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Sample records for arbuckle mountains oklahoma

  1. Hydrology of the Arbuckle Mountains area, south-central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, Roy W.; Hanson, Ronald L.; Davis, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Rocks that make up the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer crop out over ~500 mi2 in the Arbuckle Mountains province in south-central Oklahoma. The aquifer consists of limestone, dolomite, and sandstone of the Arbuckle and Simpson Groups of Late Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age and is about 5,000-9,000 ft thick. The rocks were subjected to intensive folding and faulting associated with major uplift of the area during Early to Late Pennsylvanian time.

  2. Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    1991-11-17

    The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics that can be applied to the subsurface in the adjacent Anadarko and Ardmore basins. Numerous reports and guidebooks have been written concerning the Arbuckle Mountains. A few important general publications are provided in the list of selected references. The purpose of this handout is to provide general information on the geology of the Arbuckle Mountains and specific information on the four field trip stops, adapted from the literature. The four stops were at: (1) Sooner Rock and Sand Quarry; (2) Woodford Shale; (3) Hunton Anticline and Hunton Quarry; and (4) Tar Sands of Sulfur Area. As part of this report, two papers are included for more detail: Paleomagnetic dating of basinal fluid migration, base-metal mineralization, and hydrocarbon maturation in the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma and Laminated black shale-bedded chert cyclicity in the Woodford Formation, southern Oklahoma.

  3. Multiple episodes of dolomitization in the Arbuckle Group, Arbuckle Mountains, south-central Oklahoma: Field, petrographic, and geochemical evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, G.; Land, L.S.; Elmore, R.D.

    1995-04-03

    The Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Group in the Arbuckle Mountains, south-central Oklahoma, had a complex history of dolomitization that resulted in two different geometries of dolomite bodies: stratal dolomite, of stratigraphically consistent, widespread distribution, and non-stratal dolomite, of stratigraphically inconsistent, local occurrence. Stratal dolomite includes the Royer and Butterly units in the lower Arbuckle Group. Most stratal dolomite samples are coarsely crystalline and have {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios similar to Late Cambrian limestone and coeval seawater. All stratal dolomite and Arbuckle limestone samples have low {Delta}{sup 18}O values. Nonstratal dolomite is present in two areas: the Tishomingo Anticline and the Arbuckle Anticline. In the Tishomingo Anticline area, massive bodies (> 10 km{sup 2}) of nonstratal dolomite are present in a paleokarst system of pre-Middle Ordovician age. The petrographic and isotopic characteristics suggest that the nonstratal dolomite probably resulted from dolomitization of recrystallized limestone by post-Early Ordovician seawater. In the Arbuckle Anticline area, nonstratal dolomite is present as small irregular bodies that are related to Pennsylvanian faults and are associated with the margins of stratal Butterly dolomite. The nonstratal dolomite, medium to coarsely crystalline and brightly luminescent, is characterized by high {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios values, and Fe and Mn concentrations, relative to all Arbuckle carbonates. Such compositions suggest that this type of dolomite probably originated from fluids that were derived from the adjacent basin(s) during late Paleozoic time.

  4. Thermal maturation by vitrinite reflectance of Woodford shale, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cardott, B.J.; Metcalf, W.J. III; Ahern, J.L. )

    1989-09-01

    Vitrinite reflectance was measured on 40 grab samples from outcrops of the Woodford Shale (Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian) collected near the Washita Valley fault in the Arbuckle Mountains in south-central Oklahoma. Samples are widely distributed along 40 km. Sample localities range from 60 m to 7.63 km from the Washita Valley fault. Well-indurated shale samples were collected from below the outcrop surface to reduce the effect of weathering on vitrinite reflectance. Vitrinite reflectance values were measured from standard kerogen concentrate pellets. Implications of the data specific to the Arbuckle Mountains include the Woodford Shale is immature to marginally mature with respect to the generation of liquid hydrocarbons; high heat flow associated with the rifting stage of the southern Oklahoma aulacogen was diminished by Late Devonian; the Woodford Shale was never deeply buried; and frictional heating from the Washita Valley fault did not affect the temperature field significantly.

  5. Deep-to-shallow carbonate ramp transition in Viola Limestone (Ordovician), southwest Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Glavin, P.K.

    1983-03-01

    The Viola Limestone (Middle and Upper Ordovician) of the southwest Arbuckle Mountains was deposited on a carbonate ramp within the southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Depositional environments include (1) anaerobic, deep-ramp setting represented by microfacies RL, CH, CGL, and A, (2) dysaerobic, mid-ramp setting represented by microfacies B, and (3) aerobic, shallow-ramp setting represented by microfacies C and D. Deposition in the deep- and mid-ramp environments was dominated by bottom-hugging currents produced by off-platform flow of denser waters. Primary sedimentary structures include millimeter-size laminations, starved ripples, and concave-up and inclined erosional surfaces. Shelly benthic fauna are rare in A and B; trace fossils are common only in B. Deposits associated with the line-source gully, microfacies RL, CH, and CGL, are laterally confined; they have been observed only in the southwest Arbuckle Mountains. Primary sedimentary structures present in RL include wavy and ripple-cross laminae. Microfacies CH, contained within RL and interpreted as a submarine channel deposit, is present only at one locality. Primary sedimentary structures present in CH include an erosional base and several internal erosional surfaces, lateral accretionary sets, and imbricated, locally derived intraclasts. High total organic carbon (TOC) values have been reported for the lower Viola. TOC values of 1% have been reported from microfacies A, and TOC values of 5% have been reported from microfacies RL. These high values suggest that A and RL may act as hydrocarbon source rocks. Recognition of these microfacies in the subsurface will contribute to our knowledge of the Viola Limestone as an exploration target.

  6. Proposed shallow drilling at the interface between the southern Oklahoma aulacogen and Ouachita fold belt, Arbuckle Mountains region, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lidiak, E.G. . Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science); Denison, R.E.

