Sample records for arbuckle mountains oklahoma

  1. Hydrology of the Arbuckle Mountains area, south-central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, Roy W.; Hanson, Ronald L.; Davis, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Rocks that make up the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer crop out over ~500 mi2 in the Arbuckle Mountains province in south-central Oklahoma. The aquifer consists of limestone, dolomite, and sandstone of the Arbuckle and Simpson Groups of Late Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age and is about 5,000-9,000 ft thick. The rocks were subjected to intensive folding and faulting associated with major uplift of the area during Early to Late Pennsylvanian time.

  2. Proposed shallow drilling at the interface between the southern Oklahoma aulacogen and Ouachita fold belt, Arbuckle Mountains region, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lidiak, E.G. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science); Denison, R.E.

    1993-02-01

    Two major tectonic elements in southern North America are the southern Oklahoma aulacogen and the Ouachita foldbelt. The Aulacogen is characterized by basement-cored high-angle fault blocks along which movement occurred throughout much of Paleozoic time. It is one of the most intensely deformed areas in the stable interior platform of the craton. The fold belt, in contrast, consists primarily of thin-skinned compressional structures that formed in Late Paleozoic time. These two prominent tectonic features strike at a high angle to one another and are juxtaposed in southeast Oklahoma where the contact is buried shallowly beneath Cretaceous rocks of the Gulf Coastal Plain. A drilling program comprised of a series of shallow holes drilled across the contact zone will establish the structural and stratigraphic relationships at this important tectonic interface. The results obtained should be critical in elucidating the effect that the transverse aulacogen structures had on the development of the Ouachita frontal zone. Proposed drilling sites are in northern Bryan and Choctaw counties, Oklahoma, along the Tishomingo--Belton anticlines southeast of the basement-cored eastern Arbuckle Mountains. Crystalline rocks in this region are massive middle Proterozoic granitoid rocks overlain by Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. Farther southeast, rocks in the frontal zone consist mainly of Late Paleozoic flysch-type sedimentary rocks. Depths to Paleozoic and older rocks beneath the coastal plain deposits are about 300--500 meters so that targeted structures can easily be reached.

  3. Geochemical and petrographic analyses of travertine-precipitating waters and travertine deposits, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Utech, N.M.; Chafetz, H.S.

    1989-03-01

    Waters in Honey and Falls Creeks, Arbuckel Mountains region of Oklahoma, are supersaturated in CO/sub 2/ with respect to the overlying atmosphere and are up to 10 times saturated with respect to calcite (I/sub sat/ = 10). Loss of CO/sub 2/ from the system results in a downstream increase in saturation levels, with the highest I/sub sat/ at sites of maximum travertine deposition. High supersaturation is the result of natural kinetic processes (rapid CO/sub 2/ outgassing vs. slow precipitation) rather than the effects of foreign ion inhibitors. Temporal variations in the composition of the waters indicate that, contrary to expectations, prolonged periods of heavy rainfall cause a significant increase in I/sub sat/ levels. At any sample site, no consistent chemical variation occurred between organically mediated and inorganic precipitates. However, all deposits show a significant increase in magnesium concentration in a down-stream direction; this may be a result of higher I/sub sat/ values and corresponding higher rates of precipitation. Carbon isotopes for creek waters are highly variable, from /minus/0.6 to /minus/12.2 /per thousand/, reflecting a variety of sinks and sources for C/sup 12/. Oxygen isotopes are relatively constant, from /minus/3.7 to /minus/6.0 /per thousand/, average = /minus/5.2 /per thousand/, indicating an open-water system. Based on calculations from water data, travertine should exhibit a 2 /per thousand/ difference in /delta//sup 18/O values for precipitates formed in the summer vs. those formed in the winter. Algally laminated crusts, which have been postulated to be of seasonal origin, exhibit variation in /delta//sup 18/O values between laminae, confirming the seasonal origin of the laminae.

  4. Paleokarstic and karstic features: Arbuckle and Hunton Groups, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shaieb, Z.; Puckette, J.; Matthews, F. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). School of Geology); Lynch, M. (Unocal, Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Cores of the Ordovician-age Arbuckle Group and Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian-age Hunton Group contain evidence of paleokarst. Arbuckle and Hunton Group rocks display surprisingly similar suites of distinct paleo-karstic features. Vugs, solution-enlarged fractures, cavities, collapse breccias, and sediment-filled solution features are evident. Phreatic cements are more commonly observed than vadose cements, while primary speleothemic precipitates are rare. A complex history of exposure, subsidence, and diagenesis is recorded in these rocks. Hunton and Arbuckle carbonates have been subaerially exposed for periods of variable intensity and duration during geologic history. Paleokarst appears to have developed subjacent to disconformities within and between formations of the Arbuckle Group and where these rocks subcrop below regional unconformities. Hunton paleokarstic horizons are apparent below the regional pre-Woodford unconformity, while evidence of inter- and intra-formational subaerial exposure is tenuous. This complex hierarchy of unconformities can produce numerous porous horizons. Porosity preservation may depend on subsidence rates or sea level rises rapid enough to prevent extensive low-temperature phreatic cementation and sediment infill of the existing pore network. Caves in the Arbuckle Group in Murray County, Oklahoma contain many karstic features similar to those observed in cores. Cemented collapse breccia and sediment-filled solution cavities are evident in caves developed in the Cool Creek Formation. These caves are part of an extensive internal drainage system associated with Honey Creek near the crest of the Arbuckle anticline. Cave speleothems and surficial travertine deposits are by-product of karstification processes.

  5. The geological significance of the boundary between the Fort Sill and Signal Mountain Formations in the lower Arbuckle Group (Cambrian)

    SciTech Connect

    Hosey, R.; Donovan, R.N. (Texas Christian Univ., Ft Worth, TX (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-02-01

    During the upper Cambrian, a transgression inundated the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen enveloping a landscape that consisted of hills of Cambrian-aged rhyolite up to 350 m in height. Initial deposits on this topography--the Reagan Formation--consist of siliciclastics that were deposited as alluvium and succeeding tidally-influenced marine sandstones and shales. The siliciclastics grains are made up of local rhyolite, quartz and authigenic glauconite. The overlying Honeycreek Formation is defined by the addition of carbonated detritus in the form of tidally-influenced pelmatozoan grainstones. The passage from the Honeycreek to the overlying Fort Sill Formation of the Arbuckle Group is marked by the incoming of beds of lime mudstone and the gradual disappearance of grainstones and siliciclastics. The contact between the Fort Sill and the overlying thinly-bedded dark grey bioclastic limestones of the Signal Mountain Formation is one of the most distinctive horizons in the Arbuckle Group. The contact evidently marks a substantial change in depositional environment. In detail the contact is sharp and shows evidence of minor erosion, although no karsting has been detected. The authors suggest that the contact surface records a regression, perhaps associated with dolomitization and followed by some erosion. A regression is also indicated by the local occurrence of a laminated tidal flat unit with traces of evaporites that outcrops in the far west of the Slick Hills immediately below the formation contact. They suggest that the Signal Mountains as a transgressive unit, incorporating siliciclastics transported into the area during the regression. It has been suggested that the unconformity reflects localized tectonism associated with the evolution of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. On the other hand the surface may correlate with a craton--wide Sauxian' hiatus.

  6. Cottonwood Creek-Hewitt trend Arbuckle play (southern Oklahoma): example of complexly faulted and fractured karst trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ferebee, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    The Hewitt field (T4, 5S, R1, 2W), located along the northwest-southeast-trending Wichita-Criner Hills anticlinorium, is the ninth largest field in Oklahoma with ultimate recovery projected to exceed 250 million bbl. The development of the anticlinorium was initiated by the Wichita orogeny during the Morrowan, forming north-south-trending folds. During the Atokan, extensive erosional forces removed thick sequences and exposed the Ordovician Arbuckle Group. The uplift was subsequently covered by Deese and Hoxbar clastic sediments during the Middle Pennsylvanian. The Late Pennsylvanian Arbuckle orogeny produced compressional stress from the southwest and resulted in refolding of the uplift features and movement along high-angle faults. The recent discovery of prolific hydrocarbon reserves in Ordovician carbonates (Canadian, Arbuckle Group) has renewed interest along this prolific trend. The productive reservoir in the Hewitt-Cottonwood Creek area is the dolomitic Brown zone (Kindblade Formation), located approximately 1000 ft below the top of the Arbuckle group. The zone consists of crystalline dolomite, 500-600 ft thick, with adequate porosity and permeability developed to form significant reservoirs due to karstification of the extensive fracture systems. The Bray zone (West Spring Creek Formation-upper Arbuckle Group) has production in the Healdton and southwestern Lone Grove fields from fractured, arenaceous, finely granular dolomite and may be an additional possible reservoir. The combination of good untested reservoirs located on structural features associated with block faulting, as illustrated by seismic sections across the Criner fault, gives an excellent indication that the trend may have great future potential within a mature province.

  7. Karst-related diagenesis and reservoir development in the Arbuckle Group, Wilburton field, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bliefnick, D.M. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Midland, TX (United States)); Belfield, W.C. (ARCO Exploration and Production Technology, Plano, TX (United States))

    1992-04-01

    Wilburton field is a multizone reservoir on the southwestern edge of the Arkoma basin. The most recent zone to be declared commercial is the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group. Faults, structural position, depositional environment, and diagenetic alterations play a role in controlling reservoir quality, communication of fluids and pressures within the reservoir, and stratigraphic correlations. The Arbuckle Group in Wilburton field consists of dolomite, calcareous dolomite and minor clastic-rich intervals, chert, and dolomitic limestones. Early diagenesis consisted of pervasive dolomitization that created a dolomudstone with low (12%) intercrystalline porosity. The regionally extensive Middle Ordovician unconformity, which occurs at the top of the Arbuckle Group, exposed that carbonate surface to meteoric conditions that resulted in formation of karst. The porosity development or enhancement associated with karsting modified depositional textures and their related pore geometries. Stratigraphically, the Arbuckle section can be divided into two zones. An upper zone, 200-250 ft thick, is characterized by a lack of fracturing and brecciation, and by fluid flow mainly through the matrix or intercrystalline pore system. Porosity development in these intervals extends across the field. The lower zone is characterized by multiple intervals of fracturing, brecciation (all three types), and solution collapse. The Arbuckle is most likely productive where solution has enhanced intercrystalline, fracture, and breccia porosity, and burial cements have failed to completely fill pore space. The authors anticipate that porosity development in Arbuckle carbonates in other areas is similarly controlled and should be productive.

  8. Geochemical and isotopic constraints on the diagenetic history of a massive stratal, late Cambrian (Royer) dolomite, Lower Arbuckle Group, Slick Hills, SW Oklahoma, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guoqiu Gao

    1990-01-01

    The diagenetic history of the late Cambrian massive Royer dolomite from the lower Arbuckle Group, Slick Hills, SW Oklahoma, USA, has been evaluated through comprehensive geochemical analyses. The dolomite probably formed during early diagenesis from contemporaneous late Cambrian seawater, evidenced by similar 87 Sr \\/ 86 Sr ratios (from 0.70891 to 0.70913) of most (70%) dolomite samples, to coeval late

  9. Climate Change Impacts on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Precipitation Variations

    E-print Network

    Osborne, Cesalea

    2014-11-19

    data to aquifer outcrop • Calculated precipitation values for aquifer outcrop area • Graphed results Aquifer Data • Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer outcrop area • Hydrography (lakes, rivers, streams) Geological Data • Carbonate aquifer • Made of dolomite...

  10. Evidence of paleokarstic phenomena and burial diagenesis in Ordovician Arbuckle group of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.; Al-Shaieb, Z. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (USA))

    1989-08-01

    Cores from various localities in south-central and north-central Oklahoma display surprisingly similar suites of karstic and diagenetic phenomena. Vadose dissolution tubes, solution-enlarged fractures, collapse breccias, and vugular porosity, where present are considered evidence of karstification. Primary speleothemic precipitates were not readily observed; either they were not present or were obscured by later hydrothermal dolomitization. A complex history of exposure and subsidence is recorded in these rocks. Immature karst profiles may have subsided at rapid rates under conditions that prevented low-temperature phreatic cementation, thus preserving the open pore network of the karst profile. Deep burial diagenesis is evidenced by the appearance of highly ferroan baroque dolomite cement partially or entirely occluding vugular and fracture porosity. In addition, host-rock carbonates were extensively replaced by typical thermal xenomorphic dolomite. Cathodoluminescent microscopy indicates that the hydrothermal dolomite is uniform in composition and was precipitated under highly reducing conditions. Dolomite cementation was arrested when oil migrated into the remaining pore space. A complex multistage fracture network is present in cores from the Healdton oil field. Early fracture systems are healed by highly ferroan, dull luminescent baroque dolomite, and later fractures are cemented with nonferroan, brightly luminescent cement.

  11. STUDY OF THE ARBUCKLE-SIMPSON AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study directed by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and funded by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation will investigate the hydrogeology of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in south-central Oklahoma. The five year study will involve field investigations including the installation of ne...

  12. 33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.29 Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek...designated agent, shall operate the Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles in the...

  13. 33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.29 Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek...designated agent, shall operate the Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles in the...

  14. 33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.29 Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek...designated agent, shall operate the Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles in the...

  15. 33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.29 Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek...designated agent, shall operate the Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles in the...

  16. 33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.29 Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek...designated agent, shall operate the Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles in the...

  17. BLACK FORK MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, ARAKANSAS AND OKLAHOMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mary H.

    1984-01-01

    Black Fork Mountain Roadless Area covers about 21 sq mi in the Ouachita National Forest in Polk County, Arkansas and LeFlore County, Oklahoma. On the basis of a mineral survey the area has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Stone and sand and gravel suitable for construction purposes occur in the Jackfork Sandstone and the Stanley Shale which also occur outside the roadless area. Although the potential for gas and oil is unknown and no resource potential was identified, some investigators believe that there is a possibility for the occurrence of gas and oil in the roadless area.

  18. Testing a Mahalanobis distance model of black bear habitat use in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hellgren, E.C.; Bales, S.L.; Gregory, M.S.; Leslie, David M., Jr.; Clark, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Regional wildlife-habitat models are commonly developed but rarely tested with truly independent data. We tested a published habitat model for black bears {Ursus americanus) with new data collected in a different site in the same ecological region (i.e., Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma, USA). We used a Mahalanobis distance model developed from relocations of black bears in Arkansas to produce a map layer of Mahalanobis distances on a study area in neighboring Oklahoma. We tested this modeled map layer with relocations of black bears on the Oklahoma area. The distributions of relocations of female black bears were consistent with model predictions. We conclude that this modeling approach can be used to predict regional suitability for a species of interest.

  19. A geographic analysis of the status of mountain lions in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, J.R.; Shaw, J.H.; Leslie, David M., Jr.; Shaw, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    The geographic distribution of sightings and sign of mountain lions (Puma concolor) in Oklahoma was investigated. Mail survey questionnaires were sent to natural resource professionals throughout Oklahoma to gather temporal and spatial information on sightings of mountain lions from 1985 to 1995. We used a geographic information system (GIS) to compare locations of sightings and sign in the state with ecoregions, deer harvest, human population densities, locations of licensed owners and breeders of mountain lions, and generalized topography. Sightings and sign of mountain lions occurred significantly more often in the Central Rolling Red Plains than elsewhere in the state. Sightings of mountain lions increased with total deer harvest statewide (R2=0.828, P<0.001). Numbers of sightings of mountain lions were correlated negatively with density of the human population (R2=0.885, P=0.017). Surveys are a valuable method to assess the status of rare wildlife species when other methods are not available and when those receiving the survey are qualified.

  20. Nature of Migrabitumen and Their Relation to Regional Thermal Maturity, Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BRIAN J. CARDOTT; TIM E. RUBLE; NEIL H. SUNESON

    1993-01-01

    Two grahamite and three impsonite localities are within an 82-km-long segment of the Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma. Grab samples were collected to study the petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the migrabitumen at the grahamite-impsonite transition and the relation of the migrabitumen to the regional thermal maturity pattern.Maximum and random bitumen reflectance values increased from 0·75 to 1·80% from west

  1. Nature of migrabitumen and their relation to regional thermal maturity, Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. J. Cardott; N. H. Suneson; T. E. Ruble

    2009-01-01

    Two grahamite and three impsonite localities are within an 82-km-long segment of the Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma. Grab samples were collected to study the petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the migrabitumen at the grahamite-impsonite transition and the relation of the migrabitumen to the regional thermal maturity pattern. Maximum and random bitumen reflectance values increased from 0.75 to 1.80% from

  2. A remote sensing investigation of elevated sub-horizontal topographic surfaces in the Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang

    Multiple elevated horizontal to sub-horizontal topographic surfaces are present in the Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma. Elevated topographic surfaces, developed primarily on granite bedrock with gentle slopes of 0.5 to 7°,were investigated using 1) Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) extracted from NAD 27 UTM coordinates, 2) Google Earth imagery, and 3) USGS topographic maps. In the western Wichita Mountains prominent topographic surfaces at elevations of 720 +/- 5 m, 685 +/- 5 m, and 660 +/- 5 m are well preserved on at least four different mountains (e.g., Solder's Peak, King Mt.) and can be correlated with similar surfaces on at least seven different mountains (e.g., Mt. Scott, North Mt.) in the eastern Wichita Mountains. A less well developed surface at 585 +/-5 m is present in the eastern Wichita Mountains and may not be preserved in the western Wichita Mountains. These surfaces are interpreted to be relict pediments or remnants of a more extensive peneplain subsequently dissected as a result of long term time integrated changes in base level, climate, and/or tectonic uplift. Correlation of elevated sub-horizontal surfaces between the western and eastern Wichita Mountains suggests the Wichita Mountains basement behaved as a coherent crustal block since Mid Cenozoic. The presence of multiple elevated, sub-horizontal, regional topographic surfaces throughout the Wichita Mountains complicates direct correlation of these surfaces to the Southern High Plains peneplain using either a linear regression or an exponential fit along a line of projection. Thus, a finer resolution of the timing for individual elevated surfaces in the Wichita Mountains needs to be established.

  3. Regional contemporaneity of eustatic, subsidence, and tectonic events in the Middle-Upper Ordovician of the Appalachians and Ouachita orogens and the southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, S.C.; Bergstroem, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    On-going graptolite and conodont studies in the Southern Appalachians, the Ouachitas, and the Arbuckle Mountains have revealed contemporaneity of important geological events of regional significance. Reassessment of previous graptolite biostratigraphy has resulted in a revised zonation that has solved some correlation problems and is tied to the Midcontinent and North Atlantic conodont zonations. These zonations are used to date significant geological events in geographically separate regions during two time intervals in the Middle-Upper Ordovician. The base of the graptolite shale succession (Athens) in the Southern Appalachians (Alabama-Tennessee) belongs to the G. teretiusculus Zone, or locally (Georgia) possibly a slightly older unit, and marks the initial shelf-basin development and uplift of source areas to the east reflecting a phase of the Taconic Orogeny. The bases of the Womble and Woods Hollow shales in the Ouachita Orogen represent about the same level. Slightly younger N. gracilis Zone strata tend to be transgressive throughout the world and appear to represent a global eustatic event. In the Arbuckle Mountains this event is reflected by the Tulip Creek Shale. A major subsidence event in the Oklahoma aulacogen, contemporaneous with the regression, produced a transgressive lithofacies sequence represented by the lower Viola Springs Formation in the Arbuckle Mountains. The regressive and subsidence events appear to have been coeval with the emplacement of the Taconic allochthon and Hamburg Klippe in the Northern Appalachians.

  4. Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A report on the research activities at the USDA-ARS, Plant Science Research Laboratory in Stillwater, Oklahoma, were compiled for WERA-066 Meeting that was held in Ft. Collins, Colorado, February 13, 2008. Research presentations included barley breeding research, sorghum breeding research, wheat br...

  5. Dynamics of a recolonizing population of black bears in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, S.L.; Hellgren, E.C.; Leslie, David M., Jr.; Hemphill, J., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding how populations expand to recolonize former habitats is important to restoration efforts in wildlife management and conservation. Translocation of black bears (Ursus americanus) to Arkansas in the 1950s and 1960s has led to recolonization of former bear range in Oklahoma, with substantial increases in distribution and abundance of the species in Oklahoma over the last 15 years. We studied demographics of black bears in southeastern Oklahoma from May 2001 to November 2002 to provide insight into characteristics of recolonizing populations of large carnivores. We trapped 51 black bears (22 M, 29 F) 77 times and radiocollared 25 female bears. Sex ratios of adults and cubs were skewed toward females, and the age structure was younger than observed in other unharvested populations. Survival of adult females was estimated at 0.9??0.1, and fertility was estimated at 0.77 female young/female/year. Density on the study area was estimated at 0.21 bears/km2 and the current finite growth rate (??) of the study population was estimated to be 1.11/year. Demographic characteristics of the Oklahoma population of black bears were similar to those of other recolonizing populations of large carnivores.

  6. Devitrification of the Carlton Rhyolite in the Blue Creek Canyon area, Wichita Mountains, southwestern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bigger, S.E. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Geology); Hanson, R.E. (Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-02-01

    The Cambrian Carlton Rhyolite is a sequence of lava flows and ignimbrites extruded in association with rifting in the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. Rhyolite exposed in the Blue Creek Canyon area consists of a single, originally glassy, porphyritic lava flow > 300 m thick. Abundant flow banding is deformed by variably oriented flow folds present on both outcrop and thin-section scales. A variety of complex texture record the cooling, degassing, and devitrification history of the flow. Acicular Fe, Ti-oxide crystallites aligned in the flow banding document nucleation and limited crystal growth during flow. Spherical microvesicles and larger lithophysal cavities up to 10 cm long crosscut flow banding, showing that degassing continued after flow had ceased. Pseudomorphs of quartz after cristobalite and tridymite are present on cavity walls and are products of high-T vapor-phase crystallization. Devitrification textures overprint the flow banding and developed in two stages. Primary devitrification occurred during initial cooling and formed spherulitic intergrowths in distinct areas bound by sharp devitrification fronts. Spherulites nucleated on phenocrysts, vesicles, and flow bands and show evidence of multiple episodes of growth. Rhyolite outside of the devitrification fronts initially remained glassy but underwent later, low-T hydration to form perlitic texture, which was followed by prolonged secondary devitrification to form extremely fine-grained, equigranular quartzofeldspathic mosaics. Snowflake texture (micropoikilitic quartz surrounding randomly oriented alkali feldspar) developed during both primary and secondary devitrification. Spherical bodies up to 30 cm across are present in discrete horizons within the flow and weather out preferentially from the host rhyolite.

  7. Ravia nappe, Bryan County, Oklahoma: a gravity slide block off the Tishomingo uplift

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, M.I.

    1983-08-01

    The Ravia nappe in Bryan County, Oklahoma, is located along the southwestern flank of the Tishomingo uplift, between the Cumberland and East Durant oil fields. This mass of Cambrian-Ordovician through Mississippian sediments tectonically overlies younger Springer shales (Pennsylvanian) of the Ardmore basin. Previously, this feature has been interpreted to have been thrust southward along the Cumberland fault, a fault parallel to the Ravia thrust. Reinterpretation of this area, with additional well data, indicates the Ravia nappe is a gravity slide block off the uplifted Tishomingo mountains. The Ravia nappe is interpreted to have been originally the southwest overturned limb of the Tishomingo uplift. Prior to the major thrusting on the Ravia thrust, but after compressional folding and uplift of the Tishomingo mountains, a breakaway fault formed across the most intensely folded beds. The breakaway fault undercut the overturned southwestern limb of the Tishomingo uplift in a concave-upward fault surface. Gravitational forces caused the Ravia nappe Mississippian Caney rocks to Cambrian-Ordoviciena Arbuckle rocks to slide rotationally southwestward 2.5 mi (4 km). Topographic relief prior to the slide may have been as much as 9000 ft (2700 m). The slide occurred sometime during late Morrowan to early Desmoinesian.

  8. Shape Restoration by Active Self-Assembly Daniel Arbuckle and Aristides A. G. Requicha

    E-print Network

    Southern California, University of

    Shape Restoration by Active Self-Assembly Daniel Arbuckle and Aristides A. G. Requicha Laboratory.arbuckle | requicha} @ usc.edu Abstract - Shape restoration is defined as the problem of constructing a desired alternative to replacement. This paper presents a solution to the shape restoration problem by using

  9. Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Above the forest: the alpine tundra; Solar energy, water, wind and soil in mountains; Mountain weather; Mountain building and plate tectonics; Mountain walls: forming, changing, and disappearing; Living high: mountain ecosystems; Distribution of mountain plants and animals; On foot in the mountains: how to hike and backpack; Ranges and peaks of the world. Map and guidebook sources, natural history and mountain adventure trips, mountain environmental education centers and programs, and sources of information on trails for the handicapped are included.

  10. Geohydrology of and potential for fluid disposal in the Arbuckle Aquifer in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, J.E.; McGovern, H.E.; Gogel, Tony; Doveton, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Arbuckle aquifer is an extensive aquifer that contains mostly saline water and that immediately overlies Precambrian ' basement ' rocks throughout Kansas, except for major uplift areas where it has been removed by erosion. In the southeast part of the state, it is a major freshwater aquifer. The upper part of the Arbuckle contains significant oil and gas reservoirs in central and south-central Kansas. During the last 40 years the Arbuckle also has become the major zone of fluid disposal in the state. Most of the fluids disposed into the Arbuckle were produced from oil and gas wells in other formations. However, in recent years, state water agencies have become increasingly concerned about injection of fluids into the subsurface and the effects of injection on the hydrologic systems involved. An investigation of the geohydrology of the Arbuckle aquifer and of the hydrologic aspects of fluid disposal into the Arbuckle was conducted to evaluate these effects. Hydraulic characteristics obtained from drill stem tests, injection tests, and numerical modeling have indicated a range of permeability in the Arbuckle from 1 millidarcy to 30 darcys. Analysis of injection tests indicated that average permeability in the basin areas probably is in the 50-300 millidarcy range. Analyses of 76 geophysical logs indicate an average porosity of about 12%. An evaluation of the geohydrology of the Arbuckle shows that it is a large regional flow system that is in hydraulic connection with several other major aquifers. Groundwater flow within the Arbuckle is principally from the west-northwest to the east-southeast. Brine disposal in the Arbuckle has been increasing over the years. Rates of injection average about 60 gal/min. Model analysis, using aquifer properties similar to those expected in the basin areas and under selected conditions of well injection into the Arbuckle, indicates that, even with an injection rate of only 100 gal/min, pressure increases equivalent to fluid-level rises of up to 100 ft are expected as far as 500 ft away from the injection well. The model analysis indicates that the effects of transmission of fluid through the confining layer on overlying units are minor. (Lantz-PTT)

  11. Software Documents: Comparison and Measurement Tom Arbuckle, Adam Balaban, Dennis K. Peters and Mark Lawford

    E-print Network

    Lawford, Mark

    Software Documents: Comparison and Measurement Tom Arbuckle, Adam Balaban, Dennis K. Peters of Newfoundland, St. John's NL, Canada A1B 3X5. Email: dpeters@engr.mun.ca §Department of Computing and Software@mcmaster.ca Abstract-- For some time now, researchers have been seeking to place software measurement on a more firmly

  12. Oklahoma Today

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Published since the 1950s, Oklahoma Today is a production of several state agencies, and it is designed to showcase various cultural, historical, and social aspects of Oklahoma. Over the past several years, Oklahoma State University has digitized back issues of the magazine, and visitors can now read all the way back to the first issue from 1956. Visitors can browse back issues by decade, and they can also perform key-word searches. First-time visitors should start by reading through the spring 1960 issue, which contains pieces on rattlesnakes, Oklahoma wildflowers, and the Washington Irving Trail. While the name Washington Irving may not be commonly associated with Oklahoma, the author spent part of 1832 wandering through the state with a Native American guide. More recent issues feature profiles of singer Vince Gill and Route 66.

  13. Preliminary data from Arbuckle test wells, Miami, Douglas, Saline, and Labette counties, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gogel, Tony

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary data are presented for test wells in Kansas that were completed in Cambrian and Ordovician rocks of the Arbuckle Group in late 1979 and early 1980. Included in the report are hole history, electrical logs, geology (sample descriptions and cores), hydrologic testing, and geochemistry. These wells were drilled to determine the regional hydrology of the Arbuckle Group and to investigate the hydraulic characteristics of the formation at site-specific areas. The test wells were drilled in Miami, Douglas, Saline, and Labette Counties, Kansas. Depths of the wells ranged from 1,816 feet in Labette County to 3,665 feet in Saline County. Results of core analyses from rocks in the Arbuckle Group are presented for vertical and horizontal permeability to air, porosity, fluid saturation, acoustic velocity, resistivity indices, and formation factor. Formation data from drill-stem tests are presented for use in calculating transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, and hydraulic head. Analyses of water samples from the test wells are presented to indicate water quality in the aquifers. (USGS)

  14. Geomorphic evidence for Late Cenozoic deformation, Wichita Moutains, Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Snell, Charles Burton

    1989-01-01

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Geology GEOMORPHIC EVIDENCE FOR LATE CENOZOIC DEFORMATION' WICHITA MOUNTAINS, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by CHARLES BURTON SNELL Approved as to style and content by Norman R. Til d (Chair of Com ttee) Christ... her C. Mathewson (Member) Kenneth L. White (Member) Jo . S ng (Head of Department) December 1989 ABSTRACT Geomorphic Evidence for Late Cenozoic Deformation, Wichita Mountains~~ Oklahoma. (December 1989) Charles B. Snell, B. S. , University...

  15. Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma agriculture affects each of us every day, young and old, whether we live in largely rural regions or the state's Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources promotes sustainable land use and embraces the land

  16. A review of Arbuckle Group strata in Kansas from a sedimentologic perspective: Insights for future research from past and recent studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franseen, E.K.

    2000-01-01

    Arbuckle Group and equivalent-age rocks (Cambrian and Lower Ordovician) represent an important record of sediment deposition in the history of the North American continent and they contain important accumulations of hydrocarbons (oil and gas) and base metal deposits. This is true for Kansas as well where Arbuckle strata account for approximately 40% of the volume of produced petroleum and known reserves. However, in comparison to their counterparts in other areas, such as the Ellenburger and Knox, Arbuckle rocks in Kansas remain relatively understudied, especially with respect to sedimentology and diagenesis. The Arbuckle is present in the subsurface in most of Kansas and is absent only in areas of northeastern and northwestern Kansas, and over ancient uplifts and buried Precambrian highs. Arbuckle rocks thicken from north to south and are up to 1,390 feet in the southeastern corner of Kansas. Arbuckle Group and equivalent-age rocks from Kansas and surrounding areas are similar, consisting of platform deposits dominated by ramp-type subtidal to peritidal carbonates (mostly dolomitized) which can be subdivided into cycles, less than 0.5 m to 40 m thick, based on facies type and depositional patterns. Recent studies from central Kansas show that major depositional facies consist of coarse-grained packstones/ grainstones, fine-grained packstones/wackestones/mudstones, stromatolites-thrombolites, intraclastic conglomerate and breccia, and shale. In addition, secondary features include dolomitization, breccia, fracture, and conglomerate related to early subaerial exposure and later karst, burial or structural processes, silicification, and local mineralization. Arbuckle and equivalent strata in the Midcontinent were affected by prolonged subaerial exposure that began immediately after Arbuckle deposition, forming the sub-Tippecanoe to sub-Absaroka unconformity. Favorable reservoir qualities generally are thought to be related directly to basement structural elements and karstic features from the post-Arbuckle subaerial exposure event. Although most production in Kansas is from the top of the Arbuckle, some early and recent studies indicate that the Arbuckle is not a simple homogeneous reservoir, that complex vertical and lateral heterogeneities exist including both nonporous and porous horizons in the formation, and that high probability exist of locating additional oil with improved reservoir characterization. Although fracture and vuggy porosity contribute importantly to the production of Arbuckle strata, recent observations indicate a significant amount of porosity (about 50%) in many cores is controlled by depositional facies and dolomitization. Studies of Arbuckle and equivalent-age strata from other areas indicate that Arbuckle strata and diagenetic processes are complex and that porosity/permeability patterns are related to a number of processes. These studies underscore the importance of continued study of Arbuckle rocks in Kansas for improved reservoir characterization. Ongoing and future geologic studies of Arbuckle rocks in Kansas are being directed toward: (1) Continued sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and sequence stratigraphic analyses incorporating core, well log, and seismic data; (2) petrophysical studies. Initial studies indicate that core plug petrophysical properties are controlled by matrix grain size and that upscalling from plug to whole-core and drill-stem test data can identify and quantify the relative contribution of karstic, fracture and matrix porosity and permeability: (3) Regional and local structural analyses and mapping of the upper Arbuckle surface to provide more details on the contribution of structural features and karst paleogeomorphology to reservoir character; and (4) diagenetic and geochemical studies focusing especially on the timing of, and processes associated with, dolomitization and karstification events and their contributions to creating or occluding porosity.

  17. Geologic map of Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Murray County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, Charles D.; Lidke, David J.; Wahl, Ronald R.; Golab, James A.

    2013-01-01

    This 1:24,000-scale geologic map is a compilation of previous geologic maps and new geologic mapping of areas in and around Chickasaw National Recreation Area. The geologic map includes revisions of numerous unit contacts and faults and a number of previously “undifferentiated” rock units were subdivided in some areas. Numerous circular-shaped hills in and around Chickasaw National Recreation Area are probably the result of karst-related collapse and may represent the erosional remnants of large, exhumed sinkholes. Geospatial registration of existing, smaller scale (1:72,000- and 1:100,000-scale) geologic maps of the area and construction of an accurate Geographic Information System (GIS) database preceded 2 years of fieldwork wherein previously mapped geology (unit contacts and faults) was verified and new geologic mapping was carried out. The geologic map of Chickasaw National Recreation Area and this pamphlet include information pertaining to how the geologic units and structural features in the map area relate to the formation of the northern Arbuckle Mountains and its Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The development of an accurate geospatial GIS database and the use of a handheld computer in the field greatly increased both the accuracy and efficiency in producing the 1:24,000-scale geologic map.

