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1

Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics t...

1991-01-01

2

Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics that can be applied to the subsurface in the adjacent Anadarko and Ardmore basins. Numerous reports and guidebooks have been written concerning the Arbuckle Mountains. A few important general publications are provided in the list of selected references. The purpose of this handout is to provide general information on the geology of the Arbuckle Mountains and specific information on the four field trip stops, adapted from the literature. The four stops were at: (1) Sooner Rock and Sand Quarry; (2) Woodford Shale; (3) Hunton Anticline and Hunton Quarry; and (4) Tar Sands of Sulfur Area. As part of this report, two papers are included for more detail: Paleomagnetic dating of basinal fluid migration, base-metal mineralization, and hydrocarbon maturation in the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma and Laminated black shale-bedded chert cyclicity in the Woodford Formation, southern Oklahoma.

NONE

1991-11-17

3

Variation of oil composition in vicinity of Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Fifteen oils in an 8-county area in the vicinity of the Arbuckle Mountains were classified into 6 oil types: stable platform type, Mill Creek syncline type, Joiner City field type, Gloeocapsamorpha type, Hoover field A-type; and Fitts field type. The stable platform, Mill Creek syncline, and Joiner City field types have a common element (diminished C/sub 32/ hopane) and are thought to be derived from distinctly different facies of the Woodford Formation. The Viola Limestone oil is typical of oil generated from Ordovician rocks. The Hoover field A-type has an element of Ordovician composition and is thought to have been derived from an Arbuckle Group shale. The Fitts field oil has a unique composition and has not been assigned to a source. The variation of oil composition in the vicinity of the Arbuckle Mountains is attributed to (1) the large number of potential source rocks, (2) the variety of facies going from the stable platform into the southern Oklahoma aulacogen, and (3) biodegradation of oils in shallow reservoirs.

Zemmels, I.; Walters, C.C.

1987-08-01

4

Hydrology of the Arbuckle Mountain area, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water in the aquifer is confined in some parts of the area, while in other parts it is unconfined. The average saturated thickness of the aquifer is about 3,500 feet in the outcrop area. Water levels measured in wells fluctuated from 8 to 53 feet each year, primarily in response to recharge from rainfall. Recharge to the aquifer is estimated at about 4.7 inches per year. The average storage coefficient of the aquifer is estimated at 0.008, and the average transmissivity is estimated at 15,000 feet squared per day. Based on an average saturated thickness of about 3,500 feet and a storage coefficient of 0.008, the volume of ground water contained in the 500-square-mile outcrop area is about 9 million acre-feet. An undetermined amount of fresh water probably exists in the aquifer around the periphery of the aquifer outcrop. Base flow of streams that drain the aquifer accounts for about 60 percent of the total annual runoff from the outcrop area and is maintained by numerous springs. The close hydraulic connection between streams in the outcrop area and the aquifer is shown by a close correlation between base flow in Blue River and the fluctuation of ground-water levels in five wells in the Blue River basin. This correlation also exists between the discharge by Byrds Mill Spring and the fluctuation in water level in a nearby observation well; increase and decrease in spring discharge correspond to rise and fall of the water level in the well. The chemical quality of water from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer is suitable for most industrial and municipal uses. The water is hard and of the bicarbonate type; the average hardness is about 340 milligrams per liter, and the average dissolved-solids concentration is about 360 milligrams per liter. Because springs issue from the aquifer and discharge to streams in the area, the quality of water from springs and base flow in streams is similar to that of ground water. The average dissolved-solids concentration of stream water is slightly less than that of water from wells and springs. (available as photostat copy only)

Fairchild, R. W.; Hanson R. L.; Davis R. E.

1982-01-01

5

Remote Sensor Application Studies Progress Report, July 1, 1968 to June 30, 1969. RemoteSensing Reconnaissance, Mill Creek Area, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Infrared data for the Mill Creek area in the Arbuckle Mountains of Oklahoma reveal significant stratigraphic and structural information. Relatively pure limestones and dolomites in this area can be differentiated in the nighttime infrared images, and the ...

L. C. Rowan T. W. Offield K. Watson P. J. Cannon R.D. Watson

1970-01-01

6

Deep-to-shallow carbonate ramp transition in Viola Limestone (Ordovician), southwest Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Viola Limestone (Middle and Upper Ordovician) of the southwest Arbuckle Mountains was deposited on a carbonate ramp within the southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Depositional environments include (1) anaerobic, deep-ramp setting represented by microfacies RL, CH, CGL, and A, (2) dysaerobic, mid-ramp setting represented by microfacies B, and (3) aerobic, shallow-ramp setting represented by microfacies C and D. Deposition in the deep- and mid-ramp environments was dominated by bottom-hugging currents produced by off-platform flow of denser waters. Primary sedimentary structures include millimeter-size laminations, starved ripples, and concave-up and inclined erosional surfaces. Shelly benthic fauna are rare in A and B; trace fossils are common only in B. Deposits associated with the line-source gully, microfacies RL, CH, and CGL, are laterally confined; they have been observed only in the southwest Arbuckle Mountains. Primary sedimentary structures present in RL include wavy and ripple-cross laminae. Microfacies CH, contained within RL and interpreted as a submarine channel deposit, is present only at one locality. Primary sedimentary structures present in CH include an erosional base and several internal erosional surfaces, lateral accretionary sets, and imbricated, locally derived intraclasts. High total organic carbon (TOC) values have been reported for the lower Viola. TOC values of 1% have been reported from microfacies A, and TOC values of 5% have been reported from microfacies RL. These high values suggest that A and RL may act as hydrocarbon source rocks. Recognition of these microfacies in the subsurface will contribute to our knowledge of the Viola Limestone as an exploration target.

Glavin, P.K.

1983-03-01

7

Petrology and geochemistry of the Buckhorn Asphalt (Desmoinsian) Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Buckhorn Asphalt is the informal name for asphalt-impregnated carbonate sediments of the Deese Group (Desmoinsian) deposited in the Mill Creek graben, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma. This interbedded sequence of calcareous shale, carbonate sediments, and muddy chert conglomerates were deposited as inner marine shelf and fan delta facies in a sheltered coastal bay setting. Active faulting, due to the transpressional stress of continental collision, deformed the sediments and allowed secondary migration of Oil Creek Formation oil into the upper Deese section during or immediately following deposition. The non-asphaltic lower Deese carbonates have all the petrographic and geochemical characteristics of normal carbonate diagenesis by meteoric and/or subsurface groundwater. Asphaltic Deese carbonates contain unaltered aragonitic molluscs, neomorphosed skeletal aragonite and magnesian calcites, and delta TC-depleted sparry cements; this indicates that the presence of the oil and its alteration to asphalt physically limited and chemical influenced carbonate diagenesis. Deese asphalt has all the physical and chemical characteristics of oil degraded under low-temperature aerobic conditions by both biologic and inorganic processes. Comparison of the biomarker chemistry and organic TC composition of Deese asphalt with that of Oil Creek tar suggests that a substantial proportion of the Deese asphalt is composed of immature hydrocarbons. The chemical similarity of the indigenous Deese sedimentary hydrocarbons with this hypothetical immature hydrocarbon end member suggests that is may have an intraformational source.

Sadd, J.L.

1986-01-01

8

Paleomagnetic dating of diagenesis by basinal and meteoric fluids, Ordovician carbonates, Arbuckle Mountains, southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Late Paleozoic chemical magnetizations can be directly related to migration of basinal fluids and exposure to meteoric fluids in Ordovician carbonates in the Arbuckle Mountains. The Viola Formation contains a pervasive synfolding (Pennsylvanian) magnetization residing in magnetite, but, around some mineralized fractures and veins, there are alteration halos that contain a Late Permian chemical magnetization residing in hematite. The veins contain calcites and associated MVT minerals that formed from fluids which were radiogenic, relatively warm, and saline. These fluids caused the alteration and acquisition of the chemical magnetization. The origin of the synfolding magnetization is not well constrained and preliminary studies suggest it is not related to basinal fluids. Hematite Liesegang bands around calcite-filled fractures in dolomitic beds in the Kindblade Formation contain an apparent Early Permian chemical magnetization whereas unbanded rock contains a weak and unstable magnetization. Fluids, probably basinal in origin, which emanated from the fractures, caused the hematite banding and acquisition of the chemical magnetization. In contrast, field relations and geochemical studies indicate that the Royer Dolomite and clasts of the Royer in the Pennsylvanian Collings Ranch Conglomerate contain a Permian magnetization which was acquired as a result of exposure to meteoric fluids. Although all the chemical magnetizations in these carbonates are related to orogeny, they were cause by different fluids at apparently different times at several locations in the Arbuckle Mountains.

Elmore, R.D.; Bagley, D.S.; London, D.; Nick, K. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman (United States))

1991-03-01

9

Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric project  

SciTech Connect

Hydropower regulations, particularly those which must be met during the pre-construction phase, have become considerably more extensive and complicated over the last few years. This article, which outlines the pre-construction phase of the Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric project, provides a good example of the steps developers should be prepared to take before construction commences. The Department of Energy is funding $750,000 of the project's $1,200,000 budget to gain meaningful and reliable information for the public regarding the development and operation of an inexpensive, low head, domestically manufactured cross-flow turbine. To satisfy their requirements several studies and reports are being prepared for the DOE.

Peterson, J.C.

1986-02-01

10

Arbuckle source for Atoka Formation Flysch, Ouachita Mountains Frontal Belt, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The 10-mi wide Ouachita Mountains frontal belt consists of Morrowan-Atokan flysch exposed in steeply south-dipping imbricate thrust slices. Two spatially distinct groups of paleocurrents were recognized during detailed mapping of 120 mi/sup 2/ in the frontal belt (between 95/sup 0/15'W and 95/sup 0/30'W). The east-west-trending Morrowan shallow-water shelf margin (now allochthonous) marks the boundary between these two domains. Westerly azimuths (259/sup 0/n = 213), typical of almost the entire Ouachita flysch sequence, are from the Atoka Formation south of the shelf margin. Easterly azimuths (66/sup 0/n = 75), previously unrecognized in the Ouachitas, are from the Atoka Formation where it overlies Wapanucka Limestone north of the margin. A third group of paleocurrents (193/sup 0/n = 21) are from the Johns Valley Shale (an olisto-strome that is the basinward equivalent of the Wapanucka Limestone). Easterly paleocurrent azimuths indicate a western source for the Atoka Formation north of the Morrowan shelf margin. Sediment from the Arbuckle uplift was apparently channeled northeastward down a trough that was isolated from the Ouachita basin to the south where sediment had an Appalachian provenance. The authors suggest that a trough was formed by listric fault blocks (tilted toward the continent) of the foundered Morrowan shelf margin. The bounding faults would be the southernmost of a series of northward younging south-side-down growth faults that have been recognized in the subsurface of the Arkoma basin to the north.

Ferguson, C.A.; Suneson, N.H.

1988-01-01

11

Remote sensor application studies report, July 1, 1968 to June 30, 1969: Remote sensing reconnaissance, Mill creek area, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Remote Sensor Application Studies program, infrared images and several kinds of photographs were obtained on reconnaissance flights over two areas in the Arbuckle Mountains near Mill Creek, Oklahoma. These data were used in a preliminary investigation (1) to determine the diagnostic reflection and emission characteristics of various rock types, and (2) io evaluate the perturbing influence of atmospheric conditions, surface coatings, rock texture, and topography on the observed reflected and emitted energy in the thermal infrared (8-14?) part of the spectrum

Rowan, L.C.; Offield, T. W.; Watson, Kenneth; Cannon, P. J.; Watson, R.D.

1970-01-01

12

Fracture density and spacing along Washita Valley fault, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors document fracture density and spacing associated with the Washita Valley fault, a major strike-slip fault. The Washita Valley fault strikes northwest-southeast with up to 80 mi of exposure in southern Oklahoma and may be an early bounding fault of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen (Ardmore\\/Marietta basins). Horizontal displacement on the fault has been estimated to be up to 40

C. D. Ferebee; J. B. Tapp

1989-01-01

13

Arbuckle source for Atoka Formation Flysch, Ouachita Mountains Frontal Belt, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 10-mi wide Ouachita Mountains frontal belt consists of Morrowan-Atokan flysch exposed in steeply south-dipping imbricate thrust slices. Two spatially distinct groups of paleocurrents were recognized during detailed mapping of 120 mi² in the frontal belt (between 95°15'W and 95°30'W). The east-west-trending Morrowan shallow-water shelf margin (now allochthonous) marks the boundary between these two domains. Westerly azimuths (259°n = 213),

C. A. Ferguson; N. H. Suneson

1988-01-01

14

Paleomagnetic dating of dedolomitization in Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle group limestones and Pennsylvanian Collings Ranch conglomerate, southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Paleomagnetic and petrographic techniques have been used to date dedolomitization in stratigraphic and tectonic dolomites exposed in the Arbuckle Mountains, southern Oklahoma. The authors examined red dedolomites and their dolomite precursors from the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group and dolomite clasts in the Pennsylvanian Collings Ranch Conglomerate. Authigenic hematite is associated with the dedolomite and precipitated as a result of the dedolomitization process. Dedolomite is associated with paleokarst and fractures, burrows, Liesegang bands, and red rims on conglomerate clasts.

Nick, K.E.; Elmore, R.D.

1988-02-01

15

Paleokarstic and karstic features: Arbuckle and Hunton Groups, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Cores of the Ordovician-age Arbuckle Group and Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian-age Hunton Group contain evidence of paleokarst. Arbuckle and Hunton Group rocks display surprisingly similar suites of distinct paleo-karstic features. Vugs, solution-enlarged fractures, cavities, collapse breccias, and sediment-filled solution features are evident. Phreatic cements are more commonly observed than vadose cements, while primary speleothemic precipitates are rare. A complex history of exposure, subsidence, and diagenesis is recorded in these rocks. Hunton and Arbuckle carbonates have been subaerially exposed for periods of variable intensity and duration during geologic history. Paleokarst appears to have developed subjacent to disconformities within and between formations of the Arbuckle Group and where these rocks subcrop below regional unconformities. Hunton paleokarstic horizons are apparent below the regional pre-Woodford unconformity, while evidence of inter- and intra-formational subaerial exposure is tenuous. This complex hierarchy of unconformities can produce numerous porous horizons. Porosity preservation may depend on subsidence rates or sea level rises rapid enough to prevent extensive low-temperature phreatic cementation and sediment infill of the existing pore network. Caves in the Arbuckle Group in Murray County, Oklahoma contain many karstic features similar to those observed in cores. Cemented collapse breccia and sediment-filled solution cavities are evident in caves developed in the Cool Creek Formation. These caves are part of an extensive internal drainage system associated with Honey Creek near the crest of the Arbuckle anticline. Cave speleothems and surficial travertine deposits are by-product of karstification processes.

Al-Shaieb, Z.; Puckette, J.; Matthews, F. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). School of Geology); Lynch, M. (Unocal, Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

1993-02-01

16

Depositional environments and paleoecology of the Oil Creek Formation (Middle Ordovician), Arbuckle Mountains and Criner Hills, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Creek Formation (Whiterockian) is the second oldest of the five formations which make up the Simpson Group. Although widespread in the subsurface, it is exposed only in the study area and possibly in West Texas. The formation was deposited in a linear basin known as the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen during a phase of apparent episodic subsidence. Deposition occurred in supratidal to shallow marine environments which were subjected to occasional tropical storms. Six depositional facies within the shaly upper member of the formation, previously known as the Oil Creek shale are defined. These facies are based on the lithology and fossil content of the quartzarenite and limestone beds because the alternating shale beds are monotonous and essentially lack skeletal fossils. This facies tract shows that, as in other formations of the Simpson Group, deposition apparently took place in one major cycle of transgression and regression. The transgressive phase of deposition is represented by the vertical sequence consisting of the Basal Sandstone Unit, Upper Offshore Facies, Transition Zone 1, and Lower Offshore Facies. The regressive phase includes Transition Zone 2, the Shoal Facies, Lagoon Facies, and Tidal Flat Facies. The Shoal Facies has relatively thick limestone beds composed of skeletal debris, quartz sand, and goethitic ooids, while the Lagoon Facies is dominated by terrigenous shale. The species composition and number in the different communities seem to have been largely determined by the nature of the substrate.

Lewis, R.D.

1982-01-01

17

Conodont biostratigraphy of lower Ordovician rocks, Arbuckle Group, southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle Group of southern Oklahoma displays the only complete exposure of the shallow-water carbonates that characterize the Lower Ordovician of interior North America. Trilobites have been described from some parts of this sequence and sporadic occurrences of other invertebrates are known, but much of the sequence is sparingly fossiliferous. As a consequence, these magnificent exposures have not contributed notably to continuing efforts toward development of a comprehensive biostratigraphic scheme for the Lower Ordovician of the North American platform. Samples collected at 25-ft intervals through the Arbuckle Group along and adjacent to Interstate Highway 35 on the south flank of the Arbuckle anticline near Ardmore, Oklahoma, produced conodonts in abundances ranging from a few tens to over a thousand elements per kilogram and displaying good to excellent preservation with low CAI. These conodonts document a biostratigraphic continuum that provides a standard for correlation of Lower Ordovician rocks in the subsurface of central US and of the many localized and incomplete outcrops of generally equivalent strata in the Ozark and Upper Mississippi Valley regions. The stratigraphic continuity of the collections makes the I-35 section an ideal standard reference section for graphic correlation of Lower Ordovician rocks containing conodonts of the Mid-Continent Province.

Dresbach, R.I.; Ethington, R.L. (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia (USA))

1989-08-01

18

Three-Dimensional Geologic Model of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, South-Central Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer of south-central Oklahoma encompasses more than 850 square kilometers and is the principal water resource for south-central Oklahoma. Rock units comprising the aquifer are characterized by limestone, dolomite, and sandstones a...

C. D. Blome J. O. Puckette J. R. Faith M. P. Pantea N. Osborn S. Christenson S. Pack T. Halihan

2010-01-01

19

Paleokarstic phenomena of the Lower Ordovician red bed sequences of the Arbuckle group, southern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oil and gas production has been reported recently from paleokarstic Arbuckle reservoirs in the Ardmore and Arkoma basin. The West Spring Creek and the Kindblade formations apparently exhibit karstic features. The most extensive surface exposure of these formations is on the southern flank of the Arbuckle anticline along Interstate 35 north of Ardmore, Oklahoma. The lithology is predominantly limestone, ranging

Musselman

1991-01-01

20

Paleokarstic and karstic features: Arbuckle and Hunton Groups, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cores of the Ordovician-age Arbuckle Group and Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian-age Hunton Group contain evidence of paleokarst. Arbuckle and Hunton Group rocks display surprisingly similar suites of distinct paleo-karstic features. Vugs, solution-enlarged fractures, cavities, collapse breccias, and sediment-filled solution features are evident. Phreatic cements are more commonly observed than vadose cements, while primary speleothemic precipitates are rare. A complex history of exposure, subsidence,

Z. Al-Shaieb; J. Puckette; F. Matthews; M. Lynch

1993-01-01

21

Airborne and Ground Electrical Surveys for Subsurface Mapping of the Arbuckle Aquifer, Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Airborne and ground electrical surveys have been conducted to map the subsurface hydrogeologic character of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south central Oklahoma. An understanding of the geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics is necessary to evaluate groundwater flow through the highly faulted, structurally complex, carbonate aquifer. Results from this research will further understanding of the aquifer and will assist in managing

D. Smith; B. D. Smith; C. D. Blome; N. Osborn

2008-01-01

22

Geophysical Investigation of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, Oklahoma, to Determine the Influence of Subsurface Structure on Groundwater Flow  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate an area of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in southern Oklahoma by employing near-surface geophysical surveying. This predominantly carbonate aquifer encompasses the Simpson, Arbuckle, and Timbered Hills Groups, which range in age from Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician. The aquifer serves as a principle water source for the surrounding area and feeds several major springs and creeks, including Pennington Creek,

E. Lewallen; K. Ramachandran; B. Tapp

2007-01-01

23

Structural styles: Arkoma and Ardmore basins and Arbuckle Mountains  

SciTech Connect

In the Ouachita thrust belt, thin-skinned deformation has telescoped the sedimentary section along major thrust systems. In the frontal Ouachitas, Ti Valley thrust places Ordovician and Devonian rocks over Pennsylvanian rocks. Exploration for hydrocarbons on this and older thrust sheets relies on fractured Bigfork Chert and Arkansas Novaulite for reservoirs. Imbricate thrusting associated with the Choctaw thrust has produced hydrocarbon traps in the allochthonous Spiro Formation, as at Wilburton field. Thin-skinned Ouachita thrusting was superimposed over normal faults associated with early rifting, which probably localized the position of many Pennsylvanian faults. Due to northward-advancing thrust sheets, faults were reactivated by tectonic and sedimentary loading of the previously weakened foreland crust. Some of these faults may also have been reactivated as high-angle reverse faults by Ouachita compression. The discovery of commercial volumes of gas in the Pennsylvanian Spiro and Ordovician Arbuckle Group in these autochthonous subthrust fault blocks has initiated a major drilling program. Basement-involved compressional structures occur in the Ardmore basin-Arbuckle Mountains area southwest of the Ouachita thrust belt. Controversy surrounds interpretation of major faults as wrench type, with various amounts of strike-slip, or as reverse dip-slip, with large amounts of shortening. Hydrocarbons are trapped in a variety of individual structures, and include (1) large doubly-plunging anticlines exposed at the surface, (2) deep-basin structures having no surface expression, (3) large anticlines developed under, or immediately in front of, mountain overhangs, (4) faulted anticlines that subcrop the Pennsylvanian sediments on the hanging walls of buried mountain fronts, and (5) overturned beds in the footwall of major reverse faults.

Brown, W.G. (Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (USA))

1990-11-01

24

Inexpensive cross-flow hydropower turbine at the Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric Project. Field test report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric Project represents a Cooperative Agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Ron and Carlene Ott. The purpose of the project was to build, install in a hydro project, and intensively test an inexpensive Amer...

1989-01-01

25

Paleokarstic phenomena of the Lower Ordovician red bed sequences of the Arbuckle group, southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oil and gas production has been reported recently from paleokarstic Arbuckle reservoirs in the Ardmore and Arkoma basin. The West Spring Creek and the Kindblade formations apparently exhibit karstic features. The most extensive surface exposure of these formations is on the southern flank of the Arbuckle anticline along Interstate 35 north of Ardmore, Oklahoma. The lithology is predominantly limestone, ranging from argillaceous mudstone to oolitic and/or bioclastic grainstones. However, minor amounts of sandstone were also observed.These lithologies are characteristic of various peritidal facies. Of particular interest in this outcrop are three distinct red bed zones. Although the zones are part of the repetitive shallowing-upward cycles that characterize the West Spring Creek Formation, ample evidence suggests the red beds represent subaerial exposure surfaces where karstification took place. Many of the thin bedded, rubbly mudstones and wackestones actually represent varieties of breccia commonly associated with karst. Collapse and crackle breccia are most commonly observed. Small solution channels and other vugs are usually completely occluded by calcite cement. However, solution cavities or vugs with diameters larger than 10 cm (3.9 in.) are lined with drusy calcite. Hematite-impregnated sediment occurs as thinly laminated infilling of solution vugs and cavities and also acts as a cementing agent of collapse breccias. Preliminary evidence suggests that karstification processes were active during Arbuckle deposition.

Musselman, J.L. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (United States))

1991-06-01

26

Evidence for existence of Sabkhalike conditions in Upper Arbuckle Group, Slick Hills, southwestern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

In the Slick Hills of southwestern Oklahoma, the Ordovician upper Arbuckle Group carries a cryptic record of evaporite precipitation. This record is particularly well developed in the Cool Creek and, to a lesser extent, the West Spring Creek formations. Principal lines of evidence supporting this conclusion are (1) salt pseudomorphs (after gypsum( )) preserved in chert and, less commonly, in limestone (principal pseudomorphing minetals are calcite and dolomite), (2) molds of salts in cherts, (3) traces of anhydrite and celestite within chert nodules, (4) collapse breccias the authors interpret as resulting from the solution of sulfate deposits, (5) dolomite beds that have appropriate isotope values, and (6) length-slow and other varieties of chert indicative of waters of high ionic strength, some of which are the distinctive cauliflower variety. In addition, a number of features suggest that waters of unusual composition (ie., modified seawater) were present on the Arbuckle platform from time to time. These features include rare bedded (primary( )) cherts, subaqueous shrinkage cracks, and ooids of unusual and variable textures. Their conclusion is that during upper Arbuckle Group deposition, particularly Cool Creek deposition, the vast Arbuckle platform was periodically exposed and a sabkhalike environment developed in which dolomitization and gypsum/anhydrite precipitation took place. Subsequent reestablishment of fully marine conditions resulted in the early removal of the sulfates, leaving only a cryptic evaporite signature. Our interpretation can be supported in a general sense by the fact that (1) the fauna of the Cool Creek Formation is impoverished by comparison with adjacent formations, (2) the area was in a suitable climatic zone, and (3) the widespread occurrence of detrital quartz in the Cool Creek is compatible with exposure of the platform and consequent movement of clastics into the area.

Ragland, D.A. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (USA)); Donovan, R.N. (Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (USA))

1990-02-01

27

Frame Disputes in a Natural Resource Controversy: The Case of the Arbuckle Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines citizen responses to the proposed sale of water from the Arbuckle Simpson Aquifer in Oklahoma. Landowners claimed individual property rights as the primary justification for the sale of the water, while a citizens group opposing the sale of water based its arguments on the future viability of the resource and the cultural significance of the aquifer for

Thomas E. Shriver; Charles Peaden

2009-01-01

28

Magnetic, Electromagnetic, and Bathymetric Survey of the Lake of the Arbuckles, South-Central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In August 2009, we conducted a week-long geophysical and sonar survey of the Lake of the Arbuckles, within Chickasaw National Recreation Area in south-central Oklahoma. In this region, Pennsylvanian-aged orogenic deformation and sedimentation created the conditions that now govern the groundwater recharge, storage, and flow in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer, one of the most important bedrock aquifers in Oklahoma. The Lake of the Arbuckles reservoir, filled about 40 years ago, occupies an area where two major faults disrupt the geologic units that constitute the aquifer. The Reagan fault and the Mill Creek fault are hypothesized to intersect beneath the lake, based on available geologic exposures and inferences from gravity, magnetic, and helicopter electromagnetic (EM) observations in areas surrounding the lake. To understand the obscured geometry of these faults, we developed a pontoon-raft to carry a broad-band (15 kHz - 135 kHz) EM bird and a cesium-vapor magnetic sensor across the lake. We towed the raft 15 m behind a small boat to minimize EM and magnetic interference from the vessel, and we collected data on 200-m-spaced transects across much of the lake. The Reagan fault has a large electrical conductivity contrast and magnetic signature due to its juxtaposition at shallow depth of magnetic Proterozoic basement rocks with Paleozoic carbonate and clastic rocks. Initial results will show how the lake survey magnetic transects help to define the location of this fault beneath the lake. In addition, we collected dual-frequency sonar data to map the present-day bathymetry of the lake, and we collected vertical, water-column profiles of sound velocity, conductivity, temperature, pH, redox potential, and dissolved oxygen. The water-column profiles allow correction of the sonar travel-times to depth and estimation of the EM response of the lake water, which will be essential in later inversion modeling of the EM data. In addition, comparisons of the present-day bathymetry with pre-reservoir topographic contours and with sedimentation range line transects surveyed prior to the filling of the reservoir will yield estimates of sedimentation rates and patterns of the lake.

Scheirer, D. S.; Smith, D. V.; Coffee, R.; Cason, J.

2009-12-01

29

Airborne and Ground Electrical Surveys for Subsurface Mapping of the Arbuckle Aquifer, Central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Airborne and ground electrical surveys have been conducted to map the subsurface hydrogeologic character of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south central Oklahoma. An understanding of the geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics is necessary to evaluate groundwater flow through the highly faulted, structurally complex, carbonate aquifer. Results from this research will further understanding of the aquifer and will assist in managing the water resources of the region. The major issues include water quality, the allocation of water rights, and the potential impacts of pumping on springs and stream. Four areas in the Hunton anticline area, with distinctly different geology, were flown with a frequency domain helicopter electromagnetic system (HEM) in March, 2007. Ground electrical studies include dc resistivity imaging and natural field audiomagnetotelluric (AMT), and magnetotelluric (MT) surveys. The HEM resistivity and total field magnetic survey was flown in four blocks, A through D, mostly with a line spacing of 400 m. Block A extends from the Chickasaw National Recreational Area (CHIC) to Mill Creek on the west side of the anticline. The surface geology of this block is mostly dolomitic limestone of the Arbuckle Group that is in fault contact with younger Paleozoic clastic rocks. The flight line spacing was 800 meters in the western half of the block and 400 meters in the eastern part. Airborne magnetic data indicate that the Sulphur fault bends south to merge with the Mill Creek fault which substantiates an earlier hypothesis first made from interpretation of gravity data. Block B, located on the north side of the anticline consists of mostly of Arbuckle and Simpson Group rocks. Block C, covering most of the Clarita horst on the east side of the anticline, consists of the Upper Ordovician to the Lower Pennsylvanian shales. Block D, which was flown to include a deep test well site at Spears ranch, consisted of eight lines spaced at 400 meters. The HEM data are being used to more precisely locate faults, refine the lithostratigraphic units, and to map the depth and extent of shallow epikarst. The MT and AMT data revealed deep structural contacts and a transition between fresh and highly mineralized ground water between springs in the CHIC. The dc resistivity survey has greatly helped in mapping major faults both within dolomitic limestone and clastic units. Ground resistivity surveys also suggest that, in places, the faults within limestone are zones of lower resistivity and map low resistivity surficial epikarst a several meters thick. Ground penetrometer data also has been used to define the depth extent of epikarst in selected areas and the data correlate well with the dc resistivity and HEM resistivity depth sections.

Smith, D.; Smith, B. D.; Blome, C. D.; Osborn, N.

2008-12-01

30

Effects of municipal ground-water withdrawals on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma consists of a thick sequence of folded and faulted carbonate and clastic rocks of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age. Fractures and karst features locally increase the aquifer's capacity to transmit and store ground water. The aquifer is a principal source of water for municipal and rural users. A hydrologic study was conducted to evaluate the effects of municipal ground-water withdrawal from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer on local ground-water levels and discharge from nearby springs and streams in south-central Pontotoc County. A municipal well was pumped for 63 hours at an average rate of 1,170 gallons per minute. A maximum observed drawdown of 0.3 feet was recorded half a mile from the pumping well. Drawdown was observed as far as 1.2 miles from the pumping well. No measurable response was observed at any of the surface-water-discharge measurement sites; however, recharge from precipitation may have masked any decreases in discharge caused by the pumping. Simultaneous pumping of two municipal wells for 241 hours at average rates of 1,170 and 2,730 gallons per minute resulted in a maximum observed drawdown of 1.3 feet recorded at an average distance of 0.80 miles from the pumping wells. The most distant drawdown observed was at an average distance 1.1 miles from the pumped wells. Less that 2 days after pumping stopped, increases in springflow were recorded at two springs; it is unknown whether these discharge responses reflect the effects of recharge from precipitation, or the combined effects of precipitation and the cessation of ground-water withdrawal. The effects of the stress tests on the hydrologic system were offset by recharge from concurrent precipitation. The maximum observed drawdown represents about 6 percent of the median natural water-level fluctuation during the study period. The effect of drawdown could become critical during extended periods of low precipitation, if water levels are already near the bottom of domestic wells in the area. However, a comparison of maximum observed drawdown (1.3 ft) with the minimum saturated thickness of fresh ground water (1,500 ft) suggests that municipal pumping had little effect on the amount of ground water stored in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the study area. This evaluation is based on the limited pumping rates and times of the stress tests.

Savoca, M. E.; Bergman, D. L.

1994-01-01

31

Inexpensive cross-flow hydropower turbine at Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric Project: Final construction and cost report  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric Project is a Cooperative Agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Ron and Carlene Ott. The project's purpose is to build and intensively test an inexpensive American-made cross-flow turbine and to provide information to DOE on the cost, efficiency, operation and maintenance of the unit. This final report discusses the technical and financial aspects of planning, designing, manufacturing, and installing the turbine as well as design and construction details of the site.