    1993-02-01

    Two major tectonic elements in southern North America are the southern Oklahoma aulacogen and the Ouachita foldbelt. The Aulacogen is characterized by basement-cored high-angle fault blocks along which movement occurred throughout much of Paleozoic time. It is one of the most intensely deformed areas in the stable interior platform of the craton. The fold belt, in contrast, consists primarily of thin-skinned compressional structures that formed in Late Paleozoic time. These two prominent tectonic features strike at a high angle to one another and are juxtaposed in southeast Oklahoma where the contact is buried shallowly beneath Cretaceous rocks of the Gulf Coastal Plain. A drilling program comprised of a series of shallow holes drilled across the contact zone will establish the structural and stratigraphic relationships at this important tectonic interface. The results obtained should be critical in elucidating the effect that the transverse aulacogen structures had on the development of the Ouachita frontal zone. Proposed drilling sites are in northern Bryan and Choctaw counties, Oklahoma, along the Tishomingo--Belton anticlines southeast of the basement-cored eastern Arbuckle Mountains. Crystalline rocks in this region are massive middle Proterozoic granitoid rocks overlain by Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. Farther southeast, rocks in the frontal zone consist mainly of Late Paleozoic flysch-type sedimentary rocks. Depths to Paleozoic and older rocks beneath the coastal plain deposits are about 300--500 meters so that targeted structures can easily be reached.

  7. Geochemical constraints on the origin of secondary magnetizations in the Cambro-Ordovician Royer Dolomite, Arbuckle Mountains, southern Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, R. D.; Cates, K.; Gao, G.; Land, L.

    1994-08-01

    Geochemical and paleomagnetic results from Cambro-Ordovician Royer Dolomite in the Arbuckle Mountains, southern Oklahoma, suggest a connection between dolomite type and magnetizations. One dolomite type, which is most common in the vicinity of the Arbuckle Anticline, has a dull luminescence, low ?18O values, coeval to slightly lower 87Sr/86Sr ratios and contains an easterly Cambro-Ordovician magnetization in magnetite. To the southeast, closer to the Ouachita Mountain front, most of the Royer dolomite contains a southeasterly and shallow magnetization in magnetite that is interpreted to be Late Paleozoic in age. In contrast to the other dolomites, these dolomites contain abundant authigenic K-feldspar and pyrite, radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr ratios, and have a bright (red) luminescence, all of which are consistent with alteration by basinal fluids. At one site, a stromatolitic bioherm, dolomites similar to those at the Arbuckle Anticline are surrounded by the altered dolomites. The distribution of specimen directions at this site is streaked between a Cambro-Ordovician and Late Paleozoic direction. The results of this study suggest a connection, either direct (by causing precipitation) or indirect (by increasing permeabilities for another fluid), between a radiogenic fluid and a chemical magnetization in magnetite. The relatively unaltered dolomites at the stromatolitic bioherm site escaped the almost pervasive alteration and remagnetization caused by the basinal fluids close to the Ouachita Mountains, a potential source for the fluids.

  8. Simpson-Arbuckle contact revisited in Northwest Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.D.; Allen, R.W.

    1995-09-01

    The Joins Formation, the lowermost formation of the Simpson Group, is traditionally the least studied or understood of the Simpson formations. The Joins, not known to produce hydrocarbons in central Oklahoma, is frequently overlooked by those more interested in the productive Simpson formations above and the Arbuckle carbonates below. In a study of the lower Simpson to upper Arbuckle interval in northwestern Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, the Joins Formation was found to be present. The central Oklahoma section consists of interbedded gray, olive gray and green splintery moderately waxy shale, cream to light gray homogeneous microcrystallin dolomite, and microcrystalline to fine crystalline fossiliferous slightly glauconitic well cemented sandstones are also noted. The entire Joins Formation is moderately to very fossiliferous; primarily consisting of crinoids, ostracods, brachiopods, and trilobites. The ostracod fauna closely resembles and correlates with the Arbuckle Mountain section, which has been extensively studied over the years by such authors as Taff, Ulrich and Harris. Beneath the Joins in this area is a normal section of Arbuckle dolomites. Due to the absence of a basal sand in the Joins the separation of the Joins and Arbuckle, utilizing electric logs only, is frequently tenuous. In comparison with the Arbuckle, the Joins tends to have higher gamma ray and S.P. values. Other tools, such as resistivity, bulk density and photoelectric (PE), are frequently inconclusive. For geologists studying the Simpson-Arbuckle contact in central Oklahoma, the presence or absence of the Joins Formation is best determined through conventional lithologic and palenontologic sample identification techniques. Once this has been done, correlation of electric logs with this type log is possible for the local area.

  9. Fracture density and spacing along Washita Valley fault, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ferebee, C.D.; Tapp, J.B. )

    1989-08-01

    The authors document fracture density and spacing associated with the Washita Valley fault, a major strike-slip fault. The Washita Valley fault strikes northwest-southeast with up to 80 mi of exposure in southern Oklahoma and may be an early bounding fault of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen (Ardmore/Marietta basins). Horizontal displacement on the fault has been estimated to be up to 40 mi, with vertical displacement on the order of 10,000 ft. Samples collected from traverses across the Washita Valley fault have been analyzed. The traverses cross the fault at different stratigraphic levels from Proterozoic igneous basement, through the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group, Ordovician Simpson and Viola Groups, to the Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group. Several types of fracture systems are documented that reflect mechanical stratigraphy, burial depth during deformation, and episodic movement on the fault. The fractures in the study area include open fracture systems, calcite-filled fractures, tension gashes, and fractures related to pressure solution. The samples were cut parallel to the strike of the fault, vertical-normal to the fault, and horizontal-normal to the fault. These cuts allow examination of the total fracture strain, characterization of the fractures, and statistical analysis of fracture density. From these data, fracture density is shown to decrease exponentially moving away from the primary fault zone. The increased understanding of fracture patterns and characteristics will assist future exploration and development programs involving carbonate reservoirs associated with strike-slip systems.

  10. Arbuckle source for Atoka Formation Flysch, Ouachita Mountains Frontal Belt, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, C.A.; Suneson, N.H.

    1988-01-01

    The 10-mi wide Ouachita Mountains frontal belt consists of Morrowan-Atokan flysch exposed in steeply south-dipping imbricate thrust slices. Two spatially distinct groups of paleocurrents were recognized during detailed mapping of 120 mi/sup 2/ in the frontal belt (between 95/sup 0/15'W and 95/sup 0/30'W). The east-west-trending Morrowan shallow-water shelf margin (now allochthonous) marks the boundary between these two domains. Westerly azimuths (259/sup 0/n = 213), typical of almost the entire Ouachita flysch sequence, are from the Atoka Formation south of the shelf margin. Easterly azimuths (66/sup 0/n = 75), previously unrecognized in the Ouachitas, are from the Atoka Formation where it overlies Wapanucka Limestone north of the margin. A third group of paleocurrents (193/sup 0/n = 21) are from the Johns Valley Shale (an olisto-strome that is the basinward equivalent of the Wapanucka Limestone). Easterly paleocurrent azimuths indicate a western source for the Atoka Formation north of the Morrowan shelf margin. Sediment from the Arbuckle uplift was apparently channeled northeastward down a trough that was isolated from the Ouachita basin to the south where sediment had an Appalachian provenance. The authors suggest that a trough was formed by listric fault blocks (tilted toward the continent) of the foundered Morrowan shelf margin. The bounding faults would be the southernmost of a series of northward younging south-side-down growth faults that have been recognized in the subsurface of the Arkoma basin to the north.