  18. Petrological and Geochemical Studies of Samples from the Nicor Chestnut 18-4 Drill Core, AMES Impact Structure, Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeberl, C.; Reimold, W. U.

    1996-03-01

    The near-circular 15-km-diameter Ames structure is located at 36 degrees 15' N and 98 degrees 12' W in southeastern Major County (NW Oklahoma). The structure, which is set in Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle dolomite, consists of two concentric rims, an outer rim, which is about 1.5 to 3 km wide, and an inner "rim". The rocks of the outer rim consist mainly of fractured and brecciated Arbuckle dolomite. The inner "ring" (about 5 km in diameter) seems to be the eroded remnant of a central structural uplift, with rocks comprising brecciated Precambrian granite and Arbuckle dolomite. The depression is covered by Middle Ordovician Oil Creek shale. The structure is penetrated by a number of oil- and gas-producing wells in the crater rim and the central uplift. The production from these wells indicate that Ames represents one of the largest - if not the largest - single oil fields in Oklahoma. Currently the structural disturbance is buried beneath almost 3000 m of sedimentary rock. The origin of the structure has been intensely debated since the discovery of the structural anomaly, but geophysical and geological, as well as petrological and geochemical data provide very good evidence that it was formed by impact, and not by volcanism or even more esoteric processes. In the present study, we analyzed 17 samples, including impact melt breccia, from the Nicor Chestnut 18-4 core. These samples represent the largest and best examples of impact melt breccias and melt rock obtained so far from the Ames structure. One important result of the petrographic analyses is the observation that not all carbonate rocks postdate the impact, but some were clearly present among the target rocks. The chemical composition of the impact melt breccias is similar to that of other melt rocks from the Dorothy 1-19 core, as well as to the target granite, with variable carbonate admixtures. Some impact melt rocks are enriched in siderophile elements, indicating a possible meteoritic component.

  19. Oklahoma Forestry Services

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The mission of the Oklahoma Forestry Services (OFS) is "to conserve, enhance and protect the forest resources of Oklahoma for present and future generations." As part of this mission the OFS website contains information about fire reports, tree and forest health, and water quality. First-time visitors should start their journey through the site by clicking on the "Oklahoma's Forests" section. Here they will find information about Oklahoma's major forest types, the ecoregions of Oklahoma, and several Trees of Oklahoma fact sheets. Back on the homepage, visitors can learn about upcoming workshops and events, read a list of forestry bulletins, and find out about the Forest Heritage Center Museum. Residents of Oklahoma may also wish to look through the "Home and Community Trees" area to learn more about planning their own trees and Arbor Day related activities.

  20. Paver Program Oklahoma Memorial Union

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Paver Program Oklahoma Memorial Union The UniversiTy of oklahoma Alumni Association Pave the Way in the Oklahoma Memorial Union Courtyard. Now you can. The UniversiTy of oklahoma Alumni Association 900 Asp Ave an opportunity to add their names and graduation years to the stone plaza of the Oklahoma Memorial Union

  1. Surface and subsurface structural analysis of a part of Washita Valley fault zone, southern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Palladino, D.L.

    1984-04-01

    The Washita Valley fault zone is one of the major northwest-trending structures in southern Oklahoma. This fault system is believed to have originated as a series of normal faults during the formation of the southern Oklahoma aulacogen by late Precambrian or early Cambrian time and to have been reactivated during the Arbuckle orogeny in the Pennsylvanian. Descriptions of movement along the Washita Valley fault zone during Pennsylvanian deformation include numerous interpretations, the most common being left-lateral strike slip with 30-40 mi (50-65 km) of displacement. Structures in the area, however, suggest an alternate model. A detailed field study of small folds, faults, fracture arrays, slickensides, and drainage patterns was conducted along the southeastern half of the Washita Valley fault zone. An attempt has been made to relate these small-scale features to the major structures in the area to determine the orientation of the major compressive stress during deformation and the relative amounts of strike-slip vs. reverse dip-slip movement along the fault zone. Exploration for oil and gas along the Washita Valley fault zone has identified several overturned folds and repeated sections. Field observations in the study area include small drag folds and thrust faults parallel to the trend of the Washita Valley fault zone. The two major anticlines in the area, the Arbuckle and the Tishomingo, are both nearly parallel to the trend of the fault zone. These data suggest a model of deformation involving a large component of reverse dip-slip faulting with major duplication of strata.

  2. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program

    E-print Network

    Estes, C. B.; Turner, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    this, the Oklahoma Department of Energy designed a program to acquaint Oklahoma industry with the potential savings available through energy management and some basic techniques. The program is, entitled "Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program...

  3. Urban flood analysis in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tortorelli, Robert L.; Huntzinger, T.L.; Bergman, D.L.; Patneaude, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    Flood insurance study information from the Federal Emergency Management Agency is utilized to estimate future flood hazard in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Techniques are described for estimating future urban runoff estimates. A method of developing stream cross section rating curves is explained. Future runoff estimates are used in conjuction with the rating curves to develop an estimate of 50- and 100- year flood profiles that would result from future urban development.

  4. Dynamic Simulation of Pilot Scale CO2 Injection in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer at Wellington Field in Southern Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holubnyak, Y.; Watney, W. L.; Rush, J.; Birdie, T. R.; Fazelalavi, M.; Raney, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Arbuckle Group saline aquifer is a thick (>800 ft) and deeply buried (>3,500 ft) siliceous dolomite with interbedded shales. This aquifer is part of the Paleozoic-age Ozark Plateau Aquifer System (OPAS) in southern Kansas. It is identified as an excellent candidate for geological CO2 storage due to its location and proximity to major CO2 emission sources, high storage capacity potential, and multiple overlying sealing units, which can ensure safe CO2 storage for the long term. A DOE sponsored pilot-scale project has been funded in which 40,000 metric tons of CO2 from a nearby biofuel plant will be injected in the lower part of the Arbuckle reservoir over a period of 9 months at Wellington field in Sumner County, KS. This work focuses on development of various dynamic simulation scenarios in order to assess potential risks in support of the EPA class VI (CO2 sequestration) well permit application. The key objective is to estimate the resulting rise in pore fluid pressure, the extent of CO2 plume migration, and geomechanical and geochemical stability of the formation rock and any structural features that may be present. The over arching goal for the EPA is to ensure that the injected CO2 does not negatively impact the underground sources of drinking water in the area. A detailed geocellular model of the Arbuckle reservoir was produced based on the existing well-logs, seismic data, drill stem tests, step rate test, core analysis, and geochemical evaluations. The data from this modeled was upscaled to the CMG-based dual-permeability compositional model. Base case and alternative dynamic model simulations were conducted by varying key reservoir properties of the formation fluids, rock, and structural features.

  5. Oklahoma Tribes: A History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gover, Kevin

    1977-01-01

    Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the…

  6. Oklahoma Historical Society

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The mission of the Oklahoma Historical Society is "to preserve and perpetuate the history of Oklahoma and its people by collecting, interpreting and disseminating knowledge of Oklahoma and the Southwest." The Society maintains over 20 museums and historic sites, and they are also responsible for maintaining this website. On the homepage, visitors can learn about the sites they maintain, including the Pawnee Bill Ranch and the Pioneer Woman Museum. In the "Publications" area, visitors can read back issues of "The Chronicles of Oklahoma" dating from 1921 to 1962, and they can also find the "Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture". The Society's "Found in Collections" blog is a great way to learn about their current archival work, and visitors can read about textile preservation techniques and the Civil War. Also, the site includes podcasts created to profile various aspects of the state's history. Finally, visitors can sign up to receive email updates on new additions, programs, and exhibits.

  7. Is Oklahoma getting drier?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bing; Stackhouse, Paul, Jr.; Sun, Wenbo; Hu, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhaoyan; Fan, Tai-Fang (Alice)

    2013-06-01

    Land surface hydrology is important to regional climate, ecosystem, agriculture, and even human activities. Changes in soil moisture can produce considerable impacts on socioeconomics. Analysis of assimilation model results, especially those from the Community Land Model, shows that soil moisture over Oklahoma region is continuously reduced from 1980 to 2009. The potential drying trend in the Oklahoma region is evaluated by observations taken during last three decades in this study. Satellite data from Global Precipitation Climatology Project exhibit a clear precipitation decrease in the Oklahoma region during the last decade or so compared with those of two or three decades ago. Accompanying with the precipitation variation, land surface net radiation and temperature over the region are found increases by satellite and/or in-situ measurements. These changes in regional climate conditions also likely result in reduction of regional evaporation and enhancement of sensible heat transport from land surface into the atmosphere as indicated in assimilated data. These observed and modeled evidences of the changes in regional water and energy cycles lead us to conclude that the soil moisture over the Oklahoma region was reduced during the last decade. This soil moisture drop could increase a risk in water shortage for agriculture in the Oklahoma state if the dry period continues. Further investigations on the drying in the Oklahoma State or even entire Southern Great Plains are needed to mitigate potential droughts, reductions in vegetation products, and other socioeconomic impacts.

  8. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program 

    E-print Network

    Turner, W. C.; Webb, R. E.; Phillips, J. M.; Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    series of tuition free Industrial Energy Management Conferences (over 20 given to date involving many Oklahoma industries). 2. A free energy newsletter entitled "Energy Channel" mailed to all participating Oklahoma industries. 3. A series of Energy...

  9. THE BATS OF THE OUACHITA MOUNTAINS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GARY A. HEIDT

    A survey was conducted from June, 1982 through January, 1989 to determine the occurrence of bat species in the Ouachita Mountain region of west-central Arkansas and southeastern Oklahoma, with emphasis on censusing lands managed by the USDA Forest Service, Ouachita National Forest. Seven genera and 13 species of bats in the families Vespertilionidae and Molossidae were captured. Species represented included:

  10. Strengthening Oklahoma Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma Citizens' Commission on Education, Oklahoma City.

    Established by the state legislature in 1980, the Oklahoma Citizens' Commission on Education (OCCE) aimed to evaluate the state's schools and prescribe goals for its future educational system. This report presents OCCE's recommendations and background materials. The first section comprises OCCE's 42 recommendations and statements, with supporting…

  11. Sauroposeidon: Oklahoma's Native Giant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mathew J. Wedel; Richard L. Cifelli

    Sauroposeidon, the largest dinosaur ever discovered in Oklahoma, is one of the largest dinosaurs that ever lived. Sauroposeidon is represented by a series of neck vertebrae, which show that it is a sauropod dinosaur closely related to Brachiosaurus. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the vertebrae reveal a net- work of small internal chambers. In life, the chambers would have been

  12. Texas-Oklahoma

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Texas-Oklahoma Border     ... important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and ... NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science ...

  13. Oklahoma Healthy Homes Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fahad

    2011-01-01

    Compelling scientific evidence suggests that a strong association exists between housing-related hazards and the health and safety of their residents. Health, safety, and environmental hazards (such as asthma and allergy triggers), unintentional injury hazards, lead-based paint hazards, and poor indoor air quality are interrelated with substandard housing conditions. This article describes a Healthy Homes initiative to address these hazards in a coordinated fashion in the home, rather than taking a categorical approach, even in the presence of multiple hazards. It also provides an overview of Oklahoma's Healthy Homes initiative and its pilot project, the Tulsa Safe and Healthy Housing Project, which is currently administered in Tulsa in collaboration with Children First, Oklahoma's Nurse-Family Partnership program. This pilot project seeks to open new areas of research that can lead to a greater understanding of environmental health issues related to substandard housing in the United States, which will eventually make homes safer and healthier. PMID:21563709

  14. Oklahoma Digital Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A team of talented librarians at the Oklahoma State University Library have created this collection of 3,600 maps, a true find for those with an interest in Sooner history, geography, culture, and more. The cartographic resources are divided into four collections, including the WPA Collection and the USGS Collection. This first collection consists of almost 2,400 detailed county maps produced in the 1930s by the Works Progress Administration and the Oklahoma Tax Commission to determine real estate values. Moving on, the USGS Collection is made up of 300 detailed maps generated from 1892 to the 1950s documenting topographical conditions throughout the state. Interested parties can view all of the maps here via a nice digital image tool and are also welcome to search across the entire collection by keyword.

  15. Is Oklahoma getting drier?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B.; Fan, T.; Xi, B.

    2010-12-01

    Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) models, especially the Community Land Model (CLM), show a continue reduction of soil moisture over Oklahoma region from 1980 to 2008. When the top 3.5 meter of surface is considered, the total water amounts estimated from models are within the ranges of 145-150, 140-145, 135-140, and 130-135 kg/m2 for the years of 1980-1986, 1987-1993, 1994-2000, and 2001-2008, respectively. A statistically significant decreasing trend of annual mean soil moisture is also found, indicating the region may experience a continuous drying period. Although the moisture change could be related to many factors, precipitation and evaporation potentially are the two dominant meteorological variables in determining the soil moisture variation. The rainfall amounts simulated by CLM are compared well with the satellite observations of Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). Both exhibit significant decreases in the region from 1980 to 2008. The CLM rainfalls also agree well with the available in-situ rainfall measurements during 1997 to 2007 from the Oklahoma Mesonet, which consist of 120 stations over the Oklahoma. For evaporation, currently there are no reliable direct observations during the time period studied. Limited satellite observations from the Princeton land surface data set indicate likely increase of evaporation. The soil moisture and temperature from SGP has records starting 1997, which is not enough to show the trend because of large variability. But both SRB and ISCCP surface net radiative flux from 1983 to 2008 shows an increasing trend. This could support the idea of increase in evaporation. The general decreases in precipitation and possible enhancements in evaporation would reduce land surface water storage. The reduced soil moisture could have considerable impact on land surface vegetation. For the Oklahoma region, this change would have a great potential in influence of regional agriculture and society.

  16. RANGE-WIDE USE OF CULTIVATED FIELDS BY MOUNTAIN PLOVERS DURING THE BREEDING SEASON

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JOHN S. SI-IACKFORD; DAVID M. LESLIE; WARREN D. HARDEN

    During six summers from 1986 through 1995, we searched cultivated fields in Montana, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Texas for Mountain Plovers (Charadrius montanus) during the breeding and premigratory seasons. We observed 2208 Mountain Plovers on 416 cultivated fields, 96.9% of which were observed in seven counties in four states. We located 52 nests on cultivated fields:

  17. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cranganu, C.; Deming, D. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States))

    1996-01-01

    Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 [sup 0]C/km (average 31.2 [sup 0]C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

  18. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cranganu, C.; Deming, D. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 {sup 0}C/km (average 31.2 {sup 0}C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

  19. Mountain Biking

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Announcing a new WWW page for Mountain Biking enthusiasts. This page focuses on mountain biking in the San Francisco Bay area (including descriptions of several local trails), but also contains links to descriptions of mountain biking in other areas, including Pittsburgh, Colorado, Utah and New Zealand.

  20. Mountain Age

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Francis Eberle

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about processes that affect the shape of mountains. While determining the relative age of mountains involves a variety of complex interacting factors, this probe is designed to determine if students consider weathering factors or if they intuitively believe taller mountains are older.

  1. 77 FR 34890 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ...Oklahoma intends to revise its program to be no less effective than the Federal regulations and to improve operational efficiency. This document gives the times and locations that the Oklahoma program and this proposed amendment to that...

  2. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2011 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2011 Audited Financial Statements Independent Auditors' Report

  3. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2010 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2010 Audited Financial Statements Independent Auditors' Report

  4. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2008 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2008 Audited Financial Statements Independent Auditors' Report

  5. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2009 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2009 Audited Financial Statements Independent Auditors' Report

  6. the university of oklahoma Annual Report

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    the university of oklahoma ADVENTURE A Year Of Annual Report July 2005 ­ June 2006 #12;Board S S I O N Statement The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History at the University of Oklahoma Conducting and disseminating research to increase knowledge Teaching university students to develop critical

  7. 1Mohammed Atiquzzaman University of Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    Fairness in DiffServ Mohammed Atiquzzaman School of Computer Science University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK of Oklahoma DiffServ n Provides statistical guarantees to a few pre- defined per hop behavior Y Expedited University of Oklahoma Differentiated Service Network DiffServ Domain A DiffServ Domain B DiffServ Domain C

  8. STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES CODE -1 THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    of the University of Oklahoma is charged in the Constitution of the State of Oklahoma with governing the University of the United States and the State of Oklahoma and the University of Oklahoma Student Association. Those. Student Rights Students of the University of Oklahoma are guaranteed certain rights by the Constitutions

  9. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program

    E-print Network

    Turner, W. C.; Estes, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    In Oklahoma, industry consumes about 35% of the total energy consumed. While it is true that much work has been done in the larger companies, most small to medium sized companies have yet to undertake a substantial energy management program. Often...

  10. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program

    E-print Network

    Turner, W. C.; Webb, R. E.; Phillips, J. M.; Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    , and in a senior-level engineering course in energy management being taught at Oklahoma State University. The equipment used includes: 1. A solar collector connected to a coffee pot to produce hot water for instant coffee. 2. A solar photo VOltaic...

  11. Mountain Watch

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    If you've ever wanted to turn your hiking skills into helpful information, the Mountain Watch section of the Appalachian Mountain Club website may be of great interest. The site is designed to turn hikers into "citizen scientists" who can "aid in the collection of data that measures the ecological health of our mountains." The site contains four areas (including "Mountain Plants" and "Mountain Weather") where visitors can submit their own recent findings and observations. First-time visitors will need to fill out the volunteer data section, and this takes just a few minutes. After this, visitors will receive a password which will allow them to report on alpine flowers, air quality, and related subjects. Visitors can also read the observations of others, and read up on their "Naturalist Blog".

  12. Arsenic-related water quality with depth and water quality of well-head samples from production wells, Oklahoma, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, Carol J.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Greer, James R.; Smith, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey well profiler was used to describe arsenic-related water quality with well depth and identify zones yielding water with high arsenic concentrations in two production wells in central and western Oklahoma that yield water from the Permian-aged Garber-Wellington and Rush Springs aquifers, respectively. In addition, well-head samples were collected from 12 production wells yielding water with historically large concentrations of arsenic (greater than 10 micrograms per liter) from the Garber-Wellington aquifer, Rush Springs aquifer, and two minor aquifers: the Arbuckle-Timbered Hills aquifer in southern Oklahoma and a Permian-aged undefined aquifer in north-central Oklahoma. Three depth-dependent samples from a production well in the Rush Springs aquifer had similar water-quality characteristics to the well-head sample and did not show any substantial changes with depth. However, slightly larger arsenic concentrations in the two deepest depth-dependent samples indicate the zones yielding noncompliant arsenic concentrations are below the shallowest sampled depth. Five depth-dependent samples from a production well in the Garber-Wellington aquifer showed increases in arsenic concentrations with depth. Well-bore travel-time information and water-quality data from depth-dependent and well-head samples showed that most arsenic contaminated water (about 63 percent) was entering the borehole from perforations adjacent to or below the shroud that overlaid the pump. Arsenic concentrations ranged from 10.4 to 124 micrograms per liter in 11 of the 12 production wells sampled at the well head, exceeding the maximum contaminant level of 10 micrograms per liter for drinking water. pH values of the 12 well-head samples ranged from 6.9 to 9. Seven production wells in the Garber-Wellington aquifer had the largest arsenic concentrations ranging from 18.5 to 124 micrograms per liter. Large arsenic concentrations (10.4-18.5) and near neutral to slightly alkaline pH values (6.9-7.4) were detected in samples from one well in the Garber-Wellington aquifer, three production wells in the Rush Springs aquifer, and one well in an undefined Permian-aged aquifer. All well-head samples were oxic and arsenate was the only species of arsenic in water from 10 of the 12 production wells sampled. Arsenite was measured above the laboratory reporting level in water from a production well in the Garber-Wellington aquifer and was the only arsenic species measured in water from the Arbuckle-Timbered Hills aquifer. Fluoride and uranium were the only trace elements, other than arsenic, that exceeded the maximum contaminant level for drinking water in well-head samples collected for the study. Uranium concentrations in four production wells in the Garber-Wellington aquifer ranged from 30.2 to 99 micrograms per liter exceeding the maximum contaminant level of 30 micrograms per liter for drinking water. Water from these four wells also had the largest arsenic concentrations measured in the study ranging from 30 to 124 micrograms

  13. What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase II State Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano Research Laboratory, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Phase II provides a more detailed examination of classroom variables important to achievement in Oklahoma schools. Where Phase I addressed all nine of the Oklahoma essential elements using survey data, Phase II focuses on what occurs in Oklahoma classrooms primarily using data from principal interviews, classroom observations (on-site), and video…

  14. Mountain Watch

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-05-14

    Mountain Watch is a group of ongoing trail-side citizen science programs that track reproductive (flower/fruit development) plant phenology of a small set of alpine and forest plants in the U.S.'s Eastern Appalachian mountains and other northeast areas. The program encourages hikers, families, school groups and conservationists to help scientists make observations along the trails on the timing of plant flower and fruit development for inclusion in a long-term study to understand how shifts in climate trends may impact mountain flora. Resources to help teachers get started are available at the website.

  15. Mountain Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mountains can be awe-inspiring both for the vistas they provide and for the weather events and long-term climate systems they support. This interactive feature illustrates how a moisture-laden air mass interacts with a mountain slope to produce characteristic patterns of precipitation over the mountain and surrounding areas. Viewers can see how clouds and precipitation form as the air mass ascends the windward side of the peak, and observe the rain shadow created on the leeward side by the descending, warmed, and moisture-depleted air. A background essay and list of discussion questions supplement the interactive feature.

  16. University of Oklahoma Police Department

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    .Disposition: Date Reported: Location : Report #:04/09/14 - WED at 12:59 KUHLMAN COURT, ALL BLOCKS 14-0561 Address Court 04/09/14 - WED at 19:00 - 04/09/14 - WED at 21:00Date and Time Occurred From - Occurred To: CaseUniversity of Oklahoma Police Department Case Log Media Apr 09, 2014 Jun 09, 2014From to Date

  17. Atlas Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These are the Anti-Atlas Mountains, part of the Atlas Mountain range in southern Morocco, Africa. The region contains some of the world's largest and most diverse mineral resources, most of which are still untouched. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on June 22, 2001. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, infrared, and red wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  18. Mountain Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this interactive resource students slide a bar across the screen and view the steps in the water cycle as a water-laden air mass hits a mountain range. They see how clouds and precipitation form as the air mass ascends the windward side of the mountain, and observe the rain shadow created on the leeward side by the descending, warmed, and moisture-depleted air.

  19. Mountain Building

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site offers several sets of questions for students to answer about where mountain ranges are located and why they are where they are. Many of the questions have links to more information and/or images. Questions address the role of plate tectonics in the process of mountain building. A computer isn't necessary to answer the questions, but is highly recommended so that the students can use the links provided. These questions require some prior knowledge of the content.

  20. Mountain Mash

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    Learners model the processes that formed some of Earth's largest mountain ranges: the Himalayas, the Andes, and the Alps. Using layers of clay to represent continental plates, learners push the clay together to see model mountains form. When learners set up a free account at Kinetic City, they can answer bonus questions at the end of the activity as a quick assessment. As a larger assessment, learners can complete the Smart Attack game after they've completed several activities.

  1. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Oklahoma, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Oklahoma for 2010. Oklahoma made progress in narrowing achievement gaps for most major subgroups on the End-of-Instruction (EOI) test in Algebra I. Trends in achievement gaps could not be determined for other grades in math, or for any grades in reading, because the state…

  2. Organic vegetable weed control research in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lane Agriculture Research Center is operated by Oklahoma State University and the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Located in southeastern Oklahoma, 13 resident scientists work cooperatively to develop production practices for organic vegetable production. On...

  3. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Oklahoma Water. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) is located within the ISE and is responsible for developing and coordinating water research funding to address the needs of Oklahoma. To guide it in meeting

  4. Did Divorces Decline after the Oklahoma City Bombing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakonezny, Paul A.; Reddick, Rebecca; Rodgers, Joseph Lee

    2004-01-01

    The Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995 was an act of terrorism that had many potential influences on the city and state, including influences on families. We analyzed divorce data from 1985 to 2000 for all 77 counties in Oklahoma to assess the divorce response to the Oklahoma City bombing. Our prediction was that divorce rates in Oklahoma would…

  5. Contemporary Native American Autobiography: N. Scott Momaday's "The Way to Rainy Mountain."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Hertha D.

    1988-01-01

    Explores aspects of "The Way to Rainy Mountain," through which Momaday incorporates Native American oral narrative modes into Euro-American written autobiography, and blends mythical, historical, and personal narratives of the Kiowa migration and Momaday's own journey from Montana to Oklahoma. Contains 36 references. (SV)

  6. Oklahoma Whistleblower Act The Oklahoma Whistleblower Act (74 O.S. 840 -2.5) protects employees who

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Oklahoma Whistleblower Act The Oklahoma Whistleblower Act (74 O.S. §840 -2.5) protects employees that he or she has been retaliated against in violation of the Oklahoma Whistleblower Act may file grievance alleging retaliation in violation of the Oklahoma Whistleblower Act must be filed within sixty (60

  7. A transgression-regression event during the deposition of the Upper Cambrian Honey Creek formation in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    SciTech Connect

    McElmoyl, C.; Donovan, R.N. (Texas Christian Univ., Ft. Worth, TX (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-02-01

    The transgression that inundated the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen during the upper Cambrian enveloped a landscape that consisted of hills of rhyolite up to 350 m in high. Initial deposits on this topography have been interpreted as alluvium. These, together with succeeding tidally-influenced marine siliciclastics form the Reagan Formation. The siliciclastics grains are made up of fragments of local origin (i.e., rhyolite), quartz (derived from a distal source) and authigenic glauconite. The upward passage from the Reagan to the Honeycreek Formation is defined by the addition to the siliciclastics of carbonate detritus in the form of tidally-influenced grainstones, mostly composed of pelmatozoan fragments. The passage from the Honeycreek to the overlying Fort Sill Formation of the Arbuckle Group is marked by the incoming of beds of lime mudstone and the gradual disappearance of grainstones and siliciclastics. Evidence of the existence of rhyolite topography (i.e., an archipelago) can be detected to within 50 m of the top of the Fort Sill. While the overall facies pattern undoubtedly records a widespread transgression, a newly-discovered slightly angular unconformity within the lower part of the Honeycreek is best interpreted as a record of a temporary regression. Three distinctive lithologies are involved in this relationship: the lowest beds are light grey cross-bedded pelmatozoan grainstones with minor amounts of quartz and rhyolite grains. Syntaxial cements at the base of this unit are homogenous under cathode luminescence, while cements near the top display up to 27 zones of reflectance, interpreted as a fluctuating marine-meteoric groundwater imprint. The overlying bed is a red-brown mud-supported limestone that contains abundant angular rhyolite pebbles and a rich trilobite fauna. Some of the pebbles are coated by pelmatozoans.

  8. Cambrian Magmatism Along the Southern Laurentian Margin: New Petrologic Constraints from Well Cuttings in the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, J. M.; Brueseke, M. E.; Mertzman, S. A.; Puckett, R. E., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatism in the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen (SOA) is associated with >250,000 km3 of early Cambrian aged mafic-silicic intrusives and effusive products possibly related to the opening of the Iapetus Ocean. In the vicinity of the Arbuckle Mts., thick mafic to intermediate lava packages interbedded with rhyolite lavas and sedimentary strata are exposed in the subsurface and penetrated by oil and gas exploration wells. We have sampled cuttings from six wells exposed along the strike of the SOA with the aim of petrographically, geochemically, and isotopically characterizing the rocks to better understand their tectonomagmatic affinity. Cuttings were observed under a binocular microscope to ensure textural homogeneity; XRF bulk chemistry from these samples show that they are relatively unaltered based on analytical totals and alteration indices. The samples plot as basalts to andesites (e.g., 47-64 wt. % SiO2) and are primarily tholeiitic. On discrimination diagrams, these samples fall in "intraplate" fields, consistent with continental basalt volcanism, including flood basalt eruptions. These lavas show Zr/Nb values ranging from 6.8 to 11.1, K/Nb values ranging from 300-600, and Ba/Nb values ranging from 10-20, which are similar to EM1 OIB. The samples also show trace element patterns consistent with OIB-like mantle sources when normalized to primitive mantle, and similar geochemical traits to the Roosevelt Gabbros that crop out along strike of the SOA in the Wichita Mts.. Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope analysis is ongoing. Chemostratigraphic variations show the possibility of several lava packages. The geochemical analyses of the SOA lava flows provide insight into how these magmas formed as well as what tectonic regime (e.g., lower-mantle derived plume, upper-mantle extension, or "leaky" transform fault) produced the volcanism that affected the southern margin of Laurentia during the formation of the SOA; we favor the involvement of a deep mantle plume.

  9. Percentile Distributions of Median Nitrite Plus Nitrate as Nitrogen, Total Nitrogen, and Total Phosphorus Concentrations in Oklahoma Streams, 1973-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggard, Brian E.; Masoner, Jason R.; Becker, Carol J.

    2003-01-01

    Nutrients are one of the primary causes of water-quality impairments in streams, lakes, reservoirs, and estuaries in the United States. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed regional-based nutrient criteria using ecoregions to protect streams in the United States from impairment. However, nutrient criteria were based on nutrient concentrations measured in large aggregated nutrient ecoregions with little relevance to local environmental conditions in states. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is using a dichotomous process known as Use Support Assessment Protocols to define nutrient criteria in Oklahoma streams. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is modifying the Use Support Assessment Protocols to reflect nutrient informa-tion and environmental characteristics relevant to Oklahoma streams, while considering nutrient information grouped by geographic regions based on level III ecoregions and state boundaries. Percentile distributions of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorous concentrations were calculated from 563 sites in Oklahoma and 4 sites in Arkansas near the Oklahoma and Arkansas border to facilitate development of nutrient criteria for Oklahoma streams. Sites were grouped into four geographic regions and were categorized into eight stream categories by stream slope and stream order. The 50th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus concentrations were greater in the Ozark Highland ecoregion and were less in the Ouachita Mountains ecoregion when compared to other geographic areas used to group sites. The 50th percentiles of median concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus were least in first, second, and third order streams. The 50th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations in the Ozark Highland and Ouachita Mountains ecoregions were least in first, second, and third order streams with streams slopes greater than 17 feet per mile. Nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen and total nitrogen criteria determined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for the Ozark Highland ecoregion were less than the 25th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus concentrations in the Ozark Highland ecoregion calculated for this report. Nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen and total nitrogen criteria developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for the Ouachita Mountains ecoregion were similar to the 25th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen and total nitrogen concentrations in the Ouachita Mountains ecoregion calculated for this report. Nitrate as nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations currently (2002) used in the Use Support Assessment Protocols for Oklahoma were greater than the 75th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations calculated for this report.

  10. 1441210_2.DOC UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    1441210_2.DOC UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA DEFINED CONTRIBUTION RETIREMENT PLAN (Amended and Restated the right to amend, modify or terminate the Plan at any time. #12;1441210_2.DOC i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page

  11. 76 FR 77578 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00057

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 12/07/2011. Incident: Earthquakes. Incident Period: 11/05/2011 and continuing. Effective Date: 12/07/2011. Physical Loan Application...

  12. 76 FR 31670 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1970-DR), dated 05/06/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Straight-line Winds. Incident Period: 04/14/2011. Effective Date: 05/06/2011. Physical Loan...

  13. 75 FR 35103 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1917-DR), dated 06/11/2010. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, and straight-line winds. Incident Period: 05/10/2010 through 05/13/2010. Effective Date:...

  14. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-print Network

    and encourages applications from candidates with diverse cultural backgrounds. #12;. Salary and other compensation are competitive with major research institutions. Oklahoma State University State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity/E-Verify Employer committed to diversity

  15. Mountain Building

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1998-01-01

    This activity is part of a series of lessons in a continuing study of change. It is designed to give students hands-on experience manipulating and controlling the variables involved in the process of soil erosion. They will be able to identify variables that influence rates of change and use group consensus to design and build what they believe to be the strongest mountain possible.

  16. Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this grant was to increase the awareness of students of space sciences and commerce through experimentation. This objective was carried out through the award and administration, by OSIDA, the Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority, of eleven smaller grants to fund thirteen projects at schools determined by competitive application. Applications were graded on potential outreach, experimentation objectives and impact on students' awareness of space sciences. We chose projects from elementary, middle and high schools as well as colleges that would encourage students through research and experimentation to consider education and careers in related disciplines. Each organization did not receive an equal share of the grant; instead, OSIDA distributed the money to each project based on the organization's need. A copy of the dispersement record is enclosed with this final grant report. The projects covered topics such as: space colonization, space stations, constellations, model rocketry, and space commerce.

  17. TWO ADDITIONS TO THE FLORA OF OKLAHOMA AND NOTES ON XYRIS JUPICAI (XYRIDACEAE) IN OKLAHOMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason R. Singhurst; Edwin L. Bridges; Walter C. Holmes

    Eleocharis flavescens and Rhynchospora scirpoides are reported as new to Oklahoma. Xyris jupicai, which has been mentioned as occurring in Oklahoma, is documented in the state by citation of voucher specimens. The overall distribution of these species in the West Gulf Coastal Plain is discussed.

