant amount of power supplied by the control is utilised to convert the wasted-heat energy into useful-electric energy. Our findings are robust against nonlinear interactions and suggest that external time-dependent forcing, which can be incorporated with existing devices, provides a beneficial scheme to boost thermoelectric efficiency. PMID:26464021

  2. Boosting thermoelectric efficiency using time-dependent control.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hangbo; Thingna, Juzar; Hänggi, Peter; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Li, Baowen

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric efficiency is defined as the ratio of power delivered to the load of a device to the rate of heat flow from the source. Till date, it has been studied in presence of thermodynamic constraints set by the Onsager reciprocal relation and the second law of thermodynamics that severely bottleneck the thermoelectric efficiency. In this study, we propose a pathway to bypass these constraints using a time-dependent control and present a theoretical framework to study dynamic thermoelectric transport in the far from equilibrium regime. The presence of a control yields the sought after substantial efficiency enhancement and importantly a significant amount of power supplied by the control is utilised to convert the wasted-heat energy into useful-electric energy. Our findings are robust against nonlinear interactions and suggest that external time-dependent forcing, which can be incorporated with existing devices, provides a beneficial scheme to boost thermoelectric efficiency. PMID:26464021

  3. A semianalytical satellite theory for weak time-dependent perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cefola, P.; Mcclain, W.; Early, L.; Green, A.

    1980-01-01

    The modifications of the semianalytical satellite theory required to include these 'weak' time dependent perturbations are described. The new formulation results in additional terms in the short periodic variations but does not change the averaged equations of motion. Thus the m monthly terms are still included in the averaged equations of motion. This contrasts with the usual approach for the strongly time dependent perturbations in which the m monthly (or m daily, if tesseral harmonics are being considered) terms would be eliminated from the averaged equations of motion and included in the short periodics computation. Numerical test results for the GPS case obtained with a numerical averaging implementation of the new theory demonstrate the accuracy improvement.

  4. Endocannabinoids mediate bidirectional striatal spike-timing-dependent plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yihui; Paillé, Vincent; Xu, Hao; Genet, Stéphane; Delord, Bruno; Fino, Elodie; Berry, Hugues; Venance, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Key points Although learning can arise from few or even a single trial, synaptic plasticity is commonly assessed under prolonged activation. Here, we explored the existence of rapid responsiveness of synaptic plasticity at corticostriatal synapses in a major synaptic learning rule, spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). We found that spike-timing-dependent depression (tLTD) progressively disappears when the number of paired stimulations (below 50 pairings) is decreased whereas spike-timing-dependent potentiation (tLTP) displays a biphasic profile: tLTP is observed for 75–100 pairings, is absent for 25–50 pairings and re-emerges for 5–10 pairings. This tLTP induced by low numbers of pairings (5–10) depends on activation of the endocannabinoid system, type-1 cannabinoid receptor and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1. Endocannabinoid-tLTP may represent a physiological mechanism operating during the rapid learning of new associative memories and behavioural rules characterizing the flexible behaviour of mammals or during the initial stages of habit learning. Abstract Synaptic plasticity, a main substrate for learning and memory, is commonly assessed with prolonged stimulations. Since learning can arise from few or even a single trial, synaptic strength is expected to adapt rapidly. However, whether synaptic plasticity occurs in response to limited event occurrences remains elusive. To answer this question, we investigated whether a low number of paired stimulations can induce plasticity in a major synaptic learning rule, spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). It is known that 100 pairings induce bidirectional STDP, i.e. spike-timing-dependent potentiation (tLTP) and depression (tLTD) at most central synapses. In rodent striatum, we found that tLTD progressively disappears when the number of paired stimulations is decreased (below 50 pairings) whereas tLTP displays a biphasic profile: tLTP is observed for 75–100 pairings, absent for 25

  5. Autoionization in time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, V.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the exact exchange-correlation potential of the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for the correlated process of autoionization. The potential develops barriers which regulate the autoionization rate. TDDFT employing known and practicable exchange-correlation potentials does not capture any autoionization dynamics. Approximate exchange-correlation potentials capturing such dynamics would necessarily require memory effects and are unlikely to be developed, as will be illustrated.

  6. Time Dependent Models of Grain Formation Around Carbon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, M. P.; Shipman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are sites of dust formation and undergo mass loss at rates ranging from 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr. The state-of-the-art in modeling these processes is time-dependent models which simultaneously solve the grain formation and gas dynamics problem. We present results from such a model, which also includes an exact solution of the radiative transfer within the system.

  7. Quasinormal modes in a time-dependent black hole background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Cheng-Gang; Wang, Bin; Abdalla, Elcio; Su, Ru-Keng

    2005-02-01

    We have studied the evolution of the massless scalar field propagating in a time-dependent charged Vaidya black hole background. A generalized tortoise coordinate transformation was used to study the evolution of the massless scalar field. It is shown that, for the slowest damped quasinormal modes, the approximate formulas in the stationary Reissner-Nordström black hole turn out to be a reasonable prescription, showing that results from quasinormal mode analysis are rather robust.

  8. Quasinormal modes in a time-dependent black hole background

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Chenggang; Wang Bin; Abdalla, Elcio; Su Rukeng

    2005-02-15

    We have studied the evolution of the massless scalar field propagating in a time-dependent charged Vaidya black hole background. A generalized tortoise coordinate transformation was used to study the evolution of the massless scalar field. It is shown that, for the slowest damped quasinormal modes, the approximate formulas in the stationary Reissner-Nordstroem black hole turn out to be a reasonable prescription, showing that results from quasinormal mode analysis are rather robust.

  9. Time-dependent first-principles approaches to PV materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2013-12-10

    Computational scheme for designing photovoltaic (PV) materials is presented. First-principles electron dynamics of photo-excitation and subsequent electron-hole splitting is performed based on the time-dependent density functional theory. Photo-induced enhancement of dipole moment was observed in a polar crystal and a donor-acceptor molecular pair. These experiences will pave a way to design PV material from first-principles simulations.

  10. Time-dependent global modeling of the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkin, V. G.; Lyon, J.; Arge, C. N.; Lario, D.; Linker, J.; Lionello, R.

    2015-12-01

    We present results of time-dependent modeling of the inner heliosphere using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). Two types of simulations are performed: one concentrates on the background solar wind specification, while the other deals with the propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). For simulations of the first type we coupled the LFM-helio code with the ADAPT-driven WSA model. We present some details of the coupling machinery and then simulate selected periods characterized by very low solar activity with no significant energetic particle events or CMEs. The results of the model are compared with MESSENGER, ACE, STEREO A and B spacecraft to probe both radial and temporal evolution of solar wind structure. The results indicate, in particular, the importance of time-dependent modeling for more accurate prediction of high-speed streams and heliospheric current sheet structure when the spacecraft skim its surface. We will comment on the formation of magnetic field reversals in pseudostreamer regions, which is an intrinsically time-dependent phenomenon, and on the current sheet corrugation caused by solar wind momentum shears. For the second type of time-dependent inner heliosphere simulations we have coupled LFM-helio with the MAS MHD model of the corona. We first present results of idealized coupled MAS/LFM-helio simulations with symmetric solar wind background and no rotation intended to test the interface for seamless propagation of transients from the corona into the inner heliosphere domain. We then simulate an event with a CME propagating through a realistic heliosphere background including corotating interaction regions. We show details of propagation of flux-rope CMEs through the boundary between MAS and LFM-helio and compare the results between the two codes in the heliospheric domain. The results indicate that the coupling works well, although some differences in the solutions are observed probably due to differences in numerical

  11. Gamma time-dependency in Blaxter's compartmental model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matis, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A new two-compartment model for the passage of particles through the gastro-intestinal tract of ruminants is proposed. In this model, a gamma distribution of lifetimes is introduced in the first compartment; thereby, passage from that compartment becomes time-dependent. This modification is strongly suggested by the physical alteration which certain substances, e.g. hay particles, undergo in the digestive process. The proposed model is applied to experimental data.

  12. Stochastic protein production and time-dependent current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorissen, Mieke; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2011-03-01

    Translation is the cellular process in which ribosomes make proteins from information encoded on messenger RNA. We model this process using driven lattice gases and take into account the finite lifetime of mRNA. The stochastic properties of the translation process can then be determined from the time-dependent current fluctuations of the lattice gas model. We illustrate our ideas with a totally asymmetric exclusion process with extended objects.

  13. On the solution of time-dependent problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, M. A.

    2005-10-01

    The time-dependent radiative transfer problems involving non-equilibrium coupling to the material temperature to differential equation and ballistic-diffusive equation have been solved by means of two different techniques, namely, flux-limited approach and maximum entropy method. The behaviour of the radiative intensity is shown graphically. Knowing the radiative intensity allows us to calculate directly some physical parameters such as the reflection function and heat flux that are numerically computed.

  14. A High Order Mixed Vector Finite Element Method for Solving the Time Dependent Maxwell Equations on Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R N; Rodrigue, G H; White, D A

    2004-03-09

    We present a mixed vector finite element method for solving the time dependent coupled Ampere and Faraday laws of Maxwell's equations on unstructured hexahedral grids that employs high order discretization in both space and time. The method is of arbitrary order accuracy in space and up to 5th order accurate in time, making it well suited for electrically large problems where grid anisotropy and numerical dispersion have plagued other methods. In addition, the method correctly models both the jump discontinuities and the divergence-free properties of the electric and magnetic fields, is charge and energy conserving, conditionally stable, and free of spurious modes. Several computational experiments are performed to demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency and benefits of the method.

  15. Time-Dependent Approach to Two-Proton Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Hagino, Kouichi; Sagawa, Hiroyuki

    We apply a time-dependent quantum three-body model to the two-proton emission of 6Be nucleus in order to discuss the role of pairing correlation between the emitted two protons during the tunneling process. With this method, we calculate the time-evolution of the two protons, which provides an intuitive way to understand this phenomenon. The calculated decay width is in a good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, we also show that the pairing correlation significantly enhances the probabilities of the diproton-like cluster emission, reflecting the "diproton correlation" in proton-rich nuclei.

  16. Time-dependent thermoelectric transport for nanoscale thermal machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daré, A.-M.; Lombardo, P.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze an electronic nanoscale thermal machine driven by time-dependent environment: besides bias and gate voltage variations, we consider also the less prevailing time modulation of the couplings between leads and dot. We provide energy and heat current expressions in such situations, as well as expressions for the power exchanged between the dot+leads system and its outside. Calculations are made in the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function framework. We apply these results to design a cyclic refrigerator, circumventing the ambiguity of defining energy flows between subsystems in the case of strong coupling. For fast lead-dot coupling modulation, we observe transient currents which cannot be ascribed to charge tunneling.

  17. Scale dependence of the directional relationships between coupled time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Amir Hossein; Aghamohammadi, Cina; Anvari, Mehrnaz; Bahraminasab, Alireza; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza; Peinke, Joachim; Sahimi, Muhammad; Marsili, Matteo

    2013-02-01

    Using the cross-correlation of the wavelet transformation, we propose a general method of studying the scale dependence of the direction of coupling for coupled time series. The method is first demonstrated by applying it to coupled van der Pol forced oscillators and coupled nonlinear stochastic equations. We then apply the method to the analysis of the log-return time series of the stock values of the IBM and General Electric (GE) companies. Our analysis indicates that, on average, IBM stocks react earlier to possible common sector price movements than those of GE.

  18. Time-dependent simulations of filament propagation in photoconducting switches

    SciTech Connect

    Rambo, P.W.; Lawson, W.S.; Capps, C.D.; Falk, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    The authors present a model for investigating filamentary structures observed in laser-triggered photoswitches. The model simulates electrons and holes in two-dimensional cylindrical (r-z) geometry, with realistic electron and hole mobilities and field dependent impact ionization. Because of the large range of spatial and temporal scales to be resolved, they are using an explicit approach with fast, direct solution of the field equation. A flux limiting scheme is employed to avoid the time-step constraint due to the short time for resistive relaxation in the high density filament. Self-consistent filament propagation with speeds greater than the carrier drift velocity are observed in agreement with experiments.

  19. Time-dependent modes associated with finite time instabilities in unstable fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaee, Hessam; Sapsis, Themistoklis

    2015-11-01

    We apply a recently developed variational formulation for the determination of a finite-dimensional, time-dependent, orthonormal basis that captures the directions associated with finite-time instabilities. We demonstrate the capability of the method for two problems: the Orr-Sommerfeld/Squire operator and the vertical jet in crossflow. In the first problem we demonstrate that the time-dependent subspace captures the strongly transient non-normal energy growth (in the short time regime), while for longer times the modes capture the expected asymptotic behavior of the dynamics. We also consider the vertical jet in crossflow at the jet Reynolds number of Rej = 900 . We demonstrate that the subspace instantaneously captures the most unstable directions of the time-dependent flow. We explore the connection between the shear flow, non-normal growth and persistent instabilities. Supported by ARO Award # 66710-EG-YIP.

  20. Acoustic asymmetric transmission based on time-dependent dynamical scattering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Ni, Xu; Xu, Ye-Long; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic asymmetric transmission device exhibiting unidirectional transmission property for acoustic waves is extremely desirable in many practical scenarios. Such a unique property may be realized in various configurations utilizing acoustic Zeeman effects in moving media as well as frequency-conversion in passive nonlinear acoustic systems and in active acoustic systems. Here we demonstrate a new acoustic frequency conversion process in a time-varying system, consisting of a rotating blade and the surrounding air. The scattered acoustic waves from this time-varying system experience frequency shifts, which are linearly dependent on the blade’s rotating frequency. Such scattering mechanism can be well described theoretically by an acoustic linear time-varying perturbation theory. Combining such time-varying scattering effects with highly efficient acoustic filtering, we successfully develop a tunable acoustic unidirectional device with 20 dB power transmission contrast ratio between two counter propagation directions at audible frequencies. PMID:26038886

  1. Equation-free analysis of spike-timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Laing, Carlo R; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G

    2015-12-01

    Spike-timing-dependent plasticity is the process by which the strengths of connections between neurons are modified as a result of the precise timing of the action potentials fired by the neurons. We consider a model consisting of one integrate-and-fire neuron receiving excitatory inputs from a large number-here, 1000-of Poisson neurons whose synapses are plastic. When correlations are introduced between the firing times of these input neurons, the distribution of synaptic strengths shows interesting, and apparently low-dimensional, dynamical behaviour. This behaviour is analysed in two different parameter regimes using equation-free techniques, which bypass the explicit derivation of the relevant low-dimensional dynamical system. We demonstrate both coarse projective integration (which speeds up the time integration of a dynamical system) and the use of recently developed data mining techniques to identify the appropriate low-dimensional description of the complex dynamical systems in our model. PMID:26577337

  2. Optimal resolution of a time-dependent aberrationless magnetic lens.

    PubMed

    Calvo, M

    2004-05-01

    We analyse the optimal conditions for operation of a time-dependent magnetic field lens recently proposed. The lens consists of an axially symmetric ellipsoidal coil producing a spatially homogeneous but time-pulsating magnetic field. This system is capable of focusing a beam of charged particles drifting parallel to the coil axis as well as forming images of an object emitting electrons. This lens has no spherical aberration and, consequently, opens the possibility of surpassing the resolving power of conventional round static field lenses. The cardinal elements of this lens are functions of time and thereby the image position, its magnification factor and orientation change in time. We show how by a suitable choice of the magnetic field pulse parameters and the introduction of screens with circular apertures, it is possible to render all the image characteristics stationary. The effect of diffraction is also discussed in the context of transfer function theory. PMID:15093944

  3. Time-dependent, optically thick accretion onto a black hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilden, D. L.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A fully relativistic hydrodynamics code which incorporates diffusive radiation transport is used to study time-dependent, spherically symmetric, optically thick accretion onto a black hole. It is found that matter free-falls into the hole regardless of whether the diffusion time scale is longer or shorter than the dynamical time. Nonadiabatic heating due to magnetic field reconnection is included. The internal energy thus generated affects the flow in a purely relativistic way, again ensuring free-fall collapse of the inflowing matter. Any matter enveloping a black hole will thus be swallowed on a dynamical time scale with relatively small net release of energy. The inclusion of angular momentum will not necessarily affect this conclusion.

  4. Time-dependent strains and stresses in a pumpkin balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    This paper presents a study of pumpkin-shaped superpressure balloons consisting of gores made from a thin polymeric film attached to high stiffness meridional tendons This type of design is being used for the NASA ULDB balloons The gore film shows considerable time-dependent stress relaxation whereas the behaviour of the tendons is essentially time-independent Upon inflation and pressurization the instantaneous i e linear-elastic strain and stress distributions in the film show significantly higher values in the meridional direction However over time and due to the biaxial visco-elastic stress relaxation of the the gore material the em hoop strains increase and the em meridional stresses decrease whereas the em remaining strain and stress components remain substantially unchanged These results are important for a correct assessment of the structural integrity of a pumpkin balloon in a long-duration mission both in terms of the material performance and the overall stability of the shape of the balloon An experimental investigation of the time dependence of the biaxial strain distribution in the film of a 4 m diameter 48 gore pumpkin balloon is presented The inflated shape of selected gores has been measured using photogrammetry and the time variation in strain components at some particular points of these gores has been measured under constant pressure and temperature The results show good correlation with a numerical study using the ABAQUS finite-element package that includes a widely used model of

  5. Time-dependent strains and stresses in a pumpkin balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a study of pumpkin-shaped superpressure balloons, consisting of gores made from a thin polymeric film attached to high stiffness, meridional tendons. This type of design is being used for the NASA ULDB balloons. The gore film shows considerable time-dependent stress relaxation, whereas the behaviour of the tendons is essentially time-independent. Upon inflation and pressurization, the "instantaneous", i.e. linear-elastic strain and stress distribution in the film show significantly higher values in the meridional direction. However, over time, and due to the biaxial visco-elastic stress relaxation of the the material, the hoop strains increase and the meridional stresses decrease, whereas the remaining strain and stress components remain substantially unchanged. These results are important for a correct assessment of the structural integrity of a pumpkin balloon in a long-duration mission, both in terms of the material performance and the overall stability of the shape of the balloon. An experimental investigation of the time dependence of the biaxial strain distribution in the film of a 4 m diameter, 48 gore pumpkin balloon is presented. The inflated shape of selected gores has been measured using photogrammetry and the time variation in strain components at some particular points of these gores has been measured under constant pressure and temperature. The results show good correlation with a numerical study, using the ABAQUS finite-element package, that includes a widely used model of the visco-elastic response of the gore material:

  6. Time-dependent motor properties of multipedal molecular spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samii, Laleh; Blab, Gerhard A.; Bromley, Elizabeth H. C.; Linke, Heiner; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Zuckermann, Martin J.; Forde, Nancy R.

    2011-09-01

    Molecular spiders are synthetic biomolecular walkers that use the asymmetry resulting from cleavage of their tracks to bias the direction of their stepping motion. Using Monte Carlo simulations that implement the Gillespie algorithm, we investigate the dependence of the biased motion of molecular spiders, along with binding time and processivity, on tunable experimental parameters, such as number of legs, span between the legs, and unbinding rate of a leg from a substrate site. We find that an increase in the number of legs increases the spiders’ processivity and binding time but not their mean velocity. However, we can increase the mean velocity of spiders with simultaneous tuning of the span and the unbinding rate of a spider leg from a substrate site. To study the efficiency of molecular spiders, we introduce a time-dependent expression for the thermodynamic efficiency of a molecular motor, allowing us to account for the behavior of spider populations as a function of time. Based on this definition, we find that spiders exhibit transient motor function over time scales of many hours and have a maximum efficiency on the order of 1%, weak compared to other types of molecular motors.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing with time-dependent acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2015-11-01

    We extend the momentum model to describe Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing driven by a time-dependent acceleration. The acceleration is a power-law function of time, similarly to astrophysical and plasma fusion applications. In RT flow the dynamics of a fluid parcel is driven by a balance per unit mass of the rates of momentum gain and loss. We find analytical solutions in the cases of balanced and imbalanced gains and losses, and identify their dependence on the acceleration exponent. The existence is shown of two typical regimes of self-similar RT mixing -acceleration-driven Rayleigh-Taylor-type and dissipation-driven Richtymer-Meshkov-type with the latter being in general non-universal. Possible scenarios are proposed for transitions from the balanced dynamics to the imbalanced self-similar dynamics. Scaling and correlations properties of RT mixing are studied on the basis of dimensional analysis. Departures are outlined of RT dynamics with time-dependent acceleration from canonical cases of homogeneous turbulence as well as blast waves with first and second kind self-similarity. Support of National Science Foundation is warmy appreciated.

  8. The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach revisited.

    PubMed

    Manthe, Uwe

    2015-06-28

    The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach facilitates accurate high-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations. In the approach, the wavefunction is expanded in a direct product of self-adapting time-dependent single-particle functions (SPFs). The equations of motion for the expansion coefficients and the SPFs are obtained via the Dirac-Frenkel variational principle. While this derivation yields well-defined differential equations for the motion of occupied SPFs, singularities in the working equations resulting from unoccupied SPFs have to be removed by a regularization procedure. Here, an alternative derivation of the MCTDH equations of motion is presented. It employs an analysis of the time-dependence of the single-particle density matrices up to second order. While the analysis of the first order terms yields the known equations of motion for the occupied SPFs, the analysis of the second order terms provides new equations which allow one to identify optimal choices for the unoccupied SPFs. The effect of the optimal choice of the unoccupied SPFs on the structure of the MCTDH equations of motion and their regularization is discussed. Generalized equations applicable in the multi-layer MCTDH framework are presented. Finally, the effects resulting from the initial choice of the unoccupied SPFs are illustrated by a simple numerical example. PMID:26133412

  9. Time-dependent numerical simulation of vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Csanak, G.; So, L.L.; Kwan, T.J.T.; Campbell, M.

    1994-12-31

    To simulate vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), the authors are developing a three-dimensional, time-dependent field-gain model with absorption in bulk dielectric regions and gain in quantum well regions. Since the laser linewidth is narrow, the bulk absorption coefficient is assumed to be independent of frequency with a value determined by the material and the lattice temperature. In contrast, the frequency-dependent gain regions must be solved consistently in the time domain. Treatment of frequency-dependent media in a finite-difference time-domain code is computationally intensive. However, because the volume of the quantum well regions is small relative to the volume of the multilayer dielectric (MLD) mirror regions, the computational overhead is reasonable. A key issue is the calculation of the fields in the MLD mirror regions. Although computationally intensive, good agreement has been obtained between simulation results and matrix equation solutions for the reflection coefficient, transmission coefficient, and bandwidth of MLD mirrors. The authors discuss the development and testing of the two-dimensional field-gain model. This field-gain model will be integrated with a carrier transport model to form the self-consistent laser code, VCSEL.

  10. The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Manthe, Uwe

    2015-06-28

    The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach facilitates accurate high-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations. In the approach, the wavefunction is expanded in a direct product of self-adapting time-dependent single-particle functions (SPFs). The equations of motion for the expansion coefficients and the SPFs are obtained via the Dirac-Frenkel variational principle. While this derivation yields well-defined differential equations for the motion of occupied SPFs, singularities in the working equations resulting from unoccupied SPFs have to be removed by a regularization procedure. Here, an alternative derivation of the MCTDH equations of motion is presented. It employs an analysis of the time-dependence of the single-particle density matrices up to second order. While the analysis of the first order terms yields the known equations of motion for the occupied SPFs, the analysis of the second order terms provides new equations which allow one to identify optimal choices for the unoccupied SPFs. The effect of the optimal choice of the unoccupied SPFs on the structure of the MCTDH equations of motion and their regularization is discussed. Generalized equations applicable in the multi-layer MCTDH framework are presented. Finally, the effects resulting from the initial choice of the unoccupied SPFs are illustrated by a simple numerical example.

  11. Arbitrary-resolution global sensitivity kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, T.; Fournier, A.; Dahlen, F.

    2007-12-01

    Extracting observables out of any part of a seismogram (e.g. including diffracted phases such as Pdiff) necessitates the knowledge of 3-D time-space wavefields for the Green functions that form the backbone of Fréchet sensitivity kernels. While known for a while, this idea is still computationally intractable in 3-D, facing major simulation and storage issues when high-frequency wavefields are considered at the global scale. We recently developed a new "collapsed-dimension" spectral-element method that solves the 3-D system of elastodynamic equations in a 2-D space, based on exploring symmetry considerations of the seismic-wave radiation patterns. We will present the technical background on the computation of waveform kernels, various examples of time- and frequency-dependent sensitivity kernels and subsequently extracted time-window kernels (e.g. banana- doughnuts). Given the computationally light-weighted 2-D nature, we will explore some crucial parameters such as excitation type, source time functions, frequency, azimuth, discontinuity locations, and phase type, i.e. an a priori view into how, when, and where seismograms carry 3-D Earth signature. A once-and-for-all database of 2-D waveforms for various source depths shall then serve as a complete set of global time-space sensitivity for a given spherically symmetric background model, thereby allowing for tomographic inversions with arbitrary frequencies, observables, and phases.

  12. Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, M. I.; Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights 1,2Dobynde M.I., 2,3Drozdov A.Y., 2,4Shprits Y.Y.1Skolkovo institute of science and technology, Moscow, Russia 2University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA 3Lomonosov Moscow State University Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow, Russia4Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USASpace radiation is the main restriction for long-term interplanetary space missions. It induces degradation of external components and propagates inside providing damage to internal environment. Space radiation particles and induced secondary particle showers can lead to variety of damage to astronauts in short- and long- term perspective. Contribution of two main sources of space radiation- Sun and out-of-heliosphere space varies in time in opposite phase due to the solar activity state. Currently the only habituated mission is the international interplanetary station that flights on the low Earth orbit. Besides station shell astronauts are protected with the Earth magnetosphere- a natural shield that prevents significant damage for all humanity. Current progress in space exploration tends to lead humanity out of magnetosphere bounds. With the current study we make estimations of spacecraft parameters and astronauts damage for long-term interplanetary flights. Applying time dependent model of GCR spectra and data on SEP spectra we show the time dependence of the radiation in a human phantom inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease

  13. Time-dependent radiation hazard estimations during space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander

    Cosmic particle radiation is a limiting factor for the out of magnetosphere crewed flights. The cosmic radiation uncrewed flights inside heliosphere and crewed flights inside of magnetosphere tend to become a routine procedure, whereas there have been only few shot time flights out of it (Apollo missions 1969-1972) with maximum duration less than a month. Long term crewed missions set much higher requirements to the radiation shielding, primarily because of long exposition term. Inside the helosphere there are two main sources of cosmic radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and coronal mass ejections (CME). GCR come from the outside of heliosphere forming a background of overall radiation that affects the spacecraft. The intensity of GCR is varied according to solar activity, increasing with solar activity decrease and backward, with the modulation time (time between nearest maxima) of 11 yeas. CME are shot term events, comparing to GCR modulation time, but are much more energetic. The probability of CME increases with the increase of solar activity. Time dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when intensity and affection of CME and GCR would be minimized. Applying time dependent models of GCR spectra [1] and estimations of CME we show the time dependence of the radiation dose in a realistic human phantom [2] inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease the incident particle energy, at the same time minimizing flow of secondary induced particles and

  14. Characterizing time-dependent mechanics in metallic MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergers, L. I. J. C.; Delhey, N. K. R.; Hoefnagels, J. P. M.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2010-06-01

    Experiments for characterization of time-dependent material properties in free-standing metallic microelectromechanical system (MEMS) pose challenges: e.g. fabrication and handling (sub)-μm sized specimens, control and measurement of sub-μN loads and sub-μm displacements over long periods and various temperatures [1]. A variety of experimental setups have been reported each having their pros and cons. One example is a micro-tensile tester with an ingenious electro-static specimen gripping system [2] aiding simple specimen design giving good results at μN and sub-μm levels, but without in-situ full-field observations. Other progressive examples assimilate the specimen, MEMS actuators and load cells on a single chip [3,4] yielding significant results at nN and nm levels with in-situ TEM/SEM observability, though not without complications: complex load actuator/sensor calibration per chip, measures to reduce fabrication failure and unfeasible cofabrication on wafers with commercial metallic MEMS. This work aims to overcome these drawbacks by developing experimental methods with high sensitivity, precision and in-situ full-field observation capabilities. Moreover, these should be applicable to simple free-standing metallic MEMS that can be co-fabricated with commercial devices. These methods will then serve in systematic studies into size-effects in time-dependent material properties. First a numeric-experimental method is developed. It characterizes bending deformation of onwafer μm-sized aluminum cantilevers. A specially designed micro-clamp is used to mechanically apply a constant precise deflection of the beam (zres <50 nm) for a prolonged period, see fig. 1. After this period, the deflection by the micro-clamp is removed. Full-field height maps with the ensuing deformation are measured over time with confocal optical profilometry (COP). This yields the tip deflection as function of time with ~3 nm precision, see fig.2. To extract material parameters

  15. A time- and dose-dependent STAT1 expression system

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Nicole R; Strobl, Birgit; Bokor, Marion; Painz, Ronald; Kolbe, Thomas; Rülicke, Thomas; Müller, Mathias; Karaghiosoff, Marina

    2006-01-01

    Background The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family of transcription factors mediates a variety of cytokine dependent gene regulations. STAT1 has been mainly characterized by its role in interferon (IFN) type I and II signaling and STAT1 deficiency leads to high susceptibility to several pathogens. For fine-tuned analysis of STAT1 function we established a dimerizer-inducible system for STAT1 expression in vitro and in vivo. Results The functionality of the dimerizer-induced STAT1 system is demonstrated in vitro in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and embryonic stem cells. We show that this two-vector based system is highly inducible and does not show any STAT1 expression in the absence of the inducer. Reconstitution of STAT1 deficient cells with inducible STAT1 restores IFNγ-mediated gene induction, antiviral responses and STAT1 activation remains dependent on cytokine stimulation. STAT1 expression is induced rapidly upon addition of dimerizer and expression levels can be regulated in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore we show that in transgenic mice STAT1 can be induced upon stimulation with the dimerizer, although only at low levels. Conclusion These results prove that the dimerizer-induced system is a powerful tool for STAT1 analysis in vitro and provide evidence that the system is suitable for the use in transgenic mice. To our knowledge this is the first report for inducible STAT1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. PMID:17184522

  16. Mesoscopic structure of neuronal tracts from time-dependent diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Burcaw, Lauren M.; Fieremans, Els; Novikov, Dmitry S.