  11. Geochemical and petrographic analyses of travertine-precipitating waters and travertine deposits, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Utech, N.M.; Chafetz, H.S.

    1989-03-01

    Waters in Honey and Falls Creeks, Arbuckel Mountains region of Oklahoma, are supersaturated in CO/sub 2/ with respect to the overlying atmosphere and are up to 10 times saturated with respect to calcite (I/sub sat/ = 10). Loss of CO/sub 2/ from the system results in a downstream increase in saturation levels, with the highest I/sub sat/ at sites of maximum travertine deposition. High supersaturation is the result of natural kinetic processes (rapid CO/sub 2/ outgassing vs. slow precipitation) rather than the effects of foreign ion inhibitors. Temporal variations in the composition of the waters indicate that, contrary to expectations, prolonged periods of heavy rainfall cause a significant increase in I/sub sat/ levels. At any sample site, no consistent chemical variation occurred between organically mediated and inorganic precipitates. However, all deposits show a significant increase in magnesium concentration in a down-stream direction; this may be a result of higher I/sub sat/ values and corresponding higher rates of precipitation. Carbon isotopes for creek waters are highly variable, from /minus/0.6 to /minus/12.2 /per thousand/, reflecting a variety of sinks and sources for C/sup 12/. Oxygen isotopes are relatively constant, from /minus/3.7 to /minus/6.0 /per thousand/, average = /minus/5.2 /per thousand/, indicating an open-water system. Based on calculations from water data, travertine should exhibit a 2 /per thousand/ difference in /delta//sup 18/O values for precipitates formed in the summer vs. those formed in the winter. Algally laminated crusts, which have been postulated to be of seasonal origin, exhibit variation in /delta//sup 18/O values between laminae, confirming the seasonal origin of the laminae.

  12. The Deese and Collings ranch conglomerates of the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma: Evidence of strike-slip movement during the deformation stage of the southern Oklahoma Aulacogen

    SciTech Connect

    Cemen, I.; Pybas, K.; Stafford, C.; Al-Shaieb, Z. . School of Geology)

    1993-02-01

    It has been widely recognized that the Pennsylvanian conglomerates of the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma, record the deformation stage of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Two of these units are the Desmoinesian Deese Conglomerate, exposed in the Mill Creek Syncline area between the Reagan and Mill Creek fault zones, and the Middle Virgilian Collings Ranch Conglomerate, exposed along the Washita Valley fault zone in the Turner Falls area. The authors investigated clast size, geometry, and content, primary sedimentary structures, petrography, petrology, and diagenesis of the two conglomerate units, as well as the geometric relationship of their basins with nearby faults. Their evidence suggests that the two conglomerates were deposited as alluvial fans in basins formed by strike-slip movements. The Collings Ranch Conglomerate was deposited in a basin formed as the result of left-stepping along the nearby Washita Valley strike-slip fault zone. The Deese Conglomerate was deposited in a basin formed due to the combined effect of strike-slip and dip-slip movements along the Reagan and Mill Creek fault zones. In the Collings Ranch basin, the deposition was accomplished primarily by channel-fill and sieve deposits in the proximal region of the fan. The Deese Conglomerate was deposited as an alluvial fan or fans which included several channel deposits while, in the deeper parts of the basin, fine-grained materials and limestones were deposited. These observations and their possible interpretations suggest that the Washita Valley, Mill Creek, and Reagan fault zones have experienced substantial strike-slip movement during the deformation stage of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen.

  13. Paleokarstic and karstic features: Arbuckle and Hunton Groups, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shaieb, Z.; Puckette, J.; Matthews, F. . School of Geology); Lynch, M. )

    1993-02-01

    Cores of the Ordovician-age Arbuckle Group and Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian-age Hunton Group contain evidence of paleokarst. Arbuckle and Hunton Group rocks display surprisingly similar suites of distinct paleo-karstic features. Vugs, solution-enlarged fractures, cavities, collapse breccias, and sediment-filled solution features are evident. Phreatic cements are more commonly observed than vadose cements, while primary speleothemic precipitates are rare. A complex history of exposure, subsidence, and diagenesis is recorded in these rocks. Hunton and Arbuckle carbonates have been subaerially exposed for periods of variable intensity and duration during geologic history. Paleokarst appears to have developed subjacent to disconformities within and between formations of the Arbuckle Group and where these rocks subcrop below regional unconformities. Hunton paleokarstic horizons are apparent below the regional pre-Woodford unconformity, while evidence of inter- and intra-formational subaerial exposure is tenuous. This complex hierarchy of unconformities can produce numerous porous horizons. Porosity preservation may depend on subsidence rates or sea level rises rapid enough to prevent extensive low-temperature phreatic cementation and sediment infill of the existing pore network. Caves in the Arbuckle Group in Murray County, Oklahoma contain many karstic features similar to those observed in cores. Cemented collapse breccia and sediment-filled solution cavities are evident in caves developed in the Cool Creek Formation. These caves are part of an extensive internal drainage system associated with Honey Creek near the crest of the Arbuckle anticline. Cave speleothems and surficial travertine deposits are by-product of karstification processes.

  14. Arbuckle group depositional cycles, southern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, R.F. ); Koskelin, K.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Outcrop and/or subsurface core studies of Butterly Dolomite, Cool Creek, Kindblade, and West Spring Creek formations reveal most of the Arbuckle Group to have been deposited as a series of storm-dominated, shallowing-upward sequences. They were deposited upon an extremely broad, nearly flat carbonate ramp that formed the southern margin of the North American craton (Knox, Arbuckle, Ellenburger, and El Paso groups) in the Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician. Shallowing-upward sequences were deposited in a cyclic manner, with individual fifth-order cycles only a few feet to tens of feet thick. These cycles record abrupt transgressions, caused by quick sea level rise, followed by progradation of a paleoshoreline as sea level gradually fell. Each cycle is divided into subtidal and tidal-flat components. Subtidal and tidal-flat components can be of equal thickness or can be skewed with one component becoming dominant and the other subordinate. Only half of all cycles are complete shallowing-upward sequences. Once understood the vertical stacking of facies in a cycle is predictable so that complete vs. incomplete cycles can be easily recognized. These distinctions are very important to recognize because well-developed subtidal portions of a cycle can form reservoir intervals when dolomitized.