  18. The Oklahoma State Study of Oklahoma's Public Higher Education Physical Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G., Ed.; And Others

    This project examines policies related to facilities at public institutions of higher education in Oklahoma in the context of a current legislative debate over a bond issue to fund facilities. The last bond issue for Oklahoma higher education was in 1968. Verification of a representative sample of 27 campus master plans validated an earlier…

  19. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... more information on enabling JavaScript. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ... Rickettsia rickettsii bacteria, which cause Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Credit: CDC Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a ...

  20. Mountain Barriers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 6-8. This lesson focuses on the changes that occur when mountains rise, thus changing the climate of the area and the plants and animals that live there. Students perform an experiment to observe differences in hot and cold air that help cause this phenomenon. It includes objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, performing extensions, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, audio vocabulary, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

  1. Mountain Stage

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mountain Stage, a famous Charleston, West Virginia, venue where folk musicians play, is broadcast on National Public Radio, and can be heard on the NPR website, simply by clicking on "Listen", next to the artist's picture and brief bio. Visitors wishing to read more about the artist's musical history can click on the name of the artist next to their picture. Included in the history is their set list for the broadcast show. Visitors can comment on each artist's show, or recommend it to other visitors, by clicking on the icons at the bottom of each brief bio on the homepage.

  2. OSU Tulsa Library Jack H. Stout University of Oklahoma Memorabilia

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    :9 University of Oklahoma Magazine. Vol. XVI, No. 3, 1928. 1:10 University of Oklahoma Magazine. Vol. 18, No. 3, 1930. The University of Oklahoma Magazine, the successor to the University Empire, was published four before the game. 1:13 Women's Student Government Association Handbook for Fresh

  3. Drought and grazing effects on Oklahoma phlox (Polemoniaceae, Phlox oklahomensis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oklahoma phlox (Phlox oklahomensis Wherry) is endemic to Butler, Chautauqua, Comanche, Cowley, and Elk Counties of Kansas and Woods and Woodward Counties of Oklahoma. The species comprises populations of a few scattered individuals to several hundred in mixed-grass prairie sites in Oklahoma where co...

  4. STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES CODE -1 THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    of the University of Oklahoma is charged in the Constitution of the State of Oklahoma with governing the University of the United States and the State of Oklahomaand the University of Oklahoma StudentAssociation. Those documents Rights Students of the University of Oklahomaare guaranteed certain rights by the Constitutions

  5. Why Norman?: Meteorology Comes to University of Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    Why Norman?: Meteorology Comes to University of Oklahoma by John M. Lewis A presentation at the 50th Anniversary University of Oklahoma's School of Meteorology October 8, 2010 #12;2 Extended Abstract A review of the University of Oklahoma's (OU's) meteorology program/department over its first 15 years

  6. Social and Economic Consequences of Indian Gaming in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Kenneth W., II; Spilde, Katherine A.; Taylor, Jonathan B.

    2004-01-01

    The balancing framework of Indian gaming as it operates in Oklahoma constrains Oklahoma Indian nations from operating facilities according to the dictates of the marketplace on a large-scale Class III basis. Indian gaming actually brings substantial net economic benefits to the state, contrary to claims that Oklahoma Indian gaming benefits come at…

  7. A Legal Analysis of Litigation against Oklahoma Educators and School Districts under the Oklahoma Governmental Tort Claims Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacefield, Kevin Lee

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation analyzed public court decisions in cases against Oklahoma school districts and their employees involving sovereign immunity claims filed under Oklahoma's Governmental Tort Claims Act. The questions addressed were: (1) How have the Oklahoma courts interpreted the Governmental Tort Claims Act, (Okla. Stat. tit. 51 Section 151 et…

  8. Minerals yearbook, 1992: Oklahoma. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Zelten, J.E.; Arndt, R.H.

    1994-03-01

    The value of Oklahoma nonfuel mineral production was nearly $252.6 million in 1992, a decrease of $22.9 million from that reported to the U.S. Bureau of Mines by State mineral producers in 1991. The value of the top three commodities produced, crushed stone, portland cement, and construction sand and gravel, exceeded $168.8 million and comprised almost 67% of the State's total nonfuel mineral value. Although rebounding from the recessionary period, the growth curve for several minerals produced in the State was minimal, and for several others it moved downward. Oklahoma ranked 35th nationally in total nonfuel mineral value. The State ranked 26th nationally in the production of industrial minerals, contributing about 1.38% of the $20.7 billion revenues received. Oklahoma ranked first in the Nation in crude gypsum production, second in the production of tripoli, and was the only domestic source of iodine.

  9. Mountains and Mountaineering in the Pacific Northwest

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-01-01

    Completed in 2013, this portal for digital collections pertaining to mountains and mountaineering brings together thousands of images from the University of Washington Libraries. Visitors should read the narrative introduction on the homepage and then move around through the various Topics, which include The Mountaineers Activities and Early Climbing and Tourism at Mt. Rainier. This last area offers a piquant look through the history of the massive peak known simply as "the Mountain" by locals. Visitors can explore the records of the adventurous spirits who have climbed the mountain over the years, along with the papers of Dee Molenaar, a celebrated geologist and local climber. The site also includes a Resources area that includes links to mountain climbing groups and such.

  10. Oklahoma Handbook: Child Nutrition Programs. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    Nutrition concepts, school food service guidelines, and related materials (such as nutrition charts, menu planning worksheets, and student survey forms) are provided in this nutrition handbook. Prepared by the Oklahoma State Department of Education's School Lunch Section, the handbook consists of nine sections that are organized in outline format.…

  11. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma

  12. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

  13. Oklahoma Curriculum Guide for Teaching Safety Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma Curriculum Improvement Commission, Oklahoma City.

    Developed by classroom teachers, university professors, and personnel from the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this guide is an effort to assist teachers in locating and utilizing safety materials as well as to assist them in developing well-balanced safety programs for the children and young people in the state. The preschool and…

  14. DISTRIBUTION OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN OKLAHOMA LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a data report presenting the species and abundance of phytoplankton in the 15 lakes sampled by the National Eutrophication Survey in the State of Oklahoma. Results from the calculation of several water quality indices are also included (Nygaard's Trophic State Index, Palm...

  15. Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators Journal 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Malinda Hendricks, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators 2009 Journal includes the following four peer reviewed articles: (1) The Changing Role of Grandparents (Fred D. Hammond, III, Terry E. Spigner, Charolette Myles-Nixon, and Pauline Holloway); (2) Pedagogical Agent Instructional Design Challenges (Jon Martens); (3) Differences in Relatedness across…

  16. House Damage from 2011 Oklahoma Earthquake

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    House damage in central Oklahoma from the magnitude 5.6 earthquake on Nov. 6, 2011. Research conducted by USGS geophysicist Elizabeth Cochran and her university-based colleagues suggests that this earthquake was induced by injection into deep disposal wells in the Wilzetta North field....

  17. Public Library Service to Children in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentroth, Mary Ann

    Because of the low density of its population and subsequent low property tax support, library service in Oklahoma is based on the multicounty library operating as a single unit. With the help of federal funds, such units now cover one-third of the state and 60 percent of its population utilizing branch libraries and bookmobile service. Service to…

  18. OKLAHOMA STATE Report of Independent Accountants' Application

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    University 107 Whitehurst Hall Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-1015 We have audited the financial statements report thereon dated October 11, 2007. Additionally, we have audited the financial statements report thereon dated October 11, 2007. We have also audited the financial statements comprising

  19. University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology Rapid-response Graduate Degree Application Form This application form is used by the School of Meteorology to provide a rapid, no-cost response to the applicant on prospects to be admitted to the School of Meteorology for pursuit of a graduate degree. The applicant should

  20. OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY VOLUME 32 SPRING 2007

    E-print Network

    Sharp, Kim

    . United States, 389 U.S. 347,350-51 (1967) (Fourth Amendment). 7. See Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113, 153 (1973 inclusion of state constitutions. State courts have repeatedly held that state constitutions significantly.H. 2003). 87 #12;88 Oklahoma City University Law Review [Vol. 32 such as states banning assisted suicide

  1. 1Mohammed Atiquzzaman, University of Oklahoma, USA.

    E-print Network

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    protocol suite ! Original TCP performed poorly in satellite networks " errors " long propagation delay. ! Many schemes for enhancing TCP for satellite networks. ! IETF developing Stream Control Transmission ­ multiple IP addresses per host #12;6Mohammed Atiquzzaman, University of Oklahoma, USA. Presentation

  2. 75 FR 42173 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00041

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 07/13/2010. Incident: Tornadoes, Severe Storms, Straight Line Winds and Flooding. Incident Period: 06/13/2010 through 06/15/2010. DATES:...

  3. Did the Oklahoma City Bombers Succeed?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jordan Steiker

    2001-01-01

    The worst case of domestic terrorism in our country's history, the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, led to the enactment of a landmark antiterrorism statute. Not surprisingly, several of the statute's provisions strengthen federal power in extraordinary and unprecedented ways to counter the threat of terrorism. But other provisions radically restrict the ability of

  4. Seismogram offers insight into Oklahoma City bombing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas L. Holzer; Joe B. Fletcher; Gary S. Fuis; Trond Ryberg; Thomas M. Brocher; Christopher M. Dietel

    1996-01-01

    The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, generated seismic waves that were recorded on two permanent seismographs about 7 and 26 km away from the bombing. The seismogram recorded at 26 km shows two low-frequency wave trains, discrete sets of oscillatory signals, that begin about 10 s apart. Public release

  5. Disaster nursing in the Oklahoma City bombing.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, R; Keylon, K; Odor, P S; Walker, G; Hunt, L

    1995-10-01

    The Oklahoma City Federal Building disaster quickly changed a routine day of eye surgical procedures into a chaotic trauma center for the victims with not only eye injuries, but multiple deep lacerations and other injuries. The devastating and disruptive effect of the bombing was stressful for the nursing staff who became disaster survivors of the emotional trauma involved. PMID:7594916

  6. Oklahoma: A View of the Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ruthe Blalock; Depriest, Maria; Fowler, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a dialogue on twentieth-century Oklahoma artists and writers given at a conference titled "Working from Community: American Indian Art and Literature in a Historical and Cultural Context" and held in the summer of 2003 at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. Twenty-five educators converged for six weeks of…

  7. Potentiometric surface in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer, Oklahoma, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mashburn, Shana L.; Magers, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    A study of the hydrogeology of the Central Oklahoma aquifer was started in 2008 to provide the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) hydrogeologic data and a groundwater flow model that can be used as a tool to help manage the aquifer. The 1973 Oklahoma water law requires the OWRB to do hydrologic investigations of Oklahoma's aquifers (termed 'groundwater basins') and to determine amounts of water that may be withdrawn by permitted water users. 'Maximum annual yield' is a term used by OWRB to describe the total amount of water that can be withdrawn from a specific aquifer in any year while allowing a minimum 20-year life of the basin (Oklahoma Water Resources Board, 2010). Currently (2010), the maximum annual yield has not been determined for the Central Oklahoma aquifer. Until the maximum annual yield determination is made, water users are issued a temporary permit by the OWRB for 2 acre-feet/acre per year. The objective of the study, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, was to study the hydrogeology of the Central Oklahoma aquifer to provide information that will enable the OWRB to determine the maximum annual yield of the aquifer based on different proposed management plans. Groundwater flow models are typically used by the OWRB as a tool to help determine the maximum annual yield. This report presents the potentiometric surface of the Central Oklahoma aquifer based on water-level data collected in 2009 as part of the current (2010) hydrologic study. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Investigations Atlas HA-724 by Christenson and others (1992) presents the 1986-87 potentiometric-surface map. This 1986-87 potentiometric-surface map was made as part of the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment pilot project for the Central Oklahoma aquifer that examined the geochemical and hydrogeological processes operating in the aquifer. An attempt was made to obtain water-level measurements for the 2009 potentiometric-surface map from the wells used for the 1986-87 potentiometric-surface map. Well symbols with circles on the 2009 potentiometric-surface map (fig. 1) indicate wells that were used for the 1986-87 potentiometric-surface map.

  8. How Mountains are Formed

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Students investigate how mountains are formed. Concepts include the composition and structure of the Earth's tectonic plates and tectonic plate boundaries, with an emphasis on plate convergence as it relates to mountain formation. Students learn that geotechnical engineers design technologies to measure movement of tectonic plates and mountain formation, as well as design to alter the mountain environment to create safe and dependable roadways and tunnels.

  9. Dam-breach analysis and flood-inundation mapping for selected dams in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and near Atoka, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shivers, Molly J.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Grout, Trevor S.; Lewis, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    Digital-elevation models, field survey measurements, hydraulic data, and hydrologic data (U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations North Canadian River below Lake Overholser near Oklahoma City, Okla. [07241000], and North Canadian River at Britton Road at Oklahoma City, Okla. [07241520]), were used as inputs for the one-dimensional dynamic (unsteady-flow) models using Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System (HEC–RAS) software. The modeled flood elevations were exported to a geographic information system to produce flood-inundation maps. Water-surface profiles were developed for a 75-percent probable maximum flood dam-breach scenario and a sunny-day dam-breach scenario, as well as for maximum flood-inundation elevations and flood-wave arrival times at selected bridge crossings. Points of interest such as community-services offices, recreational areas, water-treatment plants, and wastewater-treatment plants were identified on the flood-inundation maps.

  10. A digital geologic map database for the state of Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heran, William D.; Green, Gregory N.; Stoeser, Douglas B.

    2003-01-01

    This dataset is a composite of part or all of the 12 1:250,000 scale quadrangles that make up Oklahoma. The result looks like a geologic map of the State of Oklahoma. But it is only an Oklahoma shaped map clipped from the 1:250,000 geologic maps. This is not a new geologic map. No new mapping took place. The geologic information from each quadrangle is available within the composite dataset.

  11. GREEN MOUNTAIN MORRIS DANCERS

    E-print Network

    GREEN MOUNTAIN MORRIS DANCERS A young men's team performing Morris & Sword dances from England Mountain (boys) and Maple Leaf (girls) will be recruiting new members in January 2009, typically 6th grade, but as a springtime dance, to awaken the earth. The Green Mountain Morris and Maple Leaf Morris are based in Norwich

  12. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    in shallow streams, on the water conservation and irrigation habits of Oklahomans, and the development. · Water conservation in Oklahoma urban and suburban watersheds through modification of irrigation

  13. Largest Dinosaur Ever Discovered Found in Oklahoma

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    de Nie, Michael Willem.

    Originally discovered in a remote corner of Oklahoma in 1994, the fossil of what may have been the largest creature to ever walk the earth has been excavated by a research team from the University of Oklahoma. Dubbed Sauroposeidon proteles, or "thunder lizard," the dinosaur was almost 100 feet long, with a 39 foot neck and weighing over 50 tons, so big that it would have created minor seismic activity just by walking, according to scientists. The new find is about 110 million years old and consists of neck vertebrae, some almost five feet in length, together with neck ribs nearly twelve feet long. The find is also significant because it may shed light on the last of the North American sauropods, who died out about 100 million years ago. A paper on this new find is scheduled to appear in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. The sites listed provide information and background material about this momentous discovery.

  14. N3280RDCOTTONWOODRD PayneOklahoma 11

    E-print Network

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    51 2 54 11 51 49 4 11 2 11 10 72 51 96 26 47 51 2651 26 76 76 26 4 32 11 26 3 11 26 10 72 51 31 26 51 11 2626 72 11 49 10 11 26 11 26 96 76 26 41 11 76 51 1011 74 31 51 11 SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY Soil Survey Area: Payne County, Oklahoma Spatial Version of Data: 2 Soil Map Compilation Scale: 1

  15. Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)

    SciTech Connect

    S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

    2012-02-29

    The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma�¢����s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

  16. Shallow subsurface geological investigation near the Meers fault, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Luza, K.V. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States))

    1993-02-01

    The Meers fault is part of a complex system of northwest-trending faults forming the boundary between the Wichita Mountains (south) and the Anadarko basin (north). The frontal fault system is dominated by moderately dipping to steeply dipping reverse faults which have a combined net vertical displacement of over 9 km. Of these faults, the Meers fault has a Pennsylvanian-Permian throw of about 2 km. The Meers fault trends N. 60[degree]W. and displaces Permian conglomerate and shale for a distance of at least 26 km, from near the Comanche-Kiowa County boundary to East Cache Creek. At the northwest end of the fault trace, the fault displaces limestone-pebble conglomerates (Post Oak), whereas at the southeast end siltstones and calcrete-bearing shales of the Hennessey are displaced. Multiple radiocarbon ages of soil-humus samples from 2 Canyon Creek trenches (S24, T4N, R13W) show the last surface faulting occurred 1,200--1,300 yr ago. In 1988--89, the Oklahoma Geological Survey drilled 4 core holes to basement in the vicinity of the trench sites. The holes were drilled along a 200-m-long transect normal to the strike of the Meers fault. Two holes were drilled on the north side of the fault and penetrated highly fractured and altered rhyolite at about 58 m. A third hole drilled 25 m south of the fault, intersected weathered and sheared gabbro at 58 m. The basement material in the fourth hole consisted of dark greenish brown, highly fractured and sheared rock. The drill holes encountered Permian, poorly sorted, matrix-supported, 0.5--3 m thick, conglomerate interbedded with shale and siltstone. Drill holes 1--3 contained 3--5 m thick, granite cobble-boulder, clast supported conglomerate resting on rhyolite and/or gabbro. The core-hole information suggests the Meers-fault zone is at least 200 meters wide.

  17. Oklahoma 4-H Alumni Association Membership Form Name Maiden Name

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Oklahoma 4-H Alumni Association Membership Form Name Maiden Name Home County County Residing In Address City State Zip Code Email Home Phone Business/Cell Phone: Birthday Years in 4-H: From to 4-H Awards/Trips Your membership in the Oklahoma 4-H Alumni Association is an investment in the future

  18. Twenty-Fifth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Overton

    The Indian Education Program in Oklahoma is financed and operated under the provision of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Oklahoma Department of Education and is supervised by the State Department of Education as authorized by the Johnson O'Malley Act (JOM) of 1936. The narrative section of this 1972 annual report…

  19. Twenty Sixth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Overton

    The 26th annual report (1973) of American Indian education programs in Oklahoma is presented. The Oklahoma education program is financed and operated under a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Interior, and the State Department of Education. The supervision of the program is carried out entirely by the State…

  20. Twentieth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laney, L. J.

    Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This 1967 annual…

  1. DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;#12;DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2 DAM SAFETY MODIFICATION3 &4 Environmental Assessment Pine Creek Dam, Oklahoma Dam Safety Modification & Interim Risk Reduction Measure and risk reduction measures necessary to correct structural and maintenance deficiencies of Pine Creek Dam

  2. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    on the water cycle in a tallgrass prairie ecosystem. 2. We co-hosted the 7th annual Water Research Symposium. Chris Zou was awarded a 104G grant entitled Eastern Redcedar Encroachment and Water Cycle in TallgrassOklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Oklahoma Water

  3. IMPLICATIONS OF NEW ARSENIC STANDARDS ON OKLAHOMA WATER RESOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The new national standard for arsenic in drinking water supplies, slated to take effect in 2006, is having an unexpected impact on a number of Oklahoma communities. Currently, several municipalities in north central Oklahoma are in compliance with existing arsenic standards (50 ...

  4. Parasitism of aphids in canola fields in central Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter canola, Brassica napus L., production in Oklahoma has increased from essentially 0 ha in 2001 to 40,500 ha in 2011, and acreage is expected to continue to increase. Three aphid species typically infest canola fields in central Oklahoma, the turnip aphid Lypaphis erysimi (Kaltenbach), the cab...

  5. Fiscal Equity of Teacher Salaries and Compensation in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiden, Jeffrey; Evans, Nancy O.

    2009-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated the degree to which financial resources supporting teachers was equitably distributed in Oklahoma. Teachers are an important resource and their importance is being increasingly emphasized as educators attempt to increase student achievement. Every student educated in Oklahoma should have an equal right to…

  6. Oklahoma geology, the challenge in a changing environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. B. Miller; B. L. Tillman

    1993-01-01

    A diversity of geology and programs exists in Oklahoma which requires the SCS geologist to use a wide range of experience in order to contribute to the many existing programs. The US Soil Conservation Service geologist work force consists of Bob L. Tillman, Sedimentation Geologist, Chickasha, and Glen B. Miller, Engineering Geologist, Stillwater, Oklahoma. Their poster display illustrates channel erosion

  7. Forensic Seismology and the 1995 Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. L. Holzer

    2002-01-01

    The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on April 19, 1995, was recorded on 2 permanent seismographs, 7 and 26 km away. The more distant seismograph recorded 2 low-frequency wave trains separated by about 10 s. Militia groups speculated that the 2 wave trains were caused by separate explosions and hinted at a

  8. Literacy and Education among Adult Indians in Oklahoma. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Paul R.; And Others

    The U.S. Office of Education funded the Adult Indian Education Project (AIEP) for 15 months to identify literacy levels and educational needs of adult American Indians in Oklahoma. Using Native American field interviewers, the AIEP surveyed a 1.8% random sample of adults from 19 tribal groups representing 70% of the Indian population of Oklahoma.…

  9. Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    ://osufacts.okstate.edu Ecology and Management of Sericea Lespedeza D. Chad Cummings Sr. Agriculturist Rangeland Ecology Ecology and Management John R. Weir Research Associate Rangeland Ecology and Management Sericea lespedeza, and biological diversity. Sericea lespedeza has been found growing in all parts of Oklahoma except the Panhandle

  10. Oklahoma Aerospace Intellectual Capital/Educational Recommendations: An Inquiry of Oklahoma Aerospace Executives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Erin M.

    2010-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to conduct detailed personal interviews with aerospace industry executives/managers from both the private and military sectors from across Oklahoma to determine their perceptions of intellectual capital needs of the industry. Interviews with industry executives regarding…

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-166-1835, US Post Office Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kominsky

    1987-01-01

    In response to a request from the U.S. Department of Justice on behalf of the U.S. Postal Service, a study was made of background concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Post Office Building located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The purpose of the study was to determine the concentration of PCBs in a building similar in structure to the Page

  12. Biological assessment of environmental flows for Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, William L.; Seilheimer, Titus S.; Taylor, Jason M.

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale patterns in fish assemblage structure and functional groups are influenced by alterations in streamflow regime. In this study, we defined an objective threshold for alteration for Oklahoma streams using a combination of the expected range of 27 flow indices and a discriminant analysis to predict flow regime group. We found that fish functional groups in reference flow conditions had species that were more intolerant to flow alterations and preferences for stream habitat and faster flowing water. In contrast, altered sites had more tolerant species that preferred lentic habitat and slower water velocity. Ordination graphs of the presence and functional groups of species revealed an underlying geographical pattern roughly conforming to ecoregions, although there was separation between reference and altered sites within the larger geographical framework. Additionally, we found that reservoir construction and operation significantly altered fish assemblages in two different systems, Bird Creek in central Oklahoma and the Kiamichi River in southeastern Oklahoma. The Bird Creek flow regime shifted from a historically intermittent stream to one with stable perennial flows, and changes in fish assemblage structure covaried with changes in all five components of the flow regime. In contrast, the Kiamichi River flow regime did not change significantly for most flow components despite shifts in fish assemblage structure; however, most of the species associated with shifts in assemblage structure in the Kiamichi River system were characteristic of lentic environments and were likely related more to proximity of reservoirs in the drainage system than changes in flow. The spatial patterns in fish assemblage response to flow alteration, combined with different temporal responses of hydrology and fish assemblage structure at sites downstream of reservoirs, indicate that interactions between flow regime and aquatic biota vary depending on ecological setting. This supports the notion that regional variation in natural flow regimes could affect the development of flow recommendations.

  13. University of Oklahoma: History of Science Collections

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-09-21

    The University of Oklahoma Libraries have done a wonderful job with their history of science collections. Visitors to the site will find seven collections here to keep their minds busy. Their number includes "Copernicus's De revolutionibus" and "Scientific Instruments and Historical Artifacts." Of course this first volume is nothing less than a classic, presenting Copernicus's evidence and arguments in support of heliocentric theory. This volume also contains extensive marginalia from a circle of astronomers located in Paris in the decade following the book's publication in 1543. Moving on, the "Scientific Instruments and Historical Artifacts" area contains 16 wonderful items, including an ancient Mesopotamian cuneiform tablet and videos of historically significant refractometers.

  14. Psychological response to the Oklahoma City bombing.

    PubMed

    Krug, R S; Nixon, S J; Vincent, R

    1996-01-01

    The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Office Building in Oklahoma City was the most devastating terrorist activity that has occurred in America. Prevention of revictimization of persons seriously affected by the bombing was central to the planned response to this tragedy. Coordination and collaboration among local, state, and national agencies promoted effective clinical services provision, research facilitation, and prevention of revictimization. Information gathered from this cooperative effort will contribute to the effort to minimize the potential for such tragedies in the future as well as help to develop prevention and intervention strategies to reduce the effects when the next such disaster occurs. PMID:8682905

  15. Mountain Pine Beetles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Melissa Barker

    This lesson plan has students working in small groups to research the Mountain Pine Beetle in Colorado and other inter-mountain Western states. Students identify the factors that control pine beetle population and research how warmer winters and decreasing spring snowpack allow the population of pine beetles to expand.

  16. MARBLE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donato, Mary M.; Hale, William N.

    1984-01-01

    The Marble Mountain Wilderness is located in the north-central Klamath Mountains of northern California. Geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral investigations indicate that the wilderness has areas of probable and substantiated resource potential for placer gold, for chromite, and for marble. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuel resources.

  17. Stone Mountain in Context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The colored square in this grayscale image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity highlights the location of Stone Mountain, located within the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. Scientists are examining Stone Mountain with the instruments on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' in search of clues about the composition of the rock outcrop.

  18. Floods in Oklahoma : magnitude and frequency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westfall, A.O.; Patterson, J.L.

    1964-01-01

    This report presents methods by which the magnitude and frequency of expected floods for most streams in Oklahoma can be determined. Flood data were used to define flood-frequency curves applicable to the State. Composite frequency curves were drawn showing the relation of mean annual floods to floods having recurrence intervals from 1.2 to 50 years. In some areas, it was found that the slope of the composite frequency curve varies with the drainage area. An adjustment curve was defined for use in conjunction with the composite curve for these areas. Other curves express the relation of the mean annual flood to drainage basin characteristics. By combining data from the composite and mean annual flood curves, flood-frequency curves can be drawn for streams in Oklahoma not materially affected by the works of man. Neither of the above two types of curves should be extrapolated beyond the range defined by base data. Frequency curves presented in this report were based on analysis of flood records collected at gaging stations having 5 or more years of record not materially affected by regulation or diversion. (available as photostat copy only)

  19. Mountaineering fatalities on Denali.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott E; Campbell, Aaron D; Dow, Jennifer; Grissom, Colin K

    2008-01-01

    Mount McKinley, or Denali, is the tallest mountain in North America and attracts over 1,000 climbers annually from around the world. Since Denali is located within a national park, the National Park Service (NPS) manages mountaineering activities and attempts to maintain a balance of an adventurous experience while promoting safety. We retrospectively reviewed the fatalities on Denali from 1903 to 2006 to assist the NPS, medical personnel, and mountaineers improve safety and reduce fatalities on the mountain. Historical records and the NPS climber database were reviewed. Demographics, mechanisms, and circumstances surrounding each fatality were examined. Fatality rates and odds ratios for country of origin were calculated. From 1903 through the end of the 2006 climbing season, 96 individuals died on Denali. The fatality rate is declining and is 3.08/1,000 summit attempts. Of the 96 deaths, 92% were male, 51% occurred on the West Buttress route, and 45% were due to injuries sustained from falls. Sixty-one percent occurred on the descent and the largest number of deaths in 1 year occurred in 1992. Climbers from Asia had the highest odds of dying on the mountain. Fatalities were decreased by 53% after a NPS registration system was established in 1995. Although mountaineering remains a high-risk activity, safety on Denali is improving. Certain groups have a significantly higher chance of dying. Registration systems and screening methods provide ways to target at-risk groups and improve safety on high altitude mountains such as Denali. PMID:18331224

  20. Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Ford, Trenton W.

    2013-03-06

    , but not well understood climate factor. This study examines soil moisture-vegetation health interactions using both in situ observations and land surface model simulations. For the observational study, soil moisture is taken from 20 in situ Oklahoma Mesonet...

  1. 25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS ...1902 (32 Stat. 43), authorizes right-of-way grants across tribal and individually owned land in Oklahoma. Rights-of-way granted under...

  2. 25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS ...1902 (32 Stat. 43), authorizes right-of-way grants across tribal and individually owned land in Oklahoma. Rights-of-way granted under...

  3. 25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS ...1902 (32 Stat. 43), authorizes right-of-way grants across tribal and individually owned land in Oklahoma. Rights-of-way granted under...

  4. 25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS ...1902 (32 Stat. 43), authorizes right-of-way grants across tribal and individually owned land in Oklahoma. Rights-of-way granted under...

  5. 25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS ...1902 (32 Stat. 43), authorizes right-of-way grants across tribal and individually owned land in Oklahoma. Rights-of-way granted under...

  6. 76 FR 9040 - Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency [Internal Agency Docket...Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION:...

  7. 75 FR 6404 - Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency [Internal Agency Docket...Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION:...

  8. 76 FR 37166 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00050

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ...of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA--1989--DR), dated 06/06/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 05/22/2011 through 05/25/2011. EFFECTIVE DATES:...

  9. 76 FR 50535 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR), dated 06/21/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 05/22/2011 through 05/25/2011. Effective Date:...

  10. Seasonal to interannual variations of soil moisture measured in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illston, Bradley G.; Basara, Jeffrey B.; Crawford, Kenneth C.

    2004-12-01

    Agriculture is a $2 billion component of the state economy in Oklahoma. As a result, meteorological, climatological, and agricultural communities should benefit from an improved understanding of soil moisture conditions and how those conditions vary spatially and temporally. The Oklahoma Mesonet is an automated observing network that provides real-time hydrometeorological observations at 115 stations across Oklahoma. In 1996, sensors were installed at 60 Mesonet sites to provide near-real-time observations of soil moisture.This study focuses on 6 years of soil moisture data collected between 1997 and 2002 to analyse the annual cycle and temporal characteristics of soil moisture across Oklahoma. The statewide analysis of the annual cycle of soil moisture revealed four distinct soil moisture phases. In addition, the four statewide phases were also observed in each of the nine climate divisions across Oklahoma, although the temporal characteristics of each phase were unique for each division. Further analysis demonstrated that, at shallow soil depths (5 and 25 cm), the spatial variability of soil moisture across Oklahoma was most homogeneous during the winter and spring periods and most heterogeneous during the summer and autumn periods. Conversely, at greater depths (60 and 75 cm), soil moisture was most heterogeneous during the winter period and the most homogeneous during the late spring.

  11. US hydropower resource assessment for Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose, The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Oklahoma.

  12. Oklahoma Climatological Survey: Outreach and Educational Materials

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Oklahoma Climatological Survey (OCS) provides outreach programs and educational materials to public safety agencies, agricultural interests, educators, and the general public. These include OK-FIRST, which provides weather data and training to public safety agencies; EarthStorm, a program for educators that integrates learning modules with real-time weather data; and Agweather, a website that provides information to help agricultural producers with weather-related decisions. The site also features a glossary of weather terminology, a set of lesson plans, and reference materials intended for use as refresher information by teachers. Other resources include information on tornado safety, case studies on the use of OCS training materials, and a set of maps and graphs with climatological data and information on severe weather phenomena.

  13. Mass casualties in the Oklahoma City bombing.

    PubMed

    Teague, David C

    2004-05-01

    The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was partially destroyed by a terrorist bomb on April 19, 1995. Injuries were sustained by 759 people, 168 of whom died. Fatalities occurred primarily among victims in the collapse zone of the federal building. Only 83 survivors required hospitalization. Twenty-two surviving victims sustained multiple fractures. Most victims arrived at local emergency departments by private vehicle within 2 hours. More severely injured survivors were transported by ambulance. The closer receiving hospitals used emergency department facilities and minor treatment areas. Few survivors were extricated from the bombing site more than 3 hours after the detonation. Mass casualty plans must provide for improved communications, diversion and retriage from facilities nearest the disaster site, and effective coordination of community and hospital resources. PMID:15187837

  14. Seismogram offers insight into Oklahoma City bombing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Fletcher, Joe B.; Fuis, Gary S.; Ryberg, Trond; Brocher, Thomas M.; Dietel, Christopher M.

    The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, generated seismic waves that were recorded on two permanent seismographs about 7 and 26 km away from the bombing. The seismogram recorded at 26 km shows two low-frequency wave trains, discrete sets of oscillatory signals, that begin about 10 s apart. Public release of this record prompted speculation that each wave train was caused by a different energy source. On May 23, 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored the demolition of the bomb-ravaged Federal Building with portable seismographs (Figure 1). Two wave trains were picked up again. The recordings indicate that the wave trains during both the bombing and demolition represent seismic waves traveling at different velocities. We conclude that the two wave trains recorded during the bombing are consistent with a single impulsive energy source.