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting brain diffusion MRI measurements in terms of neuronal structure at a micrometer level is an exciting unresolved problem. Here we consider diffusion transverse to a bundle of fibers, and show theoretically, as well as using Monte Carlo simulations and measurements in a phantom made of parallel fibers mimicking axons, that the time dependent diffusion coefficient approaches its macroscopic limit slowly, in a (lnt)/t fashion. The logarithmic singularity arises due to short range disorder in the fiber packing. We identify short range disorder in axonal fibers based on histological data from the splenium, and argue that the time dependent contribution to the overall diffusion coefficient from the extra-axonal water dominates that of the intra-axonal water. This dominance may explain the bias in measuring axon diameters in clinical settings. The short range disorder is also reflected in the linear frequency dependence of the diffusion coefficient measured with oscillating gradients, in agreement with recent experiments. Our results relate the measured diffusion to the mesoscopic structure of neuronal tissue, uncovering the sensitivity of diffusion metrics to axonal arrangement within a fiber tract, and providing an alternative interpretation of axonal diameter mapping techniques. PMID:25837598

  17. Time-Dependence and Pattern Formation in Flowing Granular Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, George William, III

    1990-01-01

    We study the time dependence and pattern formation of gravity driven flows of granular media in three experiments. In three dimensional flows of sand, the normal stress on the wall of a conical hopper is measured. There is no evidence of characteristic time scales predicted by a linear stability analysis of a current continuum theory of granular media. Instead, the signal is characterized by a power law power spectrum, and the time variation of the normal stress obeys a scaling law consistent with fractional Brownian motion with H ~ 0.2. As one of the best examples to date of fractional Brownian motion in a physical experiment, this provides a unique opportunity for a study of the theory's application. In digital subtraction radiography studies of sand flow through a thin (nearly two dimensional) wedge, density waves are found. The formation and motion of these depends on the geometry of the wedge and the roughness of the sand grains. The waves form in rough sand but not in smooth sand of the same approximate size, demonstrating that grain structure has a dramatic effect on the flow. Also, the position of stagnant regions along the sides of the wedge is found to scale as a power law of the wedge angle. Neither the density waves nor the position of the stagnant regions are predicted by current theories. Finally, a cellular automata model is proposed to model the two dimensional flow of ellipsoidal grains (such as grass seed) through a wedge. By including particle shape and orientation as degrees of freedom, this model is able to capture many features of real physical flows. In sum, these experiments demonstrate that flows of even simple materials like sand or grass seed contain time dependent patterns that are not predicted by current theoretical models. This demonstrates the need to include particle structure and orientation. Finally, the cellular automata model shows that even relatively simple models which include these added degrees of freedom can reproduce the

  18. Optimization of Time-Dependent Particle Tracing Using Tetrahedral Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenwright, David; Lane, David

    1995-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is presented for computing particle paths, streak lines and time lines in time-dependent flows with moving curvilinear grids. The integration, velocity interpolation and step-size control are all performed in physical space which avoids the need to transform the velocity field into computational space. This leads to higher accuracy because there are no Jacobian matrix approximations or expensive matrix inversions. Integration accuracy is maintained using an adaptive step-size control scheme which is regulated by the path line curvature. The problem of cell-searching, point location and interpolation in physical space is simplified by decomposing hexahedral cells into tetrahedral cells. This enables the point location to be done analytically and substantially faster than with a Newton-Raphson iterative method. Results presented show this algorithm is up to six times faster than particle tracers which operate on hexahedral cells yet produces almost identical particle trajectories.

  19. Relating Time-Dependent Acceleration and Height Using an Elevator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinser, Jason M.

    2015-04-01

    A simple experiment in relating a time-dependent linear acceleration function to height is explored through the use of a smartphone and an elevator. Given acceleration as a function of time1, a(t), the velocity function and position functions are determined through integration as in v (t ) =∫ a (t ) d t (1) and x (t ) =∫ v (t ) dt. Mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets have accelerometers that capture slowly evolving acceleration with respect to time and can deliver those measurements as a CSV file. A recent example measured the oscillations of the elevator as it starts its motion.2 In the application presented here the mobile device is used to estimate the height of the elevator ride. By estimating the functional form of the acceleration of an elevator ride, it is possible to estimate the height of the ride through Eqs. (1) and (2).

  20. Simple, accurate, and efficient implementation of 1-electron atomic time-dependent Schrödinger equation in spherical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patchkovskii, Serguei; Muller, H. G.

    2016-02-01

    Modelling atomic processes in intense laser fields often relies on solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE). For processes involving ionisation, such as above-threshold ionisation (ATI) and high-harmonic generation (HHG), this is a formidable task even if only one electron is active. Several powerful ideas for efficient implementation of atomic TDSE were introduced by H.G. Muller some time ago (Muller, 1999), including: separation of Hamiltonian terms into tri-diagonal parts; implicit representation of the spatial derivatives; and use of a rotating reference frame. Here, we extend these techniques to allow for non-uniform radial grids, arbitrary laser field polarisation, and non-Hermitian terms in the Hamiltonian due to the implicit form of the derivatives (previously neglected). We implement the resulting propagator in a parallel Fortran program, adapted for multi-core execution. Cost of TDSE propagation scales linearly with the problem size, enabling full-dimensional calculations of strong-field ATI and HHG spectra for arbitrary field polarisations on a standard desktop PC.

  1. Two methods for restricted configuration spaces within the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, Daniel J.; McCurdy, C. William

    2015-01-01

    The multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method has shown promise in calculating electronic dynamics in molecules driven by strong and high-energy lasers. It must incorporate restricted configuration spaces (meaning that a particular combination of Slater determinants is used, instead of full configuration interaction) to be applied to big systems. Two different Ansätze are used to determine the essential term in the equations. The first Ansatz is the Lagrangian variational principle. The explicit, complete MCTDHF equations of motion, satisfying that principle, for arbitrary configuration spaces, are given. The property that a restricted configuration list must satisfy in order for the Lagrangian and McLachlan variational principles to give different results is identified. The second Ansatz keeps the density matrix block diagonal among equivalent orbitals, in a generalization of the method of Worth [J. Chem. Phys. 112, 8322 (2000), 10.1063/1.481438]. The methods perform well in calculating the dynamics of Be and BC2 + subject to ultrafast, ultrastrong lasers in severely truncated Hilbert spaces, although they exhibit differing degrees of numerical stability as implemented.

  2. Growing multiplex networks with arbitrary number of layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Naghmeh; Fotouhi, Babak

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the problem of growing multiplex networks. Currently, the results on the joint degree distribution of growing multiplex networks present in the literature pertain to the case of two layers and are confined to the special case of homogeneous growth and are limited to the state state (that is, the limit of infinite size). In the present paper, we first obtain closed-form solutions for the joint degree distribution of heterogeneously growing multiplex networks with arbitrary number of layers in the steady state. Heterogeneous growth means that each incoming node establishes different numbers of links in different layers. We consider both uniform and preferential growth. We then extend the analysis of the uniform growth mechanism to arbitrary times. We obtain a closed-form solution for the time-dependent joint degree distribution of a growing multiplex network with arbitrary initial conditions. Throughout, theoretical findings are corroborated with Monte Carlo simulations. The results shed light on the effects of the initial network on the transient dynamics of growing multiplex networks and takes a step towards characterizing the temporal variations of the connectivity of growing multiplex networks, as well as predicting their future structural properties.

  3. External orthogonality in subsystem time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Chulhai, Dhabih V; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-08-01

    Subsystem density functional theory (subsystem DFT) is a DFT partitioning method that is exact in principle, but depends on approximations to the kinetic energy density functional (KEDF). One may avoid the use of approximate KEDFs by ensuring that the inter-subsystem molecular orbitals are orthogonal, termed external orthogonality (EO). We present a method that extends a subsystem DFT method, that includes EO, into the time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) regime. This method therefore removes the need for approximations to the kinetic energy potential and kernel, and we show that it can accurately reproduce the supermolecular TDDFT results for weakly and strongly coupled subsystems, and for systems with strongly overlapping densities (where KEDF approximations traditionally fail). PMID:26932176

  4. Time-dependent behavior of flax/starch composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varna, J.; Spārniņš, E.; Joffe, R.; Nättinen, K.; Lampinen, J.

    2012-02-01

    The time-dependent mechanical response of flax fiber-reinforced thermoplastic starch matrix composite and neat starch is analyzed. It is demonstrated that the response is highly sensitive to the relative humidity (with specific saturation moisture content in the composite) and special effort has to be made to keep it constant. It was found that the accumulation of micro-damage and the resulting reduction of the elastic modulus in this type of composite is limited. The highly nonlinear behavior of composites is related to the nonlinear viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity. These phenomena are accounted for by simple material models, as suggested in this study. The stress-dependent nonlinearity descriptors in these models are determined in creep and strain recovery tests at low as well as by high stresses.

  5. Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries in b {yields} s Penguins

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, H.

    2006-07-11

    We present measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters in B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}(1020)K{sup 0}, {eta}'K{sup 0}, K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} K{sub S}{sup 0}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0}, {omega}(782)K{sub S}{sup 0} and K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays based on a sample of 386 x 106BB(bar sign) pairs collected at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy asymmetric e+e- collider. These decays are dominated by the b {yields} s gluonic penguin transition and are sensitive to new CP-violating phases from physics beyond the standard model. One neutral meson is fully reconstructed in one of the specified decay channels, and the flavor of the accompanying B meson is identified from its decay products. CP-violation parameters are obtained from the asymmetries in the distributions of the proper-time intervals between the two B decays. We also perform measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{gamma} decay that is dominated by the b {yields} s radiative penguin.

  6. Time dependence in B → V ℓℓ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descotes-Genon, Sébastien; Virto, Javier

    2015-04-01

    We discuss the theory and phenomenology of B d,s → V (→ M 1 M 2)ℓℓ decays in the presence of neutral-meson mixing. We derive expressions for the time-dependent angular distributions for decays into CP eigenstates, and identify the relevant observables that can be extracted from time-integrated and time-dependent analyses with or without tagging, with a focus on the difference between measurements at B-factories and hadronic machines. We construct two observables of interest, which we call Q {8/-} and Q 9, and which are theoretically clean at large recoil. We compute these two observables in the Standard Model, and show that they have good potential for New Physics searches by considering their sensitivity to benchmark New Physics scenarios consistent with current b → sℓℓ data. These results apply to decays such as B d → K ∗(→ K S π0)ℓℓ, B s → ϕ(→ K S K L )ℓℓ and B s → ϕ(→ K + K -)ℓℓ.

  7. Time-dependent response of dissipative electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Jean Christophe; Krause, Pascal; Klamroth, Tillmann; Saalfrank, Peter

    2010-06-15

    We present a systematic study of the influence of energy and phase relaxation on dynamic polarizability simulations in the linear response regime. The nonperturbative approach is based on explicit electron dynamics using short laser pulses of low intensities. To include environmental effects on the property calculation, we use the time-dependent configuration-interaction method in its reduced density matrix formulation. Both energy dissipation and nonlocal pure dephasing are included. The explicit treatment of time-resolved electron dynamics gives access to the phase shift between the electric field and the induced dipole moment, which can be used to define a useful uncertainty measure for the dynamic polarizability. The nonperturbative treatment is compared to perturbation theory expressions, as applied to a simple model system, the rigid H{sub 2} molecule. It is shown that both approaches are equivalent for low field intensities, but the time-dependent treatment provides complementary information on the phase of the induced dipole moment, which allows for the definition of an uncertainty associated with the computation of the dynamic polarizability in the linear response regime.

  8. Distributed energy storage: Time-dependent tree flow design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, A.; Ziaei, S.; Lorente, S.

    2016-05-01

    This article proposes "distributed energy storage" as a basic design problem of distributing energy storage material on an area. The energy flows by fluid flow from a concentrated source to points (users) distributed equidistantly on the area. The flow is time-dependent. Several scenarios are analyzed: sensible-heat storage, latent-heat storage, exergy storage vs energy storage, and the distribution of a finite supply of heat transfer surface between the source fluid and the distributed storage material. The chief conclusion is that the finite amount of storage material should be distributed proportionally with the distribution of the flow rate of heating agent arriving on the area. The total time needed by the source stream to "invade" the area is cumulative (the sum of the storage times required at each storage site) and depends on the energy distribution paths and the sequence in which the users are served by the source stream. Directions for future designs of distributed storage and retrieval are outlined in the concluding section.

  9. Time dependence of delayed neutron emission for fissionable isotope identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kinlaw, M.T.; Hunt, A.W.

    2005-06-20

    The time dependence of delayed neutron emission was examined as a method of fissionable isotope identification. A pulsed bremsstrahlung photon beam was used to induce photofission reactions in {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 239}Pu targets. The resulting delayed neutron emission was recorded between irradiating pulses and is a well-known technique for fissionable material detection. Monitoring the decay of delayed neutron emission between irradiating pulses demonstrates the ability to not only detect the presence of fissionable materials, but also to identify which fissionable isotope is present.

  10. Deterministic methods for time-dependent stochastic neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Randal S

    2009-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for solving the time-dependent survival probability equation in general (lD/2D/3D) geometries using the multi group SNmethod. Although this equation was first formulated by Bell in the early 1960's, it has only been applied to stationary systems (for other than idealized point models) until recently, and detailed descriptions of numerical solution techniques are lacking in the literature. This paper presents such a description and applies it to a dynamic system representative of a figurative criticality accident scenario.

  11. Invariance in quantum walks with time-dependent coin operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Miquel

    2014-12-01

    This paper unveils some features of a discrete-time quantum walk on the line whose coin depends on the temporal variable. After considering the most general form of the unitary coin operator, it focuses on the role played by the two phase factors that one can incorporate there, and shows how both terms influence the evolution of the system. A closer analysis reveals that the probabilistic properties of the motion of the walker remain unaltered when the update rule of these phases is chosen adequately. This invariance is based on a symmetry with consequences not yet fully explored.

  12. Quantum description of a time-dependent mesoscopic RLC circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrosa, I. A.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive quantum description of a mesoscopic RLC circuit with time-dependent resistance, inductance and capacitance. Based on the dynamical invariant method and using quadratic invariants, we derive exact nonstationary quantum states for this circuit and write them in terms of solutions of the Milne-Pinney equation. Afterwards, we use quadratic invariants to construct coherent states for this quantized system and employ them to investigate quantum properties of the RLC circuit. In particular, we show that the product of the quantum fluctuations of the charge and the magnetic flux does not satisfy the minimum uncertainty relation.

  13. Perspective: Fundamental aspects of time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Neepa T.

    2016-06-01

    In the thirty-two years since the birth of the foundational theorems, time-dependent density functional theory has had a tremendous impact on calculations of electronic spectra and dynamics in chemistry, biology, solid-state physics, and materials science. Alongside the wide-ranging applications, there has been much progress in understanding fundamental aspects of the functionals and the theory itself. This Perspective looks back to some of these developments, reports on some recent progress and current challenges for functionals, and speculates on future directions to improve the accuracy of approximations used in this relatively young theory.

  14. Rare B decays and time dependent mixing at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, K.J.; CDF Collaboration

    1995-06-01

    We report recent results on rare B decays searches -- specifically, the decay modes B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}, B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}K{sup 0*}, and B{sup {plus_minus}} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}K{sup {plus_minus}} -- from the CDF collaboration using data from the 1992--1993 run of the Tevatron collider. In addition, we present the first CDF measurement of time dependent B{sup 0} {minus} {bar B}{sup 0} mixing.

  15. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of partial differential equation solutions in the least squares norm.

  16. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of PDE solutions in the least-squares norm are reported.

  17. Time Dependent Hartree Fock Equation: Gateway to Nonequilibrium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Dufty

    2007-04-28

    This is the Final Technical Report for DE-FG02-2ER54677 award “Time Dependent Hartree Fock Equation - Gateway to Nonequilibrium Plasmas”. Research has focused on the nonequilibrium dynamics of electrons in the presence of ions, both via basic quantum theory and via semi-classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In addition, fundamental notions of dissipative dynamics have been explored for models of grains and dust, and for scalar fields (temperature) in turbulent edge plasmas. The specific topics addressed were Quantum Kinetic Theory for Metallic Clusters, Semi-classical MD Simulation of Plasmas , and Effects of Dissipative Dynamics.

  18. Boundary Sensitivities for Diffusion Processes in Time Dependent Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, C. Gobet, E. Karoui, N. El

    2006-09-15

    We study the sensitivity, with respect to a time dependent domain D{sub s}, of expectations of functionals of a diffusion process stopped at the exit from D{sub s} or normally reflected at the boundary of D{sub s}. We establish a differentiability result and give an explicit expression for the gradient that allows the gradient to be computed by Monte Carlo methods. Applications to optimal stopping problems and pricing of American options, to singular stochastic control and others are discussed.

  19. Time-dependent Kohn-Sham approach to quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggenthaler, M.; Mackenroth, F.; Bauer, D.

    2011-10-15

    We prove a generalization of the van Leeuwen theorem toward quantum electrodynamics, providing the formal foundations of a time-dependent Kohn-Sham construction for coupled quantized matter and electromagnetic fields. We circumvent the symmetry-causality problems associated with the action-functional approach to Kohn-Sham systems. We show that the effective external four-potential and four-current of the Kohn-Sham system are uniquely defined and that the effective four-current takes a very simple form. Further we rederive the Runge-Gross theorem for quantum electrodynamics.

  20. How arbitrary is language?

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Padraic; Shillcock, Richard C.; Christiansen, Morten H.; Kirby, Simon

    2014-01-01

    It is a long established convention that the relationship between sounds and meanings of words is essentially arbitrary—typically the sound of a word gives no hint of its meaning. However, there are numerous reported instances of systematic sound–meaning mappings in language, and this systematicity has been claimed to be important for early language development. In a large-scale corpus analysis of English, we show that sound–meaning mappings are more systematic than would be expected by chance. Furthermore, this systematicity is more pronounced for words involved in the early stages of language acquisition and reduces in later vocabulary development. We propose that the vocabulary is structured to enable systematicity in early language learning to promote language acquisition, while also incorporating arbitrariness for later language in order to facilitate communicative expressivity and efficiency. PMID:25092667

  1. Translation invariant time-dependent solutions to massive gravity II

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, J.; Steer, D.A. E-mail: steer@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2014-06-01

    This paper is a sequel to JCAP 12 (2013) 004 and is also devoted to translation-invariant solutions of ghost-free massive gravity in its moving frame formulation. Here we consider a mass term which is linear in the vielbein (corresponding to a β{sub 3} term in the 4D metric formulation) in addition to the cosmological constant. We determine explicitly the constraints, and from the initial value formulation show that the time-dependent solutions can have singularities at a finite time. Although the constraints give, as in the β{sub 1} case, the correct number of degrees of freedom for a massive spin two field, we show that the lapse function can change sign at a finite time causing a singular time evolution. This is very different to the β{sub 1} case where time evolution is always well defined. We conclude that the β{sub 3} mass term can be pathological and should be treated with care.

  2. A stochastic fault model. 2. Time-dependent case.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    A random model of fault motion in an earthquake is formulated by assuming that the slip velocity is a random function of position and time truncated at zero, so that it does not have negative values. This random function is chosen to be self-affine; that is, on change of length scale, the function is multiplied by a scale factor but is otherwise unchanged statistically. A snapshot of slip velocity at a given time resembles a cluster of islands with rough topography; the final slip function is a smoother island or cluster of islands. In the Fourier transform domain, shear traction on the fault equals the slip velocity times an impedance function. The fact that this impedance function has a pole at zero frequency implies that traction and slip velocity cannot have the same spectral dependence in space and time. To describe stress fluctuations of the order of 100 bars when smoothed over a length of kilometers and of the order of kilobars at the grain size, shear traction must have a one-dimensional power spectrum is space proportional to the reciprocal wave number. Then the one-dimensional power spectrum for the slip velocity is proportional to the reciprocal wave number squared and for slip to its cube. If slip velocity has the same power law spectrum in time as in space, then the spectrum of ground acceleration with be flat (white noise) both on the fault and in the far field.-Author

  3. Time-dependent classification accuracy curve under marker-dependent sampling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhaoyin; Wang, Xiaofei; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; George, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the classification accuracy of a candidate biomarker signaling the onset of disease or disease status is essential for medical decision making. A good biomarker would accurately identify the patients who are likely to progress or die at a particular time in the future or who are in urgent need for active treatments. To assess the performance of a candidate biomarker, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) are commonly used. In many cases, the standard simple random sampling (SRS) design used for biomarker validation studies is costly and inefficient. In order to improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of biomarker validation, marker-dependent sampling (MDS) may be used. In a MDS design, the selection of patients to assess true survival time is dependent on the result of a biomarker assay. In this article, we introduce a nonparametric estimator for time-dependent AUC under a MDS design. The consistency and the asymptotic normality of the proposed estimator is established. Simulation shows the unbiasedness of the proposed estimator and a significant efficiency gain of the MDS design over the SRS design. PMID:27119599

  4. Time-dependent classification accuracy curve under marker-dependent sampling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaoyin; Wang, Xiaofei; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Kosinski, Andrzej S; George, Stephen L

    2016-07-01

    Evaluating the classification accuracy of a candidate biomarker signaling the onset of disease or disease status is essential for medical decision making. A good biomarker would accurately identify the patients who are likely to progress or die at a particular time in the future or who are in urgent need for active treatments. To assess the performance of a candidate biomarker, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) are commonly used. In many cases, the standard simple random sampling (SRS) design used for biomarker validation studies is costly and inefficient. In order to improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of biomarker validation, marker-dependent sampling (MDS) may be used. In a MDS design, the selection of patients to assess true survival time is dependent on the result of a biomarker assay. In this article, we introduce a nonparametric estimator for time-dependent AUC under a MDS design. The consistency and the asymptotic normality of the proposed estimator is established. Simulation shows the unbiasedness of the proposed estimator and a significant efficiency gain of the MDS design over the SRS design. PMID:27119599

  5. A time-dependent neutron transport method of characteristics formulation with time derivative propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Adam J.; Lee, John C.

    2016-02-01

    A new time-dependent Method of Characteristics (MOC) formulation for nuclear reactor kinetics was developed utilizing angular flux time-derivative propagation. This method avoids the requirement of storing the angular flux at previous points in time to represent a discretized time derivative; instead, an equation for the angular flux time derivative along 1D spatial characteristics is derived and solved concurrently with the 1D transport characteristic equation. This approach allows the angular flux time derivative to be recast principally in terms of the neutron source time derivatives, which are approximated to high-order accuracy using the backward differentiation formula (BDF). This approach, called Source Derivative Propagation (SDP), drastically reduces the memory requirements of time-dependent MOC relative to methods that require storing the angular flux. An SDP method was developed for 2D and 3D applications and implemented in the computer code DeCART in 2D. DeCART was used to model two reactor transient benchmarks: a modified TWIGL problem and a C5G7 transient. The SDP method accurately and efficiently replicated the solution of the conventional time-dependent MOC method using two orders of magnitude less memory.

  6. Time-dependent corona models - A numerical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korevaar, P.; van Leer, B.

    1988-07-01

    A time-dependent numerical method for calculating gas flows is described. The method is implicit and especially suitable for finding stationary flow solutions. Although the method is general in its application to ideal compressible fluids, this paper applies it to a stellar atmosphere, heated to coronal temperatures by dissipation of mechanical energy. The integration scheme is based on conservative upwind spatial differencing. The upwind switching is provided by Van Leer's method of differentiable flux-splitting. It is shown that the code can handle large differences in density: up to 14 orders of magnitude. Special attention is paid to the boundary conditions, which are made completely transparent to disturbances. Besides some test-results, converged solutions for various values of the initial mechanical flux are presented which are in good agreement with previous time-independent calculations.

  7. Time-dependent simulations of a Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D.P.; Bateman, G.

    1988-05-01

    Detailed simulations of the Compact Ignition Tokamak are carried out using a 1-1/2-D transport code. The calculations include time-varying densities, fields, and plasma shape. It is shown that ignition can be achieved in this device if somewhat better than L-mode energy confinement time scaling is possible. We also conclude that the performance of such a compact, short-pulse device can depend greatly on how the plasma is evolved to its flat-top parameters. Furthermore, in cases such as the ones discussed here, where there is not a great deal of ignition margin and the electron density is held constant, ignition ends if the helium ash is not removed. In general, control of the deuterium--tritium density is equivalent to burn control. 48 refs., 15 figs.

  8. Time-dependent response of hydrogels under constrained swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A. D.; Sommer-Larsen, P.; Christiansen, J. deClaville; Sanporean, C.-G.

    2014-06-01

    Constitutive equations are developed for the viscoplastic behavior of covalently cross-linked hydrogels subjected to swelling. The ability of the model to describe the time-dependent response is confirmed by comparison of results of simulation with observations on partially swollen poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) gel specimens in uniaxial tensile tests with a constant strain rate and tensile relaxation tests. The stress-strain relations are applied to study the kinetics of unconstrained and constrained swelling. The following conclusions are drawn from numerical analysis: (i) maximum water uptake under constrained swelling a viscoplastic hydrogel is lower than that for unconstrained swelling of its elastic counterpart and exceeds maximum water uptake under constrained swelling of the elastic gel, (ii) when the rate of water diffusion exceeds the rate of plastic flow in a polymer network, swelling curves (mass uptake versus time) for viscoplastic gels under constraints demonstrate characteristic features of non-Fickian diffusion.

  9. Light pressure of time-dependent fields in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidler, A.; Schnabl, H.; Mulser, P.

    1985-01-01

    An expression of the light pressure Pi is derived for the case of a nearly monochromatic electromagnetic wave with arbitrarily time-dependent amplitude. Thereby Pi is defined as the time-averaged force density exerted on a plasma by the wave. The resulting equations are valid for both transverse and longitudinal waves. The light pressure turns out to consist of two components: the well-known gradient-type term and a new nonstationary solenoidal term. This is true for warm as well as cold plasmas. The importance of the new term for the generation of static magnetic fields is shown, and a model in which shear forces may result is given. Formulas for the nonstationary light pressure developed previously are discussed.

  10. Rate and time dependent failure of structural adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, H. F.; Renieri, M. P.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Studies on two adhesives (Metlbond 1113 and 1113-2) identified as having important applications in the bonding of composite materials are presented. A testing program to ascertain stress-strain, strain-rate, time, yield, and/or failure behavior of these materials in bulk form using uniaxial tensile constant strain-rate, creep, and relaxation tests is described. The stress-strain behavior of each material is shown to be significantly rate dependent. A rate dependent stress whitening (crazing) phenomenon occurs prior to either yield or fracture. A region of linear elasticity, a region of viscoelasticity, and the onset of yielding are identified in the stress-strain behavior. The linear elastic limit and the yield point are shown to be rate dependent and agree well with an empirical equation proposed by Ludwik. A creep to failure phenomenon is shown to exist and is correlated with a delayed yield equation proposed by Crochet. Analytical predictions based on a modified Bingham model are shown to agree well with experimental stress-strain strain-rate data. Analytical predictions based on a modified Ramberg-Osgood equation are also shown for comparison purposes.

  11. Time dependent patient no-show predictive modelling development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Li; Hanauer, David A

    2016-05-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop evident-based predictive no-show models considering patients' each past appointment status, a time-dependent component, as an independent predictor to improve predictability. Design/methodology/approach - A ten-year retrospective data set was extracted from a pediatric clinic. It consisted of 7,291 distinct patients who had at least two visits along with their appointment characteristics, patient demographics, and insurance information. Logistic regression was adopted to develop no-show models using two-thirds of the data for training and the remaining data for validation. The no-show threshold was then determined based on minimizing the misclassification of show/no-show assignments. There were a total of 26 predictive model developed based on the number of available past appointments. Simulation was employed to test the effective of each model on costs of patient wait time, physician idle time, and overtime. Findings - The results demonstrated the misclassification rate and the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic gradually improved as more appointment history was included until around the 20th predictive model. The overbooking method with no-show predictive models suggested incorporating up to the 16th model and outperformed other overbooking methods by as much as 9.4 per cent in the cost per patient while allowing two additional patients in a clinic day. Research limitations/implications - The challenge now is to actually implement the no-show predictive model systematically to further demonstrate its robustness and simplicity in various scheduling systems. Originality/value - This paper provides examples of how to build the no-show predictive models with time-dependent components to improve the overbooking policy. Accurately identifying scheduled patients' show/no-show status allows clinics to proactively schedule patients to reduce the negative impact of patient no-shows. PMID:27142954

  12. Time-dependent simulations of disk-embedded planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stökl, A.; Dorfi, E. A.