  15. Conodont biostratigraphy of lower Ordovician rocks, Arbuckle Group, southern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Dresbach, R.I.; Ethington, R.L. )

    1989-08-01

    The Arbuckle Group of southern Oklahoma displays the only complete exposure of the shallow-water carbonates that characterize the Lower Ordovician of interior North America. Trilobites have been described from some parts of this sequence and sporadic occurrences of other invertebrates are known, but much of the sequence is sparingly fossiliferous. As a consequence, these magnificent exposures have not contributed notably to continuing efforts toward development of a comprehensive biostratigraphic scheme for the Lower Ordovician of the North American platform. Samples collected at 25-ft intervals through the Arbuckle Group along and adjacent to Interstate Highway 35 on the south flank of the Arbuckle anticline near Ardmore, Oklahoma, produced conodonts in abundances ranging from a few tens to over a thousand elements per kilogram and displaying good to excellent preservation with low CAI. These conodonts document a biostratigraphic continuum that provides a standard for correlation of Lower Ordovician rocks in the subsurface of central US and of the many localized and incomplete outcrops of generally equivalent strata in the Ozark and Upper Mississippi Valley regions. The stratigraphic continuity of the collections makes the I-35 section an ideal standard reference section for graphic correlation of Lower Ordovician rocks containing conodonts of the Mid-Continent Province.

  16. Three-dimensional geologic model of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer, south-central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faith, Jason R.; Blome, Charles D.; Pantea, Michael P.; Puckette, James O.; Halihan, Todd; Osborn, Noel; Christenson, Scott; Pack, Skip

    2010-01-01

    The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer of south-central Oklahoma encompasses more than 850 square kilometers and is the principal water resource for south-central Oklahoma. Rock units comprising the aquifer are characterized by limestone, dolomite, and sandstones assigned to two lower Paleozoic units: the Arbuckle and Simpson Groups. Also considered to be part of the aquifer is the underlying Cambrian-age Timbered Hills Group that contains limestone and sandstone. The highly faulted and fractured nature of the Arbuckle-Simpson units and the variable thickness (600 to 2,750 meters) increases the complexity in determining the subsurface geologic framework of this aquifer. A three-dimensional EarthVision (Trademark) geologic framework model was constructed to quantify the geometric relationships of the rock units of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the Hunton anticline area. This 3-D EarthVision (Trademark) geologic framework model incorporates 54 faults and four modeled units: basement, Arbuckle-Timbered Hills Group, Simpson Group, and post-Simpson. Primary data used to define the model's 54 faults and four modeled surfaces were obtained from geophysical logs, cores, and cuttings from 126 water and petroleum wells. The 3-D framework model both depicts the volumetric extent of the aquifer and provides the stratigraphic layer thickness and elevation data used to construct a MODFLOW version 2000 regional groundwater-flow model.

  17. Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer, south-central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christenson, Scott; Osborn, Noel I.; Neel, Christopher R.; Faith, Jason R.; Blome, Charles D.; Puckette, James; Pantea, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater in the aquifer moves from areas of high head (altitude) to areas of low head along streams and springs. The potentiometric surface in the eastern Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer generally slopes from a topographic high from northwest to the southeast, indicating that regional groundwater flow is predominantly toward the southeast. Freshwater is known to extend beyond the aquifer outcrop near the City of Sulphur, Oklahoma, and Chickasaw National Recreation Area, where groundwater flows west from the outcrop of the eastern Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer and becomes confin

  18. Structural styles: Arkoma and Ardmore basins and Arbuckle Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.G. )

    1990-11-01

    In the Ouachita thrust belt, thin-skinned deformation has telescoped the sedimentary section along major thrust systems. In the frontal Ouachitas, Ti Valley thrust places Ordovician and Devonian rocks over Pennsylvanian rocks. Exploration for hydrocarbons on this and older thrust sheets relies on fractured Bigfork Chert and Arkansas Novaulite for reservoirs. Imbricate thrusting associated with the Choctaw thrust has produced hydrocarbon traps in the allochthonous Spiro Formation, as at Wilburton field. Thin-skinned Ouachita thrusting was superimposed over normal faults associated with early rifting, which probably localized the position of many Pennsylvanian faults. Due to northward-advancing thrust sheets, faults were reactivated by tectonic and sedimentary loading of the previously weakened foreland crust. Some of these faults may also have been reactivated as high-angle reverse faults by Ouachita compression. The discovery of commercial volumes of gas in the Pennsylvanian Spiro and Ordovician Arbuckle Group in these autochthonous subthrust fault blocks has initiated a major drilling program. Basement-involved compressional structures occur in the Ardmore basin-Arbuckle Mountains area southwest of the Ouachita thrust belt. Controversy surrounds interpretation of major faults as wrench type, with various amounts of strike-slip, or as reverse dip-slip, with large amounts of shortening. Hydrocarbons are trapped in a variety of individual structures, and include (1) large doubly-plunging anticlines exposed at the surface, (2) deep-basin structures having no surface expression, (3) large anticlines developed under, or immediately in front of, mountain overhangs, (4) faulted anticlines that subcrop the Pennsylvanian sediments on the hanging walls of buried mountain fronts, and (5) overturned beds in the footwall of major reverse faults.

  19. Preliminary Gravity and Ground Magnetic Data in the Arbuckle Uplift near Sulphur, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheirer, Daniel S.; Aboud, Essam

    2008-01-01

    Improving knowledge of the geology and geophysics of the Arbuckle Uplift in south-central Oklahoma is a goal of the Framework Geology of Mid-Continent Carbonate Aquifers project sponsored by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program (NCGMP). In May 2007, we collected ground magnetic and gravity observations in the Hunton Anticline region of the Arbuckle Uplift, near Sulphur, Oklahoma. These observations complement prior gravity data collected for a project sponsored by the National Park Service and helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) and aeromagnetic data collected in March 2007 for the NCGMP project. This report describes the instrumentation and processing that was utilized in the May 2007 geophysical fieldwork, and it presents preliminary results as gravity anomaly maps and magnetic anomaly profiles. Digital tables of gravity and magnetic observations are provided as a supplement to this report. Future work will generate interpretive models of these anomalies and will involve joint analysis of these ground geophysical measurements with airborne and other geophysical and geological observations, with the goal of understanding the geological structures influencing the hydrologic properties of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer.