Not Available

1988-07-01

32

Geochemical Investigation of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, South-Central Oklahoma, 2004-06  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A geochemical reconnaissance investigation of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma was initiated in 2004 to characterize the ground-water quality at an aquifer scale, to describe the chemical evolution of ground water as it flows from recharge areas to discharge in wells and springs, and to determine the residence time of ground water in the aquifer. Thirty-six water samples were collected from 32 wells and springs distributed across the aquifer for chemical analysis of major ions, trace elements, isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, dissolved gases, and age-dating tracers. In general, the waters from wells and springs in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer are chemically suitable for all regulated uses, such as public supplies. Dissolved solids concentrations are low, with a median of 347 milligrams per liter (mg/L). Two domestic wells produced water with nitrate concentrations that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's nitrate maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 mg/L. Samples from two wells in the confined part of the aquifer exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) for chloride of 250 mg/L and the SMCL of 500 mg/L for dissolved solids. Water samples from these two wells are not representative of water samples from the other wells and springs completed in the unconfined part of the aquifer. No other water samples from the Arbuckle-Simpson geochemical reconnaissance exceeded MCLs or SMCLs, although not every chemical constituent for which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established a MCL or SMCL was analyzed as part of the Arbuckle-Simpson geochemical investigation. The major ion chemistry of 34 of the 36 samples indicates the water is a calcium bicarbonate or calcium magnesium bicarbonate water type. Calcium bicarbonate water type is found in the western part of the aquifer, which is predominantly limestone. Calcium magnesium bicarbonate water is found in the eastern part of the aquifer, which is predominantly a dolomite. The major ion chemistry for these 34 samples is consistent with a set of water-rock interactions. Rainfall infiltrates the soil zone, where the host rock, limestone or dolomite, dissolves as a result of uptake of carbon dioxide gas. Some continued dissolution of dolomite and precipitation of calcite occur as the water flows through the saturated zone. The major ion chemistry of the two samples from wells completed in the confined part of the aquifer indicates the water is a sodium chloride type. Geochemical inverse modeling determined that mixing of calcite-saturated recharge water with brine and dissolving calcite, dolomite, and gypsum accounts for the water composition of these two samples. One of the two samples, collected at Vendome Well in Chickasaw National Recreation Area, had a mixing fraction of brine of about 1 percent. The brine component of the sample at Vendome Well is likely to account for the relatively large concentrations of many of the trace elements (potassium, fluoride, bromide, iodide, ammonia, arsenic, boron, lithium, selenium, and strontium) measured in the water sample. Carbon-14, helium-3/tritium, and chlorofluorocarbons were used to calculate ground-water ages, recharge temperatures, and mixtures of ground water in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. Thirty four of 36 water samples recharged the aquifer after 1950, indicating that water is moving quickly from recharge areas to discharge at streams and springs. Two exceptions to this classification were noted in samples 6 and 15 (Vendome Well). Ground-water ages determined for these two samples by using carbon-14 are 34,000 years (site 6) and 10,500 years (site 15). Concentrations of dissolved argon, neon, and xenon in water samples were used to determine the temperature of the water when it recharged the aquifer. The mean annual air temperature at Ada, Oklahoma, is 16 degrees Celsius (C) and the median temperature of the 30 reconnaissance water samples was 18.1 C. The av

Christenson, Scott; Hunt, Andrew G.; Parkhurst, David L.

2009-01-01

33

Discrete and Continuous Gravity Studies of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, South-Central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of a high-resolution gravity study using traditional and novel observational methods focused on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer (ASA), a major ground-water system in Oklahoma that is experiencing demand from distant regions. We have partnered with the National Park Service to conduct gravity surveys of prominent faults near the Chickasaw National Recreation Area. These structures, created during late Paleozoic orogenies, may serve as conduits for ground-water flow to the springs and wells that are important natural resources of this park. Gravity data were collected in two modes: traditional observations at discrete stations and a new approach utilizing continuous data from a marine gravity meter deployed on a moving land vehicle. With the discrete data, we clearly define the extensions of the major Sulphur, South Sulphur, and Mill Creek fault zones beneath younger, unfaulted rocks that form the surface geology of the park. Gravity anomalies range from 1 mGal to 15 mGal and arise from the juxtaposition of Paleozoic carbonate and clastic rocks across the faults. With the continuous gravity data, we increase the number of gravity observations by two or more orders of magnitude, although the precision of the continuous gravity varies with the quality of the navigation (Eotvos correction) and the measurement of vertical motion of the vehicle. To explore the limits of this continuous gravity technique, we performed numerous tests operating the vehicle at different speeds and using multiple GPS sensors that range in capability from recreational to survey quality. These tests demonstrate the tradeoff between the along-track data resolution and the precision of the gravity anomaly.

Scheirer, D.; Hosford Scheirer, A.; Herr, R.

2005-12-01

34

Inexpensive cross-flow hydropower turbine at Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric Project  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the first three and half years of operation and maintenance on the Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric Project. Located on a flashy mountain stream in northern California, the project was designed, built and tested through a Cooperative Agreement between the US DOE and OTT Engineering, Inc. (OTT). The purpose of the Agreement is to build and intensively test an inexpensive American-made cross-flow turbine and to provide information to the DOE on the cost, efficiency, operation, and maintenance of the unit. It requires that OTT document for DOE a summary of the complete operating statistics, operation and maintenance cost, and revenues from power sales for a two-year operating period. Several unique events occurred between the initial start-up (December 1986) and the beginning of the 1989 generation season (October 1988) that delayed the first year's full operation and provided unique information for a demonstration project of this type. Accordingly, this report will discuss certain major problems experienced with the design, operation and maintenance, and energy production, as well as the operation and maintenance costs and value of the power produced for the first three and half years of operation. 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1991-07-01

35

Inexpensive cross-flow hydropower turbine at the Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric Project  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric Project represents a Cooperative Agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Ron and Carlene Ott. The purpose of the project was to build, install in a hydro project, and intensively test an inexpensive American-made cross-flow turbine and to provide information to the DOE on the costs, efficiency, operation, and maintenance of the unit. The data gained from the research and development project will assist in development of cost-effective technology for low-head small hydro sites. The turbine was designed to reduce the cost of manufacturing while making maximum use of the power available in a remote flashy northern California stream. Even with extensive field modifications, the cost of the unit was much less than those quoted by foreign manufacturers for the same site. The new type of cross-flow turbine developed uses an innovative automatic flow control sliding device which allows the unit to produce power at flow ranges of less than 6% of design flow. This coupled with the infinite flow adjustment feature allows detailed flow regulation needed for small run-of-river projects. The field efficiency testing, the subject of this report, was conducted by Ott Engineering, Inc. in 1988 and early 1989. The tests showed the turbine to have efficiencies in the high seventies and with improvements could reach the efficiencies touted by the European manufacturers of 85% and still be relatively inexpensive to manufacture. It was also found during the tests that the vacuum and depth of water on the runner had a pronounced effect on the turbine output and it is recommended that future research be conducted on these effects, especially for high-vacuum cross-flow turbines. 3 refs.

Not Available

1989-11-01

36

Arbuckle Lake, Murray County, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Annual total phosphorus and total nitrogen loadings to the lake were estimated and subdivided according to either point or non-point source origin. An assessment of the lake's trophic condition and limiting nutrient is also provided. All data collected by...

1977-01-01

37

Submarine-fan sedimentation, Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

More than 10,000 m (32,808 ft) of interbedded sandstones and shales comprise the Upper Mississippian and Lower Pennsylvanian flysch succession (Stanley, Jackfork, Johns Valley, Atoka) in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma. Deposited primarily by turbidity current and hemipelagic processes in bathyal and abyssal water depths, these strata formed major submarine-fan complexes that prograded in a westward direction along the axis of an elongate remnant ocean basin that was associated with the collision and suturing of the North American and African-South American plates. A longitudinal fan system is visualized as the depositional framework for these strata, which were deposited in a setting analogous to the modern Bengal fan of the Indian Ocean. Facies analysis of the Jackfork formation indicates that inner fan deposits are present in the vicinity of Little Rock, Arkansas; middle fan channel and interchannel deposits occur at DeGray Dam and Friendship, Arkansas; and outer fan depositional-lobe deposits are present in southeastern Oklahoma. Boulder-bearing units (olistostromes), many with exotic clasts, were shed laterally into the Ouachita basin. They occur throughout the flysch succession and in all fan environments (i.e., inner, middle, and outer). This relationship may serve as a useful criterion for recognizing analogous longitudinal fan systems in the rock record.

Moiola, R.J.; Shanmugam, G.

1984-09-01

38

33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla...REGULATIONS § 208.29 Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla...agent, shall operate the Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles in the interest of...

2013-07-01

39

Source rock geochemistry and liquid and solid petroleum occurrences of the Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Crude oils, solid bitumens and potential oil source rocks of the frontal and central Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma are examined. The organic matter in each of these materials is characterized, and oils are correlated to potential source rocks in the Ouachita Mountains. Four Ouachita Mountain oils and seven solid bitumens (grahamite and impsonite) are analyzed. The oils are paraffinic and range from 31.8 to 43.1 API gravity. The oils are thermally mature and generally unaltered. All four oils are commonly sourced, by n-alkane, sterane and hopane distributions, stable isotope ratios, infrared spectra and vanadium/nickel ratios. A common source for the solid bitumens is also suggested by isotope ratios and pyrolyzate characteristics. An origin due to crude oil biodegradation is suggested for these solids, based on carbon isotope ratios, elemental analyses, and sterane distributions of the solid bitumen pyrolyzates.

Curiale, J. A.

40

Structural style and timing of Late Paleozoic basement uplifts in southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Proposed theories of deformation in southern Oklahoma presently involve large-scale basement thrusting or large magnitudes of strike slip. As more and better seismic data and well control have become available, a predominant interpretation of the structural style is emerging. This style is characterized by a large basement overhang along the mountain fronts, created by major reverse dip-slip (thrust) faults. Additionally, these reverse faults may have an antithetic back-thrust on the hanging wall. In cross section, this style appears as a wedge-uplift that is often mistakenly interpreted to represent the upper portion of a flower structure created by wrench-faulting. Structural uplifts in southern Oklahoma developed as a result of Late Paleozoic Wichita, Ouachita and Arbuckle orogenies. Emplacement of the thin-skinned Ouachita thrust belt occurred during the Ouachita orogeny (Mississippian through Middle Pennsylvanian). Basement-involved compressional uplifts of the Wichita Mountains and Criner Hills were initially uplifted during the Wichita orogeny (Late Mississippian to Early Pennsylvanian), while the Arbuckle anticline and Tishomingo uplift reached their culmination during the Arbuckle orogeny (Middle to Late Pennsylvanian). Evidence for the timing of these uplifts are the various conglomerates and unconformities preserved in the subsurface, and occasionally exposed at the surface. Age-dating of these unconformities strongly suggests a sequence of deformation in which the culmination of uplift progressed generally from south to north through time. This sequence is also suggested by deformation of the thin-skinned Ouachita thrust belt by basement-involved structures of the Arbuckle orogeny.

Brown, W.G. (Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1993-04-01

41

Relationship of facies and sequence stratigraphy to Paleokarst and fracture overprints in the carbonates of the Arbuckle Group in the evaluation of exploration and horizontal drilling potential  

SciTech Connect

The mid-continent region, especially in Oklahoma and Arkansas, contains thick dolomite Paleozoic carbonate sections with karstic character. These sections commonly exhibit strong structural overprints, including intense fracturing, due primarily to Pennsylvanian orogenies. The Arbuckle Group is compose of multiple parasequences that are the result of cyclic peritidal deposition on a broad shallow shelf. Sequence stratigraphy evaluation indicates that significant unconformities or disconformities occur within the Arbuckle Group along third-order sequence boundaries. Arbuckle carbonates were subjected to very early dolomitization (Ordovician through Devonian). Sequences in which intercrystalline porosity was developed with little or no vuggy porosity usually have low permeability and effective porosity. However, these dolomitic sequences are quite susceptible to fracturing and they may produce in structural traps. These fractured sequences in the Arbuckle also are particularly susceptible to karstification associated with multiple unconformities, especially in areas where there has been significant orogenic activity such as the Criner uplift in southern Oklahoma. Fracturing and subsequent karstification have significant influence on porosity development and can produce extremely heterogeneous reservoirs. Exploration for oil and gas in the Arbuckle Group has been a difficult task. Problems with seal and source along with complex diagenetic and structural histories still plague efforts to understand Arbuckle reservoir development. There is new evidence that dolomitization, fracturing and karstification may be related to particular sequence positions and their related facies and disconformities. Innovative advances in geologic concepts, such as sequence stratigraphy, and in techniques, such as horizontal drilling, may lead to new discoveries in the Arbuckle Group.

Fritz, R.D.; Wilson, J.L.; Medlock, P.L.; Kuykendall, M.D. (MASERA Corp., Tulsa, OK (United States))

1993-09-01

42

Correlation of oil and asphaltite in Quachita mountain region of Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Several chemical characteristics of oils and asphaltites in the frontal and central Ouachita Mountains have been examined. Results indicate that the three oils and six asphaltites examined from Atoka, Pittsburg, and Pushmataha counties in southeastern Oklahoma originated from a common source. Carbon isotope ratios for oil and asphaltite suggest that the asphaltite is neither a protopetroleum nor a thermally degraded crude oil. Results of metallic and elemental analyses are consistent with an oil alteration origin for Ouachita solid bitumens. It is proposed that low-temperature, near-surface alteration phenomena, such as biodegradation and water washing, have degraded crude oil to produce asphaltite in the frontal and central areas. These results suggest that previous assumptions of a high temperature history are unwarranted.

Curiale, J.A.; Harrison, W.E.

1981-11-01

43

Rb-Sr Isotopic Systematics of Felsic Igneous Rocks, Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently determined Rb-Sr isotopic characteristics of twelve of the recognized felsic units of the Cambrian Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen, which crop out in the Wichita Mountains of the southwestern Oklahoma, give some clues to the petrogenesis of these felsic units. 1) Plots of 87Rb/86Sr vs. 87Sr/86Sr form subsets yielding dates of 516 Ma and 522 Ma, discrepancies of about 10 to 20 Ma from the U-Pb zircon age for the Mount Scott Granite of 534 Ma, probably attributable to a systematic loss of radiogenic 87Sr for these units. 2) The Mount Scott Granite and related units (n=7) including Medicine Park Granite and Saddle Mountain Granite give a probable pseudoisochron of 516\\pm4{}Ma and an initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7045\\pm4{}, indicating derivation from a primitive mantle source with little crustal contamination. 3) A well-regressed line of 522\\pm2{} Ma with an initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7059\\pm7{} is shown by the Long Mountain Granite (n=3), one of the finer-grained western granites, and the Fort Sill Section of the Carlton Rhyolite (n=2) in the eastern Wichitas, which indicates that both were possibly derived contemporaneously from a mixed crustal-mantle source. 4) The Lugert Granite of the western Wichitas has variable and relatively high 87Sr/86Sr initials at 516 Ma probably indicating heterogeneous crustal sources. Interpretation of these data can be made with the following scenario: The earliest known felsic unit is the Carlton Rhyolite, Fort Sill Section. This must have been generated mostly from crustal melting around large mafic plutons in the mid- to lower crust. Crustal melting around the mafic plutons continued to generate liquids rising to the emplacement position, e.g., Long Mountain Granite. Following this, the host magma for the Mount Scott set of units originated dominantly by fractional crystallization from the mafic plutons. Subsequently, additional mafic magma must have moved into the lower- to mid-crust, at some other stratigraphic level, melting a more heterogeneous mixture of rock types to yield the Lugert Granite. Thus, in this rather narrow rift zone, felsic magmas of varying origin, but similar chemistry, have risen to the same emplacement level.

Min, K.; Gilbert, M. C.

2001-12-01

44

Pennsylvanian foreland deformation of Wichita uplift, southwest Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Pennsylvanian foreland deformation associated with the Ouachita orogene reactivated a west-northwest-east-southeast Cambrian basement trend, the southern Oklahoma aulacogen, to form the Wichita uplift, southwest Oklahoma. The 30-km-wide subsurface Frontal fault zone separates the uplift from the Anadarko basin to the north. Horizontal shortening across this fault zone is estimated at 7-15 km (20-40%), vertical displacement totals 9-10 km from the uplift to the basin. Folds are mapped on an interformational scale within the Frontal fault zone, and on an intraformational scale (Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Group) in the Slick Hills, southwest Oklahoma. Additional shortening occurred along southwest dipping mountain flank thrusts and on bedding plane thrusts, respectively. Hanging wall blocks of major faults contain the shallow dipping limb and anticlinal hinge zone of the interformational scale folds. Oil and gas production is generally restricted to these anticlinal crests within Paleozoic rocks. Deep wells (> 6000 m) that have penetrated footwall imbricates of the mountain flank thrusts have drilled through steep-overturned beds and tight recumbent folds before passing through faults into a normal stratigraphic sequence. Basement thrust loading of the southern margin of the Anadarko basin controlled the trend (west-northwest-east-southeast) of the axis of maximum deposition within the basin during the Pennsylvanian.

McConnell, D.

1986-05-01

45

Quebec Cambro-Ordovician exploration focuses on Wilburton Arbuckle analog  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Quebec is the site of key Cambro-Ordovician wildcatting and lower risk gas drilling. A group of companies is below 7,000 ft at 1 St. Simon, a wildcat in the St. Lawrence Lowlands basin projected to Cambrian Potsdam sand at about 13,800 ft. The drill site is on part of the ancient Cambro-Ordovician coastline from Newfoundland through Quebec and the eastern U.S. to West Texas. Bow Valley Industries Ltd. is operator of the well on a prospect assembled by Exploration Terrenex Ltd., Calgary. The companies say the area south of the St. Lawrence River is a depositional and structural look-alike to Wilburton deep field in the Arkoma basin of eastern Oklahoma, where the gas productive Ordovician carbonate is the Arbuckle.

Not Available

1992-02-17

46

Relationship of facies and sequence stratigraphy to Paleokarst and fracture overprints in the carbonates of the Arbuckle Group in the evaluation of exploration and horizontal drilling potential  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mid-continent region, especially in Oklahoma and Arkansas, contains thick dolomite Paleozoic carbonate sections with karstic character. These sections commonly exhibit strong structural overprints, including intense fracturing, due primarily to Pennsylvanian orogenies. The Arbuckle Group is compose of multiple parasequences that are the result of cyclic peritidal deposition on a broad shallow shelf. Sequence stratigraphy evaluation indicates that significant unconformities

R. D. Fritz; J. L. Wilson; P. L. Medlock; M. D. Kuykendall

1993-01-01

47

Geology of the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

In late 1987, the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma, was heralded by flows of nearly 4,000 BOPD and 3 MMCFGD from the upper Arbuckle Group. The field structure is part of the buried Criner uplift along the southwest flank of the Ardmore basin. The uplift formed during a Late Mississippian\\/Early Pennsylvanian episode of bidirectional thrusting (northeast and southwest) probably

M. T. Roberts; D. L. Read

1990-01-01

48

Geology Fieldnotes: Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides information about the Chickasaw National Recreation Area including geology, park maps, visitor information, photographs, and links for more details. The human attraction to the water found there(streams, lakes, and springs), human history, the old mountains (300 million years old - Carboniferous) formed by the Arbuckle uplift, and sedimentary rock deposits are highlighted.

49

Three-dimensional seismic interpretation from the triangle zone of the frontal Ouachita mountains and Arkoma basin, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of 28.5 km{sup 2} of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data from the triangle zone of the Ouachita fold-and-thrust belt and the foreland Arkoma basin reveals structural details not recognized previously in conventional two-dimensional (2-D) seismic data. The data indicate that the frontal Kiowa syncline in the Arkoma basin has been passively uplifted by blind thrusting at the Morrowan Wapanucka Limestone level, and that smaller wavelength folds are produced by thrusting at shallower levels in the Atoka Formation. Faulting at deeper levels in the Hunton and Arbuckle groups has been traditionally interpreted as normal, but our analysis of this data set indicates that, in this area, normal faults were reactivated during the Ouachita orogeny as reverse faults, and the changes in fault separation can be followed along strike. These faults show the same trend as the overlying thrusts and are normal or have minor inversion where the overlying thrusts have small displacement. These faults have been completely inverted where the overlying thrusts have more displacement, suggesting a genetic relation between the Wapanucka thrusts and the inversion of the Hunton and Arbuckle faults. Four reflections were chosen for analysis: one reflection in the lower Atoka Formation, two reflections repeated in the Wapanucka Limestone, and a fourth reflection in the Hunton Group. All of these surfaces exhibit the same geometry with the fold axes plunging to the southwest. Variations in bearing and plunge of fold axes in the Wapanucka Limestone can be directly correlated to changes in displacement and ramp height along strike. The similarity between surface geometries suggests that the last deformation took place at deeper levels in the Hunton and Arbuckle groups and folded the overlying thrusts. Reactivation of Atokan normal faults at deeper levels in the Arkoma basin and Ouachita subthrust play may be more widespread than previously recognized.

Valderrama, M.H.; Nielsen, K.C.; McMechan, G.A. [Univ. of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States)

1996-08-01

50

Devitrification of the Carlton Rhyolite in the Blue Creek Canyon area, Wichita Mountains, southwestern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Cambrian Carlton Rhyolite is a sequence of lava flows and ignimbrites extruded in association with rifting in the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. Rhyolite exposed in the Blue Creek Canyon area consists of a single, originally glassy, porphyritic lava flow > 300 m thick. Abundant flow banding is deformed by variably oriented flow folds present on both outcrop and thin-section scales. A variety of complex texture record the cooling, degassing, and devitrification history of the flow. Acicular Fe, Ti-oxide crystallites aligned in the flow banding document nucleation and limited crystal growth during flow. Spherical microvesicles and larger lithophysal cavities up to 10 cm long crosscut flow banding, showing that degassing continued after flow had ceased. Pseudomorphs of quartz after cristobalite and tridymite are present on cavity walls and are products of high-T vapor-phase crystallization. Devitrification textures overprint the flow banding and developed in two stages. Primary devitrification occurred during initial cooling and formed spherulitic intergrowths in distinct areas bound by sharp devitrification fronts. Spherulites nucleated on phenocrysts, vesicles, and flow bands and show evidence of multiple episodes of growth. Rhyolite outside of the devitrification fronts initially remained glassy but underwent later, low-T hydration to form perlitic texture, which was followed by prolonged secondary devitrification to form extremely fine-grained, equigranular quartzofeldspathic mosaics. Snowflake texture (micropoikilitic quartz surrounding randomly oriented alkali feldspar) developed during both primary and secondary devitrification. Spherical bodies up to 30 cm across are present in discrete horizons within the flow and weather out preferentially from the host rhyolite.

Bigger, S.E. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Geology); Hanson, R.E. (Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1993-02-01

51

Oklahoma Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oklahoma Geological Survey is a state agency dedicated to geological research and public service. This site contains information on earthquakes, geographic names, general Oklahoma geology, and the mountains and water resources of the state. There are educational materials available to order, many of which are free. Geologic maps indicate rock types and ages, as well as the geologic provinces of the state. Links are provided for more resources.

52

Ravia nappe, Bryan County, Oklahoma: a gravity slide block off the Tishomingo uplift  

SciTech Connect

The Ravia nappe in Bryan County, Oklahoma, is located along the southwestern flank of the Tishomingo uplift, between the Cumberland and East Durant oil fields. This mass of Cambrian-Ordovician through Mississippian sediments tectonically overlies younger Springer shales (Pennsylvanian) of the Ardmore basin. Previously, this feature has been interpreted to have been thrust southward along the Cumberland fault, a fault parallel to the Ravia thrust. Reinterpretation of this area, with additional well data, indicates the Ravia nappe is a gravity slide block off the uplifted Tishomingo mountains. The Ravia nappe is interpreted to have been originally the southwest overturned limb of the Tishomingo uplift. Prior to the major thrusting on the Ravia thrust, but after compressional folding and uplift of the Tishomingo mountains, a breakaway fault formed across the most intensely folded beds. The breakaway fault undercut the overturned southwestern limb of the Tishomingo uplift in a concave-upward fault surface. Gravitational forces caused the Ravia nappe Mississippian Caney rocks to Cambrian-Ordoviciena Arbuckle rocks to slide rotationally southwestward 2.5 mi (4 km). Topographic relief prior to the slide may have been as much as 9000 ft (2700 m). The slide occurred sometime during late Morrowan to early Desmoinesian.

Jacobson, M.I.

1983-08-01

53

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The contribution by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) on the depositional processes of the Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group (Formation) in Arkansas and Oklahoma highlights a few important processes that are often overlooked. Their work on the fabric of some high-density flow deposits is interesting in light of the debate over the nature of these types of deposits (Lowe, 1982; Hiscott, 1994). However,

A. H. Bouma; M. B. DeVries; C. G. Stone

1997-01-01

54

Structural styles: Arkoma and Ardmore basins and Arbuckle Mountains  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Ouachita thrust belt, thin-skinned deformation has telescoped the sedimentary section along major thrust systems. In the frontal Ouachitas, Ti Valley thrust places Ordovician and Devonian rocks over Pennsylvanian rocks. Exploration for hydrocarbons on this and older thrust sheets relies on fractured Bigfork Chert and Arkansas Novaulite for reservoirs. Imbricate thrusting associated with the Choctaw thrust has produced hydrocarbon

1990-01-01

55

Mountains  

SciTech Connect

This book covers the following topics: Above the forest: the alpine tundra; Solar energy, water, wind and soil in mountains; Mountain weather; Mountain building and plate tectonics; Mountain walls: forming, changing, and disappearing; Living high: mountain ecosystems; Distribution of mountain plants and animals; On foot in the mountains: how to hike and backpack; Ranges and peaks of the world. Map and guidebook sources, natural history and mountain adventure trips, mountain environmental education centers and programs, and sources of information on trails for the handicapped are included.

Fuller, M.

1989-01-01

56

Porosity development in quartz-rich, oolitic limestones of upper Arbuckle Group: A response to unloading  

SciTech Connect

The upper Arbuckle Group of southern Oklahoma is composed of a thick sequence of carbonates deposited in shallow, epicontinental seas. Several concentrations of quartz sandy detritus, two of which are significant markers in outcrop, are found in the Kindblade and Cool Creek Formations. Both units are composed of varying amounts of quartz sand, ooids, peloids, clasts, and micrite matrix cemented by calcite, silica, and minor dolomite. After a complex postdepositional history of burial, tectonism, and uplift, removal of overburden resulted in relaxation of compressive forces and the development of microfractures between and within grains in the mixed mineralogy units. Equidimensional voids formed around the outer edges of syntaxial quartz overgrowths as calcite spar separated from silica spar. Relatively thin cortices pulled away from large nuclei resulting in spherical voids within ooids. Multiple microfractures in the radial cortices connect the inner spherical pores to interparticle porosity. A system of microfractures between crystal boundaries in the calcite cement links the pores. Porosity development varies laterally within the quartz sandy, oolitic units and is, in part, dependent on the original burial depth and the amount of overburden removed. Microfractures in subsurface units, if present, may not be as well developed. Alternatively, microfracturing may be enhanced as a result of subsurface dissolution.

Ragland, D.A.; Matthews, F. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (USA))

1989-08-01

57

Sterane distribution of solid bitumen pyrolyzates. Changes with biodegradation of crude oil in the Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Solid bitumens (grahamite and impsonite) of southeastern Oklahoma have been shown to originate from near-surface alteration of crude oil ( , 1981; and , 1981). Pyrolysis of these solids has been employed to compare the sterane distribution of geographically proximate oils to that of the bitumens. The ratio of rearranged to regular steranes is higher in the pyrolyzates than in the oils, a finding consistent with a bitumen origin due to biodegradation of oil. The remaining presence of steranes, particularly regular steranes, in the bitumens suggests that sterane occlusion may have occurred prior to or during the alteration process, thus removing tetracyclic compounds from the influence of microbial attack. These data suggest that pyrolysis- GC / MS offers a viable approach to correlation problems involving solid bitumens.

Curiale, Joseph A.; Harrison, William E.; Smith, Garmon

1983-03-01

58

Sterane distribution of solid bitumen pyrolyzates. Changes with biodegradation of crude oil in the Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Solid bitumens (grahamite and impsonite) of southeastern Oklahoma have been shown to originate from near-surface alteration of crude oil (Curiale, 1981; Curiale and Harrison, 1981). Pyrolysis of these solids has been employed to compare the sterane distribution of geographically proximate oils to that of the bitumens. The ratio of rearranged to regular steranes is higher in the pyrolyzates than in the oils, a finding consistent with a bitumen origin due to biodegradation of oil. The remaining presence of steranes, particularly regular steranes, in the bitumens suggests that sterane occlusion may have occurred prior to or during the alteration process, thus removing tetracyclic compounds from the influence of microbial attack. These data suggest that pyrolysis- GC MS offers a viable approach to correlation problems involving solid bitumens. ?? 1983.

Curiale, J. A.; Harrison, W. E.; Smith, G.

1983-01-01

59

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect

Shanmugam and Moiola (1994a, b, 1995) have generated substantial controversy and reexamination of what was originally thought to be a well-understood stratigraphic interval of deep-water origin in the Carboniferous Jackfork Group of Arkansas and Oklahoma. This reexamination of interpretation is good in that it forces sedimentologists, sequence stratigraphers, and reservoir geologists to reconsider their understanding of deep-water processes and products, usage of scientific terms to communicate interpretations, and the economic consequences of being nearly right or certainly wrong. Examination of Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) prompts brief comments on three issues: (1) the classification of a sedimentary deposit based on the sedimentary process during the final moments of deposition, (2) the use of apparently irrelevant analogs to interpret depositional and postdepositional processes and products, and (3) the regional interpretation of overall depositional environment from very specific and very local observations of sedimentary products.

Coleman, J.L. Jr. [Amoco Worldwide Exploration Business Group, Houston, TX (United States)

1997-03-01

60

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} deep-water outcrops of the Pennsylvanian upper Jackfork Group in the Ouachita Mountains of west-central Arkansas, recently discussed by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995), are especially significant to the petroleum industry because they have long been used as an analog to fine-grained, deep-water clastic reservoirs throughout the world. Numerous industry, academic, and government geoscientists have studied these outcrops for many

R. M. Slatt; P. Weimer; C. G. Stone

1997-01-01

61

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect

The contribution by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) on the depositional processes of the Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group (Formation) in Arkansas and Oklahoma highlights a few important processes that are often overlooked. Their work on the fabric of some high-density flow deposits is interesting in light of the debate over the nature of these types of deposits (Lowe, 1982; Hiscott, 1994). However, we disagree with some of the observations and interpretations they use in making their argument for a new depositional model, and submit that (1) turbidity current deposits (turbidites) are a major lithofacies component in the DeGray Spillway cut is not difficult, and (4) because it is not necessary to preserve conventional dogma, a change in nomenclature is more appropriate than a change in depositional models. Finally, their call for application of their debris-flow model to the North Sea, Gulf of Mexico, offshore Nigeria, and elsewhere is disturbing because they would have the petroleum industry relinquish the idea of predictability in deep-water reservoirs.

Bouma, A.H. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); DeVries, M.B. [Exxon Company, Houston, TX (United States); Stone, C.G. [Arkansas Geological Commission, Little Rock, AR (United States)

1997-03-01

62

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect

The {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} deep-water outcrops of the Pennsylvanian upper Jackfork Group in the Ouachita Mountains of west-central Arkansas, recently discussed by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995), are especially significant to the petroleum industry because they have long been used as an analog to fine-grained, deep-water clastic reservoirs throughout the world. Numerous industry, academic, and government geoscientists have studied these outcrops for many years. As Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) point out, several interpretations of these outcrops have been made through the years. These changing interpretations coincide with the evolution of knowledge about deep-marine sedimentation and reservoirs. These outcrops have been constantly reexamined as petroleum geoscientists have brought their global exploration and production experience to the field.

Slatt, R.M. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Weimer, P. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Stone, C.G. [Arkansas Geological Commission, Little Rock, AR (United States)

1997-03-01

63

Alterations in the non-clay-mineral fraction of pelitic rocks the diagenetic to low-grade metamorphic transition, Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma and Arkansas  

SciTech Connect

The transformation of smectite to illite has been cited by many authors as a source of silica during diagenesis of mudrocks. Illites themselves, however, undergo chemical changes as they recrystallize into micas during high-grade diagenesis/low-grade metamorphism. Average compositions of phyllosilicates from the literature suggest that an equivalent amount of silica is available from transformation of illite to muscovite as from illitization of smectites. The fate of silica released by this process has not been reported, but could be a major contributor to the silt-size quartz population. The quartz and feldspar fraction of pelites from the Stanley Shale (Mississippian) in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma and Arkansas was separated using sodium bisulfate fusions. The mineralogy and the grain-size distribution of this fraction were determined using standard petro-graphic and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Bulk rock samples were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) methods. The data obtained were related to illite crystallinity and vitrinite reflectance as reported by Guthrie el al. (1986) and Houseknecht and Matthews (1985). The authors results are consistent with reported differences between quartz in schists and their shale precursors, and suggest that release of silica during diagenesis of phyllosilicates continues after the smectite-illite transformation. This silica precipitates as quartz within the pelite, consistent with the suggestion by Blatt (1987) that metapelites are the source of abundant silt-size quartz. The lack of whole-rock chemical variation with thermal maturity implies closed-system behavior across much of the pelite-to-metapelite transition.

Totten, M.W.; Blatt, H. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). School of Geology and Geophysics)

1993-09-01

64

Mississippian facies relationships, eastern Anadarko basin, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Mississippian strata in the eastern Anadarko basin record a gradual deepening of the basin. Late and post-Mississippian tectonism (Wichita and Arbuckle orogenies) fragmented the single large basin into the series of paired basins and uplifts recognized in the southern half of Oklahoma today. Lower Mississippian isopach and facies trends (Sycamore and Caney Formations) indicate that basinal strike in the study area (southeastern Anadarko basin) was predominantly east-west. Depositional environment interpretations made for Lower Mississippian strata suggest that the basin was partially sediment starved and exhibited a low shelf-to-basin gradient. Upper Mississippian isopach and facies trends suggest that basinal strike within the study area shifted from dominantly east-west to dominantly northwest-southeast due to Late Mississippian and Early Pennsylvanian uplift along the Nemaha ridge. Within the study area, the Chester Formation, composed of gray to dove-gray shales with interbedded limestones deposited on a carbonate shelf, thins depositionally into the basin and is thinnest at its facies boundary with the Springer Group and the upper portion of the Caney Formation. As basin subsidence rates accelerated, the southern edge of the Chester carbonate shelf was progressively drowned, causing a backstepping of the Chester Formation calcareous shale and carbonate facies. Springer Group sands and black shales transgressed northward over the drowned Chester Formation shelf.