  15. Dynamics of Mountain Pine

    E-print Network

    Powell, James

    are the most obvious in their impact, and of these, the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus pon- derosae Hopkins et al., 2001; Munson et al., 2004). A complex of bark beetles are killing ponderosa pine

  16. Smoky Mountain Field School

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The University of Tennessee Division of Continuing Education contains the home page for the Smoky Mountain Field School which offers supervised wilderness adventures for people of all ages and levels of experience. http://www.ce.utk.edu/Smoky/

  17. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  18. The Meers Fault in Southern Oklahoma: Holocene Movements on a Fault with Pennsylvanian and Cambrian Linages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, G. R.; Holland, A. A.; Luza, K.; Oldow, J. S.; Crain, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Meers fault and subparallel fault strands in southern Oklahoma is the southernmost element of the complex and massive (>10 km of throw) frontal fault zone that forms the boundary between the Anadarko basin, which is the deepest intra-continental basin in the United States, and the uplifted Cambrian igneous rocks of the Wichita Mountains. The Wichita uplift is evidence of extraordinary Pennsylvanian intra-plate deformation along the trend of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen, which is a classic example of a failed and massively inverted rift. The Meers Fault is the best-documented Holocene fault scarp east of Colorado and probably represents reactivation of a Pennsylvanian oblique thrust that in turn is likely to be an inverted Cambrian normal fault. The magnitude of these structures is shown on images from 3-D industry seismic reflection data ~25 km northwest of the northwestern mapped extent of the Meers fault that indicate the Pennsylvanian structure, or a northern strand of it, has a reverse throw of ~6km at depth. The fault displays a conspicuous and continuous scarp that is at least 25 km long and is evident in air photos and 1:100,000 scale geologic mapping, but this feature is not well mapped in detail beyond the area of trenching studies conducted in the 1980's. In the Holocene, 3-5 m of vertical surface displacement has been documented and left-lateral strike slip displacement on the fault is 2-3 times greater than the vertical displacement. During this movement, Quaternary soils along the fault were folded and ruptured, and the scarp has dammed small gullies where fine-grained alluvium has collected and has been used in the dating efforts. The most recent movement occurred (1100-1300 y ago) with a variety of earlier events having been proposed. As such, this fault represents one of the highest potential seismic hazards in the central/eastern United States.

  19. POSITION AVAILABLE Post-doctoral Research Associate at the University of Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    POSITION AVAILABLE Post-doctoral Research Associate at the University of Oklahoma Overview The Advanced Radar Research Center (ARRC) at the University of Oklahoma (OU) is looking to hire a post-doctoral

  20. Weed Control Research in Guar in Texas and Oklahoma: 1961-72.

    E-print Network

    Smith, D. T.; Wiese, A. F.; Santelmann, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    ................................................. Lubbock, Texas 6 Preemergence Treatments ....................................... 6 Perking, Oklahoma ............................................. 6 Lu hhock, Texa s ................................................. 6 Bro~~mfield, Texas... ............................................. 6 xtemergencc Trert tmen t~ ..................................... 6 P. esults and Discussion ................................................. 7 Preplant Trentmentu ............................................... 7 Perkin\\, Oklahoma...

  1. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  2. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  3. 40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125 Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwestern...

  4. 40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.124 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.124 North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North...

  5. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  6. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  7. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  8. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  9. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  10. 40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125 Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwestern...

  11. 3 CFR - Expediting Review of Pipeline Projects From Cushing, Oklahoma, to Port Arthur, Texas, and Other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Expediting Review of Pipeline Projects From Cushing, Oklahoma, to Port Arthur, Texas, and Other Domestic Pipeline Infrastructure Projects Presidential...March 22, 2012 Expediting Review of Pipeline Projects From Cushing, Oklahoma,...

  12. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  13. The North West Oklahoma In-Service Cooperative: A Model for Rural Cooperative Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwink, Timothy A.; Hensley, Stephen R.

    The North West Oklahoma In-Service Cooperative (NWOIC), established in 1980, encourages, promotes, and channels faculty development and needs in the rural northwestern quadrant of Oklahoma. Its objectives are: (1) to aid northwestern Oklahoma school districts in the structure and administration of local faculty development plans; (2) to develop…

  14. Oklahoma Library Technology Network (OLTN) Electronic Resources for Elementary Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Carol, Comp.

    This document describes Oklahoma Library Technology Network electronic resources for elementary age children. The first section provides a history of Oklahoma statewide shared databases. Oklahoma statewide information database contacts are listed in the second section. The third section presents information on InfoTrac Kid's Edition Online…

  15. Pacific Mountain System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This web page guides the user through the Pacific Mountain System geologic province, one of the most geologically young and tectonically active in North America. The generally rugged, mountainous landscape of this province, which includes parts of Washington, Oregon, and California, provides evidence of ongoing mountain-building. One map shows the plate tectonic setting of the Pacific Mountain System which straddles the boundaries between several of Earth's moving plates. This province includes the active volcanoes of the Cascade Range and the young, steep mountains of the Pacific Border and the Sierra Nevada. The user can find out more with links to USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory, Seattle region earthquake hazards, or North Cascades National Park geology. Links are provided to a simple shaded relief map and to several other shaded relief maps including ones with National Park locations and with major and subprovince boundaries. Image gallery links are given to several national parks sites: Lassen Volcanic National Park, Yosemite National Park, and North Cascades National Park.

  16. Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) Aquifer, Oklahoma, 1987 to 2009, and simulation of available water in storage, 2010-2059

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mashburn, Shana L.; Ryter, Derek; Neel, Christopher R.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Magers, Jessica S.

    2014-01-01

    The Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma. The study area for this investigation was the extent of the Central Oklahoma aquifer. Water from the Central Oklahoma aquifer is used for public, industrial, commercial, agricultural, and domestic supply. With the exception of Oklahoma City, all of the major communities in central Oklahoma rely either solely or partly on groundwater from this aquifer. The Oklahoma City metropolitan area, incorporating parts of Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, and Oklahoma Counties, has a population of approximately 1.2 million people. As areas are developed for groundwater supply, increased groundwater withdrawals may result in decreases in long-term aquifer storage. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, investigated the hydrogeology and simulated groundwater flow in the aquifer using a numerical groundwater-flow model. The purpose of this report is to describe an investigation of the Central Oklahoma aquifer that included analyses of the hydrogeology, hydrogeologic framework of the aquifer, and construction of a numerical groundwater-flow model. The groundwater-flow model was used to simulate groundwater levels and for water-budget analysis. A calibrated transient model was used to evaluate changes in groundwater storage associated with increased future water demands.

  17. Spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance in the forested landscape of Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma 

    E-print Network

    Isaacs, Rachel E.

    2009-05-15

    Large-extent ice storms have received relatively little attention from researchers. This research investigates the effects of abiotic and biotic factors on the spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance on a forested landscape. This investigation...

  18. Mountain Road with Autumn Foliage

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A mountain road and surrounding early autumn foliage photographed from a higher elevation in the Appalachian Mountains. The especially prominent orange leaves of a maple tree are in the foreground....

  19. Mountain Man Measurement Rendezvous

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Utah LessonPlans

    2012-10-22

    In this math lesson, learners participate in several activities where they apply measurement skills. Learners explore how the Mountain Men played an important part in the history of the American frontier and more importantly, how the Mountain Men used different techniques for making measurements in their daily activities. At the various stations, learners measure their jump distances, handfuls of "gold," water-soaked sponges, "buffalo chip" throws, arm spans, "stone" throws, "arrow" tosses, foot sizes, pots of beans, and "shooting" distances. This activity works well outside.

  20. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  1. A proposed streamflow data program for Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohn, J.D.; Hoffman, G.L.

    1970-01-01

    An evaluation of the streamflow data available in Oklahoma has been made to provide guidelines for planning future data-collection programs. The basic steps in the evaluation procedure were (1) definition of the long-terms goals of the streamflow-data program in quantitative form, (2) examination and analysis of streamflow data to determine which goals have been met, and (3) consideration of alternate programs and techniques to meet the remaining goals. The study defines the individual relation between certain statistical streamflow characteristics and selected basin parameters. This relation is a multiple regression equation that could be used on a statewide basis to compute a selected natural-flow characteristic at any site on a stream. The study shows that several streamflow characteristics can be estimated within an accuracy equivalent to 10 years of record by use of a regression related to at least three climatic or basin parameters for any basin of 50 square miles or more. The study indicates that significant changes in the scope and character of the data-collection program would enhance the possibility of attaining the remaining goals. A streamflow-data program based on the guidelines developed in this study is proposed for the future.

  2. Rocky Mountain High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, David

    2001-01-01

    Describes Colorado's Eagle Rock School, which offers troubled teens a fresh start by transporting them to a tuition- free campus high in the mountains. The program encourages spiritual development as well as academic growth. The atmosphere is warm, loving, structured, and nonthreatening. The article profiles several students' experiences at the…

  3. Freshness in the Mountains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Kay Slattery; Clauss, Judith Enz

    2000-01-01

    Situated in a western mountain range, the North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching is a residential facility that houses teachers seeking intellectual refreshment. The center pays all expenses, aiming to advance teaching as an art and a profession via seminars and a relaxed atmosphere. (MLH)

  4. The Mountaineer Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egerton, John; Gaillard, Frye

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the new Appalachian movement, based on the assumption that mountain people are a distinct and maligned cultural minority; the people of Appalachia, white, black and red, have begun to strike back against the dam-builders, strip-miners, and others they say are gouging out the region's mineral resources by the cheapest means possible no…

  5. North American mountain bromes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alicia N Massa; Steven R Larson

    2005-01-01

    Although native grasses are often desired and used for revegetation of disturbed areas, genetic differences may exist within and among natural and cultivated germplasm sources. This phylogeographic study compares geographic origin and genealogical linkages of 25 natural and cultivated germplasm sources of mountain brome (Bromus carinatus Hook. & Arn. [Poaceae]) from western North America. Significant variation among accessions (FST =

  6. Carve That Mountain

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    In this activity, students further investigate major landforms (e.g., mountains, rivers, plains, hills, oceans and plateaus). They build a three-dimensional model of a landscape depicting several of these landforms. Once they have built their model, they act as civil and transportation engineers to build a road through the landscape they have created.

  7. POTENTAIL HABITAT MOUNTAIN PLOVERS

    E-print Network

    POTENTAIL HABITAT FOR MOUNTAIN PLOVERS ON COLORADO SPRINGS UTILITIES PROPERTY A Report to Colorado). To identify potential habitat on current and future Colorado Springs Utilities property, the Utility funded a habitat survey conducted by the Colorado Natural Heritage Program at Colorado State University. METHODS

  8. Wuyi mountains 3

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julian Landa

    2006-01-01

    In the spring of 2001, my wife and I were invited to participate in a tea tour taking us to different regions of China famous for producing tea. When I arrived in Wuyi Shan, I was overwhelmed by the beauty of the landscape of the Wuyi Mountains, the peaks shrouded in mist and in my mind, I could see all

  9. Wuyi mountains 11

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julian Landa

    2006-01-01

    In the spring of 2001, my wife and I were invited to participate in a tea tour taking us to different regions of China famous for producing tea. When I arrived in Wuyi Shan, I was overwhelmed by the beauty of the landscape of the Wuyi Mountains, the peaks shrouded in mist and in my mind, I could see all

  10. Wuyi mountains 8

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julian Landa

    2006-01-01

    In the spring of 2001, my wife and I were invited to participate in a tea tour taking us to different regions of China famous for producing tea. When I arrived in Wuyi Shan, I was overwhelmed by the beauty of the landscape of the Wuyi Mountains, the peaks shrouded in mist and in my mind, I could see all

  11. Wuyi mountains 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julian Landa

    2006-01-01

    In the spring of 2001, my wife and I were invited to participate in a tea tour taking us to different regions of China famous for producing tea. When I arrived in Wuyi Shan, I was overwhelmed by the beauty of the landscape of the Wuyi Mountains, the peaks shrouded in mist and in my mind, I could see all

  12. Melting Mountain Glaciers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NBC Learn

    2010-10-07

    The world's glaciers are shrinking at alarming rates, and many scientists believe it is due to changes in climate. Dr. Lonnie Thompson of Ohio State University and Dr. Douglas Hardy of UMass-Amherst discuss glaciers and how they melt, and pay special attention to Africa's tallest mountain, Mt. Kilimanjaro. "Changing Planet" is produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation.

  13. Alternative Export - Wheat Distribution Systems for the Texas - Oklahoma Panhandle.

    E-print Network

    Fuller, Stephen W.; Shanmugham C.V.

    1980-01-01

    in the would annually generate marketing-systemsavings Texas-Oklahoma Panhandle and Texas Gulf ports. of $2.49 million or 12.2 cents per bushel. The 50-, 80- Costs of the current system are estimated and then car system was the second-most efficient system... the development of several system components. Conse- - Unit bai&rarraportation economicdgrain hansporta- quent'r , this would be the most difficult alternative tionlgnin exports. to imp ement. 2 Alternative Export-Wheat Distribution Systems for the Texas-Oklahoma...

  14. Environmental and hydrologic setting of the Ozark Plateaus study unit, Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adamski, James C.; Petersen, James C.; Freiwald, David A.; Davis, Jerri V.

    1995-01-01

    The environmental and hydrologic setting of the Ozark Plateaus National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) study unit and the factors that affect water quality are described in this report. The primary natural and cultural features that affect water- quality characteristics and the potential for future water-quality problems are described. These environmental features include climate, physio- graphy, geology, soils, population, land use, water use, and surface- and ground-water flow systems. The study-unit area is approximately 47,600 square miles and includes most of the Ozark Plateaus Province and parts of the adjacent Osage Plains and Mississippi Alluvial Plain in parts of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. The geology is characterized by basement igneous rocks overlain by a thick sequence of dolomites, limestones, sandstones, and shales of Paleozoic age. Land use in the study unit is predominantly pasture and forest in the southeastern part, and pasture and cropland in the northwestern part. All or part of the White, Neosho-lllinois, Osage, Gasconade, Meramec, St. Francis, and Black River Basins are within the study unit. Streams in the Boston Mountains contain the least mineralized water, and those in the Osage Plains contain the most mineralized water. The study unit contains eight hydrogeologic units including three major aquifers--the Springfield Plateau, Ozark, and St. Francois aquifers. Streams and aquifers in the study unit generally contain calcium or calcium-magnesium bicarbonate waters. Ground- and surface-water interactions are greatest in the Salem and Springfield Plateaus and least in the Boston Mountains and Osage Plains. Geology, land use, and population probably are the most important environmental factors that affect water quality.

  15. Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutz, Mary N. Hill

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal responsibility. The most frequently identified curriculum need across all aviation disciplines was that of communication skills.

  16. Oklahoma blast forces unsettling design questions

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The bomb that brought down a government building in Oklahoma City killed hundreds of people after it was detonated near the building`s key supports. The blast has reopened a long-simmering debate on safety by design. Structurally, it`s not practical to designing bomb-proof buildings. But it is possible to engineer a structure to deform rather than go through immediate progressive collapse. Delaying collapse gives occupants extra time to evacuate. And that could mean the difference between life and death. The construction material of choice really {open_quotes}depends on the height of the building and the lateral load resisting system,{close_quotes} says Charles H. Thornton of Thornton-Tomasetti/Engineers, New York City. But whether in steel or reinforced concrete, moment-resisting frames, which are inherently redundant, give horizontal components the ability to take reversals of stress common in explosions, he says. Simple frames do not. {open_quotes}They go down like a house of cards,{close_quotes} says Thornton. In reinforced concrete moment frames, beam reinforcing steel is continuous. In simple reinforced concrete frames, beam rebar only penetrates the column for a determined number of inches based on the length of the span. And it is absent from the mid-span of the beam. In a blast from below, the beam, its top usually in compression and bottom in tension, deflects up, throwing the beam top into tension. With no rebar, it loses structural integrity, and falls apart. With rebar, it has a chance of surviving. If a building is not designed for blasts, a steel frame might be better under a reasonably small bomb because steel has equal capacity in tension and compression, and concrete has capacity only in compression, says Thornton.

  17. Nonlinear processes in mountain building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, N.; Lavier, L.

    2009-04-01

    The growth of a mountain belt is classically believed to be a quasi-stationary process ending in a steady state. Starting from a simple 2D analytic model of mass conservation during mountain growth we explore the domains of stability of a mountain for both nonlinear erosion laws and deformation laws that lead to quasistatic yielding of the mountain over different time scales. This model is composed of a pure shear mountain attached to a critical wedge. We show that if erosive processes are focused on the front ranges of growing mountains then uplift is enhanced in mountain belt interiors. This model of rain shadow development has important implications for plateau uplift and makes predictions about changes in erosive flux to sedimentary basins. However, mass conservation integrated over the models does not make predictions about the movement of material within a mountain belt without the adoption of specific mass flux boundary conditions and a rheological model. We therefore extend our models by using a simple force balance between the Mohr-Coulomb wedge and the mountain interior, which deforms by pure shear. We also choose to model the mountain interior as a viscoelastic material. This allows us to test the effects of stress change in the mountain belt due to the formation of localized semibrittle shear zone at the depth of the brittle ductile transition. Once the mountain belt grows to sufficient size, nonlinear deformation within its interior becomes important and leads to nonlinear macroscopic behavior of mountains, such as long-period aseismic oscillations that interact with shorter-time-scale seismic processes. These dynamical models make direct predictions about the movement of material within a mountain belt and can therefore be constrained by surface observations.

  18. Oklahoma Library Technology Network Plan for Information Sharing and Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Libraries, Oklahoma City.

    This plan sets forth approaches for state-level assistance for Oklahoma libraries to exchange information and to share or acquire machine-readable information from public and private sources through telecommunications, as well as for access to these libraries for existing and future state informational databases. Objectives and requirements are…

  19. Oklahoma Structural Engineers Association Central Chapter Monthly Meeting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2001-01-01

    The need for Special Inspections vary based on building code requirements, local building requirements, and the owner's specifications. The need for special inspections and how to communicate the results with all interested parties will be discussed during this meeting. The views of the City of Oklahoma City, a structural engineering firm, and a testing company will be offered followed by

  20. Fungicides for organic cantaloupe production in Oklahoma: An initial assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungicides that are potentially useful in organic production were evaluated for foliar disease control in cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulates ’Israeli’) during 2009 at Lane, Oklahoma. Milstop (85% potassium bicarbonate), Neem oil, Bonide liquid copper (10% copper octanoate), Serenade (QST ...

  1. Program Assessment: University Without Walls, "Flaming Rainbow," Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitka, Gene

    An educational program assessment of the University Without Walls (UWW), located in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, and known as "Flaming Rainbow," was presented in this document. The evaluation was conducted during March 27-30, 1973. The 6 American Indian participants, who are financially supported by the Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA) Higher Education…

  2. Investigaciones en la producción orgánica de vegetales en Oklahoma, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nationally recognized standards for certified organic farming were established in 2002 in the United States. This action stimulated increased scientific research on production methods that can be used in certified organic growing. In 2003, a multi-disciplinary scientific team in Oklahoma that cons...

  3. Evaluation of Reflex (fomesafen) herbicide for watermelon in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective preemergence herbicides are needed for weed control in watermelon grown from transplants. Reflex (fomesafen) was found to be effective and to exhibit crop safety in southeast USA. Trials were conducted during 2011 and 2012 in southeast Oklahoma to determine if this product would be useful...

  4. Twenty-Seventh Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Overton

    The Oklahoma Indian education program is financed and operated under a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Interior, and the State Department of Education. Supervision of the program is the responsibility of the State Department of Education as authorized by the Johnson O'Malley (JOM) Act of 1936. To qualify for JOM…

  5. Hydrogen manufacture by Lurgi gasification of Oklahoma coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of using the Lurgi gasification process to produce hydrogen from Oklahoma coal are listed. Special attention was given to the production of heat for the process; heat is generated by burning part of pretreated coal in the steam generator. Overall performance of the Lurgi process is summarized in tabular form.

  6. Research Training at the University of Oklahoma: An Opinion Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotsky, Ivan

    The extent to which research training is needed by Master of Public Administration (MPA) graduates at the University of Oklahoma, Advanced Programs, was investigated through the administration of a questionnaire to 38 August 1977 MPA degree recipients. The questionnaire contained 13 questions concerning where the student took most of his courses;…

  7. Emergency Department Impact of the Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David E Hogan; Joseph F Waeckerle; Daniel J Dire; Scott R Lillibridge

    1999-01-01

    Study objective: To collect descriptive epidemiologic injury data on patients who suffered acute injuries after the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing and to describe the effect on metropolitan emergency departments. Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of victims seen for injury or illness related to the bombing at 1 of the 13 study hospitals from 9:02 AM

  8. Oklahoma School Grows from 85 to 473 Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gust, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of a Catholic K-8 school in Oklahoma. Reports that the school opened in 1990 and more than quintupled in size by 2001, making it the largest Catholic school in the state. Identifies the school's number one priority as its commitment to Catholicism. (NB)

  9. Improving Print Management at at the University of Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colaw, Lee M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how business students at the University of Oklahoma improved the school's print management by initiating an alternative charging system, networking the printers, and choosing the right hardware and software. Reasons why the UnipriNT Print Management system was chosen to manage the computer lab's printing services are discussed. (GR)

  10. Estimating bioenergy feedstock potential of red cedar in western Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red cedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) is an invasive species that seriously degrades tallgrass prairie and adjacent landscapes in the southern plains region of the US with an estimated 8 million acres impacted in the state of Oklahoma alone. This study is part of a larger project to improve grassland...

  11. Evaluating Injury Prevention Programs: The Oklahoma City Smoke Alarm Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallonee, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Illustrates how evaluating the Oklahoma City Smoke Alarm Project increased its success in reducing residential fire-related injuries and deaths. The program distributed and tested smoke alarms in residential dwellings and offered educational materials on fire prevention and safety. Evaluation provided sound data on program processes and outcomes,…

  12. The northwest extension of the Meers Fault in southwestern Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Cetin, Hasan

    1991-01-01

    ). General Geologic History and Stratigraphy There are three stages in the geologic history of Southern Oklahoma (Ham et al. , 1964). During the first stage, an aulocogen is thought to have formed in the region as is evidenced by intrusion of diabase...

  13. Oklahoma State University Master of Science in Aviation and Space

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma State University Master of Science in Aviation and Space The Master of Science in Aviation and Space emphasizes management, leadership, legal, and regulatory issues, finance, current participating in this program come from a variety of backgrounds including aviation, military, and government

  14. Infant Toddler Services through Community Collaboration: Oklahoma's Early Childhood Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Carla B.; Horm, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive, integrated services for infants, toddlers, and families are essential for optimal child development, and collaboration across systems is increasingly important to maximize limited resources. The authors describe three successful initiatives in Oklahoma that use a collaborative systems approach to providing direct services to young…

  15. Alternative Export - Wheat Distribution Systems for the Texas - Oklahoma Panhandle. 

    E-print Network

    Fuller, Stephen W.; Shanmugham C.V.

    1980-01-01

    -78 From Catoosa, Oklahoma Cents Per to bushel (Q/bu.) Mississippi River Ports1 16.92 Houston, Galveston, Beaumont, Port Arthur 26.82 Corpus Christi 37.26 p p p p p p 'Includes Anu, Baton Rouge, Destrehan, Myrtle Grove, New Orleans, Reserve...

  16. Annotated bibliography of the Anadarko basin area; Kansas - Oklahoma - Texas

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This bibliography contains 118 additional records related to the geology of the Anadarko basin area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; petrology; tectonics; and geochemistry. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area.

  17. University of Oklahoma: Chemical, Biological, and Materials Engineering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Oklahoma offers information on research in the areas of bioengineering, polymers science and engineering, environmental engineering, and energy studies. Examples include the Engineering Virtual Library and the Chemical Engineering Virtual Library, related government research labs, discipline-specific groupings of Chemical Engineering online resources, and selected corporate Web pages.

  18. Personal Touches Warm up Oklahoma City U.'s Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Oklahoma City University prides itself on treating its faculty and staff members like family. It is the kind of place where new employees are welcomed in the president's house, staff members kick in to raise money when a colleague faces hard times, and promising young workers are offered flexible work schedules and free tuition to help them…

  19. 78 FR 36632 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR), dated 05/20/ 2013. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes and Flooding. Incident Period: 05/18/2013 through 06/02/2013. Effective Date: 06/11/2013. Physical Loan...

  20. Da-Jiang (David) Zheng Oklahoma State University

    E-print Network

    Hofmann, Hans A.

    ) Female alternative mating tactics, reproductive success and the social decision-making network Ophir, AG decisions to mate and reproductive success within alternative mating tactics. Society for Social ochrogaster. Honors and Awards: 2012 Outstanding Master's student, Oklahoma State University 2011 Grant-in-Aid

  1. ACT Profile Report: State. Graduating Class 2012. Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report provides information about the performance of Oklahoma's 2012 graduating seniors who took the ACT as sophomores, juniors, or seniors; and self-reported at the time of testing that they were scheduled to graduate in 2012 and tested under standard time conditions. This report focuses on: (1) Performance: student test performance in the…

  2. UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA CAMPUS ACTIVITIES COUNCIL SPEAKER BUREAU

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    "; to perform at the date, time, and place specified below: If no, are you and your employees legally authorized information Any person who has been an employee of the State of Oklahoma within the past 12 months at the above address immediately following the engagement. FEDERAL LAWS prohibit payment to be given

  3. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Sensing of Water Quality and Harmful Algae in Oklahoma's Lakes (Dr. David Hambright, OU) will use algae blooms. This is a proof-of-concept project. - Developing the Groundwater Monitoring Potential satellite imagery and handheld devices to test the efficacy of remote sensing to detect potential harmful

  4. How a School Coped with the Oklahoma City Bombing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspy, David N.; Aspy, Cheryl B.

    1996-01-01

    Following the Oklahoma City bombing, fifth graders at a nearby elementary school coped with ensuing uncertainty, pain, and loss. They wrote appreciative letters to fire and rescue workers; shared personal stories with classmates; compiled an anthology of poems, prayers, and stories; attended an assembly to honor parents participating in rescue…

  5. STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY -1 The University of Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY - 1 The University of Oklahoma STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY Revised and Responsibilities Code, and the Student Alcohol Policy. (1) All fraternities, sororities, and residence halls shall be dry. Alcoholic beverages will not be allowed inside fraternity houses, sorority houses and OU

  6. 27 CFR 9.108 - Ozark Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Springs, Missouri (on the Joplin map); (iv) Then westward along...Miami, Oklahoma (on the Tulsa map); (vii) Then southward...and Fort Gibson Lake) until it flows into the Arkansas River, approximately...Oklahoma (on the Fort Smith map); (viii) Then...

  7. Mountain West Digital Library

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Formed as part of a consortium between universities, colleges, museums, and historical societies in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho, the Mountain West Digital Library contains dozens of digital collections whose content ranges far beyond that of the geographical area covered by the Mountain West region. On their homepage, visitors can learn about the "Featured Collection" and then browse all of the available collections via a list of partner institutions. All told, there are over 100 collections here, and visitors can search the entire archive for text, images, video, or audio clips. A couple of the collections should not be missed, including "Before Gaming: Las Vegas Centennial", which provides visual documentation of a (relatively) quiet Las Vegas before the emergence of gambling. Additionally, the Mormon publication "The Young Woman's Journal" provides insight into the lives of Mormon women in the early 20th century.

  8. Yucca Mountain Milestone

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Rod

    1997-06-09

    The Department of Energy project to determine if the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is suitable for geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste reached a major milestone in late April when a 25-foot-diameter tunnel boring machine ``holed through'' completing a five-mile-long, horseshoe-shaped excavation through the mountain. When the cutting-head of the giant machine broke through to daylight at the tunnel's south portal, it ended a 2 1/2-year excavation through the mountain that was completed ahead of schedule and with an outstanding safety record. Video of the event was transmitted live by satellite to Washington, DC, where it was watched by Secretary of Energy Frederico Pena and other high-level DOE officials, signifying the importance of the project's mission to find a repository for high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel produced by nuclear power plants. This critical undertaking is being performed by DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The tunnel is the major feature of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), which serves as an underground laboratory for engineers and scientists to help determine if Yucca Mountain is suitable to serve as a repository for the safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Morrison Knudsen's Environmental/Government Group is providing design and construction-management services on the project. The MK team is performing final design for the ESF and viability assessment design for the underground waste repository that will be built only if the site is found suitable for such a mission. In fact, if at anytime during the ESF phase, the site is found unsuitable, the studies will be stopped and the site restored to its natural state.

  9. Diurnal cycle of the Oklahoma City urban heat island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basara, Jeffrey B.; Hall, Peter K.; Schroeder, Amanda J.; Illston, Bradley G.; Nemunaitis, Kodi L.

    2008-10-01

    Between the dates of 28 June and 31 July 2003, the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field project was conducted in Oklahoma City and was the largest urban dispersion experiment ever in North America. Because the focus of JU2003 was on atmospheric processes within the urban environment, an extremely dense network of instrumentation was deployed in and around the central business district (CBD) both prior to and during the field experiment. Among the variables collected were high-resolution observations of air temperature from various instrument sources. Additional observations of air temperature were also collected at Oklahoma Mesonet stations in the rural areas surrounding Oklahoma City. Using an index value, the diurnal cycle of the urban heat island (UHI) for Oklahoma City, with respect to the surrounding rural terrain, was quantified. The results revealed a consistent mean nocturnal UHI greater than 1.5°C at both 2 and 9 m. However, observations at 2 m during JU2003 revealed a significant urban "cool" island during the convective portion of the day. The mean variability of temperature within the urban core of Oklahoma City increased significantly after sunrise, increased to a maximum near solar noon, and decreased following sunset. These results were inconsistent with the rural observations wherein the variability among sites was maximized during the nocturnal period. Finally, the vertical temperature gradient between 2 and 9 m demonstrated a clear and strong diurnal trend at the rural locations, whereas observations from the urban environment were nearly isothermal and consistent with near-neutral conditions throughout JU2003.

  10. University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Skubic, Patrick L. [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

    2013-07-31

    The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances, or at the very highest energies. The outcomes of the group's combined experimental and theoretical research will be an improved understanding of nature, at the highest energies reachable, from which applications to technological innovation will surely result, as they always have from such studies in the past.

  11. Employment Advertising Request -University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) To place a University of Oklahoma employment advertisement with an external publication, complete and return

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Employment Advertising Request - University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) To place a University of Oklahoma employment advertisement with an external publication, complete and return this form to the Office, call Employment & Compensation Services at (405) 325-1826. Deadline for receipt of advertising requests

  12. Mountain Waves and Downslope Winds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    Mountain waves form above and downwind of topographic barriers and frequently pose a serious hazard to mountain aviation because of strong-to-extreme turbulence. This foundation module describes the features of mountain waves and explores the conditions under which they form. Like other foundation modules in the Mesoscale Primer, this module starts with a forecast scenario and concludes with a final exam. Rich graphics, audio narration, and frequent interactions enhance the presentation.

  13. Mountain Building in Extensional Regimes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Koehn; K. Aanyu; S. Haines; T. Sachau

    2006-01-01

    Mountain building processes are generally thought to take place in compressive or strike-slip dominated environments. Exceptions are uplifted rift-flanks and uplifted horst structures within rifts. An extreme example of an uplifted horst-block in an extensional environment are the Rwenzori mountains between Uganda and the democratic republic of Kongo. These 5000m high mountains lie within the western branch of the East

  14. Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995March 31, 1995

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. Mankin; M. K. Banken

    1995-01-01

    The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaging in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and

  15. Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Yearly technical progress report, January 1December 31, 1993

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. Mankin; M. K. Banken

    1994-01-01

    The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection, evaluation, and distribution of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD

  16. Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Yearly technical progress report, January 1December 31, 1994

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. Mankin; M. K. Banken

    1995-01-01

    The Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection, evaluation, and distribution of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD oil reservoirs and the recovery technologies that can be applied to those reservoirs with

  17. ACULEATA HYMENOPTERA OF SAND MOUNTAIN AND BLOW SAND MOUNTAINS, NEVADA

    E-print Network

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    ACULEATA HYMENOPTERA OF SAND MOUNTAIN AND BLOW SAND MOUNTAINS, NEVADA R. W. Rust1, L. !\\1. Hanks,l.2, and R. C. BechteJ3 ABsTRACT.- There were 198 species of aculeata Hymenoptera in 15 families on the acu leate Hymenoptera collected during the study. Over 2,000 specimens were obtained, representing 198

  18. Digital geologic map of Fort Smith Quadrangle, east-central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cederstrand, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    This data set consists of digital data and accompanying documentation of the surficial geology of the 1:250,000-scale Fort Smith quadrangle, Oklahoma. The original data are from the Geologic Map, sheet 1 of 4, included in the Oklahoma Geological Survey publication, Reconnaissance of the water resources of the Fort Smith quadrangle, east-central Oklahoma, Hydrologic Atlas 1, Marcher, 1969. The geology was compiled by M.V. Marcher, in 1967.

  19. CABINET MOUNTAINS WILDERNESS, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, David A.; Banister, D'Arcy P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey of the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness, Montana indicate areas of probable and substantiated resource potential for copper, silver, lead, zinc, and gold. No potential for other metals or energy resources was identified in this survey. The mineral-resource potential of the area was evaluated by interpretation of geologic mapping, geochemical, geophysical, and gravity surveys, and by examination of mines and prospects, these studies were conducted from 1972 to 1974. Exploration by private industry has resulted in discovery of significant copper-silver deposits in and adjacent to the wilderness.