  20. Paleomagnetic dating of dedolomitization in Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group limestones and Pennsylvanian Collings Ranch Conglomerate, southern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nick, K.E.; Elmore, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and petrographic techniques have been used to date dedolomitization in stratigraphic and tectonic dolomites exposed in the Arbuckle Mountains, southern Oklahoma. The authors examined red dedolomites and their dolomite precursors from the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group and dolomite clasts in the Pennsylvanian Collings Ranch Conglomerate. Authigenic hematite is associated with the dedolomite and precipitated as a result of the dedolomitization process. Dedolomite is associated with paleokarst and fractures, burrows, Liesegang bands, and red rims on conglomerate clasts. Magnetic directions from these dedolomitized rocks range from Dec = 145/sup 0/ to 154/sup 0/ and Inc = 2/sup 0/ to 9/sup 0/, with ks greater than 50 and /alpha/95s less than 5. The directions are constrained by fold tests to be post-structural (Late Pennsylvanian to Early Permian) and in the Collings Ranch to post-depositional. These directions correspond to a reversed Pennsylvanian pole position and the magnetizations are interpreted as chemical remanent magnetizations (CRM) acquired when hematite precipitated during dedolomitization.

  1. Paleokarstic phenomena of the Lower Ordovician red bed sequences of the Arbuckle group, southern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Musselman, J.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Oil and gas production has been reported recently from paleokarstic Arbuckle reservoirs in the Ardmore and Arkoma basin. The West Spring Creek and the Kindblade formations apparently exhibit karstic features. The most extensive surface exposure of these formations is on the southern flank of the Arbuckle anticline along Interstate 35 north of Ardmore, Oklahoma. The lithology is predominantly limestone, ranging from argillaceous mudstone to oolitic and/or bioclastic grainstones. However, minor amounts of sandstone were also observed.These lithologies are characteristic of various peritidal facies. Of particular interest in this outcrop are three distinct red bed zones. Although the zones are part of the repetitive shallowing-upward cycles that characterize the West Spring Creek Formation, ample evidence suggests the red beds represent subaerial exposure surfaces where karstification took place. Many of the thin bedded, rubbly mudstones and wackestones actually represent varieties of breccia commonly associated with karst. Collapse and crackle breccia are most commonly observed. Small solution channels and other vugs are usually completely occluded by calcite cement. However, solution cavities or vugs with diameters larger than 10 cm (3.9 in.) are lined with drusy calcite. Hematite-impregnated sediment occurs as thinly laminated infilling of solution vugs and cavities and also acts as a cementing agent of collapse breccias. Preliminary evidence suggests that karstification processes were active during Arbuckle deposition.

  2. Evidence for existence of Sabkhalike conditions in Upper Arbuckle Group, Slick Hills, southwestern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ragland, D.A. ); Donovan, R.N. )

    1990-02-01

    In the Slick Hills of southwestern Oklahoma, the Ordovician upper Arbuckle Group carries a cryptic record of evaporite precipitation. This record is particularly well developed in the Cool Creek and, to a lesser extent, the West Spring Creek formations. Principal lines of evidence supporting this conclusion are (1) salt pseudomorphs (after gypsum( )) preserved in chert and, less commonly, in limestone (principal pseudomorphing minetals are calcite and dolomite), (2) molds of salts in cherts, (3) traces of anhydrite and celestite within chert nodules, (4) collapse breccias the authors interpret as resulting from the solution of sulfate deposits, (5) dolomite beds that have appropriate isotope values, and (6) length-slow and other varieties of chert indicative of waters of high ionic strength, some of which are the distinctive cauliflower variety. In addition, a number of features suggest that waters of unusual composition (ie., modified seawater) were present on the Arbuckle platform from time to time. These features include rare bedded (primary( )) cherts, subaqueous shrinkage cracks, and ooids of unusual and variable textures. Their conclusion is that during upper Arbuckle Group deposition, particularly Cool Creek deposition, the vast Arbuckle platform was periodically exposed and a sabkhalike environment developed in which dolomitization and gypsum/anhydrite precipitation took place. Subsequent reestablishment of fully marine conditions resulted in the early removal of the sulfates, leaving only a cryptic evaporite signature. Our interpretation can be supported in a general sense by the fact that (1) the fauna of the Cool Creek Formation is impoverished by comparison with adjacent formations, (2) the area was in a suitable climatic zone, and (3) the widespread occurrence of detrital quartz in the Cool Creek is compatible with exposure of the platform and consequent movement of clastics into the area.

  3. Magnetic, Electromagnetic, and Bathymetric Survey of the Lake of the Arbuckles, South-Central Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheirer, D. S.; Smith, D. V.; Coffee, R.; Cason, J.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, we conducted a week-long geophysical and sonar survey of the Lake of the Arbuckles, within Chickasaw National Recreation Area in south-central Oklahoma. In this region, Pennsylvanian-aged orogenic deformation and sedimentation created the conditions that now govern the groundwater recharge, storage, and flow in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer, one of the most important bedrock aquifers in Oklahoma. The Lake of the Arbuckles reservoir, filled about 40 years ago, occupies an area where two major faults disrupt the geologic units that constitute the aquifer. The Reagan fault and the Mill Creek fault are hypothesized to intersect beneath the lake, based on available geologic exposures and inferences from gravity, magnetic, and helicopter electromagnetic (EM) observations in areas surrounding the lake. To understand the obscured geometry of these faults, we developed a pontoon-raft to carry a broad-band (15 kHz - 135 kHz) EM bird and a cesium-vapor magnetic sensor across the lake. We towed the raft 15 m behind a small boat to minimize EM and magnetic interference from the vessel, and we collected data on 200-m-spaced transects across much of the lake. The Reagan fault has a large electrical conductivity contrast and magnetic signature due to its juxtaposition at shallow depth of magnetic Proterozoic basement rocks with Paleozoic carbonate and clastic rocks. Initial results will show how the lake survey magnetic transects help to define the location of this fault beneath the lake. In addition, we collected dual-frequency sonar data to map the present-day bathymetry of the lake, and we collected vertical, water-column profiles of sound velocity, conductivity, temperature, pH, redox potential, and dissolved oxygen. The water-column profiles allow correction of the sonar travel-times to depth and estimation of the EM response of the lake water, which will be essential in later inversion modeling of the EM data. In addition, comparisons of the present-day bathymetry with pre-reservoir topographic contours and with sedimentation range line transects surveyed prior to the filling of the reservoir will yield estimates of sedimentation rates and patterns of the lake.