Peace, H.W. (Oryx Energy, Inc., Midland, TX (United States)); Forgotson, J.M. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman (United States))

1991-08-01

65

Geologic map of Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Murray County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This 1:24,000-scale geologic map is a compilation of previous geologic maps and new geologic mapping of areas in and around Chickasaw National Recreation Area. The geologic map includes revisions of numerous unit contacts and faults and a number of previously undifferentiated rock units were subdivided in some areas. Numerous circular-shaped hills in and around Chickasaw National Recreation Area are probably the result of karst-related collapse and may represent the erosional remnants of large, exhumed sinkholes. Geospatial registration of existing, smaller scale (1:72,000- and 1:100,000-scale) geologic maps of the area and construction of an accurate Geographic Information System (GIS) database preceded 2 years of fieldwork wherein previously mapped geology (unit contacts and faults) was verified and new geologic mapping was carried out. The geologic map of Chickasaw National Recreation Area and this pamphlet include information pertaining to how the geologic units and structural features in the map area relate to the formation of the northern Arbuckle Mountains and its Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The development of an accurate geospatial GIS database and the use of a handheld computer in the field greatly increased both the accuracy and efficiency in producing the 1:24,000-scale geologic map.

Blome, Charles D.; Lidke, David J.; Wahl, Ronald R.; Golab, James A.

2013-01-01

66

Geology of the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

In late 1987, the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma, was heralded by flows of nearly 4,000 BOPD and 3 MMCFGD from the upper Arbuckle Group. The field structure is part of the buried Criner uplift along the southwest flank of the Ardmore basin. The uplift formed during a Late Mississippian/Early Pennsylvanian episode of bidirectional thrusting (northeast and southwest) probably related to convergent strike-slip faulting. The basic field structure formed as a northeast-directed thrust plate, cored with Arbuckle Group carbonates and cut by a backthrust. The Cottonwood Creek anticline was near the crest of the uplift. It was erosionally denuded of its Simpson through Caney cover and karsted to depths of at least 1,600 ft. Subthrust strata include the Woodford source rocks. In the Middle to Late Pennsylvanian the uplift was buried by clastics (about 8,000 ft thick over cottonwood Creek). Culminating in the late Pennsylvanian, a second episode of wrench faulting sliced through the Criner uplift. About 3 mi of left-lateral slip occurred on this Criner-Healdton fault, which also dropped the anticline about 3,000 ft relative to the block to the south, completing the trap at Cottonwood Creek field. Fourteen wells have found oil in the anticline over an approximately 2.5 by 0.5-mi area. The oil column is at least 900 ft thick. Eight of the wells tested for 1,200-3,700 BOPD plus associated gas from a complex of fractures, Brown Zone dolomite, and karst-enhanced porosity in the West Spring Creek and Kindblade formations.

Roberts, M.T.; Read, D.L. (CNG Producing Co., Denver, CO (USA))

1990-05-01

67

Urban flood analysis in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flood insurance study information from the Federal Emergency Management Agency is utilized to estimate future flood hazard in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Techniques are described for estimating future urban runoff estimates. A method of developing stream cross section rating curves is explained. Future runoff estimates are used in conjuction with the rating curves to develop an estimate of 50- and 100- year flood profiles that would result from future urban development.

Tortorelli, Robert L.; Huntzinger, T. L.; Bergman, D. L.; Patneaude, A. L.

1983-01-01

68

Chronicles of Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Developed through a partnership between the Oklahoma Historical Society and the Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center, this site makes 20 volumes of the Chronicles of Oklahoma available for researchers and the general public. Originally published by the Oklahoma State Historical Society, the available volumes range in date from 1921 to 1942. Users may search the volumes indices provided online, or search by keyword. The volumes contain a number of compelling articles on Oklahoma history, such as "Oklahoma as a Part of the Spanish Dominion, 1763-1803" and "My Experience with the Cheyenne Indians." The table of contents for each volume is a helpful way to browse through the different volumes. Along with the volumes currently available online, more volumes will be added in the future, time and money permitting.

69

Oklahoma Tribes: A History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the

Gover, Kevin

1977-01-01

70

Oklahoma Tribes: A History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the

Gover, Kevin

1977-01-01

71

Oklahoma Historical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Historical Society is "to preserve and perpetuate the history of Oklahoma and its people by collecting, interpreting and disseminating knowledge of Oklahoma and the Southwest." The Society maintains over 20 museums and historic sites, and they are also responsible for maintaining this website. On the homepage, visitors can learn about the sites they maintain, including the Pawnee Bill Ranch and the Pioneer Woman Museum. In the "Publications" area, visitors can read back issues of "The Chronicles of Oklahoma" dating from 1921 to 1962, and they can also find the "Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture". The Society's "Found in Collections" blog is a great way to learn about their current archival work, and visitors can read about textile preservation techniques and the Civil War. Also, the site includes podcasts created to profile various aspects of the state's history. Finally, visitors can sign up to receive email updates on new additions, programs, and exhibits.

72

Gravity investigations of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geological configuration of the Arbuckle Uplift in the vicinity of Chickasaw National Recreation Area in south-central Oklahoma plays a governing role in the distribution of fresh and mineral springs within the park and in the existence of artesian wells in and around the park. A confining layer of well-cemented conglomerate lies immediately below the surface of the recreation area, and groundwater migrates from an area of meteoric recharge where rocks of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer crop out as close as two kilometers to the east of the park. Prominent, Pennsylvanian-aged faults are exposed in the aquifer outcrop, and two of the fault traces project beneath the conglomerate cover toward two groups of springs within the northern section of the park. We conducted gravity fieldwork and analysis to investigate the subsurface extensions of these major faults beneath Chickasaw National Recreation Area. By defining gravity signatures of the faults where they are exposed, we infer that the Sulphur and Mill Creek Faults bend to the south-west where they are buried. The South Sulphur Fault may project westward linearly if it juxtaposes rocks that have a density contrast opposite that of that fault's density configuration in the Sulphur Syncline area. The Sulphur Syncline, whose eastern extent is exposed in the outcrop area of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, does not appear to extend beneath Chickasaw National Recreation Area nor the adjacent City of Sulphur. The South Sulphur Fault dips steeply northward, and its normal sense of offset suggests that the Sulphur Syncline is part of a graben. The Mill Creek Fault dips vertically, and the Reagan Fault dips southward, consistent with its being mapped as a thrust fault. The Sulphur and Mill Creek Synclines may have formed as pull-apart basins in a left-lateral, left-stepping strike-slip environment. The character of the gravity field of Chickasaw National Recreation Area is different from the lineated gravity field in the area of Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer outcrop. This change in character is not due to the presence of the overlying conglomerate layer, which is quite thin (<100 m) in the area of the park with the springs. The presence of relatively high-density Precambrian basement rocks in a broader region suggests that significant gravity anomalies may arise from variations in basement topography. Understanding of the geological configuration of Chickasaw National Recreation Area can be improved by expanding the study area and by investigating complementary geophysical and borehole constraints of the subsurface.

Scheirer, Daniel S.; Scheirer, Allegra Hosford

2006-01-01

73

Oklahoma Climate Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Produced by the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, the Oklahoma Climate Data Web site offers information on various weather topics for the state that include normals and extremes, a rainfall update, monthly summaries, climate event summaries, and a weather timeline. The data is presented in tables, charts, illustrations, or Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) files (e.g., the timeline that goes back to 1900). A very interesting collection of facts, this site is a great example of a public agency offering quality information of their work to the public.

1996-01-01

74

Oklahoma Biological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Associated with the state of Oklahoma and the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Oklahoma, this Web site provides a wealth of information on the flora, fauna, and ecological communities found throughout the state. The site offers a variety of databases and literature collections on a variety of subjects including rare species, woody plants, breeding birds, and much more. The site is easy to navigate, and most searches can be executed simply. Some general information on biodiversity and tips on information sources for the non-specialist make this site valuable to a broader audience.

1969-12-31

75

Oklahoma Forest Industries, 1978.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oklahoma supplied 73 million cu ft of roundwood to forest industries in 1978, an increase of 13 percent since 1972, and 35 percent since 1975 (fig. 1). Pine made up four-fifths of the total. Sawlogs and pulpwood were the major products, accounting for 81 ...

J. G. Jones V. A. Rudis

1978-01-01

76

Heat flow and heat production in the Arkoma Basin and Oklahoma Platform, southeastern Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subsurface temperature and thermal gradients along a north-south cross section through the Arkoma Basin and the Oklahoma Platform in southeastern Oklahoma were estimated from 345 bottom hole temperatures from 199 oil and gas wells. The average geothermal gradient in the southern part of the basin near the Ouachita Front is 20C/km, exceeds 30C/km in the middle part of the basin, and is 24C/km on the Oklahoma Platform to the north. Drill cuttings obtained from 11 oil and gas wells were used for 843 thermal conductivity measurements. Thermal conductivity data, corrected to in situ conditions, were used to estimate heat flow. Estimated heat flow (20%) in the deep part of the Arkoma Basin near the Ouachita Front is 35-40 mW/m2 and increases systematically northward to 60-65 mW/m2 on the Oklahoma Platform. Average heat production, estimated from gamma ray logs, is 2.3 0.2 ?W/m3 for basement rocks underlying the Arkoma Basin and 2.8 0.1 ?W/m3 for basement rocks in the Oklahoma Platform area. Numerical models show that heat refraction from the less conductive sedimentary rocks (1.6 W/mK) of the Arkoma Basin to the more conductive crystalline rocks (3.0 W/mK at 25C) of the Oklahoma Platform and the Ouachita Mountains accounts for about 5-10 mW/m2 of the observed 20-30 mW/m2 decrease in heat flow from north to south. Changes in crustal heat production related to compositional changes and crustal thinning account for another 5-15 mW/m2 of the observed heat flow change. If the remaining 0-20 mW/m2 difference in heat flow is attributed to heat transport by topographically driven groundwater flow, the average basin-scale permeability of the Arkoma Basin and the Oklahoma Platform can be no greater than 10-15 m2. Results of this study are not generally supportive of theories which invoke topographically driven regional groundwater flow from the Arkoma Basin in Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian time (290 Ma) to explain the genesis of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, paleothermal anomalies, and regional diagenesis in the North American midcontinent.

Lee, Youngmin; Deming, David; Chen, Kevin F.

1996-11-01

77

77 FR 26598 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00059  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 13069 and 13070] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00059 AGENCY: U...declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes...Counties: Woodward. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma: Dewey, Ellis, Harper, Major,...

2012-05-04

78

Oklahoma DOE EPSCoR Trainees.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of the State of Oklahoma DOE EPSCOR Traineeship program. The program was carried out at the three major research universities in the state: the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University, and the University of Tulsa...

R. C. Knox

2000-01-01

79

76 FR 24555 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00045  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...24555-24556] [FR Doc No: 2011-10490... 12536 and 12537] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00045...disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1970-DR...Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma: Bryan, Choctaw...Disaster Assistance. [FR Doc. 2011-10490...

2011-05-02

80

Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 46th state, Oklahoma, presents its unusual history with the online version of The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. The Encyclopedia was prepared by over 500 "university-based scholars and independent historians and scholars," and was a joint effort by The Oklahoma Historical Society and Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center. Visitors can click on the "Table of Contents" link near the bottom of the homepage to "Browse Entries Alphabetically", "Browse Entries Chronologically", or "Browse Entries by Subject". Browsing via chronology introduces visitors to Oklahoma starting with the "Precontact Era", through the "Westward Expansion" and on to "Twentieth Century to Present". Subject categories include "African Americans", "Farming", "Military", and "Petroleum". When searching, visitors will be taken to the Electronic Publishing Center Search Page, so they will need to choose the specific collection, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, from the drop down box, to confine the search to the Encyclopedia.

81

Oklahoma Healthy Homes Initiative  

PubMed Central

Compelling scientific evidence suggests that a strong association exists between housing-related hazards and the health and safety of their residents. Health, safety, and environmental hazards (such as asthma and allergy triggers), unintentional injury hazards, lead-based paint hazards, and poor indoor air quality are interrelated with substandard housing conditions. This article describes a Healthy Homes initiative to address these hazards in a coordinated fashion in the home, rather than taking a categorical approach, even in the presence of multiple hazards. It also provides an overview of Oklahoma's Healthy Homes initiative and its pilot project, the Tulsa Safe and Healthy Housing Project, which is currently administered in Tulsa in collaboration with Children First, Oklahoma's Nurse-Family Partnership program. This pilot project seeks to open new areas of research that can lead to a greater understanding of environmental health issues related to substandard housing in the United States, which will eventually make homes safer and healthier.

Khan, Fahad

2011-01-01

82

USGS Water Resources of Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS): Water Resources of Oklahoma contains hydrologic data; information on current state water-resource projects; USGS maps and aerial photo images; USGS publications and presentations; technical resources; and information on the general climate and water quality monitoring programs. There is also a form for making water data requests; a drought watch for Oklahoma; analysis of daily and monthly water conditions for Oklahoma; and a Water Science for Schools site.

83

THREATENED FISHES OF OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of museum coUecdoos aod recent inteDSive c:ollectiq throqbout Oklahoma have revealed a Dumber of fish species to be threateD.ed by mao, aetiYities. AD lUUlOCated list of the 34 forms c:oosidered threatened in the ._ is presented. Five species are believed to be rare and endaqered. Hopefallyz dariJicaeion of the scatus of these 34 forms will aid in their

Henry W. Robison; George A. Moore; Rudolph J. Miller

84

78 FR 31998 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00071  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties (Physical Damage and Economic Injury Loans): Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma:...

2013-05-28

85

75 FR 47650 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00042  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Oklahoma. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma: Canadian, Cleveland, Kingfisher, Lincoln, Logan, Pottawatomie. The Interest Rates are: [[Page...

2010-08-06

86

Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project was to increase the functional capacity of the Maternal and Child Health Service of the Oklahoma State Department of Health to address the problem of pediatric injuries. The objectives of the pr...

M. L. Brown

1994-01-01

87

Backtalk: Adult Services in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes projects of Oklahoma libraries designed to combat the problem of illiteracy among adults and explains Oklahoma Image, a humanities effort aimed at attracting out-of-school adults to public libraries by focusing on the state's multicultural heritage. Column also reports adult service news from other states. (JD)|

Giblon, Della L.; Henke, Esther Mae

1980-01-01

88

78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for Tulsa--Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln, Creek...Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Rail Division intend to prepare an EIS pursuant...for the State of Oklahoma High-Speed Rail Initiative: Tulsa--Oklahoma City...

2013-05-28

89

Mountaineers heel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mountaineers are at risk of skin lesions caused by constant boot friction. This is the case of a 35 year old mountaineer who presented with large and deeply ulcerated lesions over the medial aspects of both heels after a two and a half day climb using crampons. A number of factors such as the length of the climb in cold

R M Strauss

2004-01-01

90

Promoting School Readiness in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The results of the research, conducted on Oklahoma's universal Pre-kindergarten (Pre-k) program, on children of Tulsa Public Schools (TPS), the largest school district in the state to increase the school readiness are presented.

Gormley, William T., Jr.; Gayer, Ted

2005-01-01

91

Gas-producing submarine-fan channel-levee complexes in Forbes Formation, Arbuckle field, central Sacramento basin, California  

SciTech Connect

The Campanian Forbes Formation was deposited as a south-prograding basin-plain, deep-sea fan and slope turbidite system in the Late Cretaceous Great Valley forearc basin of California. Gas production from the Arbuckle field is from the middle deep-sea fan deposits of the Forbes Formation at depths of 5500-7000 ft. The field is located approximately 7 mi east of the western erosional margin of the Sacramento basin, where the Forbes Formation crops out and dips steeply to the east. The field has a proven acreage of 3450 and contains 25 producing wells. A north-trending anticline, which is present on the regional easterly dip, provides 150-200 ft of closure in the southern part of the field. Detailed maps and cross sections of the gas-producing intervals of the Forbes Formation in the Arbuckle field have been constructed from correlation of 77 well logs and detailed examination of the nearby outcrops. Well-log correlations and sedimentary facies identified in outcrop indicate that the gas-producing intervals are chiefly channel-levee complexes in a mud-rich deep-sea fan system. These channel-level complexes trend southward, are slightly sinuous, and are as much as 1 mi wide. A comparison of structure-contour maps with net-sandstone maps and gas production data indicates that not all gas production is structurally controlled. Channel-axis sandstone that is as thick as 250 ft generally produces gas only within structural closure, whereas thinner, more shale-rich, channel-margin and levee deposits produce gas from updip stratigraphic pinch-outs into interchannel shale.

Imperato, D.P.; Nilsen, T.H.

1988-02-01

92

Gas-producing submarine-fan channel-levee complexes in Forbes Formation, Arbuckle Field, central Sacramento Basin, California  

SciTech Connect

The Campanian Forbes Formation was deposited as a southprograding basin-plain, deep-sea fan and slope turbidite system in the Late Cretaceous Great Valley forearc basin of California. Gas production from the Arbuckle field is from the middle deep-sea fan deposits of the Forbes Formation at depths of 5,500-7,000 ft. The field is located approximately 7 mi east of the western erosional margin of the Sacramento basin, where the Forbes Formation crops out and dips steeply to the east. The field has a proven acreage of 3,450 and contains 25 producing wells. A north-trending anticline, which is present on the regional easterly dip, provides 150-200 ft of closure in the southern part of the field. Detailed maps and cross sections of the gas-producing intervals of the Forbes Formation in the Arbuckle field have been constructed from correlation of 77 well logs and detailed examination of the nearby outcrops. Well-log correlations and sedimentary facies identified in outcrop indicate that the gas-producing intervals are chiefly channel-levee complexes in a mud-rich deep-sea fan system. These channel-level complexes trend southward, are slightly sinuous, and are as much as 1 mi wide. A comparison of structure-contour maps with net-sandstone maps and gas production data indicates that not all gas production is structurally controlled. Channel-axis sandstone that is as thick as 250 ft generally produces gas only within structural closure, whereas thinner, more shale-rich, channel-margin and levee deposits produce gas from updip stratigraphic pinch-outs into interchannel shale.

Imperato, D.P.; Nilsen, T.H.

1988-01-01

93

Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA 2001-0496-2866, Oklahoma City Community College, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request for a health hazard evaluation from employees at the Oklahoma City Community College Bookstore on August 13, 2001. Employees were concerned that the temporary location of...

2001-01-01

94

Sho-Vel-Tum oil field, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prolific oil and gas production is obtained in the Sho-Vel-Tum area of eastern Stephens and western Carter Counties, Okla., from rocks of Permian, Pennsylvanian, Mississippian, Siluro-Devonian, and Ordovician ages. This large, complexly folded and faulted area is in the NW. part of the Ardmore basin between the Arbuckle Mts. on the E. and Wichita Mts. on the W. The first

1968-01-01

95

Healthcare Inspection: Review of a Patient with Pulmonary Embolism Oklahoma City VA Medical Center Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The VA Office of Inspector General (OIG) Office of Healthcare Inspections reviewed allegations of misdiagnosis by providers at the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, (facility) in Oklahoma City, OK. The purpose of the inspection was to determine if the alle...

2011-01-01

96

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Interstate Unclassifiable/Attainment McCurtain County AQCR 184 Central Oklahoma Intrastate...Intrastate Unclassifiable/Attainment McCurtain County AQCR 184 Central Oklahoma Intrastate...022Shreveport-Texarkana-Tyler Intrastate: McCurtain County...

2009-07-01

97

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Interstate Unclassifiable/Attainment McCurtain County AQCR 184 Central Oklahoma Intrastate...Intrastate Unclassifiable/Attainment McCurtain County AQCR 184 Central Oklahoma Intrastate...022Shreveport-Texarkana-Tyler Intrastate: McCurtain County...

2010-07-01

98

76 FR 34799 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00050  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties (Physical Damage and Economic Injury...Kingfisher, Logan, Mcclain, Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma...Oklahoma, Ottawa, Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Stephens. Arkansas: Benton....

2011-06-14

99

Oklahoma's Federally-Recognized Indian Tribes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document compiles lesson plans, classroom activities, and facts from previous Oklahoma state publications about Oklahoma's American Indian peoples. "Oklahoma's Indian People: Images of Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow" contains brief presentations and related class activities and writing assignments about the histories of approximately 29

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City. Indian Education Section.

100

76 FR 23522 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...OK-033-FOR; Docket ID: OSM-2011-0001] Oklahoma Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of...receipt of a proposed amendment to the Oklahoma regulatory program under the Surface...Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA or the Act). Oklahoma proposes revisions to its program...

2011-04-27

101

Gender, Crime and Incarceration in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Why is Oklahoma ranked No. 1 in the rate of incarcerating its female population. Senate Bill No. 810 of the 2003 Legislature created the Special Task Force for Women Incarcerated in Oklahoma to answer that question. The Oklahoma Criminal Justice Resource ...

D. Simpson M. Boling N. Warren L. Byrum

2004-01-01

102

Shocked quartz and impact melt rock at the AMES structure, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ames structure in northwestern Oklahoma is evident in the form of a relatively circular, concentric, structural depression with a minimum diameter of approximately 15 km, on top of the Upper Ordovician Sylvan shale. The feature is covered by approximately 3000 m of sediments. It is marked by two concentric rims, an outer rim (comprising fractured and brecciated Arbuckle dolomite) that is approximately 1.5-3 km wide, and an inner 'ring' structure that seems to be the collapsed remnant of a structural uplift that consists of brecciated Precambrian granite and Arbuckle dolomite. The crater, which is sealed by Middle Ordovician Oil Creek shale, acts as a structural trap for hydrocarbons and is of local economic importance. We have begun studies of samples from several drill cores. No characteristic shock features were found in basement granite and fragmental breccia samples from the URC Bland #1-33. In these samples, deformation was found only in the form of local cataclasis of quartz or feldspar minerals and localized, possibly shearing-related, annealing. New samples were received from the following drill holes: Gamman 1-34, Dorothy 1-19, James 1-20, Wayne 1-32, Dixon 2-18, and Lloyd 1-17. The samples comprised mainly granitic basement, brecciated granite, and sediments, and were studied by optical microscopy, X-ray fluorescence analysis (major-element composition), and neutron activation analysis (trace-element composition). Breccias and melt breccias from the Gamman 1-24, Dixon 2-18, and Dorothy 1-19 drill holes were found to contain shocked quartz and K-feldspar with up to three sets of PDFs. The chemical composition of the fine-grained melt rock from Dorothy 1-19 is very similar to that of average granitic basement. The melt rock shows some differences in alkali contents and possibly some minor ad-mixture of dolomite; other melt rocks have a more pronounced carbonate component. Our findings confirm earlier reports of shocked quartz and provide further evidence for an impact origin of the Ames structure.

Koeberl, C.; Reimold, W. U.; Powell, R. A.

1994-07-01

103

Researching the Oklahoma City bombing.  

PubMed

The authors present a literature retrieval strategy for investigators who plan to conduct research on the Oklahoma City bombing. To facilitate a comprehensive review of the scholarly research on disasters, mass emergencies, and terrorism, a multidatabase search strategy is strongly encouraged. Secondly, a wealth of current information and data on the bombing are available on "popular" and "news" files. PMID:8643773

Piotrowski, C; Perdue, B

1995-12-01

104

Oklahoma Commercial Fishing Development Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contract commercial fisheries were established in two small recreational and industrial impoundments in Oklahoma to remove over abundant commercial species and evaluate the use of the experimental whip-set trammel net and the 1.2 meter trap net by commerc...

D. L. Combs

1977-01-01

105

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school

Ingraham, Sandy

106

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of children in Oklahoma. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school

Ingraham, Sandy

107

Clayton Lake, Jackfork Creek, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposed Clayton damsite is located at mile 2.8 on Jackfork Creek in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, about 6 miles northwest of Clayton. The project consists of construction of a flood control, water supply, recreation, and fish and wildlife lake located...

1971-01-01

108

Water supplies of East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

To plan effectively for future growth in East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma, sound information on public water systems is imperative. This report evaluates the 229 public water systems in 24 counties in East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma. Areas included are: the Central Oklahoma Economic Development District, the Kiamichi Economic Development District of Oklahoma, and the Southern Oklahoma Development Authority. Quantity,

J. W. Ferrell; J. B. Perry; W. F. Harris

1984-01-01

109

Structural profiles of Ouachita Mountains, western Arkansas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma and Arkansas are the largest exposure of the Pennsylvania-age orogen rimming the southern margin of North America. The exposure consists of a thick Carboniferous flysch sequence overlying a thin early Paleozoic deep-water sequence and is generally interpreted to have been deformed in a south-dipping subduction zone. Two balanced cross sections (\\/approximately\\/ 40 km apart) of

A. E. Blythe; A. Sugar; S. P. Phipps

1988-01-01

110

Biogeography, ecoregions, and geomorphology affect fish species composition in streams of eastern Oklahoma, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stream fish assemblages are structured by biogeographical, physical and biological factors acting on different spatial scales.\\u000a We determined how physical factors, geomorphology and stream habitat, influenced fish species composition (presenceabsence)\\u000a in eastern Oklahoma, USA relative to the ecoregion and biogeographic effects previously reported. We sampled fish assemblages\\u000a and surveyed geomorphology and habitat at 107 stream sites in the Boston Mountains,

Daniel C. Dauwalter; Dale K. Splinter; William L. Fisher; Richard A. Marston

2008-01-01

111

Left-lateral intraplate deformation along the Amarillo-Wichita Uplift. Texas Panhandle and Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The west-northwest trending Amarillo-Wichita Uplift in the Texas Panhandle and southwestern Oklahoma was produced as a result of recurrent large-scale intraplate deformation during the Late Paleozoic Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny. The area was broadly folded in the Late Devonian to Early Mississippian. Cambrian through Devonian units were downwarped into the Anadarko Basin, truncated by erosion, and unconformably overlain by Upper

Budnik

1985-01-01

112

Mountain Biking  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Announcing a new WWW page for Mountain Biking enthusiasts. This page focuses on mountain biking in the San Francisco Bay area (including descriptions of several local trails), but also contains links to descriptions of mountain biking in other areas, including Pittsburgh, Colorado, Utah and New Zealand.

113

Mountains Flowing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mountains look solid, but actually they flow like molasses under their own weight, according to a new study. This radio broadcast introduces research into the forces on mountains, and how they can best be explained by mountains flowing like a liquid. The study is changing the way scientists think about how the American landscape was formed. The clip is 2 minutes in length.

114

Mountain Age  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about processes that affect the shape of mountains. While determining the relative age of mountains involves a variety of complex interacting factors, this probe is designed to determine if students consider weathering factors or if they intuitively believe taller mountains are older.

Eberle, Francis; Farrin, Lynn; Keeley, Page

2005-01-01

115

75 FR 32821 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00038  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 12194 and 12195] Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00038 AGENCY...of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA--1917--DR), dated 05...disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated 05/24/2010 is hereby...

2010-06-09

116

Granite Monument Plaza Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Granite Monument Plaza - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

117

75 FR 5015 - Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...RM-11589] Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission...the licensee of KWTV-DT, channel 9, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Griffin requests the substitution of channel...

2010-02-01

118

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...following elements submitted to EPA in Oklahoma's program application for final...Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State...

2009-07-01

119

Typical Raised Planter Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Typical Raised Planter - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

120

Site Plans (1936 and 2001) Oklahoma City Civic Center, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Site Plans (1936 and 2001) - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

121

Municipal Building Planting Plan Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Municipal Building Planting Plan - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

122

Site Plans (2008 As Built) Oklahoma City Civic Center, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Site Plans (2008 As Built) - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

123

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...following elements submitted to EPA in Oklahoma's program application for final...Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State...

2010-07-01

124

West Lawn Site and Planting Plans Oklahoma City Civic ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

West Lawn Site and Planting Plans - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

125

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...following elements submitted to EPA in Oklahoma's program application for final...Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State...

2012-07-01

126

Comprehensive Hosing Market Analysis: Oklahoma City, Oklahome As of October 1, 2009.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Housing Market Area (HMA) is coterminous with the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area and comprises Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, and Oklahoma Counties in central Oklahoma. The HMA includes the st...

2009-01-01

127

Jimson weed abuse in an Oklahoma teen.  

PubMed

Jimson weed, a plant often abused by teenagers and young adults, grows wild throughout Oklahoma. It is best known for its hallucinogenic properties; however intoxication can lead to anticholinergic manifestations that are potentially dangerous. Over the past six years, sixty-three individuals in Oklahoma have been hospitalized for jimson weed intoxication, including this Oklahoma teen. Importance lies in proper identification, understanding, and management in persons presenting with jimson weed poisoning. PMID:20131730

Honey, Brooke L; Hagemann, Tracy M; Lobb, Kelley M; McGoodwin, Lee

2009-12-01

128

What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase II State Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Phase II provides a more detailed examination of classroom variables important to achievement in Oklahoma schools. Where Phase I addressed all nine of the Oklahoma essential elements using survey data, Phase II focuses on what occurs in Oklahoma classrooms primarily using data from principal interviews, classroom observations (on-site), and video

Marzano Research Laboratory, 2010

2010-01-01

129

40 CFR 81.424 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oklahoma. 81.424 Section 81.424 Protection of Environment...Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.424 Oklahoma. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing...

2012-07-01

130

The Oklahoma Territorial Election System: 1890 - 1905  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oklahoma's first Territorial election, administered under the 1890 Organic Act, was typical of the early Nineteenth Century. By today's standards it was primitive. By, the end of the Territorial period in 1907, Oklahoma had a modern election system. The shape this election system took was a product of Territorial political struggles.

R. Darcy

2002-01-01

131

76 FR 59766 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00056  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Oklahoma County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/30/2011 through 09/01/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-27

132

Aquatic Vegetation Restoration in Arcadia Lake, Oklahoma: A Case Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Arcadia Lake is located within the metropolitan area of Oklahoma City and Edmund, in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, about 2.4 km (1.5 miles) southwest of Arcadia, Oklahoma (Figure 1). Construction of the earth-filled dam was authorized by the Flood Control Ac...

G. O. Dick R. M. Smart E. R. Gilliland

2004-01-01

133

Mountain Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you've ever wanted to turn your hiking skills into helpful information, the Mountain Watch section of the Appalachian Mountain Club website may be of great interest. The site is designed to turn hikers into "citizen scientists" who can "aid in the collection of data that measures the ecological health of our mountains." The site contains four areas (including "Mountain Plants" and "Mountain Weather") where visitors can submit their own recent findings and observations. First-time visitors will need to fill out the volunteer data section, and this takes just a few minutes. After this, visitors will receive a password which will allow them to report on alpine flowers, air quality, and related subjects. Visitors can also read the observations of others, and read up on their "Naturalist Blog".

134

The Oklahoma bombing. Lessons learned.  

PubMed

The Oklahoma City bombing experience in April of 1995 provided a unique opportunity to test the effectiveness of an existing disaster plan. The critical care nurses at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital learned valuable lessons about managing intense activity, equipment and supplies, staffing resources, and visitor issues. The degree to which the bombing affected the emotional state of personnel was unanticipated, and leaders learned that critical stress management interventions should be included in every emergency preparedness plan. Additionally, recommendations include using runners for communication; assigning specific roles (supplies, staffing, triage); keeping additional staff in reserve for shift relief; ensuring ample hospital staff members are available to coordinate visitors and media; and setting up record systems to preserve continuity. The unique lessons learned as a result of this terrorist attack can be used by other critical care nurses to understand and refine disaster plans. PMID:9214891

Anteau, C M; Williams, L A

1997-06-01

135

Investigations in organic vegetable production in Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A demonstration plot to provide technology transfer on best management practices in organic production was established in a cooperative effort between scientists of the South Central Agricultural Research Laboratory and Oklahoma State University Wes Watkins Agricultural Research and Extension Center...

136

PDC bits find applications in Oklahoma drilling  

SciTech Connect

Drilling in Oklahoma is difficult by any standards. Polycrystalline diamond cutter (PDC) bits, with proven success drilling soft, homogenous formations common in the North Sea and U.S. Gulf Coast regions, have found some significant ''spot'' applications in Oklahoma. Applications qualified by bit design and application development over the past two (2) years include slim hole drilling in the deep Anadarko Basin, deviation control in Southern Oklahoma, drilling on mud motors, drilling in oil base mud, drilling cement, sidetracking, coring and some rotary drilling in larger hole sizes. PDC bits are formation sensitive, and care must be taken in selecting where to run them in Oklahoma. Most of the successful runs have been in water base mud drilling hard shales and soft, unconsolidated sands and lime, although bit life is often extended in oil-base muds.

Offenbacher, L.A.; McDermaid, J.D.; Patterson, C.R.

1983-02-01

137

75 FR 45679 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00043  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1926-DR), dated 07/26/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident...

2010-08-03

138

Standards for Accreditation of Oklahoma Schools, 2002.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oklahoma schools have the responsibility of meeting the educational needs of all students, providing equitable educational opportunities, and fostering lifelong learning as they prepare to participate in a democratic society. In order to establish priorit...