    2014-03-01

    At the early stages of evolution of planetary systems, young Earth-like planets still embedded in the protoplanetary disk accumulate disk gas gravitationally into planetary atmospheres. The established way to study such atmospheres are hydrostatic models, even though in many cases the assumption of stationarity is unlikely to be fulfilled. Furthermore, such models rely on the specification of a planetary luminosity, attributed to a continuous, highly uncertain accretion of planetesimals onto the surface of the solid core. We present for the first time time-dependent, dynamic simulations of the accretion of nebula gas into an atmosphere around a proto-planet and the evolution of such embedded atmospheres while integrating the thermal energy budget of the solid core. The spherical symmetric models computed with the TAPIR-Code (short for The adaptive, implicit RHD-Code) range from the surface of the rocky core up to the Hill radius where the surrounding protoplanetary disk provides the boundary conditions. The TAPIR-Code includes the hydrodynamics equations, gray radiative transport and convective energy transport. The results indicate that diskembedded planetary atmospheres evolve along comparatively simple outlines and in particular settle, dependent on the mass of the solid core, at characteristic surface temperatures and planetary luminosities, quite independent on numerical parameters and initial conditions. For sufficiently massive cores, this evolution ultimately also leads to runaway accretion and the formation of a gas planet.

  13. Inverse problem of quadratic time-dependent Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guang-Jie; Meng, Yan; Chang, Hong; Duan, Hui-Zeng; Di, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Using an algebraic approach, it is possible to obtain the temporal evolution wave function for a Gaussian wave-packet obeying the quadratic time-dependent Hamiltonian (QTDH). However, in general, most of the practical cases are not exactly solvable, for we need general solutions of the Riccatti equations which are not generally known. We therefore bypass directly solving for the temporal evolution wave function, and study its inverse problem. We start with a particular evolution of the wave-packet, and get the required Hamiltonian by using the inverse method. The inverse approach opens up a new way to find new exact solutions to the QTDH. Some typical examples are studied in detail. For a specific time-dependent periodic harmonic oscillator, the Berry phase is obtained exactly. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11347171), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province of China (Grant No. A2012108003), and the Key Project of Educational Commission of Hebei Province of China (Grant No. ZD2014052).

  14. Spike-timing dependent plasticity in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Fino, Elodie; Venance, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The striatum is the major input nucleus of basal ganglia, an ensemble of interconnected sub-cortical nuclei associated with fundamental processes of action-selection and procedural learning and memory. The striatum receives afferents from the cerebral cortex and the thalamus. In turn, it relays the integrated information towards the basal ganglia output nuclei through which it operates a selected activation of behavioral effectors. The striatal output neurons, the GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs), are in charge of the detection and integration of behaviorally relevant information. This property confers to the striatum the ability to extract relevant information from the background noise and select cognitive-motor sequences adapted to environmental stimuli. As long-term synaptic efficacy changes are believed to underlie learning and memory, the corticostriatal long-term plasticity provides a fundamental mechanism for the function of the basal ganglia in procedural learning. Here, we reviewed the different forms of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) occurring at corticostriatal synapses. Most of the studies have focused on MSNs and their ability to develop long-term plasticity. Nevertheless, the striatal interneurons (the fast-spiking GABAergic, NO-synthase and cholinergic interneurons) also receive monosynaptic afferents from the cortex and tightly regulated corticostriatal information processing. Therefore, it is important to take into account the variety of striatal neurons to fully understand the ability of striatum to develop long-term plasticity. Corticostriatal STDP with various spike-timing dependence have been observed depending on the neuronal sub-populations and experimental conditions. This complexity highlights the extraordinary potentiality in term of plasticity of the corticostriatal pathway. PMID:21423492

  15. The IMF dependence of the local time of transpolar arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fear, R.; Milan, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    Transpolar arcs or polar cap arcs are auroral features which are observed within the polar cap. They occur predominantly during intervals of northward IMF (Berkey et al., 1976). There is mixed evidence for IMF BY control of the local time at which the arcs initially form; Gussenhoven (1982) found that polar cap arcs formed preferentially post-midnight when BY < 0 (evaluated over 1 or 2 hours preceding the start of the arc) and pre-midnight when BY > 0, whereas Valladares et al (1991) found no clear dependency. The only previous statistical study of globally-imaged transpolar arcs (Kullen et al., 2002) found differing results for moving and non-moving arcs, concluding that three different models were required to identify (i) moving arcs, (ii) stationary arcs near the dawn/dusk portion of the main oval, and (iii) stationary arcs in the midnight sector. In this presentation, we show the results of a statistical study of 131 transpolar arcs observed by the FUV cameras on the IMAGE satellite between June 2000 and September 2005. We find that arcs tend to form following the same dependency on BY as identified by Gussenhoven (1982), whether moving or not. We find that the correlation between the magnetic local time at which the arc forms and the IMF BY component is relatively weak if the IMF is only averaged over the hour preceding the arc formation, but becomes stronger if the IMF is evaluated between 1 and 4 hours before the arc first forms. This is consistent with the timescale that is expected for newly-opened magnetospheric flux to reach the magnetotail plasma sheet (Dungey, 1961; Milan et al., 2007), and is therefore consistent with the suggestion that transpolar arcs map to the plasma sheet. We suggest that the similar dependence of stationary and moving arcs on the IMF BY component might imply that it is possible to explain both types of arc in terms of a single mechanism.

  16. Nonpreemptive run-time scheduling issues on a multitasked, multiprogrammed multiprocessor with dependencies, bidimensional tasks, folding and dynamic graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Allan Ray

    1987-05-01

    Increases in high speed hardware have mandated studies in software techniques to exploit the parallel capabilities. This thesis examines the effects a run-time scheduler has on a multiprocessor. The model consists of directed, acyclic graphs, generated from serial FORTRAN benchmark programs by the parallel compiler Parafrase. A multitasked, multiprogrammed environment is created. Dependencies are generated by the compiler. Tasks are bidimensional, i.e., they may specify both time and processor requests. Processor requests may be folded into execution time by the scheduler. The graphs may arrive at arbitrary time intervals. The general case is NP-hard, thus, a variety of heuristics are examined by a simulator. Multiprogramming demonstrates a greater need for a run-time scheduler than does monoprogramming for a variety of reasons, e.g., greater stress on the processors, a larger number of independent control paths, more variety in the task parameters, etc. The dynamic critical path series of algorithms perform well. Dynamic critical volume did not add much. Unfortunately, dynamic critical path maximizes turnaround time as well as throughput. Two schedulers are presented which balance throughput and turnaround time. The first requires classification of jobs by type; the second requires selection of a ratio value which is dependent upon system parameters. 45 refs., 19 figs., 20 tabs.

  17. Time dependency of molecular evolutionary rates? Yes and no.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sankar; Lambert, David M

    2011-01-01

    Some previous studies have suggested that rates of evolution inferred using molecular sequences vary substantially depending on the time frame over which they are measured, whereas a number of other studies have argued against this proposition. We examined this issue by separating positions of primate mitochondrial genomes that are under different levels of selection constraints. Our results revealed an order of magnitude variation in the evolutionary rates at constrained sites (including nonsynonymous sites, D-loop, and RNA) and virtually an identical rate of evolution at synonymous sites, independent of the timescales over which they were estimated. Although the evolutionary rate at nonsynonymous sites obtained using the European (H1 haplogroup) mitogenomes is 9-15 times higher than that estimated using the human-chimpanzee pair, in contrast, the rates at synonymous sites are similar between these comparisons. We also show that the ratio of divergence at nonsynonymous to synonymous sites estimated using intra- and interspecific comparisons vary up to nine times, which corroborates our results independent of calibration times. PMID:22016336

  18. Time Dependency of Molecular Evolutionary Rates? Yes and No

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sankar; Lambert, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Some previous studies have suggested that rates of evolution inferred using molecular sequences vary substantially depending on the time frame over which they are measured, whereas a number of other studies have argued against this proposition. We examined this issue by separating positions of primate mitochondrial genomes that are under different levels of selection constraints. Our results revealed an order of magnitude variation in the evolutionary rates at constrained sites (including nonsynonymous sites, D-loop, and RNA) and virtually an identical rate of evolution at synonymous sites, independent of the timescales over which they were estimated. Although the evolutionary rate at nonsynonymous sites obtained using the European (H1 haplogroup) mitogenomes is 9–15 times higher than that estimated using the human–chimpanzee pair, in contrast, the rates at synonymous sites are similar between these comparisons. We also show that the ratio of divergence at nonsynonymous to synonymous sites estimated using intra- and interspecific comparisons vary up to nine times, which corroborates our results independent of calibration times. PMID:22016336

  19. Quasiequilibrium directed hopping in a time-dependent two-well periodic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, V. M.; Shapochkina, I. V.

    2011-11-01

    We consider the directed motion of a Brownian particle in a two-well periodic potential with time-varying barriers and wells described by arbitrary periodic functions of time, v(t) and u(t), alternating with the period τ. In the framework of the low-temperature kinetic approach, we obtain explicit formulas for the probabilities of finding the particle in potential wells, average velocity of directed motion, input energy Pin and useful work Pout against additionally introduced stationary load force f. These formulas are considerably simplified by the assumption of the quasiequilibrium regime of motion corresponding to small values of u(t) and f. It is shown that depending on the same or opposite parity of the functions v(t) and u(t) with respect to time reversal, the motion direction of a Brownian particle is retained or reversed under the reversal of the direction of movement along the (v-u) loop in the phase space of the functions v(t) and u(t), and the nondiagonal kinetic coefficients are mutually symmetric or antisymmetric. In the adiabatic limit τ→∞, the average velocity is proportional to τ-1 in two cases: (i) the above loop has a nonzero area, (ii) the functions v(t) and u(t) are proportional to each other (zero loop area) and include intervals of fast changes with small durations τ0 on the period τ of their variations. In both of these cases, the efficiency of energy conversion, η=Pout/Pin, tends to unity at large variations of the barriers v(t). In the second case, the deviation of η from unity can be split into two contributions: The former decreases exponentially with increasing amplitude v0 of v(t), while the latter is a small nonadiabatic correction proportional to v0-3/2. It is the nonadiabatic correction that limits high efficiencies at large variations of barriers.

  20. Reconsolidation of Motor Memories Is a Time-Dependent Process

    PubMed Central

    de Beukelaar, Toon T.; Woolley, Daniel G.; Alaerts, Kaat; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Reconsolidation is observed when a consolidated stable memory is recalled, which renders it transiently labile and requires re-stabilization. Motor memory reconsolidation has previously been demonstrated using a three-day design: on day 1 the memory is encoded, on day 2 it is reactivated and experimentally manipulated, and on day 3 memory strength is tested. The aim of the current study is to determine specific boundary conditions in order to consistently degrade motor memory through reconsolidation paradigms. We investigated a sequence tapping task (n = 48) with the typical three-day design and confirmed that reactivating the motor sequence briefly (10 times tapping the learned motor sequence) destabilizes the memory trace and makes it susceptible to behavioral interference. By systematically varying the time delay between memory reactivation and interference while keeping all other aspect constant we found that a short delay (i.e., 20 s) significantly decreased performance on day 3, whereas performance was maintained or small (but not significant) improvements were observed for longer delays (i.e., 60 s). We also tested a statistical model that assumed a linear effect of the different time delays (0 s, 20 s, 40 s, 60 s) on the performance changes from day 2 to day 3. This linear model revealed a significant effect consistent with the interpretation that increasing time delays caused a gradual change from performance degradation to performance conservation across groups. These findings indicate that re-stabilizing motor sequence memories during reconsolidation does not solely rely on additional motor practice but occurs with the passage of time. This study provides further support for the hypothesis that reconsolidation is a time-dependent process with a transition phase from destabilization to re-stabilization. PMID:27582698

  1. Reconsolidation of Motor Memories Is a Time-Dependent Process.

    PubMed

    de Beukelaar, Toon T; Woolley, Daniel G; Alaerts, Kaat; Swinnen, Stephan P; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Reconsolidation is observed when a consolidated stable memory is recalled, which renders it transiently labile and requires re-stabilization. Motor memory reconsolidation has previously been demonstrated using a three-day design: on day 1 the memory is encoded, on day 2 it is reactivated and experimentally manipulated, and on day 3 memory strength is tested. The aim of the current study is to determine specific boundary conditions in order to consistently degrade motor memory through reconsolidation paradigms. We investigated a sequence tapping task (n = 48) with the typical three-day design and confirmed that reactivating the motor sequence briefly (10 times tapping the learned motor sequence) destabilizes the memory trace and makes it susceptible to behavioral interference. By systematically varying the time delay between memory reactivation and interference while keeping all other aspect constant we found that a short delay (i.e., 20 s) significantly decreased performance on day 3, whereas performance was maintained or small (but not significant) improvements were observed for longer delays (i.e., 60 s). We also tested a statistical model that assumed a linear effect of the different time delays (0 s, 20 s, 40 s, 60 s) on the performance changes from day 2 to day 3. This linear model revealed a significant effect consistent with the interpretation that increasing time delays caused a gradual change from performance degradation to performance conservation across groups. These findings indicate that re-stabilizing motor sequence memories during reconsolidation does not solely rely on additional motor practice but occurs with the passage of time. This study provides further support for the hypothesis that reconsolidation is a time-dependent process with a transition phase from destabilization to re-stabilization. PMID:27582698

  2. Grover's quantum search algorithm for an arbitrary initial mixed state

    SciTech Connect

    Biham, Eli; Kenigsberg, Dan

    2002-12-01

    The Grover quantum search algorithm is generalized to deal with an arbitrary mixed initial state. The probability to measure a marked state as a function of time is calculated, and found to depend strongly on the specific initial state. The form of the function, though, remains as it is in the case of initial pure state. We study the role of the von Neumann entropy of the initial state, and show that the entropy cannot be a measure for the usefulness of the algorithm. We give few examples and show that for some extremely mixed initial states (carrying high entropy), the generalized Grover algorithm is considerably faster than any classical algorithm.

  3. Solving Nonlinear Euler Equations with Arbitrary Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program that efficiently solves the time-dependent, nonlinear Euler equations in two dimensions to an arbitrarily high order of accuracy has been developed. The program implements a modified form of a prior arbitrary- accuracy simulation algorithm that is a member of the class of algorithms known in the art as modified expansion solution approximation (MESA) schemes. Whereas millions of lines of code were needed to implement the prior MESA algorithm, it is possible to implement the present MESA algorithm by use of one or a few pages of Fortran code, the exact amount depending on the specific application. The ability to solve the Euler equations to arbitrarily high accuracy is especially beneficial in simulations of aeroacoustic effects in settings in which fully nonlinear behavior is expected - for example, at stagnation points of fan blades, where linearizing assumptions break down. At these locations, it is necessary to solve the full nonlinear Euler equations, and inasmuch as the acoustical energy is of the order of 4 to 5 orders of magnitude below that of the mean flow, it is necessary to achieve an overall fractional error of less than 10-6 in order to faithfully simulate entropy, vortical, and acoustical waves.

  4. Time dependence of energy storage across multiple ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D. E.; Frank, J. M.; Ewers, B. E.; Desai, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Energy flow through ecosystems plays a critical role in processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales, from monthly growing season length of landscapes to sub-diurnal responses of soil respiration to temperature, photosynthesis and water inputs. The interaction of solar radiation and ecosystems is complex with terrestrial canopies and aquatic structure both connecting above- and below-ground processes via energy fluxes. Previous work by Leuning et al has shown that at 30-minute timescales, only 8% of eddy covariance sites in the La Thuile dataset observe energy closure and when averaged to 24-hour timescales, this goes up to 45%. This work examines the effect of temporal lags in energy storage in both terrestrial (shrub and forest) and aquatic (lake) ecosystems. Analyses show energy storage terms have unique temporal lags that vary between ecosystem and time of year, from having zero lag to several hour timescales within terrestrial ecosystems, depending primarily on water content. Large differences between ecosystem types are also highlighted as aquatic ecosystems have lags that range between daily and monthly timescales. Furthermore, ecosystem disturbance can alter time lags as well and results from a native bark beetle disturbance show vegetation lag decreasing while soil lag increasing following changes in water content. Energy storage lags can improve site energy closure by several percent, and these results will lead to a better understanding of surface energy budget closure, an as-of-yet unresolved issue in the flux community, as well as highlighting the importance of time-dependency of ecosystem energy fluxes as a unique method to examine ecosystem processes.

  5. Time-Dependent, Parallel Neutral Particle Transport Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-09-10

    Version 00 PARTISN (PARallel, TIme-Dependent SN) is the evolutionary successor to CCC-547/DANTSYS. The PARTISN code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent or dependent multigroup discrete ordinates form of the Boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, the Solver Module, and themore » Edit Module, respectively. PARTISN is the evolutionary successor to the DANTSYSTM code system package. The Input and Edit Modules in PARTISN are very similar to those in DANTSYS. However, unlike DANTSYS, the Solver Module in PARTISN contains one, two, and three-dimensional solvers in a single module. In addition to the diamond-differencing method, the Solver Module also has Adaptive Weighted Diamond-Differencing (AWDD), Linear Discontinuous (LD), and Exponential Discontinuous (ED) spatial differencing methods. The spatial mesh may consist of either a standard orthogonal mesh or a block adaptive orthogonal mesh. The Solver Module may be run in parallel for two and three dimensional problems. One can now run 1-D problems in parallel using Energy Domain Decomposition (triggered by Block 5 input keyword npeg>0). EDD can also be used in 2-D/3-D with or without our standard Spatial Domain Decomposition. Both the static (fixed source or eigenvalue) and time-dependent forms of the transport equation are solved in forward or adjoint mode. In addition, PARTISN now has a probabilistic mode for Probability of Initiation (static) and Probability of Survival (dynamic) calculations. Vacuum, reflective, periodic, white, or inhomogeneous boundary conditions are solved. General anisotropic scattering and inhomogeneous sources are permitted. PARTISN solves the transport equation on orthogonal (single level or block-structured AMR) grids in 1-D

  6. Prominence oscillations: Effect of a time-dependent background temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, J. L.; Carbonell, M.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Small amplitude oscillations in prominences have been known about for a long time, and from a theoretical point of view, these oscillations have been interpreted in terms of standing or propagating linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In general, these oscillations were studied by producing small perturbations in a background equilibrium with stationary physical properties. Aims: Taking into account that prominences are dynamic plasma structures, the assumption of a stationary equilibrium is not realistic. Therefore, our main aim is to study the effects produced by a non-stationary background on slow MHD waves, which could be responsible for prominence oscillations. Methods: Assuming that the radiation term is proportional to temperature and constant external heating, we have derived an expression for the temporal variation of the background temperature, which depends on the imbalance between heating and cooling processes. Furthermore, radiative losses, together with parallel thermal conduction, have also been included as damping mechanisms for the waves. Results: As temperature increases with time, the period of slow waves decreases and the amplitude of the velocity perturbations is damped. The inclusion of radiative losses enhances the damping. As temperature decreases with time, the period of slow waves increases and the amplitude of velocity perturbations grows while, as expected, the inclusion of radiative losses contributes to the damping of oscillations. Conclusions: There is observational evidence that, in different locations of the same prominence, oscillations are damped or amplified with time. This temporal damping or amplification can be obtained by a proper combination of a variable background temperature, together with radiative damping. Furthermore, decayless oscillations can also be obtained with an appropriate choice of the characteristic radiation time.

  7. Radiation dependence of inverter propagation delay from timing sampler measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.; Lin, Y.-S.

    1989-01-01

    A timing sampler consisting of 14 four-stage inverter-pair chains with different load capacitances was fabricated in 1.6-micron n-well CMOS and irradiated with cobalt-60 at 10 rad(Si)/s. For this CMOS process the measured results indicate that the rising delay increases by about 2.2 ns/Mrad(Si) and the falling delay increase is very small, i.e., less than 300 ps/Mrad(Si). The amount of radiation-induced delay depends on the size of the load capacitance. The maximum value observed for this effect was 5.65 ns/pF-Mrad(Si). Using a sensitivity analysis, the sensitivity of the rising delay to radiation can be explained by a simple timing model and the radiation sensitivity of dc MOSFET parameters. This same approach could not explain the insensitivity of the falling delay to radiation. This may be due to a failure of the timing model and/or trapping effects.

  8. Local time dependences of oxygen ENA periodicities at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbary, J. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Brandt, P. C.

    2014-08-01

    The periodicities of energetic neutral atoms (90-170 keV oxygens) at Saturn are determined by applying Lomb-Scargle periodogram analyses to energetic neutral atom (ENA) fluxes observed in eight local time sectors of the equatorial plane between 5 and 15 RS (1 RS = 60,268 km). The analyses come from four long intervals (>180 days each) of high-latitude viewing from 2007 to 2013 and represent an essentially global view of Saturn's periodicities. The periodograms display rich and complex structures in local time. Sectors near midnight generally exhibit the strongest periodicities (in terms of highest signal-to-noise ratios) and often show the dual or single periods of the Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR). Sectors near noon display single or multiple periodicities or none. Furthermore, dayside periods may be much shorter (~10.3 h) than SKR periods. Sectors near dawn or dusk display periodicities intermediate between midnight and noon or may show no periodicities whatsoever. These patterns of local time dependence do not remain constant from interval to interval.

  9. Time-dependent density functional theory of extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulenburger, Luke; Desjarlais, Michael; Magyar, Rudolph

    2013-04-01

    We describe the challenges involved when using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to describe warm dense matter (WDM) within a plane-wave, real-time formulation. WDM occurs under conditions of temperature and pressure (over 1000 K and 1 Mbar) where plasma physics meets condensed matter physics. TDDFT is especially important in this regime as it can describe ions and electrons strongly out of equilibrium. Several theoretical challenges must be overcome including assignment of initial state orbitals, choice of time-propogation scheme, treatment of PAW potentials, and inclusion of non-adiabatic effects in the potential energy surfaces. The results of these simulations are critical in several applications. For example, we will explain how the TDDFT calculation can resolve modeling inconsistencies in X-ray Thompson cross-sections, thereby improving an important temperature diagnostic in experiments. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Dependence of aqua-planet simulations on time step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, David L.; Olson, Jerry G.

    2003-04-01

    decreases the convection there. The behaviour of the parametrizations depends on the amount of water inserted into the troposphere during a discrete time step. This is as important as the rate of insertion. Experiments are described that support this explanation.

  11. Using time-dependent density functional theory in real time for calculating electronic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffhauser, Philipp; Kümmel, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We present a scheme for calculating electronic transport within the propagation approach to time-dependent density functional theory. Our scheme is based on solving the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations on grids in real space and real time for a finite system. We use absorbing and antiabsorbing boundaries for simulating the coupling to a source and a drain. The boundaries are designed to minimize the effects of quantum-mechanical reflections and electrical polarization build-up, which are the major obstacles when calculating transport by applying an external bias to a finite system. We show that the scheme can readily be applied to real molecules by calculating the current through a conjugated molecule as a function of time. By comparing to literature results for the conjugated molecule and to analytic results for a one-dimensional model system we demonstrate the reliability of the concept.

  12. Optical response of extended systems from time-dependent Hartree-Fock and time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, Leonardo; Webster, Ross; Tomić, Stanko; Harrison, Nicholas M.

    2012-05-01

    We describe a unified formulation of time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TD-HF) and time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) for the accurate and efficient calculation of the optical response of infinite (periodic) systems. The method is formulated within the linear-response approximation, but it can easily be extended to include higher-order response contributions, and, in TD-DFT, it can treat with comparable computational efficiency purely local, semi-local or fully non-local approximations for the ground-state exchange-correlation (XC) functional and for the response TD-DFT XC kernel in the adiabatic approximation. At variance with existing methods for computing excitation energies based on the diagonalisation of suitable coupling matrices, or on the inversion of a dielectric matrix, our approach exploits an iterative procedure similar to a standard self-consistent field calculation. This results in a particularly efficient treatment of the coupling of excitations at different k points in the Brillouin zone. As a consequence, our method has the potential to describe completely from first principles the optically induced formation of bound particle-hole pairs in wide classes of materials. This point is illustrated by computing the optical gaps of a series of representative bulk semiconductors, (non-spin polarised) oxides and ionic insulators.

  13. Measurement of time-dependent fractal dimension for time series of silicon content in pig iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi-Min

    2007-03-01

    This work applies the rescaled range analysis and fractal dimension technique to analyze the time series on silicon content in pig iron for detecting the inherent mechanism that governs blast furnace iron making process. The results show that there is time-dependent fractal feature and deterministic mechanism in blast furnace (BF) ironmaking process, which is helpful to gain deeper understanding of BF ironmaking process and also provide a powerful tool to solve the prediction of the silicon content in pig iron.

  14. On the time evolution operator for time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, F. M.

    1989-07-01

    The Schr/umlt o/dinger equation with a time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian isinvestigated. The time-evolution operator is written as a product of exponentialoperators determined by the Heisenberg equations of motion. This productoperator is shown to be global in the occupation number representation when theHamiltonian is Hermitian. The success of some physical applications of theproduct-form representation is explained.

  15. All-electron time-dependent density functional theory with finite elements: time-propagation approach.

    PubMed

    Lehtovaara, Lauri; Havu, Ville; Puska, Martti

    2011-10-21

    We present an all-electron method for time-dependent density functional theory which employs hierarchical nonuniform finite-element bases and the time-propagation approach. The method is capable of treating linear and nonlinear response of valence and core electrons to an external field. We also introduce (i) a preconditioner for the propagation equation, (ii) a stable way to implement absorbing boundary conditions, and (iii) a new kind of absorbing boundary condition inspired by perfectly matched layers. PMID:22029294

  16. Immersion Freezing of Clay Minerals and its Time Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Moehler, O.; Bundke, U.; Cziczo, D. J.; Danielczok, A.; Ebert, M.; Garimella, S.; Hoffmann, N.; Kanji, Z. A.; Kiselev, A. A.; Raddatz, M.; Stetzer, O.

    2012-12-01

    Immersion ice nucleation efficiency of clay minerals has been investigated using the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber. Various clay dust samples, including two illite as well as three kaolinite standards, have been examined in the temperature range between 238 K and 255 K. We observed two trends in immersion ice nucleation properties as cloud expansion conditions in the AIDA are varied. First, as previously described in the literature, the supersaturation required for the immersion freezing of clay minerals decreased with decreasing temperature and increasing inferred ice-active surface site densities. Second, the ice nucleation activity of clay minerals strongly depended on the solo-parameter, which is the rate change in temperature (i.e., dNice/dT = ∂Nice/∂t ÷ ∂T/∂t). Further time dependence of ice formation is investigated and discussed as a function of cooling rates, ice nuclei (IN), and aerosol concentrations. Ice residuals collected through a pumped counterflow virtual impactor are examined by electron microprobe analyses to seek the true chemical and physical identity of IN in clay minerals. Brief comparisons of AIDA measurement to the measurements with other ice nucleation chambers (e.g., ETH-PINC, FINCH, and commercially available DMT-SPIN) are also presented.

  17. Time-dependent buoyant puff model for explosive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kansa, E.J.

    1997-10-01

    This paper presents a new model for explosive puff rise histories that is derived from the strong conservative form of the partial differential equations of mass, momenta, and total energy that are integrated over space to yield a coupled system of time dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). By allowing the dimensions of the puff to evolve laterally and horizontally, the initial rising spherical shaped puff evolves into a rising ellipsoidal shaped mushroom cloud. This model treats the turbulence that is generated by the puff itself and the ambient atmospheric turbulence as separate mechanisms in determining the puff history. The puff rise history was found to depend not only upon the mass and initial temperature of the explosion, but also upon the local stability conditions of the ambient atmosphere through which the puff rises. This model was calibrated by comparison with the Roller Coaster experiments, ranging from unstable to very stable atmospheric conditions; the agreement of the model history curves with these experimental curves was within 10%.

  18. Mixed-mode, time-dependent rubber/metal debonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liechti, Kenneth M.; Wu, Jeng-Dah

    2001-05-01

    This paper examines the need to incorporate a rate-dependent traction-separation law in order to model quasi-static debonding between rubber and metal. A pseudo-stress model was used to account for the nonlinear, multi-axial and time-dependent nature of the filled rubber that was used in the experiments. The parameters for the traction-separation law were extracted on the basis of measurements of load, crack length and crack opening displacements in an opening mode experiment at one applied displacement rate. The form of the traction-separation law was consistent with observations of ligament content on the metal fracture surface. Additional experiments were then conducted in opening mode at different rates and in mixed mode with positive and negative shear so that comparisons with predictions from the calibrated cohesive zone model could be made. The crack length history proved to be the most discriminating measure of the validity of the model, which was most effective at higher loading rates.

  19. Time-dependent corticosteroid modulation of prefrontal working memory processing

    PubMed Central

    Henckens, Marloes J. A. G.; van Wingen, Guido A.; Joëls, Marian; Fernández, Guillén

    2011-01-01

    Corticosteroids are potent modulators of human higher cognitive function. They are released in response to stress, and are thought to be involved in the modulation of cognitive function by inducing distinct rapid nongenomic, and slow genomic changes, affecting neural plasticity throughout the brain. However, their exact effects on the neural correlates of higher-order cognitive function as performed by the prefrontal cortex at the human brain system level remain to be elucidated. Here, we targeted these time-dependent effects of corticosteroids on prefrontal cortex processing in humans using a working memory (WM) paradigm during functional MRI scanning. Implementing a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 72 young, healthy men received 10 mg hydrocortisone either 30 min (rapid corticosteroid effects) or 240 min (slow corticosteroid effects), or placebo before a numerical n-back task with differential load (0- to 3-back). Corticosteroids’ slow effects appeared to improve working memory performance and increased neuronal activity during WM performance in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex depending on WM load, whereas no effects of corticosteroids’ rapid actions were observed. Thereby, the slow actions of corticosteroids seem to facilitate adequate higher-order cognitive functioning, which may support recovery in the aftermath of stress exposure. PMID:21436038

  20. SYMTRAN - A Time-dependent Symmetric Tandem Mirror Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, D; Fowler, T

    2004-06-15

    A time-dependent version of the steady-state radial transport model in symmetric tandem mirrors in Ref. [1] has been coded up and first tests performed. Our code, named SYMTRAN, is an adaptation of the earlier SPHERE code for spheromaks, now modified for tandem mirror physics. Motivated by Post's new concept of kinetic stabilization of symmetric mirrors, it is an extension of the earlier TAMRAC rate-equation code omitting radial transport [2], which successfully accounted for experimental results in TMX. The SYMTRAN code differs from the earlier tandem mirror radial transport code TMT in that our code is focused on axisymmetric tandem mirrors and classical diffusion, whereas TMT emphasized non-ambipolar transport in TMX and MFTF-B due to yin-yang plugs and non-symmetric transitions between the plugs and axisymmetric center cell. Both codes exhibit interesting but different non-linear behavior.