  4. Airborne and Ground Electrical Surveys for Subsurface Mapping of the Arbuckle Aquifer, Central Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.; Smith, B. D.; Blome, C. D.; Osborn, N.

    2008-12-01

    Airborne and ground electrical surveys have been conducted to map the subsurface hydrogeologic character of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south central Oklahoma. An understanding of the geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics is necessary to evaluate groundwater flow through the highly faulted, structurally complex, carbonate aquifer. Results from this research will further understanding of the aquifer and will assist in managing the water resources of the region. The major issues include water quality, the allocation of water rights, and the potential impacts of pumping on springs and stream. Four areas in the Hunton anticline area, with distinctly different geology, were flown with a frequency domain helicopter electromagnetic system (HEM) in March, 2007. Ground electrical studies include dc resistivity imaging and natural field audiomagnetotelluric (AMT), and magnetotelluric (MT) surveys. The HEM resistivity and total field magnetic survey was flown in four blocks, A through D, mostly with a line spacing of 400 m. Block A extends from the Chickasaw National Recreational Area (CHIC) to Mill Creek on the west side of the anticline. The surface geology of this block is mostly dolomitic limestone of the Arbuckle Group that is in fault contact with younger Paleozoic clastic rocks. The flight line spacing was 800 meters in the western half of the block and 400 meters in the eastern part. Airborne magnetic data indicate that the Sulphur fault bends south to merge with the Mill Creek fault which substantiates an earlier hypothesis first made from interpretation of gravity data. Block B, located on the north side of the anticline consists of mostly of Arbuckle and Simpson Group rocks. Block C, covering most of the Clarita horst on the east side of the anticline, consists of the Upper Ordovician to the Lower Pennsylvanian shales. Block D, which was flown to include a deep test well site at Spears ranch, consisted of eight lines spaced at 400 meters. The HEM data are being used to more precisely locate faults, refine the lithostratigraphic units, and to map the depth and extent of shallow epikarst. The MT and AMT data revealed deep structural contacts and a transition between fresh and highly mineralized ground water between springs in the CHIC. The dc resistivity survey has greatly helped in mapping major faults both within dolomitic limestone and clastic units. Ground resistivity surveys also suggest that, in places, the faults within limestone are zones of lower resistivity and map low resistivity surficial epikarst a several meters thick. Ground penetrometer data also has been used to define the depth extent of epikarst in selected areas and the data correlate well with the dc resistivity and HEM resistivity depth sections.

  5. Effects of municipal ground-water withdrawals on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoca, M.E.; Bergman, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma consists of a thick sequence of folded and faulted carbonate and clastic rocks of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age. Fractures and karst features locally increase the aquifer's capacity to transmit and store ground water. The aquifer is a principal source of water for municipal and rural users. A hydrologic study was conducted to evaluate the effects of municipal ground-water withdrawal from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer on local ground-water levels and discharge from nearby springs and streams in south-central Pontotoc County. A municipal well was pumped for 63 hours at an average rate of 1,170 gallons per minute. A maximum observed drawdown of 0.3 feet was recorded half a mile from the pumping well. Drawdown was observed as far as 1.2 miles from the pumping well. No measurable response was observed at any of the surface-water-discharge measurement sites; however, recharge from precipitation may have masked any decreases in discharge caused by the pumping. Simultaneous pumping of two municipal wells for 241 hours at average rates of 1,170 and 2,730 gallons per minute resulted in a maximum observed drawdown of 1.3 feet recorded at an average distance of 0.80 miles from the pumping wells. The most distant drawdown observed was at an average distance 1.1 miles from the pumped wells. Less that 2 days after pumping stopped, increases in springflow were recorded at two springs; it is unknown whether these discharge responses reflect the effects of recharge from precipitation, or the combined effects of precipitation and the cessation of ground-water withdrawal. The effects of the stress tests on the hydrologic system were offset by recharge from concurrent precipitation. The maximum observed drawdown represents about 6 percent of the median natural water-level fluctuation during the study period. The effect of drawdown could become critical during extended periods of low precipitation, if water levels are already near the bottom of domestic wells in the area. However, a comparison of maximum observed drawdown (1.3 ft) with the minimum saturated thickness of fresh ground water (1,500 ft) suggests that municipal pumping had little effect on the amount of ground water stored in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the study area. This evaluation is based on the limited pumping rates and times of the stress tests.

  6. The geological significance of the boundary between the Fort Sill and Signal Mountain Formations in the lower Arbuckle Group (Cambrian)

    SciTech Connect

    Hosey, R.; Donovan, R.N. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-02-01

    During the upper Cambrian, a transgression inundated the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen enveloping a landscape that consisted of hills of Cambrian-aged rhyolite up to 350 m in height. Initial deposits on this topography--the Reagan Formation--consist of siliciclastics that were deposited as alluvium and succeeding tidally-influenced marine sandstones and shales. The siliciclastics grains are made up of local rhyolite, quartz and authigenic glauconite. The overlying Honeycreek Formation is defined by the addition of carbonated detritus in the form of tidally-influenced pelmatozoan grainstones. The passage from the Honeycreek to the overlying Fort Sill Formation of the Arbuckle Group is marked by the incoming of beds of lime mudstone and the gradual disappearance of grainstones and siliciclastics. The contact between the Fort Sill and the overlying thinly-bedded dark grey bioclastic limestones of the Signal Mountain Formation is one of the most distinctive horizons in the Arbuckle Group. The contact evidently marks a substantial change in depositional environment. In detail the contact is sharp and shows evidence of minor erosion, although no karsting has been detected. The authors suggest that the contact surface records a regression, perhaps associated with dolomitization and followed by some erosion. A regression is also indicated by the local occurrence of a laminated tidal flat unit with traces of evaporites that outcrops in the far west of the Slick Hills immediately below the formation contact. They suggest that the Signal Mountains as a transgressive unit, incorporating siliciclastics transported into the area during the regression. It has been suggested that the unconformity reflects localized tectonism associated with the evolution of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. On the other hand the surface may correlate with a craton--wide Sauxian' hiatus.