S. Garrett

2002-01-01

139

76 FR 77578 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00057  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 12/07/2011. Incident: Earthquakes. Incident Period: 11/05/2011 and continuing. Effective Date: 12/07/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-12-13

140

77 FR 61651 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00067  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Multiple Wildfires. Incident Period: 07/30/2012 Through 08/12/2012. Effective Date: 10/01/2012. Physical Loan...

2012-10-10

141

76 FR 31670 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00048  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1970-DR), dated 05/06/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Straight-line Winds. Incident Period: 04/14/2011. Effective Date: 05/06/2011. Physical Loan...

2011-06-01

142

75 FR 30871 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00038  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1917-DR), dated 05/24/2010. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, and straight-line winds. Incident Period: 05/10/2010 through 05/13/2010. Effective Date:...

2010-06-02

143

75 FR 35103 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00040  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1917-DR), dated 06/11/2010. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, and straight-line winds. Incident Period: 05/10/2010 through 05/13/2010. Effective Date:...

2010-06-21

144

78 FR 23622 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00070  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 4109-DR), dated 04/08/2013. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and Snowstorm. Incident Period: 02/24/2013 through 02/26/2013. Effective Date: 04/08/2013....

2013-04-19

145

76 FR 30224 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00047  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-- 1985--DR), dated 05/13/2011. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and Snowstorm. Incident Period: 01/31/2011 through 02/05/2011. Effective Date: 05/13/2011....

2011-05-24

146

75 FR 10330 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00034  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1876-DR), dated 02/25/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm. Incident Period: 12/24/2009 through 12/25/2009. DATES: Effective Date: 02/25/2010. Physical...

2010-03-05

147

75 FR 11949 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00035  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1883-DR), dated 03/05/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm. Incident Period: 01/28/2010 through 01/30/2010. Effective Date: 03/05/2010. Physical Loan...

2010-03-12

148

76 FR 38263 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00052  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Notices] [Pages 38263-38264] [FR Doc No: 2011-16242...Disaster Declaration 12647 and 12648] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00052 AGENCY: U...Administrator for Disaster Assistance. [FR Doc. 2011-16242 Filed...

2011-06-29

149

Archeological Testing in Atoka County, Southeastern Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Proposed Impoundment 20 of the Lower Clear Boggy Creek Watershed Project is a single purpose floodwater retarding structure on Birch Creek in Atoka County, Oklahoma. Three archeological sites in the direct impact zone of the maximum flood pool were tested...

D. T. Hughes

1977-01-01

150

78 FR 42147 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00073  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Atoka, Canadian, Cleveland, Coal, Hughes, Latimer...McClain, Nowata, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Okmulgee, Pittsburg, Pottawatomie, Pushmataha, Seminole. The Interest Rates...

2013-07-15

151

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...responsibility for enforcing its underground storage tank program...may be obtained from the Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma...Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City...reference as part of the underground storage tank program...

2013-07-01

152

A transgression-regression event during the deposition of the Upper Cambrian Honey Creek formation in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

SciTech Connect

The transgression that inundated the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen during the upper Cambrian enveloped a landscape that consisted of hills of rhyolite up to 350 m in high. Initial deposits on this topography have been interpreted as alluvium. These, together with succeeding tidally-influenced marine siliciclastics form the Reagan Formation. The siliciclastics grains are made up of fragments of local origin (i.e., rhyolite), quartz (derived from a distal source) and authigenic glauconite. The upward passage from the Reagan to the Honeycreek Formation is defined by the addition to the siliciclastics of carbonate detritus in the form of tidally-influenced grainstones, mostly composed of pelmatozoan fragments. The passage from the Honeycreek to the overlying Fort Sill Formation of the Arbuckle Group is marked by the incoming of beds of lime mudstone and the gradual disappearance of grainstones and siliciclastics. Evidence of the existence of rhyolite topography (i.e., an archipelago) can be detected to within 50 m of the top of the Fort Sill. While the overall facies pattern undoubtedly records a widespread transgression, a newly-discovered slightly angular unconformity within the lower part of the Honeycreek is best interpreted as a record of a temporary regression. Three distinctive lithologies are involved in this relationship: the lowest beds are light grey cross-bedded pelmatozoan grainstones with minor amounts of quartz and rhyolite grains. Syntaxial cements at the base of this unit are homogenous under cathode luminescence, while cements near the top display up to 27 zones of reflectance, interpreted as a fluctuating marine-meteoric groundwater imprint. The overlying bed is a red-brown mud-supported limestone that contains abundant angular rhyolite pebbles and a rich trilobite fauna. Some of the pebbles are coated by pelmatozoans.

McElmoyl, C.; Donovan, R.N. (Texas Christian Univ., Ft. Worth, TX (United States). Geology Dept.)

1993-02-01

153

Regional impacts of coal mining in eastern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study identifies the impacts of an expansion in Oklahoma coal mining, specifically in promoting economic growth in a rural and economically depressed region. Also, the study examined factors preventing Oklahoma coal-fired electric power plants from using Oklahoma coal and conditions that may induce them to use Oklahoma coal. The economic impacts of three coal production scenarios (5.0, 6.25, and

Martinez-Salazar

1985-01-01

154

76 FR 42723 - Land Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Affairs Land Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior...into trust for the Osage Nation of Oklahoma on July 8, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...land into trust for the Osage Nation of Oklahoma under the authority of the Indian...

2011-07-19

155

76 FR 9040 - Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-3316-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations...declaration of an emergency for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-3316-EM), dated February...emergency conditions in the State of Oklahoma resulting from a severe winter...

2011-02-16

156

Muriel Wright: Telling the Story of Oklahoma Indian Nations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Wright family, descended from the patriarch Allen Wright, who arrived in the new Choctaw Nation after surviving the "Trail of Tears," played an important role in Oklahoma politics and society. Following removal to Oklahoma, Allen went on to become Principal Chief of the Choctaw Nation and gave the name, Oklahoma, to the southwest territory.

Cesar, Dana; Smith, Joan K.; Noley, Grayson

2004-01-01

157

Social and Economic Consequences of Indian Gaming in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The balancing framework of Indian gaming as it operates in Oklahoma constrains Oklahoma Indian nations from operating facilities according to the dictates of the marketplace on a large-scale Class III basis. Indian gaming actually brings substantial net economic benefits to the state, contrary to claims that Oklahoma Indian gaming benefits come

Grant, Kenneth W., II; Spilde, Katherine A.; Taylor, Jonathan B.

2004-01-01

158

76 FR 42723 - Land Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian...known as ``OMDE Ponca City,'' into trust for the Osage Nation of Oklahoma on July 8, 2011. FOR FURTHER...trust for the Osage Nation of Oklahoma under the authority of...

2011-07-19

159

East Lawn Site and Planting Plan with Section Oklahoma ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

East Lawn Site and Planting Plan with Section - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

160

Magnificent Mountains  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|One way to increase awareness of endangered national heritage is to teach youth the importance of the land through the study of selected works of art. This article describes a lesson, in which students will study the work of Thomas Moran and create a mountain range collage. A short biography of Thomas Moran is included.|

Anderson, Heather

2004-01-01

161

Mountain Sickness  

Microsoft Academic Search

I HAVE just come back from a journey in the region of the Andes, and in looking over the numbers of NATURE, which had accumulated during my absence, I came across the extract, which you make in your notes of February 21, from the Revue Scientifique, on the subject of mountain sickness. I cannot agree with M. Kronecker's statement that

George Griffith

1895-01-01

162

Left-lateral intraplate deformation along the Amarillo-Wichita Uplift. Texas Panhandle and Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The west-northwest trending Amarillo-Wichita Uplift in the Texas Panhandle and southwestern Oklahoma was produced as a result of recurrent large-scale intraplate deformation during the Late Paleozoic Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny. The area was broadly folded in the Late Devonian to Early Mississippian. Cambrian through Devonian units were downwarped into the Anadarko Basin, truncated by erosion, and unconformably overlain by Upper Devonian to Mississippian strata. To the south, Mississippian units overlie Ordovician strata and Precambrian basement along the axis of the Texas Arch. Strike-slip faulting along the axis of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen formed the Amarillo-Wichita Uplift during the Pennsylvanian. In the Texas Panhandle, the uplift has been internally deformed into a series of pull-apart grabens which are filled with up to 1500 m of Pennsylvanian arkosic debris. The Whittenburg Trough, a large pull-apart basin along the southwest flank of the uplift, contains about 2300 m of syntectonic deposits. Erosional edges of older units beneath the Mississippian are presently offset 120 km in a left-lateral sense along the uplift. Pre-Mississippian units located in the Hardeman Basin of southwestern Oklahoma originally aligned with those in the western Anadarko Basin of the Texas Panhandle. Restoration to the pre-faulting configuration also realigns offset Proterozoic basement terranes. The orientation of strike-slip and reverse faults and related folds indicate northeast-southwest directed compression during the Pennsylvanian.

Budnik, R.T.

1985-01-01

163

Stratigraphic variations in the Carboniferous section across the Arkansas-Oklahoma State Line Arch  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The State Line Arch is represented by a structural high that trends through the study area in a loose alignment with the Arkansas-Oklahoma state line. Evidence of the arch extending further to the north includes a structural high and stratigraphic variation at an outcrop on Highway 59 near Evansville Mountain in Crawford County, Arkansas. The exact timing of the formation of the arch remains undetermined, but upper Devonian thinning at the top of the arch indicates the structure is pre-Mississippian. The reason for the development of the arch is poorly understood, but evidence linking Mississippian-aged Waulsortian mounds to Precambrian Spavinaw granite structures of northeastern Oklahoma and southwestern Missouri suggests Precambrian basement structures may extend into the study area. The structural nature of the arch provided an environment favorable to carbonate build-up during deposition of the Mississippian interval. A previously unidentified limestone unit measuring 175 feet thick likely represents the transgressive phase of a transgressive-regressive sequence responsible for the deposition of the Mayes Group of northeastern Oklahoma. Growth on the downthrown side of the Muldrow-Mulberry Fault system may indicate earlier movement than previous studies have suggested on the east-west trending normal faults of the Arkoma Basin. A possible roll-over anticline structure may exist to the south of the Muldrow-Mulberry fault system.

Engelhardt, Tyler D.

164

Minerals yearbook, 1992: Oklahoma. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The value of Oklahoma nonfuel mineral production was nearly $252.6 million in 1992, a decrease of $22.9 million from that reported to the U.S. Bureau of Mines by State mineral producers in 1991. The value of the top three commodities produced, crushed stone, portland cement, and construction sand and gravel, exceeded $168.8 million and comprised almost 67% of the State's total nonfuel mineral value. Although rebounding from the recessionary period, the growth curve for several minerals produced in the State was minimal, and for several others it moved downward. Oklahoma ranked 35th nationally in total nonfuel mineral value. The State ranked 26th nationally in the production of industrial minerals, contributing about 1.38% of the $20.7 billion revenues received. Oklahoma ranked first in the Nation in crude gypsum production, second in the production of tripoli, and was the only domestic source of iodine.

Zelten, J.E.; Arndt, R.H.

1994-03-01

165

A Legal Analysis of Litigation against Oklahoma Educators and School Districts under the Oklahoma Governmental Tort Claims Act  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation analyzed public court decisions in cases against Oklahoma school districts and their employees involving sovereign immunity claims filed under Oklahoma's Governmental Tort Claims Act. The questions addressed were: (1) How have the Oklahoma courts interpreted the Governmental Tort Claims Act, (Okla. Stat. tit. 51 Section 151 et

Lacefield, Kevin Lee

2010-01-01

166

A climatic guide for North Central Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides some climatological data pertaining to central and north central Oklahoma. The information was derived from standard reference material to reflect what general surface meteorological characteristics exist in that region. It is intended to assist those individuals involved in the implementation of the first ARM site in that locale. A similar guide already exists for the region involved in Kansas entitled, ``One Regional ARM Guide for Climatic Evaluation``. The Oklahoma Kansas area was selected as the first site from the process reported in the ``Identification, Recommendation and Justification of Potential Locales for ARM Sites``.

Brown, R.M.

1991-06-01

167

A climatic guide for North Central Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides some climatological data pertaining to central and north central Oklahoma. The information was derived from standard reference material to reflect what general surface meteorological characteristics exist in that region. It is intended to assist those individuals involved in the implementation of the first ARM site in that locale. A similar guide already exists for the region involved in Kansas entitled, One Regional ARM Guide for Climatic Evaluation''. The Oklahoma Kansas area was selected as the first site from the process reported in the Identification, Recommendation and Justification of Potential Locales for ARM Sites''.

Brown, R.M.

1991-06-01

168

Health Manpower in Oklahoma. Chiropractic: A Statistical Investigation of Practice Patterns and Service Characteristics in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The characteristics of the chirpractic physician (D.C.) in Oklahoma are described statistically. A questionnaire was mailed to all 262 active, full-time chiropractic physicians; 163 (62 percent) returned the questionnaires. The questionnaire contained que...

W. W. Edmundson

1976-01-01

169

Market Feasibility Study of the Northeast, Park Plaza and Park Estates Shopping Centers, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report documents research findings related to three shoppings centers in northeast Oklahoma City. The three shopping centers targeted were Northeast Shopping Center, Park Plaza and Park Estates. An analysis of these centers has been divided into sever...

1978-01-01

170

Report for Consultation on the Metropolitan Oklahoma City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Oklahoma).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is intended to provide the basic background information to provide a basis for the adoption of regional air quality standards and the implementation of those standards. It proposes boundaries for the Oklahoma City Intrastate Air Quality Control...

1970-01-01

171

Mountain Building  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is part of a series of lessons in a continuing study of change. It is designed to give students hands-on experience manipulating and controlling the variables involved in the process of soil erosion. They will be able to identify variables that influence rates of change and use group consensus to design and build what they believe to be the strongest mountain possible.

1998-01-01

172

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Central Oklahoma Aquifer in central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export files The data sets in this report include digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of Cleveland, Lincoln, Logan, Oklahoma, Payne, and Pottawatomie Counties. The Central Oklahoma aquifer includes the alluvial and terrace deposits along major streams, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations, and the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups. The Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits consist of unconsolidated clay, silt, sand, and gravel. The Permian-age Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations consist of sandstone with interbedded siltstone and mudstone. The Permian-age Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups consist of sandstone, shale, and thin limestone. The Central Oklahoma aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma where the aquifer is used extensively for municipal, industrial, commercial, and domestic water supplies. Most of the usable ground water within the aquifer is from the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations. Substantial quantities of usable ground water also are present in the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups, and in alluvial and terrace deposits associated with the major streams. The aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity and recharge values, and ground-water level elevation contours are from previously published reports.

Runkle, D. L.; Christenson, S. C.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

173

Mountains: An Overview.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces the lessons from "Mountain: A Global Resource" that were developed by the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) and The Mountain Institute for use by NCSS members and their students. Provides an overview that introduces the mountains, mountain cultures, historical perceptions, and the geographical importance of mountains. (CMK)

Byers, Alton; Gilligan, Nancy; Golston, Syd; Linville, Rex

1999-01-01

174

Seismogram offers insight into Oklahoma City bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, generated seismic waves that were recorded on two permanent seismographs about 7 and 26 km away from the bombing. The seismogram recorded at 26 km shows two low-frequency wave trains, discrete sets of oscillatory signals, that begin about 10 s apart. Public release

Thomas L. Holzer; Joe B. Fletcher; Gary S. Fuis; Trond Ryberg; Thomas M. Brocher; Christopher M. Dietel

1996-01-01

175

Oklahoma city: The storying of a disaster  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bombing in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995 was a massive assault on the meaning?making of survivors and community members. Utilizing a social constructionist perspective, this article explores the evolution of the community's social narrative as it shifted in the immediate wake of the blast to a new framework for understanding the event three months later. It is speculated

James E. Levine

1996-01-01

176

Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators Journal 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators 2009 Journal includes the following four peer reviewed articles: (1) The Changing Role of Grandparents (Fred D. Hammond, III, Terry E. Spigner, Charolette Myles-Nixon, and Pauline Holloway); (2) Pedagogical Agent Instructional Design Challenges (Jon Martens); (3) Differences in Relatedness across

Green, Malinda Hendricks, Ed.

2009-01-01

177

Oklahoma Handbook: Child Nutrition Programs. Revised Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nutrition concepts, school food service guidelines, and related materials (such as nutrition charts, menu planning worksheets, and student survey forms) are provided in this nutrition handbook. Prepared by the Oklahoma State Department of Education's School Lunch Section, the handbook consists of nine sections that are organized in outline format.

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

178

Confirmation of Aedes taeniorhynchus in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A single female collected in 1971 confirms the presence of Aedes taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) in Oklahoma. This species was also collected from inland localities in Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas. During the 1971 Venezuelan equine encephalitis epizootic in Texas a U. S. Army sponsored surveillance program resulted in the collection, identification and processing of 501,992 mosquitoes comprising 51 species from Arkansas, Louisiana,

Bruce A. Harrison; John F. Reinertl; Edward S. Saugstad; Joseph E. Farlow

179

Migrant Education Handbook, 1975 [State of Oklahoma].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The national goal of migrant education is "to establish programs and projects which are designed to meet the special educational needs of migratory children of migratory agricultural workers or migratory fishermen and to coordinate these programs and projects with similar programs in other states". In Oklahoma, the major objectives for migrant

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

180

JOM Rip-Off in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A report by the Department of the Interior on the misuse of Johnson-O'Malley funds in Oklahoma is reprinted in its entirety. The questionable costs total over $400 thousand, and the report recommends that the Bureau of Indian Affairs seek compensation and adjustment for the misspent funds. (KM)

Education Journal of the Institute for the Development of Indian Law, 1973

1973-01-01

181

Field Evaluation of Drainable Bases in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Research and Development Division (R&D) installed field data acquisition systems in 1992 on five test pavement sections with a view to evaluate the performance of the drainable base and edge drain systems i...

M. Rahman M. Zaman T. Curtis

1996-01-01

182

ASPECTS OF COWBIRD PARASITISM IN SOUTHERN OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

SPECTS of the parasitic breedin, u habits of the Brown-headed Cowbird (IMoZothrus ater) have been documented extensively by Friedmann (1929)) Laskey (1950)) Berger (1951)) Norris (1947), and others. It was the purpose of this study to investigate some of the major aspects of such parasitism in the breeding avifauna of southern Oklahoma. Particular em- phasis was placed on observation of

JOHN A. WIENS

183

77 FR 53247 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00063  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/2012. Incident: Freedom Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 through 08/14/2012. Effective Date: 08/22/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-08-31

184

77 FR 61652 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00066  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Luther Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 Through 08/10/2012. Effective Date: 10/01/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-10-10

185

76 FR 60959 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00055  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Pawnee County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/07/2011 through 08/14/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-30

186

75 FR 42173 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00041  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 07/13/2010. Incident: Tornadoes, Severe Storms, Straight Line Winds and Flooding. Incident Period: 06/13/2010 through 06/15/2010. DATES:...

2010-07-20

187

Iranians in Oklahoma: Learning the Hard Way.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The general frustration among Iranian students at Southwestern College and other colleges in Oklahoma City were revealed last February in an angry confrontation at the College. Political tensions, racial prejudice of Americans, language barriers, and problems of cultural adjustment are some causes of their frustration. (JMD)

Honey, Charles

1978-01-01

188

Subsurface geology of the Seminole area. [Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study area includes N. Seminole County and portions of Pottawatomie and Okfuskee counties, which are in the Greater Seminole District of central Oklahoma and in the NW. part of the Arkoma Basin. The subsurface stratigraphy, structure, and conditions of oil accumulation of Desmoinesian and older rocks in the Seminole Area are discussed. Subsurface structure maps, isopach maps, and cross

Cutolo-Lozano

1969-01-01

189

Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for

Mary N. Hill Kutz

1998-01-01

190

State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

2009-01-01

191

State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Oklahoma. The state uses a State Aid Formula to determine the appropriation of funds to various districts. Along with the aid formula, the state collects revenue from the following sources: compensatory programs, special education, vocational programs, transportation

Slosburg, Tucker

2010-01-01

192

2. EAGLE MOUNTAIN SWITCHYARD. EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP PLANT CAN BE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. EAGLE MOUNTAIN SWITCHYARD. EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP PLANT CAN BE SEEN THROUGH SWITCHYARD IN BACKGROUND. 165MM LENS. - Eagle Mountain Pump Plant, Ten miles north of Route 10, southeast of Eagle Mountain, Eagle Mountain, Riverside County, CA

193

78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor, South Texas to Oklahoma...improved high- speed intercity passenger rail service along an 850-mile corridor...Level EIS, the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study (Study) also includes...

2013-03-13

194

75 FR 19667 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00036 Declaration of Economic Injury  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12115] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00036 Declaration...EIDL) declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated 04/09/2010. Incident...Jefferson, Stephens. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma Beckham, Caddo, Carter, Cotton,...

2010-04-15

195

40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region...Regions § 81.124 North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality...

2012-07-01

196

30 CFR 936.15 - Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments. 936.15...SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OKLAHOMA § 936.15 Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments. The...

2010-07-01

197

30 CFR 936.25 - Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments...SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OKLAHOMA § 936.25 Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan...

2010-07-01

198

40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...26 2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization...APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Oklahoma § 272.1851 Oklahoma State-administered program: Final...

2009-07-01

199

30 CFR 936.15 - Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments. 936.15...SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OKLAHOMA § 936.15 Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments. The...

2009-07-01

200

30 CFR 936.25 - Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments...SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OKLAHOMA § 936.25 Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan...

2009-07-01

201

77 FR 5710 - Federal Implementation Plans for Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin either significantly...Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin that required...Columbia Circuit (EME Homer City Generation, L.P. v. EPA...Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin. Because...

2012-02-06

202

75 FR 9895 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Monday through Friday, at the following offices: Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, Water Quality Division, 707 N. Robinson, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73101-1677; and the EPA Region 6, Drinking...

2010-03-04

203

40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Statutes and Regulations. (1) The Oklahoma statutes and regulations cited...You may obtain copies of the Oklahoma regulations that are incorporated...of State, P.O. Box 53390, Oklahoma City, OK 73152-3390; Phone...

2010-07-01

204

30 CFR 936.20 - Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... The Secretary approved the Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation...plan are available at: (a) Oklahoma Conservation Commission, 2800 N. Lincoln Blvd., Suite 160, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (b) Office...

2009-07-01

205

30 CFR 936.20 - Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... The Secretary approved the Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation...plan are available at: (a) Oklahoma Conservation Commission, 2800 N. Lincoln Blvd., Suite 160, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (b) Office...

2010-07-01

206

77 FR 21154 - BNSF Railway Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Oklahoma County, OK  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Railway Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Oklahoma County, OK BNSF Railway Company (BNSF) has filed...between milepost 541.69 and milepost 542.91 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla. (the Line).\\1\\ The Line...

2012-04-09

207

75 FR 65524 - United Auto Workers Local 1999, Oklahoma City, OK; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...TA-W-71,863] United Auto Workers Local 1999, Oklahoma City, OK; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding...former workers of United Auto Workers Local 1999, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (the subject firm). The determination was...

2010-10-25

208

Largest Dinosaur Ever Discovered Found in Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Originally discovered in a remote corner of Oklahoma in 1994, the fossil of what may have been the largest creature to ever walk the earth has been excavated by a research team from the University of Oklahoma. Dubbed Sauroposeidon proteles, or "thunder lizard," the dinosaur was almost 100 feet long, with a 39 foot neck and weighing over 50 tons, so big that it would have created minor seismic activity just by walking, according to scientists. The new find is about 110 million years old and consists of neck vertebrae, some almost five feet in length, together with neck ribs nearly twelve feet long. The find is also significant because it may shed light on the last of the North American sauropods, who died out about 100 million years ago. A paper on this new find is scheduled to appear in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. The sites listed provide information and background material about this momentous discovery.

De Nie, Michael W.

209

In Oklahoma, Building More Prisons Has Solved No Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1973, Oklahoma State Penitentiary exploded in the costliest prison riot in American history. In the wake of that riot, Oklahoma adopted a Master Plan which called for lowering populations in the overcrowded prisons, primarily by reducing the state's incarceration rate-then as now twice the national averageand partly by new prison construction. Since 1975, Oklahoma has built 2,000 new spaces

Maygene Giari

1979-01-01

210

Oklahoma's Ouachita area beginning to stir  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on exploration of Ouachita rocks of southeastern Oklahoma. Wells are completed or planned in the Potato Hills, Moyers, and Atoka areas of the Ouachita Province. Deep and shallow drilling will start soon in a 9 sq mile area in the Potato Hills area of southern Latimer County. The shallow drilling program will consist of eight wells to about 6,000 ft to assess potential in Ordovician Big Fork, Womble, and Mississippian-Devonian Arkansas Novaculite.

Petzet, G.A.

1991-02-18

211

Passive electrical measurements from three Oklahoma tornados  

Microsoft Academic Search

Passive electrical measurement of three tornados in the Oklahoma area have been made and are being reported upon. The measurements made include point discharge current, 18.5-kc\\/s sferics, along with 10-, 50-, 100-, and 175-kc\\/s, and 30-Mc\\/s sferics. The preceding measurements of tornados are compared with a typical local thunderstorm. In this comparison, it is shown that the electrical discharges within

P. A. Silberg

1965-01-01

212

LEMANEA FUSCINA BORG (RHODOPHYTA) IN OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Field work was supported by NIH Grant 5506RR08003. I express my gratitude for their assistance to Dr. James J. White and Dr. Harold Robinson of the Smithsonian Institution. REFERENCES 1. C. E. TAFT, Proc. Okla. Acad. Sci. 20: 49-54, (1940). 2. W. C. VINYARD, The Algae of Oklahoma, Ph.D. Dissertation, Michigan State University, 1958. 3. L. H. FLINT, Am.

R. John Taylor

1977-01-01

213

76 FR 33394 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00051  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-- 1988--DR), dated 05/27/2011. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/21/2011 through 04/28/2011. Effective Date: 05/27/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 07/26/2011. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date:...

2011-06-08

214

RAPTOR REHABILITATION AT THE OKLAHOMA CITY ZOO  

Microsoft Academic Search

A program of raptor rehabilitation has been conducted at the Oklahoma City Zoo in an effort to conserve wildlife, to assist the publid, and to gain knowledge about the care and treatment of injured birds. From October 1973 through December 1974 Red-tailed Hawks and Great Horned Owls constituted 45.3 percent of all birds donated. Donations from the public comprised 89.0

John C. Snelling

1975-01-01

215

77 FR 29275 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs'', Oklahoma's authorized...

2012-05-17

216

75 FR 36609 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs'', Oklahoma's authorized...

2010-06-28

217

77 FR 46994 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs'', Oklahoma's authorized...

2012-08-07

218

Oklahoma Aerospace Intellectual Capital/Educational Recommendations: An Inquiry of Oklahoma Aerospace Executives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to conduct detailed personal interviews with aerospace industry executives/managers from both the private and military sectors from across Oklahoma to determine their perceptions of intellectual capital needs of the industry. Interviews with industry executives regarding

Nelson, Erin M.

2010-01-01

219

Oklahoma Aerospace Intellectual Capital/Educational Recommendations: An Inquiry of Oklahoma Aerospace Executives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to conduct detailed personal interviews with aerospace industry executives/managers from both the private and military sectors from across Oklahoma to determine their perceptions of intellectual capital needs of the industry. Interviews with industry executives regarding

Nelson, Erin M.

2010-01-01

220

Survey of Fishes in the Oklahoma Panhandle and Harper County, Northwestern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of the fishes of the Panhandle and Harper County in Northwestern Oklahoma produced 33 species representing 12 families. Sixteen additional species have been reported by others or have been stocked in lakes, for a total of 48 known species. Only seven were new records for the region. A description of the Cimarron and North Canadian River Systems, a

Jimmie Pigg

221

Forensic Seismology and the 1995 Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on April 19, 1995, was recorded on 2 permanent seismographs, 7 and 26 km away. The more distant seismograph recorded 2 low-frequency wave trains separated by about 10 s. Militia groups speculated that the 2 wave trains were caused by separate explosions and hinted at a

T. L. Holzer

2002-01-01

222

Guide to Oklahoma Colleges and Universities, 2000-2001 Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This guide contains information about Oklahoma's public colleges and universities, private colleges, and proprietary institutions that submitted material. Each institution prepared and submitted its own institutional page. The guide opens with general information about higher education in Oklahoma and presents some academic and financial

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

223

Twenty-Third Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, which is authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This 1970

Laney, L. J.

224

Twentieth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This 1967 annual

Laney, L. J.

225

Twenty-Fifth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Indian Education Program in Oklahoma is financed and operated under the provision of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Oklahoma Department of Education and is supervised by the State Department of Education as authorized by the Johnson O'Malley Act (JOM) of 1936. The narrative section of this 1972 annual report

James, Overton

226

Nineteenth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This 1966 annual

Laney, L. J.

227

Twenty-First Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, which is authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This

Laney, L. J.

228

Twenty-Third Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, which is authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This

Laney, L. J.

229

Twentieth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This 1967 annual

Laney, L. J.

230

The Oklahoma PN/ADN Articulation Project Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In response to a critical nursing shortage in the state of Oklahoma, the Oklahoma Practical Nursing (PN)/Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Articulation Project Coordinating Committee was formed in spring 1990 to develop a proposal for program articulation. A curriculum matrix was designed and adopted for use by five regional subcommittees which

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

231

Policies and Procedures Manual for Special Education in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The guide, a support document to the Oklahoma State Plan for Special Education, presents a policies and procedures manual for special education in Oklahoma in accordance with the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (P.L. 94-142). The manual is intended to establish the minimum standards for special education program approval, to establish

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

232

Ground-water in the Beggs area, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This memorandum discusses the geology of the Beggs area in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma, as it is related to the availability of ground water. Geological reports and unpublished data from the files of the Oklahoma Geological Survey, together with local information furnished by R.W. Steinman, Beggs Water Superintendent, are the basis for the statements that follow. (available as photostat copy only)

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

233

Biology and epidemiology of peanut soilborne pathogens in Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Pressure from soil borne diseases limits yields and increases production costs to Oklahoma peanut growers. Sclerotinia blight, caused by the fungus Sclerotinia minor, and southern blight, caused by the fungus Sclerotium rolfsii, are the most economically damaging peanut diseases in Oklahoma. The c...

234

Biological assessment of environmental flows for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Large-scale patterns in fish assemblage structure and functional groups are influenced by alterations in streamflow regime. In this study, we defined an objective threshold for alteration for Oklahoma streams using a combination of the expected range of 27 flow indices and a discriminant analysis to predict flow regime group. We found that fish functional groups in reference flow conditions had species that were more intolerant to flow alterations and preferences for stream habitat and faster flowing water. In contrast, altered sites had more tolerant species that preferred lentic habitat and slower water velocity. Ordination graphs of the presence and functional groups of species revealed an underlying geographical pattern roughly conforming to ecoregions, although there was separation between reference and altered sites within the larger geographical framework. Additionally, we found that reservoir construction and operation significantly altered fish assemblages in two different systems, Bird Creek in central Oklahoma and the Kiamichi River in southeastern Oklahoma. The Bird Creek flow regime shifted from a historically intermittent stream to one with stable perennial flows, and changes in fish assemblage structure covaried with changes in all five components of the flow regime. In contrast, the Kiamichi River flow regime did not change significantly for most flow components despite shifts in fish assemblage structure; however, most of the species associated with shifts in assemblage structure in the Kiamichi River system were characteristic of lentic environments and were likely related more to proximity of reservoirs in the drainage system than changes in flow. The spatial patterns in fish assemblage response to flow alteration, combined with different temporal responses of hydrology and fish assemblage structure at sites downstream of reservoirs, indicate that interactions between flow regime and aquatic biota vary depending on ecological setting. This supports the notion that regional variation in natural flow regimes could affect the development of flow recommendations.

Fisher, William L.; Seilheimer, Titus S.; Taylor, Jason M.

2012-01-01

235

Psychological response to the Oklahoma City bombing.  

PubMed

The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Office Building in Oklahoma City was the most devastating terrorist activity that has occurred in America. Prevention of revictimization of persons seriously affected by the bombing was central to the planned response to this tragedy. Coordination and collaboration among local, state, and national agencies promoted effective clinical services provision, research facilitation, and prevention of revictimization. Information gathered from this cooperative effort will contribute to the effort to minimize the potential for such tragedies in the future as well as help to develop prevention and intervention strategies to reduce the effects when the next such disaster occurs. PMID:8682905

Krug, R S; Nixon, S J; Vincent, R

1996-01-01

236

Chemical analyses of surface waters in Oklahoma, September - December 1944  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A preliminary survey of the industrial quality of surface waters in Oklahoma was started in August, 1944, by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Resources and Planning Board, with the Oklahoma A. & M. College, Engineering Experiment Station and Department of Chemistry. From September to December, 1944, three hundred and fifteen samples were obtained at eighty-four points where gages are maintained for measurement of discharge. Daily samples were collected at six stations, namely: Illinois River near Gore, Oklahoma Cimarron River near Oilton, Oklahoma Canadian River near Whitefield, Oklahoma Washita River near Durwood, Oklahoma Red River near Gainesville, Texas Red River at Denison Dam, Texas Sport samples were collected at the remainder of the stations. The analyses of the spot samples were made largely in a laboratory provided by the Oklahoma A. & M. College, under the supervision of Dr. O.M. Smith, Head, Department of Chemistry; Dr. S.R. Wood, Associate Professor of Chemistry; and W.W. Hastings, U.S. Geological Survey. The daily samples were analyzed in the water resources laboratory of the Geological Survey at Austin, Texas. These data have been summarized in a report to the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, March 1, 1945. The streams of Oklahoma are classified into two major drainage basins: the Arkansas River and the Red River and their tributaries. The attached analyses are arranged in geographical order for their respective drainage basins, with records listed in downstream order for stations on the main stem first, followed by the analyses for the tributaries. When available, the mean daily discharge is given for the analyses. (available as photostat copy only)

Geological Survey (U.S.)