  20. Succession patterns on mountain pastures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Spatz; W. Germany

    1980-01-01

    Some successional patterns on mountain pastures in the Hohe Tauern mountains, Austria, are described. A close relation with former pasture management is shown. Very clear gradients in the nutritional status of the soil exist from stables towards more remote areas where no nutrients are added. Dwarf shrub or Alnus viridis woodland vegetation will develop after abandoning pastures, depending on elevation

  1. White Mountain Wilderness, New Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Segerstrom; R. B. Stotelmeyer

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey made during 1971-1973, the White Mountain Wilderness, which constitutes much of the western and northern White Mountains, New Mexico, is appraised to have six areas of probable mineral potential for base and precious metals. In mineral deposits exist in the wilderness, the potential is for small deposits of base and precious metals in

  2. A Day on Bare Mountain

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Richard Konicek-Moran

    2010-03-12

    Students may have the idea that all mountains are volcanoes and were formed by eruptions. The story in this chapter brings up questions about the geology of mountains and the weathering and erosion that takes place as nature breaks down the higher landsca

  3. Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2007-06-30

    Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

  4. Aerobiology of Juniperus Pollen in Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levetin, Estelle; Bunderson, Landon; VandeWater, Pete; Luvall, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Pollen from members of the Cupressaceae are major aeroallergens in many parts of the world. In the south central and southwest United States, Juniperus pollen is the most important member of this family with J. ashei (JA) responsible for severe winter allergy symptoms in Texas and Oklahoma. In New Mexico, pollen from J. monosperma (JM) and other Juniperus species are important contributors to spring allergies, while J. pinchotii (JP) pollinates in the fall affecting sensitive individuals in west Texas, southwest Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico. Throughout this region, JA, JM, and JP occur in dense woodland populations. Generally monitoring for airborne allergens is conducted in urban areas, although the source for tree pollen may be forested areas distant from the sampling sites. Improved pollen forecasts require a better understanding of pollen production at the source. The current study was undertaken to examine the aerobiology of several Juniperus species at their source areas for the development of new pollen forecasting initiatives.

  5. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2002-03-31

    The West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma is one of few newly discovered oil fields in Oklahoma. Although profitable, the field exhibits several unusual characteristics. These include decreasing water-oil ratios, decreasing gas-oil ratios, decreasing bottomhole pressures during shut-ins in some wells, and transient behavior for water production in many wells. This report explains the unusual characteristics of West Carney Field based on detailed geological and engineering analyses. We propose a geological history that explains the presence of mobile water and oil in the reservoir. The combination of matrix and fractures in the reservoir explains the reservoir's flow behavior. We confirm our hypothesis by matching observed performance with a simulated model and develop procedures for correlating core data to log data so that the analysis can be extended to other, similar fields where the core coverage may be limited.

  6. SP mountain data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawson, R. F.; Hamilton, R. E.; Liskow, C. L.; Dias, A. R.; Jackson, P. L.

    1981-09-01

    An analysis of synthetic aperture radar data of SP Mountain was undertaken to demonstrate the use of digital image processing techniques to aid in geologic interpretation of SAR data. These data were collected with the ERIM X- and L-band airborne SAR using like- and cross-polarizations. The resulting signal films were used to produce computer compatible tapes, from which four-channel imagery was generated. Slant range-to-ground range and range-azimuth-scale corrections were made in order to facilitate image registration; intensity corrections were also made. Manual interpretation of the imagery showed that L-band represented the geology of the area better than X-band. Several differences between the various images were also noted. Further digital analysis of the corrected data was done for enhancement purposes. This analysis included application of an MSS differencing routine and development of a routine for removal of relief displacement. It was found that accurate registration of the SAR channels is critical to the effectiveness of the differencing routine. Use of the relief displacement algorithm on the SP Mountain data demonstrated the feasibility of the technique.

  7. SP mountain data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawson, R. F.; Hamilton, R. E.; Liskow, C. L.; Dias, A. R.; Jackson, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of synthetic aperture radar data of SP Mountain was undertaken to demonstrate the use of digital image processing techniques to aid in geologic interpretation of SAR data. These data were collected with the ERIM X- and L-band airborne SAR using like- and cross-polarizations. The resulting signal films were used to produce computer compatible tapes, from which four-channel imagery was generated. Slant range-to-ground range and range-azimuth-scale corrections were made in order to facilitate image registration; intensity corrections were also made. Manual interpretation of the imagery showed that L-band represented the geology of the area better than X-band. Several differences between the various images were also noted. Further digital analysis of the corrected data was done for enhancement purposes. This analysis included application of an MSS differencing routine and development of a routine for removal of relief displacement. It was found that accurate registration of the SAR channels is critical to the effectiveness of the differencing routine. Use of the relief displacement algorithm on the SP Mountain data demonstrated the feasibility of the technique.

  8. A DIGITAL GEOLOGIC MAP DATABASE FOR THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William D. Heran; Gregory N. Green; Douglas B. Stoeser

    This report consists of a compilation of twelve digital geologic maps provided in ARC\\/INFO interchange (e00) format for the state of Oklahoma. The source maps consisted of nine USGS 1:250,000-scale quadrangle maps and three 1:125,000 scale county maps. This publication presents a digital composite of these data intact and without modification across quadrangle boundaries to resolve geologic unit discontinuities. An

  9. Eutrophication of Tenkiller Reservoir, Oklahoma, from nonpoint agricultural runoff

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Dennis Cooke; Eugene B. Welch; John R. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Tenkiller Ferry Reservoir, a large (51.6 km) US midcontinent reservoir in Oklahoma, switched from oligo-mesotrophic prior to 1975 to eutrophic by 1986, evidenced by changes in phytoplankton taxa, chlorophyll (Chl), total phosphorus (TP), transparency, and areal hypolimnetic oxygen deficit. External TP loading increased 2.5-fold between 1974 and 2004, mainly as nonpoint loading from disposal of an annual (2001–2004) average 406,818

  10. Geomorphic evidence for Late Cenozoic deformation, Wichita Moutains, Oklahoma 

    E-print Network

    Snell, Charles Burton

    1989-01-01

    set document moderate post-Pliocene deformation along the Wichita Uplift. Tectonic activity along the Amarillo Uplift resulted in slight warping of the Southern High Plains surface. Modest upwarping is suggested by abnormal surface contours... of Delaware Chair of Advisory Committee: Mr. Norman R. Tilford Holocene displacement on the Meers fault has prompted an investigation into Late Cenozoic tectonic activity in southwestern Oklahoma. The emphasis of this study was on geomorphic evidence...

  11. Echinoderm Faunas from the Bromide Formation (Middle Ordovician) of Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    1982-01-01

    geosyncline and the opposite end dies out in the platform. Subsidence, sediment thickness, sediment diversity, and tectonic activity are greatest near the mouth of the aulacogen, where it merges with the miogeosyncline from which it is indistinguish- able...) that the concept of aulacogens was clearly presented in English. Hoffman and others stressed how well the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen fits the definition of Shatski and used the work of Ham and others (1964) to discuss the geologic history of the structure trn nap...

  12. SOME INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES IN OKLAHOMA RAPTORS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. ALAN KOCAN; JOHN SNELLING; ELLIS C. GREINER

    Blood films and sera samples from wild Oklahoma raptors (Strigiformes -36 birds, 3 species; Falconiformes-SO birds, 7 species) were examined for hematozoa and tested for serologic antibody response to Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), encephalitis (EEE and WEE), ornithosis, and influenza. Twenty-nine of 36 (80.5%) Strigiformes and 24 of 50 (48.0%) Falconiformes showed the presence of one or more hematozoa. Serologic

  13. AVIFAUNA OF THE FOUR CANYON PRESERVE, ELLIS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael A. Patten; Dan L. Reinking; Donald H. Wolfe

    In 2004 the Nature Conservancy established a new preserve in the mixed prairie of northwestern Oklahoma. Our year-round surveys of the preserve in 2005 yielded 97 bird species. With additional species recorded by others, the site list stands at 111 native species and two non-native species. We confirmed nearly one-fourth of these species as breeders on site, and an additional

  14. 34. At Willard, Oklahoma Road north of Willard Road, at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. At Willard, Oklahoma Road north of Willard Road, at the site of the former Cook House for Willard Mill (upper mill that cut cants for Broughton Lumber Company's flume). Section of feeder after Lava Creek, looking down flume. Note extra large size of "V" in water supply vs. cant portions of flume. South/southeast 170 degrees. - Broughton Flume, Hood River Junction on Columbia River at Washington/Oregon border, Hood, Skamania County, WA

  15. NESTING ECOLOGY OF THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE IN SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JACK D. TYLER

    AssraAcr.-Loggerhead Shrike (Lank ludovicianus) nests were studied in southwestern Oklahoma from 1985 through 1988. Pairing began in late February to early March, and completed nests were found from 13 March to 20 June. Nesting peaked in mid-April, with second nestings from late May to late June. Average length of the nesting season was 11 weeks. Almost one-third of all nests

  16. Characterizing Earthquake Clusters in Oklahoma Using Subspace Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, N. D.; Benz, H.; Aster, R. C.; McNamara, D. E.; Myers, E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Subspace detection is a powerful and adaptive tool for continuously detecting low signal to noise seismic signals. Subspace detectors improve upon simple cross-correlation/matched filtering techniques by moving beyond the use of a single waveform template to the use of multiple orthogonal waveform templates that effectively span the signals from all previously identified events within a data set. Subspace detectors are particularly useful in event scenarios where a spatially limited source distribution produces earthquakes with highly similar waveforms. In this context, the methodology has been successfully deployed to identify low-frequency earthquakes within non-volcanic tremor, to characterize earthquakes swarms above magma bodies, and for detailed characterization of aftershock sequences. Here we apply a subspace detection methodology to characterize recent earthquakes clusters in Oklahoma. Since 2009, the state has experienced an unprecedented increase in seismicity, which has been attributed by others to recent expansion in deep wastewater injection well activity. Within the last few years, 99% of increased Oklahoma earthquake activity has occurred within 15 km of a Class II injection well. We analyze areas of dense seismic activity in central Oklahoma and construct more complete catalogues for analysis. For a typical cluster, we are able to achieve catalog completeness to near or below magnitude 1 and to continuously document seismic activity for periods of 6 months or more. Our catalog can more completely characterize these clusters in time and space with event numbers, magnitudes, b-values, energy, locations, etc. This detailed examination of swarm events should lead to a better understanding of time varying earthquake processes and hazards in the state of Oklahoma.

  17. 75 FR 2860 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Call for Data for the Illinois River Watershed in Oklahoma and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ...d): Call for Data for the Illinois River Watershed in Oklahoma and Arkansas AGENCY: Environmental...SUMMARY: EPA Region 6 is developing a watershed model for the Illinois River watershed in Oklahoma and Arkansas to address...

  18. Red Fork sandstone of Oklahoma: depositional history and reservoir distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, J.W.; Fritz, R.D.; Johnson, C.

    1989-03-01

    The Middle Pennsylvanian Red Fork sandstone formed as a result of progradation across eastern Kansas and most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork is one of several transgressive-regressive sequences (cyclothems) developed within the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group. Sea level changes, together with varying subsidence, were dominant factors controlling the general stratigraphic (correlative) characteristics of the Red Fork interval. Progradation was episodic, with sand deposition in the more active part of the basin during lower sea level stands and valley-fill deposition in the more stable areas during sea level rises. A map of Red Fork sand trends reveals an alluvial-deltaic complex covering most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork consists primarily of alluvial-valley and plain (fluvial) bodies in the northernmost part of northeastern Oklahoma, alluvial-deltaic bodies in most of the remaining parts of the shelf area, and off-shelf submarine-fan and slope basinal-floor complexes within the deeper part of the Anadarko basin. Determination of reservoir trend and genesis requires integration of rock and log data. Logs need to be calibrated to cores in order to estimate depositional environments accurately and to make a reasonable assessment of diagenetic overprints. Much of the oil and gas has been trapped in stratigraphic traps, and a significant amount of oil is in channel sandstones with trends at high angles to the structural grain. In some areas, secondary clay, in particular chloritic clay, has resulted in microporosity, high water saturation, and correspondingly low resistivities in oil reserves.

  19. Chronology of migration by American coots in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eddleman, William R.; Knopf, Fritz L.; Patterson, Craig T.

    1985-01-01

    American coots (Fulica americana) were studied on large reservoirs in north-central Oklahoma in 1979-1982 to determine chronologies of migrations by age- and sex class. Coots began migrating into Oklahoma in mid-September, numbers peaked in early to mid-October, and few birds were seen after 1 November. Some late migrants appeared in mid-December. In spring, coots began migrating in late February, numbers peaked in mid-April, and the last birds were seen in mid-May. Generally, adult and juvenile males and juvenile female coots migrated simultaneously in autumn, but adult females completed migration by 1 November. A few juveniles and adult males migrated in December. Adult coots preceded yearlings in spring. Despite annual and between-lake differences in chronology of autumn migration, most coots migrated before waterfowl hunting season in Oklahoma. Coot hunting seasons in mid-latitude states should commence before the general waterfowl season where management goals are to increase hunter interest and the harvest of birds.

  20. ESTIMATES OF CLOUD WATER DEPOSITION AT MOUNTAIN DEPOSITION AT MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM SITES IN THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cloud water deposition was estimated at three high elevation sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States (Whiteface Mountain, NY, Whitetop Mountain, VA, and Clingrnan's Dome, TN) from 1994 through 1999 as part of the Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro). ...

  1. Glacial effects limiting mountain height.

    PubMed

    Egholm, D L; Nielsen, S B; Pedersen, V K; Lesemann, J-E

    2009-08-13

    The height of mountain ranges reflects the balance between tectonic rock uplift, crustal strength and surface denudation. Tectonic deformation and surface denudation are interdependent, however, and feedback mechanisms-in particular, the potential link to climate-are subjects of intense debate. Spatial variations in fluvial denudation rate caused by precipitation gradients are known to provide first-order controls on mountain range width, crustal deformation rates and rock uplift. Moreover, limits to crustal strength are thought to constrain the maximum elevation of large continental plateaus, such as those in Tibet and the central Andes. There are indications that the general height of mountain ranges is also directly influenced by the extent of glaciation through an efficient denudation mechanism known as the glacial buzzsaw. Here we use a global analysis of topography and show that variations in maximum mountain height correlate closely with climate-controlled gradients in snowline altitude for many high mountain ranges across orogenic ages and tectonic styles. With the aid of a numerical model, we further demonstrate how a combination of erosional destruction of topography above the snowline by glacier-sliding and commensurate isostatic landscape uplift caused by erosional unloading can explain observations of maximum mountain height by driving elevations towards an altitude window just below the snowline. The model thereby self-consistently produces the hypsometric signature of the glacial buzzsaw, and suggests that differences in the height of mountain ranges mainly reflect variations in local climate rather than tectonic forces. PMID:19675651

  2. Rocky Mountain Online Archive

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Rocky Mountain Online Archive contains archival collections in Colorado, Wyoming, and New Mexico from 20 participating institutions. To view a list of these institutions, visitors should click on the "About" tab at the top of the page, then click on the link "Participating Institutions". Visitors can click on the "Browse the Archive" tab at the top of the page to browse by institutions, subcategorized by Colorado, Wyoming and New Mexico, or by subjects, which includes the subcategories of subjects, genre, and places. The genres represented are "Audio-visual", "Correspondence", "Diaries", and "Photographs". Visitors may find the abundance of oral histories available under the "Audio-visual" tab very interesting to explore. The "Inventory of the Alamo Navajo Oral History Project 1977-1984", "Inventory of Italians of Albuquerque Oral History Project, 1995-1996", and "Guide to the North Poudre Irrigation Company Oral history Collection" are just some of the many available oral histories.

  3. Quantifying Mountain Front Recharge Using Isotopic Tracers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Wahi; B. Ekwurzel; J. F. Hogan; C. J. Eastoe; M. N. Baillie

    2005-01-01

    To improve our conceptual and quantitative understanding of mountain-front\\/mountain-block recharge (MFR) associated with the Huachuca Mountains of the Upper San Pedro River Basin in Arizona, we employed a suite of geochemical measurements including isotopic tracers and noble gases. MFR is frequently the dominant source of recharge to alluvial basins in the semiarid Basin and Range province. It consists of mountain

  4. Bald Mountain, Washington Plantation, Maine

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This guide provides information on the geology of Bald Mountain, an outstanding example of an unvegetated mountain summit in western Maine. Topics include the petrology of the metamorphic rocks exposed on the mountain (layered quartzite and schist), which preserve evidence of their sedimentary origin (graded bedding, cross-bedding). There is also information on the glacial history of the area, as indicated by the presence of glacial striations and erratics. For visitors, there is information on permission and access, directions, sampling information, and activities. References are included.

  5. Oklahoma, Maine, Migration and "Right to Work": A Confused and Misleading Analysis

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Andrew

    Oklahoma, Maine, Migration and "Right to Work": A Confused and Misleading Analysis By the Bureau of Labor Education, University of Maine (Spring 2012) The recent article released by the Maine Heritage Policy Center (MHPC), "The Case for Right-to-Work in Maine: Examining the Evidence in Oklahoma" (1

  6. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.27 Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...of Reclamation shall operate the Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  7. 33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Foss Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  8. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.27 Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...of Reclamation shall operate the Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  9. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.27 Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...of Reclamation shall operate the Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  10. 33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Foss Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  11. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.27 Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...of Reclamation shall operate the Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  12. 33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Foss Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  13. 33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Foss Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  14. 33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Foss Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  15. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.27 Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...of Reclamation shall operate the Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  16. The Oklahoma's Promise Program: A National Model to Promote College Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.

    2013-01-01

    Using a multi-method approach involving fixed effects and logistic regressions, this study examined the effect of the Oklahoma's Promise Program on student persistence in relation to the Pell and Stafford federal programs and according to socio-economic characteristics and class level. The Oklahoma's Promise is a hybrid state program that pays…

  17. The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant in meteorology, and the applicant's general character. If you need room for additional comments please feel free the completed form to: School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, 120 David L. Boren Blvd. Suite 5900

  18. 1SCTP Multistreaming over satellite M.Atiquzzaman, Univ. of Oklahoma, Oct 22, 2003.

    E-print Network

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    Multihoming ­ multiple IP addresses per host #12;Page 4 7SCTP Multistreaming over satellite M Payload, SACK, etc. #12;Page 6 11SCTP Multistreaming over satellite M.Atiquzzaman, Univ. of Oklahoma, OctPage 1 1SCTP Multistreaming over satellite M.Atiquzzaman, Univ. of Oklahoma, Oct 22, 2003. Effect

  19. Neglected or Delinquent Transition Services in Oklahoma 1982-83. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma City Public School System, OK.

    This report describes a special, 1-year federally funded project of the Oklahoma State Department of Education and the Oklahoma City Public schools, which operated to facilitate the transition of neglected or delinquent youths from state operated institutions to locally operated educational programs. The problems specific to youths in transition…

  20. Secondary Agricultural Education Teachers as Agents of Change in Oklahoma and the Adoption of Precision Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickeson, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that precision agricultural education (PAE) in Oklahoma affects environmental quality, water conservation, and crop yields. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the nature and perceived effectiveness of PAE in Oklahoma secondary agricultural education classes. The study was framed by the diffusion of…

  1. Never Again Would We Be the Same: The Oklahoma City Bombing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathers, Kent

    1996-01-01

    A high school principal describes the day of the terrorist attack on the federal building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. After meeting with assistant principals and the school nurse to make plans for dealing with possible repercussions, he told students what had happened, monitored TV broadcasts, evacuated the building during bomb scares, and…

  2. Tornado-Related Deaths and Injuries in Oklahoma due to the 3 May 1999 Tornadoes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheryll Brown; Pam Archer; Elizabeth Kruger; Sue Mallonee

    2002-01-01

    During the evening hours of 3 May 1999, 58 tornadoes occurred in Oklahoma. One tornado reached F5 intensity and left a widespread path of death, injury, and destruction in and around the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. Other communities across the state were also affected. Data on persons who died or were injured were collected from medical examiner reports, hospital medical

  3. The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Palmer, Michael W.

    The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma Michael W. Palmer Tallgrass Prairie Preserve (Osage County, Oklahoma), managed by The Nature Conservancy, consists collected between 1992 and 2007 were examined to obtain a vouchered flora of the preserve. The known flora

  4. Ooh La La! Oklahoma Culinary Programs Cook up Great Partnerships with French Counterparts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCharen, Belinda

    2009-01-01

    The dream of a Franco-Oklahoma partnership began over a year ago when Chantal Manes, now from the French Ministry of Education, visited Oklahoma. The Technologie Academie in Soissons, France, had a goal for all the career and technical students in the Picardie Region of France to have an international experience before completing their technical…

  5. Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Jim I.; Martin, Paul S.; Euler, Robert C.; Long, Austin; Jull, A. J. T.; Toolin, Laurence J.; Donahue, Douglas J.; Linick, T. W.

    1986-01-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 ± 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters. Images PMID:16593655

  6. Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat.

    PubMed

    Mead, J I; Martin, P S; Euler, R C; Long, A; Jull, A J; Toolin, L J; Donahue, D J; Linick, T W

    1986-02-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 +/- 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters. PMID:16593655

  7. Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 1990–1999

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Lee Rodgers; Craig A. St. John; Ronnie Coleman

    2005-01-01

    Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility.\\u000a In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced\\u000a fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientations—replacement theory, community

  8. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    points are killed or the cambium is killed). Eastern Redcedar (Juniperus virginiana) Mountain Cedar, such as sand plum, but they will recover. Depending upon objectives, a three year or less fire return interval

  9. After the bomb. Oklahoma City rescuers talk about their experiences.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M; Kernes, R; Lindsay, W; Webster, M

    1995-06-01

    Rather than trying to write a second-hand description of the response to the April 19 bombing of the Federal Building in Oklahoma City, we thought we'd let some of the people who were there caring for patients and searching for victims share their experiences in their own words. Marion Angell Garza, JEMS editorial/news coordinator, spoke at length with six responders, including paramedics, the triage and treatment officer, a firefighter/EMT-1 and an emergency physician. The following excerpts are from those interviews. PMID:10143265

  10. Permian karst topography in the Wichita uplift, southwestern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, R.N. Busbey, A.B. (Texas Christian Univ., Ft. Worth, TX (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-02-01

    The Wichita uplift in southwestern Oklahoma is one part of a record of Pennsylvania and early Permian deformation that affected the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. As a result of a partial inversion, the Lower Paleozoic section of this aulacogen was sequentially stripped off an uplift between the Wichita uplift and the Anadarko basin, resulting in the exposure of ultrabasic rocks deep in the Cambrian igneous fill of the aulacogen. Following the late Paleozoic tectonism, the topography of the uplift was entombed beneath Permian sediments and remained essentially undisturbed until exhumation during the present erosional cycle. Modern erosion is gradually exposing this topography, permitting morphometric analysis of the Permian hill forms. Because of the variation of lithology in the uplift, it is possible to isolate the effects of weathering processes such as intense hydrolysis of the igneous rocks (producing, among other features, or topography) and limestone dissolution, in the form of a surface and subsurface karst imprint. The latter process resulted in a network of small caves that are essentially fissures eroded along tectonic fractures. These small caves can be found in all the exposed areas of limestone. They are particularly noteworthy for three reasons: in at least five examples they contain a complex fauna of Permian vertebrates (mostly fragmentary), speleothems in some examples contain hydrocarbon inclusions, derived from the underlying Anadarko basin, some of the caves yield evidence of post burial evolution in the form of clay infiltration from the surface and brine flushing from the underlying Anadarko basin.

  11. Improved Estimates of Evapotranspiration at Oklahoma Mesonet Sites (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basara, J. B.; Illston, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) of the United States is a region of dynamic weather and climate. In addition, the SGP region has demonstrated significant coupling between the land surface and atmospheric processes across varying spatial and temporal scales during the warm season. As such, mesocsale events including deep convection as well as regional drought and pluvial periods are impacted by land-atmosphere inter actions and gradients in the surface conditions. With the establishment of the Oklahoma Mesonet in 1994 and subsequent upgrades to the sensors deployed at the over 100 sites across the state, near real-time, collocated observations of soil and atmospheric variables have been collected, quality assured, and archived. At the same time additional observing systems and field campaigns have increased the breadth of the information gathered on soil, vegetation, and atmospheric processes across the SGP region. Such datasets have led (a) to numerous studies that have increased the understanding of how land-atmosphere interactions impact the local weather and climate of the SGP region and (b) new techniques to link in situ observations with remote sensing to provide improved understanding of surface-atmosphere exchange. Most recently, Oklahoma Mesonet soil and atmospheric observations have been combined with near real-time land surface conditions via MODIS remotely sensed data to improve estimates of evapotranspiration at local and regional scales, understand the dynamics of flash drought, and address the water budget of the region.

  12. Late Paleozoic deformation of interior North America: The greater Ancestral Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Hongzhuan [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)]|[Univ. of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Royden, L.; Burchfiel, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schuepbach, M. [MAXUS Energy Co., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Late Paleozoic deformation within interior North America has produced a series of north-northwest- to northwest-trending elongate basins that cover much of Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah. Each basin thickens asymmetrically toward an adjacent region of coeval basement uplift from which it is separated by synsedimentary faults with great vertical relief. The remarkable coincidence in timing, geometry, and apparent structural style throughout the region of late Paleozoic deformation strongly suggests that these paired regions of basin subsidence and basement uplift form a unified system of regional deformation, the greater Ancestral Rocky Mountains. Over this region, basin subsidence and basement uplift were approximately synchronous, beginning in the Chesterian-Morrowan, continuing through the Pennsylvanian, and ending in the Wolfcampian (although minor post-Wolfcampian deformation occurs locally). The basement uplifts show evidence for folding and faulting in the Pennsylvanian and Early Permian. Reverse faults and thrust faults have been drilled over many of the uplifts, but only in the Anadarko region has thrusting of the basement uplifts over the adjacent basin been clearly documented. Extensive basement-involved thrusting also occurs along the margins of the Delaware and Midland basins, and suggests that the entire greater Ancestral Rocky Mountains region probably formed as the result of northeast-southwest-directed-intraplate shortening. Deformation within the greater Ancestral Rocky Mountains was coeval with late Paleozoic subduction along much of the North American plate margin, and has traditionally been related to emplacement of thrust sheets within the Ouachita-Marathon orogenic belt. The nature, timing, and orientation of events along the Ouachita-Marathon belt make it difficult to drive the deformation of the greater Ancestral Rocky Mountains by emplacement of the Ouachita-Marathon belt along the southern margin of North America.

  13. Mountains and Lowlands: Enemies or Partners?

    E-print Network

    Stoffel, Markus

    Mountains and Lowlands: Enemies or Partners? Example of the High Atlas, Morocco #12;Contact Address of the High Atlas, Morocco Preface Sahara and Sahel Observatory (OSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The High Atlas Mountains ­ the backbone of Morocco

  14. The distributed model intercomparison project - Phase 2: Motivation and design of the Oklahoma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael B.; Koren, Victor; Reed, Seann; Zhang, Ziya; Zhang, Yu; Moreda, Fekadu; Cui, Zhengtao; Mizukami, Naoki; Anderson, Eric A.; Cosgrove, Brian A.

    2012-02-01

    SummaryThe Office of Hydrologic Development (OHD) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) conducted the second phase of the Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP 2). After DMIP 1, the NWS recognized the need for additional science experiments to guide its research-to-operations path towards advanced hydrologic models for river and water resources forecasting. This was accentuated by the need to develop a broader spectrum of water resources forecasting products (such as soil moisture) in addition to the more traditional river, flash flood, and water supply forecasts. As it did for DMIP 1, the NWS sought the input and contributions from the hydrologic research community. DMIP 1 showed that using operational precipitation data, some distributed models could indeed perform as well as lumped models in several basins and better than lumped models for one basin. However, in general, the improvements were more limited than anticipated by the scientific community. Models combining so-called conceptual rainfall-runoff mechanisms with physically-based routing schemes achieved the best overall performance. Clear gains were achieved through calibration of model parameters, with the average performance of calibrated models being better than uncalibrated models. DMIP 1 experiments were hampered by temporally-inconsistent precipitation data and few runoff events in the verification period for some basins. Greater uncertainty in modeling small basins was noted, pointing to the need for additional tests of nested basins of various sizes. DMIP 2 experiments in the Oklahoma (OK) region were more comprehensive than in DMIP 1, and were designed to improve our understanding beyond what was learned in DMIP 1. Many more stream gauges were located, allowing for more rigorous testing of simulations at interior points. These included two new gauged interior basins that had drainage areas smaller than the smallest in DMIP 1. Soil moisture and routing experiments were added to further assess if distributed models could accurately model basin-interior processes. A longer period of higher quality precipitation data was available, and facilitated a test to note the impacts of data quality on model calibration. Moreover, the DMIP 2 calibration and verification periods contained more runoff events for analysis. Two lumped models were used to define a robust benchmark for evaluating the improvement of distributed models compared to lumped models. Fourteen groups participated in DMIP 2 using a total of sixteen models. Ten of these models were not in DMIP 1. This paper presents the motivation for DMIP 2 Oklahoma experiments, discusses the major project elements, and describes the data and models used. In addition, the paper introduces the findings, which are covered in a companion results paper ( Smith et al., this issue). Lastly, the paper summarizes the DMIP 1 and 2 experiments with commentary from the NWS perspective. Future papers will cover the DMIP 2 experiments in the western USA mountainous basins.

  15. BLOOD MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeppen, Robert P.; Armstrong, Michelle K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Blood Mountain Roadless Area, Georgia, indicates that there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral and energy resources. Natural gas may be present at great depth, perhaps 5 mi down and below the overthrust sheets of the Blue Ridge Mountains, but presently available information is not adequate to evaluate the resource potential of this commodity. Further seismic studies and exploratory drilling are needed to evaluate the gas potential of this part of the Eastern Overthrust Belt.

  16. White Mountain Wilderness, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Segerstrom, K.; Stotelmeyer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey made during 1971-1973, the White Mountain Wilderness, which constitutes much of the western and northern White Mountains, New Mexico, is appraised to have six areas of probable mineral potential for base and precious metals. In mineral deposits exist in the wilderness, the potential is for small deposits of base and precious metals in veins and breccia pipes or, more significantly, the possibility for large low-grade disseminated porphyry-type molybdenum deposits. There is little promise for the occurrence of geothermal energy resources in the area.

  17. Biodiversity of the Hengduan Mountains

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides data on plants and fungi from the Hengduan Mountains and adjacent areas of south-central China, including the Gaoligong Mountains and Tibetan Himalaya. The data were derived from georeferenced collections made on recent expeditions (1984-present) to the region, and include specimens with DNA tissue. Users can browse specimens by name; search by taxon, collector number, or date; or browse collecting localities in the database using Google Earth (TM). There is also information on expeditions and personnel, the Biodiversity of the Eastern Himalaya project, an image gallery, a multilingual gazetteer and thesaurus, and a map showing the historic Tibetan provinces of the region.

  18. Quantification of Juniperus Ashei Pollen Production for the Development of Forecasting Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunderson, L. D.; Levetin, E.

    2010-01-01

    Juniperus ashei pollen is considered one of the most allergenic species of Cupressaceae in North America. Juniperus ashei is distributed throughout central Texas, Northern Mexico, the Arbuckle Mountains of south central Oklahoma, and the Ozark Mountains of northern Arkansas and southwestern Missouri. The large amount of airborne pollen that J. ashei produces affects inhabitants of cities and towns adjacent to juniper woodland areas and because juniper pollen can be transported over long distances, it affects populations that are far away. In order to create a dynamic forecast system for allergy and asthma sufferers, pollen production must be estimated. Estimation of pollen production requires the estimation of male cone production. Two locations in the Arbuckle Mountains of Oklahoma and 4 locations in the Edwards Plateau region of Texas were chosen as sampling sites. Trees were measured to determine approximate size. Male to female ratio was determined and pollen cone production was estimated using a qualitative scale from 0 to 2. Cones were counted from harvested 1/8 sections of representative trees. The representative trees were measured and approximate surface area of the tree was calculated. Using the representative tree data, the number of cones per square meter was calculated for medium production (1) and high production (2) trees. These numbers were extrapolated to calculate cone production in other trees sampled. Calibration was achieved within each location's sub-plot by counting cones on 5 branches collected from 5 sides of both high production and medium production trees. The total area sampled in each location was 0.06 hectare and total cone production varied greatly from location to location. The highest production area produced 5.8 million cones while the lowest production area produced 72,000 cones. A single representative high production tree in the Arbuckle Mountains produced 1.38 million cones. The number of trees per location was relatively uniform, but the number of high cone production trees varied greatly. Although there is great diversity in the locations making it difficult to determine which factors are most important, cone production was well correlated with certain stand characteristics including trunk diameter.

  19. 27 CFR 9.213 - Snipes Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Snipes Mountain. 9.213 Section...TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE... § 9.213 Snipes Mountain. (a) Name. ...chapter, “Snipes Mountain” is a term of viticultural...Approved maps. The two United States Geological...

  20. First aid knowledge of alpine mountaineers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Kuepper; D. Wermelskirchen; Th. Beeker; O. Reisten; R. Waanders

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The study evaluates the knowledge of first aid in mountaineerers who climb routes of moderate difficulty in the western Alps. Additionally the mountaineer's ability to assess their own knowledge was investigated. An analysis of the mountain accidents in the same area showed the real need for knowledge. Design: An investigation of a cohort of mountaineers who reached Margherita Hut

  1. MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE INFESTATION: HYDROLOGICAL IMPACTS

    E-print Network

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE INFESTATION: HYDROLOGICAL IMPACTS by EDI ENVIRONMENTAL DYNAMICS INC. for Ministry of Environment Mountain Pine Beetle Action Team March 2008 #12;This document was produced under contract to the ministry of environment mountain pine beetle action team (MPBAT) by EDI Environmental

  2. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section 9.167 ...American Viticultural Areas § 9.167 Red Mountain (a) Name. The name of the...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps....

  3. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section 9.167 ...American Viticultural Areas § 9.167 Red Mountain (a) Name. The name of the...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps....

  4. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section 9.167 ...American Viticultural Areas § 9.167 Red Mountain (a) Name. The name of the...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps....

  5. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section 9.167 ...American Viticultural Areas § 9.167 Red Mountain (a) Name. The name of the...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps....

  6. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section 9.167 ...American Viticultural Areas § 9.167 Red Mountain (a) Name. The name of the...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps....

  7. Oklahoma Orchestrates Energy Efficiency Solutions: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    D& R International

    2001-10-10

    Oklahoma demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  8. The Agricultural Benefits of Salinity Control on the Red River of Texas and Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, D. H.; Lacewell, R. D.; Moore, D. S.