  1. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-01

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  2. Time-dependent reliability analysis of ceramic engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.

    1993-01-01

    The computer program CARES/LIFE calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/or proof test loading. This program is an extension of the CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program. CARES/LIFE accounts for the phenomenon of subcritical crack growth (SCG) by utilizing either the power or Paris law relations. The two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function is used to characterize the variation in component strength. The effects of multiaxial stresses are modeled using either the principle of independent action (PIA), the Weibull normal stress averaging method (NSA), or the Batdorf theory. Inert strength and fatigue parameters are estimated from rupture strength data of naturally flawed specimens loaded in static, dynamic, or cyclic fatigue. Two example problems demonstrating proof testing and fatigue parameter estimation are given.

  3. Doppler tracking in time-dependent cosmological spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulini, Domenico; Carrera, Matteo

    I will discuss the theoretical problems associated with Doppler tracking in time dependent background geometries, where ordinary Newtonian kinematics fails. A derivation of an exact general-relativistic formula for the two-way Doppler tracking of a spacecraft in homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetimes is presented, as well as a controlled approximation in McVittie spacetimes representing an FLRW background with a single spherically-symmetric inhomogeneity (e.g. a single star or black hole). The leading-order corrections of the acceleration as compared to the Newtonian expression are calculated, which are due to retardation and cosmological expansion and which in the Solar System turn out to be significantly below the scale (nanometer per square-second) set by the Pioneer Anomaly. Last, but not least, I discuss kinematical ambiguities connected with notions of "simultaneity" and "spatial distance", which, in principle, also lead to tracking corrections.

  4. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  5. A time dependent anatomically detailed model of cardiac conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxberg, B. E.; Grumbach, M. P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the determinants of transitions in cardiac electrical activity from normal patterns to dysrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation, we are constructing an anatomically and physiologically detailed finite element simulation of myocardial electrical propagation. A healthy human heart embedded in paraffin was sectioned to provide a detailed anatomical substrate for model calculations. The simulation of propagation includes anisotropy in conduction velocity due to fiber orientation as well as gradients in conduction velocities, absolute and relative refractory periods, action potential duration and electrotonic influence of nearest neighbors. The model also includes changes in the behaviour of myocardial tissue as a function of the past local activity. With this model, we can examine the significance of fiber orientation and time dependence of local propagation parameters on dysrhythmogenesis.

  6. Time dependent electronic transport in chiral edge channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-02-01

    We study time dependent electronic transport along the chiral edge channels of the quantum Hall regime, focusing on the role of Coulomb interaction. In the low frequency regime, the a.c. conductance can be derived from a lumped element description of the circuit. At higher frequencies, the propagation equations of the Coulomb coupled edge channels need to be solved. As a consequence of the interchannel coupling, a charge pulse emitted in a given channel fractionalized in several pulses. In particular, Coulomb interaction between channels leads to the fractionalization of a charge pulse emitted in a given channel in several pulses. We finally study how the Coulomb interaction, and in particular the fractionalization process, affects the propagation of a single electron in the circuit. All the above-mentioned topics are illustrated by experimental realizations.

  7. Time-dependent reliability analysis and condition assessment of structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Structures generally play a passive role in assurance of safety in nuclear plant operation, but are important if the plant is to withstand the effect of extreme environmental or abnormal events. Relative to mechanical and electrical components, structural systems and components would be difficult and costly to replace. While the performance of steel or reinforced concrete structures in service generally has been very good, their strengths may deteriorate during an extended service life as a result of changes brought on by an aggressive environment, excessive loading, or accidental loading. Quantitative tools for condition assessment of aging structures can be developed using time-dependent structural reliability analysis methods. Such methods provide a framework for addressing the uncertainties attendant to aging in the decision process.

  8. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Abhronil Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-02

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  9. Measuring time-dependent diffusion in polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilli, Siva P.; Smith, Lloyd V.; Vaithiyalingam, Shutthanandan

    2014-11-01

    Moisture plays a significant role in influencing the mechanical behavior and long-term durability of polymer matrix composites (PMCs). The common methods used to determine the moisture diffusion coefficients of PMCs are based on the solution of Fickian diffusion in the one-dimensional domain. Fick's Law assumes that equilibrium between the material surface and the external vapor is established instantaneously. A time-dependent boundary condition has been shown to improve correlation with some bulk diffusion measurements, but has not been validated experimentally. The surface moisture content in a Toray 800S/3900-2B toughened quasi-isotropic laminate system, [0/±60] s , was analyzed experimentally using Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). It was found that the surface moisture content showed a rapid increase to an intermediate concentration C 0, followed by a slow linear increase to the saturation level.

  10. Retroactive modulation of spike timing-dependent plasticity by dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Brzosko, Zuzanna; Schultz, Wolfram; Paulsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Most reinforcement learning models assume that the reward signal arrives after the activity that led to the reward, placing constraints on the possible underlying cellular mechanisms. Here we show that dopamine, a positive reinforcement signal, can retroactively convert hippocampal timing-dependent synaptic depression into potentiation. This effect requires functional NMDA receptors and is mediated in part through the activation of the cAMP/PKA cascade. Collectively, our results support the idea that reward-related signaling can act on a pre-established synaptic eligibility trace, thereby associating specific experiences with behaviorally distant, rewarding outcomes. This finding identifies a biologically plausible mechanism for solving the ‘distal reward problem’. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09685.001 PMID:26516682

  11. Measuring time-dependent diffusion in polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Pilli, Siva Prasad; Smith, Lloyd V.; Shutthanandan, V.

    2014-11-01

    Moisture plays a significant role in influencing the mechanical behavior and long-term durability of polymer matrix composites (PMC’s). The common methods used to determine the moisture diffusion coefficients of PMCs are based on the solution of Fickian diffusion in the one-dimensional domain. Fick’s Law assumes that equilibrium between the material surface and the external vapor is established instantaneously. A time dependent boundary condition has been shown to improve correlation with some bulk diffusion measurements, but has not been validated experimentally. The surface moisture content in a Toray 800S/3900-2B toughened quasi-isotropic laminate system, [0/±60]s, was analyzed experimentally using Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). It was found that the surface moisture content showed a rapid increase to an intermediate concentration C0, followed by a slow linear increase to the saturation level.

  12. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in a time-dependent box

    PubMed Central

    Campo, A. del; Boshier, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed to drive an ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of an ultracold gas trapped in a time-dependent box potential. The resulting state is free from spurious excitations associated with the breakdown of adiabaticity, and preserves the quantum correlations of the initial state up to a scaling factor. The process relies on the existence of an adiabatic invariant and the inversion of the dynamical self-similar scaling law dictated by it. Its physical implementation generally requires the use of an auxiliary expulsive potential. The method is extended to a broad family of interacting many-body systems. As illustrative examples we consider the ultrafast expansion of a Tonks-Girardeau gas and of Bose-Einstein condensates in different dimensions, where the method exhibits an excellent robustness against different regimes of interactions and the features of an experimentally realizable box potential. PMID:22970340

  13. Translation invariant time-dependent solutions to massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, J.; Steer, D.A. E-mail: steer@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2013-12-01

    Homogeneous time-dependent solutions of massive gravity generalise the plane wave solutions of the linearised Fierz-Pauli equations for a massive spin-two particle, as well as the Kasner solutions of General Relativity. We show that they also allow a clear counting of the degrees of freedom and represent a simplified framework to work out the constraints, the equations of motion and the initial value formulation. We work in the vielbein formulation of massive gravity, find the phase space resulting from the constraints and show that several disconnected sectors of solutions exist some of which are unstable. The initial values determine the sector to which a solution belongs. Classically, the theory is not pathological but quantum mechanically the theory may suffer from instabilities. The latter are not due to an extra ghost-like degree of freedom.

  14. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm-diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  15. Reprint of : Time dependent electronic transport in chiral edge channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-08-01

    We study time dependent electronic transport along the chiral edge channels of the quantum Hall regime, focusing on the role of Coulomb interaction. In the low frequency regime, the a.c. conductance can be derived from a lumped element description of the circuit. At higher frequencies, the propagation equations of the Coulomb coupled edge channels need to be solved. As a consequence of the interchannel coupling, a charge pulse emitted in a given channel fractionalized in several pulses. In particular, Coulomb interaction between channels leads to the fractionalization of a charge pulse emitted in a given channel in several pulses. We finally study how the Coulomb interaction, and in particular the fractionalization process, affects the propagation of a single electron in the circuit. All the above-mentioned topics are illustrated by experimental realizations.

  16. Cosmological consequences of a time-dependent Λ term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J. C.; Lima, J. A. S.; Waga, I.

    1992-09-01

    The phenomenological approach to investigate the decay of the effective cosmological constant, as recently proposed by Chen and Wu, is generalized to include a term proportional to H2 on the time dependence of Λ, where H is the Hubble parameter. This new term can modify some features of the standard Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model and its free parameter may be adjusted in accordance with nucleosynthesis constraints. The model also allows a deceleration parameter q0 assuming negative values so that the density parameter Ω0 is smaller than 2/3 and the age of the Universe is always bigger than H-10. In these cases, the usual matter creation rate appearing in models with a decaying vacuum energy is smaller than the one present in the steady-state model.

  17. Nonlinear fracture mechanics. Volume 1. Time-dependent fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Landes, J.D.; Bassani, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on time-dependent fracture in nonlinear fracture mechanics are presented. Individual subjects considered include: numerical study of non-steady-state creep at stationary crack tips, crack growth in small-scale creep, growth of macroscopic cracks by void coalescence under extensive creeping conditions, creep embrittlement susceptibility and creep crack growth behavior in low-alloy steels, and experimental determination of the high-temperature crack growth behavior of Incoloy 800H. Also discussed are: three-dimensional transient analysis of a dynamically loaded three-point-bend ductile fracture specimen, experimental study of the validity of a Delta J criterion for fatigue crack growth, combined-mode low-cycle fatigue crack growth under torsional loading, fatigue crack-tip mechanics in 7075-T6 aluminum alloy from high-sensitivity displacement field measurements, and nonlinear fracture of concrete and ceramics.

  18. Single trapped ion as a time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, Nicolas C.; Milburn, G. J.

    2007-11-15

    We show how a single trapped ion may be used to test a variety of important physical models realized as time-dependent harmonic oscillators. The ion itself functions as its own motional detector through laser-induced electronic transitions. Alsing et al., [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 220401 (2005)] proposed that an exponentially decaying trap frequency could be used to simulate (thermal) Gibbons-Hawking radiation in an expanding universe, but the Hamiltonian used was incorrect. We apply our general solution to this experimental proposal, correcting the result for a single ion and showing that while the actual spectrum is different from the Gibbons-Hawking case, it nevertheless shares an important experimental signature with this result.

  19. Time-Dependent Model of the Global Electric Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallios, S. A.; Pasko, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Electric Circuit (GEC) is a circuit that is formed between the Earth's surface, which is a good conductor of electricity, and the ionosphere, a weekly-ionized plasma at around 80 km altitude [e.g., Rycroft et al., Space Sci. Rev., 137(1-4), pp. 83-105, 2008]. In the absence of any source, the GEC behaves as a leaky spherical capacitor, with the ground being the negative charged plate and the ionosphere the positive one, which discharges through the weakly conducting atmosphere creating fair-weather current, which is about 1 kA integrated over the entire Earth surface [e.g., Bering et al., Physics Today, Oct., 24-30, 1998]. It is accepted that thunderstorms are the main generators in the GEC [e.g., Williams, Atmospheric Research, 91, 140, 2009; Mareev, Physics Uspekhi, 53, 504, 2010]. In this current work, we developed a two-dimensional cylindrical time-dependent model, which calculates the quasi-electrostatic fields created by the slow accumulation of the charge in the cloud, by taking into account the Maxwellian relaxation of the charges in the conducting atmosphere. The model is capable of simulating the whole volume of the GEC and thus it has the same electrical properties as the three-dimensional spherical system. Two different kinds of boundary conditions (Dirichlet and homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions) were used in order to describe the global circulation of the current, and it has been found that both of them give the same results regarding the general contribution of a storm to the GEC. We present results regarding the response of the fair weather region to lightning transients that occur in the thunderstorm, and in the steady state limit the results of the time-dependent model are compared to static GEC solutions similar to those reported previously by Tzur and Roble [JGR, 90, 5989, 1985].

  20. Understanding and Predicting Time-Dependent Dune Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J.; Stockdon, H. F.; Smith, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The vulnerability of coastal ecosystems, habitats, and infrastructure is largely dictated by how protective sand dunes respond to extreme waves and water levels during storms. Predicting the type of dune response (e.g., scarping, overwashing, breaching) is often done with conditional storm-impact scale models (e.g. Sallenger 2000) however, these models do not describe the magnitude of expected changes or account for the continuum of dune responses throughout the duration of a storm event. Alternatively, process-based dune erosion models like XBeach explicitly compute interactions between waves, water levels, and sediment transport but are limited in regional applications due to computational requirements and inadequate knowledge of required boundary conditions. Using historical observations of storm-induced coastal change, we are developing and testing a variety of new static, probabilistic, and time-dependent models for dune erosion. Model development is informed by the observed dune response from four events that impacted geomorphically diverse regions along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastlines. Results from the static models indicate that alongshore differences in the magnitude of dune elevation change can be related to the depth of water over of the dune crest (e.g. freeboard) but that increasing freeboard does not always correspond to an increased lowering of the dune crest. Applying the concept of dune freeboard in a time-dependent approach that incorporates rising water levels that cause a dune to sequentially experience collision, overwash and then inundation shows that reasonable estimates of dune erosion are obtained. The accuracy of each of the models is now being evaluated along the large and diverse regions of coast that were impacted by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 where dune response was highly variable.

  1. Real-Time Time-Dependent DFT Study of Electronic Stopping in Semiconductors under Proton Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Dillon C.; Reeves, Kyle G.; Kanai, Yosuke

    Understanding the detailed mechanisms of how highly energetic charged particles transfer their kinetic energy to electronic excitations in materials has become an important topic in various technologies ranging from nuclear energy applications to integrated circuits for space missions. In this work, we use our new large-scale real-time time-dependent density functional theory simulation to investigate details of the ion-velocity-dependent dynamics of electronic excitations in the electronic stopping process. In particular, we will discuss how point defects in semiconductor materials influence the electronic stopping process under proton irradiation, using silicon carbide (3C-SiC) as a representative material due to its great technological importance. Additionally, we will provide atomistic insights into existing analytical models that are based on the plane-wave Born approximation by examining velocity-dependence of the projectile charge from first-principles simulations.

  2. Quantum Drude friction for time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Lopata, Kenneth

    2008-10-01

    way to very simple finite grid description of scattering and multistage conductance using time-dependent density functional theory away from the linear regime, just as absorbing potentials and self-energies are useful for noninteracting systems and leads.

  3. Exact transient photon correlation with arbitrary laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2011-11-15

    We present a full quantum theory to study the transient evolution of photon pairs. We introduce a method which gives exact time-dependent solutions of the coupled quantum Langevin equations for a multilevel quantum particle driven by arbitrary time-dependent laser fields. The analytical solutions are used to develop a numerical code for computing exact time evolution of the two-photon correlation function. We analyze the effects of laser pulses sequence, pulse duration, chirping, and initial internal quantum states on the nonclassicality of the photon correlation through the violation of the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. The results provide a promising possibility of controlling the generation of highly correlated photon pairs using tailored short laser pulses.

  4. Spectral methods on arbitrary grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Gottlieb, David

    1995-01-01

    Stable and spectrally accurate numerical methods are constructed on arbitrary grids for partial differential equations. These new methods are equivalent to conventional spectral methods but do not rely on specific grid distributions. Specifically, we show how to implement Legendre Galerkin, Legendre collocation, and Laguerre Galerkin methodology on arbitrary grids.

  5. Some Consequences of a Time Dependent Speed of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Felix T.

    2007-06-01

    For reasons connected with both cosmology (the flatness and horizon problems) and atomic physics (n-body Dirac equation, etc.), various proposals have been made to modify general or special relativity(SR) to accommodate a cosmologically decreasing light speed [J. Magueijo, Rep. Prog. Phys. 66, 2025 (2003)]. Two such theories, projective SR [S.N. Manida, gr-qc/9905046; S. S. Stepanov, physics/9909009 and Phys. Rev. D, 62, 023507 (2000)] and symmetric SR [F.T. Smith, Ann. Fond. L. de Broglie, 30, 179 (2005)] adapt special relativity to in different ways to an expanding, hyperbolically curved position space and predict time-dependences of c within reach of measurement but differing by a factor of two. Both theories bring in a new constant λ-1=σ=c^2H0-1. As Magueijo points, out the role of c in physics and cosmology is so profound that many deep changes must follow if is not absolutely invariant in space and time. In particular, symmetric SR brings a new light to the Dirac large-number relationship between the constants of gravitation and atomic physics.

  6. A time-dependent model for improved biogalvanic tissue characterisation.

    PubMed

    Chandler, J H; Culmer, P R; Jayne, D G; Neville, A

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of the passive electrical resistance of biological tissues through biogalvanic characterisation has been proposed as a simple means of distinguishing healthy from diseased tissue. This method has the potential to provide valuable real-time information when integrated into surgical tools. Characterised tissue resistance values have been shown to be particularly sensitive to external load switching direction and rate, bringing into question the stability and efficacy of the technique. These errors are due to transient variations observed in measurement data that are not accounted for in current electrical models. The presented research proposes the addition of a time-dependent element to the characterisation model to account for losses associated with this transient behaviour. Influence of switching rate has been examined, with the inclusion of transient elements improving the repeatability of the characterised tissue resistance. Application of this model to repeat biogalvanic measurements on a single ex vivo human colon tissue sample with healthy and cancerous (adenocarcinoma) regions showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between tissue types. In contrast, an insignificant difference (p > 0.05) between tissue types was found when measurements were subjected to the current model, suggesting that the proposed model may allow for improved biogalvanic tissue characterisation. PMID:26298197

  7. The Out-of-Equilibrium Time-Dependent Gutzwiller Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrizio, Michele

    We review the recently proposed extension of the Gutzwiller approximation (Schirò and Fabrizio, Phys Rev Lett 105:076401, 2010), designed to describe the out-of-equilibrium time-evolution of a Gutzwiller-type variational wave function for correlated electrons. The method, which is strictly variational in the limit of infinite lattice-coordination, is quite general and flexible, and it is applicable to generic non-equilibrium conditions, even far beyond the linear response regime. As an application, we discuss the quench dynamics of a single-band Hubbard model at half-filling, where the method predicts a dynamical phase transition above a critical quench that resembles the sharp crossover observed by time-dependent dynamical mean field theory. We next show that one can actually define in some cases a multi-configurational wave function combination of a whole set of mutually orthogonal Gutzwiller wave functions. The Hamiltonian projected in that subspace can be exactly evaluated and is equivalent to a model of auxiliary spins coupled to non-interacting electrons, closely related to the slave-spin theories for correlated electron models. The Gutzwiller approximation turns out to be nothing but the mean-field approximation applied to that spin-fermion model, which displays, for any number of bands and integer fillings, a spontaneous Z 2 symmetry breaking that can be identified as the Mott insulator-to-metal transition.

  8. Estimation of sensitivity depending on sojourn time and time spent in preclinical state.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongho; Wu, Dongfeng

    2016-04-01

    The probability model for periodic screening was extended to provide statistical inference for sensitivity depending on sojourn time, in which the sensitivity was modeled as a function of time spent in the preclinical state and the sojourn time. The likelihood function with the proposed sensitivity model was then evaluated with simulated data to check its reliability in terms of the mean estimation and the standard error. Simulation results showed that the maximum likelihood estimates of the proposed model have little bias and small standard errors. The extended probability model was further applied to the Johns Hopkins Lung Project data using both maximum likelihood estimation and Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo. PMID:23129110

  9. An inverse time-dependent source problem for a time-fractional diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, T.; Li, X. L.; Li, Y. S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is devoted to identifying a time-dependent source term in a multi-dimensional time-fractional diffusion equation from boundary Cauchy data. The existence and uniqueness of a strong solution for the corresponding direct problem with homogeneous Neumann boundary condition are firstly proved. We provide the uniqueness and a stability estimate for the inverse time-dependent source problem. Then we use the Tikhonov regularization method to solve the inverse source problem and propose a conjugate gradient algorithm to find a good approximation to the minimizer of the Tikhonov regularization functional. Numerical examples in one-dimensional and two-dimensional cases are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. This paper was supported by the NSF of China (11371181) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (lzujbky-2013-k02).

  10. Solving the time dependent vehicle routing problem by metaheuristic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johar, Farhana; Potts, Chris; Bennell, Julia

    2015-02-01

    The problem we consider in this study is Time Dependent Vehicle Routing Problem (TDVRP) which has been categorized as non-classical VRP. It is motivated by the fact that multinational companies are currently not only manufacturing the demanded products but also distributing them to the customer location. This implies an efficient synchronization of production and distribution activities. Hence, this study will look into the routing of vehicles which departs from the depot at varies time due to the variation in manufacturing process. We consider a single production line where demanded products are being process one at a time once orders have been received from the customers. It is assumed that order released from the production line will be loaded into scheduled vehicle which ready to be delivered. However, the delivery could only be done once all orders scheduled in the vehicle have been released from the production line. Therefore, there could be lateness on the delivery process from awaiting all customers' order of the route to be released. Our objective is to determine a schedule for vehicle routing that minimizes the solution cost including the travelling and tardiness cost. A mathematical formulation is developed to represent the problem and will be solved by two metaheuristics; Variable Neighborhood Search (VNS) and Tabu Search (TS). These algorithms will be coded in C ++ programming and run using 56's Solomon instances with some modification. The outcome of this experiment can be interpreted as the quality criteria of the different approximation methods. The comparison done shown that VNS gave the better results while consuming reasonable computational efforts.

  11. From Induced Seismicity to Direct Time-Dependent Seismic Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convertito, V.; Maercklin, N.; Sharma, N.; Zollo, A.

    2012-12-01

    The growing installation of industrial facilities for subsurface exploration worldwide requires continuous refinements in understanding both the mechanisms by which seismicity is induced by field operations and the related seismic hazard. Particularly in proximity of densely populated areas, induced low-to-moderate magnitude seismicity characterized by high-frequency content can be clearly felt by the surrounding inhabitants and, in some cases, may produce damage. In this respect we propose a technique for time-dependent probabilistic seismic hazard analysis to be used in geothermal fields as a monitoring tool for the effects of on-going field operations. The technique integrates the observed features of the seismicity induced by fluid injection and extraction with a local ground-motion prediction equation. The result of the analysis is the time-evolving probability of exceedance of peak ground acceleration (PGA), which can be compared with selected critical values to manage field operations. To evaluate the reliability of the proposed technique, we applied it to data collected in The Geysers geothermal field in northern California between 1 September 2007 and 15 November 2010. We show that the period considered the seismic hazard at The Geysers was variable in time and space, which is a consequence of the field operations and the variation of both seismicity rate and b-value. We conclude that, for the exposure period taken into account (i.e., two months), as a conservative limit, PGA values corresponding to the lowest probability of exceedance (e.g., 30%) must not be exceeded to ensure safe field operations. We suggest testing the proposed technique at other geothermal areas or in regions where seismicity is induced, for example, by hydrocarbon exploitation or carbon dioxide storage.

  12. Fraunhofer diffraction by arbitrary-shaped obstacles.

    PubMed

    Malinka, Aleksey V; Zege, Eleonora P

    2009-08-01

    We consider Fraunhofer diffraction by an ensemble of large arbitrary-shaped screens that are randomly oriented in the plane of a wavefront and have edges of arbitrary shape. It is shown that far outside the main diffraction peak the differential scattering cross section behaves asymptotically as theta(-3), where theta is the diffraction angle. Moreover, the differential scattering cross section depends only on the length of the contours bordering the screens and does not depend on the shape of the obstacles. As both strictly forward and total diffraction cross sections are specified by obstacle area only, the differential cross section of size-distributed obstacles is expected to be nearly independent of obstacle shape over the entire region of the diffraction angles. PMID:19649110

  13. A History of Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Markram, Henry; Gerstner, Wulfram; Sjöström, Per Jesper

    2011-01-01

    How learning and memory is achieved in the brain is a central question in neuroscience. Key to today’s research into information storage in the brain is the concept of synaptic plasticity, a notion that has been heavily influenced by Hebb's (1949) postulate. Hebb conjectured that repeatedly and persistently co-active cells should increase connective strength among populations of interconnected neurons as a means of storing a memory trace, also known as an engram. Hebb certainly was not the first to make such a conjecture, as we show in this history. Nevertheless, literally thousands of studies into the classical frequency-dependent paradigm of cellular learning rules were directly inspired by the Hebbian postulate. But in more recent years, a novel concept in cellular learning has emerged, where temporal order instead of frequency is emphasized. This new learning paradigm – known as spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) – has rapidly gained tremendous interest, perhaps because of its combination of elegant simplicity, biological plausibility, and computational power. But what are the roots of today’s STDP concept? Here, we discuss several centuries of diverse thinking, beginning with philosophers such as Aristotle, Locke, and Ribot, traversing, e.g., Lugaro’s plasticità and Rosenblatt’s perceptron, and culminating with the discovery of STDP. We highlight interactions between theoretical and experimental fields, showing how discoveries sometimes occurred in parallel, seemingly without much knowledge of the other field, and sometimes via concrete back-and-forth communication. We point out where the future directions may lie, which includes interneuron STDP, the functional impact of STDP, its mechanisms and its neuromodulatory regulation, and the linking of STDP to the developmental formation and continuous plasticity of neuronal networks. PMID:22007168

  14. Computationally efficient approach for solving time dependent diffusion equation with discrete temporal convolution applied to granular particles of battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senegačnik, Jure; Tavčar, Gregor; Katrašnik, Tomaž

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents a computationally efficient method for solving the time dependent diffusion equation in a granule of the Li-ion battery's granular solid electrode. The method, called Discrete Temporal Convolution method (DTC), is based on a discrete temporal convolution of the analytical solution of the step function boundary value problem. This approach enables modelling concentration distribution in the granular particles for arbitrary time dependent exchange fluxes that do not need to be known a priori. It is demonstrated in the paper that the proposed method features faster computational times than finite volume/difference methods and Padé approximation at the same accuracy of the results. It is also demonstrated that all three addressed methods feature higher accuracy compared to the quasi-steady polynomial approaches when applied to simulate the current densities variations typical for mobile/automotive applications. The proposed approach can thus be considered as one of the key innovative methods enabling real-time capability of the multi particle electrochemical battery models featuring spatial and temporal resolved particle concentration profiles.

  15. Time-dependent transonic flow solutions for axial turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdos, J.; Alzner, E.; Kalben, P.; Mcnally, W.; Slutsky, S.

    1975-01-01

    Three-dimensional unsteady transonic flow through an axial turbomachine stage is described in terms of a pair of two-dimensional formulations pertaining to orthogonal surfaces, namely, a blade-to-blade surface and a hub-to-casing surface. The resulting systems of nonlinear, inviscid, compressible equations of motion are solved by an explicit finite-difference technique. The blade-to-blade program includes the periodic interaction between rotor and stator blade rows. Treatment of the boundary conditions and of the blade slipstream motion by a characteristic type procedure is discussed in detail. Harmonic analysis of the acoustic far field produced by the blade row interaction, including an arbitrary initial transient, is outlined. Results from the blade-to-blade program are compared with experimental measurements of the rotating pressure field at the tip of a high-speed fan. The hub-to-casing program determines circumferentially averaged flow properties on a meridional plane. Blade row interactions are neglected in this formulation, but the force distributions over the entire blade surface for both the rotor and stator are obtained. Results from the hub-to-casing program are compared with a relaxation method solution for a subsonic rotor. Results are also presented for a quiet fan stage which includes transonic flow in both the rotor and stator and a normal shock in the stator.

  16. Modeling and Correcting the Time-Dependent ACS PSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Albert, Justin; Taylor, James E.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Leauthaud, Alexie

    2006-01-01

    The ability to accurately measure the shapes of faint objects in images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) depends upon detailed knowledge of the Point Spread Function (PSF). We show that thermal fluctuations cause the PSF of the ACS Wide Field Camera (WFC) to vary over time. We describe a modified version of the TinyTim PSF modeling software to create artificial grids of stars across the ACS field of view at a range of telescope focus values. These models closely resemble the stars in real ACS images. Using 10 bright stars in a real image, we have been able to measure HST s apparent focus at the time of the exposure. TinyTim can then be used to model the PSF at any position on the ACS field of view. This obviates the need for images of dense stellar fields at different focus values, or interpolation between the few observed stars. We show that residual differences between our TinyTim models and real data are likely due to the effects of Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) degradation. Furthermore, we discuss stochastic noise that is added to the shape of point sources when distortion is removed, and we present MultiDrizzle parameters that are optimal for weak lensing science. Specifically, we find that reducing the MultiDrizzle output pixel scale and choosing a Gaussian kernel significantly stabilizes the resulting PSF after image combination, while still eliminating cosmic rays/bad pixels, and correcting the large geometric distortion in the ACS. We discuss future plans, which include more detailed study of the effects of CTE degradation on object shapes and releasing our TinyTim models to the astronomical community.