1945-01-01

237

Three-Dimensional Fractal Mountains.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study provides a guide to a series of systematic techniques used to create fractal mountains. The fractal mountains are created through an Interactive System for Fractal Mountains (ISFM). To create the fractal mountains in ISFM a modified midpoint di...

P. J. Collins

1988-01-01

238

Ground-water quality assessment of the central Oklahoma Aquifer, Oklahoma; project description  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In April 1986, the U.S. Geological Survey began a pilot program to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. The program, known as the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program, is designed to acquire and interpret information about a variety of water-quality issues. The Central Oklahoma aquifer project is one of three ground-water pilot projects that have been started. The NAWQA program also incudes four surface-water pilot projects. The Central Oklahoma aquifer project, as part of the pilot NAWQA program, will develop and test methods for performing assessments of ground-water quality. The objectives of the Central Oklahoma aquifer assessment are: (1) To investigate regional ground-water quality throughout the aquifer in the manner consistent with the other pilot ground-water projects, emphasizing the occurrence and distribution of potentially toxic substances in ground water, including trace elements, organic compounds, and radioactive constituents; (2) to describe relations between ground-water quality, land use, hydrogeology, and other pertinent factors; and (3) to provide a general description of the location, nature, and possible causes of selected prevalent water-quality problems within the study unit; and (4) to describe the potential for water-quality degradation of ground-water zones within the study unit. The Central Oklahoma aquifer, which includes in descending order the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, the Chase Group, the Council Grove Group, the Admire Group, and overlying alluvium and terrace deposits, underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma and is used extensively for municipal, industrial, commercial, and domestic water supplies. The aquifer was selected for study by the NAWQA program because it is a major source for water supplies in central Oklahoma and because it has several known or suspected water-quality problems. Known problems include concentrations of arsenic, chromium, selenium, and gross-alpha activity that exceed drinking-water standards. Suspected problems include possible contamination of the aquifer by oil-field brines and drilling fluids, pesticides, industrial chemicals, septic-tank effluent, fertilizers, and leakage from sewage systems and underground tanks used for storage of hydrocarbons. There are four major components of the Central Oklahoma aquifer project. The first component is the collection and analysis of existing information, including chemical, hydrologic, and land-use data. The second component is the geohydrologic and geochemical investigations of the aquifer flow system. The third component is the sampling for a wide variety of inorganic, organic, and radioactive constituents as part a regional survey that will produce a consistent set of data among all ground-water pilot projects. These data can be used to: (1) Define regional ground-water quality within the Central Oklahoma aquifer, and (2) compare water quality in the Central Oklahoma aquifer to the water quality in the other ground-water study units of the NAWQA program. The fourth component is topical studies that will address, in more detail, some of the major water-quality issues pertaining to the aquifer.

Christenson, S. C.; Parkhurst, D. L.

1987-01-01

239

Digital-map grids of mean-annual precipitation for 1961-90, and generalized skew coefficients of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital report contains two digital-map grids of data that were used to develop peak-flow regression equations in Tortorelli, 1997, 'Techniques for estimating peak-streamflow frequency for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 97-4202. One data set is a grid of mean annual precipitation, in inches, based on the period 1961-90, for Oklahoma. The data set was derived from the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model) mean annual precipitation grid for the United States, developed by Daly, Neilson, and Phillips (1994, 'A statistical-topographic model for mapping climatological precipitation over mountainous terrain:' Journal of Applied Meteorology, v. 33, no. 2, p. 140-158). The second data set is a grid of generalized skew coefficients of logarithms of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma streams less than or equal to 2,510 square miles in drainage area. This grid of skew coefficients is taken from figure 11 of Tortorelli and Bergman, 1985, 'Techniques for estimating flood peak discharges for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 84-4358. To save disk space, the skew coefficient values have been multiplied by 100 and rounded to integers with two significant digits. The data sets are provided in an ASCII grid format.

Rea, A. H.; Tortorelli, R. L.

1997-01-01

240

Use of preserved museum fish to evaluate historical and current mercury contamination in fish from two rivers in Oklahoma, USA.  

PubMed

We examined the effects of a commonly used preservation technique on mercury concentration in fish tissue. After fixing fish muscle tissue in formalin followed by preservation in isopropanol, we found that mercury concentration in fish muscle tissue increased by 18%, reaching an asymptote after 40 days. We used formalin-isopropanol-preserved longear sunfish (Lepomis megalotis) from the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History to examine historical changes and predict current mercury concentrations in fish from two rivers in southeastern Oklahoma. Glover River was free-flowing, while Mountain Fork River was impounded in 1970 and a coldwater trout fishery was established upstream from the collection site in 1989. Mercury concentrations in longear sunfish from Glover River showed no historical changes from 1963 to 2001. Mercury concentrations in longear sunfish from Mountain Fork River showed no change from 1925 to 1993 but declined significantly from 1993 to 2003. We also compared mercury concentrations of the most recently collected longear sunfish in the museum to mercury concentrations of unpreserved fish collected from the rivers in 2006. Concentrations of mercury in museum fish were not significantly different from mercury concentrations in unpreserved fish we collected from the rivers. Our study indicates that preserved museum fish specimens can be used to evaluate historical changes and predict current levels of mercury contamination in fish. PMID:19377911

Hill, J Jaron; Chumchal, Matthew M; Drenner, Ray W; Pinder, John E; Drenner, S Matthew

2009-04-18

241

Lesson 2: Sacred Mountains.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a lesson in which the students are divided into four Mountain Study Teams in order to examine a sacred mountain. Explains that the students in each group assume a particular role, such as an historian or scientist. Provides a profile on the four mountains and a definition of the seven student roles. (CMK)

Byers, Alton; Gilligan, Nancy; Golston, Syd; Linville, Rex

1999-01-01

242

Lesson 1: Mountains Matter.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a lesson that enables students to explain the global importance of mountains by applying the five themes of geography (location, place, relationships within places, movement, and regions) to a particular mountain range. Explains that students work in teams to prepare a brochure about their mountain range. (CMK)

Byers, Alton; Gilligan, Nancy; Golston, Syd; Linville, Rex

1999-01-01

243

Mountains Majesty: Ecosystems of the Rocky Mountains  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Traveling from the East, one can see the towering snow-covered peaks of the Rocky Mountains long before reaching foothills. But to fully appreciate these mountains, one must venture into them and experience up close the colorful bursts of summer wildflowers, the glittering leaves of the quaking aspen, the cold clear alpine streams and lakes, and the distinctive sweet scent of the ponderosa pine. Scientists from the Bureau of Land Management provide an in-depth look at the management issues and diversity of plants, animals, and habitats of the Rocky Mountains.

Wooster, Betsy; Rieben, Elizabeth; Quesenberry, Leah

2004-11-01

244

Seismogram offers insight into Oklahoma City bombing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, generated seismic waves that were recorded on two permanent seismographs about 7 and 26 km away from the bombing. The seismogram recorded at 26 km shows two low-frequency wave trains, discrete sets of oscillatory signals, that begin about 10 s apart. Public release of this record prompted speculation that each wave train was caused by a different energy source. On May 23, 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored the demolition of the bomb-ravaged Federal Building with portable seismographs (Figure 1). Two wave trains were picked up again. The recordings indicate that the wave trains during both the bombing and demolition represent seismic waves traveling at different velocities. We conclude that the two wave trains recorded during the bombing are consistent with a single impulsive energy source.

Holzer, Thomas L.; Fletcher, Joe B.; Fuis, Gary S.; Ryberg, Trond; Brocher, Thomas M.; Dietel, Christopher M.

245

Mass casualties in the Oklahoma City bombing.  

PubMed

The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was partially destroyed by a terrorist bomb on April 19, 1995. Injuries were sustained by 759 people, 168 of whom died. Fatalities occurred primarily among victims in the collapse zone of the federal building. Only 83 survivors required hospitalization. Twenty-two surviving victims sustained multiple fractures. Most victims arrived at local emergency departments by private vehicle within 2 hours. More severely injured survivors were transported by ambulance. The closer receiving hospitals used emergency department facilities and minor treatment areas. Few survivors were extricated from the bombing site more than 3 hours after the detonation. Mass casualty plans must provide for improved communications, diversion and retriage from facilities nearest the disaster site, and effective coordination of community and hospital resources. PMID:15187837

Teague, David C

2004-05-01

246

Oklahoma Climatological Survey: Outreach and Educational Materials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oklahoma Climatological Survey (OCS) provides outreach programs and educational materials to public safety agencies, agricultural interests, educators, and the general public. These include OK-FIRST, which provides weather data and training to public safety agencies; EarthStorm, a program for educators that integrates learning modules with real-time weather data; and Agweather, a website that provides information to help agricultural producers with weather-related decisions. The site also features a glossary of weather terminology, a set of lesson plans, and reference materials intended for use as refresher information by teachers. Other resources include information on tornado safety, case studies on the use of OCS training materials, and a set of maps and graphs with climatological data and information on severe weather phenomena.

247

SFC to cease operations at Gore, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

On February 16, Sequoyah Fuels Corporation (SFC) formally notified the Nuclear Regulatory Commission it intends to terminate operations and commence decommissioning at its uranium conversion facility at Gore, Oklahoma. SFC officially requested that its NRC operating license be terminated July 31, 1993. SFC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of General Atomics Corporation (GA), will be responsible for the estimated $21.2-million decommissioning plan. GA has contended that it is not financially liable for the cleanup but stated it would be available to offer financial assistance if needed. Over the proposed 10-year cleanup schedule, GA said SFC can finance the decommissioning by drawing on SFC's estimated $70-million in revenue from a fee-for-contract agreement in its recently formed joint-venture with AlliedSignal Inc., called ConverDyn.

Not Available

1993-03-01

248

75 FR 13236 - Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...10-395; MB Docket No. 10-19; RM-11589] Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK AGENCY...1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television, Television broadcasting. 0 For the reasons discussed in...

2010-03-19

249

Petroleum Solvent Mortality Study of Oklahoma Dry Cleaners. Volume 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The association between exposures to the primary petroleum solvents used in commercial dry cleaning processes and various causes of death was investigated. Each commercial dry cleaning establishment in Oklahoma was classified according to the solvent or s...

N. R. Asal R. L. Coleman R. L. Petrone W. Owen S. Walsworth

1988-01-01

250

A Survey of the Paleontological Resources of Southeastern Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents data on the location, quantity and quality of the paleontological resources of those formations that might be affected by Federal coal leasing in southeastern Oklahoma. These formations are of Pennsylvanian-age and include the Hartsho...

C. R. Robison

1978-01-01

251

Planning for the Development of the Commercial Fishery in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report was prepared as an aid to public relations and promotion of Oklahoma's commercial fishing program. The history, productivity, and problems of the commercial fishery are summarized. A general plan for promoting the fishery is provided with the o...

G. C. Mensinger

1971-01-01

252

Statistical Analysis of Compositional Data from Desmoinesian Sandstones in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The present-day geologic framework of Oklahoma and the entire southern midcontinent region is related directly to Pennsylvanian paleotectonic development. The most important goal of the study was to simply define the range of compositional variation in sa...

T. S. Dyman

1989-01-01

253

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Uranium favorability of the Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface geologic studies were supplemented by aerial radiometric surveys and hydrogeochemical and stream-...

D. K. Hobday F. G. Rose

1982-01-01

254

Responding to Terrorism Victims. Oklahoma City and Beyond.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City literally brought home the impact of terrorism for Americans. Individuals and agencies responded in extraordinary ways in the aftermath of the bombing and throughout the criminal t...

2000-01-01

255

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

West Carney field one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction cap...

M. Kelkar

2006-01-01

256

Contaminant Studies on Endangered Bats in Northeastern Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three federally listed endangered bat species are known to inhabit Oklahoma. The gray bat (Mvotis qrisescens) is probably the most abundant, and is presently known to occur in Adair, Cherokee, Delaware, and Ottawa Counties. Gray bats are almost unknown ou...

D. B. Martin

1992-01-01

257

76 FR 37166 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00050  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA--1989--DR), dated 06/06/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 05/22/2011 through 05/25/2011. EFFECTIVE DATES:...

2011-06-24

258

76 FR 50535 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00052  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR), dated 06/21/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 05/22/2011 through 05/25/2011. Effective Date:...

2011-08-15

259

75 FR 19667 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00035  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1883-DR), dated 03/05/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm. Incident Period: 01/28/2010 through 01/30/2010. DATES: Effective Date: 04/08/2010. Physical...

2010-04-15

260

75 FR 15755 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00035  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1883-DR), dated 03/05/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm. Incident Period: 01/28/2010 through 01/30/2010. Effective Date: 03/22/2010. Physical Loan...

2010-03-30

261

75 FR 6404 - Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...I have determined that the emergency conditions in certain areas of the State of Oklahoma resulting from a severe winter storm beginning on January 28, 2010, and continuing, are of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant an emergency...

2010-02-09

262

Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area Air Pollutant Emission Inventory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A summary report is presented of the emission inventory for the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. The report provides estimates of the present levels of air pollutant emissions and status of their control. The pollutants which include sulfur oxides, partic...

M. J. McGraw

1970-01-01

263

75 FR 11904 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Noble, Nowata, Okfuskee, Okmulgee, Ottawa, Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Sequoyah, Stephens, Tillman, and Tulsa Counties for Public Assistance. All counties within the State of Oklahoma are eligible to apply for...

2010-03-12

264

Implementation of the ProScan System in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) conducted a Profilograph Operator's Training and Certification Course in November, 1995. Course excercises included testing one track of a roadway with six different profilographs. The profilographs used co...

G. Williams

1998-01-01

265

25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS ...1902 (32 Stat. 43), authorizes right-of-way grants across tribal and individually owned land in Oklahoma. Rights-of-way granted under...

2011-04-01

266

Feasibility Study - Industrial Park in Northeast Oklahoma City.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report studies the feasibility of establishing an industrial park in the northeast sector of Oklahoma City, with respect to its geographic location, accessibility, size, the community characteristics and the available infrastructure. The analysis pres...

1975-01-01

267

Fiscal Year 1987 Program Report: Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The FY 1987 Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute research program addressed the issues of surface and ground water quality and management of water resources. Research projects funded by the OWRRI to address these issues included: an investigation o...

E. M. McTernan N. N. Durham

1988-01-01

268

Assessment of Nursing in Oklahoma - 1970 - Summary Report and Recommendations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results are reported of a study initiated by the Oklahoma Board of Nurse Registration and Nursing Education to obtain information that would assist individuals and groups to plan effectively for health care services in the State. The primary objective of ...

1971-01-01

269

DWARF BUFO AMERICANUS AMERICANUS FROM CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The American toad, Bv,!o americanus americanv,s (Holbrook), i8 an eastern form, ranging from southeastern Canada southward along the coast to eastern Texas, and westward through the prairie states to eastern Kansas and central Oklahoma. It is the common toad in New England, New York, Wisconsin, and Missouri and is the commonest species of B.fo in eastern Oklahoma, especially in the

ARTHUR N. BRAGG

270

Mountain Home Municipal Airport, Mountain Home, Idaho.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the proposal for land acquisition, and realignment and improvement of a general utility runway, Mountain Home, Idaho. The adverse environmental effects are noise exposure, and air pollution. (Author)

1972-01-01

271

Galileo's Moon Mountain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Galileo's Moon Mountain Model illustrates the method used by Galileo to measure the height of a mountain on the Moon. Using his improved telescope design, Galileo was able to see spots of light in the otherwise dark potion of the Moon. He interpreted these spots as mountain peaks which caught the rays of the sun even though the sun did not illuminate the Moon's surface at the base of the mountain. He measured the distance of the bright spot from the terminator (the line separating the lit and unlit portions of the Moon) as a fraction of the Moon's radius. Then he was able to use a geometrical argument to determine the height of the mountain as a fraction of the Moon's radius. Galileo knew that the Moon's radius was approximately 1600 km (he didn't use those units, of course), which allowed him to determine the absolute height of the mountain. (Note that the modern value for the Moon's radius is about 1740 km.) One window shows the view from above the North pole of the Moon. The mountain appears near the bottom of this window. A ray of sunlight which just grazes the Moon's surface at the terminator is shown. Controls allow the user to adjust the angle of sunlight (thus altering the Moon's phase) and the height of the mountain. The other window shows the view from Earth. When sunlight strikes the top of the mountain a bright spot becomes visible in the dark area of the Moon. Likewise, when the mountain is in the bright region it casts a shadow. The distance across the Moon's face from terminator to mountain in shown.

Timberlake, Todd

2011-05-18

272

The Meers Fault in Southern Oklahoma: Holocene Movements on a Fault with Pennsylvanian and Cambrian Linages  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Meers fault and subparallel fault strands in southern Oklahoma is the southernmost element of the complex and massive (>10 km of throw) frontal fault zone that forms the boundary between the Anadarko basin, which is the deepest intra-continental basin in the United States, and the uplifted Cambrian igneous rocks of the Wichita Mountains. The Wichita uplift is evidence of extraordinary Pennsylvanian intra-plate deformation along the trend of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen, which is a classic example of a failed and massively inverted rift. The Meers Fault is the best-documented Holocene fault scarp east of Colorado and probably represents reactivation of a Pennsylvanian oblique thrust that in turn is likely to be an inverted Cambrian normal fault. The magnitude of these structures is shown on images from 3-D industry seismic reflection data ~25 km northwest of the northwestern mapped extent of the Meers fault that indicate the Pennsylvanian structure, or a northern strand of it, has a reverse throw of ~6km at depth. The fault displays a conspicuous and continuous scarp that is at least 25 km long and is evident in air photos and 1:100,000 scale geologic mapping, but this feature is not well mapped in detail beyond the area of trenching studies conducted in the 1980's. In the Holocene, 3-5 m of vertical surface displacement has been documented and left-lateral strike slip displacement on the fault is 2-3 times greater than the vertical displacement. During this movement, Quaternary soils along the fault were folded and ruptured, and the scarp has dammed small gullies where fine-grained alluvium has collected and has been used in the dating efforts. The most recent movement occurred (1100-1300 y ago) with a variety of earlier events having been proposed. As such, this fault represents one of the highest potential seismic hazards in the central/eastern United States.

Keller, G. R.; Holland, A. A.; Luza, K.; Oldow, J. S.; Crain, K.

2011-12-01

273

30 CFR 936.20 - Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 936.20 Section 936.20...Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE...Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary approved...

2013-07-01

274

An Index of the Social Indicators of the American Indian in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is an exhaustive research study of socio-economic characteristics of the Indian population in the state of Oklahoma. The socia-economic characteristics included a historical background of the American Indian in Oklahoma, population characterist...

J. E. Trimble

1971-01-01

275

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Canadian County, Cleveland County, Grady County, Lincoln County, Logan County, Kingfisher County, McClain County, Oklahoma County, Pottawatomie...

2010-07-01

276

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Canadian County, Cleveland County, Grady County, Lincoln County, Logan County, Kingfisher County, McClain County, Oklahoma County, Pottawatomie...

2009-07-01

277

75 FR 21015 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-1883-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Oklahoma; Amendment No...Oklahoma (FEMA-1883-DR), dated March 5, 2010, and related determinations. DATES...President in his declaration of March 5, 2010. Tillman County for Public...

2010-04-22

278

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Clinton Quadrangle, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Uranium resources of the Clinton Quadrangle, west-central Oklahoma, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using available surface and subsurface geologic information. Uranium occurrences reported in previously published literature were located, sampled, and described in detail. Areas of anomalous radioactivity, which were interpreted from aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance surveys, were also investigated. Five areas of uranium favorability were delineated within the quadrangle. Delineation was based on both surface and subsurface data. Two of these areas include coastal-plain facies of the Upper Permian Doxey Shale. Two other areas include the marginal basin facies of the Cloud Chief and Rush Springs Formations (Late Permian). The fifth area, in the southern part of the quadrangle, is characterized by arkosic alluvial-fan and fluvial facies of Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian age. Geologic units considered to be unfavorable include all pre-Upper Pennsylvanian rocks, most Permian rocks, the Pliocene Ogallala Formation, Pleistocene sediments, and parts of the Upper Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian rocks.

Bloch, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Eutsler, R.L.; Myers, J.J.

1982-09-01

279

A proposed streamflow data program for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An evaluation of the streamflow data available in Oklahoma has been made to provide guidelines for planning future data-collection programs. The basic steps in the evaluation procedure were (1) definition of the long-terms goals of the streamflow-data program in quantitative form, (2) examination and analysis of streamflow data to determine which goals have been met, and (3) consideration of alternate programs and techniques to meet the remaining goals. The study defines the individual relation between certain statistical streamflow characteristics and selected basin parameters. This relation is a multiple regression equation that could be used on a statewide basis to compute a selected natural-flow characteristic at any site on a stream. The study shows that several streamflow characteristics can be estimated within an accuracy equivalent to 10 years of record by use of a regression related to at least three climatic or basin parameters for any basin of 50 square miles or more. The study indicates that significant changes in the scope and character of the data-collection program would enhance the possibility of attaining the remaining goals. A streamflow-data program based on the guidelines developed in this study is proposed for the future.

Bohn, J. D.; Hoffman, G. L.

1970-01-01

280

Mountain chickadee (Poecile gambeli)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli), a small, cavity-nesting songbird, is one of the most common birds of montane and coniferous forest from southern Arizona and Baja California north to British Columbia and the Yukon territory. This publication describes the life history of the Mountain Chickadee.

McCallum, D. Archibald; Grundel, Ralph; Dahlsten, Donald L.

1999-01-01

281

Injuries in mountain biking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite still growing attraction mountain biking as a matter of sports traumatology still lacks relevant data based on large cross-sectional surveys. To obtain an overview of risk factors, types, and main body sites of injuries occurring in mountain biking we assessed the results of a questionnaire answered by 3873 athletes. A total of 8133 single lesions were reported by 3474

H. Gaulrapp; A. Weber; B. Rosemeyer

2001-01-01

282

Injuries to rescue workers following the Oklahoma City bombing.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to identify and describe physical injuries to rescue workers in the aftermath of the Oklahoma City bombing. Data were obtained from medical records from 16 hospital emergency departments and specialty clinics in the Oklahoma City area, and reported visits to medical providers at the bombing site. Participants were rescue personnel from the Oklahoma City Fire Department, the mutual aid fire stations in the Oklahoma City area, the Federal Emergency Management Agency's Urban Search and Rescue teams, and military personnel stationed near Oklahoma City. All participants were involved in the rescue and recovery operation. The two main outcome measures were (1) the number, types, and rates of injuries; and (2) comparisons of case-finding methods, including medical chart review and telephone interview. The most common injuries were strains and sprains (21.4%), foreign bodies in eyes (14.5%), and laceration/crush/puncture wounds (18.4%). Of the four case-finding mechanisms, telephone interviews following the event identified the largest number of cases (84.5%). Most injuries were minor; some injuries such as chemical burns were preventable. The potential utility of other data collection mechanisms is considered. PMID:9131228

Dellinger, A M; Waxweiler, R J; Mallonee, S

1997-06-01

283

The impact of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing on the partners of firefighters  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored the impact of the 1995 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, bombing on the spouses and significant others of a volunteer\\u000a sample of Oklahoma City firefighters who participated in the bombing rescue effort. Twenty-seven partners of Oklahoma City\\u000a firefighters participated in this study, conducted 42 to 44 months after the bombing. These partners were assessed using a\\u000a structured diagnostic interview

Betty Pfefferbaum; Carol S. North; Kenneth Bunch; Teddy G. Wilson; Phebe Tucker; John K. Schorr

2002-01-01

284

Structural evolution of the Ardmore basin, Oklahoma, U.S.A.: Progressive deformation in the foreland of the Ouachita collision  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Synthesis of oil field studies, seismic reflection data, and surface geology has resulted in a reconstruction of the Pennsylvanian evolution of the structural style of fault systems bordering and within the Ardmore Basin in south central Oklahoma. Faults bounding the margins of the basin were part of a broader left-lateral shear belt that affected southern Oklahoma during the early Pennsylvanian. The mid-Pennsylvanian and later zone of deformation contracted in southern Oklahoma to concentrate on the Washita Valley-Eola Robberson fault systems along the northern edge of the basin, and on the Criner Uplift-Healdton-Stephens County fault systems along the southern and western side of the basin. Deformation on the floor of the basin was amplified, with left-lateral strike-slip faults slicing the basin into a system of rhombohedral blocks. Deformation continued at least into Virgil time (late Pennsylvanian). A two-dimensional displacement field derived for the middle to late Pennsylvanian deformation reveals that a strong component of transpression affected both the basin-bounding faults and, by reason of the geometry of their connections to the west, the Wichita Mountain front as well. Broadly spread left-lateral shear evolved into crustal scale transpression during the Pennsylvanian Period. That progressive contraction of deformation and the change in style correlate with mid-Pennsylvanian approach and passage of the Ouachita collision along the Ouachita embayment (Thomas, 1983) on the southern margin of the North American craton. Inasmuch as the Ardmore Basin was located at the sharp internal corner of the embay ment, the coincidence suggests that the style of evolution records (1) early far-field influence of the approaching Ouachita collision during early Pennsylvanian, (2) passage of the suture during mid-Pennsylvanian, and (3) concentration of foreland deformation at the corner of the embayment as the Arkoma and Fort Worth flexural basins evolved to the south and east during late Pennsylvanian.

Granath, James W.

1989-10-01

285

THE DISTRIBUTION OF NOTROPIS BAIRDI ALONG THE CIMARRON RIVER IN LOGAN COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Recognition is respectfully given to Mr. William Mathews of the University of Oklahoma,for identifying the N. bairdi in our sample. The help of James Magovern and Gregory Steele of the University of Oklahoma is also acknowledged,for their efforts in data collection of the N. bairdi distribution. Our gratitude is expressed to Drs. Loren Hill, University of Oklahoma, and George

Charles L. Marshall

1978-01-01

286

77 FR 15343 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...EPA-R06-RCRA-2012-0054; FRL-9647-8] Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous...SUMMARY: The State of Oklahoma has applied to EPA for Final authorization...grant Final authorization to the State of Oklahoma. In the ``Rules and...

2012-03-15

287

75 FR 15447 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-1883-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Oklahoma; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major...disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1883-DR), dated March 5...disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma is hereby amended to include the...

2010-03-29

288

76 FR 49781 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-1989-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Oklahoma; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of a Major...disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR), dated June 6...disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma is hereby amended to include the...

2011-08-11

289

76 FR 38195 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-1989-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major...disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR), dated June 6...disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma is hereby amended to include the...

2011-06-29

290

76 FR 44027 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-1989-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Oklahoma; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of a Major...disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR), dated June 6...disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma is hereby amended to include the...

2011-07-22

291

Lower-Division Offerings in the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area: Studies and Recommendations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report provides information on associate degree and certificate offerings at four two-year institutions in the Oklahoma and Tulsa City metropolitan areas and articulation between baccalaureate degree programs at the University of Central Oklahoma and four metropolitan area two-year institutions. Part I classifies Oklahoma City area

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

292

Oklahoma Library Technology Network (OLTN) Electronic Resources for Elementary Age Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document describes Oklahoma Library Technology Network electronic resources for elementary age children. The first section provides a history of Oklahoma statewide shared databases. Oklahoma statewide information database contacts are listed in the second section. The third section presents information on InfoTrac Kid's Edition Online

Fox, Carol, Comp.

293

Case finding and mental health services for children in the aftermath of the Oklahoma City bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1995 Oklahoma City bombing killed 168 people, including 19 children, and injured hundreds more. Children were a major focus of concern in the mental health response. Most services for them were delivered in the Oklahoma City Public Schools where approximately 40,000 students were enrolled at the time of the explosion. Middle and high school students in the Oklahoma City

Betty Pfefferbaum; Guy M. Sconzo; Brian W. Flynn; Lauri J. Kearns; Debby E. Doughty; Robin H. Gurwitch; Sara Jo Nixon; Shajitha Nawaz

2003-01-01

294

Ground water available in the Davenport area, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This memorandum describes the ground-water resources in the vicinity of Davenport, Lincoln County, Oklahoma. It is based on a one-day trip to Davenport made by the writer on February 11, 1948, to obtain information in addition to that in the ground-water files in Norman on the availability of ground water for public supply or other uses in the Davenport area. Davenport is a town of about 1,000 in east-central Lincoln County, Oklahoma, on U.S. Highway 66, about half way between Oklahoma City and Tulsa. It is in an area of undulating to gently rolling topography underlain by rocks of Pennsylvanian age. The area is drained into Deep Fork of the Canadian River, by Dry Creek and its tributary, Chuckaho Creek. (available in photostat copy only)

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

295

E-mountains and progress of digital mountains  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Human being has experienced five stages on the mountainous study, in which the form of mountain information presented like a cycle, i.e. starts from data, and changed to information, knowledge, finally returned back to data. Similarly, attribute of mountain information also experienced a cycle of objective information-subjective information-objective information. There is no essential difference between e-mountains and digital mountains. Based on the analyzing of the progression of e-mountains studies in China and abroad, this work proposed three key points to build digital mountains (China): 1) integration and sharing mountain information; 2) methods and models of mountain data mining; 3) visualization and 3-D simulation of mountain surface processes.

Jiang, Xiaobo; Ji, Wei; Zeng, Hongcheng

2009-09-01

296

Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal responsibility. The most frequently identified curriculum need across all aviation disciplines was that of communication skills.

Kutz, Mary N. Hill

297

Mountains and Moving Plates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These are the lecture notes for a class on plate tectonics and mountain building which is taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The course describes the connections between the earth's tectonic plates, earthquakes, and its many mountain ranges. Topics include basic geography, the structure of the earth's interior, the relationships between the seismic cycle, volcanism, and plate movements, erosion of mountains, and mass wasting. Links are provided to additional resources, including aerial photos of geologic features, an interactive map of geology and topography of the United States, and a glossary.

298

Relations among land cover, streamflow, and water quality in the North Canadian River Basin near Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: 1968-2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Oklahoma City, has collected water-quality samples at the North Canadian River near Harrah, Oklahoma (the Harrah station), since 1968, and the North Canadian River at Britton Road at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (the Britton Road station), since 1988. The North Canadian municipal wastewater-treatment plant, managed by the city of Oklahoma City, is the largest wastewater-treatment plant in the North Canadian River Basin and discharges effluent between the Britton Road and Harrah stations. Water-quality constituent concentrations were summarized, and trends in concentrations and frequencies of detection of selected constituents with time were evaluated to determine if changes in land cover, streamflow, and other potential sources of constituents in water had significant effects on water quality in the North Canadian River downstream from Oklahoma City.

Esralew, Rachel A.; Andrews, William J.; Smith, S. Jerrod

2011-01-01

299

Early petroleum exploration, Rocky Mountain region, USA  

SciTech Connect

Historically, geology exposed on the flanks of Rocky Mountain uplifts has given unique opportunities to integrate surface and subsurface data to understand the petroleum geology of the intermontane basins. Exploration evolved from drilling near seeps to mapping of surface anticlines, to use of geophysics and subsurface data acquired by drilling. Oil seeps were first recorded by explorers in Wyoming in 1832 (Dallas dome, Wind River basin) and 1847 (Absaroka thrust, southwest area). Oil skimmed from springs was used for medicinal purposes and sold for wagon lubrication. The first commercial well was drilled in 1862 by an oil seep 9 mi north of Florence, Colorado. Subsequent drilling led to the discovery of the Florence field which has now produced more than 15,000,000 barrels of oil. Production is from fractured Cretaceous shale in a tilted graben with a fault trap on the updip side. Early fields were geologically diverse and reports describing the accumulations developed concepts that guided exploration in the region. The following fields illustrate the wide range of trapping conditions. (1) Faults and fractures on homoclinal dip: Florence-Oil Creek area (1862) and Boulder (1901), Colorado; Uinta basin, Utah. (2) Closed anticline: Dallas dome (1884) and Salt Creek (1908), Wyoming; Rangely (1902), Colorado. (3) Stratigraphic change on anticlinal plunge or regional dip: Moorcroft (1888) and Shannon (1889), Wyoming. (4) Syncline: Mexican Hat (1907), Utah; Blanco gas field (1926), New Mexico. (5) Unconformity: Kevin-Sunburst (1922), Montana. Techniques and ideas developed in areas peripheral to the Rocky Mountains also influence exploration in the overall region, especially Kansas, Oklahoma, and Canada.

Weimer, R.J.

1991-03-01

300

Smoky Mountain Field School  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Tennessee Division of Continuing Education contains the home page for the Smoky Mountain Field School which offers supervised wilderness adventures for people of all ages and levels of experience. http://www.ce.utk.edu/Smoky/

301

The Strongest Mountain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

After learning about weathering and erosion, fifth-grade students worked in cooperative groups to create a "mountain" that could resist the effects of water erosion and demonstrate their understanding of the subject.