  7. Geochemical Investigation of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, South-Central Oklahoma, 2004-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christenson, Scott; Hunt, Andrew G.; Parkhurst, David L.

    2009-01-01

    A geochemical reconnaissance investigation of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma was initiated in 2004 to characterize the ground-water quality at an aquifer scale, to describe the chemical evolution of ground water as it flows from recharge areas to discharge in wells and springs, and to determine the residence time of ground water in the aquifer. Thirty-six water samples were collected from 32 wells and springs distributed across the aquifer for chemical analysis of major ions, trace elements, isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, dissolved gases, and age-dating tracers. In general, the waters from wells and springs in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer are chemically suitable for all regulated uses, such as public supplies. Dissolved solids concentrations are low, with a median of 347 milligrams per liter (mg/L). Two domestic wells produced water with nitrate concentrations that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's nitrate maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 mg/L. Samples from two wells in the confined part of the aquifer exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) for chloride of 250 mg/L and the SMCL of 500 mg/L for dissolved solids. Water samples from these two wells are not representative of water samples from the other wells and springs completed in the unconfined part of the aquifer. No other water samples from the Arbuckle-Simpson geochemical reconnaissance exceeded MCLs or SMCLs, although not every chemical constituent for which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established a MCL or SMCL was analyzed as part of the Arbuckle-Simpson geochemical investigation. The major ion chemistry of 34 of the 36 samples indicates the water is a calcium bicarbonate or calcium magnesium bicarbonate water type. Calcium bicarbonate water type is found in the western part of the aquifer, which is predominantly limestone. Calcium magnesium bicarbonate water is found in the eastern part of the aquifer, which is predominantly a dolomite. The major ion chemistry for these 34 samples is consistent with a set of water-rock interactions. Rainfall infiltrates the soil zone, where the host rock, limestone or dolomite, dissolves as a result of uptake of carbon dioxide gas. Some continued dissolution of dolomite and precipitation of calcite occur as the water flows through the saturated zone. The major ion chemistry of the two samples from wells completed in the confined part of the aquifer indicates the water is a sodium chloride type. Geochemical inverse modeling determined that mixing of calcite-saturated recharge water with brine and dissolving calcite, dolomite, and gypsum accounts for the water composition of these two samples. One of the two samples, collected at Vendome Well in Chickasaw National Recreation Area, had a mixing fraction of brine of about 1 percent. The brine component of the sample at Vendome Well is likely to account for the relatively large concentrations of many of the trace elements (potassium, fluoride, bromide, iodide, ammonia, arsenic, boron, lithium, selenium, and strontium) measured in the water sample. Carbon-14, helium-3/tritium, and chlorofluorocarbons were used to calculate ground-water ages, recharge temperatures, and mixtures of ground water in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. Thirty four of 36 water samples recharged the aquifer after 1950, indicating that water is moving quickly from recharge areas to discharge at streams and springs. Two exceptions to this classification were noted in samples 6 and 15 (Vendome Well). Ground-water ages determined for these two samples by using carbon-14 are 34,000 years (site 6) and 10,500 years (site 15). Concentrations of dissolved argon, neon, and xenon in water samples were used to determine the temperature of the water when it recharged the aquifer. The mean annual air temperature at Ada, Oklahoma, is 16 degrees Celsius (C) and the median temperature of the 30 reconnaissance water samples was 18.1 C. The av

  8. Discrete and Continuous Gravity Studies of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, South-Central Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheirer, D.; Hosford Scheirer, A.; Herr, R.

    2005-12-01

    We present the results of a high-resolution gravity study using traditional and novel observational methods focused on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer (ASA), a major ground-water system in Oklahoma that is experiencing demand from distant regions. We have partnered with the National Park Service to conduct gravity surveys of prominent faults near the Chickasaw National Recreation Area. These structures, created during late Paleozoic orogenies, may serve as conduits for ground-water flow to the springs and wells that are important natural resources of this park. Gravity data were collected in two modes: traditional observations at discrete stations and a new approach utilizing continuous data from a marine gravity meter deployed on a moving land vehicle. With the discrete data, we clearly define the extensions of the major Sulphur, South Sulphur, and Mill Creek fault zones beneath younger, unfaulted rocks that form the surface geology of the park. Gravity anomalies range from 1 mGal to 15 mGal and arise from the juxtaposition of Paleozoic carbonate and clastic rocks across the faults. With the continuous gravity data, we increase the number of gravity observations by two or more orders of magnitude, although the precision of the continuous gravity varies with the quality of the navigation (Eotvos correction) and the measurement of vertical motion of the vehicle. To explore the limits of this continuous gravity technique, we performed numerous tests operating the vehicle at different speeds and using multiple GPS sensors that range in capability from recreational to survey quality. These tests demonstrate the tradeoff between the along-track data resolution and the precision of the gravity anomaly.

  9. Three-Dimensional EarthVision Modeling for Ground-Water Resource Applications: Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, Southern Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faith, J. R.; Blome, C. D.

    2008-12-01

    The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in southern Oklahoma encompasses more than 500 square miles and is the primary source of water in the area. The subsurface hydrogeologic framework of this structurally complex carbonate aquifer was unresolved until now because of the complex geology of the aquifer's confining rock units with stratigraphic unit thicknesses from 60 to 1200 m and fault displacements over 2000 m. Three- dimensional analyses of geologic surface and subsurface data have led to the construction of a 3-D EarthVision (EV) geologic framework model that characterizes the lateral continuity of water-bearing rock units across fault zones. The geologic modeling was planned in collaboration with ongoing USGS MODFLOW modeling efforts supported by the Oklahoma State-funded Arbuckle-Simpson Hydrology Study. Although traditional ground-water reservoir characterization techniques were used in the construction of the 3-D EV model, which included the integration of outcrop geology and stratigraphic elevations from more than 300 water and petroleum wells, new geophysical data were also integrated into the model. Despite limited funding for acquisition of basin-wide subsurface data, such as 3-D seismic or deep-hole control wells and cores, new methods of compiling and assimilating multiple data sources into a workable database are demonstrated in this study. The Arbuckle-Simpson 3-D EV model depicts more than 50 principal and intermediate faults and stratigraphic tops (td's) for the following units: Precambrian basement, Arbuckle Group, Simpson Group (Bromide Formation), and overlying units (undivided). To support the subsurface data, existing seismic and gravity data and recently acquired electromagnetic survey data were incorporated into the stratigraphic elevation datasets. Electromagnetic data acquired from a helicopter geophysical survey was used to identify shallow faults that have no recognizable surface expression. Electrical resistivity imaging was conducted across some major fault zones to help accurately locate the fault traces and determine the degree of dip in the subsurface. Gravity surveys were conducted to identify subsurface faults and the depth to Precambrian basement, both of which helped to constrain the volumetric extent of the water-bearing rock units. The resulting framework model represents the first depiction of the volumetric and lateral extent of the aquifer. The faulted geologic layers have also been discretized using a domain with 200x200 meter-node spacing and successfully integrated into the Arbuckle-Simpson Hydrology Study's multi-layer MODFLOW ground-water model.