    Salinity of the waters from the Red River and its major tributaries has virtually eliminated its use for irrigation of agricultural crops in Texas and Oklahoma. A chloride control project has been proposed whereby the source salt waters...

  9. Principal facts for a gravity survey made in northeastern Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas during 1948

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, K.L.; Hoskinson, A.J.; Shelton, G.R.

    1971-01-01

    Observed gravity values, station locations, elevations, theoretical gravity, and free-air anomaly values are provided in tabular form for 554 gravity locations in northeastern Oklahoma-southeastern Kansas.

  10. 75 FR 56923 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; State Implementation Plan Revisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ...to prohibit air emissions from adversely...through interstate transport. In this action...the interstate transport of NO X emissions from Oklahoma that...pertains to interstate transport of certain emissions. On August...

  11. 76 FR 64065 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ...to prohibit emissions that adversely...of interstate transport. The SIP must...CSAPR or Transport Rule) for State emissions that contribute...revision for the transport element of 110...that Oklahoma emissions are not...

  12. Adjustments Due to a Declining Groundwater Supply: High Plains of Northern Texas and Western Oklahoma 

    E-print Network

    Lacewell, R D.; Jones, L. L.; Osborn, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The region north of the Canadian River in Texas and including the three western counties of Oklahoma have been rapidly developing the groundwater resource since the mid 1960's. This region, hereafter referred to as the Northern High Plains...

  13. JOB OPPORTUNITIES (SUBSURFACE PROTECTION AND REMEDIATION DIVISION, ADA, OKLAHOMA, NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This page lists job opportunities at NRMRL's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division (SPRD) located in Ada, Oklahoma. These include both EPA Postdoctoral Positions and National Research Council Postdoctoral Positions. SPRD's research programs include basic studies to enha...

  14. 40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County, Roger Mills County, Texas County, Woods County, Woodward...

  15. Four Possible Steps to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Ada, Oklahoma

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of federal, state, and city initiatives on climate change are presented. Specific steps for the City of Ada, Oklahoma, are presented. This is an abstract of a proposed presentation and does not necessarily reflect EPA policy....

  16. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center, Ada, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar-Nagy, S.; Voss, P.; Van Geet, O.

    2006-10-01

    U.S. EPA's Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center, Ada, Oklahoma, has reduced its annual energy consumption by 45% by upgrading its building mechanical system and incorporating renewable energy.

  17. Information for Prospective International Graduate Students Page -1 Oklahoma State University Graduate College Information for Prospective

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Information for Prospective International Graduate Students Page -1 Oklahoma State University Graduate College Information for Prospective International Graduate Students Thank you for your interest prospective students about OSU. You can find our online application at this web address: https

  18. Depth-Duration Frequency of Precipitation for Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tortorelli, Robert L.; Rea, Alan; Asquith, William H.

    1999-01-01

    A regional frequency analysis was conducted to estimate the depth-duration frequency of precipitation for 12 durations in Oklahoma (15, 30, and 60 minutes; 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours; and 1, 3, and 7 days). Seven selected frequencies, expressed as recurrence intervals, were investigated (2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years). L-moment statistics were used to summarize depth-duration data and to determine the appropriate statistical distributions. Three different rain-gage networks provided the data (15minute, 1-hour, and 1-day). The 60-minute, and 1-hour; and the 24-hour, and 1-day durations were analyzed separately. Data were used from rain-gage stations with at least 10-years of record and within Oklahoma or about 50 kilometers into bordering states. Precipitation annual maxima (depths) were determined from the data for 110 15-minute, 141 hourly, and 413 daily stations. The L-moment statistics for depths for all durations were calculated for each station using unbiased L-mo-ment estimators for the mean, L-scale, L-coefficient of variation, L-skew, and L-kur-tosis. The relation between L-skew and L-kurtosis (L-moment ratio diagram) and goodness-of-fit measures were used to select the frequency distributions. The three-parameter generalized logistic distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 15-, 30-, and 60-minute annual maxima; and the three-parameter generalized extreme-value distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 1-hour to 7-day annual maxima. The mean for each station and duration was corrected for the bias associated with fixed interval recording of precipitation amounts. The L-scale and spatially averaged L-skew statistics were used to compute the location, scale, and shape parameters of the selected distribution for each station and duration. The three parameters were used to calculate the depth-duration-frequency relations for each station. The precipitation depths for selected frequencies were contoured from weighted depth surfaces to produce maps from which the precipitation depth-duration-frequency curve for selected storm durations can be determined for any site in Oklahoma.

  19. Constraints on recent earthquake source parameters, fault geometry and aftershock characteristics in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Benz, H.; Herrmann, R. B.; Bergman, E. A.; McMahon, N. D.; Aster, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    In late 2009, the seismicity of Oklahoma increased dramatically. The largest of these earthquakes was a series of three damaging events (Mw 4.8, 5.6, 4.8) that occurred over a span of four days in November 2011 near the town of Prague in central Oklahoma. Studies suggest that these earthquakes were induced by reactivation of the Wilzetta fault due to the disposal of waste water from hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") and other oil and gas activities. The Wilzetta fault is a northeast trending vertical strike-slip fault that is a well known structural trap for oil and gas. Since the November 2011 Prague sequence, thousands of small to moderate (M2-M4) earthquakes have occurred throughout central Oklahoma. The most active regions are located near the towns of Stillwater and Medford in north-central Oklahoma, and Guthrie, Langston and Jones near Oklahoma City. The USGS, in collaboration with the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma, has responded by deploying numerous temporary seismic stations in the region in order to record the vigorous aftershock sequences. In this study we use data from the temporary seismic stations to re-locate all Oklahoma earthquakes in the USGS National Earthquake Information Center catalog using a multiple-event approach known as hypo-centroidal decomposition that locates earthquakes with decreased uncertainty relative to one another. Modeling from this study allows us to constrain the detailed geometry of the reactivated faults, as well as source parameters (focal mechanisms, stress drop, rupture length) for the larger earthquakes. Preliminary results from the November 2011 Prague sequence suggest that subsurface rupture lengths of the largest earthquakes are anomalously long with very low stress drop. We also observe very high Q (~1000 at 1 Hz) that explains the large felt areas and we find relatively low b-value and a rapid decay of aftershocks.

  20. Continuous Commissioning of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital, Fort Sill, Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Turner, W. D.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Martinez, J. T.

    2007-01-01

    Continuous Commissioning ® of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital Fort Sill, Oklahoma Joseph T. Martinez Assistant Research Engineer W. Dan Turner, P.E., Ph,D. Professor and Director Juan Carlos Baltazar, Ph,D. Research Associate... Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University College Station, Texas Facilities Branch Management Reynolds Army Community Hospital, Fort Sill, Oklahoma ABSTRACT Continuous Commissioning ® (CC ®1 ) of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital...

  1. A study of the relationship between certain moisture parameters and severe convective storms in central Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Scott, Carven Allen

    1977-01-01

    A STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CERTAIN MOISTURE PARAMETERS AND SEVERE CONVECTIVE STORMS IN CENTRAL OKLAHOMA A Thesis by CARVEN ALLEN SCOTT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major Subject: Meteorology A STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CERTAIN MOISTURE PARAMETERS AND SEVERE CONVECTIVE STORMS IN CENTRAL OKLAHOMA A Thesis by CARVEN ALLEN SCOTT Approved as to style...

  2. Texture, composition, and diagenesis of the Burbank Sandstone, North Burbank field, Tract 97, Osage County, Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Hufford, Walter Ray

    1983-01-01

    TEXTURE, COMPOSITION, AND DIAGENESIS OF THE BURBANK SANDSTONE, NORTH BURBANK FIELD, TRACT 97, OSAGE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis HALTER RAY HUFFORD Sumitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Geology TEXTURE, COMPOSITION, AND DIAGENESIS OF THE BURBANK SANDSTONE, NORTH BURBANK FIELD, TRACT 97, OSAGE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by WALTER RAY HUFFORD Approved as the style and content...

  3. Costs and Economies of Size in Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operations.

    E-print Network

    Dietrich, Raymond A.

    1969-01-01

    Costs and Economies of Size in I Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operat ions B-1083 May 1969 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Texas Agricultural Experiment Station H. 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas In Cooperation with the U. S... Depreciation Costs and Classification ! of Feedlot Labor ................................................... 31 . Appendix C: Derivation of Cost Curves .................... )I I Highlights Southern Plains (Texas and Oklahoma) feedlot One of the major...

  4. Variational optimization analysis of the 8 June 1974 severe storms in Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Liles, Charlie A

    1976-01-01

    VARIATIONAL OPTIMIZATION ANALYSIS OF THE 8 Ji3NE 1974 SEVERE STORMS IN OKLAHOMA A THESIS hy CHARLIE A. LILES Suhmitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM Hniversity pa -tie' fulfillment of the requiremert for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subjeot; Meteorology VARIATIONAL OPTIMIZATION ANALYSIS OF THE 8 JUNE 1974 SEVERE STORMS IN OKLAHOMA A THESIS by CHARLIE A. LILES Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) L (Head of Depar ent...

  5. Rocky Mountain Bio Lab: Wildflowers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Geographic

    This video explores the work of environmentalist John Hart, a Professor of Environmental Science at U.C. Berkley. In the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, Dr. Hart has established an experimental laboratory in which he has artificially created and maintained a 3-degree increase in surface temperature of a plot of land, and documented the impact on plant species occupying the plot.

  6. Plate Borders and Mountain Building

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Schlumberger Excellence in Educational Development, Inc.

    This page features animations of four different types of plate boundaries, including one animation of the collision of two pieces of continental crust, forming steep mountain ranges. The animations are all presented in flash, and the plate convergence offers a useful, generic view of orogeny.

  7. The Mountaineer-Malaysia Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    A 26-day summer field course of West Virginia University's (WVU) Recreation and Parks Department took students to Malaysia's mountains and rainforests to observe how Malaysians are managing national parks, problem elephants, and population pressures on parks. The adventure provided powerful learning experiences. Further exchanges between WVU and…

  8. Mountainous Star Coral (Montastraea faveolata)

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This colony of Mountainous Star Coral (Montastraea faveolata) is so large (about 3 feet across) that it must have been growing before the severe bleaching and disease episode in 2005/2006 that caused so much coral mortality on St. John's reefs....

  9. ROCKY MOUNTAIN JOURNAL OF MATHEMATICS

    E-print Network

    Saff, E. B.

    OF POLYNOMIALS A. ISERLES,S.P.N0RSETT AND E.B. SAFF ABSTRACT. We survey certain transformations of the set 7rn of E.B. Saff was supported, in part, by the National Science Foundation under grant DMS-862 Mountain Mathematics Consortium 331 #12;A. ISERLES,S.P.N0RSETT AND E.B. SAFF known and appreciated

  10. Gearing Up for Mountain Biking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahnke, Thomas; Hamson, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Examines the gear system of a mountain bike to discover any redundancy in the many gear settings available to the cyclist. Suggests a best strategy for changing up through the gears on a typical 21-gear system and an adjustment to the available gears that would result in a smoother change. (Author/ASK)

  11. Artifical Mountains: A Synthetic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipiera, Paul P.; Aumann, John A.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a secondary science unit which uses an urban environment to develop a comparison between naturally formed mountains and man-constructed skyscrapers. The unit is one in a series of fifty laboratory activities designed to stimulate students of earth science by interrelating scientific principles and procedures to a familiar environment.…

  12. Anatomy of a Mountain Range.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Berkeley

    1993-01-01

    Provides written tour of Colorado Rockies along San Juan Skyway in which the geological features and formation of the mountain range is explored. Discusses evidence of geologic forces and products such as plate tectonic movement and the Ancestral Rockies; subduction and the Laramide Orogeny; volcanism and calderas; erosion, faulting, land…

  13. Physiology of ski mountaineering racing.

    PubMed

    Duc, S; Cassirame, J; Durand, F

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify and describe the exercise intensity of ski mountaineering racing, and to identify the best physiological predictors of ski mountaineering racing. Before participating in the race in which heart rate (HR) and speed were continuously recorded, 10 trained ski-mountaineers performed a field maximal test to determine the first ventilatory threshold (VT1) and the respiratory compensation threshold (RCT) in order to establish 3 exercise intensity zones (Z1: below VT1, Z2: between VT1 and RCT, and Z3: above RCT). Energy cost (EC) of each subject was estimated on the HR/ V?O2 relationship obtained during the field maximal test. VT1 and RCT threshold were equal to 84.2±3.0 and 94.5±1.7% of HR (max). Race time was significantly correlated with V?O2max (r = -0.87), VT1 (r = -0.82) and RCT (r = -0.85) expressed for body mass unit. The mean race time and the mean HR were 101±11?min and 93.4±1.8% of HR (max). The % race time spent in Z1, Z2 and Z3, were 7.0±4.8, 51.3±4.7 and 42.0±6.5%, respectively. The mean value of EC during the two uphill of the race was 14.3±2.6 J x kg(-1) x m(-1). HR and speed decreased significantly during the second uphill whereas EC increased significantly by ?15%. Data obtained in the present study represent the first qualitative description of physiology demand of ski mountaineering racing. The long period of time spent just below and above RCT suggest that ski-mountaineering can be viewed as one of the most strenuous endurance sports like cross-country skiing, running and off-road biking. In addition to high aerobic capacities, body mass seems to appear as a key factor given that performance in ski mountaineering is strongly correlated to relative common physiological variables. The changes of HR, speed and EC during the second uphill, which indicate the prevalence of fatigue, confirm the exhaustive character of ski mountaineering. PMID:22012642

  14. SEASONAL GROWTH RATES OF FISHES IN RELATION TO CONDITIONS OF LAKE STRATIFICATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Glen E. Gebhart; Robert C. Summerfelt

    The effect of lake stratification and hypolimnetic anoxia on growth of gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepidianum), white crappie (Pomoxis annularis), and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) was studied in Arbuckle Lake, Oklahoma. The percentage of total available fish habitat of Arbuckle Lake was decreased by anoxic conditions to 72.9% in 1973, 82.7% in 1974, and 72.7% in 1975. In 6 of 8

  15. University of Oklahoma Libraries: Bass Business Oral Histories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Bass Business History Collection at the University of Oklahoma Libraries began in 1955, and since that time the collection has grown to include books, videos, journals and oral histories. The oral histories here include 24 interviews with business professors at the University about everything from the time management studies of Frederick Taylor to the development of organizational theory. Visitors can browse the alphabetical list of interviewees on the right-hand side of the page, and they have the option of listening to the interview or downloading it for later use. Also, visitors can browse the interviews by key names, words, or subjects. Finally, users can opt to sign up for updates when new interviews are added to this enticing collection.

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in a dog from Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Fox, J C; Ewing, S A; Buckner, R G; Whitenack, D; Manley, J H

    1986-12-15

    A dog with signs of weakness, labored breathing, and generalized edema was examined. It was heavily infested with fleas and had wounds resulting from a recent fight. Hematologic findings were not remarkable, except for parasites in the blood. The dog was treated for fleas and given antibiotics, but was euthanatized when it failed to respond. Blood and tissue specimens were found to contain Trypanosoma cruzi, and the serum contained antibodies to the organism. We believe this is the first confirmed case of T cruzi infection in dogs from Oklahoma. The public health implications of this finding are underscored by a report on the detection of T cruzi in raccoons in the same season and geographic area. PMID:3098711

  17. Geothermal research at Oklahoma State University: An integrated approach

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.D.

    1997-12-31

    Oklahoma State University and the International Ground Source Heat Pump Association (IGSHPA) are active in providing technical support to government and industry through technology transfer, technology development, technical assistance, and business development support. Technology transfer includes geothermal heat pump (GHP) system training for installers and architects and engineers, national teleconferences, brochures, and other publications. Technology development encompasses design software development, GLHEPRO, in-situ thermal conductivity testing methods and verification of data reduction techniques, and specifications and standards for GHP systems. Examples of technical assistance projects are a Navy officers quarters and a NASA Visitors Center which required design assistance and supporting information in reducing the life cycle cost to make them viable projects.

  18. Forensic Seismology and the 1995 Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, T. L.

    2002-05-01

    The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on April 19, 1995, was recorded on 2 permanent seismographs, 7 and 26 km away. The more distant seismograph recorded 2 low-frequency wave trains separated by about 10 s. Militia groups speculated that the 2 wave trains were caused by separate explosions and hinted at a government cover up. Preliminary statements by the scientific community also contributed to the uncertainty. A public science organization issued a press release that stated "the location and source of the second surface wave-recording is unknown. Detailed investigations at the building site may offer an explanation as to the cause and origin of the second event." A prominent professional newsletter reported that the "first event was caused by energy from the explosion and the second from the fall of the building." To understand the seismic phases in the April 19 seismograms, the USGS monitored the demolition of the damaged building on May 23, 1995, with a portable seismic array. The array recorded the same 2 wave trains during the demolition and indicated the wave trains were a propagation effect and not the result of multiple sources. Modeling of the waveforms indicated that the 2 wave trains probably resulted from propagation of seismic energy in a near-surface zone with a strong velocity gradient. The first phase appeared to be a packet of scattered body waves and the second was the fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave. Timely resolution of the ambiguity of the seismogram and publication of results in a refereed publication, EOS, discouraged a conspiracy defense by the terrorists.

  19. Regional geology of Pierce member of upper Morrow formation in Anadarko basin, with a detailed look at South Dempsey field in Roger Mills County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.S. (AnSon Gas Co., Oklahoma City, OK (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The members of the upper Morrow formation in the deep Anadarko basin are extremely prolific but elusive targets. The high reserve potential attributable to these reservoirs has been responsible for the ranking of Roger Mills County, Oklahoma, as the leading gas-producing county in the state. The deposition of the Pierce, one of the oldest members of the upper Morrow, was a result of upward movement, during the late Morrowan, of Mississippian Meramec-Osage age sediments along the Amarillo-Wichita uplift, that were unroofed by erosion and deposited as coastal alluvial fans. High-energy traction currents, associated with fluvial channels, carried sediments 10-17 mi northeast, away from the mountain front, and deposited them in sinuous to braided patterns. Textural interpretations from core data of the Pierce show an immature, very poorly sorted conglomerate consisting of medium to coarse-grained quartz sand with pebble to cobble-sized angular and subrounded chert clasts. The Pierce has productive thicknesses ranging from 8 to 60 ft with porosities of 9 to 15% and estimated per-well reserves from 8 to 30 bcf of gas. Although the irregular depositional patterns associated with the Pierce present a challenge to the explorationist, the accompanying prolific production, characteristic of this reservoir, has made it one of the more rewarding targets in Oklahoma. Further understanding of the petrology and depositional environment of the Pierce will aid in the delineation of future exploration plays within both this unit and other members of the upper Morrow formation deposited under similar conditions.

  20. POND MOUNTAIN AND POND MOUNTAIN ADDITION ROADLESS AREAS, TENNESSEE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffitts, W.R.; Bitar, Richard

    1984-01-01

    As a result of a mineral study of the Pond Mountain Roadless Areas, Tennessee, a probable potential for the occurrence of tin, niobium, and tungsten resource with associated beryllium, molybdenum, zinc, and fluorite was identified in rocks of Precambrian age particularly in the southeastern part of the area. Detailed geologic mapping and geochemical sampling of the soils and rocks in the area of Precambrian rocks is recommended to identify and delimit the areas of potential resources of tin, niobium, and tungsten.

  1. A comparison of the speech patterns and dialect attitudes of Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, Jon

    The lexical dialect usage of Oklahoma has been well-studied in the past by the Survey of Oklahoma Dialects, but the acoustic speech production of the state has received little attention. Apart from two people from Tulsa and two people from Oklahoma City that were interviewed for the Atlas of North American English, no other acoustic work has been performed within the state. This dissertation begins to fill in these gaps by presenting twelve respondents interviewed by the Research on Dialects of English in Oklahoma (RODEO) project. For each speaker, a brief biography is given, including some of their regional and speech attitudes of Oklahoma. Then acoustic data from a wordlist and reading task are presented and compared. Analysis will consider plots of each speaker's vowel system as a whole, and will also examine many environments in isolation. These environments were chosen for their likely presence in Oklahoma, and include such dialect features as the Southern Shift, the pin/pen merger, the caught/cot merger, monophthongization of the PRICE vowel, and neutralization of tense vowels before /l./ After considering each respondent separately, some of their results will be pooled together to give a preliminary sense of the state of dialect within Oklahoma. Demographic variables such as age, gender, and urban/rural upbringing will be related to speakers' attitudes and acoustic production. This will serve two goals - first, to compare modern-day production to the findings of previous scholars, and second, to suggest a dialect trajectory for the state that could be studied further in additional research.

  2. Mountain Weather: A Climber's Story

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this video segment, mountain-climber Rob Taylor gives an account of his failed attempt to scale the peak of Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro. Because it is a free-standing mountain, the tallest in the world, climbers must ascend from the base through several climate zones, from tropical heat to sub-zero temperatures, before reaching the summit. After falling near the summit and nearly freezing to death, Taylor thought his worst problems were behind him when the moist trpoical climate near the bottom triggered a runaway infection in his injured leg. The segment is four minutes forty-two seconds in length. A background essay and list of discussion questions supplement the video.

  3. Identification and Evaluation of Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic (Class 1 Oil) Reservoirs in Oklahoma: Yearly technical progress report for January 1December 31, 1996

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. K. Banken; R. Andrews

    1997-01-01

    The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes a systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all FDD oil reservoirs in

  4. Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Anti-Atlas Mountains of northern Africa and the nearby Atlas mountains were created by the prolonged collision of the African and Eurasian tectonic plates, beginning about 80 million years ago. Massive sandstone and limestone layers have been crumpled and uplifted more than 4,000 meters in the High Atlas and to lower elevations in the Anti-Atlas. Between more continuous major fold structures, such as the Jbel Ouarkziz in the southwestern Anti-Atlas, tighter secondary folds (arrow) have developed. Earlier, the supercontinent of Pangea rifted apart to form precursors to the Mediterranean and the Atlantic Ocean (Beauchamp and others, 1996). In those seas sands, clays, limey sediments, and evaporite layers (gypsum, rock salt) were deposited. Later, during the mountain-building plate collision, the gypsum layers flowed under the pressure and provided a slippery surface on which overlying rigid rocks could glide (Burkhard, 2001). The broad, open style of folds seen in this view is common where evaporites are involved in the deformation. Other examples can be found in the Southern Zagros of Iran and the Sierra Madre Oriental of Mexico. Information Sources: Beauchamp, W., Barazangi, M., Demnati, A., and El Alji, M., 1996, Intracontinental rifting and inversion: Missour Basin and Atlas Mountains, Morocco: Tulsa, American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 80, No. 9, p. 1459-1482. Burkhard, Martin, 2001, Tectonics of the Anti-Atlas of Morocco -- Thin-skin/thick-skin relationships in an atypical foreland fold belt. University of Neuchatel, Switzerland: http://www-geol.unine.ch/Structural/Antiatlas.html (accessed 1/29/02). STS108-711-25 was taken in December, 2001 by the crew of Space Shuttle mission 108 using a Hasselblad camera with 250-mm lens. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  5. Geology of Stone Mountain, Georgia

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Pamela Gore

    This virtual field trip to Stone Mountain Georgia includes both a narrative and photographs of such features as flow banding, tourmaline pods, and several types of xenoliths. Intrusive granite and diabase dikes are shown at both the east quarry and old route 78 locations where products of weathering such as saprolite, kaolinite, halloysite, and gibbsite reside. Photographs of an area of the east quarry taken six years apart show the progress of exfoliation. The site also has a list of references.

  6. Prediction of mountain stream morphology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ellen Wohl; David Merritt

    2005-01-01

    We use a large and diverse data set from mountain streams around the world to explore relationships between reach-scale channel morphology and control variables. The data set includes 177 step-pool reaches, 44 plane-bed reaches, and 114 pool-riffle reaches from the western United States, Panama, and New Zealand. We performed several iterations of stepwise discriminant analysis on these data. A three-variable

  7. Plate T-11: Appalachian Mountains

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Appalachian Mountain landforms clearly demonstrate the relation of plate tectonics and structure to geomorphology. The folded rocks record the convergence of two continental plates in Pennsylvanian/Permian time. This page uses text, maps, and remotely sensed imagery to explain the relationship between plate tectonics, geologic structures, and the resulting landforms. It is part of an out-of-print NASA publication entitled 'Geomorphology from Space'. Links to the rest of the book are provided.

  8. Micrometeorites from the Transantarctic Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Rochette, P.; Folco, L.; Suavet, C.; van Ginneken, M.; Gattacceca, J.; Perchiazzi, N.; Braucher, R.; Harvey, R. P.

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of large accumulations of micrometeorites on the Myr-old, glacially eroded granitic summits of several isolated nunataks in the Victoria Land Transantarctic Mountains. The number (>3,500) of large (>400 ?m and up to 2 mm in size) melted and unmelted particles is orders of magnitudes greater than other Antarctic collections. Flux estimates, bedrock exposure ages and the presence of ?0.8-Myr-old microtektites suggest that extraterrestrial dust collection occurred over the last 1 Myr, taking up to 500 kyr to accumulate based on 2 investigated find sites. The size distribution and frequency by type of cosmic spherules in the >200-?m size fraction collected at Frontier Mountain (investigated in detail in this report) are similar to those of the most representative known micrometeorite populations (e.g., South Pole Water Well). This and the identification of unusual types in terms of composition (i.e., chondritic micrometeorites and spherulitic aggregates similar to the ?480-kyr-old ones recently found in Antarctic ice cores) and size suggest that the Transantarctic Mountain micrometeorites constitute a unique and essentially unbiased collection that greatly extends the micrometeorite inventory and provides material for studies on micrometeorite fluxes over the recent (?1 Myr) geological past. PMID:19011091

  9. Hydrology of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, Alan L.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Kwicklis, Edward M.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Fabryka-Martin, June M.

    2001-11-01

    Yucca Mountain, located in southern Nevada in the Mojave Desert, is being considered as a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. Although the site is arid, previous studies indicate net infiltration rates of 5-10 mm yr-1 under current climate conditions. Unsaturated flow of water through the mountain generally is vertical and rapid through the fractures of the welded tuffs and slow through the matrix of the nonwelded tuffs. The vitric-zeolitic boundary of the nonwelded tuffs below the potential repository, where it exists, causes perching and substantial lateral flow that eventually flows through faults near the eastern edge of the potential repository and recharges the underlying groundwater system. Fast pathways are located where water flows relatively quickly through the unsaturated zone to the water table. For the bulk of the water a large part of the travel time from land surface to the potential repository horizon (˜300 m below land surface) is through the interlayered, low fracture density, nonwelded tuff where flow is predominately through the matrix. The unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain is being modeled using a three-dimensional, dual-continuum numerical model to predict the results of measurements and observations in new boreholes and excavations. The interaction between experimentalists and modelers is providing confidence in the conceptual model and the numerical model and is providing researchers with the ability to plan further testing and to evaluate the usefulness or necessity of further data collection.

  10. Micrometeorites from the transantarctic mountains.

    PubMed

    Rochette, P; Folco, L; Suavet, C; van Ginneken, M; Gattacceca, J; Perchiazzi, N; Braucher, R; Harvey, R P

    2008-11-25

    We report the discovery of large accumulations of micrometeorites on the Myr-old, glacially eroded granitic summits of several isolated nunataks in the Victoria Land Transantarctic Mountains. The number (>3,500) of large (>400 mum and up to 2 mm in size) melted and unmelted particles is orders of magnitudes greater than other Antarctic collections. Flux estimates, bedrock exposure ages and the presence of approximately 0.8-Myr-old microtektites suggest that extraterrestrial dust collection occurred over the last 1 Myr, taking up to 500 kyr to accumulate based on 2 investigated find sites. The size distribution and frequency by type of cosmic spherules in the >200-mum size fraction collected at Frontier Mountain (investigated in detail in this report) are similar to those of the most representative known micrometeorite populations (e.g., South Pole Water Well). This and the identification of unusual types in terms of composition (i.e., chondritic micrometeorites and spherulitic aggregates similar to the approximately 480-kyr-old ones recently found in Antarctic ice cores) and size suggest that the Transantarctic Mountain micrometeorites constitute a unique and essentially unbiased collection that greatly extends the micrometeorite inventory and provides material for studies on micrometeorite fluxes over the recent ( approximately 1 Myr) geological past. PMID:19011091

  11. The hydrology of Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Kwicklis, E.M.; Fabryka-Martin, J.M.

    2000-12-04

    Yucca Mountain, located in southern Nevada in the Mojave Desert, is being considered as a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. Although the site is arid, previous studies indicate net infiltration rates of 5-10 mm yr(-1) under current climate conditions. Unsaturated flow of water through the mountain generally is vertical and rapid through the fractures of the welded tuffs and slow through the matrix of the nonwelded tuffs. The vitric-zeolitic boundary of the nonwelded tuffs below the potential repository, where it exists, causes perching and substantial lateral flow that eventually flows through faults near the eastern edge of the potential repository and recharges the underlying groundwater system. Fast pathways are located where water flows relatively quickly through the unsaturated zone to the water table. For the bulk of the water a large part of the travel time from land surface to the potential repository horizon (similar to 300 m below land surface) is through the interlayered, low fracture density, nonwelded tuff where flow is predominantly through the matrix. The unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain is being modeled using a three-dimensional, dual-continuum numerical model to predict the results of measurements and observations in new boreholes and excavations. The interaction between experimentalists and modelers is providing confidence in the conceptual model and the numerical model and is providing researchers with the ability to plan further testing and to evaluate the usefulness or necessity of further data collection.

  12. Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A

    E-print Network

    Gaffin, Doug

    Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma. Detection of vibrations in sand by tarsal sense organs of the nocturnal scorpion Paruroctonus mesaensis sensilla (BCSS), which are groups of eight slits that are responsive to vibrational waves in sand (Brownell

  13. Mountaineering adventure tourists: a conceptual framework for research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gill Pomfret

    2006-01-01

    Mountaineering has emerged as a popular form of adventure tourism, yet there is scant research that develops an understanding of its participants. This paper contributes to a theoretical understanding of mountaineer adventure tourists by evaluating previous work on mountaineering, mountaineers, adventure, recreation and tourism. It uses this to develop a conceptual framework to examine mountaineer adventure tourists, the key influences

  14. Cenozoic evidence of displacements along the Meers Fault, southwestern Oklahoma 

    E-print Network

    Kientop, Gregory Allen

    1988-01-01

    -lateral movement (and possibly as many as four) was established near the Bedrock Pit Site. In addition, small (young) drainages are offset vert1cally due to the later Holocene displacements. Brittle deformation was associated with th1s earlier displacement(s... of the Proposed Study Geologic Setting. . . . . . . Physiographic Setting The Meers Fault Study Area . METHODOLOGY Remote Sensing . Pediment Investigation . Wichita Mountains Study Alluvial Fan Excavation Pointer Site Excavation Bedrock Pit Site . Cave...

  15. Impact of Configurations of Rapid Intermittent Assimilation of WSR-88D Radar Data for the 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Thunderstorm Case

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming Hu; Ming Xue

    2007-01-01

    Various configurations of the intermittent data assimilation procedure for Level-II Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler radar data are examined for the analysis and prediction of a tornadic thunderstorm that occurred on 8 May 2003 near Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Several tornadoes were produced by this thunderstorm, causing extensive damages in the south Oklahoma City area. Within the rapidly cycled assimilation system, the

  16. Evolution of an ophiolitic tectonic melange, Marble Mountains, northern California Klamath Mountains ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donato, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    Describes multiply deformed amphibolite facies metamorphic rocks of the Marble Mountain and western Hayfork terranes in the western Paleozoic and Triassic belt of the northern Klamath Mountains, California.-from Author

  17. Marketing the Mountains: An Environmental History of Tourism in Rocky Mountain National Park

    E-print Network

    Frank, Jerritt

    2008-09-05

    Marketing the Mountains explores the impact of tourism upon the natural world of Rocky Mountain National Park. Moving beyond culutral analysis of the development of tourism in the American West, this dissertation seeks to ...

  18. Ore microscopy of the Paoli silver-copper deposit, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, C.A.; Hagni, R.D.; Berendsen, P.

    1991-01-01

    The Paoli silver-copper deposit is located in south-central Oklahoma, 56 km south-southeast from Norman, Oklahoma. It was mined for high-grade silver-copper near the beginning of this century, and intensive exploratory drilling during the early 1970's delineated unmined portions of the deposit. A collaborative study between the U.S.G.S., the Kansas Geological Survey, and the University of Missouri-Rolla was undertaken to provide new information on the character of red bed copper deposits of the Midcontinent region. The Paoli deposit has been interpreted to occur as a roll-front type of deposit. The silver and copper mineralization occurs within paleochannels in the Permian Wellington Formation. The silver-copper interfaces appear to be controlled by oxidation-reduction interfaces that are marked by grey to red color changes in the host sandstone. Ore microscopic examinations of polished thin sections show that unoxidized ore consists of chalcocite, digenite, chalcopyrite, covellite and pyrite; and oxidized ores are characterized by covellite, bornite, hematite and goethite. In sandstone-hosted ores, chalcocite and digenite replace dolomite and border clastic quartz grains. In siltstone-hosted ores, the copper sulfide grains have varied shapes; most are irregular in shape and 5-25 ??m across, others have euhedral shapes suggestive of pyrite crystal replacements, and some are crudely spherical and are 120-200 ??m across. Chalcopyrite is the predominant copper sulfide at depth. Covellite and malachite replace chalcocite and digenite near the surface. Silver only occurs as native silver; most as irregularly shaped grains 40-80 ??m across, but some as cruciform crystals that are up to 3.5 mm across. The native silver has been deposited after copper sulfides, and locally replaces chalcocite. Surficial nodules of pyrite, malachite and hematite locally are present in outcrops at the oxidation-reduction fronts. Polished sections of the nodules show that malachite forms a cement around quartz sand grains, and brecciated pyrite grains are surrounded by rims of hematite and goethite. Dolomite is the principal sandstone cement. Cathodoluminescence microscopic study of the mineral has shown that it was deposited during seven periods before the copper sulfide mineralization. ?? 1991.