Monnes, Colleen

2004-10-01

302

Mountains of Fractals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The "Mountains of Fractals" article in the Math DL develops algorithms to produce coastlines and mountains in two dimensions by adapting mathematical ideas related to the construction of such fractals as Koch's curve. EJS is used to create a hands-on activity that allows a reader to create a coastline with a rubberband, six-sided die, and thumb tacks. Java applications allow for exploration of these algorithms and the influence of their associated parameters. After discussing 2D fractal mountains, this article extends the 2D algorithm to produce 3D mountains. Finally, mathematical issues in random number generation are discussed. More specifically, linear congruential generators are considered and shown to be suitable as a random number generator for the 3D fractal landscape algorithm. The use of fractal landscapes in movies is also discussed.

Chartier, Tim

2009-09-11

303

YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect

The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

A.M. Simmons

2004-04-16

304

Pennsylvania's dead mountain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most first-time visitors to Blue Mountain are never quite prepared for it. They don't expect to see 2000 acres of dead mountain-especially land looking like that. The defoliation started in 1898 when New Jersey Zinc Company opened the first of two plants to process zinc silicate (and later zinc sulfide) from nearby New Jersey. While the acid rain worked on

Lalo

2009-01-01

305

Rocky Mountain acidification study  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report were to determine the sensitivity of watersheds characteristic of the Rocky Mountain Region and the relationship of watershed sensitivity to geology and soils; to evaluate the extent of current acidification and the potential for increasing acidification with increasing deposition of nitrate and sulfate; to evaluate the results of the preceding in terms of impacts on fish populations; and to develop recommendations for assessment of future trends in both changing water chemistry and impacts on fish populations. Areas selected for study included the Rocky Mountain National Ppark and Yellowstone National Park, exemplifying two different geologic types that are representative of a large portion of the Rocky Mountain region. Rocky Mountain National Park is primarily underlain by granite and Yellowstone National Park by volcanic materials. Sensitivity is primarily determined by bedrock geology and varies inversely with elevation. High-elevation lakes and streams in the central Rocky Mountain region are very sensitive to acidic deposition. With respect to fish populations there is currently no evidence of chronic acidification and thus no apparent impact on fisheries. However, the very low base cation concentration observed in the headwater drainages of Rocky Mountain National Park suggests extreme sensitivity to acidification. Waters in volcanic areas such as Yellowstone National Park are generally of high alkalinity and do not represent potentially sensitive habitats. 109 references, 31 figures, 24 tables.

Gibson, J.H.; Galloway, J.N.; Schofield, C.; McFee, W.; Johnson, R.; McCarley, S.; Dise, N.; Herzog, D.

1983-10-01

306

Seaway conversion moves Oklahoma gas to Texas plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purchase and conversion to natural gas transmission of the Seaway crude oil pipeline was an effort to capitalize on the line's location to gather raw gas in Oklahoma and Texas for use as fuel at Phillips Petroleum Co.'s Sweeny, Tex., refinery. The Seaway pipeline was planned during the early 1970s as a major midwest oil artery. The purpose of the

G. L. II Bazin; R. L. Ince

1986-01-01

307

University of Oklahoma: School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Oklahoma offers information on research in the areas of bioengineering, polymers science and engineering, environmental engineering, and energy studies. Examples include the Engineering Virtual Library and the Chemical Engineering Virtual Library, related government research labs, discipline-specific groupings of Chemical Engineering online resources, and selected corporate Web pages.

308

Arkansas turbidite studies may aid Oklahoma Jackfork exploration  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past 2 years, more than a dozen successful Pennsylvanian Jackfork gas wells have been drilled in eastern Oklahoma, and the play seems ready for expansion if drilling and completion costs can be contained. To date, wells are thought to produce from fractures in highly quartz-cemented, brittle sandstones. However, there is potential for stratigraphic accumulations of gas. It is

R. M. Slatt; H. Al-Siyabi; E. T. Williams; C. G. Stone; P. Weimer; R. J. Davis; D. W. Jordan

1997-01-01

309

Subsidence and basin development in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

Microsoft Academic Search

Development of the southern Oklahoma aulacogen was the result of Cambrian tectonism along Proterozoic zones of weakness that caused northwest-trending extensional normal faults related to a rifting event. These faults were reactivated during upper Paleozoic compressional stress with fault patterns indicative of sinistral transpressive and transtensional movement. Mapping in the region has allowed classification of the myriad of faults into

1991-01-01

310

Annotated bibliography of the Ardmore and Marietta basins - Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This bibliography contains 828 records related to the geology of the Ardmore and Marietta basins, Oklahoma. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: coal, petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; paleontology; petrology; stratigraphy; tectonics; electric logs; fossils;geophysics; geologic structures; uranium deposits; and ground water. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic

1982-01-01

311

Hydrocarbon accumulation along the Cumberland Thrust, Bryan County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bryan County is in the Coastal Plain Province in S. Oklahoma. Surface rocks are Cretaceous in age and are superimposed over preexisting Paleozoic folds and faults which control the oil and gas accumulation. Cretaceous strata dip gently into the Cumberland-Kingston Syncline, a southeastern extension of the Ardmore-Anadarko Basin. The folds and faults of the subsurface trend northwest to southeast from

Huffman

1976-01-01

312

Geohydrology of the Oklahoma Panhandle, Beaver, Cimarron, and Texas Counties.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Ogallala aquifer is the principal source of ground water in the Oklahoma Panhandle. Based on an estimated average storage coefficient of 0.1, the quantity of water stored in the Ogallala aquifer was computed at approximately 50 million acre-feet (6.17...

D. L. Hart G. L. Hoffman R. L. Goemaat

1976-01-01

313

Diurnal cycle of the Oklahoma City urban heat island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between the dates of 28 June and 31 July 2003, the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field project was conducted in Oklahoma City and was the largest urban dispersion experiment ever in North America. Because the focus of JU2003 was on atmospheric processes within the urban environment, an extremely dense network of instrumentation was deployed in and around the central business

Jeffrey B. Basara; Peter K. Hall; Amanda J. Schroeder; Bradley G. Illston; Kodi L. Nemunaitis

2008-01-01

314

Archaeological Investigations at Clayton Lake, Southeast Oklahoma. Phase II.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The results of excavations and analyses at five prehistoric sites in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma are described in this report. The fieldwork was conducted between July and October 1979. These sites (34Pu-74, 34Pu-100, 34Pu-102, 34Pu-105, and 34Pu-111) wil...

R. Vehik S. J. Bobalik C. Lintz

1982-01-01

315

Students' Perceptions of Bullying in Oklahoma Public Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We studied perceptions of Oklahoma public school students (n = 7,848) regarding bullying. Specifically, we asked for their thoughts about the seriousness of bullying, the hurtfulness of bullying, their involvement in bullying (as victim or perpetrator), their responses to being bullied or seeing someone else being bullied, and what they wanted

Hughes, Patricia Paulsen; Middleton, Katherine M.; Marshall, David D.

2009-01-01

316

The Oklahoma Amish: Survival of an Ethnic Subculture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Focuses on ways that an Oklahoma Amish community creates, defines, maintains, and manipulates various symbols in an effort to deal with five problems that threaten the survival of Amish life: disenchanted youth, inroads of modernity, tourism, vanishing farm land, and governmental intervention. (Author/GC)|

Thompson, William E.

1981-01-01

317

Bidding Documents for Asbestos Abatement in Oklahoma Public Buildings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

All relevant specifications and forms for the removal of asbestos from Oklahoma public buildings are consolidated in this document. The specifications cover the entire procedure for asbestos removal beginning with solicitation for bids; contractor's responsibilities concerning date of completion, general cleanup, laying out work, wage scale, and

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

318

A Multilayer Aquifer Model of the Ogallala Formation in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The effects of layering on an aquifer were studied to obtain a better definition of the properties of the Ogallala Formation in the panhandle of Oklahoma. Two sand models simulated the conditions found in this area. Laboratory analyses of sand samples fro...

J. T. Chowning

1973-01-01

319

Annotated bibliography of the Anadarko basin area; Kansas - Oklahoma - Texas  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 118 additional records related to the geology of the Anadarko basin area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; petrology; tectonics; and geochemistry. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area.

McLaughlin, J.E.

1985-01-01

320

Ground water in the Anadarko area [Caddo County], Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report offers a preliminary interpretation of the geology and ground-water hydrology of the Anadarko area, Oklahoma. L.V. Davis prepared the accompanying map from aerial photographs and furnished much of the geologic information, and records of the State Mineral Survey (WPA) were used in the preparation of the section on the Rush Springs sandstone. (available as photostat copy only)

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

321

77 FR 63409 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00063  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/ 2012. Incident: Freedom and Noble Wildfires. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 through 08/14/2012. DATES: Effective Date: 10/05/2012. Physical Loan...

2012-10-16

322

77 FR 61466 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00063  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/ 2012. Incident: Freedom and Noble Wildfires. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 through 08/14/2012. Effective Date: 09/27/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-10-09

323

78 FR 36632 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR), dated 05/20/ 2013. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes and Flooding. Incident Period: 05/18/2013 through 06/02/2013. Effective Date: 06/11/2013. Physical Loan...

2013-06-18

324

78 FR 40819 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA--4117-DR), dated 05/20/ 2013. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes and flooding. Incident Period: 05/18/2013 through 06/02/2013. Effective Date: 06/26/2013. Physical Loan...

2013-07-08

325

78 FR 25462 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Oklahoma resulting from a severe winter storm and snowstorm during the period of February 24-26, 2013, is of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant a...

2013-05-01

326

75 FR 15450 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Oklahoma resulting from a severe winter storm during the period of January 28-30, 2010, is of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant a major disaster...

2010-03-29

327

Sports Officials Fret over Oklahoma Plan to Raise Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A proposed state policy requiring college students to maintain a 2.0 grade point average to participate in extracurricular activities is seen by supporters of athletics as discriminating against athletes and endangering Oklahoma's teams' success. If the extracurricular activities provision is removed, grade standards for good academic standing

Lederman, Douglas

1990-01-01

328

How a School Coped with the Oklahoma City Bombing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Following the Oklahoma City bombing, fifth graders at a nearby elementary school coped with ensuing uncertainty, pain, and loss. They wrote appreciative letters to fire and rescue workers; shared personal stories with classmates; compiled an anthology of poems, prayers, and stories; attended an assembly to honor parents participating in rescue

Aspy, David N.; Aspy, Cheryl B.

1996-01-01

329

Bidding Documents for Asbestos Abatement in Oklahoma Public Buildings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|All relevant specifications and forms for the removal of asbestos from Oklahoma public buildings are consolidated in this document. The specifications cover the entire procedure for asbestos removal beginning with solicitation for bids; contractor's responsibilities concerning date of completion, general cleanup, laying out work, wage scale, and

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

330

Radar polarimetric signatures of fire plumes in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radar observations of wild fire plumes in Oklahoma carried out with the prototype of dual polarization S-band WSR-88D weather radar are presented. The observations show that the copolar correlation coefficients between horizontally and vertically polarized returns in the plumes are mostly less than 0.4 and this can be used in identification of plumes.

V. M. Melnikov; D. S. Zrnic; R. M. Rabin; P. Zhang

2008-01-01

331

The Oklahoma Amish: Survival of an Ethnic Subculture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focuses on ways that an Oklahoma Amish community creates, defines, maintains, and manipulates various symbols in an effort to deal with five problems that threaten the survival of Amish life: disenchanted youth, inroads of modernity, tourism, vanishing farm land, and governmental intervention. (Author/GC)

Thompson, William E.

1981-01-01

332

FEASIBILITY OF AN OKLAHOMA FRESH GREENS AND COWPEAS PACKING COOPERATIVE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oklahoma's green producers are not benefiting from a growing fresh market. In order to seize the opportunities offered by the growing fresh market for leafy greens, investment in packing facilities have been evaluated. To make use of these facilities during summer months, the addition of a cowpea shelling enterprise is considered. A business plan for a new generation cooperative is

Germain P. Nkengoum; Rodney B. Holcomb; Brian A. Kahn; Daniel S. Tilley

2004-01-01

333

Estimating bioenergy feedstock potential of red cedar in western Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Red cedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) is an invasive species that seriously degrades tallgrass prairie and adjacent landscapes in the southern plains region of the US with an estimated 8 million acres impacted in the state of Oklahoma alone. This study is part of a larger project to improve grassland...

334

The University of Oklahoma Library's Digitization of Title Pages Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The University of Oklahoma library's digitization of title pages project began as a result of a backlog in the History of Science Collections. Lacking sufficient staff to fully catalog 17,000 books, many of which were rare, a decision was made to scan the title page of each book and download these into Hyperion, a component of SIRSI, the University's ILS,

Anna May Wyatt; Katherine Wong

2004-01-01

335

Emergency Department Impact of the Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study objective: To collect descriptive epidemiologic injury data on patients who suffered acute injuries after the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing and to describe the effect on metropolitan emergency departments. Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of victims seen for injury or illness related to the bombing at 1 of the 13 study hospitals from 9:02 AM

David E Hogan; Joseph F Waeckerle; Daniel J Dire; Scott R Lillibridge

1999-01-01

336

Oklahoma city: Disaster challenges mental health and medical administrators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental health and medical administrators responded to the Oklahoma City bombing with cooperative and overlapping efforts to meet community needs in the wake of terrorism. The major agencies assisted in the immediate rescue response, organized crisis hotlines, prepared mental health professionals to counsel bereaved families and victims, organized debriefing of rescuers, assessed mental health needs of local school children, planned

Phebe Tucker; Betty Pfefferbaum; Robert Vincent; Sharron D. Boehler; Sara Jo Nixon

1998-01-01

337

A paradigm for multidisciplinary disaster research: the oklahoma city experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this article is to describe the creation and operation of a multidisciplinary group to examine the Oklahoma City (OKC) bombing. The OKC bombing presented an opportunity to study a major disaster within 2 days of the incident. The Disaster Health Studies Group (DHSG) was created to facilitate this effort. The creation, organization, and operation of the DHSG

Gary Quick

1998-01-01

338

Tornadoes in the Oklahoma City Area Since 1890.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oklahoma City (OKC), by virtue of its large areal extent and location near the heart of 'tornado alley,' has earned a reputation over the years as one of the tornado-prone cities in the United States. Each of the 93 tornado listings presented in this repo...

M. L. Branick

1994-01-01

339

Field Evaluation of a Near Zero Energy Home in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The authors evaluated a zero energy home built by Ideal Homes in Edmond, Oklahoma, that included an extensive package of energy-efficient technologies and a photovoltaic array for site electricity generation. The home was part of a Building America research project in partnership with the Building Science Consortium to exhibit high efficiency technologies while keeping costs within the reach of average home buyers.

Hendron, R.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

2008-08-01

340

National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Oklahoma. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,

National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

341

Climate variability in Oklahoma - get ready for more  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Our climate is changing relatively rapidly now, with the most critical changes for agriculture in Oklahoma manifesting as increases in the number of intense rainfall events and prolonged droughts, wild swings in the winter and early spring between "too cold" and "too hot", and higher-than-previous o...

342

Comparative analysis of wind energy production in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. In the last decades humanity has realized the necessity of developing alternative energy sources for its efficient economic development and simple survival in the future. During the last 30 years major improvements were made in renewable energy technologies and they started to become competitive with traditional energy sources (fossil fuels), especially with consideration of external costs. Among the renewable energy sources, wind energy is one of the cheapest and fastest growing nowadays. Oklahoma is a very promising site for wind energy development considering its excellent wind resources. Developing wind energy can allow not only electricity production for in-state consumption, but also exporting to other states. The development of wind energy could encourage economic growth with very few adverse impacts on the environment. However, traditional energy sources are still the cheapest and, thus, the introduction of the wind energy in Oklahoma should be critically analyzed from economic, ecological and social points of view. The goal of this study is to conduct analysis of wind energy electricity production in Oklahoma on the four main stages: (1) Investment Analysis from Private Perspective: Calculate present value net benefits for wind energy and traditional energy (natural gas), make sure that both of them are positive. (2) Investment Analysis from Social Perspective: Evaluate present value net private benefits (PVNPB) and present value net social benefit from both projects (PVNSB). (3) Government Subsidy Analysis: recognize the necessity of the subsidies and evaluate the amount of subsidies if any. (4) Investment Analysis from a Geographic Perspective: determine economic feasibility of wind power generation for 77 Oklahoma counties. Findings and conclusions. The final output of the study is the recommendations concerning wind energy development in Oklahoma with consideration of economic efficiency, ecological and social impacts. Study not only analyze possibilities for wind energy development in the state, but make recommendations on the county by county basis with consideration of wind power density, land cost, property tax and infrastructure development in each county.

Ermilova, Ekaterina Alexeevna

343

Diurnal cycle of the Oklahoma City urban heat island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Between the dates of 28 June and 31 July 2003, the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field project was conducted in Oklahoma City and was the largest urban dispersion experiment ever in North America. Because the focus of JU2003 was on atmospheric processes within the urban environment, an extremely dense network of instrumentation was deployed in and around the central business district (CBD) both prior to and during the field experiment. Among the variables collected were high-resolution observations of air temperature from various instrument sources. Additional observations of air temperature were also collected at Oklahoma Mesonet stations in the rural areas surrounding Oklahoma City. Using an index value, the diurnal cycle of the urban heat island (UHI) for Oklahoma City, with respect to the surrounding rural terrain, was quantified. The results revealed a consistent mean nocturnal UHI greater than 1.5C at both 2 and 9 m. However, observations at 2 m during JU2003 revealed a significant urban "cool" island during the convective portion of the day. The mean variability of temperature within the urban core of Oklahoma City increased significantly after sunrise, increased to a maximum near solar noon, and decreased following sunset. These results were inconsistent with the rural observations wherein the variability among sites was maximized during the nocturnal period. Finally, the vertical temperature gradient between 2 and 9 m demonstrated a clear and strong diurnal trend at the rural locations, whereas observations from the urban environment were nearly isothermal and consistent with near-neutral conditions throughout JU2003.

Basara, Jeffrey B.; Hall, Peter K.; Schroeder, Amanda J.; Illston, Bradley G.; Nemunaitis, Kodi L.

2008-10-01

344

Ground-water-quality assessment of the central Oklahoma aquifer, Oklahoma - Analysis of available water-quality data through 1987  

Microsoft Academic Search

The water quality of the Central Oklahoma aquifer was assessed using the information available through 1987. The following conclusions were drawn from the available data and the contingency-table statistics. The word common is used to describe situations where approximately 10% or more of the data exceeded a water quality standard: (1) groundwater concentrations of nitrate and selenium commonly exceed the

D. L. Parkhurst; S. C. Christenson; J. L. Schlottmann

1989-01-01

345

Certified organic farming research and demonstration project by Oklahoma State University and USDA's Agricultural Research Service at Lane, Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In 2003, Oklahoma State University and USDA, Agricultural Research Service, South Central Agricultural Research Laboratory received organic certification for 8 acres at the Lane Agricultural Center, Lane, OK. The certified organic land was used to develop a cooperative project with a diversity of a...

346

Results of the DMIP 2 Oklahoma experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phase 2 of the Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP 2) was formulated primarily as a mechanism to help guide the US National Weather Service (NWS) as it expands its use of spatially distributed watershed models for operational river, flash flood, and water resources forecasting. The overall purpose of DMIP 2 was to test many distributed models with operational quality data with a view towards meeting NWS operational forecasting needs. At the same time, DMIP 2 was formulated as an experiment that could be leveraged by the broader scientific community as a platform for testing, evaluating, and improving the science of spatially distributed models.This paper presents the key results of the DMIP 2 experiments conducted for the Oklahoma region, which included comparison of lumped and distributed model simulations generated with uncalibrated and calibrated parameters, water balance tests, routing and soil moisture tests, and simulations at interior locations. Simulations from 14 independent groups and 16 models are analyzed. As in DMIP 1, the participant simulations were evaluated against observed hourly streamflow data and compared with simulations generated by the NWS operational lumped model. A wide range of statistical measures are used to evaluate model performance on both run-period and event basis. A noteworthy improvement in DMIP 2 was the combined use of two lumped models to form the benchmark for event improvement statistics, where improvement was measured in terms of runoff volume, peak flow, and peak timing for between 20 and 40 events in each basin.Results indicate that in general, those spatially distributed models that are calibrated to perform well for basin outlet simulations also, in general, perform well at interior points whose drainage areas cover a wide range of scales. Two of the models were able to provide reasonable estimates of soil moisture versus depth over a wide geographic domain and through a period containing two severe droughts. In several parent and interior basins, a few uncalibrated spatially distributed models were able to achieve better goodness-of-fit statistics than other calibrated distributed models, highlighting the strength of those model structures combined with their a priori parameters. In general, calibration solely at basin outlets alone was not able to greatly improve relative model performance beyond that established by using uncalibrated a priori parameters. Further, results from the experiment for returning DMIP 1 participants reinforce the need for stationary data for model calibration: in some cases, the improvements gained by distributed models compared to lumped were not realized when the models were calibrated using inconsistent precipitation data from DMIP 1. Event-average improvement of distributed models over the combined lumped benchmark was measured in terms of runoff volume, peak flow, and peak timing for between 20 and 40 events. The percentage of model-basin pairs having positive distributed model improvement at basin outlets and interior points was 18%, 24%, and 28% respectively, for these quantities. These values correspond to 14%, 33%, and 22% respectively, in DMIP 1. While there may not seem to be much gain compared to DMIP 1 results, the DMIP 2 values were based on more precipitation-runoff events, more model-basin combinations (148 versus 51), more interior ungauged points (9 versus 3), and a benchmark comprised of two lumped model simulations.In addition, we propose a set of statistical measures that can be used to guide the calibration of distributed and lumped models for operational forecasting.

Dmip 2 Participants Smith, Michael B.; Koren, Victor; Zhang, Ziya; Zhang, Yu; Reed, Seann M.; Cui, Zhengtao; Moreda, Fekadu; Cosgrove, Brian A.; Mizukami, Naoki; Anderson, Eric A.

2012-02-01

347

The Mountaineers Collection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With an eye towards conservation and documentation, The Mountaineers outdoor club has been in existence since 1906. Since that time, the group has been actively engaged in and around the Pacific Northwests many wilderness areas in a variety of capacities. Recently, the University of Washington Libraries Digital Collections project saw fit to digitize some of their extensive photographic collections. The result is this fine online archive which contains delightful documentation of some of their early expeditions, such as a 1912 trek to Mount Rainier and a 1951 sojourn to Mount Olympus in the Olympic Mountain range. The site also includes a detailed map of their 1920 outing to Mount Olympus and an introductory essay about the history of the organization. Finally, the site also contains 28 bulletins from the organizations history that document some of their outings and mountaineering accomplishments.

348

Mountain Man Measurement Rendezvous  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this math lesson, learners participate in several activities where they apply measurement skills. Learners explore how the Mountain Men played an important part in the history of the American frontier and more importantly, how the Mountain Men used different techniques for making measurements in their daily activities. At the various stations, learners measure their jump distances, handfuls of "gold," water-soaked sponges, "buffalo chip" throws, arm spans, "stone" throws, "arrow" tosses, foot sizes, pots of beans, and "shooting" distances. This activity works well outside.

Lessonplans, Utah

2012-10-22

349

Human impacts to mountain streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mountain streams are here defined as channel networks within mountainous regions of the world. This definition encompasses tremendous diversity of physical and biological conditions, as well as history of land use. Human effects on mountain streams may result from activities undertaken within the stream channel that directly alter channel geometry, the dynamics of water and sediment movement, contaminants in the

Ellen Wohl

2006-01-01

350

SACRED MOUNTAINS WHERE BEING OF \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since primeval days to date, the Japanese have regarded certain mountains as objects of worship believing that mountains are places where multitudinous gods reside. This belief in mountains as sacred places still lives on and is practiced in the Japanese traditional religion, Shinto, which is based on animism and ancestor worship. Today, this notion of sacredness is generally accepted and

Kazuyuki Yano

351

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

The West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma is one of few newly discovered oil fields in Oklahoma. Although profitable, the field exhibits several unusual characteristics. These include decreasing water-oil ratios, decreasing gas-oil ratios, decreasing bottomhole pressures during shut-ins in some wells, and transient behavior for water production in many wells. This report explains the unusual characteristics of West Carney Field based on detailed geological and engineering analyses. We propose a geological history that explains the presence of mobile water and oil in the reservoir. The combination of matrix and fractures in the reservoir explains the reservoir's flow behavior. We confirm our hypothesis by matching observed performance with a simulated model and develop procedures for correlating core data to log data so that the analysis can be extended to other, similar fields where the core coverage may be limited.

Mohan Kelkar

2002-03-31

352

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

Mohan Kelkar

2007-06-30

353

Karst in Permian evaporite rocks of western Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Bedded evaporites (gypsum and salt) of Permian age have been dissolved naturally by ground water to form a major evaporite-karst region in western Oklahoma. The Blaine Formation and associated evaporites comprise 100--800 ft of strata that dip gently into broad, structural basins. Outcropping gypsum, dolomite, and red-bed shales of the Blaine display typical karstic features, such as sinkholes, caves, disappearing streams, and springs. Large caves are developed in gypsum beds 10--30 ft thick at several places, and a major gypsum/dolomite karst aquifer provides irrigation water to a large region in southwestern Oklahoma, where salt layers above and below the Blaine Formation have been partly dissolved at depths of 30--800 ft below the land surface. Salt dissolution causes development of brine-filled cavities, into which overlying strata collapse, and the brine eventually is emitted at the land surface in large salt plains.

Johnson, K.S. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States))

1993-02-01

354

The Oklahoma Cooling Retrofit Field Test: Experimental plan  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Cooling Retrofit Field Test will be performed to determine the magnitude of the cooling-energy savings attributed to the installation of conservation measures as typically installed by Oklahoma's Low-Income Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) and the additional savings that can be achieved by the installation of two cooling retrofit measures: replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and installation of attic radiant barriers. This report is an experimental plan presenting the specific research goals and questions to be addressed by the field test, the responsibilities of the six field test participants, 16 tasks required to complete the field test, the experimental design, the data requirements and the instrumentation to collect the data, a data management procedure to store the data and check it for errors, and analysis procedures to be employed to study the collected data. 13 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Ternes, M.P.; Hu, P.S.

1989-01-01

355

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uranium favorability of the Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface geologic studies were supplemented by aerial radiometric surveys and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. A total of 1537 rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples were analyzed for 30 elements. Environments favorable for sandstone-type uranium deposits are present in the Cretaceous Antlers

D. K. Hobday; F. G. Jr. Rose

1982-01-01

356

Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Bacteria from Nursing Home Residents in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

In vitro antimicrobial susceptibilities for 2,832 isolates from nursing home patients in Oklahoma (1992) were compiled retrospectively. An appreciable proportion of antimicrobial resistance was detected for ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole-trimetho-prim and ciprofloxacin among gram-negative bacilli. Of 301 Staphylococcus aureus isolates tested, 70% were resistant to methicillin and 72% resistant to ciprofloxacin. Vancomycin resistance occurred in 22% of Enterococcus faecium isolates. These findings

D. J. Flournoy

1994-01-01

357

DISTRIBUTION OF CALANOID COPEPODS (CALANOIDA, COPEPODA) IN OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eight ~pecic~ of ealanoid copepods ha,'c now been rcported from Oklahoma. Two of thl'5C, Diaptomlls a\\/buqllcrqucmis and D. dorsalis, are reported here for the fiut time. The Ii ~pccies arc all mcmocrs of thc genus Diaptomlls, but 6 differcnt subgenera arc rcprl'5ellted. No sp<:c;e5 ha~ been fonnd throughout thc state, although D. pal\\/idu5 ~cm, to OCCIl1 cn:rywherc exeept in a

Andrew Robertson

358

34. At Willard, Oklahoma Road north of Willard Road, at ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

34. At Willard, Oklahoma Road north of Willard Road, at the site of the former Cook House for Willard Mill (upper mill that cut cants for Broughton Lumber Company's flume). Section of feeder after Lava Creek, looking down flume. Note extra large size of "V" in water supply vs. cant portions of flume. South/southeast 170 degrees. - Broughton Flume, Hood River Junction on Columbia River at Washington/Oregon border, Hood, Skamania County, WA

359

Yucca Mountain tuffs  

SciTech Connect

This is a compilation of petrographic slides detailing the microstructure and petrographic character of the tuff deposits associated with the Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. It describes crystal structures, clay alterations, and mineral associations. The paper contains a description of the petrographic thin-sections but contains no narrative or conclusions of what the slides suggest with regards to the facility.

NONE

1996-08-01

360

DOE's Yucca Mountain Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This booklet is about the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the United States with a particular focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a repository site. Intended for readers who do not have a technical background, the booklet discusses why scientists and engineers think high-level nuclear waste may be disposed of safely underground. An

Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

361

Melting Mountain Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The world's glaciers are shrinking at alarming rates, and many scientists believe it is due to changes in climate. Dr. Lonnie Thompson of Ohio State University and Dr. Douglas Hardy of UMass-Amherst discuss glaciers and how they melt, and pay special attention to Africa's tallest mountain, Mt. Kilimanjaro. "Changing Planet" is produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation.

Learn, Nbc

2010-10-07

362

The Strongest Mountain  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The article describes an activity for the author's fifth-grade students called "build the strongest mountain." To them, it was not a lesson--it was a challenge. To the author, it was an activity that turned a run-of-the-mill Earth science unit into a terrific opportunity for students to demonstrate their knowledge of erosion and develop

Monnes, Colleen

2004-01-01

363

Yucca Mountain Review Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Yucca Mountain Review Plan provides guidance for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff to evaluate a U.S. Department of Energy license application for a geologic repository. It is not a regulation and does not impose regulatory requirements. Th...

2003-01-01

364

Mountain-Plains Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health

Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

365

Carve That Mountain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students further investigate major landforms (e.g., mountains, rivers, plains, hills, oceans and plateaus). They build a three-dimensional model of a landscape depicting several of these landforms. Once they have built their model, they act as civil and transportation engineers to build a road through the landscape they have created.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

366

The Mountaineer Minority  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the new Appalachian movement, based on the assumption that mountain people are a distinct and maligned cultural minority; the people of Appalachia, white, black and red, have begun to strike back against the dam-builders, strip-miners, and others they say are gouging out the region's mineral resources by the cheapest means possible no

Egerton, John; Gaillard, Frye

1974-01-01

367

Arkansas turbidite studies may aid Oklahoma Jackfork exploration  

SciTech Connect

During the past 2 years, more than a dozen successful Pennsylvanian Jackfork gas wells have been drilled in eastern Oklahoma, and the play seems ready for expansion if drilling and completion costs can be contained. To date, wells are thought to produce from fractures in highly quartz-cemented, brittle sandstones. However, there is potential for stratigraphic accumulations of gas. It is generally agreed that Jackfork Group rocks were deposited mainly as turbidites in the deepwater Ouachita basin. A recent suggestion that significant amounts of Jackfork Group rocks are discontinuous and less predictable sandy debris flows has received considerable critical review in the recent literature and at the 1996 American Association of Petroleum Geologists convention. A shallower water origin has also been suggested for some outcrops in eastern Oklahoma. With this in mind, the authors provide a summary of their observations, measurements, and interpretations of upper Jackfork outcrops in southwest-central Arkansas as a guide for interpreting the subsurface Jackfork in eastern Oklahoma.

Slatt, R.M.; Al-Siyabi, H.; Williams, E.T. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Stone, C.G. [Arkansas Geological Commission, Little Rock, AR (United States); Weimer, P. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Davis, R.J. [Schlumberger Wireline and Testing, Jakarta (Indonesia); Jordan, D.W. [ARCO Venezuela Inc., Caracas (Venezuela)

1997-08-18

368

Red Fork sandstone of Oklahoma: depositional history and reservoir distribution  

SciTech Connect

The Middle Pennsylvanian Red Fork sandstone formed as a result of progradation across eastern Kansas and most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork is one of several transgressive-regressive sequences (cyclothems) developed within the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group. Sea level changes, together with varying subsidence, were dominant factors controlling the general stratigraphic (correlative) characteristics of the Red Fork interval. Progradation was episodic, with sand deposition in the more active part of the basin during lower sea level stands and valley-fill deposition in the more stable areas during sea level rises. A map of Red Fork sand trends reveals an alluvial-deltaic complex covering most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork consists primarily of alluvial-valley and plain (fluvial) bodies in the northernmost part of northeastern Oklahoma, alluvial-deltaic bodies in most of the remaining parts of the shelf area, and off-shelf submarine-fan and slope basinal-floor complexes within the deeper part of the Anadarko basin. Determination of reservoir trend and genesis requires integration of rock and log data. Logs need to be calibrated to cores in order to estimate depositional environments accurately and to make a reasonable assessment of diagenetic overprints. Much of the oil and gas has been trapped in stratigraphic traps, and a significant amount of oil is in channel sandstones with trends at high angles to the structural grain. In some areas, secondary clay, in particular chloritic clay, has resulted in microporosity, high water saturation, and correspondingly low resistivities in oil reserves.

Shelton, J.W.; Fritz, R.D.; Johnson, C.