  17. Dose- and time-dependent antiplatelet effects of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Perneby, Christina; Wallén, N Håkan; Rooney, Cathy; Fitzgerald, Desmond; Hjemdahl, Paul

    2006-04-01

    Aspirin is widely used, but dosages in different clinical situations and the possible importance of "aspirin resistance" are debated. We performed an open cross-over study comparing no treatment (baseline) with three aspirin dosage regimens--37.5 mg/day for 10 days, 320 mg/day for 7 days, and, finally, a single 640 mg dose (cumulative dose 960 mg)--in 15 healthy male volunteers. Platelet aggregability was assessed in whole blood (WB) and platelet rich plasma (PRP). The urinary excretions of stable thromboxane (TxM) and prostacyclin (PGI-M) metabolites, and bleeding time were also measured. Platelet COX inhibition was nearly complete already at 37.5 mg aspirin daily, as evidenced by >98% suppression of serum thromboxane B2 and almost abolished arachidonic acid (AA) induced aggregation in PRP 2-6 h after dosing. Bleeding time was similarly prolonged by all dosages of aspirin. Once daily dosing was associated with considerable recovery of AA induced platelet aggregation in WB after 24 hours, even after 960 mg aspirin. Collagen induced aggregation in WB with normal extracellular calcium levels (hirudin anticoagulated) was inhibited <40% at all dosages. TxM excretion was incompletely suppressed, and increased <24 hours after the cumulative 960 mg dose. Aspirin treatment reduced PGI-M already at the lowest dosage (by approximately 25%), but PGI-M excretion and platelet aggregability were not correlated. Antiplatelet effects of aspirin are limited in WB with normal calcium levels. Since recovery of COX-dependent platelet aggregation occurred within 24 hours, once daily dosing of aspirin might be insufficient in patients with increased platelet turnover. PMID:16601836

  18. Stress-induced neuroinflammatory priming is time of day dependent.

    PubMed

    Fonken, Laura K; Weber, Michael D; Daut, Rachel A; Kitt, Meagan M; Frank, Matthew G; Watkins, Linda R; Maier, Steven F

    2016-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous cycles of physiology and behavior that align with the daily rotation of the planet and resulting light-dark cycle. The circadian system ensures homeostatic balance and regulates many aspects of physiology, including the stress response and susceptibility to and/or severity of stress-related sequelae. Both acute and chronic stressors amplify neuroinflammatory responses to a subsequent immune challenge, however it is not known whether circadian timing of the stressor regulates the priming response. Here, we test whether stress-induced neuroinflammatory priming is regulated by the circadian system. As has been previously shown, exposure to 100 inescapable tails shocks (IS) increased hippocampal cytokines following a subsequent inflammatory challenge. However, this effect was limited to animals that experienced the stressor during the light phase. Rats exposed to stress during the dark phase did not alter inflammatory potential following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. To determine whether microglia might be involved in diurnal differences in neuroinflammatory priming, microglia were isolated 24h after stress that occurred either during the middle of the light or dark phase. Only microglia isolated from animals stressed during the light phase demonstrated an exaggerated inflammatory response when treated ex vivo with LPS. To determine possible circadian dependency of microglia responsiveness to glucocorticoids - the likely proximal mediator for stress associated neuroinflammatory priming - microglia were isolated during the middle of the light or dark phase and treated ex vivo with corticosterone. Glucocorticoids treatment downregulated CX3CR1 and CD200R, two genes involved in microglial inflammatory "off" signaling; however, there was no effect of time of day on expression of either gene. Importantly, while absolute concentrations of corticosterone were comparable following IS during the light and dark phase, the magnitude of

  19. The time dependence of reversed archeomagnetic flux patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra-Nova, Filipe; Amit, Hagay; Hartmann, Gelvam A.; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.

    2015-02-01

    Archeomagnetic field models may provide important insights to the geodynamo. Here we investigate the existence and mobility of reversed flux patches (RFPs) in an archeomagnetic field model. We introduce topological algorithms to define, identify, and track RFPs. In addition, we explore the relations between RFPs and dipole changes and apply robustness tests to the RFPs. In contrast to previous definitions, patches that reside on the geographic equator are adequately identified based on our RFPs definition. Most RFPs exhibit a westward drift and migrate toward higher latitudes. Undulations of the magnetic equator and RFPs oppose the axial dipole moment (ADM). Filtered models show a tracking behavior similar to the nonfiltered model, and surprisingly new RFPs occasionally emerge. The advection and diffusion of RFPs have worked in unison to yield the decrease of the ADM at recent times. The absence of RFPs in the period 550-1440 A.D. is related to a low in intermediate degrees of the geomagnetic power spectrum. We thus hypothesize that the RFPs are strongly dependent on intermediate spherical harmonic degrees 4 and above.

  20. Time dependent ventilation flows driven by opposing wind and buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coomaraswamy, Imran; Caulfield, Colm

    2008-11-01

    We consider flow in an enclosure containing an isolated heat source, ventilated by a windward high level opening and a leeward low level opening, so that prevailing wind acts to oppose buoyancy driven flow. Following the ``emptying filling box'' approach of Linden et al., Hunt & Linden demonstrate that multiple steady states can exist above a critical wind strength. We develop time dependent models for this system and apply them to an initial value problem - box filling with constant opposing wind. We identify the final state attained for any given heat load, wind strength and vent size. We note that the interface between the upper region of hot plume fluid and the lower region of cool ambient air can dramatically overshoot its final level before relaxing to equilibrium; in some cases, a fully mixed transient can occur before the stratified steady state is reached. Analogue laboratory experiments confirm the existence of these transient phenomena and elucidate the range of validity of our predictions. Linden, Lane-Serff & Smeed, J. Fluid Mech. 212, 309 (1990)., Hunt & Linden, J. Fluid Mech. 527, 27 (2005).

  1. Time-dependent perturbation and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilcott, Steven Wayne, Jr.

    2000-12-01

    We discuss the physical problem of a molecule interacting with an electromagnetic field pulse and model the problem using a time-dependent perturbation of the Born- Oppenheimer approximation to the Schrödinger equation. Using previous results that develop asymptotic series solutions in the Born-Oppenheimer parameter ɛ, we derive a formal Dyson series expansion in the perturbation parameter μ, which is proportional to the electromagnetic field strength. We then prove that this series is asymptotically accurate in both parameters, provided that the Hamiltonian for the electrons has purely discrete spectrum. Under more general hypotheses, we show that the series is accurate to first order in μ, and that it is accurate to one higher order if we place conditions on the abruptness of the EM pulse. We also show how this series development provides a justification for the Franck-Condon factors in the case of a diatomic molecule.* *This work was supported by the Cunningham Research Fellowship provided by Virginia Tech.

  2. Self-Consistent and Time-Dependent Solar Wind Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, K. K.; Musielak, Z. E.; Rosner, R.; Suess, S. T.; Sulkanen, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the first results from a self-consistent study of Alfven waves for the time-dependent, single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solar wind equations, using a modified version of the ZEUS MHD code. The wind models we examine are radially symmetrical and magnetized; the initial outflow is described by the standard Parker wind solution. Our study focuses on the effects of Alfven waves on the outflow and is based on solving the full set of the ideal nonlinear MHD equations. In contrast to previous studies, no assumptions regarding wave linearity, wave damping, and wave-flow interaction are made; thus, the models naturally account for the back-reaction of the wind on the waves, as well as for the nonlinear interaction between different types of MHD waves. Our results clearly demonstrate when momentum deposition by Alfven waves in the solar wind can be sufficient to explain the origin of fast streams in solar coronal holes; we discuss the range of wave amplitudes required to obtained such fast stream solutions.

  3. Granular matter and the time-dependent viscous eikonal equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadeler, K. P.; Schieborn, Dirk

    2012-03-01

    Deposition of granular matter under gravity can be described by the well-known two-layer model for a standing and a rolling layer. Matter from sources enters the rolling layer which flows along the gradient of the standing layer and finally enters the standing layer via interaction of the two layers. From this system of two coupled hyperbolic partial differential equations a time-dependent viscous eikonal equation is derived as a limiting case for weak sources, a thin rolling layer and fast convection of the rolling layer. This equation, supplied with boundary conditions, describes the deposition of dry sand from evenly distributed sources onto a flat table with a vertical rim of variable height. The stationary problem can also be seen as an application of the method of vanishing viscosity to the eikonal equation. For certain types of interaction between the two layers the resulting eikonal equation can be transformed into a linear equation. This transformation yields additional insight into the problem.

  4. Learning Probabilistic Inference through Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity123

    PubMed Central

    Pecevski, Dejan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous experimental data show that the brain is able to extract information from complex, uncertain, and often ambiguous experiences. Furthermore, it can use such learnt information for decision making through probabilistic inference. Several models have been proposed that aim at explaining how probabilistic inference could be performed by networks of neurons in the brain. We propose here a model that can also explain how such neural network could acquire the necessary information for that from examples. We show that spike-timing-dependent plasticity in combination with intrinsic plasticity generates in ensembles of pyramidal cells with lateral inhibition a fundamental building block for that: probabilistic associations between neurons that represent through their firing current values of random variables. Furthermore, by combining such adaptive network motifs in a recursive manner the resulting network is enabled to extract statistical information from complex input streams, and to build an internal model for the distribution p* that generates the examples it receives. This holds even if p* contains higher-order moments. The analysis of this learning process is supported by a rigorous theoretical foundation. Furthermore, we show that the network can use the learnt internal model immediately for prediction, decision making, and other types of probabilistic inference. PMID:27419214

  5. Endocannabinoid dynamics gate spike-timing dependent depression and potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yihui; Prokin, Ilya; Xu, Hao; Delord, Bruno; Genet, Stephane; Venance, Laurent; Berry, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is a cardinal cellular mechanism for learning and memory. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system has emerged as a pivotal pathway for synaptic plasticity because of its widely characterized ability to depress synaptic transmission on short- and long-term scales. Recent reports indicate that eCBs also mediate potentiation of the synapse. However, it is not known how eCB signaling may support bidirectionality. Here, we combined electrophysiology experiments with mathematical modeling to question the mechanisms of eCB bidirectionality in spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) at corticostriatal synapses. We demonstrate that STDP outcome is controlled by eCB levels and dynamics: prolonged and moderate levels of eCB lead to eCB-mediated long-term depression (eCB-tLTD) while short and large eCB transients produce eCB-mediated long-term potentiation (eCB-tLTP). Moreover, we show that eCB-tLTD requires active calcineurin whereas eCB-tLTP necessitates the activity of presynaptic PKA. Therefore, just like glutamate or GABA, eCB form a bidirectional system to encode learning and memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13185.001 PMID:26920222

  6. Local Time-Dependent Charging in a Perovskite Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Victor W; Guo, Yunlong; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Hermes, Ilka M; Li, Dan; Klasen, Alexander; Bretschneider, Simon A; Nakamura, Eiichi; Berger, Rüdiger; Weber, Stefan A L

    2016-08-01

    Efficient charge extraction within solar cells explicitly depends on the optimization of the internal interfaces. Potential barriers, unbalanced charge extraction, and interfacial trap states can prevent cells from reaching high power conversion efficiencies. In the case of perovskite solar cells, slow processes happening on time scales of seconds cause hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. In this work, we localized and investigated these slow processes using frequency-modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KPFM) on cross sections of planar methylammonium lead iodide (MAPI) perovskite solar cells. FM-KPFM can map the charge density distribution and its dynamics at internal interfaces. Upon illumination, space charge layers formed at the interfaces of the selective contacts with the MAPI layer within several seconds. We observed distinct differences in the charging dynamics at the interfaces of MAPI with adjacent layers. Our results indicate that more than one process is involved in hysteresis. This finding is in agreement with recent simulation studies claiming that a combination of ion migration and interfacial trap states causes the hysteresis in perovskite solar cells. Such differences in the charging rates at different interfaces cannot be separated by conventional device measurements. PMID:27377472

  7. The time dependence of reversed archeomagnetic flux patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra-Nova, Filipe; Amit, Hagay; Hartmann, Gelvam A.; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.

    2016-04-01

    Archeomagnetic field models may provide important insights to the geodynamo. Here we investigate the existence and mobility of reversed flux patches (RFPs) in archeomagnetic field model CALS3k.4b of Korte and Constable (2011; PEPI, 188, 247-259). We introduce topological algorithms to define, identify and track RPFs. In addition, we explore the relations between RFPs and dipole changes, and apply robustness tests to the RFPs. In contrast to previous definitions, patches that reside on the geographic equator are adequately identified based on our RFPs definition that takes the magnetic equator as a reference. Most RFPs exhibit a westward drift and migrate towards higher latitudes. Undulations of the magnetic equator and RFPs oppose the axial dipole moment (ADM). Filtered models show a tracking behaviour similar to the non-filtered model, and surprisingly new RFPs occasionally emerge. The advection and diffusion of RFPs have worked in unison to yield the decrease of the ADM at recent times. The absence of RFPs in the period 550-1440 AD is related to a low in intermediate degrees of the geomagnetic power spectrum. We thus hypothesize that the RFPs are strongly dependent on intermediate spherical harmonic degrees 4 and above. Comparison of tracking of RFPs among various archeomagnetic field models was also performed and gives more complex results.

  8. Interpreting the Dependence of Mutation Rates on Age and Time

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ziyue; Wyman, Minyoung J.; Sella, Guy; Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Mutations can originate from the chance misincorporation of nucleotides during DNA replication or from DNA lesions that arise between replication cycles and are not repaired correctly. We introduce a model that relates the source of mutations to their accumulation with cell divisions, providing a framework for understanding how mutation rates depend on sex, age, and cell division rate. We show that the accrual of mutations should track cell divisions not only when mutations are replicative in origin but also when they are non-replicative and repaired efficiently. One implication is that observations from diverse fields that to date have been interpreted as pointing to a replicative origin of most mutations could instead reflect the accumulation of mutations arising from endogenous reactions or exogenous mutagens. We further find that only mutations that arise from inefficiently repaired lesions will accrue according to absolute time; thus, unless life history traits co-vary, the phylogenetic “molecular clock” should not be expected to run steadily across species. PMID:26761240

  9. Scene Context Dependency of Pattern Constancy of Time Series Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodell, Glenn A.; Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur

    2008-01-01

    A fundamental element of future generic pattern recognition technology is the ability to extract similar patterns for the same scene despite wide ranging extraneous variables, including lighting, turbidity, sensor exposure variations, and signal noise. In the process of demonstrating pattern constancy of this kind for retinex/visual servo (RVS) image enhancement processing, we found that the pattern constancy performance depended somewhat on scene content. Most notably, the scene topography and, in particular, the scale and extent of the topography in an image, affects the pattern constancy the most. This paper will explore these effects in more depth and present experimental data from several time series tests. These results further quantify the impact of topography on pattern constancy. Despite this residual inconstancy, the results of overall pattern constancy testing support the idea that RVS image processing can be a universal front-end for generic visual pattern recognition. While the effects on pattern constancy were significant, the RVS processing still does achieve a high degree of pattern constancy over a wide spectrum of scene content diversity, and wide ranging extraneousness variations in lighting, turbidity, and sensor exposure.

  10. Simple preconditioning for time-dependent density functional perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Lehtovaara, Lauri; Marques, Miguel A L

    2011-07-01

    By far, the most common use of time-dependent density functional theory is in the linear-reponse regime, where it provides information about electronic excitations. Ideally, the linear-response equations should be solved by a method that avoids the use of the unoccupied Kohn-Sham states--such as the Sternheimer method--as this reduces the complexity and increases the precision of the calculation. However, the Sternheimer equation becomes ill-conditioned near and indefinite above the first resonant frequency, seriously hindering the use of efficient iterative solution methods. To overcome this serious limitation, and to improve the general convergence properties of the iterative techniques, we propose a simple preconditioning strategy. In our method, the Sternheimer equation is solved directly as a linear equation using an iterative Krylov subspace method, i.e., no self-consistent cycle is required. Furthermore, the preconditioner uses the information of just a few unoccupied states and requires simple and minimal modifications to existing implementations. In this way, convergence can be reached faster and in a considerably wider frequency range than the traditional approach. PMID:21744884

  11. Retrospective optimization of time-dependent fermentation control strategies using time-independent historical data.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Matthew C; Block, David E

    2006-10-20

    We have previously shown the usefulness of historical data for fermentation process optimization. The methodology developed includes identification of important process inputs, training of an artificial neural network (ANN) process model, and ultimately use of the ANN model with a genetic algorithm to find the optimal values of each critical process input. However, this approach ignores the time-dependent nature of the system, and therefore, does not fully utilize the available information within a database. In this work, we propose a method for incorporating time-dependent optimization into our previously developed three-step optimization routine. This is achieved by an additional step that uses a fermentation model (consisting of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODE)) to interpret important time-course features of the collected data through adjustments in model parameters. Important process variables not explicitly included in the model were then identified for each model parameter using automatic relevance determination (ARD) with Gaussian process (GP) models. The developed GP models were then combined with the fermentation model to form a hybrid neural network model that predicted the time-course activity of the cell and protein concentrations of novel fermentation conditions. A hybrid-genetic algorithm was then used in conjunction with the hybrid model to suggest optimal time-dependent control strategies. The presented method was implemented upon an E. coli fermentation database generated in our laboratory. Optimization of two different criteria (final protein yield and a simplified economic criteria) was attempted. While the overall protein yield was not increased using this methodology, we were successful in increasing a simplified economic criterion by 15% compared to what had been previously observed. These process conditions included using 35% less arabinose (the inducer) and 33% less typtone in the media and reducing the time required to reach

  12. Electron plasma oscillations at arbitrary Debye lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1991-06-01

    A solution is presented for electron plasma oscillations in a thermalized plasma, at arbitrary ratios of the Debye length AλD and the perturbation wavelength λ. The limit λDλ corresponds to the conventional fluid-like theory of small particle excursions, whereas λDλ corresponds to the free-streaming limit of strong kinetic phase mixing due to large particle excursions. A strong large-Debye-distance (LDD) effect already appears when λD λ. The initial amplitude of the fluid-like contribution to the macroscopic density perturbation then becomes small compared with the contribution from the free-streaming part. As a consequence, only a small fraction of the density perturbation remains after a limited number of kinetic damping times of the free-streaming part. The present analysis can be considered as a first exercise in an attempt to tackle the far more difficult problem of large-Larmor-radius (LLR) effects in a magnetized plasma. The analysis further shows that a representation in terms of normal modes of the form exp (— iωt) leads to amplitude factors of these modes that are related to each other and that depend on the combined free-streaming and fluid behaviour of the plasma. Consequently, these modes are coupled and cannot be treated as independent of each other.

  13. On the time-dependent extra spatial dimensions in six dimensional space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Phan Hong; Hai, Do Thi Hong

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the time-dependent extra spatial dimensions in six dimensional (6D) space-time. The 4-brane is assumed to be a de Sitter space. Based on the form of the brane-world energy-momentum tensor proposed by Shiromizu et al. and the five dimensions by Peter K. F. Kuhfittic, we extended the theory to the 2-codimension embedded in higher dimensions. The inflation scenario in 6D is investigated in two cases of cosmological constant: Ʌ > 0 and Ʌ < 0. The energy of two extra dimensions is calculated too.

  14. Parallelizing across time when solving time-dependent partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P.H.

    1991-09-01

    The standard numerical algorithms for solving time-dependent partial differential equations (PDEs) are inherently sequential in the time direction. This paper describes algorithms for the time-accurate solution of certain classes of linear hyperbolic and parabolic PDEs that can be parallelized in both time and space and have serial complexities that are proportional to the serial complexities of the best known algorithms. The algorithms for parabolic PDEs are variants of the waveform relaxation multigrid method (WFMG) of Lubich and Ostermann where the scalar ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that make up the kernel of WFMG are solved using a cyclic reduction type algorithm. The algorithms for hyperbolic PDEs use the cyclic reduction algorithm to solve ODEs along characteristics. 43 refs.

  15. Multi-Resolution Dynamic Meshes with Arbitrary Deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Shamir, A.; Pascucci, V.; Bajaj, C.

    2000-07-10

    Multi-resolution techniques and models have been shown to be effective for the display and transmission of large static geometric object. Dynamic environments with internally deforming models and scientific simulations using dynamic meshes pose greater challenges in terms of time and space, and need the development of similar solutions. In this paper we introduce the T-DAG, an adaptive multi-resolution representation for dynamic meshes with arbitrary deformations including attribute, position, connectivity and topology changes. T-DAG stands for Time-dependent Directed Acyclic Graph which defines the structure supporting this representation. We also provide an incremental algorithm (in time) for constructing the T-DAG representation of a given input mesh. This enables the traversal and use of the multi-resolution dynamic model for partial playback while still constructing new time-steps.

  16. Time-dependent fiber bundles with local load sharing.

    PubMed

    Newman, W I; Phoenix, S L

    2001-02-01

    Fiber bundle models, where fibers have random lifetimes depending on their load histories, are useful tools in explaining time-dependent failure in heterogeneous materials. Such models shed light on diverse phenomena such as fatigue in structural materials and earthquakes in geophysical settings. Various asymptotic and approximate theories have been developed for bundles with various geometries and fiber load-sharing mechanisms, but numerical verification has been hampered by severe computational demands in larger bundles. To gain insight at large size scales, interest has returned to idealized fiber bundle models in 1D. Such simplified models typically assume either equal load sharing (ELS) among survivors, or local load sharing (LLS) where a failed fiber redistributes its load onto its two nearest flanking survivors. Such models can often be solved exactly or asymptotically in increasing bundle size, N, yet still capture the essence of failure in real materials. The present work focuses on 1D bundles under LLS. As in previous works, a fiber has failure rate following a power law in its load level with breakdown exponent rho. Surviving fibers under fixed loads have remaining lifetimes that are independent and exponentially distributed. We develop both new asymptotic theories and new computational algorithms that greatly increase the bundle sizes that can be treated in large replications (e.g., one million fibers in thousands of realizations). In particular we develop an algorithm that adapts several concepts and methods that are well-known among computer scientists, but relatively unknown among physicists, to dramatically increase the computational speed with no attendant loss of accuracy. We consider various regimes of rho that yield drastically different behavior as N increases. For 1/2< or =rho< or =1, ELS and LLS have remarkably similar behavior (they have identical lifetime distributions at rho=1) with approximate Gaussian bundle lifetime statistics and a

  17. Network Structures Arising from Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadi, Baktash

    Spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), a widespread synaptic modification mechanism, is sensitive to correlations between presynaptic spike trains, and organizes neural circuits in functionally useful ways. In this dissertation, I study the structures arising from STDP in a population of synapses with an emphasis on the interplay between synaptic stability and Hebbian competition, explained in Chapter 1. Starting from the simplest description of STDP which relates synaptic modification to the intervals between pairs of pre- and postsynaptic spikes, I show in Chapter 2 that stability and Hebbian competition are incompatible in this class of "pair-based" STDP models, either when hard bounds or soft bounds are imposed to the synapses. In chapter 3, I propose an alternative biophysically inspired method for imposing bounds to synapses, i.e. introducing a small temporal shift in the STDP window. Shifted STDP overcomes the incompatibility of synaptic stability and competition and can implement both Hebbian and anti-Hebbian forms of competitive plasticity. In light of experiments the explored a variety of spike patterns, STDP models have been augmented to account for interactions between multiple pre- and postsynaptic action potentials. In chapter 4, I study the stability/competition interplay in three different proposed multi-spike models of STDP. I show that the "triplet model" leads to a partially steady-state distribution of synaptic weights and induces Hebbian competition. The "suppression model" develops a stable distribution of weights when the average weight is high and shows predominantly anti-Hebbian competition. The "NMDAR-based" model can lead to either stable or partially stable synaptic weight distribution and exhibits both Hebbian and anti-Hebbian competition, depending on the parameters. I conclude that multi-spike STDP models can produce radically different effects at the population level depending on how they implement multi-spike interactions

  18. Parallel machine scheduling problem with ready times, due times and sequence-dependent setup times using meta-heuristic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Cheol Min; Kim, Byung Soo

    2012-09-01

    This article considers a parallel machine scheduling problem with ready times, due times and sequence-dependent setup times. The objective of this problem is to determine the allocation policy of jobs and the scheduling policy of machines to minimize the weighted sum of setup times, delay times and tardy times. A mathematical model for optimal solution is derived. An in-depth analysis of the model shows that it is very complicated and difficult to obtain optimal solutions as the problem size becomes large. Therefore, two meta-heuristics, genetic algorithm (GA) and a new population-based evolutionary meta-heuristic called self-evolution algorithm (SEA), are proposed. The performances of the meta-heuristic algorithms are evaluated through comparison with optimal solutions using several randomly generated examples.

  19. Mean Velocity of Local Populations: Axiality, Age and Time Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubarsi, Rafael; Alcobé, Santiago

    2007-05-01

    The mean velocity of local stellar populations is analyzed by building a set of hierarchically selected samples from Hipparcos catalog, with the full space motions. The technique for scanning populations, MEMPHIS (Maximum Entropy of the Mixture Probability from HIerarchical Segregation), is a combination of two separate procedures: A sample selecting filter (Alcobé & Cubarsi 2005, A&A 442, 292) and a segregation method (Cubarsi & Alcobé 2004, A&A 427, 131). By continuously increasing the sampling parameter, in our case the absolute value of the stellar velocity, we build a set of nested subsamples containing an increasing number of populations. A bimodal pattern is then applied in order to identify differentiated kinematic populations. The resulting populations can be identified as early-type stars, young disk stars, old disk stars, and thick disk stars. Discontinuities of the velocity dispersion are found for early-type and thick disk stars, while young and old disk stars show a continuous trend that is asymptotically represented by the thin disk galactic component. Similarly, the mean velocity of early-type stars shows a particular behavior, while the remaining populations share a similar average motion. The later populations are studied on the basis of a time-dependent and non-axial Chandrasekhar model, allowing to estimate the degree of deviation from axial symmetry and steady-state hypotheses, as well as the average age of each population. According to this model, the no net radial movement point can be evaluated, having heliocentric velocities U=-18 ± 1 km/s in the radial direction, which is very close to the radial mean velocity of early-type stars, and V=-76 ± 2 km/s in rotation. The remaining populations share a common differential galactic movement, suggesting a common dynamical origin for the rupture of the axial symmetry.

  20. Pharmacokinetics: time-dependent changes--autoinduction of carbamazepine epoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Bertilsson, L.; Tomson, T.; Tybring, G.

    1986-07-01

    Drugs labeled with stable isotopes have been useful to study time-dependent changes in kinetics. Early studies suggested that carbamazepine (CBZ) may induce its own metabolism, but this could not be proved until tetradeuterium-labeled CBZ (CBZ-D4) was synthesized and then given to patients. CBZ-D4 was administered to three children during long-term treatment of epilepsy with CBZ. After 17 to 32 days of treatment, the plasma clearance of CBZ-D4 was doubled, but during the next four months, there was no further increase, indicating that autoinduction was complete within one month. Two patients with chronic alcoholism were treated with CBZ for five days. Half of the first dose of 600 mg was comprised of CBZ-D4. The half-life of this CBZ-D4 dose in the two patients (20 and 26 hr, respectively) was similar to the post-steady-state half-life of CBZ (23 hr in both patients) measured later. A single dose of CBZ given one week after the last maintenance dose had a longer half-life (46 and 45 hr, respectively), which probably is close to the disposition of the drug before starting the treatment with CBZ. This shows that autoinduction of CBZ metabolism was completed during the very first doses of CBZ. Autoinduction also disappeared rapidly after stopping the treatment. We have shown that it is mainly the epoxide-diol pathway that is induced, both during autoinduction and after induction with other antiepileptic agents.

  1. Time-dependent computational studies of flames in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oran, Elaine S.; Kailasanath, K.

    1989-01-01

    The research performed at the Center for Reactive Flow and Dynamical Systems in the Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, at the Naval Research Laboratory, in support of the NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Program is described. The primary focus was on investigating fundamental questions concerning the propagation and extinction of premixed flames in Earth gravity and in microgravity environments. The approach was to use detailed time-dependent, multispecies, numerical models as tools to simulate flames in different gravity environments. The models include a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism consisting of elementary reactions among the eight reactive species involved in hydrogen combustion, coupled to algorithms for convection, thermal conduction, viscosity, molecular and thermal diffusion, and external forces. The external force, gravity, can be put in any direction relative to flame propagation and can have a range of values. A combination of one-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations was used to investigate the effects of curvature and dilution on ignition and propagation of flames, to help resolve fundamental questions on the existence of flammability limits when there are no external losses or buoyancy forces in the system, to understand the mechanism leading to cellular instability, and to study the effects of gravity on the transition to cellular structure. A flame in a microgravity environment can be extinguished without external losses, and the mechanism leading to cellular structure is not preferential diffusion but a thermo-diffusive instability. The simulations have also lead to a better understanding of the interactions between buoyancy forces and the processes leading to thermo-diffusive instability.

  2. Structural instabilities involving time dependent materials : theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minahen, Timothy M.