  19. The EMS response to the Oklahoma City bombing.

    PubMed

    Maningas, P A; Robison, M; Mallonee, S

    1997-01-01

    This is a descriptive study of the Emergency Medical Services response to a bombing of a United States Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on 19 April 1995. The explosion emanated from a rented truck parked in the front of the building. The force of the explosion destroyed three of the four support columns in the front of the building and resulted in a pancaking effect of the upper floors onto the lower floors. There were three distinct phases of the medical response: 1) Immediately available local EMS ambulances and staff; 2) Additional ambulances staffed by recalled, off-duty personnel; and 3) mutual-aid ambulances and personnel from the surrounding communities. There were 361 persons in the building at the time of the explosion, 163 of these perished. Within the first hour of the explosion, 139 patients were transported to area hospitals. Of these, 32% were in critical condition. During the day of the explosion, 444 persons were treated for physical injuries: 410 of these were related to the explosion and 14, including one with fatal injuries, were sustained during search and rescue attempts. A total of 354 (80%) were treated and released from emergency departments, and 90 (20%) were admitted to hospitals. Six of the transported victims either were dead on arrival to the emergency department or died after admission to the hospital. Of those who died, 95% of the deaths were related to blunt trauma associated with the collapse of the structure. Only three persons were extricated alive after the first five hours following the explosion. The scene became flooded with volunteers who, although their intentions were to provide help and aid to those injured, created a substantial logistical problem for Incident Command. Several other lessons were learned: 1) Telephone lines and cells became overloaded, but the Hospital Emergency Administrative Radio system was operational only in three of the 15 hospitals; 2) Volunteer personnel should have responded to the hospitals and not to the scene; and 3) Training was an essential for the success of such a response. Thus, the success of this operation was a function of the intense training, practice, and coordination between multiple agencies. PMID:10187007

  20. Geographic Information Science and Mountain Geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Louis A.

    Mountain areas are among the most threatened environments worldwide.These sensitive systems suffer from human encroachment, resource extraction, and subsequent environmental degradation. Mountain ecosystems are also extremely sensitive to climate variability with impacts on snow and ice cover, hydrologic response, and sediment yield. From this perspective, mountain environments can be viewed as one of the “canaries in the coal mine” for the entire global environmental system.

  1. Assessment of climatic suitability for the expansion of Solenopsis invicta Buren in Oklahoma using three general circulation models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. F. Levia Jr; E. E. Frost

    2004-01-01

    Summary This study assessed the climatic suitability for the expansion of Solenopsis invicta Buren (red imported fire ant) in Oklahoma under the present climate and with a doubling of atmospheric CO 2 using three general circulation models (GCMs) (GFDL R30, OSU, UKMO). Oklahoma was chosen as the geographical focus because it has a dense network of meteorological stations and lies

  2. University of Oklahoma Bilingual Education Multifunctional Resource Center, Service Area 4. Final Performance Report, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma Univ., Norman. Bilingual Education Multifunctional Resource Center.

    This report describes and assesses the 1993-94 (October 1, 1993 through September 1994) activities of the federally-funded Bilingual Education Multifunctional Resource Center based at the University of Oklahoma and serving a nine-state area (Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee).…

  3. The Effects of Universal Pre-K in Oklahoma: Research Highlights and Policy Implications. CROCUS Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gormley, William T., Jr.; Phillips, Deborah

    Oklahoma is one of three states to offer a free prekindergarten (pre-K) program to all students in participating school districts on a voluntary basis. Fortuitous circumstances in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the state's largest school district, permitted an unusually rigorous evaluation of the pre-K program in Tulsa. Because 4-year-olds beginning pre-K and…

  4. Political Protest, Conflict, and Tribal Nationalism: The Oklahoma Choctaws and the Termination Crisis of 1959-1970

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma is headquartered in southeastern Oklahoma and has a tribal citizenry of just over 175,000. The tribal government currently compacts almost all of the tribe's Bureau of Indian Affairs and Indian Health Service program funding and runs dozens of tribal businesses that today fund more than 80 percent of the tribal…

  5. Financial Aid and Persistence in Community Colleges: Assessing the Effectiveness of Federal and State Financial Aid Programs in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.; Malcolm, Zaria

    2009-01-01

    Using a longitudinal, state-wide dataset, this study assessed the effect of financial aid on the persistence of full-time students in associate's degree programs at the Oklahoma community colleges. Three financial-aid sources were examined: the Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program (OHLAP), Pell grants, and Stafford loans. Results indicate that…

  6. Oklahoma School Testing Program: Writing Assessment Component. 1993 Summary Report. Stanford Writing Assessment Program for Grades 7 and 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This report provides an overview of the Oklahoma School Testing Program (OSTP) and summarizes students' average writing assessment scores from 1987 through 1993. In 1992, the Stanford Writing Assessment replaced the MAT-6 Writing Test as the instrument for measuring writing achievement for 7th and 10th graders in Oklahoma. Student papers were hand…

  7. Sadness, tragedy and mass disaster in Oklahoma City: providing critical incident stress debriefings to a community in crisis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Davis

    1996-01-01

    Shortly after 09:00 h on 19 April 1995, the Alfred P Murrah Federal Building, located in downtown Oklahoma City, was devastated with a bomb blast of such gigantic proportions that it was heard 60 miles away in neighbouring Norman, Oklahoma. Oklahomans routinely commuting to work on that sunny Wednesday morning went about their business as usual. A crude bomb chemically

  8. Landscape, Mountain Worship and Astronomy in Socaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyano, Ricardo

    The spatiotemporal analysis of mountain worship in the indigenous community of Socaire, Atacama, northern Chile, relates to cultural, geographical, climatic, psychological, and astronomical information gathered from ethno archaeological studies. We identify a system of offerings to the mountains that incorporates concepts such as ceque (straight line), mayllku (mountain lord or ancestor), and pacha (space and time). Here, the mountains on the visible horizon (Tumisa, Lausa, Chiliques, Ipira, and Miñiques) feature as the fingers on the left hand (PAH Triad). This structure regulates annual activities and rituals and sets the basis for the Socaireños' worldview raised on a humanized landscape.

  9. Characterization of oil types along Hewitt trend, Carter County, Oklahoma: implications for future exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrek, D.A.

    1989-03-01

    Crude oil production has been significant along the Hewitt trend for over 70 years. Although the area has been considered a mature exploration province, recent success at Cottonwood Creek has generated a high level of interest. An understanding of the oil types, their distribution, and their relationship to the structural development can have a dramatic impact on future success. Twenty-seven oils from Cambrian-Ordovician to Pennsylvanian reservoirs have been characterized by routine methods of geochemical analysis. The results indicate that three distinct oil types exist, along with oils of intermediate compositions. The oil families correlate to source rocks in the Ordovician, Devonian-Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian sections. Variation in oil chemistry can be attributed to differences in source facies, thermal maturity, and mixing. Development of unconformity surfaces and an extensive fracture system complicate the migration pathways and appear to facilitate the mixing of the different oil types. The structural development of the Hewitt trend controls the distribution of genetic oil types. The near-identical composition of the Arbuckle (Cambrian-Ordovician) reservoired oil (Devonian-Mississippian Woodford sourced) in both the Cottonwood Creek and Hewitt fields suggests that the oil was emplaced before the movement on the Criner fault separated the fields. If these oils had been subjected to different migration histories, variations would be evident. The distribution of genetic oil types in other Hewitt trend oil fields displays additional characteristics essential to future activity and demonstrates the applicability of geochemistry in mature exploration provinces.

  10. entomology & pathology Phoretic Symbionts of the Mountain Pine Beetle

    E-print Network

    entomology & pathology Phoretic Symbionts of the Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae life cycle, the tree-killing mountain pine beetle Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins interacts T he mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) is a natural disturbance agent

  11. 14 CFR 95.19 - Hawaii Mountainous Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hawaii Mountainous Area. 95.19 Section...Designated Mountainous Areas § 95.19 Hawaii Mountainous Area. The following islands of the State of Hawaii: Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Lanai,...

  12. 14 CFR 95.19 - Hawaii Mountainous Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hawaii Mountainous Area. 95.19 Section...Designated Mountainous Areas § 95.19 Hawaii Mountainous Area. The following islands of the State of Hawaii: Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Lanai,...

  13. 14 CFR 95.19 - Hawaii Mountainous Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hawaii Mountainous Area. 95.19 Section...Designated Mountainous Areas § 95.19 Hawaii Mountainous Area. The following islands of the State of Hawaii: Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Lanai,...

  14. 14 CFR 95.19 - Hawaii Mountainous Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hawaii Mountainous Area. 95.19 Section...Designated Mountainous Areas § 95.19 Hawaii Mountainous Area. The following islands of the State of Hawaii: Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Lanai,...

  15. 14 CFR 95.19 - Hawaii Mountainous Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hawaii Mountainous Area. 95.19 Section...Designated Mountainous Areas § 95.19 Hawaii Mountainous Area. The following islands of the State of Hawaii: Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Lanai,...

  16. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2005-02-01

    Hunton formation in Oklahoma has displayed some unique production characteristics. These include high initial water-oil and gas-oil ratios, decline in those ratios over time and temporary increase in gas-oil ratio during pressure build up. The formation also displays highly complex geology, but surprising hydrodynamic continuity. This report addresses three key issues related specifically to West Carney Hunton field and, in general, to any other Hunton formation exhibiting similar behavior: (1) What is the primary mechanism by which oil and gas is produced from the field? (2) How can the knowledge gained from studying the existing fields can be extended to other fields which have the potential to produce? (3) What can be done to improve the performance of this reservoir? We have developed a comprehensive model to explain the behavior of the reservoir. By using available production, geological, core and log data, we are able to develop a reservoir model which explains the production behavior in the reservoir. Using easily available information, such as log data, we have established the parameters needed for a field to be economically successful. We provide guidelines in terms of what to look for in a new field and how to develop it. Finally, through laboratory experiments, we show that surfactants can be used to improve the hydrocarbons recovery from the field. In addition, injection of CO{sub 2} or natural gas also will help us recover additional oil from the field.

  17. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2005-04-01

    West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we present the data on methane injection using huff-n-puff process. It appears that additional oil can be recovered using methane as a solvent. Additional experiments will be needed to confirm our analysis. Our engineering analysis has laid out detailed indicators to make the de-watering successful. Using those indicators, we are currently investigating potential in fill well locations in West Carney field. Our technology transfer activities continued this quarter with two presentations and one workshop.

  18. Public Education in Oklahoma: A Digest of the Report of a Survey of Public Education in the State of Oklahoma, Made at the Request of the Oklahoma State Educational Survey Commission under the Direction of the United States Commissioner of Education. Bulletin, 1923, No. 14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1923

    1923-01-01

    This bulletin presents the results of a study on the special problems of education for Indians in Oklahoma. During the months of April and May of 1922, a committee of Oklahoma educators, under the direction of the Bureau of Education, conducted a series of educational tests and measurements in public schools in various parts of the State. The…

  19. Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy; November 16-17, 1996; Bartlesville, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1999-04-27

    Thirty-three Native American tribal members, council members, and other interested parties gathered in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, to attend the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy on October 16 and 17 1996, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Tribes represented at the workshop included the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Hopi, Jicarilla Apache, Osage, Seminole, and Ute. Representatives of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) also attended. BDM-Oklahoma developed and organized the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy to help meet the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Domestic Gas and Oil Initiative to help Native American Tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing petroleum resources.

  20. Doctor on a mountaineering expedition.

    PubMed Central

    A'Court, C. H.; Stables, R. H.; Travis, S.

    1995-01-01

    Doctors are welcome members on mountaineering expeditions to remote areas, but practical advice on how to prepare and what kit to take can be difficult to find. This article is a ragbag of useful advice on diverse topics. It explains the necessary preparation, provides tips for a healthy expedition, and summarises the common disorders encountered at high altitude. The comprehensive drug and equipment lists and first aid kit for climbers were used for the 1992 Everest in winter expedition. They are there to be sacrificed to personal preference and the experience and size of individual expeditions. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:7767198

  1. The use and tenure of land in Oklahoma held primarily for its mineral potential

    E-print Network

    Parcher, L. A.

    1955-01-01

    L I B R A R Y fc&M COLLEGE OF TEXAS THE USE AND TENURE OF LAND IN OKLAHOMA HELD PRIMARILY FOR ITS MINERAL POTENTIAL A Dis sertation By Loris Alvin Parcher Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 1955 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics THE USE AND TENURE OF LAND IN OKLAHOMA HELD PRIMARILY FOR ITS MINERAL POTENTIAL A Dissertation By Loris Alvin Parcher...

  2. Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.C.; Ball, D.E.

    1981-06-01

    The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included utility interconnection of wind machines and the buy-back rate for excess power, wind system reliability and maintenance concerns, machine performance standards, and state governmental incentives. A short summary of each presentation is included.

  3. The Significance of Stratigraphy and Lithology in Landform Development in Washington County, Oklahoma

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This winning entry in the museum's Young Naturalist Awards 1999 by Katie, a 15 year old student from Oklahoma, takes a look at the development of Washington County, Oklahoma. Katie's essay has a field-journal focus and explains stratigraphy and lithology, two of the main factors controlling the shape of the land in her county. She provides an overview of the six different formations in the Skiatook Group and the five different formations that outcrop in the Bartlesville area. There are descriptions of the many rock samples she took for this study.

  4. Mountain Snow System Interactions - An Integrative Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. C. Landry; T. H. Painter; A. P. Barrett

    2004-01-01

    Snow scientists now have capabilities and opportunities unimagined in the 1950's due to refinements in field techniques and instrumentation, and the advent of remote sensing platforms. These technical advances enable snow scientists to observe the mountain snow system at virtually any spatial scale. Mountain snow covers are essential water resources in many regions and are increasingly recognized as sensitive bellwethers

  5. Mountain-Plains Curriculum Package. Teacher Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, Robert G.

    Designed to give the teacher a capsule explanation of how the system works, this guide introduces the Mountain-Plains instructor to specific curriculum materials and provides examples of the basic instruments used in the Mountain-Plains program, a residential, family-based education program developed to improve the economic potential and lifestyle…

  6. 78 FR 29366 - Green Mountain Power Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ...Commission [Docket No. TS04-277-002] Green Mountain Power Corporation Notice of Filing Take notice that on May 2, 2013, Green Mountain Power Corporation filed additional...and 214 of the Commission's Rules of Practice and Procedure (18 CFR 385.211,...

  7. Mountaineering fatalities on Aconcagua: 2001-2012.

    PubMed

    Westensee, Jeffrey; Rogé, Ignacio; Van Roo, Jon D; Pesce, Carlos; Batzli, Sam; Courtney, D Mark; Lazio, Matthew P

    2013-09-01

    High altitude mountaineering is a dangerous endeavor due to the hypoxic hypobaric environment, extreme weather, and technical skills required. One of the seven summits, Aconcagua (6962 m) is the highest mountain outside of Asia. Its most popular route is nontechnical, attracting >3000 mountaineers annually. Utilizing data from the Servicio Médico Aconcagua (park medical service), we performed a retrospective descriptive analysis with the primary objective of deriving a fatality rate on Aconcagua from 2001 to 2012. The fatality rate on Aconcagua was then compared to other popular mountains. For climbers who died, we report all available demographic data, mechanisms of death, and circumstances surrounding the death. Between 2001 and 2012, 42,731 mountaineers attempted to summit Aconcagua. There were 33 fatalities. The fatality rate was 0.77 per 1000, or 0.077%. The fatality rate on Aconcagua is lower than that on Everest or Denali but higher than that on Rainier. PMID:24028641

  8. Mountain Glaciers and Ice Caps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ananichheva, Maria; Arendt, Anthony; Hagen, Jon-Ove; Hock, Regine; Josberger, Edward G.; Moore, R. Dan; Pfeffer, William Tad; Wolken, Gabriel J.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of future rates of mass loss from mountain glaciers and ice caps in the Arctic focus primarily on projections of changes in the surface mass balance. Current models are not yet capable of making realistic forecasts of changes in losses by calving. Surface mass balance models are forced with downscaled output from climate models driven by forcing scenarios that make assumptions about the future rate of growth of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Thus, mass loss projections vary considerably, depending on the forcing scenario used and the climate model from which climate projections are derived. A new study in which a surface mass balance model is driven by output from ten general circulation models (GCMs) forced by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) A1B emissions scenario yields estimates of total mass loss of between 51 and 136 mm sea-level equivalent (SLE) (or 13% to 36% of current glacier volume) by 2100. This implies that there will still be substantial glacier mass in the Arctic in 2100 and that Arctic mountain glaciers and ice caps will continue to influence global sea-level change well into the 22nd century.

  9. A sightability model for mountain goats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, C.G.; Jenkins, K.J.; Chang, W.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    Unbiased estimates of mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) populations are key to meeting diverse harvest management and conservation objectives. We developed logistic regression models of factors influencing sightability of mountain goat groups during helicopter surveys throughout the Cascades and Olympic Ranges in western Washington during summers, 20042007. We conducted 205 trials of the ability of aerial survey crews to detect groups of mountain goats whose presence was known based on simultaneous direct observation from the ground (n 84), Global Positioning System (GPS) telemetry (n 115), or both (n 6). Aerial survey crews detected 77 and 79 of all groups known to be present based on ground observers and GPS collars, respectively. The best models indicated that sightability of mountain goat groups was a function of the number of mountain goats in a group, presence of terrain obstruction, and extent of overstory vegetation. Aerial counts of mountain goats within groups did not differ greatly from known group sizes, indicating that under-counting bias within detected groups of mountain goats was small. We applied HorvitzThompson-like sightability adjustments to 1,139 groups of mountain goats observed in the Cascade and Olympic ranges, Washington, USA, from 2004 to 2007. Estimated mean sightability of individual animals was 85 but ranged 0.750.91 in areas with low and high sightability, respectively. Simulations of mountain goat surveys indicated that precision of population estimates adjusted for sightability biases increased with population size and number of replicate surveys, providing general guidance for the design of future surveys. Because survey conditions, group sizes, and habitat occupied by goats vary among surveys, we recommend using sightability correction methods to decrease bias in population estimates from aerial surveys of mountain goats.

  10. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2004-10-01

    West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we present the data on surfactant injection in near well bore region. We demonstrate that by injecting the surfactant, the relative permeability of water could be decreased, and that of gas could be increased. This should result in improved gas recovery from the reservoir. Our geological analysis of the reservoir develops the detailed stratigraphic description of the reservoir. Two new stratigraphic units, previously unrecognized, are identified. Additional lithofacies are recognized in new core descriptions. Our engineering analysis has determined that well density is an important parameter in optimally producing Hunton reservoirs. It appears that 160 acre is an optimal spacing. The reservoir pressure appears to decline over time; however, recovery per well is only weakly influenced by the pressure. This indicates that additional opportunity to drill wells exists in relatively depleted fields. A simple material balance technique is developed to validate the recovery of gas, oil and water. This technique can be used to further extrapolate recoveries from other fields with similar field characteristics.

  11. Validation of soil temperature dataset against ground measurements in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, T. R.; Jackson, T. J.; Reichle, R. H.; Basara, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    In the near future two dedicated soil moisture satellites will be launched (SMOS and SMAP), both carrying an L-band radiometer. It is well known that microwave soil moisture retrieval algorithms must account for the physical temperature of the emitting surface. Solutions to this include: difference, or ratio indices; forecast model products; thermal infrared satellite observations; and high frequency passive microwave estimates. The availability of multifrequency observations in the same data stream has made the use of high frequency temperature estimates, specifically 37 GHz (Ka-band), an attractive option. SMOS and SMAP will not include a 37 GHz (Ka-band) microwave radiometer. Therefore, alternative algorithms and data sources will be utilized and explored. One proposed approach is the use of temperature output from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. This temperature estimate will need to closely match the spatial resolution and the overpass time of SMOS and SMAP (between 6 and 7 am/pm local time). To date, very little analysis has been performed to assess the accuracy of the NWP forecasts in terms of land surface temperature. In addition, the relationship between the model products and the requirements of radiative transfer and soil moisture retrieval algorithm temperature requirements needs to be assessed. The goal of this paper is to set up a validation framework that can be applied to NWP outputs. In this investigation, we use in situ data from the Oklahoma Mesonet (at 5 cm) to assess the near surface soil temperature from the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA).

  12. Water conservation as a long-range strategy in municipal water supply planning: the case of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    This study is concerned with Oklahoma water managers' attitudes toward the adoption or rejection of long-term water conservation options in small and medium sized cities under 50,000 in population. In focusing upon Oklahoma water managers' attitudes, the following questions are addressed: (1) What factors influence Oklahoma water managers' attitudes toward the adoption or rejection of long-term water conservation measures. (2) What are the major incentives or disincentives that may encourage or discourage the adoption and implementing of long-term water conservation alternatives at the municipal level in Oklahoma. (3) What are the distinct geographical variations in attitudes toward adopting water conservation policies. To address these and related questions, a questionnaire was mailed to each of the water managers in the selected Oklahoma towns and cities. Results of the study indicated that local water managers considered local governments as the most appropriate body to deal with water management issues. Local water managers in Oklahoma also place heavy reliance upon traditional structural solutions. If these solutions prove to be inadequate, long-term water conservation alternatives become more appealing. However, Oklahoma water managers in the selected cities and towns expressed their profound concerns about the potential revenue loss if long-term water conservation measures were to be adopted and implemented.

  13. Africanized Honey Bees in Oklahoma History of the Africanized Honey Bee

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Africanized Honey Bees in Oklahoma History of the Africanized Honey Bee South America Africanized honey bees (AHB) were first imported to the Americas in 1956 by the prominent Brazilian geneticist breed of honey bees, which would be less defensive than the wild African bees but which would be more

  14. A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Ohta, Shigemi

    A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma cores over the central plains of the United States, accomplished using a novel and now-standard Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) scanning mode for a commercial wind-profiler system. A unique

  15. NOTES ON FOODS OF GREAT HORNED OWLS (BUBO VIRGINIANUS) IN JACKSON COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack D. Tyler; Jill F. Jensen

    1981-01-01

    Prey species were identified from 169 pellets cast by a pair of great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and their young in Jackson County, southwestern Oklahoma. Pellets were collected monthly between February and August, 1977. In decreasing order of importance, prey species were: cottontails (Sylvilagus spp.), cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), and mice (Perognathus hispidus, Peromyscus spp., and Reithrodontomys spp.).

  16. A fresh-market onion production system for Oklahoma using short and intermediate cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onion is a useful fresh-market specialty crop for some Oklahoma producers. In the state, bulb onion is traditionally established using bare-rooted transplants of short day cultivars which are set in the field in February or March. For commercial scale production this can be a problem because weather...

  17. Geophysical logs for selected wells in the Picher Field, northeast Oklahoma and southeast Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christenson, Scott C.; Thomas, Tom B.; Overton, Myles D.; Goemaat, Robert L.; Havens, John S.

    1991-01-01

    The Roubidoux aquifer in northeastern Oklahoma is used extensively as a source of water for public supplies, commerce, industry, and rural water districts. The Roubidoux aquifer may be subject to contamination from abandoned lead and zinc mines of the Picher field. Water in flooded underground mines contains large concentrations of iron, zinc, cadmium, and lead. The contaminated water may migrate from the mines to the Roubidoux aquifer through abandoned water wells in the Picher field. In late 1984, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board began to locate abandoned wells that might be serving as conduits for the migration of contaminants from the abandoned mines. These wells were cleared of debris and plugged. A total of 66 wells had been located, cleared, and plugged by July 1985. In cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, the U.S. Geological Survey took advantage of the opportunity to obtain geophysical data in the study area and provide the Oklahoma Water Resources Board with data that might be useful during the well-plugging operation. Geophysical logs obtained by the U.S. Geological Survey are presented in this report. The geophysical logs include hole diameter, normal, single-point resistance, fluid resistivity, natural-gamma, gamma-gamma, and neutron logs. Depths logged range from 145 to 1,344 feet.

  18. Twenty-Ninth Annual Report of Indian Education in Eastern Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Overton

    Comprised mainly of tabular data, this 1975-76 annual report on the American Indian Education Program in Eastern Oklahoma presents statistics, a brief narrative highlighting the year's accomplishments, and an appendix. Specifically, this report includes statistical tables on the: number of schools; enrollment and average daily attendance of all…

  19. Twenty-Eighth Annual Report of Indian Education in Eastern Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Overton

    Comprised mainly of tabular data, this annual report on American Indian education in Eastern Oklahoma presents statistics, a brief narrative highlighting the year's accomplishments, and an appendix. The statistical information includes the following: (1) Johnson O'Malley (JOM) assisted graduates and dropouts, Indian enrollment, and total JOM…

  20. Discrimination against and Adaptation of Italians in the Coal Counties of Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoConto, David G.

    2004-01-01

    In the late 1800s and early 1900s coal reigned supreme in what is now southeastern Oklahoma. As was the case in the northeastern United States, Italians and other immigrants from southern and eastern Europe were brought in as a form of inexpensive labor to work the mines. Italians had different customs, a different language, a unique appearance,…

  1. Petroleum Geoscience Program at University of Oklahoma: 25 Years of Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Slatt; W. W. Clopine

    2003-01-01

    The School of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Oklahoma has a long history and tradition of petroleum geoscience education and research. The 1980's and early 1990's downturn in the petroleum industry resulted in significantly fewer students seeking petroleum industry education and careers. Like many U.S. earth science departments, the School looked to geochemistry and hard rock geology to

  2. Teachers' Perceptions of SAE Programs and Benefits for Students with Special Needs in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwager, Tony A.; White, James D.

    An Oklahoma study sought to identify specific benefits that accrue to students with special needs in secondary Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) programs and to determine teachers' perceptions of SAE programs for students with special needs. Data were gathered in the fall of 1993 through a mailed survey of all 362 agricultural education…

  3. Does Universal Preschool Improve Learning? Lessons from Georgia and Oklahoma. Backgrounder. No. 2272

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Lindsey

    2009-01-01

    More than a decade after offering students universal preschool, neither Georgia nor Oklahoma has shown impressive progress in student academic achievement, as measured by the National Assessment of Educational Progress. As Congress considers whether the federal government should encourage states to offer universal preschool, the author advocates…

  4. Research, scholarship and creative activity at Oklahoma State University 2010 OSU research team

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    for Research and Technology Transfer Vanguard is published annually by Oklahoma State University Green, Editor, Vanguard 405.744.5827; vpr@okstate.edu Dear Friends and Colleagues: 2009 was a year persistently to find solutions to our society's most pressing needs. This issue of Vanguard is an opportunity

  5. Additional Records of the Little-Known Corixidea major (Heteroptera: Schizopteridae) from Arkansas and Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corixidea major is reported for the first time from Arkansas and Oklahoma. Although described eighty years ago, this minute insect, measuring less than 1.5 mm, has remained one of the rarest North American heteropterans. Previously known only from the Florida, Tennessee, and Virginia, our records e...

  6. Home Processing of Poultry Cooperative Extension Service * Division of Agriculture * Oklahoma State University No. 8400

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Home Processing of Poultry Cooperative Extension Service * Division of Agriculture * Oklahoma State University No. 8400 Joe G. Berry Extension Poultry Specialist Charles Lester County Extension 4-H Agent. Scalding temperatures should be determined by the type of poultry and the difficulty of picking

  7. Impact of Low-Level Jets on the Nocturnal Urban Heat Island Intensity in Oklahoma City

    E-print Network

    Xue, Ming

    modifications is the so-called urban heat island (UHI) effect, in which near-surface temperaturesImpact of Low-Level Jets on the Nocturnal Urban Heat Island Intensity in Oklahoma City XIAO-MING HU that urban heat islands (UHIs) frequently formed at night and the observed UHI intensity was variable (18­48C

  8. 78 FR 73858 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Oklahoma

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ...Oklahoma has adopted three EPA drinking water rules, namely the: (1) Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2), (2) the Stage 2 Disinfectants...Byproducts Rule (DBP2), and (3) the Ground Water Rule (GWR). EPA has determined...

  9. Delivering an Organizational Leadership PhD Program at a Distance: University of Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Joseph Lee; Williams, T. H. Lee

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors identify and review a number of key features in the successful development and maintenance of a PhD program delivered at a distance. The University of Oklahoma's PhD program in organizational leadership was developed in the early 1990s and delivered (primarily, but not completely) to military personnel and families…

  10. 76 FR 18927 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ...PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 [EPA-R06-RCRA-2010-0307; FRL-9291-1] Oklahoma...Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA has determined that these changes...final authorization from the EPA under RCRA section 3006(b), 42 U.S.C....

  11. 78 FR 32161 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ...PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 [EPA-R06-RCRA-2012-0821; 9817-6] Oklahoma: Final...Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA has determined that these changes...final authorization from the EPA under RCRA section 3006(b), 42 U.S.C....

  12. 77 FR 15273 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ...PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 [EPA-R06-RCRA-2012-0054; FRL-9647-7] Oklahoma...Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA has determined that these changes...final authorization from the EPA under RCRA section 3006(b), 42 U.S.C....

  13. 40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6926(b), Oklahoma...management program under subtitle C of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6921 et seq. (See...management program under subtitle C of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6921 et seq....

  14. Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education. Graduate Plan for Enhancing Diversity: Oklahoma State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tovar, Molly

    This report describes Oklahoma State University's (OSU's) Graduate Plan for Enhancing Diversity (GPED), a program designed to increase the number of minority group graduate students at OSU. GPED goals are: the population of OSU graduate students pursuing degrees will reflect the demographics of the state population by the year 2004; and the…

  15. Cloud-to-Ground Lightning throughout the Lifetime of a Severe Storm System in Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark A. Shafer; Donald R. MacGorman; Frederick H. Carr

    2000-01-01

    Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning data are examined relative to digitized radar data for a storm system that occurred in Oklahoma on 26 May 1985. This system evolved through three stages: 1) two lines of cells, one near the dryline and the other 60 km ahead of it; 2) a supercell storm; and 3) a mesoscale convective system (MCS). The behavior of

  16. 'Right-to-Work' Laws and Economic Development in Oklahoma. Briefing Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishel, Lawrence, Ed.

    The bulk of this position paper consists of statements in opposition to a September 2001 referendum on adopting 'right-to-work' (RTW) legislation in Oklahoma. The statements are by Joan Fitzgerald, William Sschweke, Raymond Hogler, Steven Shulman, Stephan Weiler, Ann Markusen, Robert G. Lynch, David R. Howell, James Galbraith, Colin Gordon, Wim…

  17. Soil water signature of the 2005-2006 drought under tallgrass prairie at Fort Reno, Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined changes in the seasonal pattern of soil water content under a tall grass prairie in central Oklahoma as a result of the 2005-2006 drought. The seasonal pattern of soil water content in the top 50 cm of the soil profile was minimally impacted by the drought, as this portion of the...

  18. Report on the projected future climate of the Fort Cobb Watershed, Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report provides technical information on projected climate change and associated monotonic trends of precipitation and air temperature at the ARS Fort Cobb Experimental Watershed in west-central Oklahoma. The report is an attachment to the full report of the multi-location project MLP 464: “Est...

  19. A Survey of Nurse Training Needs in Oklahoma Health Care Institutions. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, William D.

    A study was conducted to identify staffing patterns for nursing personnel in the health care institutions of Oklahoma in order to predict future needs for nursing education and training. Structured interviews with administrators and directors of nursing from eighteen hospitals and eighteen nursing homes were used to elicit demographic data…

  20. Personal Profile Select Campus: Norman Oklahoma City Tulsa 1 Employee Information

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Personal Profile Select Campus: Norman Oklahoma City Tulsa 1 Employee Information: Last: First: Middle: Date: Current Driver's License State: Number: Home address: City: State: Zip: Phone #1: Phone #2 A Filing B I A B I A Authorization - The information contained on this form is complete and accurate

  1. Distribution patterns of imported fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) on a sheep and goat farm in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imported fire ant colonies were quantified in 1000 m2 circular subplots spaced about 125 m apart on a sheep and goat farm in Oklahoma. Mound counts and cumulative above-ground mound volume were used as measures of fire ant population density, and were subjected to regression analyses to determine e...

  2. Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed, Oklahoma and Thika River Watershed, Kenya Twinning Pilot Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Moriasi; J. Steiner; J. Arnold; P. Allen; J. Dunbar; C. Shisanya; J. Gathenya; J. Nyaoro; J. Sang

    2007-01-01

    The Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed (FCRW) (830 km2) is a watershed within the HELP Washita Basin, located in Caddo and Washita Counties, OK. It is also a benchmark watershed under USDA's Conservation Effects Assessment Project, a national project to quantify environmental effects of USDA and other conservation programs. Population in south-western Oklahoma, in which FCRW is located, is sparse and

  3. Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north-central Oklahoma: 1992–2008

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Michalsky; Frederick Denn; Connor Flynn; Gary Hodges; Piotr Kiedron; Annette Koontz; James Schlemmer; Stephen E. Schwartz

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow-band, interference-filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at

  4. Multi-year precipitation variations and water resources in west-central Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Persistent, multi-year departures in annual precipitation from mean have been observed in central Oklahoma. Precipitation departures caused by a sequence of predominantly wet or dry years and lasting 5 or more years are called wet or dry periods, respectively. Impacts of wet and dry periods on water...