1989-03-01

369

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Rocky Mountain spotted fever is an acute febrile illness transmitted to man by ticks infected with Rickettsia rickettsii. Usually sudden in onset, it is characterized by chills, headache, and fever lasting 2 or more weeks. A characteristic rash\\u000a appears on the extremities on about the 4th febrile day and spreads to the trunk. The exanthem and other anatomical manifestations\\u000a result

Aaron Milstone; J. Stephen Dumler

370

Folds, Faults, and Mountains  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive Flash explores forces and processes that deform rocks by creating folds, faults, and mountain ranges. The overview covers topics such as stress, tension, deformation, strike, dip, folds and thrusts, and an interactive model allows users to model different processes related to these topics. This site provides diagrams, interactive animations, and supplementary information suitable for introductory level undergraduate physical geology or high school Earth science students.

Smoothstone; Company, Houghton M.

371

Preliminary appraisal of the hydrology of the Blocker area, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Bedrock in the Blocker area of southeastern Oklahoma consists principally of shale, siltstone, and sandstone of the Boggy and Savanna Formations of Pennsylvanian age. These rocks have been folded to form the Panther Mountain syncline on the south and the Kinta anticline on the north. Alluvium along streams is less than 15 feet thick and consists mainly of sandy silt. Water in bedrock is under artesian conditions. Well depths range from 11 to 213 feet and average 75 feet. In 86% of the wells measured, the water level was less than 30 feet below the land surface. Because the rocks have minimal permeability, well yields probably are less than 5 gallons per minute. Ground water is commonly a mixed cation bicarbonate type with dissolved solids ranging from about 300 to 2,000 milligrams per liter. No relationship between water chemistry and well depth or geographic distribution is apparent. Streams in the area are ephemeral and there are extended periods of no flow. Blue Creek was dry 30% of the time during 1976-80 and had flows of less than 0.1 cubic foot per second for at least 80 consecutive days. Stream water is generally a mixed cation sulfate type. The maximum dissolved-solids concentration determined in stream water was 3670 milligrams per liter. Maximum suspended sediment discharge, in tons per day, was about 235 for Blue Creek, 40 for Blue Creek tributary, and 630 for Mathuldy Creek. Silt-clay particles (diameters less than 0.062 millimeter) are the dominant sediment size. Surface mining for coal undoubtedly will have some effect on the environment. The most likely deleterious effects are increased sediment loads in streams and increased mineralization of stream waters. However, these effects should be of only limited extent and duration if appropriate mining and reclamation practices are followed. (USGS)

Marcher, Melvin V.; Bergman, D. L.; Stoner, J. D.; Blumer, S. P.

1981-01-01

372

HOW DO THE STRUCTURES OF THE LATE PALEOZOIC OUACHITA THRUST BELT RELATE TO THE STRUCTURES OF THE SOUTHERN OKLAHOMA AULACOGEN  

Microsoft Academic Search

The thin-skinned structures of the late Paleozoic Ouachita thrust belt intersect the basement structures of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen beneath the Mesozoic strata of the Gulf Coastal Plain in southeastern Oklahoma. The Ouachita thrust belt forms a large northwest-directed salient which extends primarily in the subsurface from central Mississippi northwestward to Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma, and from there, southwestward toward

Steven John Jusczuk

2002-01-01

373

Oklahoma DOE EPSCoR Trainees. Final Report for the Period September 30, 1991 to March 31, 1996  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of the State of Oklahoma DOE EPSCOR Traineeship program. The program was carried out at the three major research universities in the state: the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University, and the University of Tulsa. Each of the three universities selected a central thrust area for the DOE EPSCOR traineeships that was in keeping with

Knox

2000-01-01

374

77 FR 66217 - Arkansas-Oklahoma Railroad, Inc.-Lease and Operation Exemption-Lines of Union Pacific Railroad...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...rail lines. See Arkansas-Oklahoma R.R.--Trackage Rights...General Counsel, Arkansas-Oklahoma Railroad, Inc., P.O...UP, rather than with Kansas City Southern (KCS). The shippers...arrangement. See Arkansas-Oklahoma R.R.--Trackage...

2012-11-02

375

Fish and Habitat Heterogeneity in Four Streams in the Central Oklahoma\\/Texas Plains Ecoregion  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined fish assemblages and habitat characteristics in four streams within the Oklahoma portion of the Central Oklahoma\\/Texas Plains Ecoregion. Our objective was to evaluate the heterogeneity of habitat and fish assemblages within a single ecoregion. We were also interested in whether observed patterns in habitat and fish assemblages were related. We measured habitat characteristics and sampled fish at four

Conrad S. Toepfer; Lance R. Williams; A. David Martinez; William L. Fisher

1998-01-01

376

Collection in Oklahoma of a Rare Fish Species, Notropis chalybaeus (Cyprinidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We thank Alice Echelle and the 1997 OSU Ichthyology class for field assistance and Marsha Williams for help with the manuscript. REFERENCES 1. Miller RJ, Robison HW. The fishes of Oklahoma. Stillwater (OK): Oklahoma State University Press; 1973. 2. Robison HW. Distribution and habitat notes on the ,ironcolor shiner Notropis chalybaeus (Cope) in Arkansas. Proc Ark Acad Sci 1977;31:92-94.

Lance R. Williams; Anthony A. Echelle

1998-01-01

377

Report on the Economic Impact of American Indians in the State of Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report assesses the economic impact created by the presence of American Indians in Oklahoma. In 1980, American Indians in Oklahoma numbered 169,459, or 5.6% of the state's population. Most Indians lived in central and eastern counties. Compared to the general population, Indians were younger, less educated, and had higher unemployment and

Green, Margaret Abudu; And Others

378

An Investigation of Issues Related to the Special Education Teacher Shortage in the State of Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated the shortage of special education teachers in Oklahoma and presented a long term plan to meet this need. The study examined: (1) teacher shortages by category and geographic location in Oklahoma; (2) availability of individuals with the potential to be special education teachers; and (3) innovative recruitment and retention

Davis, JoAnne; And Others

379

Fifteenth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma Under State Contract.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, which is authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This 1962

Laney, L. J.

380

Spatial and Temporal Patterns in Stream Habitat and Smallmouth Bass Populations in Eastern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spatial and temporal dynamics of stream habitat and fish populations are important considerations for the conservation and management of stream fishes. We determined how stream habitat and populations of smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu varied among third-order to fifth-order stream reaches in two regional streams in eastern Oklahoma from 2003 to 2005. Eastern Oklahoma represents the southwestern edge of the

Daniel C. Dauwalter; William L. Fisher

2008-01-01

381

ON-SITE: Oklahoma Nucleus for School Involvement in Teacher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|ON-SITE (Oklahoma Nucleus for School Involvement in Teacher Education), an innovative teacher education program, is a cooperative effort between the College of Education at Oklahoma State University (OSU) and the Stillwater Public Schools (SPS). The program was initiated in 1973 and is maintained as a free partnership whose program development is

Roos, Marie C.; And Others

382

Twenty-Fourth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma Under State Contract, 1971.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Education Program in Oklahoma is financed and operated under the provision of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Oklahoma Department of Education as authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act (JOM) of 1936. In this 1971 annual report, average daily attendance figures for participating school districts; JOM funding for

Laney, L. J.

383

Sixteenth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma Under State Contract.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, which is authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This

Laney, L. J.

384

Eighteenth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma Under State Contract.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education in Oklahoma, which is authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This 1965 annual

Laney, L. J.

385

Fifteenth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma Under State Contract.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, which is authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This

Laney, L. J.

386

Continued support of the natural resources information system (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this research program was to continue developing, editing, maintaining, utilizing and making publicly available the Oil and Gas Well History file portion of the Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma. The NRIS Well History file contains historical and recent completion records for oil and gas wells reported to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission on

C. J. Mankin; T. P. Rizzuti

1994-01-01

387

A Program of Education for Exceptional Children in Oklahoma: Bulletin S.E. No. 11.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended for special education personnel, the handbook sets forth the Oklahoma state program for the education of handicapped, gifted, and talented children. Aspects covered include the number of special needs students in Oklahoma, state laws pertaining to the education of exceptional children, state department of education regulations, mediation

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City. Curriculum Div.

388

Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included

S. C. Nelson; D. E. Ball

1981-01-01

389

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Foss Dam and Reservoir in the interest of...

2009-07-01

390

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Foss Dam and Reservoir in the interest of...

2010-07-01

391

Transmission of employment shocks before and after the Oklahoma City tornado  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the economic impact of the May 3, 1999 Oklahoma tornado outbreak on the labor markets of Oklahoma City (OK), Wichita (KS), and Kansas City (MO). In particular, this article examines the transmission of shocks to employment growth across these different labor markets. Using monthly employment data from January 1990 to December 2004, we provide empirical evidence on

Bradley T. Ewing; Jamie B. Kruse; Mark A. Thompson

2005-01-01

392

Multiple Radar Comparison and Analysis of the 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Supercell  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This paper will examine the structure and evolution of the 8 May 2003 Central Oklahoma tornadic ,supercell using two ,different radars: the KTLX WSR-88D and the Central Oklahoma TDWR. Measurements of the vertical vorticity and ,convergence ,of each of three scales of rotation (mesocyclone, tornado cyclone signature [TCS], and tornadic vortex signature [TVS]) were made by ,subjectively choosing ,maximum

Michael E. Charles

2003-01-01

393

76 FR 50753 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application OKNM 126630, Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...OKNM 126630) are available for review from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday: BLM New Mexico State Office, 301 Dinosaur Trail, Santa Fe, New Mexico; and BLM, Oklahoma Field Office, 7906 East 33rd Street Suite 101, Tulsa, Oklahoma....

2011-08-16

394

Sensory, Health and Quality Evaluation of Two Blackberry (Rubus subgenus Rubus) Cultivars from Arkansas and Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Berries from two thornless, erect, blackberry (Rubus subgenus Rubus) cultivars, Apache and Ouachita were harvested in summer 2008 from the University of Arkansas Fruit Research Substation in Clarksville, Arkansas and a commercial berry farm in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. Berries were frozen immediately after harvest for future analysis at Oklahoma State University (OSU), z Total Phenolic, Flavonoid and Anthocyanin Content (mg\\/100gBB)

Richelle A. Stafne; William G. McGlynn; Eric T. Stafne; Edralin A. Lucas; John R. Clark

395

Moral Reconation Therapy and Problem Behavior in the Oklahoma Department of Corrections  

Microsoft Academic Search

In late 1993, Oklahoma Department of Corrections officials implemented Moral Reconation Therapy (MRT), a cognitive behavioral treatment program, throughout the correctional system. Relying on official records of institutional misconduct and community recidivism, the analysis of the Oklahoma implementation of the program compared the outcomes of individuals who participated in the MRT cognitive-behavioral program to both individuals who participated in other

Robert Brame; Doris Layton MacKenzie; Arnold R. Waggoner

396

The Oklahoma's Promise Program: A National Model to Promote College Persistence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using a multi-method approach involving fixed effects and logistic regressions, this study examined the effect of the Oklahoma's Promise Program on student persistence in relation to the Pell and Stafford federal programs and according to socio-economic characteristics and class level. The Oklahoma's Promise is a hybrid state program that pays

Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.

2013-01-01

397

Reproductive Cycle of the Red Shiner, Notropis lutrensis, in Central Texas and South Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The breeding season of red shiner extended from April to September in south central Oklahoma and central Texas in both 1976 and 1977. Ovarian regression occurred in midsummer of 1977; this coincided with hot, dry weather. In Oklahoma, but not in Texas, ovarian regression was followed by recrudescence during a brief period of rainfall. The midseason regression did not occur

Russel T. Farringer III; Anthony A. Echelle; Steven F. Lehtinen

1979-01-01

398

A Study of Current Practices in Freshman English in Oklahoma Colleges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to ascertain the current practices in freshman English in Oklahoma colleges. The population in this study included all Oklahoma institutions of higher education fully accredited by the state as of July 1, 1972, and extending through June 30, 1973. Some of the findings were: three-fourths of the senior colleges and all

Willis, Phyllis Waynne Pack

399

Funding for Local Government and Schools in Rural Oklahoma. ERS Staff Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oil, gas, and agriculture are the bases of rural Oklahoma's economy, and income from these sectors varied widely during the 1980s. This study investigated revenue sources and the effects of changing revenues for county and town governments and school systems in 36 rural Oklahoma counties. Major sources of local revenue were sales taxes, property

Sloggett, Gordon; Doeksen, Gerald

400

Twister! Employment responses to the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City tornado  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examined the impact of the 3 May 1999 tornado on the Oklahoma City labour market. We estimated time series models that allow for time-varying variance in employment growth. The models include intervention variables designed to capture the tornado's effect at initial impact as well as over the post-tornado period. In terms of total employment growth, the Oklahoma City

Bradley T. Ewing; Jamie B. Kruse; Mark A. Thompson

2009-01-01

401

75 FR 68755 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Oklahoma Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Oklahoma Advisory Committee Notice is hereby given...FACA), that a planning meeting of the Oklahoma Advisory Committee to the Commission will...400 State Avenue, Suite 908, Kansas City, Kansas 66101. Comments may be...

2010-11-09

402

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE ARTS ON THE OKLAHOMA CITY AREA ECONOMY FOR 1978  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine the type and magnitude of economic impacts on the Oklahoma City economy by 34 arts agencies, organizations, festivals, shows, programs, and other events. The direct and secondary impacts on the Oklahoma City economy in terms of spending and employment were significant. Further analysis indicated that the industry was in need of state,

James V. Pinto

1980-01-01

403

Professors, Presidents, and Politicians. Civil Rights and the University of Oklahoma, 1890-1968.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Civil rights and academic freedom at the University of Oklahoma from 1890-1968 are examined by George Lynn Cross, president of Oklahoma University in the critical period from 1943 to 1968. The struggle for human rights is examined from the perspectives of teachers, students, administrators, and the community. Chapters include: "The Pioneer

Cross, George Lynn

404

Building a Learning City: Developing School and Community Coalitions in Oklahoma City  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This qualitative case study focuses on a district and community relations plan developed in Oklahoma City Public Schools. This article provides a description of the proposal regarding MAPS for KIDS (Metropolitan Area Projects for Keep Improving District Schools) in Oklahoma City from 1998 through November 2001, and it explores the coalitions that

Garn, Gregg

2005-01-01

405

Determinants of mountaineers' decision to climb: An innovative marketing for mountaineering tourism  

Microsoft Academic Search

A conceptual framework is proposed to examine the determinants of the mountaineers' decision to climb. First, the four mountain-specific motivational factors are discussed, which include: mountain landscape; organization role, accessibility and perceived risk. It is argued that these factors are unique to the mountaineering tourism and as such, has an implication on the mountaineers' decision to climb a selected mountain.

Siti Hajar Mohamad Taher; Salamiah A. Jamal

2012-01-01

406

Mountain Waves and Downslope Windes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mountain waves form above and downwind of topographic barriers and frequently pose a serious hazard to mountain aviation because of strong-to-extreme turbulence. This foundation module will describe the features of mountain wave and explore the conditions under which they form. Like other foundation modules in the Mesoscale Primer, this module will start with a forecast scenario and conclude with a final exam. Rich graphics, audio narration, and frequent interactions enhance the presentation.

Spangler, Tim

2004-01-01

407

Mountain Waves and Downslope Winds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mountain waves form above and downwind of topographic barriers and frequently pose a serious hazard to mountain aviation because of strong-to-extreme turbulence. This foundation module will describe the features of mountain wave and explore the conditions under which they form. Like other foundation modules in the Mesoscale Primer, this module will start with a forecast scenario and conclude with a final exam. Rich graphics, audio narration, and frequent interactions enhance the presentation.

Spangler, Tim

2006-12-11

408

Coal-bed methane resources in Arkoma basin, southeastern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

A major federal tax incentive for unconventional gas production has interested entrepreneurs, geologists, and engineers in the occurrence and distribution of coal-bed methane resources in the Arkoma basin. Because the methane is trapped in coal beds, geology of the coal resources also has received renewed attention. The Arkoma basin contains most of the coal-bed methane resources in Oklahoma: 76% of the 7.9 billion short tons of the remaining, identified Middle Pennsylvanian coal resources of the state. This paper briefly reviews previous estimates of coal-bed methane resources in Oklahoma and presents an updated estimate for Haskell and LeFlore Counties and a new estimate for Latimer County. Rieke and Kirr indicated that 2.8 tcf of coal-bed methane is present in 10 coals in eight Oklahoma counties of the Arkoma basin, 500-3,000 ft deep. Iannacchione and Puglio estimated that a maximum of 1.5 tcf of coal-bed methane occurs in the Hartshorne coals in Haskell and LeFlore Counties from 500-3,000 ft deep. The present investigation shows that the Hartshorne and 11 other coals contain at least 1.8 tcf of coal-bed methane resources, based on identified coal resources 500-3,000 ft deep in Haskell, Latimer, and LeFlore Counties. An additional 1.2 tcf of coal-bed methane resources occur in the Hartshorne and four other coals from 3,000-7,000 ft deep, based on assumed stratigraphic and thickness continuity. Thus, a revised estimate indicates that Haskell, Latimer, and LeFlore Counties alone contain about 3 tcf of coal-bed methane resources in 12 coal beds from 500-7,000 ft deep. Undoubtedly additional coal-bed methane resources are present in the westernmost part of the Arkoma basin.

Friedman, S.A. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman (USA))

1989-08-01

409

Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 19901999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility.\\u000a In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced\\u000a fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientationsreplacement theory, community

Joseph Lee Rodgers; Craig A. St. John; Ronnie Coleman

2005-01-01

410

Oklahoma City: disaster challenges mental health and medical administrators.  

PubMed

Mental health and medical administrators responded to the Oklahoma City bombing with cooperative and overlapping efforts to meet community needs in the wake of terrorism. The major agencies assisted in the immediate rescue response, organized crisis hotlines, prepared mental health professionals to counsel bereaved families and victims, organized debriefing of rescuers, assessed mental health needs of local school children, planned for longer term treatment, and coordinated research efforts to learn from the disaster. Implications to mental health administrators responding to significant acts of terrorism are discussed. PMID:9516298

Tucker, P; Pfefferbaum, B; Vincent, R; Boehler, S D; Nixon, S J

1998-02-01

411

Oklahoma City bombing: exacerbation of symptoms in veterans with PTSD.  

PubMed

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops following exposure to an extremely traumatic stressor and consists of reexperiencing, avoidance, and hyperarousal symptoms. Exposure to stimuli reminiscent of the original trauma often causes an exacerbation of symptoms. Models attempting to explain this phenomenon include classical conditioning, emotional network imagery, and memory consolidation. The recent bombing in Oklahoma City caused an exacerbation of symptoms in veterans from World War II, the Korean War, and Vietnam, ranging from images of combat to memories of being called "baby-killer." These various responses to identical stimuli might help to explain the importance of attached meaning to traumatic events. PMID:8904036

Moyers, F

1996-02-01

412

Sulfide mineralization and magnetization, Cement oil field, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geochemical, petrographic, and rock-magnetic studies were undertaken to investigate possible sources for reported positive aeromagnetic anomalies over the Cement oil field, Oklahoma. Ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite (monoclinic, Fe7S8 ), intergrown with more-abundant, nonmagnetic pyrite (FeS2), is present in well-cutting, core, and quarry samples at Cement, and it is the only identified source of possible enhanced magnetization in rocks over the field. Magnetite, found only in well cuttings from Cement, is contamination from drilling. Magnetite was considered previously by others to be the source of magnetic anomalies at Cement.

Reynolds, Richard L.; Fishman, Neil S.; Webring, Michael W.; Wanty, Richard B.; Goldhaber, Martin B.

1989-01-01

413

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil and ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on long data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time.

Kelkar, Mohan

2001-05-08

414

Oklahoma v. FERC: the waning of cooperative federalism  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma v. FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) is an important decision in the development of constitutional interpretations of the tenth amendment after the Supreme Court decision in National League of Cities v. Usery. Even though the legislative provisions of the Natural Gas Policy Act impinge upon state regulatory decision making to a greater degree than earlier environmental legislation, the federal interest in energy price regulation was held to justify the use of state administrative agencies to further federal goals. The extension of federal control over state regulatory machinery narrows the scope of state sovereignty as a limitation on the commerce power. 55 references.

Melton, T.M.

1983-01-01

415

49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation... STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part...

2011-10-01

416

49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation... STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part...

2012-10-01

417

Landform Interpretation: Table Mountain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Working collaboratively, groups of students [3-4]develop hypotheses addressing the paleotopography of a Miocene river channel [Table Mountain Latite] and processes that have resulted in its current topographic expression. Students use observations/data gained from topographic maps [Sonora, Keystone, Melones Dam and Knight's Ferry 7.5 minute quadrangles], San Francisco-San Jose Regional Geological Map, aerial photos, and Google Earth [120 39 01W; 37 48 15N to 120 26 17W; 37 57 36N]. Using PowerPoint, students present and defend their hypotheses and plans for further research during the final week of the semester. Designed for a geomorphology course

Pearson, Gene

418

Epidemiology of homicide-suicide events: Oklahoma, 1994-2001.  

PubMed

In Oklahoma, all nonnatural deaths must be reported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (ME), whose trained investigators report cause of death using a centralized, statewide, standardized reporting system. The purpose of this study was to determine temporal trends of Oklahoma homicide-suicide events and characterize the epidemiology of these events. By reviewing all ME reports of homicides and suicides from 1994 through 2001, we identified 73 homicide-suicide events resulting in 73 suicides and 89 homicides. Suicidal perpetrators of homicide-suicide events were most often white men aged >or=30 years who killed a current or ex-spouse or intimate partner. Homicide victims tended to be younger women the same race as their killer. Firearms were the predominant method of death in both homicides and suicides, with handguns used most frequently. Divorce/estrangement was the main contributing factor to these events, and the most common relationship type was possessive. The existence of a statewide, centralized, and computerized ME system and the ability to access the detailed information in the ME narratives were critical to identifying homicide-suicide events and obtaining the type of detailed information necessary to fully investigate these events. PMID:16121077

Comstock, R Dawn; Mallonee, Sue; Kruger, Elizabeth; Rayno, Kim; Vance, April; Jordan, Fred

2005-09-01

419

Total Lightning Characteristics in Mesoscale Convective Systems in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The distribution of total and cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning was surveyed in relation to GOES infrared satellite imagery and base-scan radar reflectivity data for 30 mesoscale convective systems occurring in central Oklahoma. Lightning flash data were obtained from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array and the United States National Lightning Detection Network. Flash activity was compared with trends in the growth of the satellite-inferred cloud shield and the evolution of radar reflectivity. CG flashes accounted for 21% of all flashes studied. Of those flashes, 13% were positive polarity flashes. Most flashes were concentrated in or near regions of high radar reflectivity in agreement with past work. The distribution of total flashes generally was similar to that of ground flashes, except that the ground flash percentage increased during decay. Significant increases in flash rate were associated with an increasing -52C cloud shield area. Flash activity peaked approximately 90 minutes prior to the maximum extent of the -52C cloud shield. Trends in flash activity agreed better with trends in cloud shield evolution for colder cloud top temperatures, such as -66C. Acknowledgements: This project was supported by NASA EPSCoR grant #NNX07AV48A.

Makowski, J. A.; Macgorman, D. R.

2010-12-01

420

Tobacco use among American Indians in Oklahoma: an epidemiologic view.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: With the exception of national surveys that sample the entire U.S. population, little information exists on tobacco habits among American Indians. This study is a comparison of tobacco use findings in the 1990s among American Indians in Oklahoma, a state with a large and diverse American Indian population (39 tribes). METHODS: Data on current tobacco use are presented from two statewide surveys, the Oklahoma Youth Tobacco Survey and the Native American Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, as well as two large epidemiologic studies of chronic disease among American Indians-the Cherokee Diabetes Study and the Strong Heart Study. Three of these four sources of data involve research/surveys exclusively about American Indians. RESULTS: Nontraditional use of tobacco by American Indians occurs frequently, according to each instrument. Initiation to this habit begins in middle school and increases dramatically during high school. After age 50, reporting by individuals that they currently smoke declines steadily. CONCLUSIONS: Despite sampling different individuals for the surveys and different tribes for the epidemiologic research, results were comparable in age groups that overlapped. These findings support national data indicating that American Indians have higher prevalence rates of smoking than other racial/ethnic groups. American Indians report smoking on average about a half a pack of cigarettes per day. Individuals reporting using tobacco solely for ceremonial purposes were far fewer than habitual users. Buying tobacco products in American Indian smoke shops helps tribal economies; this fact needs to be considered for prevention programs to succeed.

Eichner, June E.; Cravatt, Kymberly; Beebe, Laura A.; Blevins, Kathleen S.; Stoddart, Martha L.; Bursac, Zoran; Yeh, Fawn; Lee, Elisa T.; Moore, William E.

2005-01-01

421

Multi-Sensor Observations of Lightning in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of this study is to examine cases where there is LIS optical data from above, NLDN and LASA stroke data as well as three dimensional LMA data for the in-cloud processes at a single location. The vicinity of the NSSL in Oklahoma was selected because these four sensor systems routinely gather data there. Between the months of May and December 2005, there were 55 LIS overpasses with lightning data. At the most basic level, the capabilities of each system to detect and locate lightning are compared. Data extractions are performed on the the four continuous data sets to create 55 overpass data sets for lightning within one degree of the Oklahoma LMA. Five overpasses with ground tracks passing very close to the LMA were selected for detailed analysis. Several mechanisms produce some deviation of optical locations from LMA source locations, including optical scattering out of the nearest cloud boundary and residual parallax errors. A detailed examination of data near the ground track provide evidence of a small discrepancy in location that is dependant on satellite attitude.

Boeck, W. L.; Suszcynsky, D. M.; Shao, X.; Nemzek, R.; Christian, H. J.; Goodman, S. J.; Macgorman, D.; Thomas, R.; Krehbeil, P.

2006-12-01

422

Prevalence of dry methods in granite countertop fabrication in Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Granite countertop fabricators are at risk of exposure to respirable crystalline silica, which may cause silicosis and other lung conditions. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of exposure control methods, especially wet methods, in granite countertop fabrication in Oklahoma to assess how many workers might be at risk of overexposure to crystalline silica in this industry. Granite fabrication shops in the three largest metropolitan areas in Oklahoma were enumerated, and 47 of the 52 shops participated in a survey on fabrication methods. Countertop shops were small businesses with average work forces of fewer than 10 employees. Ten shops (21%) reported using exclusively wet methods during all fabrication steps. Thirty-five shops (74%) employing a total of about 200 workers reported using dry methods all or most of the time in at least one fabrication step. The tasks most often performed dry were edge profiling (17% of shops), cutting of grooves for reinforcing rods (62% of shops), and cutting of sink openings (45% of shops). All shops reported providing either half-face or full-face respirators for use during fabrication, but none reported doing respirator fit testing. Few shops reported using any kind of dust collection system. These findings suggest that current consumer demand for granite countertops is giving rise to a new wave of workers at risk of silicosis due to potential overexposure to granite dust. PMID:22650974

Phillips, Margaret L; Johnson, Andrew C

2012-01-01

423

Permian karst topography in the Wichita uplift, southwestern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Wichita uplift in southwestern Oklahoma is one part of a record of Pennsylvania and early Permian deformation that affected the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. As a result of a partial inversion, the Lower Paleozoic section of this aulacogen was sequentially stripped off an uplift between the Wichita uplift and the Anadarko basin, resulting in the exposure of ultrabasic rocks deep in the Cambrian igneous fill of the aulacogen. Following the late Paleozoic tectonism, the topography of the uplift was entombed beneath Permian sediments and remained essentially undisturbed until exhumation during the present erosional cycle. Modern erosion is gradually exposing this topography, permitting morphometric analysis of the Permian hill forms. Because of the variation of lithology in the uplift, it is possible to isolate the effects of weathering processes such as intense hydrolysis of the igneous rocks (producing, among other features, or topography) and limestone dissolution, in the form of a surface and subsurface karst imprint. The latter process resulted in a network of small caves that are essentially fissures eroded along tectonic fractures. These small caves can be found in all the exposed areas of limestone. They are particularly noteworthy for three reasons: in at least five examples they contain a complex fauna of Permian vertebrates (mostly fragmentary), speleothems in some examples contain hydrocarbon inclusions, derived from the underlying Anadarko basin, some of the caves yield evidence of post burial evolution in the form of clay infiltration from the surface and brine flushing from the underlying Anadarko basin.

Donovan, R.N. Busbey, A.B. (Texas Christian Univ., Ft. Worth, TX (United States). Geology Dept.)

1993-02-01

424

Forest expansion in mountain ecosystems: \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among the main threats that mountain areas in industrialised countries are nowadays facing, land abandonment is by far the most important. Land abandonment is mainly due to marginalisation trends and it is closely associated with other processes such as depopulation and decline of mountain farming. The most evident consequence of such a situation is the phenomenon of forest expansion, due

Giorgio Conti; Laura Fagarazzi

425

A Day on Bare Mountain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students may have the idea that all mountains are volcanoes and were formed by eruptions. The story in this chapter brings up questions about the geology of mountains and the weathering and erosion that takes place as nature breaks down the higher landsca

Konicek-Moran, Richard

2010-03-12

426

Environmental Characteristics and Geographic Information System Applications for the Development of Nutrient Thresholds in Oklahoma Streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency has developed nutrient criteria using ecoregions to manage and protect rivers and streams in the United States. Individual states and tribes are encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to modify or improve upon the ecoregion approach. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board uses a dichotomous process that stratifies streams using environmental characteristics such as stream order and stream slope. This process is called the Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter15. The Use Support Assessment Protocols can be used to identify streams threatened by excessive amounts of nutrients, dependant upon a beneficial use designation for each stream. The Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter 15 uses nutrient and environmental characteristic thresholds developed from a study conducted in the Netherlands, but the Oklahoma Water Resources Board wants to modify the thresholds to reflect hydrologic and ecological conditions relevant to Oklahoma streams and rivers. Environmental characteristics thought to affect impairment from nutrient concentrations in Oklahoma streams and rivers were determined for 798 water-quality sites in Oklahoma. Nutrient, chlorophyll, water-properties, and location data were retrieved from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency STORET database including data from the U.S. Geological Survey, Oklahoma Conservation Commission, and Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Drainage-basin area, stream order, stream slope, and land-use proportions were determined for each site using a Geographic Information System. The methods, procedures, and data sets used to determine the environmental characteristics are described.

Masoner, Jason R.; Haggard, Brian E.; Rea, Alan

2002-01-01

427

YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT - A BRIEFING --  

SciTech Connect

This report has the following articles: Nuclear waste--a long-term national problem; Spent nuclear fuel; High-level radioactive waste; Radioactivity and the environment; Current storage methods; Disposal options; U.S. policy on nuclear waste; The focus on Yucca Mountain; The purpose and scope of the Yucca Mountain Project; The approach for permanently disposing of waste; The scientific studies at Yucca Mountain; The proposed design for a repository at Yucca Mountain; Natural and engineered barriers would work together to isolate waste; Meticulous science and technology to protect people and the environment; Licensing a repository; Transporting waste to a permanent repository; The Environmental Impact Statement for a repository; Current status of the Yucca Mountain Project; and Further information available on the Internet.

NA

2003-08-05

428

Seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha Uplift in Oklahoma. Part V. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Nemaha Ridge is composed of a number of crustal blocks typically 3 to 5 miles (5 to 8 km) wide and 5 to 20 miles (8 to 32 km) long. Structure-contour maps prepared of the top of the Viola Formation (Ordovician), the base of the Pennsylvanian, and the top of the Oswego Formation (Middle Pennsylvanian) reveal a complex fault pattern associated with the Nemaha Uplift. This fault pattern is dominated by several discontinuous uplifts, such as the Oklahoma City, Lovell, Garber, and Crescent Uplifts. A detailed study of the Oklahoma City Uplift suggests that a number of the Nemaha-related faults were developed in pre-Mississippian time. Many of these faults exhibit both increasing and decreasing displacements from early to late Paleozoic time. However, the displacement for most of the Oklahoma City faults took place between the end of Oswego time and the end of Hunton time. A lineament map was prepared for north-central Oklahoma. A detailed gravity map was prepared for the Kingfisher and Medford maxima. A total-intensity aeromagnetic map for the Enid and Oklahoma City 1/sup 0/ by 2/sup 0/ Quadrangles was prepared. A regional seismograph network was established to supplement existing seismological capability. A local earthquake-location program, named HYPERCUBE, was developed. From 1897 through 1976, Oklahoma has had approximately 128 known earthquakes. After the network became operational in late 1977, 255 additional earthquakes were detected in Oklahoma (through 1981). A study of earthquake distribution and intensity values in Oklahoma led to the development of a seismic-source map for Oklahoma and parts of the adjacent states. Six seismic-source zones were identified. For each zone except one, a magnitude-frequency relationship was determined.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr.

1983-02-01

429

Health-Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 86-328-1773, Memorial Hospital of Southern Oklahoma, Ardmore, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

An environmental evaluation was made of possible exposure to waste anesthetic gases at the Memorial Hospital of Southern Oklahoma, Ardmore, Oklahoma. The hospital has six surgery rooms and a recovery room. During this evaluation four of the six were in use. Samples were taken for ethrane, halothane, isoflurane, and nitrous-oxide Of 22 air samples taken, two exceeded the NIOSH criteria for ethrane of 0.5 parts per million (ppm); one exceeded NIOSH criteria for halothane of 0.5 ppm. None exceeded the isoflurane NIOSH criteria of 0.5 ppm. One exceeded the nitrous oxide standards of 25 ppm. No leaks were found in the anesthesia administering machine, pop off valve scavenging system, or any other area of the operating room. About 26 air changes per hour occurred in the operating rooms. The four elevated exposures were attributed to improper fit on an intubation tube and face masks. The authors conclude that a hazard from exposure to waste anesthetic gases did not exist at this facility.