    The creep buckling of viscoelastic structures is studied analytically and experimentally to investigate structural stability in the presence of time dependent materials. The theory of linear viscoelasticity is used to model polymeric column specimens subjected to constant compressive end loads. A strength of materials approach (Euler-Bernoulli beam theory) is employed to model the moment-curvature relation for the column. The growth of initial imperfections is calculated using the hereditary integral formulation. Solution techniques are developed for small displacements and then generalized to include the effects of large displacements and rotations. A failure criterion based on maximum deformation allows the column life to be estimated directly from the material relaxation modulus. A discussion generalizing the results to include plates and shells is presented.Rectangular cross-section polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) specimens with hinged boundary conditions are used to study viscoelastic buckling experimentally. Constant compressive end loads are applied using a servo-controlled load frame while the specimens are kept in a temperature cabinet at elevated temperatures (accelerating the creep behavior). Specimen shortening and out-of-plane deflections are monitored during the tests. The relaxation modulus of PMMA is approximated by a Prony-Dirichlet series and the model is used to simulate the laboratory experiments. Model and experimental results show good agreement during the "glassy" and slow growth phases of the column response. As the growth rate increases some deviations between theory and experiment are seen. It is shown that the deviations are not a result of geometric nonlinearities, but may, in part, be explained by material nonlinearities not accounted for in the model.

  3. Electrical conductivity of metals from real-time time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Xavier; Correa, Alfredo

    In this presentation, I will discuss how to apply real-time electron dynamics to study electronic currents in crystalline systems and, in particular, how to use this method to predict electrical conductivities in different regimes. This approach presents many interesting theoretical challenges associated to the representation of bulk systems as infinitely periodic. For example, in order to induce electronic currents in the system, we use a gauge transformation that allows us to include finite electric fields in the simulation. We have implemented this approach using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). This implementation allows us to induce, measure and visualize the current density as a function of time, in simulations with thousands of electrons (hundreds and even thousands of atoms). We have found that real-time TDDFT can describe how currents naturally decay in metals. From this dissipation process we can directly calculate the frequency-dependent conductivity, including the direct current (DC) conductivity that is not accessible from linear-response approaches like Kubo-Greenwood.

  4. Time-independent and time-dependent contributions to the unavailability of standby safety system components

    SciTech Connect

    Lofgren, E.V.; Uryasev, S.; Samanta, P.

    1997-02-01

    The unavailability of standby safety system components due to failures in nuclear power plants is considered to involve a time-independent and a time-dependent part. The former relates to the component`s unavailability from demand stresses due to usage, and the latter represents the component`s unavailability due to standby-time stresses related to the environment. In this paper, data from the nuclear plant reliability data system (NPRDS) were used to partition the component`s unavailability into the contributions from standby-time stress (i.e., due to environmental factors) and demand stress (i.e., due to usage). Analyses are presented of motor-operated valves (MOVs), motor-driven pumps (MDPs), and turbine-driven pumps (TDPs). MOVs fail predominantly (approx. 78 %) from environmental factors (standby-time stress failures). MDPs fail slightly more frequently from demand stresses (approx. 63 %) than standby-time stresses, while TDPs fail predominantly from standby-time stresses (approx. 78 %). Such partitions of component unavailability have many uses in risk-informed and performance-based regulation relating to modifications to Technical Specification, in-service testing, precise determination of dominant accident sequences, and implementation of maintenance rules.

  5. Time-independent and time-dependent contributions to the unavailability of standby safety system components

    SciTech Connect

    Lofgren, E.V.; Uryasev, S.; Samanta, P.

    1997-03-01

    The unavailability of standby safety system components due to failures in nuclear power plants is considered to involve a time independent and a time dependent part. The former relates to the component`s unavailability from demand stresses due to usage, and the latter represents the component`s unavailability due to standby time stresses related to the environment. In this paper, data from the nuclear plant reliability data system (NPRDS) were used to partition the component`s unavailability into the contributions from standby time stress (i.e., due to environmental factors) and demand stress (i.e., due to usage). Analyses are presented of motor operated valves (MOVs), motor driven pumps (MDPs), and turbine driven pumps (FDPs). MOVs fail predominantly (approx. 78%) from environmental factors (standby time stress failures). MDPs fail slightly more frequently from demand stresses (approx. 63%) than standby time stresses, while TDPs fail predominantly from standby time stresses (approx. 78%). Such partitions of component unavailability have many uses in risk informed and performance based regulation relating to modifications to Technical Specification, in-service testing, precise determination of dominant accident sequences, and implementation of maintenance rules.

  6. A Simple Arbitrary Solid Slicer

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, J

    2005-06-23

    The intersection of a given plane and an arbitrary (possibly non-convex, with multiple connectivities) meshed solid is exactly expressed by a set of planar cross-sections. A rule for marching on the edges of an arbitrary polyhedron is set for obtaining the topology of the cross-section. The method neither seeks triangulation of the surface mesh nor utilizes look-up tables, therefore it has optimal efficiency.

  7. Two-dimensional implicit time dependent calculations on adaptive unstructured meshes with time evolving boundaries.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Paul Tinphone; Jameson, Antony, 1934-; Baker, Timothy J.; Martinelli, Luigi

    2005-01-01

    An implicit multigrid-driven algorithm for two-dimensional incompressible laminar viscous flows has been coupled with a solution adaptation method and a mesh movement method for boundary movement. Time-dependent calculations are performed implicitly by regarding each time step as a steady-state problem in pseudo-time. The method of artificial compressibility is used to solve the flow equations. The solution mesh adaptation method performs local mesh refinement using an incremental Delaunay algorithm and mesh coarsening by means of edge collapse. Mesh movement is achieved by modeling the computational domain as an elastic solid and solving the equilibrium equations for the stress field. The solution adaptation method has been validated by comparison with experimental results and other computational results for low Reynolds number flow over a shedding circular cylinder. Preliminary validation of the mesh movement method has been demonstrated by a comparison with experimental results of an oscillating airfoil and with computational results for an oscillating cylinder.

  8. Time-dependent local density approximation study of attosecond time delays in the photoionization of xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Madjet, Mohamed; Chakraborty, Himadri

    2016-05-01

    We investigate Wigner-Smith (WS) time delays of the photoionization from various subshells of xenon using the time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA) with the Leeuwen and Baerends exchange-correlation functional. At the 4d giant dipole resonance region as well as near all the Cooper minimum anti-resonances in 5p, 5s and 4d photoemissions, effects of electron correlations uniquely determine the shapes of the emission quantum phase. The Wigner-Smith time delay derived from this phase indicates significant variations as a function of energy. The results qualitatively support our TDLDA predictions at the fullerene plasmon region and at 3p Cooper minimum in argon, and should encourage attosecond measurements of Xe photoemission via two-photon interferometric techniques, such as RABITT. The work is supported by the NSF, USA.

  9. Multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree method for fermions: Implementation, exactness, and few-fermion tunneling to open space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasshauer, Elke; Lode, Axel U. J.

    2016-03-01

    We report on an implementation of the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree method (MCTDH) for spin-polarized fermions (MCTDHF). Our approach is based on a mapping for operators in Fock space that allows a compact and efficient application of the Hamiltonian and solution of the MCTDHF equations of motion. Our implementation extends, builds on, and exploits the recursive implementation of MCTDH for bosons (r-mctdhb) package. Together with r-mctdhb, the present implementation of MCTDHF forms the mctdh-x package. We benchmark the accuracy of the algorithm with the harmonic interaction model and a time-dependent generalization thereof. These models consider parabolically trapped particles that interact through a harmonic interaction potential. We demonstrate that MCTDHF is capable of solving the time-dependent many-fermion Schrödinger equation to an arbitrary degree of precision and can hence yield numerically exact results even in the case of Hamiltonians with time-dependent one-body and two-body potentials. We study the problem of two initially parabolically confined and charged fermions tunneling through a barrier to open space. We demonstrate the validity of a model proposed previously for the many-body tunneling to open space of bosonic particles with contact interactions [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 13521 (2012), 10.1073/pnas.1201345109]. The many-fermion tunneling can be built up from sequentially happening single-fermion tunneling processes. The characteristic momenta of these processes are determined by the chemical potentials of trapped subsystems of smaller particle numbers: The escaped fermions convert the different chemical potentials into kinetic energy. Using the two-body correlation function, we present a detailed picture of the sequentiality of the process and are able to tell tunneling from over-the-barrier escape.

  10. ‘Slow’ time discretization: a versatile time propagator for the time-dependent Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bækhøj, Jens E.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Bojer Madsen, Lars

    2014-04-01

    We present the slow time discretization (STD) method for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The method is an extension of the slow variable discretization method for solving the stationary Schrödinger equation (Tolstikhin et al 1996 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 29 L389), with time treated as the ‘slow’ variable. It is based on an expansion of the state vector in a discrete variable representation basis, in time, and an adiabatic basis, in Hilbert space. This approach is much more efficient in implementation than a direct solution of the Born-Fock equations. The versatility of the STD time propagator is illustrated through calculations for one-dimensional models of the ionization of hydrogen by an intense laser pulse and resonance charge transfer in proton-hydrogen collisions. The method is shown to perform well in the broad dynamical range considered, from adiabatic to nonadiabatic regimes.

  11. Time-averaged and time-dependent computations of isothermal flowfields in a centerbody combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, L.; Raju, M. S.; Creed, M. J.; Memering, J. N.

    1984-12-01

    A numerical investigation of the near-wake region in a ducted bluff-body combustor by finite-difference computations is reported. The numerical predictions are based upon: (1) the Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes equations and the k-epsilon turbulence model; and (2) the time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations, The standard K-epsilon turbulence model was modified to account for the effect of streamline curvature and for the preferential influence of normal stresses. The time-averaged calculations addressed the turbulent mixing under isothermal conditions in: (1) the large and small-scale centerbody combustor configurations, due to annular air flow and central CO2 flow; and (2) the two-dimensional mixing-layer configuration, due to two streams of nitrogen at different velocities. The time-dependent calculations addressed the near-wake flowfield of the large-scale centerbody combustor configuration with only the annular air stream present. The Reynolds-averaged predictions examined the influence of the turbulence model corrections and geometric scale under varying annular and central flows on: (1) the axial and radial distributions of the mean and fluctuating components of the axial and radial velocities and of the mean CO2 concentrations; and (2) the axial and the radial locations of the vortex center, as well as the magnitude and location of the minimum centerline mean axial velocity. Comparison of the predicted results with experimental data emphasizes and clarifies the complex flowfield interactions of the recirculating near-wake region.

  12. Time-dependent Computational Studies of Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kailasanath, K.; Patnaik, Gopal; Oran, Elaine S.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the research performed at the Center for Reactive Flow and Dynamical Systems in the Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, at the Naval Research Laboratory, in support of NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Program. The primary focus of this research is on investigating fundamental questions concerning the propagation and extinction of premixed flames in earth gravity and in microgravity environments. Our approach is to use detailed time-dependent, multispecies, numerical models as tools to simulate flames in different gravity environments. The models include a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism consisting of elementary reactions among the eight reactive species involved in hydrogen combustion, coupled to algorithms for convection, thermal conduction, viscosity, molecular and thermal diffusion, and external forces. The external force, gravity, can be put in any direction relative to flame propagation and can have a range of values. Recently more advanced wall boundary conditions such as isothermal and no-slip have been added to the model. This enables the simulation of flames propagating in more practical systems than before. We have used the numerical simulations to investigate the effects of heat losses and buoyancy forces on the structure and stability of flames, to help resolve fundamental questions on the existence of flammability limits when there are no external losses or buoyancy forces in the system, to understand the interaction between the various processes leading to flame instabilities and extinguishment, and to study the dynamics of cell formation and splitting. Our studies have been able to bring out the differences between upward- and downward-propagating flames and predict the zero-gravity behavior of these flames. The simulations have also highlighted the dominant role of wall heat losses in the case of downward-propagating flames. The simulations have been able to qualitatively predict the

  13. Time dependent modeling at Mt. Etna volcano: an application to the 2005-2013 time interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavo', Flavio; McCaffrey, Robert; Palano, Mimmo

    2015-04-01

    Following the 2004-05 eruption, Mt. Etna activity has been characterized by the occurrence of a number of eruptive episodes (2006, 2008 and 2012) and more than 35 paroxysmal events (mainly during the 2011-2012 time interval). In addition, continuous downslope motion of its eastern flank has affected the volcano. This seaward motion has been characterized by some episodic phases combined with the occurrence of multiple slow slip events (SSEs). In order to obtain a comprehensive view of the time evolution of these observed features and thus provide new insight into the ground deformation pattern of Mt. Etna, here we use time-dependent modeling of the three-component daily time series of all GNSS continuous stations installed on the volcanic edifice. All GNSS data spanning the 2005-2013 time interval were processed using the GAMIT/GLOBK software (Herring et al. 2010) following the strategy described in Gonzalez and Palano (2014). Estimated GNSS daily time series were referred to the "Etn@ref" reference frame (a local reference frame computed to isolate the Mt. Etna volcanic deformation from the background tectonic pattern; Palano et al. 2010). Using these daily time series as input we performed a time-dependent, non-linear inversion using the TDEFNODE code (McCaffrey, 2009). We used TDEFNODE to invert the time series to model simultaneously the steady tectonic kinematics plus the transient volcanic and tectonic sources, thus obtaining a realistic model of the complex area. Preliminary results allow us to track, over the considered time interval, the volume changes associated to the activity of a magmatic reservoir located at a depth of about 5 km b.s.l. beneath the upper western flank of the volcano, as well as the location and associated magnitude of four SSEs below the eastern flank. In addition, we attempted a preliminary subdivision of the southern and eastern flanks of Mt. Etna into four tectonic blocks which provide a reasonable representation of the observed

  14. ATUS-PRO: A FEM-based solver for the time-dependent and stationary Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marojević, Želimir; Göklü, Ertan; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2016-05-01

    ATUS-PRO is a solver-package written in C++ designed for the calculation of numerical solutions of the stationary- and the time dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation for local two-particle contact interaction utilising finite element methods. These are implemented by means of the deal.II library (Bangerth et al., 0000) [1], (Bangerth et al., 2007) [2]. The code can be used in order to perform simulations of Bose-Einstein condensates in gravito-optical surface traps, isotropic and full anisotropic harmonic traps, as well as for arbitrary trap geometries. A special feature of this package is the possibility to calculate non-ground state solutions (topological modes, excited states) (Marojević et al., 2013), (Yukalov et al., 1997, 2004) [3,4] for an arbitrarily high non-linearity term. The solver-package is designed to run on parallel distributed machines and can be applied to problems in one, two, or three spatial dimensions with axial symmetry or in Cartesian coordinates. The time dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation is solved by means of the fully implicit Crank-Nicolson method, whereas stationary states are obtained with a modified version based on our own constrained Newton method (Marojević et al., 2013). The latter method enables to find the excited state solutions.

  15. Linear MHD Wave Propagation in Time-Dependent Flux Tube. III. Leaky Waves in Zero-Beta Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we evaluate the time-dependent wave properties and the damping rate of propagating fast magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) waves when energy leakage into a magnetised atmosphere is considered. By considering a cold plasma, initial investigations into the evolution of MHD wave damping through this energy leakage will take place. The time-dependent governing equations have been derived previously in Williamson and Erdélyi (2014a, Solar Phys. 289, 899 - 909) and are now solved when the assumption of evanescent wave propagation in the outside of the waveguide is relaxed. The dispersion relation for leaky waves applicable to a straight magnetic field is determined in both an arbitrary tube and a thin-tube approximation. By analytically solving the dispersion relation in the thin-tube approximation, the explicit expressions for the temporal evolution of the dynamic frequency and wavenumber are determined. The damping rate is, then, obtained from the dispersion relation and is shown to decrease as the density ratio increases. By comparing the decrease in damping rate to the increase in damping for a stationary system, as shown, we aim to point out that energy leakage may not be as efficient a damping mechanism as previously thought.

  16. Generalized Gibbs ensembles for time-dependent processes

    SciTech Connect

    Chomaz, Ph.; Juillet, O.

    2005-11-01

    An information theory description of finite systems explicitly evolving in time is presented for classical as well as quantum mechanics. We impose a variational principle on the Shannon entropy at a given time while the constraints are set at a former time. The resulting density matrix deviates from the Boltzmann kernel and contains explicit time odd components which can be interpreted as collective flows. Applications include quantum Brownian motion, linear response theory, out of equilibrium situations for which the relevant information is collected within different time scales before entropy saturation, and the dynamics of the expansion.

  17. Polynomial-time-scaling quantum dynamics with time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Christov, Ivan P

    2009-05-21

    Here we study the dynamics of many-body quantum systems using the time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo method where the evolution is described by ensembles of particles and guide waves. The exponential time scaling inherent to the quantum many-body problem is reduced to polynomial-time computation by solving concurrently a set of coupled Schrodinger equations for the guide waves in physical space and a set of first-order equations for the Monte Carlo walkers. We use effective potentials to account for the local and nonlocal quantum correlations in time-varying fields, where for fermionic states an exchange "hole" is introduced explicitly through screened Coulomb potentials. The walker distributions for the ground states of para- and ortho-helium reproduce well the statistical properties, such as the electron-pair density function, of the real atoms. Our predictions for the dipole response and the ionization of an atom exposed to strong ultrashort optical pulse are in good agreement with the exact results. PMID:19391581

  18. A fast real time time-dependent density functional theory simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Wang, Zhi; Li, Shu-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    We have developed an efficient real-time time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method that can increase the effective time step from <1 attosecond in traditional methods to 0.1 0.5 femtosecond. Our algorithm, which carries out the non-adiabatic molecular dynamics TDDFT simulations, can have comparable speed to the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) ab initio molecular dynamics (MD). As an application, we simulated the process of an energetic Cl particle colliding onto a monolayer of MoSe2. Our simulations show a significant energy transfer from the kinetic energy of the Cl particle to the electronic energy of MoSe2, and the result of TDDFT is very different from that of BO MD simulations. This new algorithm will enable the use of real-time TD-DFT for many new simulations involving carrier dynamics and electron-phonon couplings. This work is supported by the Director, Office of Science, BES/MSED, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, through the Material Theory program in LBNL. Zhi Wang is supported by the China Scholarship Council.

  19. Network-based estimation of time-dependent noise in GPS position time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, Ksenia; Segall, Paul; DeMets, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Some estimates of GPS velocity uncertainties are very low, 0.1 mm/year with 10 years of data. Yet, residual velocities relative to rigid plate models in nominally stable plate interiors can be an order of magnitude larger. This discrepancy could be caused by underestimating low-frequency time-dependent noise in position time series, such as random walk. We show that traditional estimators, based on individual time series, are insensitive to low-amplitude random walk, yet such noise significantly increases GPS velocity uncertainties. Here, we develop a method for determining representative noise parameters in GPS position time series, by analyzing an entire network simultaneously, which we refer to as the network noise estimator (NNE). We analyze data from the aseismic central-eastern USA, assuming that residual motions relative to North America, corrected for glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), represent noise. The position time series are decomposed into signal (plate rotation and GIA) and noise components. NNE simultaneously processes multiple stations with a Kalman filter and solves for average noise components for the network by maximum likelihood estimation. Synthetic tests show that NNE correctly estimates even low-level random walk, thus providing better estimates of velocity uncertainties than conventional, single station methods. To test NNE on actual data, we analyze a heterogeneous 15 station GPS network from the central-eastern USA, assuming the noise is a sum of random walk, flicker and white noise. For the horizontal time series, NNE finds higher average random walk than the standard individual station-based method, leading to velocity uncertainties a factor of 2 higher than traditional methods.

  20. Preconditioning the pressure operator for the time dependent Stokes problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    In implicit time stepping procedures for the linearized Navier Stokes equations, a linear perturbed Stokes problem must be solved at each time step. Many methods for doing this require a good preconditioner for the resulting pressure operator (Schur complement). In contrast to the time independent Stokes equations where the pressure operator is well conditioned, the pressure operator for the perturbed system becomes more illconditioned as the time step is reduced (and/or the Reynolds number is increased). The authors describe the method for solving the coupled velocity/pressure systems and, in particular, show how to construct good preconditioners for the poorly conditioned pressure operator.

  1. Two-electron Rabi oscillations in real-time time-dependent density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Habenicht, Bradley F.; Tani, Noriyuki P.; Provorse, Makenzie R.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2014-11-14

    We investigate the Rabi oscillations of electrons excited by an applied electric field in several simple molecular systems using time-dependent configuration interaction (TDCI) and real-time time-dependent density-functional theory (RT-TDDFT) dynamics. While the TDCI simulations exhibit the expected single-electron Rabi oscillations at a single resonant electric field frequency, Rabi oscillations in the RT-TDDFT simulations are a two-electron process. The existence of two-electron Rabi oscillations is determined both by full population inversion between field-free molecular orbitals and the behavior of the instantaneous dipole moment during the simulations. Furthermore, the Rabi oscillations in RT-TDDFT are subject to an intensity threshold of the electric field, below which Rabi oscillations do not occur and above which the two-electron Rabi oscillations occur at a broad range of frequencies. It is also shown that at field intensities near the threshold intensity, the field frequency predicted to induce Rabi oscillations by linear response TDDFT only produces detuned Rabi oscillations. Instead, the field frequency that yields the full two-electron population inversion and Rabi oscillation behavior is shown to be the average of single-electron transition frequencies from the ground S{sub 0} state and the doubly-excited S{sub 2} state. The behavior of the two-electron Rabi oscillations is rationalized via two possible models. The first model is a multi-photon process that results from the electric field interacting with the three level system such that three level Rabi oscillations may occur. The second model suggests that the mean-field nature of RT-TDDFT induces paired electron propagation.

  2. Two-electron Rabi oscillations in real-time time-dependent density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Habenicht, Bradley F; Tani, Noriyuki P; Provorse, Makenzie R; Isborn, Christine M

    2014-11-14

    We investigate the Rabi oscillations of electrons excited by an applied electric field in several simple molecular systems using time-dependent configuration interaction (TDCI) and real-time time-dependent density-functional theory (RT-TDDFT) dynamics. While the TDCI simulations exhibit the expected single-electron Rabi oscillations at a single resonant electric field frequency, Rabi oscillations in the RT-TDDFT simulations are a two-electron process. The existence of two-electron Rabi oscillations is determined both by full population inversion between field-free molecular orbitals and the behavior of the instantaneous dipole moment during the simulations. Furthermore, the Rabi oscillations in RT-TDDFT are subject to an intensity threshold of the electric field, below which Rabi oscillations do not occur and above which the two-electron Rabi oscillations occur at a broad range of frequencies. It is also shown that at field intensities near the threshold intensity, the field frequency predicted to induce Rabi oscillations by linear response TDDFT only produces detuned Rabi oscillations. Instead, the field frequency that yields the full two-electron population inversion and Rabi oscillation behavior is shown to be the average of single-electron transition frequencies from the ground S0 state and the doubly-excited S2 state. The behavior of the two-electron Rabi oscillations is rationalized via two possible models. The first model is a multi-photon process that results from the electric field interacting with the three level system such that three level Rabi oscillations may occur. The second model suggests that the mean-field nature of RT-TDDFT induces paired electron propagation. PMID:25399137

  3. Scale-dependent intrinsic entropies of complex time series.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jia-Rong; Peng, Chung-Kang; Huang, Norden E

    2016-04-13

    Multi-scale entropy (MSE) was developed as a measure of complexity for complex time series, and it has been applied widely in recent years. The MSE algorithm is based on the assumption that biological systems possess the ability to adapt and function in an ever-changing environment, and these systems need to operate across multiple temporal and spatial scales, such that their complexity is also multi-scale and hierarchical. Here, we present a systematic approach to apply the empirical mode decomposition algorithm, which can detrend time series on various time scales, prior to analysing a signal's complexity by measuring the irregularity of its dynamics on multiple time scales. Simulated time series of fractal Gaussian noise and human heartbeat time series were used to study the performance of this new approach. We show that our method can successfully quantify the fractal properties of the simulated time series and can accurately distinguish modulations in human heartbeat time series in health and disease. PMID:26953181

  4. Estimating time-dependent connectivity in marine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defne, Zafer; Ganju, Neil K.; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo

    2016-02-01

    Hydrodynamic connectivity describes the sources and destinations of water parcels within a domain over a given time. When combined with biological models, it can be a powerful concept to explain the patterns of constituent dispersal within marine ecosystems. However, providing connectivity metrics for a given domain is a three-dimensional problem: two dimensions in space to define the sources and destinations and a time dimension to evaluate connectivity at varying temporal scales. If the time scale of interest is not predefined, then a general approach is required to describe connectivity over different time scales. For this purpose, we have introduced the concept of a "retention clock" that highlights the change in connectivity through time. Using the example of connectivity between protected areas within Barnegat Bay, New Jersey, we show that a retention clock matrix is an informative tool for multitemporal analysis of connectivity.

  5. Time-dependent density fluctuations in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, Conor J.; English, Niall J.

    2016-04-01

    Temporal system-mass-density fluctuation analysis was performed on liquid-water molecular-dynamics simulations at ambient pressure and 200 and 300 K, in three increasingly-large systems. A prominent mode in system-density fluctuations was observed at molecular-librational frequencies of ∼600-800 cm-1 (with pronounced temperature dependence). This mode displayed marked system-size dependence, disappearing for larger systems. Persistent system-density fluctuations were clearly evident at 10-11 cm-1 for all systems and temperatures, with lower-amplitude 'overtones' evident only in larger systems. It is conjectured that this reflects ∼3 ps timescales observed in earlier studies for dissipation of local-density fluctuations in liquid water in this 200-300 K temperature range.

  6. Numerical implementation of inelastic time dependent and time independent, finite strain constitutive equtions in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Key, S.W.; Krieg, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A number of complex issues are addressed which will allow the incorporation of finite strain, inelastic material behavior into the piecewise numerical construction of solutions in solid mechanics. Without recourse to extensive continuum mechanics preliminaries, an elementary time independent plasticity model, an elementary time dependent creep model, and a viscoelastic model are introduced as examples of constitutive equations which are routinely used in engineering calculations. The constitutive equations are all suitable for problems involving large deformations and finite strains. The plasticity and creep models are in rate form and use the symmetric part of the velocity gradient or the stretching to compute the co-rotational time derivative of the Cauchy stress. The viscoelastic model computes the current value of the Cauchy stress from a hereditary integral of a materially invariant form of the stretching history. The current configuration is selected for evaluation of equilibrium as opposed to either the reference configuration or the last established equilibrium configuration. The process of strain incrementation is examined in some depth and the stretching evaluated at the midinterval multiplied by the time step is identified as the appropriate finite strain increment to use with the selected form of the constitutive equations. Discussed is the conversion of rotation rates based on the spin into incremental orthogonal rotations which are then used to update stresses and state variables due to rigid body rotation during the load increment. Comments and references to the literature are directed at numerical integration of the constitutive equations with an emphasis on doing this accurately, if not exactly, for any time step and stretching. This material taken collectively provides an approach to numerical implementation which is marked by its simplicity.

  7. Forced fluid dynamics from gravity in arbitrary dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, T.

    2014-03-01

    We consider long wavelength solutions to the Einstein-dilaton system with negative cosmological constant which are dual, under the AdS/CFT correspondence, to solutions of the conformal relativistic Navier-Stokes equations with a dilaton-dependent forcing term. Certain forced fluid flows are known to exhibit turbulence; holographic duals of forced fluid dynamics are therefore of particular interest as they may aid efforts towards an explicit model of holographic steady state turbulence. In recent work, Bhattacharyya et al. have constructed long wavelength asymptotically locally AdS5 bulk space-times with a slowly varying boundary dilaton field which are dual to forced fluid flows on the 4-dimensional boundary. In this paper, we generalise their work to arbitrary space-time dimensions; we explicitly compute the dual bulk metric, the fluid dynamical stress tensor and Lagrangian to second order in a boundary derivative expansion.

  8. Two-parameter Failure Model Improves Time-independent and Time-dependent Failure Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, R L

    2004-01-27

    A new analytical model for predicting failure under a generalized, triaxial stress state was developed by the author and initially reported in 1984. The model was validated for predicting failure under elevated-temperature creep-rupture conditions. Biaxial data for three alloy steels, Types 304 and 316 stainless steels and Inconel 600, demonstrated two to three orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed creep-rupture times as compared to the classical failure models of Mises, Tresca, and Rankine. In 1990, the new model was incorporated into American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N47-29 for design of components operating under creep-rupture conditions. The current report provides additional validation of the model for predicting failure under time-independent conditions and also outlines a methodology for predicting failure under cyclic, time-dependent, creep-fatigue conditions. The later extension of the methodology may have the potential to improve failure predictions there as well. These results are relevant to most design applications, but they have special relevance to high-performance design applications such as components for high-pressure equipment, nuclear reactors, and jet engines.

  9. Solving time-dependent two-dimensional eddy current problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Min Eig; Hariharan, S. I.; Ida, Nathan

    1990-01-01

    Transient eddy current calculations are presented for an EM wave-scattering and field-penetrating case in which a two-dimensional transverse magnetic field is incident on a good (i.e., not perfect) and infinitely long conductor. The problem thus posed is of initial boundary-value interface type, where the boundary of the conductor constitutes the interface. A potential function is used for time-domain modeling of the situation, and finite difference-time domain techniques are used to march the potential function explicitly in time. Attention is given to the case of LF radiation conditions.

  10. Time-dependent quantum transport through an interacting quantum dot beyond sequential tunneling: second-order quantum rate equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, B.; Ding, G. H.; Lei, X. L.

    2015-05-01

    A general theoretical formulation for the effect of a strong on-site Coulomb interaction on the time-dependent electron transport through a quantum dot under the influence of arbitrary time-varying bias voltages and/or external fields is presented, based on slave bosons and the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function (GF) techniques. To avoid the difficulties of computing double-time GFs, we generalize the propagation scheme recently developed by Croy and Saalmann to combine the auxiliary-mode expansion with the celebrated Lacroix's decoupling approximation in dealing with the second-order correlated GFs and then establish a closed set of coupled equations of motion, called second-order quantum rate equations (SOQREs), for an exact description of transient dynamics of electron correlated tunneling. We verify that the stationary solution of our SOQREs is able to correctly describe the Kondo effect on a qualitative level. Moreover, a comparison with other methods, such as the second-order von Neumann approach and Hubbard-I approximation, is performed. As illustrations, we investigate the transient current behaviors in response to a step voltage pulse and a harmonic driving voltage, and linear admittance as well, in the cotunneling regime.