  5. OSU Human Resources 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (405) 744-5449 PREGNANCY, NEWBORN

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OSU Human Resources ­ 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 ­ (405) 744-5449 PREGNANCY to help guide you through your pregnancy up to six weeks after birth. The program offers a healthy pregnancy calendar, videos on topics such as eating habits, exercise, and stress, physical/emotional changes

  6. Water used by grazed pigeon pea [Cajanus cajan(L) Millsp] in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water use by the warm-season annual pulse pigeon pea must be described to effectively use this legume as forage to support late-summer grazing by stocker cattle in the southern Great Plains (SGP). This study was conducted in central Oklahoma during 2008 to 2010 to quantify water and water use effici...

  7. Knocking at the College Door: Projections of High School Graduates. Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    National and regional trends mask important variation among states in the supply of high school graduates. This profile provides brief indicators for Oklahoma related to: current levels of educational attainment, projections of high school graduates into the future, and two common barriers to student access and success--insufficient academic…

  8. Sauroposeidon proteles, a new sauropod from the early Cretaceous of Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mathew J. Wedel; Richard L. Cifelli; R. Kent Sanders

    2000-01-01

    Sauroposeidon proteles, a new brachiosaurid sauropod, is represented by an articulated series of four mid-cervical vertebrae recovered from the Antlers Formation (Aptian–Albian) of southeastern Oklahoma. Most Early Cretaceous North American sauropod material has been referred to Pleurocoelus, a genus which is largely represented by juvenile material and is not well understood. Regardless of the status and affinities of Pleurocoelus, the

  9. Rock and soil discrimination by low altitude airborne gamma-ray spectrometry in Payne County, Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. F. Schwarzer; J. A. S. Adams

    1973-01-01

    The ability to identify and discriminate rock and soil types from the ; air using gamma spectrometry was investigated in Payne County, Oklahoma. The ; data, which were reduced to concentration values for K, U, and Th, were obtained ; from a helicopter at an average altitude of 75 feet above the ground. The area ; investigated was underlain by

  10. Forage nutritive value of Texas bluegrass harvested in the morning and afternoon in northwest Oklahoma.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Texas bluegrass (Poa arachnifera Torr.) is a highly rhizomatous, dioecious, sexual, perennial, cool-season grass native to southern Kansas, Oklahoma, western Arkansas and most of Texas. This native species is of particular interest for development into an improved cool-season forage plant because o...

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF SUBSURFACE BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH TWO SHALLOW AQUIFERS IN OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial microflora of two shallow aquifers in Oklahoma was characterized by direct observation with light (LM) and electron microscopy (EM), by plating, and by examination of colony morphology and distribution. Total cell counts varied only slightly from sample to sample, w...

  12. DISTRIBUTION OF PROTOZOA IN SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS OF A PRISTINE GROUNDWATER STUDY SITE IN OKLAHOMA (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most-probable-number counting methods were applied to determine the distribution of protozoa in a depth profile at a groundwater microbiology study site near Lula, Oklahoma in January and June, 1985. Aseptic procedures were used to ensure minimal airborne contamination samples. N...

  13. Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Frequently Used Forestry

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Frequently Used Forestry and Natural Resource Terms for Landowners of Oklahoma Champe Green Renewable Resources Extension Specialist Steven Anderson Extension Forestry Specialist Ron Masters Extension Wildlife management zones, and installing waterbars, broad-based dips, etc. See OSU Forestry Extension Report #5, Best

  14. 2012 BUDGET, COMPENSATION, & PERFORMANCE EVALUATION GUIDELINES UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    in teaching, research and creative activity, and service to the state and society". The base pay approach operating budget base. #12;· FY 2012 ­ A budget reduction based on the total FY 2011 State Target amount2012 BUDGET, COMPENSATION, & PERFORMANCE EVALUATION GUIDELINES UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH

  15. Climatology of aerosol optical depth in North-Central Oklahoma: 1992 -2008

    E-print Network

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    information on particle size. Determination of AOD by sunradiometry is especially robust compared Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow-band, interference- filter sunradiometer with five aerosol bands

  16. State Teacher Policy Yearbook: Progress on Teacher Quality, 2007. Oklahoma State Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" examines what is arguably the single most powerful authority over the teaching profession: state government. This Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the first of what will be an annual look at the status of state policies impacting the…

  17. The Economics of Elementary and Secondary Schooling in Oklahoma. Bulletin B-714.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweeten, Luther; And Others

    Utilizing data from a random sample of Oklahoma elementary and secondary schools, the study examined interrelationships among the educational process, student achievement, and environment. Results revealed the importance of educational objectives, student backgrounds, high school curriculum, teacher salary, and student density upon optimal…

  18. Deaths in the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City Tornado from a Historical Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harold E. Brooks; Charles A. Doswell III

    2002-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City tornado was the deadliest in the United States in over 20 years, with 36 direct fatalities. To understand how this event fits into the historical context, the record of tornado deaths in the United States has been examined. Almost 20 000 deaths have been reported associated with more,than 3600 tornadoes in the United

  19. INTENSIVE SURVEY OF THE ILLINOIS RIVER (ARKANSAS AND OKLAHOMA) IN AUGUST 1985

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water quality survey of the Illinois River Basin was conducted August 16-29, 1985, in response to concerns that water clarity had decreased in the lower reach which is designated as an Oklahoma scenic river. The survey results demonstrated that background phosphorus concentrati...

  20. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked effective upon...

  1. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked effective upon...

  2. School Improvement through Community Dialogue: The First Community Study Circles on Education in Arkansas and Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesser, Jo Sykes; McNeal, Larry

    This study examines the Study Circles program on education that was conducted in Arkansas and Oklahoma in the fall of 1998. Study Circles are a community involvement strategy for collaborative problem solving. They are small, highly participatory groups led by trained facilitators using materials provided by the Study Circles Resource Center. The…

  3. University of Oklahoma and VSP provide you with an affordable eyecare plan. Sign up for VSP

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    University of Oklahoma and VSP provide you with an affordable eyecare plan. Sign up for VSP today with an affordable eyecare plan. Sign up for VSP today. PREMIUM PLAN VSP Coverage Effective with Other Providers Visit vsp.com for details, if you plan to see a provider other than a VSP doctor. Exam..................................................................Up

  4. A Comparison of the Otolith and Scale Methods for Aging White Crappies in Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeff Boxrucker

    1986-01-01

    Scales and otoliths (sagittae) were taken from a sample of 137 white crappies (Pomoxis annularis) collected by fyke netting from Ft. Supply Reservoir, Oklahoma, in November 1982. Scales and otoliths from each fish were aged independently by three experienced scale readers, none of whom had prior experience aging otoliths. The average percent error and coefficient of variation of the scale

  5. Baseline ambient gaseous ammonia concentrations in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma, USA.

    PubMed

    Sather, Mark E; Mathew, Johnson; Nguyen, Nghia; Lay, John; Golod, George; Vet, Robert; Cotie, Joseph; Hertel, Terry; Aaboe, Erik; Callison, Ryan; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Freise, Jeremy; Hathcoat, April; Sakizzie, Brenda; King, Michael; Lee, Chris; Oliva, Sylvia; San Miguel, George; Crow, Leon; Geasland, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Ambient ammonia monitoring using Ogawa passive samplers was conducted in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma, USA during 2007. The resulting data will be useful in the multipollutant management of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and visibility (atmospheric regional haze) in the Four Corners area, an area with growing oil/gas production and increasing coal-based power plant construction. The passive monitoring data also add new ambient ammonia concentration information for the U.S. and will be useful to scientists involved in present and future visibility modeling exercises. Three week integrated passive ammonia samples were taken at five sites in the Four Corners area and two sites in eastern Oklahoma from December, 2006 through December, 2007 (January, 2008 for two sites). Results show significantly higher regional background ammonia concentrations in eastern Oklahoma (1.8 parts per billion (ppb) arithmetic mean) compared to the Four Corners area (0.2 ppb arithmetic mean). Annual mean ammonia concentrations for all Four Corners area sites for the 2007 study ranged from 0.2 ppb to 1.5 ppb. Peak ambient ammonia concentrations occurred in the spring and summer in both areas. The passive samplers deployed at the Stilwell, Oklahoma site compared favorably with other passive samplers and a continuous ammonia monitoring instrument. PMID:18974901

  6. Never Again Would We Be the Same: The Oklahoma City Bombing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kent Mathers

    1996-01-01

    A terrorist attack on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City showed the nation that no area of the country was free from the possibility of violence or terrorism. This author describes the day and the aftermath of the tragedy.

  7. Oklahoma City's killer tornadoes: how local hospitals responded to yet another extreme disaster.

    PubMed

    1999-09-01

    On the evening of May 3rd, a group of high-powered tornadoes tore through Oklahoma--leaving more than 40 people dead and hundreds injured. The main twister formed about 45 miles south of Oklahoma City and was classified F5, the most severe type of tornado, with winds of more than 260 mph. It cut a path one mile wide; stayed on the ground for more than four hours; and, along with other twisters, demolished 60 miles of countryside. More than 7,000 homes were destroyed or damaged, and more than 5,000 families were left homeless. Oklahoma City was hit the hardest, with about 1,500 homes leveled in the storm. A total of 755 people were injured in Oklahoma City and the surrounding area, testing local hospital disaster plans to the maximum. The same hospitals had been called on in April 1995 to handle the over 500 persons injured in the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, a terrorist blast that killed 168. The hospitals' latest response to a disaster situation is recorded in this report. PMID:10621277

  8. Integrated grassland observation sites and integrated cropland observation sites at El Reno, Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the financial support from the National Science Foundation and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, a team of researchers from the University of Oklahoma and the USDA ARS Grazinglands Research Laboratory have worked together and established two Integrated Grassland Observation s...

  9. Oklahoma City FILM Even Start Family Literacy Program Evaluation, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Donna Castle; Shove, Joanie; Brickman, Sharon; Terrell, Sherry; Shields, Jane

    This report presents findings from the evaluation of the Oklahoma City Public Schools Even Start Program, also called the Family Intergenerational Literacy Model (FILM), now in its twelfth full year of operation. The evaluation focuses on the total population of adult students, preschoolers, adult graduates, and preschool graduates. The…

  10. Ecological Investigation of the Invasive White Perch in Kaw Lake, Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kurt E. Kuklinski

    2007-01-01

    Following an unintentional introduction of white perch (Morone americana) into Kaw Reservoir, Oklahoma, questions were raised about the potential impacts this new spe- cies may have on resident sport fish populations. White perch, white crappie (Pomoxis annularis), and white bass (Morone chrysops) were collected from 2001 through 2004 using a variety of sampling techniques. White perch catch rates were low

  11. Geohydrology of the alluvial and terrace deposits of the North Canadian River from Oklahoma City to Eufaula Lake, central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Havens, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to describe the geohydrology of the alluvial and terrace deposits along the North Canadian River between Lake Overholser and Eufaula Lake, an area of about 1,835 square miles, and to determine the maximum annual yield of ground water. A 1982 water-level map of the alluvial and terrace aquifer was prepared using field data and published records. Data from test holes and other data from the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board were used to establish the approximate thickness of the alluvial and terrace deposits. The North Canadian River from Lake Overholser, near Oklahoma City, to Eufaula Lake is paralleled by a 2- to 3-mile wide band of alluvium. Scattered terrace deposits on either side of the alluvium reach an extreme width of 8 miles. Rocks of Permian age bound the alluvial and terrace deposits from the west to the midpoint of the study area; Pennsylvanian rocks bound the alluvial and terrace deposits from that point eastward. Three major aquifers are present in the study area: the alluvial and terrace aquifer, consisting of alluvium and terrace deposits of Quaternary age in a narrow band on either side of the North Canadian River; the Garber-Wellington aquifer of Permian age, consisting of an upper unconfined zone and a lower confined zone separated by relatively impermeable shales; and the Ada-Vamoosa aquifer of Pennsylvanian age. At locations were the alluvial and terrace aquifer overlies either of the other aquifers, there is hydraulic continuity between the alluvial and terrace aquifer and the other aquifers, and water levels are the same. Most large-scale municipal and industrial pumping from the Garber-Wellington aquifer is from the lower zone and has little discernible effect upon the alluvial and terrace aquifer. The total estimated base flow of the North Canadian River for the studied reach is 264 cubic feet per second. Evapotranspiration from the basin in August is about 60 cubic feet per second for the North Canadian River from Lake Overholser to a measuring station above Eufaula Lake. Estimated recharge rates to the alluvial and terrace aquifer in the basin range from 1.7 inches at the west edge of the study area to 7.0 inches at the east edge. Total permitted withdrawal from the aquifer, according to records of the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, ranged from 2,107 acre-feet per year in 1942 to about 21,415 acre-feet per year in 1982. Simulations of the alluvial and terrace aquifer from Lake Overholser to Eufaula Lake were made using a finite-difference model developed by McDonald and Harbaugh (1984). The area of the aquifers was subdivided into a finite-difference grid having 30 rows and 57 columns with cells measuring 1 mile in the north-south direction and 2 miles in the east-west direction. The model was calibrated in two steps: A steady-state calibration simulated head distribution prior to extensive pumping of the aquifer in 1942, and a transient calibration simulated head distribution after extensive pumpage. The final horizontal hydraulic conductivity used for the alluvial and terrace aquifer was 0.0036 feet per second (310 feet per day) at all locations. The recharge rate for the alluvial and terrace aquifer ranged from 1.7 inch per year in the west to 7.0 inches per year in the east, and averaged about 3.3 inches per year. A specific yield of 15 percent was used for the transient simulation. Permitted pumpage for 1942 through 1982 was used in the digital model to estimate the annual volume of water in storage in the alluvial and terrace aquifer for the years for this time period. The 1982 permitted pumpage rates were used for projections for 1983 to 2020. The estimated volume of water in storage was 1,940,000 acre-feet in 1982. Because the estimated recharge rate is equal to the allowed pumpage rate in 1982, the projected volume of water in storage in both 1993 and 2020 was 1,890,000 acre-feet.

  12. Karstic mountain almost conquered. [Guatemala

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-10

    International design and construction teams building a 300-Mw hydroelectric system high in central Guatemala's rugged mountains since 1977 have persevered through karstic-limestone nightmares, logistical bottlenecks and political upheaval to bring the $700-million Rio Chixoy project close to completion. The costly power push, requiring the largest construction effort in Guatemala's modern history, plays a critical role for the future. When all five Pelton-wheel turbines are spinning late next year, their output will more than double electricity production in Central America's poorest, most populous country. Despite numerous delays, design changes and cost increases above the original $240-million bid package, work has progressed to the final stages on a 360-ft-high rockfill dam, 16-mile power tunnel and aboveground powerhouse.

  13. P wave velocity structure in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leiph Preston; Ken Smith; David von Seggern

    2007-01-01

    We have performed a crustal tomographic inversion using over 250,000 P arrival times from local earthquake sources and surface explosions in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, region. Within the shallowest 2–3 km, topographic features tend to dominate the structure with high velocities imaged under Bare Mountain, the Funeral Mountains, and higher terrain to the east of Yucca Mountain and low velocities

  14. 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Yucca Mountain Project

    E-print Network

    Maerz, Norbert H.

    1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Yucca Mountain Project The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada has been designated as United States choice for nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain is in a remote dry area, on federal has been made to characterize the nature of the discontinuities of the Yucca Mountain proposed nuclear

  15. ARIEL 65 WOMEN'S BACKPACK Backpacking/Mountaineering

    E-print Network

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    ARIEL 65 WOMEN'S BACKPACK Backpacking/Mountaineering Lightweight and comfortable women's specific. Volumes and Weights US and International weight and volume specifications Size cu. in. liter lbs/oz kg. XS

  16. 36 CFR 13.910 - Mountain climbing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve General Provisions § 13.910 Mountain climbing. (a) Climbing Mount McKinley...

  17. 36 CFR 13.910 - Mountain climbing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve General Provisions § 13.910 Mountain climbing. (a) Climbing Mount McKinley...

  18. 36 CFR 13.910 - Mountain climbing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve General Provisions § 13.910 Mountain climbing. (a) Climbing Mount McKinley...

  19. 36 CFR 13.910 - Mountain climbing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve General Provisions § 13.910 Mountain climbing. (a) Climbing Mount McKinley...

  20. 36 CFR 13.910 - Mountain climbing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve General Provisions § 13.910 Mountain climbing. (a) Climbing Mount McKinley...

  1. Black Box Theatres: Cheyenne Mountain High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of the academic arts building at Cheyenne Mountain High School in Colorado Springs, Colorado, including its black box theater, art classroom, computer graphics lab, gallery, video production area, and chorus classroom. (EV)

  2. ConcepTest: Linear Mountain Range

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In exploring a new planet, you discover a long, linear mountain range crossing a broad low-lying area that is interpreted to represent an ancient basin. Predict what type of plate tectonic feature this represents. ...

  3. Quantifying Mountain Front Recharge Using Isotopic Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahi, A. K.; Ekwurzel, B.; Hogan, J. F.; Eastoe, C. J.; Baillie, M. N.

    2005-05-01

    To improve our conceptual and quantitative understanding of mountain-front/mountain-block recharge (MFR) associated with the Huachuca Mountains of the Upper San Pedro River Basin in Arizona, we employed a suite of geochemical measurements including isotopic tracers and noble gases. MFR is frequently the dominant source of recharge to alluvial basins in the semiarid Basin and Range province. It consists of mountain runoff that infiltrates at the mountain front (mountain-front recharge), and percolation through the mountain bedrock that reaches the basin via the movement of deep groundwater (mountain-block recharge). The rate of MFR can be estimated from a water balance, a Darcy's law analysis, or inverse modeling of groundwater processes. Despite the large volume of research on water resources in the basin and the critical importance of MFR to the water budget, the best estimates of MFR obtained using these methods may have errors as large as 100%. We find that geochemical tracers address mechanistic questions regarding recharge seasonality, location, and rates as well as addressing groundwater flowpaths and residence times. The gradient of stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in groundwater with elevation mirrors that of regional precipitation, providing a constraint on the location and seasonality of recharge. Stable isotopic signatures indicate that MFR is dominated by winter precipitation but has 1/3 or more contribution from monsoon precipitation. Detectable tritium and 14C values greater than 100 pMC for springs, shallow groundwater in mountain canyons, and from wells along the mountain front indicate decade-scale residence times. Away from the mountain front 14C values rapidly decrease, reaching 12.3±0.2 pMC near the river. This suggests total basin residence times greater than 10,000 years, consistent with past measurements. Ongoing analysis of noble gas concentrations will provide an indication of recharge conditions. The solubility of noble gases in water depends on temperature and pressure; thus, noble gas concentrations provide a means to distinguish water samples recharged at different elevations.

  4. The Impact of Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services

    E-print Network

    Williford, G. H.; Beattie, B. R.; Lacewell, R. D.

    Reduced availability of groundwater in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma is expected to have repercussions throughout the regional economy due to the reduction in agricultural income. The decline in the economic base is expected to lead...

  5. Genetic variation in the 16s mitochondrial rDNA gene from Texas and Oklahoma populations of Amblyomma maculatum

    E-print Network

    Lostak, Tracy Karon

    2009-05-15

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism was used to detect different haplotypes of the 16S mitochondrial rDNA gene within samples of Gulf Coast ticks, Amblyomma maculatum Koch, collected from Payne County, Oklahoma and Brazos and Refugio Counties...

  6. The Impact of Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services 

    E-print Network

    Williford, G. H.; Beattie, B. R.; Lacewell, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Reduced availability of groundwater in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma is expected to have repercussions throughout the regional economy due to the reduction in agricultural income. The decline in the economic base is expected to lead...

  7. Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Weed Control in Christmas tree plantations is one of

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University Weed Control.Weedscompeteforwater,nutrients,andlight andextendthetimerequiredtoproduceamarketabletree. Successful weed control helps the grower produce high.Finally, reductionofweedsreducesinterferencewithlaborandequip- mentmovementandimprovestheplantation'sappearance forconsumers. Methods of Weed Control Site

  8. Social dominance in adult female mountain goats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    François Fournier; Marco Festa-Bianchet

    1995-01-01

    The social behaviour of adult female mountain goats, Oreamnos americanus, was studied for 2 years in an unhunted population in west-central Alberta, Canada. Compared with other female ungulates, mountain goat females interacted aggressively much more frequently and their dominance ranks were less stable in time and less age-related. Goats were organized in a non-linear but non-random dominance hierarchy, with many

  9. Integrated Ediacaran chronostratigraphy, Wernecke Mountains, northwestern Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leanne J. Pyle; Guy M. Narbonnea; Noel P. James; Robert W. Dalrymple; Alan J. Kaufman

    2004-01-01

    Terminal Neoproterozoic (Ediacaran, ca. 600-543 Ma) strata of the upper part of the Windermere Supergroup are well-exposed in the Mackenzie Mountains and the Wernecke Mountains of northwestern Canada. Windermere strata in the Mackenzie Moun- tains contain an exceptional Ediacaran biostratigraphic and isotopic (C and Sr) record, while the sequence stratigraphic record is subtle throughout this predominantly deep-water succession. Coeval strata

  10. Interpretation of Pennsylvania Bartlesville sandstone in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma from continuous dipmeter and gamma-ray logs

    E-print Network

    Kranz, Dwight Stanley

    1981-01-01

    INTERPRETATION OF PENNSYLVANIAN BARTLESVILLE SANDSTONE IN SOUTHEASTERN KANSAS AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA FROM CONTINUOUS DIPMETER AND GAMMA-RAY LOGS A Thesis by DWIGHT STANLEY KRANZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject: Geology INTERPRETATION OF PENNSYLVANIAN SARTLESVILLE SANDSTONE IN SOUTHEASTERN KANSAS AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA FROM CONTINUOUS DIPMETER AND GAMMA...

  11. The depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the Upper Morrow "A" sandstone, Postle field, Texas County, Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Travis, Lynn Suzanne

    1987-01-01

    THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE UPPER MORROW 'A' SANDSTONE, POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by LYNN SUZANNE TRAVIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major subject: Geology THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE UPPER MORROW 'A' SANDSTONE POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by LYNN...

  12. Rockfall exposures in Montserrat mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontquerni Gorchs, Sara; Vilaplana Fernández, Joan Manuel; Guinau Sellés, Marta; Jesús Royán Cordero, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    This study shows the developed methodology to analyze the exposure level on a 1:25000 scale, and the results obtained by applying it to an important part of the Monataña de Montserrat Natural Park for vehicles with and without considering their occupants. The development of this proposal is part of an ongoing study which focuses more in-depth in the analysis of the rockfall risk exposure in different scales and in different natural and social contexts. This research project applies a methodology to evaluate the rockfall exposure level based on the product of the frequency of occurrence of the event by an exposure function of the vulnerable level on a 1:25,000 scale although the scale used for the study was 1:10,000. The proposed methodology to calculate the exposure level is based on six phases: 1- Identification, classification and inventory of every element potentially under risk. 2- Zoning of the frequency of occurrence of the event in the studied area. 3- Design of the exposure function for each studied element. 4- Obtaining the Exposure index, it can be defined as the product of the frequency of occurrence by the exposure function of the vulnerable element through SIG analysis obtained with ArcGis software (ESRI) 5- Obtaining exposure level by grouping into categories the numerical values of the exposure index. 6- Production of the exposition zoning map. The different types of vulnerable elements considered in the totality of the study are: Vehicles in motion, people in vehicles in motion, people on paths, permanent elements and people in buildings. Each defined typology contains all elements with same characteristics and an exposure function has been designed for each of them. For the exposure calculation, two groups of elements have been considered; firstly the group of elements with no people involved and afterwards same group of elements but with people involved. This is a first comprehensive and synthetic work about rockfall exposure on the Montserrat Mountain. It is important to mention that the exposure level calculation has been obtained from natural hazard data do not protected by defense works. Results of this work enable us to consider best strategies to reduce rockfalls risk in the PNMM. It is clear that, apart from the required structural defense works, some of them already made, implementation of strategies not involving structural defense is, in the medium and long term, the best policy to mitigate the risk. In the PNMM case, rethinking of mobility and traffic management on the mountain access would be definitely helpful to achieve a minimized geological risk.

  13. Proterozoic Farwell Mountain Lester Mountain suture zone, northern Colorado: Subduction flip and progressive assembly of arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, A. R.; Morozova, E. A.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Dueker, K. R. Chamberlain S. B. Smithson K. G.; Foster, C. T.

    2002-10-01

    This paper considers the amalgamation of arc and oceanic terranes to be the main mechanism of ca. 1.8 1.6 Ga continental crustal growth in southwestern Laurentia. On the basis of geologic and seismic reflection data and teleseismic images, we propose the Farwell Mountain Lester Mountain suture zone as the northernmost Paleoproterozoic arc-arc suture. North-dipping (Farwell Mountain) seismic reflections project from 18 km depths to the surface and are interpreted to represent conjugate thrusting as the 1.79 1.77 Ga Green Mountain arc was partially underthrust beneath the Archean craton. We speculate that a north-dipping high-velocity mantle “slab” in the teleseismic image is a continuation of this thrust zone. South-dipping (Lester Mountain) reflections project from 22 km depths to the surface and are interpreted to be a thrust zone between the Green Mountain arc and the 1.76 1.72 Ga Rawah block. Surface features of the Farwell Mountain Lester Mountain suture zone are (1) marble, chert, rock with sillimanite pods, ultramafic rocks, sulfide deposits, and pillow basalts, which we interpret to be a dismembered accretionary complex; (2) an axial-planar fabric to north-verging isoclinal folds (F2), which we interpret to be part of a north-vergent fold-and-thrust system; and (3) a metamorphic break between ˜500 °C rocks to the north and ˜610 °C rocks to the south, which we attribute to reactivation of the zone. Movement on the Farwell Mountain backthrust is inferred to relate to Cheyenne belt suturing at 1.78 1.75 Ga. We correlate suturing in the Farwell Mountain Lester Mountain suture zone to S1/D1 (1.746 1.74 Ga) in the Soda Creek Fish Creek shear zone. We attribute the complexity of this broad suture zone to initial conjugate thrusting, plus overprinting and steepening of accretionary structures by subsequent tectonism.

  14. Mountains and Plateaus on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These two views of Io were acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft during its seventh orbit (G7) of Jupiter. The images were designed to view large features on Io at low sun angles when the lighting conditions emphasize the topography or relief of the volcanic satellite. Sun angles are low near the terminator which is the day-night boundary near the left side of the images. These images reveal that the topography is very flat near the active volcanic centers such as Loki Patera (the large dark horseshoe-shaped feature near the terminator in the left-hand image) and that a variety of mountains and plateaus exist elsewhere.

    North is to the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers per picture element (6.1 for the left hand image and 5.7 for the right). The images were taken on April 4th, 1997 at a ranges of 600,000 kilometers (left image) and 563,000 kilometers (right image) by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  15. Mountain Waves Launched By Convective Activity Within The Boundary Layer Above Mountains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Worthington

    2002-01-01

    Mountain waves are observed in the free atmosphere, even when the mountainboundary layer (the source region of these waves) is neutral or convectivelyunstable, and filled with convective rolls, revealed by cloud streets. This paperinvestigates if mountain waves are caused not simply by air flow over mountainridges, but also by flow over boundary-layer convective activity, similar toconvection waves above plains and

  16. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2003-10-01

    This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on log data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time. To understand the unique characteristics of the field, an integrated evaluation was undertaken. Production data from the field were meticulously collected, and over forty wells were cored and logged to better understand the petrophysical and engineering characteristics. Based on the work done in this budget period so far, some of the preliminary conclusions can be listed as follows: (1) Based on PVT analysis, the field most likely contains volatile oil with bubble point close to initial reservoir pressure of 1,900 psia. (2) The initial oil in place, which is contact with existing wells, can be determined by newly developed material balance technique. The oil in place, which is in communication, is significantly less than determined by volumetric analysis, indicating heterogeneous nature of the reservoir. The oil in place, determined by material balance, is greater than determined by decline curve analysis. This difference may lead to additional locations for in fill wells. (3) The core and log evaluation indicates that the intermediate pores (porosity between 2 and 6 %) are very important in determining production potential of the reservoir. These intermediate size pores contain high oil saturation. (4) The limestone part of the reservoir, although low in porosity (mostly less than 6 %) is much more prolific in terms of oil production than the dolomite portion of the reservoir. The reason for this difference is the higher oil saturation in low porosity region. As the average porosity increases, the remaining oil saturation decreases. This is evident from log and core analysis. (5) Using a compositional simulator, we are able to reproduce the important reservoir characteristics by assuming a two layer model. One layer is high permeability region containing water and the other layer is low permeability region containing mostly oil. The results are further verified by using a dual porosity model. Assuming that most of the volatile oil is contained in the matrix and the water is contained in the fractures, we are able to reproduce important reservoir performance characteristics. (6) Evaluation of secondary mechanisms indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding is potentially a viable option if CO{sub 2} is available at reasonable price. We have conducted detailed simulation studies to verify the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} huff-n-puff process. We are in the process of conducting additional lab tests to verify the efficacy of the same displacement. (7) Another possibility of improving the oil recovery is to inject surfactants to change the near well bore wettability of the rock from oil wet to water wet. By changing the wettability, we may be able to retard the water flow and hence improve the oil recovery as a percentage of total fluid produced. If surfactant is reasonably priced, other possibility is also to use huff-n-puff process using surfactants. Laboratory experiments are promising, and additional investigation continues. (8) Preliminary economic evaluation indicates that vertical wells outperform horizontal wells. Future work in the project would include: (1) Build multi-well numerical model to reproduce overall reservoir performance rather than individual well performance. Special emphasis will be placed on hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. (2) Collect data from adjacent Hunton reservoirs to validate our understanding of what makes it a productive reservoir. (3) Develop statistical methods to rank various reservoirs in Hunton formation. This will allow us to evaluate other Hunton formations based on old well logs, and determine, apriori, if

  17. Bryozoa of the Murdock Mountain formation (Wordian, Permian), Leach Mountains, northeastern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilmour, E.H.; McColloch, M.E.; Wardlaw, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    A thin limestone tongue in the upper part of the Murdock Mountain Formation of northeastern Nevada contains abundant bryozoans of earliest Wordian age. This bryozoan fauna is close to the Kungurian-Kazanian boundary in Russia. These bryozoans are younger than those found in the Kaibab Formation of southern Nevada and slightly older than those in the Gerster Limestone of northern Nevada. This limestone tongue, herein referred to as the Stenodiscus beds, lies below the Thamnosia beds described by Wardlaw in the Murdock Mountain section of the Leach Mountains. This bryozoan-rich limestone tongue serves as a marker unit for mapping the Murdock Formation in the Leach Mountains. Nine new species of bryozoans occur in the Stenodiscus beds of the Murdock Mountain Formation: Hinganella felderi, Neoeridotrypella schilti, Stenopora parvaexozona, Stenodiscus murdockensis, Dyscritella acanthostylia, Pseudobatostomella irregularis. Streblotrypa (Streblotrypa) elongata, Morozoviella praecurriensis, and Thamniscus erraticus, Hinganella felderi, Neoeridotrypella schilti, Dyscritella acanthostylia, and Streblotrypa (Streblotrypa) elongata are very similar to species described from Russia.

  18. Developing a statewide public health initiative to reduce infant mortality in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Suzanna; Patrick, Paul; Lincoln, Alicia; Cline, Janette

    2014-01-01

    The Preparing for a Lifetime, It's Everyone's Responsibility initiative was developed to improve the health and well- being of Oklahoma's mothers and infants. The development phase included systematic data collection, extensive data analysis, and multi-disciplinary partnership development. In total, seven issues (preconception/interconception health, tobacco use, postpartum depression, breastfeeding, infant safe sleep, preterm birth, and infant injury prevention) were identified as crucial to addressing infant mortality in Oklahoma. Workgroups were created to focus on each issue. Data and media communications workgroups were added to further partner commitment and support for policy and programmatic changes across multiple agencies and programs. Leadership support, partnership, evaluation, and celebrating small successes were important factors that lead to large scale adoption and support for the state-wide initiative to reduce infant mortality. PMID:25790592

  19. Municipal energy planning: the Oklahoma experience. [Communities of Altus and Edmond

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, M.

    1980-01-01

    Leadership demonstrated in the Oklahoma communities of Altus and Edmond illustrates the importance of municipal planning for energy crises. A natural gas generating plant in Altus had been closed down because wholesale rates from the Public Service Company of Oklahoma (PSO) were more attractive. Legal challenges to PSO's efforts to raise rates after 1973 led to a comprehensive management study aimed at reducing system costs without jeopardizing service. The city set a goal of reducing consumption by 30 percent and an action program which included load-scheduling changes, pricing signals to users, plans for a low-head hydroelectric facility to reduce peak loads, and management reorganization. Edmond's officials took the broad, community-wide approach of appointing a citizen advisory committee to make recommendations. The community problem-solving approach has spread to small municipal systems able to draw on local energy and personnel resources. A state-wide program involves utilities in an ad hoc planning committee. (DCK)

  20. In-situ Soil Moisture Coupled with Extreme Temperatures: A Study Based on the Oklahoma Mesonet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, T.; Quiring, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between observed (in-situ) soil moisture and percent hot days (%HD) in Oklahoma is examined using quantile regression. Consistent with results from previous modeling studies and observational studies using precipitation deficits as proxy, soil moisture is found to most strongly impact air temperature in the upper quantile of the %HD distribution. The utility of soil moisture for forecasting extreme heat events in Oklahoma is also assessed. Our results show that %HD can be predicted with reasonable skill using soil moisture anomalies from the previous month. These soil moisture-based forecasts of extreme temperature events can be used to support public health and water resource planning and mitigation activities in the Southern Great Plains region of the United States.