Gunter, B.J.; King, M.

1987-02-01

430

Glacial effects limiting mountain height.  

PubMed

The height of mountain ranges reflects the balance between tectonic rock uplift, crustal strength and surface denudation. Tectonic deformation and surface denudation are interdependent, however, and feedback mechanisms-in particular, the potential link to climate-are subjects of intense debate. Spatial variations in fluvial denudation rate caused by precipitation gradients are known to provide first-order controls on mountain range width, crustal deformation rates and rock uplift. Moreover, limits to crustal strength are thought to constrain the maximum elevation of large continental plateaus, such as those in Tibet and the central Andes. There are indications that the general height of mountain ranges is also directly influenced by the extent of glaciation through an efficient denudation mechanism known as the glacial buzzsaw. Here we use a global analysis of topography and show that variations in maximum mountain height correlate closely with climate-controlled gradients in snowline altitude for many high mountain ranges across orogenic ages and tectonic styles. With the aid of a numerical model, we further demonstrate how a combination of erosional destruction of topography above the snowline by glacier-sliding and commensurate isostatic landscape uplift caused by erosional unloading can explain observations of maximum mountain height by driving elevations towards an altitude window just below the snowline. The model thereby self-consistently produces the hypsometric signature of the glacial buzzsaw, and suggests that differences in the height of mountain ranges mainly reflect variations in local climate rather than tectonic forces. PMID:19675651

Egholm, D L; Nielsen, S B; Pedersen, V K; Lesemann, J-E

2009-08-13

431

Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results  

SciTech Connect

Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

Gail Heath

2012-07-01

432

Mountain Tourism: Toward a Conceptual Framework  

Microsoft Academic Search

A conceptual framework is proposed to examine tourism and recreation issues in mountainous regions. First, six mountain-specific resource characteristics are discussed, which include diversity, marginality, difficulty of access, fragility, niche and aesthetics. It is argued that these characteristics are unique to mountainous regions and, as such, have specific implications for mountain recreation and tourism development. The paper then examines the

Raymond Chipeniuk

2005-01-01

433

Perceived effects and recovery in Oklahoma City firefighters.  

PubMed

This survey of 325 Oklahoma City Firefighters examined their perceptions of the effect of the bombing, their recovery and their sources of support. Other variables that were considered in this analysis included age, usefulness of the Critical Incidence Stress Management (CISM) procedures, and attitude, an aggregate variable that accounted for job satisfaction. Of particular importance in this analysis was the finding that support from "faith" was a primary predictor of positive outcome and positive attitude over the one-year period. However, the effect of the variable differed for older and younger firefighters. That is, there was a greater proportion of younger firefighters among those reporting greater support from faith. These data suggest that, at least in this geographic area, chaplains, and other spiritual leaders may play a particularly important role in the aftermath of such a disaster. PMID:10213969

Nixon, S J; Schorr, J; Boudreaux, A; Vincent, R D

1999-04-01

434

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we may be able to recover additional oil through imbibition and gravity drainage process. In our Engineering and Geological Analysis section, we present a new technique to generate alternate permeability distributions at unsampled wells.

Mohan Kelkar

2006-01-01

435

Water Budget Analysis of the Norman Landfill site, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The hydrology at the Norman Landfill site in Oklahoma is quite complex. This site involves a wetland that controls the groundwater-surface water interaction. This presentation reports a simulation study for better understanding of local water balance at the landfill site using MODFLOW-2000. Inputs to the model are based on local climate, soil, geology, vegetation and seasonal hydrological dynamics of the system to determine the groundwater-surface water interaction, water balance components in various hydrologic reservoirs, and the complexity and seasonality of local/regional hydrological processes. Our model involved a transient two- dimensional hydrogeological simulation of the multi-layered aquifer. The approach was found to be efficient in identifying the dominant hydrological processes at the site including evapotranspiration, recharge, and regional groundwater flow and groundwater-surface water interaction. Model results indicate that the water balance components reflect the episodic pattern of growing and non-growing seasons.

Farid-marandi, S.; Mohanty, B. P.

2011-12-01

436

Hunting-related spinal cord injuries among Oklahoma residents.  

PubMed

While major causes of traumatic spinal cord injuries have been described as motor vehicle crashes, falls, sports-related events, and injuries related to violence, causes of serious consequence but of lesser magnitude have not been widely reported. This report, drawn from Oklahoma State Department of Health spinal cord injury surveillance data, describes the incidence and circumstances surrounding hunting-related spinal cord injuries. All of the injuries resulted from falls from trees or tree stands. The incidence rate of injury was less than one per 100,000 licensed hunters. Half of the injuries resulted in neurological damage severe enough to result in permanent paralysis or death. The circumstances of the injuries suggest a need for educating hunters concerning safe hunting practices and safe tree stand use, including inspection of trees for weak or dead branches, and use of a safety belt when ascending, descending, or sitting in a tree or tree stand. PMID:8051586

Price, C; Mallonee, S

1994-06-01

437

Statistical Summaries of Streamflow in and near Oklahoma Through 2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Statistical summaries of streamflow records through 2007 for gaging stations in Oklahoma and parts of adjacent states are presented for 238 stations with at least 10 years of streamflow record. Streamflow at 120 of the stations is regulated for specific periods. Data for these periods were analyzed separately to account for changes in streamflow because of regulation by dams or other human modification of streamflow. A brief description of the location, drainage area, and period of record is given for each gaging station. A brief regulation history also is given for stations with a regulated streamflow record. This descriptive information is followed by tables of mean and median monthly and annual discharges, magnitude and probability of exceedance of annual instantaneous peak flows, durations of daily mean flow, magnitude and probability of nonexceedance of annual low flows, and magnitude and probability of nonexceedance of seasonal low flows.

Lewis, Jason M.; Esralew, Rachel A.

2009-01-01

438

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we may be able to recover additional oil through imbibition and gravity drainage process.

Mohan Kelkar

2006-06-30

439

Epilithic diatoms of mountain lakes of the Tatra Mountains (Slovakia)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the framework of the international project EMERGE, species composition of epilithic diatoms of 34 selected high mountain\\u000a lakes of Slovak part of the Tatra Mountains were investigated. In all, 127 taxa of diatoms belonging to 26 genera were recorded.\\u000a Comparison of the epilithic assemblages of the investigated lakes showed differences both in relative abundance and taxa present\\u000a in the

Elena tefkov

2006-01-01

440

Forensic Seismology and the 1995 Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on April 19, 1995, was recorded on 2 permanent seismographs, 7 and 26 km away. The more distant seismograph recorded 2 low-frequency wave trains separated by about 10 s. Militia groups speculated that the 2 wave trains were caused by separate explosions and hinted at a government cover up. Preliminary statements by the scientific community also contributed to the uncertainty. A public science organization issued a press release that stated "the location and source of the second surface wave-recording is unknown. Detailed investigations at the building site may offer an explanation as to the cause and origin of the second event." A prominent professional newsletter reported that the "first event was caused by energy from the explosion and the second from the fall of the building." To understand the seismic phases in the April 19 seismograms, the USGS monitored the demolition of the damaged building on May 23, 1995, with a portable seismic array. The array recorded the same 2 wave trains during the demolition and indicated the wave trains were a propagation effect and not the result of multiple sources. Modeling of the waveforms indicated that the 2 wave trains probably resulted from propagation of seismic energy in a near-surface zone with a strong velocity gradient. The first phase appeared to be a packet of scattered body waves and the second was the fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave. Timely resolution of the ambiguity of the seismogram and publication of results in a refereed publication, EOS, discouraged a conspiracy defense by the terrorists.

Holzer, T. L.

2002-05-01

441

The New Robotic Telescope at Oklahoma State University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new, 0.6-m robotic telescope of Ritchey-Chrtien design was recently installed at the H. S. Mendenhall Observatory (HSMO) of Oklahoma State University (OSU), and is now undergoing operational tests. Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program, it replaces HSMO's original 0.35-m Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. Research programs will include the characterization of near-Earth objects and collaborative searches for transiting exoplanets, programs which will also open up new research opportunities for students in the Oklahoma-Arkansas region. Ideally, these opportunities will attract more undergraduate and graduate students to major in physics and astronomy, and foster the creation of degree programs in astronomy at OSU. Optical Guidance Systems was the contractor for both the telescope and dome automation. The telescope's ceramic 602-mm f/3 primary and 220-mm secondary mirrors yield an effective focal ratio of f/8 that can be changed to f/5.3 with a focal reducer / field flattener. Fields of view range from 0.75 at f/5.3 to 1.2 at f/8. The Strehl ratio is 0.954. The telescope's carbon-fiber Serrurier truss is supported by an equatorial fork mount equipped with friction drives. Telescope equipment includes a 35-mm-format CCD camera with UBVRI filters, field rotator, off-axis guider, and flip-mirror unit for quick switches to eyepiece observing. HSMO itself is conveniently located under reasonably dark skies at an elevation of 340 m about 15 km southwest of the city of Stillwater, whose population, including OSU, is approaching 50,000. HSMO's dome was completed in 2002, and funding is being raised for a control building near the dome. The observatory's URL is www.physics.okstate.edu/observatory.

Shull, Peter, Jr.

2007-12-01

442

Personality and posttraumatic stress disorder among directly exposed survivors of the Oklahoma City bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundFew disaster studies have specifically examined personality in association with exposure to disaster and development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A study of survivors of the Oklahoma City bombing examined PTSD and personality measured after the disaster.

Carol S. North; Anna Abbacchi; C. Robert Cloninger

443

Live Weight-Dressed Weight Relationship for Commercial Fishes from Four Oklahoma Reservoirs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oklahoma commercial fishermen on Lakes Texoma, Grand, Eufaula, and Gibson were studied from July 1967 to June 1968. In each quarter samples of fish were weighed prior to cleaning, by a commercial fishermen, and immediately afterwards. Linear and curviline...

G. Mensinger B. E. Brown

1971-01-01

444

Archaeological Investigations of the Waterfall-Gilford Creeks Watershed, McCurtain County, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Archaeological investigations in the Waterfall-Gilford Creeks Watershed, McCurtain County, Oklahoma, produced information on the culture history and settlement ecology of the region along the Red River drainage. Three archaeological sites yielded componen...

T. J. Prewitt F. E. Kirby D. J. Gaston

1982-01-01

445

An Analysis of Three Commercial Harvest Estimation Procedures Used in the Oklahoma Commercial Fishery.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The commercial fishery on four Oklahoma reservoirs was sampled from July 1967 through June 1968. The total harvest was estimated by two ratio estimators and a simple expansion estimator. These three statistical estimates were compared with a questionnaire...

M. L. Parrack

1965-01-01

446

The Prehistory of the Proposed Clayton Lake Area, Southeast Oklahoma. Phase I Investigations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes archaeological field work conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Latimer, Pushmataha, and Pittsburg Counties) between July and September 1978 for the Tulsa District. Excavations were undertaken at seven sites that will be directly impacted...

R. Vehik J. R. Galm

1979-01-01

447

Predictability of Physical Changes of Clay-Forming Materials in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

It is necessary to establish methods of testing and criteria which will permit the material characterization of shales so their engineering performance can be predicted more accurately. Oklahoma shales were tested for index and strength related properties...

L. G. Laguros

1972-01-01

448

78 FR 32161 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision AGENCY: Environmental...implement its base hazardous waste management program. We authorized the...21. The Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (``OHWMA'')...

2013-05-29

449

78 FR 32223 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 [EPA-R06-RCRA-2012-0821; 9817-5] Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed...

2013-05-29

450

76 FR 19004 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...CFR Part 271 [EPA-R06-RCRA-2010-0307; FRL-9290-9] Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed...

2011-04-06

451

77 FR 15273 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision AGENCY: Environmental...implement its base hazardous waste management program. We authorized the...21. The Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (``OHWMA'')...

2012-03-15

452

76 FR 18927 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision AGENCY: Environmental...implement its base hazardous waste management program. We authorized the...21. The Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (``OHWMA'')...

2011-04-06

453

Continued support of the natural resources information system (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this research program was to continue developing, editing, maintaining, utilizing and making publicly available the Oil and Gas Well History file portion of the Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma. The NR...

C. J. Mankin T. P. Rizzuti

1994-01-01

454

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2013-07-01

455

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123...

2013-07-01

456

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2013-07-01

457

40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.124 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.124 North...

2013-07-01

458

40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125...

2013-07-01

459

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility/constraints of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers a select area of the United States. The Midcontinent (Kansas, Nssouri, Oklahoma) has produced significant ...

D. K. Olsen W. I. Johnson

1993-01-01

460

Salvage Excavations of Prehistoric Human Burials at Altus and Foss Reservoirs, Southwestern Oklahoma: 1980-1984.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A series of four reports is presented which document seven human burials salvaged by Bureau of Reclamation staff archeologists. The burials were exposed by lake shore erosion at Altus and Foss Reservoirs in southwestern Oklahoma. A formal analysis of the ...

G. Agogino D. K. Boyd V. T. Button M. Etchieson B. Ferguson

1985-01-01

461

Environmental Impact Statement for the Reclamation of the Sequoyah Fuels Corporation Site in Gore, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sequoyah Fuels Corporation (SFC) is proposing to conduct reclamation activities at its 243-hectare (600-acre) former uranium conversion site in Gore, Oklahoma. SFC proposes to consolidate contaminated sludges and soils, demolish existing site structures, ...

2008-01-01

462

American Housing Survey for the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area in 1988. Current Housing Reports.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents statistics on housing and household characteristics from the 1988 American Housing Survey Metropolitan Sample (AHS-MS), for the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. The AHS was designed to provide a current series of information on the siz...

1990-01-01

463

Food Habits of the Bigmouth and Smallmouth Buffalo from Four Oklahoma Reservoirs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The qualitative and quantitative food habits are described for 1,132 smallmouth buffalo and 623 bigmouth buffalo commercially harvested from four Oklahoma reservoirs. Smallmouth buffalo are predominantly bottom feeders, whereas bigmouth buffalo are more p...

R. Tafanelli P. E. Mauck G. Mensinger

1970-01-01

464

78 FR 41073 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 7 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Pittsburg, Pushmataha, and Seminole Counties for Public Assistance, including...Canadian, Okfuskee, and Okmulgee Counties for Public Assistance, including...Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties for Public Assistance...

2013-07-09

465

75 FR 56135 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease OKNM 121969, Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease OKNM 121969, Oklahoma AGENCY...Notice of Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease...121969 from the lessee(s), Brower Oil & Gas, Inc., for lands in Garvin...

2010-09-15

466

The association of pseudoephedrine sales restrictions on emergency department urine drug screen results in Oklahoma.  

PubMed

On June 15, 2004, Oklahoma became the first state to reclassify pseudoephedrine as a Schedule V drug. Arrests in Oklahoma for the manufacture of methamphetamines in clandestine laboratories precipitously declined. It was hypothesized that a decrease in methamphetamine use could be shown in the patient population in Oklahoma's largest emergency department. To test this hypothesis, all urine drug screen results in the Saint Francis Hospital Trauma Emergency Center from January 2003 through May 2005 were reviewed. There was a significant increase in the total tests performed and the percentage of positive test results for the amphetamine drug class (p = 0.0004, R2 = 0.3785) over time. These results suggest that methamphetamine usage has not decreased in the emergency department patient population. Possibly, methamphetamine usage in Oklahoma has not been impacted by the passage of HB 2176 due to an increase in drug trafficking of methamphetamine into the state. PMID:18183861

Brandenburg, M A; Brown, S J; Arneson, W L; Arneson, D L

2007-11-01

467

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center, Ada, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

U.S. EPA's Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center, Ada, Oklahoma, has reduced its annual energy consumption by 45% by upgrading its building mechanical system and incorporating renewable energy.

Farrar-Nagy, S.; Voss, P.; Van Geet, O.

2006-10-01

468

Four Possible Steps to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Ada, Oklahoma  

EPA Science Inventory

An overview of federal, state, and city initiatives on climate change are presented. Specific steps for the City of Ada, Oklahoma, are presented. This is an abstract of a proposed presentation and does not necessarily reflect EPA policy....

469

76 FR 37827 - Notice of Proposed Audit Delegation Renewals for the States of Oklahoma and Montana  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ONRR-2011-0018] Notice of Proposed Audit Delegation Renewals for the States of Oklahoma...ACTION: Notice of States' proposals for audit delegation renewals...Revenue (ONRR) renew current delegations of audit and investigation authority. This...

2011-06-28

470

The Effects of Universal Pre-K in Oklahoma: Research Highlights and Policy Implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract ,Oklahoma is one of only three states in the nation to offer a free pre-kindergarten(pre-K) program,to all students in participatingschool districts on a voluntary basis. Fortuitous circumstances in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the states largest school district, permitted an unusually rigorous evaluation of the pre-K program in Tulsa. Because four-year-olds beginning pre-K and five-year-olds beginning kindergarten were administered the same test

William T. Gormley; Deborah Phillips

2005-01-01

471

A Brief History of Women in Oklahoma Corrections: Inmates and Employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper provides a brief history of womenboth offenders and employeeswithin the adult criminal justice system in the state of Oklahoma. Generally using the periods of Statehood (1900-1909), the Traditional (1910-1979), and the Contemporary (1980 to the present), we examined historical development of Oklahoma Department of Corrections (ODOC) facilities for women, incarceration data, and selected characteristics of these offenders. The

Philip D. Holley; Dennis Brewster

472

Differential alcohol-related mortality among American Indian tribes in Oklahoma, 1968-1978  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tribal differences in alcohol-related mortality were examined among 11 Indian tribes living in Oklahoma. Data on alcohol-related deaths from 1968 to 1978 were compiled and assigned to various tribes on the basis of population distributions by county. Results showed significant differences in alcohol-related mortality among the various tribes. Of the 267,238 total deaths in Oklahoma during the study period, 9.3%

Charles M. Christian; Mary Dufour; Darryl Bertolucci

1989-01-01

473

Engineered barrier environment, Yucca Mountain.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The US Department of Energy is studying the suitability of Yucca Mountain (YM) as a potential nuclear waste repository site. Environmental conditions are important to engineered barrier system (EBS) design, materials testing, selection, design criteria, w...

D. G. Wilder

1993-01-01

474

Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat  

SciTech Connect

Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 +/- 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters.

Mead, J.I.; Martin, P.S.; Euler, R.C.; Long, A.; Jull, A.J.T.; Toolin, L.J.; Donahue, D.J.; Linick, T.W.

1986-02-01

475

The Dilemma of Mountain Roads  

EPA Science Inventory

Mountain roads and trails are proliferating throughout developing Southeast Asia with severe but largely unrecognized long-term consequences related to effects of landslides and surface erosion on communities and downstream resources....

476

Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat  

PubMed Central

Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters. Images

Mead, Jim I.; Martin, Paul S.; Euler, Robert C.; Long, Austin; Jull, A. J. T.; Toolin, Laurence J.; Donahue, Douglas J.; Linick, T. W.

1986-01-01

477

Cathedral Mountain debris flows, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historic debris flow activity along the north side of Cathedral Mountain in the southern Rocky Mountains of British Columbia,\\u000a began in 1925 and has increased in frequency up to 1985. A typical debris flow event involves approximately 100,000 m3 of material. Debris flow velocities and discharges above the head of the fan crossed by the Trans-Canada Highway and the\\u000a C.P.R.

L. E. Jackson; O. Hungr; J. S. Gardner; C. Mackay

1989-01-01

478

Plate tectonics and mountain building  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a One of the greatest strengths of the modern plate tectonics theory is its ability to explain the origin of virtually all of\\u000a the present and most ancient mountain belts on Earth. In other words, mountain building (orogeny) stands in strong causal\\u000a interrelation with the global plate drift pattern. The motor of orogeny is subduction. To enable subduction, a basin floored

Wolfgang Frisch; Martin Meschede; Ronald Blakey

479

Three-dimensional seismic interpretation from the triangle zone of the frontal Ouachita mountains and Arkoma basin, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of 28.5 km² of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data from the triangle zone of the Ouachita fold-and-thrust belt and the foreland Arkoma basin reveals structural details not recognized previously in conventional two-dimensional (2-D) seismic data. The data indicate that the frontal Kiowa syncline in the Arkoma basin has been passively uplifted by blind thrusting at the Morrowan Wapanucka Limestone

M. H. Valderrama; K. C. Nielsen; G. A. McMechan

1996-01-01

480

The EMS response to the Oklahoma City bombing.  

PubMed

This is a descriptive study of the Emergency Medical Services response to a bombing of a United States Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on 19 April 1995. The explosion emanated from a rented truck parked in the front of the building. The force of the explosion destroyed three of the four support columns in the front of the building and resulted in a pancaking effect of the upper floors onto the lower floors. There were three distinct phases of the medical response: 1) Immediately available local EMS ambulances and staff; 2) Additional ambulances staffed by recalled, off-duty personnel; and 3) mutual-aid ambulances and personnel from the surrounding communities. There were 361 persons in the building at the time of the explosion, 163 of these perished. Within the first hour of the explosion, 139 patients were transported to area hospitals. Of these, 32% were in critical condition. During the day of the explosion, 444 persons were treated for physical injuries: 410 of these were related to the explosion and 14, including one with fatal injuries, were sustained during search and rescue attempts. A total of 354 (80%) were treated and released from emergency departments, and 90 (20%) were admitted to hospitals. Six of the transported victims either were dead on arrival to the emergency department or died after admission to the hospital. Of those who died, 95% of the deaths were related to blunt trauma associated with the collapse of the structure. Only three persons were extricated alive after the first five hours following the explosion. The scene became flooded with volunteers who, although their intentions were to provide help and aid to those injured, created a substantial logistical problem for Incident Command. Several other lessons were learned: 1) Telephone lines and cells became overloaded, but the Hospital Emergency Administrative Radio system was operational only in three of the 15 hospitals; 2) Volunteer personnel should have responded to the hospitals and not to the scene; and 3) Training was an essential for the success of such a response. Thus, the success of this operation was a function of the intense training, practice, and coordination between multiple agencies. PMID:10187007

Maningas, P A; Robison, M; Mallonee, S

481

Did fertility go up after the Oklahoma City bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 1990-1999.  

PubMed

Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility. In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientations--replacement theory, community influence theory, and terror management theory--that motivate a general expectation of birth increases, with different predictions emerging from time and geographic considerations. We used two different empirical methodologies. First, we fitted dummy-variable regression models to monthly birth data from 1990 to 1999 in metropolitan counties. We used birth counts to frame the problem and general fertility rates to address the problem formally. These analyses were organized within two design structures: a control-group interrupted time-series design and a difference-in-differences design. In these analyses, Oklahoma County showed an interpretable, consistent, and significant increase in births. Second, we used graphical smoothing models to display these effects visually. In combination, these methods provide compelling support for a fertility response to the Oklahoma City bombing. Certain parts of each theory helped us organize and understand the pattern of results. PMID:16463916

Rodgers, Joseph Lee; St John, Craig A; Coleman, Ronnie

2005-11-01

482

Ground-Water-Quality Assessment of the Central Oklahoma Aquifer, Oklahoma: Analysis of Available Water-Quality Data through 1987. National Water-Quality Assessment. (Chapter B).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the paper is to report on the assessment of the water quality of the Central Oklahoma aquifer using the information available through 1987. The scope of the work included compiling data from Federal, State, and local agencies; evaluating th...

D. L. Parkhurst S. C. Christenson J. L. Schlottmann

1994-01-01

483

10. SLIGHTLY OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP COMPLEX. NOTE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. SLIGHTLY OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP COMPLEX. NOTE AUXILIARY STRUCTURES. - Eagle Mountain Pump Plant, Ten miles north of Route 10, southeast of Eagle Mountain, Eagle Mountain, Riverside County, CA

484

Geographic Information Systems Methods for Determining Drainage-Basin Areas, Stream-Buffered Areas, Stream Length, and Land Uses for the Neosho and Spring Rivers in Northeastern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geographic Information Systems have many uses, one of which includes the reproducible computation of environmental characteristics that can be used to categorize hydrologic features. The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality are investigating Geographic Information Systems techniques to determine partial drainage-basin areas, stream-buffer areas, stream length, and land uses (drainage basin and stream characteristics) in northeastern Oklahoma. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, documented the methods used to determine drainage-basin and stream characteristics for the Neosho and Spring Rivers above Grand Lake Of the Cherokees in northeastern Oklahoma and calculated the characteristics. The drainage basin and stream characteristics can be used by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality to aid in natural-resource assessments.

Masoner, Jason R.; March, Ferrella

2006-01-01

485

A paradigm for multidisciplinary disaster research: the Oklahoma City experience.  

PubMed

The objective of this article is to describe the creation and operation of a multidisciplinary group to examine the Oklahoma City (OKC) bombing. The OKC bombing presented an opportunity to study a major disaster within 2 days of the incident. The Disaster Health Studies Group (DHSG) was created to facilitate this effort. The creation, organization, and operation of the DHSG is outlined. In addition the mission statement, participants, communications, political empowerment, data preservation and collection, data ownership, patient rights, threats to the DHSG, media interactions, funding, the institutional review board process, and results reporting will be detailed. The 22 projects of the DHSG are listed. In conclusion, four main findings are examined: 1) A multidisciplinary disaster study group is feasible and can be rapidly organized; 2) certain organizations and institutions form a core group for facilitation of the research effort; 3) specific issues must be addressed in order for the group to succeed; and 4) the group leader should have disaster expertise and be committed to the multidisciplinary process. PMID:9696182

Quick, G

486

Legume Genome Initiative at the University of Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Consolidated Appropriations Resolution, 2003 Conference Report for the Department of Energy's Biological and Environmental Research (BER) program provided $481,000 for the Legume Genome Initiative at the University of Oklahoma. These funds were used to support our research that is aimed at determining the entire sequence of the gene rich regions of the genome of the legume, Medicago truncatula, by allowing us to obtain a greater degree of finished BAC sequences from the draft sequences we have already obtained through research funded by the Noble Foundation. During the funding period we increased the number of Medicago truncatula BACs with finished (Bermuda standard) sequences from 109 to 359, and the total number of BACs for which we collected sequence data from 584 to 842, 359 of which reached phase 2 (ordered and oriented contigs). We also sequenced a series of pooled BAC clones that cover additional euchromatic (gene rich) genomic regions. This work resulted in 6 refereed publications, see below. Genes whose sequence was determined during this study included multiple members of the plant disease resistance (R-gene) family as well as several genes involved in flavinoid biosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and plant-microbial symbosis. This work also served as a prelude to obtaining NSF funding for the international collaborative effort to complete the entire sequence of the Medicago truncatula genomic euchromatic regions using a BAC based approach.

Bruce A. Roe

2004-02-27

487

Subsidence and basin development in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

SciTech Connect

Development of the southern Oklahoma aulacogen was the result of Cambrian tectonism along Proterozoic zones of weakness that caused northwest-trending extensional normal faults related to a rifting event. These faults were reactivated during upper Paleozoic compressional stress with fault patterns indicative of sinistral transpressive and transtensional movement. Mapping in the region has allowed classification of the myriad of faults into six major systems, from the north to south: the Washita Valley, Madill-Aylesworth, Caddo, Criner, Horseshoe Bend, and Muenster systems. Development of the fault systems occurred somewhat independently as energy was transferred between them owing to changes in stress from the uneven collision of the Ouachita front. This model may account for the episodic movement recognized by past investigators. The determination of relative timing of development within these systems has shown that the Madill-Aylesworth and Criner systems were active during the Upper Mississippian. As deformation continued along the Criner system structural activity moved southward to include the Horseshoe Bend and Muenster systems during the Early Pennsylvanian. During the Middle Pennsylvanian, fault development along the southern margin of the aulacogen subsided, and deformation activity was initiated in the northern portions of the Ardmore basin. The amount of horizontal displacement along fault systems in the region is still unresolved. However, by regional mapping along the Criner systems, a minimum of 6 mi left-lateral movement can be documented as having occurred during the Upper Pennsylvanian using models of sediment deposition and transport in strike-slip basins.

Ferebee, C. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States))

1991-03-01

488

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has displayed some unique production characteristics. These include high initial water-oil and gas-oil ratios, decline in those ratios over time and temporary increase in gas-oil ratio during pressure build up. The formation also displays highly complex geology, but surprising hydrodynamic continuity. This report addresses three key issues related specifically to West Carney Hunton field and, in general, to any other Hunton formation exhibiting similar behavior: (1) What is the primary mechanism by which oil and gas is produced from the field? (2) How can the knowledge gained from studying the existing fields can be extended to other fields which have the potential to produce? (3) What can be done to improve the performance of this reservoir? We have developed a comprehensive model to explain the behavior of the reservoir. By using available production, geological, core and log data, we are able to develop a reservoir model which explains the production behavior in the reservoir. Using easily available information, such as log data, we have established the parameters needed for a field to be economically successful. We provide guidelines in terms of what to look for in a new field and how to develop it. Finally, through laboratory experiments, we show that surfactants can be used to improve the hydrocarbons recovery from the field. In addition, injection of CO{sub 2} or natural gas also will help us recover additional oil from the field.

Mohan Kelkar

2005-02-01

489

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we present the data on methane injection using huff-n-puff process. It appears that additional oil can be recovered using methane as a solvent. Additional experiments will be needed to confirm our analysis. Our engineering analysis has laid out detailed indicators to make the de-watering successful. Using those indicators, we are currently investigating potential in fill well locations in West Carney field. Our technology transfer activities continued this quarter with two presentations and one workshop.

Mohan Kelkar

2005-04-01

490

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we should be able to change the water-gas ratio in the reservoir and, hence, improve productivity from the well. In our Engineering and Geological Analysis section, we present our rock typing analysis work which combines the geological data with engineering data to develop a unique rock characteristics description. By using porosity as a variable, we can generate alternate rock type descriptions at logged wells. This procedure also allows us to quantify uncertainties in rock type description.

Mohan Kelkar

2005-10-01

491

27 CFR 9.213 - Snipes Mountain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...topographic maps used to determine the boundary of the Snipes Mountain viticultural area are titled: (1) Sunnyside, Wash., 1965, photo revised 1978; and (2) Granger, Wash., 1965. (c) Boundary. The Snipes Mountain viticultural area is...

2013-04-01

492

[Organization and management of mountain rescues].  

PubMed

Mountain rescue is a matter for specialists. Specific training, a model of organisation under state control, emergency protocols and information and prevention campaigns have helped to improve morbidity and mortality rates in the mountains. PMID:23951620

Maupin, Thierry

493

Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery Plan outlines steps for recovery of gray wolf (Canis lupus) populations in portions of their former range in the Northern Rocky Mountains of the United States. Historical evidence documents the presence of gray wo...

1987-01-01

494

Mountain Warfare: The Need for Specialist Training.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study focuses on the need for specialist training for mountain warfare. It analyzes the special characteristics of mountain and high altitude terrain which affect conduct of military operations. It identifies the differences between low and high moun...

M. A. Malik

2003-01-01

495

Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station  

SciTech Connect

A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

Lyles Brad,McCurdy Greg,Chapman Jenny,Miller Julianne

2012-01-01

496

Biodiversity of the Hengduan Mountains  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides data on plants and fungi from the Hengduan Mountains and adjacent areas of south-central China, including the Gaoligong Mountains and Tibetan Himalaya. The data were derived from georeferenced collections made on recent expeditions (1984-present) to the region, and include specimens with DNA tissue. Users can browse specimens by name; search by taxon, collector number, or date; or browse collecting localities in the database using Google Earth (TM). There is also information on expeditions and personnel, the Biodiversity of the Eastern Himalaya project, an image gallery, a multilingual gazetteer and thesaurus, and a map showing the historic Tibetan provinces of the region.

497

Large-Scale Change: Mountain-Building  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is designed to help students learn how mountains form, identify the components of mountain systems, and explore the transfer of matter and the role of energy during mountain building. It employs links to three other websites to lead students to information about the evolution of mountains, provide background information on the continent-continent collisions that resulted in the Himalayas, and explore geomorphology from space.

498

27 CFR 9.55 - Bell Mountain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bell Mountain. 9.55 Section 9.55 Alcohol...Viticultural Areas § 9.55 Bell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...described in this section is Bell Mountain. (b) Approved map. The...

2010-04-01

499

27 CFR 9.55 - Bell Mountain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 2009-04-01 false Bell Mountain. 9.55 Section 9.55 Alcohol...Viticultural Areas § 9.55 Bell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...described in this section is Bell Mountain. (b) Approved map. The...

2009-04-01

500

Mountain Belts and the New Global Tectonics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of the sedimentary, volcanic, structural, and metamorphic chronology in mountain belts, and consideration of the implications of the new global tectonics (plate tectonics), strongly indicate that mountain belts are a consequence of plate evolution. It is proposed that mountain belts develop by the deformation and metamorphism of the sedimentary and volcanic assemblages of Atlantic-type continental margins. These assemblages result

John F. Dewey; John M. Bird

1970-01-01