  11. Ultrafast strong-field photoelectron emission from biased metal surfaces: exact solution to time-dependent Schrödinger Equation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven ultrafast electron emission offers the possibility of manipulation and control of coherent electron motion in ultrashort spatiotemporal scales. Here, an analytical solution is constructed for the highly nonlinear electron emission from a dc biased metal surface illuminated by a single frequency laser, by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation exactly. The solution is valid for arbitrary combinations of dc electric field, laser electric field, laser frequency, metal work function and Fermi level. Various emission mechanisms, such as multiphoton absorption or emission, optical or dc field emission, are all included in this single formulation. The transition between different emission processes is analyzed in detail. The time-dependent emission current reveals that intense current modulation may be possible even with a low intensity laser, by merely increasing the applied dc bias. The results provide insights into the electron pulse generation and manipulation for many novel applications based on ultrafast laser-induced electron emission. PMID:26818710

  12. Ultrafast strong-field photoelectron emission from biased metal surfaces: exact solution to time-dependent Schrödinger Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven ultrafast electron emission offers the possibility of manipulation and control of coherent electron motion in ultrashort spatiotemporal scales. Here, an analytical solution is constructed for the highly nonlinear electron emission from a dc biased metal surface illuminated by a single frequency laser, by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation exactly. The solution is valid for arbitrary combinations of dc electric field, laser electric field, laser frequency, metal work function and Fermi level. Various emission mechanisms, such as multiphoton absorption or emission, optical or dc field emission, are all included in this single formulation. The transition between different emission processes is analyzed in detail. The time-dependent emission current reveals that intense current modulation may be possible even with a low intensity laser, by merely increasing the applied dc bias. The results provide insights into the electron pulse generation and manipulation for many novel applications based on ultrafast laser-induced electron emission.

  13. Ultrafast strong-field photoelectron emission from biased metal surfaces: exact solution to time-dependent Schrödinger Equation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y Y

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven ultrafast electron emission offers the possibility of manipulation and control of coherent electron motion in ultrashort spatiotemporal scales. Here, an analytical solution is constructed for the highly nonlinear electron emission from a dc biased metal surface illuminated by a single frequency laser, by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation exactly. The solution is valid for arbitrary combinations of dc electric field, laser electric field, laser frequency, metal work function and Fermi level. Various emission mechanisms, such as multiphoton absorption or emission, optical or dc field emission, are all included in this single formulation. The transition between different emission processes is analyzed in detail. The time-dependent emission current reveals that intense current modulation may be possible even with a low intensity laser, by merely increasing the applied dc bias. The results provide insights into the electron pulse generation and manipulation for many novel applications based on ultrafast laser-induced electron emission. PMID:26818710

  14. Time-ordering dependence of measurements in teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertlmann, Reinhold A.; Narnhofer, Heide; Thirring, Walter

    2013-03-01

    We trace back the phenomenon of "delayed-choice entanglement swapping" as it was realized in a recent experiment to the commutativity of the projection operators that are involved in the corresponding measurement process. We also propose an experimental set-up which depends on the order of successive measurements corresponding to noncommutative projection operators. In this case entanglement swapping is used to teleport a quantum state from Alice to Bob, where Bob has now the possibility to examine the noncommutativity within the quantum history.

  15. Exact solution of a quantum forced time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeon, Kyu Hwang; George, Thomas F.; Um, Chung IN

    1992-01-01

    The Schrodinger equation is used to exactly evaluate the propagator, wave function, energy expectation values, uncertainty values, and coherent state for a harmonic oscillator with a time dependent frequency and an external driving time dependent force. These quantities represent the solution of the classical equation of motion for the time dependent harmonic oscillator.

  16. Time-dependent deformation of titanium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.; Bahei-El-din, Y. A.; Mirdamadi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element program called VISCOPAC was developed and used to conduct a micromechanics analysis of titanium metal matrix composites. The VISCOPAC program uses a modified Eisenberg-Yen thermo-viscoplastic constitutive model to predict matrix behavior under thermomechanical fatigue loading. The analysis incorporated temperature-dependent elastic properties in the fiber and temperature-dependent viscoplastic properties in the matrix. The material model was described and the necessary material constants were determined experimentally. Fiber-matrix interfacial behavior was analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model. The thermal residual stresses due to the fabrication cycle were predicted with a failed interface, The failed interface resulted in lower thermal residual stresses in the matrix and fiber. Stresses due to a uniform transverse load were calculated at two temperatures, room temperature and an elevated temperature of 650 C. At both temperatures, a large stress concentration was calculated when the interface had failed. The results indicate the importance of accuracy accounting for fiber-matrix interface failure and the need for a micromechanics-based analytical technique to understand and predict the behavior of titanium metal matrix composites.

  17. Mechanics of Single Cells: Rheology, Time Dependence, and Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Massiera, Gladys; Van Citters, Kathleen M.; Biancaniello, Paul L.; Crocker, John C.

    2007-01-01

    The results of mechanical measurements on single cultured epithelial cells using both magnetic twisting cytometry (MTC) and laser tracking microrheology (LTM) are described. Our unique approach uses laser deflection for high-performance tracking of cell-adhered magnetic beads either in response to an oscillatory magnetic torque (MTC) or due to random Brownian or ATP-dependent forces (LTM). This approach is well suited for accurately determining the rheology of single cells, the study of temporal and cell-to-cell variations in the MTC signal amplitude, and assessing the statistical character of the tracers' random motion in detail. The temporal variation of the MTC rocking amplitude is surprisingly large and manifests as a frequency-independent multiplicative factor having a 1/f spectrum in living cells, which disappears upon ATP depletion. In the epithelial cells we study, random bead position fluctuations are Gaussian to the limits of detection both in the Brownian and ATP-dependent cases, unlike earlier studies on other cell types. PMID:17693461

  18. Time-Dependent Changes in a Shampoo Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2000-10-01

    This article demonstrates the fascinating phenomenon of time evolution of a shampoo bubble through experiments that can be performed by undergraduate students. The changes in thickness of the bubble films with time are followed by UV-vis spectroscopy. The change in chemical composition as a bubble film evolves is monitored by FTIR spectroscopy. It is observed that the change in thickness of a typical shampoo bubble film enclosed in a container is gradual and slow, and the hydrocarbon components of the bubble drain from the bubble much more slowly than water. An additional agent, such as acetonitrile, strikingly alters the dynamics of evolution of such a bubble.

  19. On the Time-Dependent Analysis of Gamow Decay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durr, Detlef; Grummt, Robert; Kolb, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Gamow's explanation of the exponential decay law uses complex "eigenvalues" and exponentially growing "eigenfunctions". This raises the question, how Gamow's description fits into the quantum mechanical description of nature, which is based on real eigenvalues and square integrable wavefunctions. Observing that the time evolution of any…

  20. Climate impacts of energy technologies depend on emissions timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Morgan R.; Trancik, Jessika E.

    2014-05-01

    Energy technologies emit greenhouse gases with differing radiative efficiencies and atmospheric lifetimes. Standard practice for evaluating technologies, which uses the global warming potential (GWP) to compare the integrated radiative forcing of emitted gases over a fixed time horizon, does not acknowledge the importance of a changing background climate relative to climate change mitigation targets. Here we demonstrate that the GWP misvalues the impact of CH4-emitting technologies as mid-century approaches, and we propose a new class of metrics to evaluate technologies based on their time of use. The instantaneous climate impact (ICI) compares gases in an expected radiative forcing stabilization year, and the cumulative climate impact (CCI) compares their time-integrated radiative forcing up to a stabilization year. Using these dynamic metrics, we quantify the climate impacts of technologies and show that high-CH4-emitting energy sources become less advantageous over time. The impact of natural gas for transportation, with CH4 leakage, exceeds that of gasoline within 1-2 decades for a commonly cited 3 W m-2 stabilization target. The impact of algae biodiesel overtakes that of corn ethanol within 2-3 decades, where algae co-products are used to produce biogas and corn co-products are used for animal feed. The proposed metrics capture the changing importance of CH4 emissions as a climate threshold is approached, thereby addressing a major shortcoming of the GWP for technology evaluation.

  1. Open Quantum Transport and Non-Hermitian Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elenewski, Justin; Zhao, Yanxiang; Chen, Hanning

    Sub-nanometer electronic devices are notoriously difficult to simulate, with the most widely adopted transport schemes predicting currents that diverge from experiment by several orders of magnitude. This deviation arises from numerous factors, including the inability of these methods to accommodate dynamic processes such as charge reorganization. A promising alternative entails the direct propagation of an electronic structure calculation, as exemplified by real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT). Unfortunately this framework is inherently that of a closed system, and modifications must be made to handle incoming and outgoing particle fluxes. To this end, we establish a formal correspondence between the quantum master equation for an open, many-particle system and its description in terms of RT-TDDFT and non-Hermitian boundary potentials. By dynamically constraining the particle density within the boundary regions corresponding to the device leads, a simulation may be selectively converged to the non-equilibrium steady state associated with a given electrostatic bias. Our numerical tests demonstrate that this algorithm is both highly stable and readily integrated into existing electronic structure frameworks

  2. Scale and time dependence of serial correlations in word-length time series of written texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Aguilar-Cornejo, M.; Femat, R.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-11-01

    This work considered the quantitative analysis of large written texts. To this end, the text was converted into a time series by taking the sequence of word lengths. The detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) was used for characterizing long-range serial correlations of the time series. To this end, the DFA was implemented within a rolling window framework for estimating the variations of correlations, quantified in terms of the scaling exponent, strength along the text. Also, a filtering derivative was used to compute the dependence of the scaling exponent relative to the scale. The analysis was applied to three famous English-written literary narrations; namely, Alice in Wonderland (by Lewis Carrol), Dracula (by Bram Stoker) and Sense and Sensibility (by Jane Austen). The results showed that high correlations appear for scales of about 50-200 words, suggesting that at these scales the text contains the stronger coherence. The scaling exponent was not constant along the text, showing important variations with apparent cyclical behavior. An interesting coincidence between the scaling exponent variations and changes in narrative units (e.g., chapters) was found. This suggests that the scaling exponent obtained from the DFA is able to detect changes in narration structure as expressed by the usage of words of different lengths.

  3. Cumulative Beam Breakup in Linear Accelerators with Arbitrary Beam Current Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen

    2003-06-01

    An analytical formalism for the solution of cumulative beam breakup in linear accelerators with arbitrary time dependence of beam current is presented, and a closed-form expression for the time and position dependence of the transverse displacement is obtained. It is applied to the behavior of single bunches and to the steady state and transient behavior of dc beams and beams composed of point-like and finite length bunches. This formalism is also applied to the problem of cumulative beam breakup in the presence of random displacement of cavities and focusing elements, and a general solution is presented.

  4. Scattering theory for arbitrary potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyrov, A.S.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A.T.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.

    2005-09-15

    The fundamental quantities of potential scattering theory are generalized to accommodate long-range interactions. Definitions for the scattering amplitude and wave operators valid for arbitrary interactions including potentials with a Coulomb tail are presented. It is shown that for the Coulomb potential the generalized amplitude gives the physical on-shell amplitude without recourse to a renormalization procedure.

  5. Arbitrary and Capricious Nonrenewal Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phay, Robert E.

    This chapter discusses the question, To what degree is the school board limited by the requirement that it not be arbitrary or capricious in deciding not to renew a probationary teacher? When teachers have been notified that their employment contracts will not be renewed, they are responsible for initiating a review of the decision. If the school…

  6. DEVELOPMENT AND PEER REVIEW OF TIME-TO-EFFECT MODELS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF NEUROTOXICITY AND OTHER TIME DEPENDENT DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurobehavioral studies pose unique challenges for dose-response modeling, including small sample size and relatively large intra-subject variation, repeated measurements over time, multiple endpoints with both continuous and ordinal scales, and time dependence of risk characteri...

  7. Maximum time-dependent space-charge limited diode currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griswold, M. E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent papers claim that a one dimensional (1D) diode with a time-varying voltage drop can transmit current densities that exceed the Child-Langmuir (CL) limit on average, apparently contradicting a previous conjecture that there is a hard limit on the average current density across any 1D diode, as t → ∞, that is equal to the CL limit. However, these claims rest on a different definition of the CL limit, namely, a comparison between the time-averaged diode current and the adiabatic average of the expression for the stationary CL limit. If the current were considered as a function of the maximum applied voltage, rather than the average applied voltage, then the original conjecture would not have been refuted.

  8. Time-dependent charge renormalization procedure in QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Q. Z.; Betke, J.; Su, Q.; Grobe, R.

    2015-09-01

    We examine the formation process of the vacuum polarization cloud around a localized charge with space-time resolution permitting us to view the traditional charge renormalization procedure from a dynamical perspective. The asymptotic steady-state charge cloud found in the long-time limit (after the subtraction of a suitable term) matches the distribution predicted by standard perturbative propagator techniques based on Feynman diagrams. This match demonstrates that an alternative (classical-field approximation based) approach can predict the nonlinear properties of the vacuum state. It turns out that some aspects of the polarization dynamics suggest that the vacuum can be viewed as a classical dielectric medium, while other aspects are purely quantum mechanical in nature and cannot be predicted from the Maxwell theory for classical fields.

  9. Time-dependent accident sequences including human actions

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolakis, G.; Chu, T.L.

    1984-02-01

    During an accident, transitions between plant states can occur due to operator intervention and the failure of systems while running. The latter cause of transition is much less likely than the first, which includes errors of commission and omission as well as recovery of lost functions. A methodology has been developed to model these transitions in the time domain. As an example, it is applied to the analysis of Three-Mile-Island-type accidents. Statistical evidence is collected and used in assessing the frequency of stuck-open power-operated relief valves at Babcock and Wilcox plants as well as the frequency of misdiagnosis. Statistical data are also used in modeling the timing of operator actions during the accident, i.e., turning off and on the high-pressure injection system and closing the block valves.

  10. Path-Dependent Travel Time Prediction Variance and Covariance for a Global Tomographic P- and S-Velocity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipp, J. R.; Ballard, S.; Begnaud, M. L.; Encarnacao, A. V.; Young, C. J.; Phillips, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    Recently our combined SNL-LANL research team has succeeded in developing a global, seamless 3D tomographic P- and S-velocity model (SALSA3D) that provides superior first P and first S travel time predictions at both regional and teleseismic distances. However, given the variable data quality and uneven data sampling associated with this type of model, it is essential that there be a means to calculate high-quality estimates of the path-dependent variance and covariance associated with the predicted travel times of ray paths through the model. In this paper, we describe a methodology for accomplishing this by exploiting the full model covariance matrix and show examples of path-dependent travel time prediction uncertainty computed from our latest tomographic model. Typical global 3D SALSA3D models have on the order of 1/2 million nodes, so the challenge in calculating the covariance matrix is formidable: 0.9 TB storage for 1/2 of a symmetric matrix, necessitating an Out-Of-Core (OOC) blocked matrix solution technique. With our approach the tomography matrix (G which includes a prior model covariance constraint) is multiplied by its transpose (GTG) and written in a blocked sub-matrix fashion. We employ a distributed parallel solution paradigm that solves for (GTG)-1 by assigning blocks to individual processing nodes for matrix decomposition update and scaling operations. We first find the Cholesky decomposition of GTG which is subsequently inverted. Next, we employ OOC matrix multiplication methods to calculate the model covariance matrix from (GTG)-1 and an assumed data covariance matrix. Given the model covariance matrix, we solve for the travel-time covariance associated with arbitrary ray-paths by summing the model covariance along both ray paths. Setting the paths equal and taking the square root yields the travel prediction uncertainty for the single path.

  11. Transient scattering from a thin arbitrary wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, S. Ananda; Rao, Sadasiva M.

    1988-08-01

    The conjugate gradient (CG) method is applied to solve the problem of transient scattering from a thin arbitrary wire. The method is simple, efficient, and yields more accurate results than the marching-on-in-time procedure. Numerical examples for the case of a bent wire, a wire with discontinuous radii, and a circular loop are presented to highlight the advantages of this procedure. It is concluded that the occurrence of late-time oscillations may not be due to the accumulation of truncation of roundoff errors. These oscillations may be attributed to the insufficient sampling of the structure.

  12. Time-dependent, irreversible entropy production and geodynamics.

    PubMed

    Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Karrech, Ali; Chua, Hui Tong; Horowitz, Franklin G; Yuen, Dave

    2010-01-13

    We present an application of entropy production as an abstraction tool for complex processes in geodynamics. Geodynamic theories are generally based on the principle of maximum dissipation being equivalent to the maximum entropy production. This represents a restriction of the second law of thermodynamics to its upper bound. In this paper, starting from the equation of motion, the first law of thermodynamics and decomposition of the entropy into reversible and irreversible terms,(1) we come up with an entropy balance equation in an integral form. We propose that the extrema of this equation give upper and lower bounds that can be used to constrain geodynamics solutions. This procedure represents an extension of the classical limit analysis theory of continuum mechanics, which considers only stress and strain rates. The new approach, however, extends the analysis to temperature-dependent problems where thermal feedbacks can play a significant role. We apply the proposed procedure to a simple convective/conductive heat transfer problem such as in a planetary system. The results show that it is not necessary to have a detailed knowledge of the material parameters inside the planet to derive upper and lower bounds for self-driven heat transfer processes. The analysis can be refined by considering precise dissipation processes such as plasticity and viscous creep. PMID:19948557

  13. Preferential growth: exact solution of the time-dependent distributions.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, L; Kertész, J

    2001-05-01

    We consider a preferential growth model where particles are added one by one to the system consisting of clusters of particles. A new particle can either form a new cluster (with probability q) or join an already existing cluster with a probability proportional to the size thereof. We calculate exactly the probability Pi(k,t) that the size of the ith cluster at time t is k. We analyze the asymptotics, the scaling properties of the size distribution and of the mean size, as well as the relation of our system to recent network models. PMID:11414892

  14. Age-dependent changes in central somatosensory conduction time.

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Hedderich, J

    1982-01-01

    Cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials(SEPs) were recorded in 45 normal subjects. Absolute peak latencies and latency differences between the components P7, N9, N11, N13, P17 and N20 were measured. Subjects aged 40-60 years had significantly longer latencies of N13 and N20 than subjects aged 15-39 years. Moreover, statistical analysis revealed a significant prolongation of N9-N13, N11-N13 and N13-N20 transit times in older subjects. Possible connections with known morphological age-related findings are discussed. PMID:6288387

  15. Time dependent optimal switching controls in online selling models

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Cohen, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We present a method to incorporate dishonesty in online selling via a stochastic optimal control problem. In our framework, the seller wishes to maximize her average wealth level W at a fixed time T of her choosing. The corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellmann (HJB) equation is analyzed for a basic case. For more general models, the admissible control set is restricted to a jump process that switches between extreme values. We propose a new approach, where the optimal control problem is reduced to a multivariable optimization problem.

  16. Initial Time Dependence of Abundances in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.; Ny, C. K.; Tylka, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    We compare the initial behavior of Fe/O and He/H abundance ratios and their relationship to the evolution of the proton energy spectra in "small" and "large" gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events. The results are qualitatively consistent with the behavior predicted by the theory of Ng et al. (1999a, b). He/H ratios that initially rise with time are a signature of scattering by non-Kolmogorov Alfven wave spectra generated by intense beams of shock-accelerated protons streaming outward in large gradual SEP events.

  17. Solving time-dependent two-dimensional eddy current problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Min Eig; Hariharan, S. I.; Ida, Nathan

    1988-01-01

    Results of transient eddy current calculations are reported. For simplicity, a two-dimensional transverse magnetic field which is incident on an infinitely long conductor is considered. The conductor is assumed to be a good but not perfect conductor. The resulting problem is an interface initial boundary value problem with the boundary of the conductor being the interface. A finite difference method is used to march the solution explicitly in time. The method is shown. Treatment of appropriate radiation conditions is given special consideration. Results are validated with approximate analytic solutions. Two stringent test cases of high and low frequency incident waves are considered to validate the results.

  18. time Dependence of Aerosols in Biomass Burn Plumes from Bbop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, L. I.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Yokelson, R. J.; Onasch, T. B.; Adachi, K.; Buseck, P. R.; Chand, D.; Collier, S.; Dubey, M. K.; Mei, F.; Shilling, J. E.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Wigder, N. L.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) was conducted between the beginning of July, 2013 and the end of October, 2013. This period overlapped the wildland fire season in the Pacific Northwest from July to mid September, and in October, prescribed agricultural burns in the lower Mississippi River Valley. Urban plumes from 7 cities in the NW and SE U.S. provided a contrasting set of observations. An extended aircraft deployment using the DOE G-1 was made possible by the fortuitous citing of the planes home base within 2 hours flight time of regions with a high incidence of wildland fires. In this presentation we concentrate on wildland fires and the time development of aerosol concentration, size distributions, and optical and physical properties as a function of plume age. Our focus is on physical properties of organic aerosols, a category that often exceeded 95% of total aerosol mass. Other BBOP presentations will highlight carbonaceous particle chemical composition and morphology as revealed by an SP-AMS, an SP2, and electron microscopy. Flight patterns were designed so as to sample plumes as close to a fire as allowed by aviation rules, followed by one or two sets of three to six transects covering a transport time of two to four hours. Average values of aerosol parameters are calculated for each plume transect with CO used as an inert tracer to account for dilution. It is found that OA increases by ~ 50% to 100%, with much of the increase occurring within the first hour. There is a corresponding increase in scattering which causes single scattering albedo to increase. At 2 to 4 hours downwind, plumes have evolved to yield net cooling, an effect that is much more pronounced if one takes into account known artifacts in PSAP measurements or uses the photothermal interferometer (PTI) to measure light absorption. The fires sampled have a relatively narrow range of modified combustion efficiencies, but it is centered on 0.9, at which point there are emission

  19. Controlled oscillator system with a time dependent output frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelstein, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A controlled oscillator system is presented for providing an output with a frequency which changes with respect to time and with a phase which is within established phase error limits. The system includes a frequency synthesizer with a symmetrical search oscillator, capable of tuning the output with a range of + or - 100 Hz about any fixed frequency to which the synthesizer is set. For a tuning range of 200 Hz (+ or - 100 Hz) an expanded search oscillator output of a frequency range of 4 MHz (from 1 MHz to 5 MHz) is provided. A counter counts continuously the expanded output cycles and at each of fixed sampling intervals, for every 0.1 second, the count or number accumulated in the counter is read out. The sample number is compared with a theoretical number which should be present in the counter at the particular sampling instant for proper synthesizer's output frequency and phase.

  20. Time-dependent hydrophilicity of nickel nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarakati, Nahla; Ye, Dexian

    2014-03-01

    Wetting properties of metals are fundamentally important in applications such as catalysis, solar energy conversion, and fuel cells. Complete wetting of transition metal surfaces by water is ascertained due to their high surface energy. On flat metal surfaces, zero contact angles (CAs) can only be observed on ultra-clean metal surfaces, while finite CAs are measured as soon as the surface is contaminated. However, it is not clear whether or not the hydrophilicity of a nanostructured metal surface can be maintained. Here, we design a series of experiments to test the hydrophilicity of nickel nanorods with heights ranging from 50 to 600 nm. We observe that all of our samples are initially superhydrophilic, but reduce their hydrophilicity over a time period of three months. Airborne hydrocarbon is believed to be the reason for the reducing hydrophilicity. A theory based on the Cassie-Baxter model is constructed to explain our observations in experiment.

  1. Time-dependent effect in green synthesis of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Darroudi, Majid; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Zamiri, Reza; Zak, A K; Abdullah, Abdul Halim; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa

    2011-01-01

    The application of "green" chemistry rules to nanoscience and nanotechnology is very important in the preparation of various nanomaterials. In this work, we successfully developed an eco-friendly chemistry method for preparing silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) in natural polymeric media. The colloidal Ag-NPs were synthesized in an aqueous solution using silver nitrate, gelatin, and glucose as a silver precursor, stabilizer, and reducing agent, respectively. The properties of synthesized colloidal Ag-NPs were studied at different reaction times. The ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra were in excellent agreement with the obtained nanostructure studies performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and their size distributions. The prepared samples were also characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The use of eco-friendly reagents, such as gelatin and glucose, provides green and economic attributes to this work. PMID:21556342

  2. Exact Solution of Quadratic Fermionic Hamiltonians for Arbitrary Boundary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Alase, Abhijeet; Cobanera, Emilio; Ortiz, Gerardo; Viola, Lorenza

    2016-08-12

    We present a procedure for exactly diagonalizing finite-range quadratic fermionic Hamiltonians with arbitrary boundary conditions in one of D dimensions, and periodic in the remaining D-1. The key is a Hamiltonian-dependent separation of the bulk from the boundary. By combining information from the two, we identify a matrix function that fully characterizes the solutions, and may be used to construct an efficiently computable indicator of bulk-boundary correspondence. As an illustration, we show how our approach correctly describes the zero-energy Majorana modes of a time-reversal-invariant s-wave two-band superconductor in a Josephson ring configuration, and predicts that a fractional 4π-periodic Josephson effect can only be observed in phases hosting an odd number of Majorana pairs per boundary. PMID:27563986

  3. Exact Solution of Quadratic Fermionic Hamiltonians for Arbitrary Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alase, Abhijeet; Cobanera, Emilio; Ortiz, Gerardo; Viola, Lorenza

    2016-08-01

    We present a procedure for exactly diagonalizing finite-range quadratic fermionic Hamiltonians with arbitrary boundary conditions in one of D dimensions, and periodic in the remaining D -1 . The key is a Hamiltonian-dependent separation of the bulk from the boundary. By combining information from the two, we identify a matrix function that fully characterizes the solutions, and may be used to construct an efficiently computable indicator of bulk-boundary correspondence. As an illustration, we show how our approach correctly describes the zero-energy Majorana modes of a time-reversal-invariant s -wave two-band superconductor in a Josephson ring configuration, and predicts that a fractional 4 π -periodic Josephson effect can only be observed in phases hosting an odd number of Majorana pairs per boundary.

  4. Time-dependent water dynamics in hydrated uranyl fluoride

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Anderson, Brian B.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Rondinone, Adam; Trowbridge, Lee D.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, uranyl fluoride is a three-layer, hexagonal structure with significant stacking disorder in the c-direction. It supports a range of unsolved ‘thermodynamic’ hydrates with 0–2.5 water molecules per uranium atom, and perhaps more. However, the relationship between water, hydrate crystal structures, and thermodynamic results, collectively representing the chemical pathway through these hydrate structures, has not been sufficiently elucidated. We used high-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering to study the dynamics of water in partially hydrated uranyl fluoride powder over the course of 4 weeks under closed conditions. The spectra are composed of two quasielastic components: one is associated with translationalmore » diffusive motion of water that is approximately five to six times slower than bulk water, and the other is a slow (on the order of 2–300 ps), spatially bounded water motion. The translational component represents water diffusing between the weakly bonded layers in the crystal, while the bounded component may represent water trapped in subnanometre ‘pockets’ formed by the space between uranium-centred polymerisation units. Complementary neutron diffraction measurements do not show any significant structural changes, suggesting that a chemical conversion of the material does not occur in the thermodynamically isolated system on this timescale.« less

  5. Time-dependent water dynamics in hydrated uranyl fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Anderson, Brian B.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Rondinone, Adam; Trowbridge, Lee D.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, uranyl fluoride is a three-layer, hexagonal structure with significant stacking disorder in the c-direction. It supports a range of unsolved ‘thermodynamic’ hydrates with 0–2.5 water molecules per uranium atom, and perhaps more. However, the relationship between water, hydrate crystal structures, and thermodynamic results, collectively representing the chemical pathway through these hydrate structures, has not been sufficiently elucidated. We used high-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering to study the dynamics of water in partially hydrated uranyl fluoride powder over the course of 4 weeks under closed conditions. The spectra are composed of two quasielastic components: one is associated with translational diffusive motion of water that is approximately five to six times slower than bulk water, and the other is a slow (on the order of 2–300 ps), spatially bounded water motion. The translational component represents water diffusing between the weakly bonded layers in the crystal, while the bounded component may represent water trapped in subnanometre ‘pockets’ formed by the space between uranium-centred polymerisation units. Complementary neutron diffraction measurements do not show any significant structural changes, suggesting that a chemical conversion of the material does not occur in the thermodynamically isolated system on this timescale.

  6. Implosion Robustness, Time-Dependent Flux Asymmetries and Big Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. L.; Field, J. E.; Spears, B. K.; Brandon, S. T.; Gaffney, J. A.; Hammer, J.; Kritcher, A.; Nora, R. C.; Springer, P. T.

    2015-11-01

    Both direct and indirect drive inertial confinement fusion rely on the formation of spherical implosions, which can be a challenge under temporal and spatial drive variations (either from discrete laser beams, a complex hohlraum radiation environment, or both). To that end, we examine the use of large simulation databases of 2D capsule implosions to determine the sensitivity of indirectly driven NIF designs to time-varying low-mode radiation drive asymmetries at varying convergence ratios. In particular, we define and calculate a large number of extensive quantities for the simulations within the database and compare with the equivalent quantities extracted from fully 3D simulations and those used in 1D hydrodynamic models. Additionally, we discuss some of the practical challenges of searching for physical insight in multi-petabyte datasets. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-674884.

  7. Time-dependent recovery of passive neutrophils after large deformation.

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Son-Tay, R; Needham, D; Yeung, A; Hochmuth, R M

    1991-01-01

    Experiments are performed in which a passive human neutrophil is deformed into an elongated "sausage" shape by aspirating it into a small glass pipette. When expelled from the pipette the neutrophil recovers its natural spherical shape in approximately 1 minute. This recovery process is analyzed according to a Newtonian, liquid-drop model in which a variational method is used to simultaneously solve the hydrodynamic equations for low Reynolds-number flow and the equations for membrane equilibrium with a constant membrane tension. The theoretical model gives a good fit to the experimental data for a ratio of membrane cortical tension to cytoplasmic viscosity of approximately 1.7 x 10(-5) cm/s (0.17 micron/s). However, when the cell is held in the pipette for only a short time period of 5 s or less, and then expelled, the cell undergoes an initial, rapid elastic rebound suggesting that the cell behaves in this instance as a Maxwell viscoelastic liquid rather than a Newtonian liquid with constant cortical tension. PMID:1742456

  8. Mechanisms of time-dependent crack growth at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Stock, S.R.

    1990-04-15

    Objective of this 3-y study was to conduct creep and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments and to characterize the crack tip damage mechanisms in a model material (Cu-1wt%Sb), which is known to cavitate at grain boundaries under creep deformation. Results were: In presence of large scale cavitation damage and crack branching, time rate of creep crack growth da/dt does not correlate with C[sub t] or C[sup *]. When cavitation damage is constrained, da/dt is characterized by C[sub t]. Area fraction of grain boundary cavitated is the single damage parameter for the extent of cavitation damage ahead of crack tips. C[sub t] is used for the creep-fatigue crack growth behavior. In materials prone to rapid cavity nucleation, creep cracks grow faster initially and then reach a steady state whose growth rate is determined by C[sub t]. Percent creep life exhausted correlates with average cavity diameter and fraction of grain boundary area occupied by cavities. Synchrotron x-ray tomographic microscopy was used to image individual cavities in Cu-1wt% Sb. A methodology was developed for predicting the remaining life of elevated temperature power plant components; (C[sub t])[sub avg] was used to correlate creep-fatigue crack growth in Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steel and weldments.

  9. Time-Dependent Noise in GPS Position Time Series By a Network Noise Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, K.; Segall, P.

    2014-12-01

    Some current estimates of GPS velocity uncertainties for continuous stations with more than a decade of data can be very low, < 0.1 mm per year. Yet, velocities with respect to rigid plates can be an order of magnitude larger, even in nominally stable plate interiors. This could be caused by underestimating low frequency, time-dependent noise, such as random walk. Traditional estimators, based on individual time series, are insensitive to low amplitude random walk, yet such noise significantly increases GPS velocity uncertainties. We develop a new approach to estimating noise in GPS time series, focusing on areas where the signal in the data is well characterized. We analyze data from the seismically inactive parts of central US. The data is decomposed into signal, plate rotation and Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA), and various noise components. Our method processes multiple stations simultaneously with a Kalman Filter, and estimates average noise components for the network by maximum likelihood. Currently, we model white noise, flicker noise and random walk. Synthetic tests show that this approach correctly estimates the velocity uncertainty by determining a good estimate of random walk variance, even when it is too small to be correctly estimated by traditional approaches. We present preliminary results from a network of 15 GPS stations in the central USA. The data is in a North America fixed reference frame, we subtract seasonal components and GIA displacements used in the SNARF model. Hence, all data in this reference frame is treated as noise. We estimate random walk of 0.82 mm/yr0.5, flicker noise of 3.96 mm/yr0.25 and white noise of 1.05 mm. From these noise parameters the estimated velocity uncertainty is 0.29 mm/yr for 10 years of daily data. This uncertainty is significantly greater than estimated by the traditional methods, at 0.12 mm/yr. The estimated uncertainty is still less than the median residual velocity in the North America fixed reference

  10. TIME-DEPENDENT MODELING OF PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Vorster, M. J.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Tibolla, O.; Kaufmann, S. E-mail: omar.tibolla@gmail.com

    2013-08-20

    A spatially independent model that calculates the time evolution of the electron spectrum in a spherically expanding pulsar wind nebula (PWN) is presented, allowing one to make broadband predictions for the PWN's non-thermal radiation. The source spectrum of electrons injected at the termination shock of the PWN is chosen to be a broken power law. In contrast to previous PWN models of a similar nature, the source spectrum has a discontinuity in intensity at the transition between the low- and high-energy components. To test the model, it is applied to the young PWN G21.5-0.9, where it is found that a discontinuous source spectrum can model the emission at all wavelengths better than a continuous one. The model is also applied to the unidentified sources HESS J1427-608 and HESS J1507-622. Parameters are derived for these two candidate nebulae that are consistent with the values predicted for other PWNe. For HESS J1427-608, a present day magnetic field of B{sub age} = 0.4 {mu}G is derived. As a result of the small present day magnetic field, this source has a low synchrotron luminosity, while remaining bright at GeV/TeV energies. It is therefore possible to interpret HESS J1427-608 within the ancient PWN scenario. For the second candidate PWN HESS J1507-622, a present day magnetic field of B{sub age} = 1.7 {mu}G is derived. Furthermore, for this candidate PWN a scenario is favored in the present paper in which HESS J1507-622 has been compressed by the reverse shock of the supernova remnant.

  11. Time-dependent Modeling of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorster, M. J.; Tibolla, O.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Kaufmann, S.

    2013-08-01

    A spatially independent model that calculates the time evolution of the electron spectrum in a spherically expanding pulsar wind nebula (PWN) is presented, allowing one to make broadband predictions for the PWN's non-thermal radiation. The source spectrum of electrons injected at the termination shock of the PWN is chosen to be a broken power law. In contrast to previous PWN models of a similar nature, the source spectrum has a discontinuity in intensity at the transition between the low- and high-energy components. To test the model, it is applied to the young PWN G21.5-0.9, where it is found that a discontinuous source spectrum can model the emission at all wavelengths better than a continuous one. The model is also applied to the unidentified sources HESS J1427-608 and HESS J1507-622. Parameters are derived for these two candidate nebulae that are consistent with the values predicted for other PWNe. For HESS J1427-608, a present day magnetic field of B age = 0.4 μG is derived. As a result of the small present day magnetic field, this source has a low synchrotron luminosity, while remaining bright at GeV/TeV energies. It is therefore possible to interpret HESS J1427-608 within the ancient PWN scenario. For the second candidate PWN HESS J1507-622, a present day magnetic field of B age = 1.7 μG is derived. Furthermore, for this candidate PWN a scenario is favored in the present paper in which HESS J1507-622 has been compressed by the reverse shock of the supernova remnant.

  12. Time-Dependent Transcriptional Changes in Axenic Giardia duodenalis Trophozoites

    PubMed Central

    Ansell, Brendan R. E.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Baker, Louise; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Young, Neil D.; Hall, Ross S.; Rojas, Cristian A. A.; Svärd, Staffan G.; Gasser, Robin B.; Jex, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is the most common gastrointestinal protozoan parasite of humans and a significant contributor to the global burden of both diarrheal disease and post-infectious chronic disorders. Although G. duodenalis can be cultured axenically, significant gaps exist in our understanding of the molecular biology and metabolism of this pathogen. The present study employed RNA sequencing to characterize the mRNA transcriptome of G. duodenalis trophozoites in axenic culture, at log (48 h of growth), stationary (60 h), and declining (96 h) growth phases. Using ~400-times coverage of the transcriptome, we identified 754 differentially transcribed genes (DTGs), mainly representing two large DTG groups: 438 that were down-regulated in the declining phase relative to log and stationary phases, and 281 that were up-regulated. Differential transcription of prominent antioxidant and glycolytic enzymes implicated oxygen tension as a key factor influencing the transcriptional program of axenic trophozoites. Systematic bioinformatic characterization of numerous DTGs encoding hypothetical proteins of unknown function was achieved using structural homology searching. This powerful approach greatly informed the differential transcription analysis and revealed putative novel antioxidant-coding genes, and the presence of a near-complete two-component-like signaling system that may link cytosolic redox or metabolite sensing to the observed transcriptional changes. Motif searching applied to promoter regions of the two large DTG groups identified different putative transcription factor-binding motifs that may underpin global transcriptional regulation. This study provides new insights into the drivers and potential mediators of transcriptional variation in axenic G. duodenalis and provides context for static transcriptional studies. PMID:26636323

  13. Path integral density matrix dynamics: A method for calculating time-dependent properties in thermal adiabatic and non-adiabatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Habershon, Scott

    2013-09-14

    We introduce a new approach for calculating quantum time-correlation functions and time-dependent expectation values in many-body thermal systems; both electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic cases can be treated. Our approach uses a path integral simulation to sample an initial thermal density matrix; subsequent evolution of this density matrix is equivalent to solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, which we perform using a linear expansion of Gaussian wavepacket basis functions which evolve according to simple classical-like trajectories. Overall, this methodology represents a formally exact approach for calculating time-dependent quantum properties; by introducing approximations into both the imaginary-time and real-time propagations, this approach can be adapted for complex many-particle systems interacting through arbitrary potentials. We demonstrate this method for the spin Boson model, where we find good agreement with numerically exact calculations. We also discuss future directions of improvement for our approach with a view to improving accuracy and efficiency.

  14. On the effect of time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields in electron-positron pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlfürst, Christian; Alkofer, Reinhard

    2016-05-01

    Electron-positron pair production in space- and time-dependent electromagnetic fields is investigated. Especially, the influence of a time-dependent, inhomogeneous magnetic field on the particle momenta and the total particle yield is analyzed for the first time. The role of the Lorentz invariant E2 -B2, including its sign and local values, in the pair creation process is emphasized.

  15. VNAP2: a computer program for computation of two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible, turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, M.C.

    1981-08-01

    VNAP2 is a computer program for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow. VNAP2 solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing-length model, a one-equation model, or the Jones-Launder two-equation model. The geometry may be a single- or a dual-flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference-plane-characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free-jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet-powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free-jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

  16. New set of time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations for dirty superconductors near T/sub c/

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, C.

    1980-04-01

    A critical reexamination is given to the microscopic derivation of a set of time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations, for dirty superconductors near T/sub c/ (not assuming gaplessness), by Kramer and Watts-Tobin and by Schoen and Ambegaokar. The following improvements are first made: (i) A more general representation is used for the retarded 2 x 2 Green's function G/sup R/, valid in an arbitrary magnetic field; (ii) A ''static approximation'' for G/sup R/ is removed; (iii) An approximate gauge invariance is converted to an exact one, by some small changes in the equations for the order parameter and the charge density, in a way consistent with the approximation used. (iv) The simplifications of the collision integrals, based on a ''mutilated-collision-operator'' approximation, are shown to be also a direct consequence of the smallness of 1-T/T/sub c/. The set of equations is then tested against a local-charge-conservation law. A small violation is found, which leads to the discovery of an inconsistency in the truncation procedure used. Several new contributions are then found which leads to a new set of TDGL equations. This contains all the above improvements, and also satisfies a local-charge-conservation law essentially exactly. At least some of the new contributions are shown to be important in the energy range of the order of the gap frequency.

  17. Metal Accretion onto White Dwarfs. II. A Better Approach Based on Time-Dependent Calculations in Static Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, G.; Dufour, P.; Chayer, P.; Dupuis, J.; Brassard, P.

    2015-06-01

    The accretion-diffusion picture is the model par excellence for describing the presence of planetary debris polluting the atmospheres of relatively cool white dwarfs. Inferences on the process based on diffusion timescale arguments make the implicit assumption that the concentration gradient of a given metal at the base of the convection zone is negligible. This assumption is, in fact, not rigorously valid, but it allows the decoupling of the surface abundance from the evolving distribution of a given metal in deeper layers. A better approach is a full time-dependent calculation of the evolution of the abundance profile of an accreting-diffusing element. We used the same approach as that developed by Dupuis et al. to model accretion episodes involving many more elements than those considered by these authors. Our calculations incorporate the improvements to diffusion physics mentioned in Paper I. The basic assumption in the Dupuis et al. approach is that the accreted metals are trace elements, i.e, that they have no effects on the background (DA or non-DA) stellar structure. This allows us to consider an arbitrary number of accreting elements.

  18. VNAP2: A Computer Program for Computation of Two-dimensional, Time-dependent, Compressible, Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program, VNAP2, for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow is presented. It solves the two dimensional, time dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing length model, a one equation model, or the Jones-Launder two equation model. The geometry may be a single or a dual flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference plane characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

  19. Motherhood and drug-dependency: the attributes of full-time versus part-time responsibility for child care.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M R; Berry, G L

    1994-10-01

    This study examined differences between the maternal characteristics of African-American drug-dependent mothers who have full-time responsibility for child care and those having part-time responsibility. The study revealed that full-time mothers have significantly higher levels of maternal adaptation than part-time mothers. For part-time mothers, the level of maternal adaptation or self-esteem did not fluctuate, regardless of whether she saw the child 4 days a week or once a month. The article identifies variables that may facilitate better maternal behaviors among drug-dependent mothers. PMID:7836017

  20. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals. PMID:27608987

  1. Field quantization and squeezed states generation in resonators with time-dependent parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodonov, V. V.; Klimov, A. B.; Nikonov, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of electromagnetic field quantization is usually considered in textbooks under the assumption that the field occupies some empty box. The case when a nonuniform time-dependent dielectric medium is confined in some space region with time-dependent boundaries is studied. The basis of the subsequent consideration is the system of Maxwell's equations in linear passive time-dependent dielectric and magnetic medium without sources.

  2. History-dependent friction and slow slip from time-dependent microscopic junction laws studied in a statistical framework.

    PubMed

    Thøgersen, Kjetil; Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Scheibert, Julien

    2014-05-01

    To study how macroscopic friction phenomena originate from microscopic junction laws, we introduce a general statistical framework describing the collective behavior of a large number of individual microjunctions forming a macroscopic frictional interface. Each microjunction can switch in time between two states: a pinned state characterized by a displacement-dependent force and a slipping state characterized by a time-dependent force. Instead of tracking each microjunction individually, the state of the interface is described by two coupled distributions for (i) the stretching of pinned junctions and (ii) the time spent in the slipping state. This framework allows for a whole family of microjunction behavior laws, and we show how it represents an overarching structure for many existing models found in the friction literature. We then use this framework to pinpoint the effects of the time scale that controls the duration of the slipping state. First, we show that the model reproduces a series of friction phenomena already observed experimentally. The macroscopic steady-state friction force is velocity dependent, either monotonic (strengthening or weakening) or nonmonotonic (weakening-strengthening), depending on the microscopic behavior of individual junctions. In addition, slow slip, which has been reported in a wide variety of systems, spontaneously occurs in the model if the friction contribution from junctions in the slipping state is time weakening. Next, we show that the model predicts a nontrivial history dependence of the macroscopic static friction force. In particular, the static friction coefficient at the onset of sliding is shown to increase with increasing deceleration during the final phases of the preceding sliding event. We suggest that this form of history dependence of static friction should be investigated in experiments, and we provide the acceleration range in which this effect is expected to be experimentally observable. PMID:25353806

  3. Revivals in quantum walks with a quasiperiodically-time-dependent coin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedzich, C.; Werner, R. F.

    2016-03-01

    We provide an explanation of recent experimental results of Xue et al. [P. Xue, R. Zhang, H. Qin, X. Zhan, Z. H. Bian, J. Li, and B. C. Sanders, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 140502 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.140502], where full revivals in a time-dependent quantum walk model with a periodically changing coin are found. Using methods originally developed for "electric" walks with a space-dependent, rather than a time-dependent, coin, we provide a full explanation of the observations of Xue et al. We extend the analysis from periodic time dependence to quasiperiodic behavior with periods incommensurate to the step size. Spectral analysis, one of the principal tools for the study of electric walks, fails for time-dependent systems, but we find qualitative propagation behavior of the time-dependent system in close analogy to the electric case.

  4. Uniqueness and self-conjugacy of Dirac Hamiltonians in arbitrary gravitational fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatenko, M. V.; Neznamov, V. P.

    2011-05-15

    Proofs of two statements are provided in this paper. First, the authors prove that the formalism of the pseudo-Hermitian quantum mechanics allows for describing the Dirac particles motion in arbitrary stationary gravitational fields. Second, it is proved that using the Parker weight operator and the subsequent transition to the {eta} representation gives the transformation of the Schroedinger equation for the nonstationary metric, when the evolution operator becomes self-conjugate. The scalar products in the {eta} representation are flat, which makes possible the use of a standard apparatus for the Hermitian quantum mechanics. Based on the results of this paper the authors draw a conclusion about solution of the problem of uniqueness and self-conjugacy of Dirac Hamiltonians in arbitrary gravitational fields including those dependent on time. The general approach is illustrated by the example of Dirac Hamiltonians for several stationary metrics, as well as for the cosmologically flat and the open Friedmann models.

  5. Vector Constants of Motion for Time-Dependent Kepler and Isotropic Harmonic Oscillator Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, O. M.; Santos, F. C.; Tort, A. C.

    2001-06-01

    A method of obtaining vector constants of motion for time-independent as well as time-dependent central fields is discussed. Some well-established results are rederived in this alternative way and new ones obtained.

  6. Time-dependent Kramers escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanjun; Yin, Cangtao

    2016-05-01

    The probability distribution of Brownian particles moving in an overdamped complex system follows the generalized Smoluchowski equation, which can be rigorously proven that the exact time-dependent solution for this equation follows Tsallis form. Time-dependent escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distributions is then established based on the flux over population theory. The stationary state escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distribution which has been obtained before based on mean first passage time theory is recovered from time-dependent escape rate as time toward infinity.

  7. Time-dependent difference theory for noise propagation in a two-dimensional duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A time-dependent numerical formulation is derived for sound propagation in a two-dimensional straight soft-walled duct in the absence of mean flow. The time-dependent governing acoustic-difference equations and boundary conditions are developed along with the maximum stable time increment. Example calculations are presented for sound attenuation in hard- and soft-wall ducts. The time-dependent analysis has been found to be superior to the conventional steady numerical analysis because of much shorter solution times and the elimination of matrix storage requirements.

  8. Equientangled bases in arbitrary dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Karimipour, V.; Memarzadeh, L.

    2006-01-15

    For the space of two identical systems of arbitrary dimensions, we introduce a continuous family of bases with the following properties: (i) the bases are orthonormal (ii) in each basis, all the states have the same values of entanglement, and (iii) they continuously interpolate between the product basis and the maximally entangled basis. The states thus constructed may find applications in many areas related to the quantum information science including quantum cryptography, optimal Bell tests, and the investigation of the enhancement of channel capacity due to entanglement.

  9. Arbitrary quantum control of qubits in the presence of universal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Todd J.; Sastrawan, Jarrah; Uys, Hermann; Biercuk, Michael J.

    2013-09-01

    We address the problem of deriving analytic expressions for calculating universal decoherence-induced errors in qubits undergoing arbitrary, unitary, time-dependent quantum control protocols. We show that the fidelity of a control operation may be expressed in terms of experimentally relevant spectral characteristics of the noise and of the control, over all Cartesian directions. We formulate control matrices in the time domain to capture the effects of piecewise-constant control, and convert them to generalized Fourier-domain filter functions. These generalized filter functions may be derived for complex temporally modulated control protocols, accounting for susceptibility to rotations of the qubit state vector in three dimensions. Taken together, we show that this framework provides a computationally efficient means to calculate the effects of universal noise on arbitrary quantum control protocols, producing results comparable with those obtained via time-consuming simulations of Bloch vector evolution. As a concrete example, we apply our method to treating the problem of dynamical decoupling incorporating realistic control pulses of arbitrary duration or form, including the replacement of simple π-pulses with complex dynamically corrected gates.

  10. Density-potential mapping in time-dependent density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Maitra, N. T.; Todorov, T. N.; Woodward, C.; Burke, K.

    2010-04-15

    The key questions of uniqueness and existence in time-dependent density-functional theory are usually formulated only for potentials and densities that are analytic in time. Simple examples, standard in quantum mechanics, lead, however, to nonanalyticities. We reformulate these questions in terms of a nonlinear Schroedinger equation with a potential that depends nonlocally on the wave function.

  11. Normal form and Nekhoroshev stability for nearly integrable hamiltonian systems with unconditionally slow aperiodic time dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunati, Alessandro; Wiggins, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to extend the result of Giorgilli and Zehnder for aperiodic time dependent systems to a case of nearly integrable convex analytic Hamiltonians. The existence of a normal form and then a stability result are shown in the case of a slow aperiodic time dependence that, under some smallness conditions, is independent of the size of the perturbation.

  12. Time-Dependent Neutral Particle Transport Benchmarks in Two and Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Barry D. Ganapol

    2007-10-12

    The main objective of NEER grant was to generate highly accurate 2D and 3D time-dependent neutral particle intensity maps from 3D pulsed wire sources through integration of the analytical representation of a time-dependent point source.

  13. Relativistic effects in imaging of light in flight with arbitrary paths.

    PubMed

    Laurenzis, Martin; Klein, Jonathan; Bacher, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    Direct observation of light in flight is enabled by recent avalanche photodiode arrays, which have the capability for time-correlated single photon counting. In contrast to classical imaging, imaging of light in flight depends on the relative sensor position, which is studied in detail by measurement and analysis of light pulses propagating at different angles. The time differences of arrival are analyzed to determine the propagation angle and distance of arbitrary light paths. Further analysis of the apparent velocity shows that light pulses can appear to travel at superluminal or subluminal apparent velocities. PMID:27128059

  14. Time-dependent multiconfiguration self-consistent-field method based on the occupation-restricted multiple-active-space model for multielectron dynamics in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Kenichi L.

    2015-02-01

    The time-dependent multiconfiguration self-consistent-field method based on the occupation-restricted multiple-active-space model is proposed (TD-ORMAS) for multielectron dynamics in intense laser fields. Extending the previously proposed time-dependent complete-active-space self-consistent-field method [TD-CASSCF; Phys. Rev. A 88, 023402 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.023402], which divides the occupied orbitals into core and active orbitals, the TD-ORMAS method further subdivides the active orbitals into an arbitrary number of subgroups and poses the occupation restriction by giving the minimum and maximum number of electrons distributed in each subgroup. This enables highly flexible construction of the configuration-interaction (CI) space, allowing a large-active-space simulation of dynamics, e.g., the core excitation or ionization. The equations of motion for both CI coefficients and spatial orbitals are derived based on the time-dependent variational principle, and an efficient algorithm is proposed to solve for the orbital time derivatives. In-depth descriptions of the computational implementation are given in a readily programmable manner. The numerical application to the one-dimensional lithium hydride cluster models demonstrates that the high flexibility of the TD-ORMAS framework allows for the cost-effective simulations of multielectron dynamics by exploiting systematic series of approximations to the TD-CASSCF method.

  15. Time-dependent crack growth behavior of alloy 617 and alloy 230 at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shawoon Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Two Ni-base solid-solution-strengthened superalloys: INCONEL 617 and HAYNES 230 were studied to check sustained loading crack growth (SLCG) behavior at elevated temperatures appropriate for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) applictaions with constant stress intensity factor (Kmax= 27.75 MPa✓m) in air. The results indicate a time-dependent rate controlling process which can be characterized by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) parameter -- stress intensity factor (K). At elevated temperatures, the crack growth mechanism was best described using a damage zone concept. Based on results and study, SAGBOE (stress accelerated grain boundary oxidation embrittlement) is considered the primary reason for time-dependent SLCG. A thermodynamic equation was considered to correlate all the SLCG results to determine the thermal activation energy in the process. A phenomenological model based on a time-dependent factor was developed considering the previous researcher's time-dependent fatigue crack propagation (FCP) results and current SLCG results to relate cycle-dependent and time-dependent FCP for both alloys. Further study includes hold time (3+300s) fatigue testing and no hold (1s) fatigue testing with various load ratios (R) at 700°C with a Kmax of 27.75 MPa✓m. Study results suggest an interesting point: crack growth behavior is significantly affected with the change in R value in cycle-dependent process whereas in time-dependent process, change in R does not have any significant effect. Fractography study showed intergranular cracking mode for all time-dependent processes and transgranular cracking mode for cycle-dependent processes. In Alloy 230, SEM images display intergranular cracking with carbide particles, dense oxides and dimple mixed secondary cracks for time-dependent 3+300s FCP and SLCG test. In all cases, Alloy 230 shows better crack growth resistance compared to Alloy 617.

  16. Time-dependent scalar fields in modified gravities in a stationary spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yi; Gu, Bao-Ming; Wei, Shao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-07-01

    Most no-hair theorems involve the assumption that the scalar field is independent of time. Recently in Graham and Jha (Phys. Rev. D90: 041501, 2014) the existence of time-dependent scalar hair outside a stationary black hole in general relativity was ruled out. We generalize this work to modified gravities and non-minimally coupled scalar field with the additional assumption that the spacetime is axisymmetric. It is shown that in higher-order gravity such as metric f( R) gravity the time-dependent scalar hair does not exist. In Palatini f( R) gravity and the non-minimally coupled case the time-dependent scalar hair may exist.

  17. Dielectrics in a time-dependent electric field: A real-time approach based on density-polarization functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grüning, M.; Sangalli, D.; Attaccalite, C.

    2016-07-01

    In the presence of a (time-dependent) macroscopic electric field the electron dynamics of dielectrics cannot be described by the time-dependent density only. We present a real-time formalism that has the density and the macroscopic polarization P as key quantities. We show that a simple local function of P already captures long-range correlation in linear and nonlinear optical response functions. Specifically, after detailing the numerical implementation, we examine the optical absorption, the second- and third-harmonic generation of bulk Si, GaAs, AlAs, and CdTe, at different levels of approximation. We highlight links with ultranonlocal exchange-correlation functional approximations proposed within a linear response time-dependent density functional theory framework.

  18. Time-dependent-S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory of complex reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, James J.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Dworzecka, Maria

    1980-04-01

    Some limitations of the conventional time-dependent Hartree-Fock method for describing complex reactions are noted, and one particular ubiquitous defect is discussed in detail: the post-breakup spurious cross channel correlations which arise whenever several asymptotic reaction channels must be simultaneously described by a single determinant. A reformulated time-dependent-S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory is proposed, which obviates this difficulty. Axiomatic requirements minimal to assure that the time-dependent-S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory represents an unambiguous and physically interpretable asymptotic reaction theory are utilized to prescribe conditions upon the definition of acceptable asymptotic channels. That definition, in turn, defines the physical range of the time-dependent-S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory to encompass the collisions of mathematically well-defined "time-dependent Hartree-Fock droplets." The physical properties of these objects then circumscribe the content of the Hartree-Fock single determinantal description. If their periodic vibrations occur for continuous ranges of energy then the resulting "classical" time-dependent Hartree-Fock droplets are seen to be intrinsically dissipative, and the single determinantal description of their collisions reduces to a "trajectory" theory which can describe the masses and relative motions of the fragments but can provide no information about specific asymptotic excited states beyond their constants of motion, or the average properties of the limit, if it exists, of their equilibrization process. If, on the other hand, the periodic vibrations of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock droplets are discrete in energy, then the time-dependent-S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory can describe asymptotically the time-average properties of the whole spectrum of such periodic vibrations of these "quantized" time-dependent Hartree-Fock droplets which are asymptotically stationary on a time-averaged basis. Such quantized time-dependent

  19. Scattering of Massless Particles in Arbitrary Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachazo, Freddy; He, Song; Yuan, Ellis Ye

    2014-10-01

    We present a compact formula for the complete tree-level S-matrix of pure Yang-Mills and gravity theories in arbitrary spacetime dimensions. The new formula for the scattering of n particles is given by an integral over the positions of n points on a sphere restricted to satisfy a dimension-independent set of equations. The integrand is constructed using the reduced Pfaffian of a 2n ×2n matrix, Ψ, that depends on momenta and polarization vectors. In its simplest form, the gravity integrand is a reduced determinant which is the square of the Pfaffian in the Yang-Mills integrand. Gauge invariance is completely manifest as it follows from a simple property of the Pfaffian.

  20. Time-dependent damage in predictions of fatigue behaviour of normal and healing ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Gail M.; Bailey, Soraya J.; Schwab, Timothy D.

    2015-08-01

    Ligaments are dense fibrous tissues that connect bones across a joint and are exposed daily to creep and fatigue loading. Ligaments are tensile load-bearing tissues; therefore, fatigue loading will have a component of time-dependent damage from the non-zero mean stress and cycle-dependent damage from the oscillating stress. If time-dependent damage is not sufficient to completely predict the fatigue response, then cycle-dependent damage could be an important contributor. Using data from normal ligaments (current study and Thornton et al., Clin. Biomech. 22:932-940, 2007a) and healing ligaments (Thornton and Bailey, J. Biomech. Eng. 135:091004-1-091004-6, 2013), creep data was used to predict the fatigue response considering time-dependent damage. Relationships between creep lifetime and test stress or initial strain were modelled using exponential or power-law regression. In order to predict fatigue lifetimes, constant rates of damage were assumed and time-varying stresses were introduced into the expressions for time-dependent damage from creep. Then, the predictions of fatigue lifetime were compared with curvefits to the fatigue data where exponential or power-law regressions were used to determine the relationship between fatigue lifetime and test stress or initial strain. The fatigue prediction based on time-dependent damage alone greatly overestimated fatigue lifetime suggesting that time-dependent damage alone cannot account for all of the damage accumulated during fatigue and that cycle-dependent damage has an important role. At lower stress and strain, time-dependent damage was a greater relative contributor for normal ligaments than healing ligaments; however, cycle-dependent damage was a greater relative contributor with incremental increases in stress or strain for normal ligaments than healing ligaments.