  10. Karst-related diagenesis and reservoir development in the Arbuckle Group, Wilburton field, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bliefnick, D.M. ); Belfield, W.C. )

    1992-04-01

    Wilburton field is a multizone reservoir on the southwestern edge of the Arkoma basin. The most recent zone to be declared commercial is the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group. Faults, structural position, depositional environment, and diagenetic alterations play a role in controlling reservoir quality, communication of fluids and pressures within the reservoir, and stratigraphic correlations. The Arbuckle Group in Wilburton field consists of dolomite, calcareous dolomite and minor clastic-rich intervals, chert, and dolomitic limestones. Early diagenesis consisted of pervasive dolomitization that created a dolomudstone with low (12%) intercrystalline porosity. The regionally extensive Middle Ordovician unconformity, which occurs at the top of the Arbuckle Group, exposed that carbonate surface to meteoric conditions that resulted in formation of karst. The porosity development or enhancement associated with karsting modified depositional textures and their related pore geometries. Stratigraphically, the Arbuckle section can be divided into two zones. An upper zone, 200-250 ft thick, is characterized by a lack of fracturing and brecciation, and by fluid flow mainly through the matrix or intercrystalline pore system. Porosity development in these intervals extends across the field. The lower zone is characterized by multiple intervals of fracturing, brecciation (all three types), and solution collapse. The Arbuckle is most likely productive where solution has enhanced intercrystalline, fracture, and breccia porosity, and burial cements have failed to completely fill pore space. The authors anticipate that porosity development in Arbuckle carbonates in other areas is similarly controlled and should be productive.

  11. Paleomagnetism of the Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Group and associated deposits in the southern Oklahoma Aulacogen: Evidence for block rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, R. Douglas; Nick, Kevin E.; Cochran, Karen A.; Crawford, Lisa D.

    1988-04-01

    The magnetization in hydrocarbon-impregnated Arbuckle Group limestones from the southern margin of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen (Limestone Hills) is secondary and resides in magnetite. The magnetization (Declination/Inclination=128°/2°, ?95=7.6°, k=79) fails a fold test and is post Pennsylvanian. The corresponding pole position (146°E, 30°N), however, does not coincide with the post-Pennsylvanian Apparent Polar Wander Path (APWP). Some Permian speleothems that fill caves in these rocks contain magnetizations that are also anomalous. Shallow remanent inclinations from the folded limestones and speleothems suggest that the most likely time of remanence acquisition was the Permian. The directions are at least 30° in declination from the expected directions based on the inferred ages of the magnetizations. This discrepancy can be explained by a horizontal counterclockwise rotation, consistent with left-lateral wrench faulting, during deformation of the aulacogen.

  12. Geophysical Investigation of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, Oklahoma, to Determine the Influence of Subsurface Structure on Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewallen, E.; Ramachandran, K.; Tapp, B.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate an area of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in southern Oklahoma by employing near-surface geophysical surveying. This predominantly carbonate aquifer encompasses the Simpson, Arbuckle, and Timbered Hills Groups, which range in age from Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician. The aquifer serves as a principle water source for the surrounding area and feeds several major springs and creeks, including Pennington Creek, around which a number of rare species dwell. Due to the high amount of fracturing and faulting present in the aquifer system, the possible effects of large-scale groundwater withdrawal are poorly understood and have spurred increased interest in a comprehensive investigation of the aquifer. We seek to understand the subsurface structure of a small area of the aquifer, focused around Pilot Springs, by identifying and interpreting faults and their interaction with the groundwater hydrology. To this end, we have carried out electrical resistivity soundings using Wenner and Schlumberger array spreads. Analysis of these data is being performed to identify faults and estimate depths to the water table. Modeling of horizontal layers is carried out by means of the IPI2win Resistivity Sounding Interpretation algorithm from Moscow State University. This modeling approach allows us to obtain for each sounding point an optimized subsurface model that specifies the number of layers present and the apparent resistivity and depths to each layer. We are able to refine this model based on our prior understanding of the geology of the region. At least one sounding appears to reveal the presence of one of the major north bounding faults in the area. Further surveying is planned, including additional resistivity soundings as well as resistivity profiling and ground-penetrating radar.

  13. Evidence of paleokarstic phenomena and burial diagenesis in Ordovician Arbuckle group of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.; Al-Shaieb, Z. )

    1989-08-01

    Cores from various localities in south-central and north-central Oklahoma display surprisingly similar suites of karstic and diagenetic phenomena. Vadose dissolution tubes, solution-enlarged fractures, collapse breccias, and vugular porosity, where present are considered evidence of karstification. Primary speleothemic precipitates were not readily observed; either they were not present or were obscured by later hydrothermal dolomitization. A complex history of exposure and subsidence is recorded in these rocks. Immature karst profiles may have subsided at rapid rates under conditions that prevented low-temperature phreatic cementation, thus preserving the open pore network of the karst profile. Deep burial diagenesis is evidenced by the appearance of highly ferroan baroque dolomite cement partially or entirely occluding vugular and fracture porosity. In addition, host-rock carbonates were extensively replaced by typical thermal xenomorphic dolomite. Cathodoluminescent microscopy indicates that the hydrothermal dolomite is uniform in composition and was precipitated under highly reducing conditions. Dolomite cementation was arrested when oil migrated into the remaining pore space. A complex multistage fracture network is present in cores from the Healdton oil field. Early fracture systems are healed by highly ferroan, dull luminescent baroque dolomite, and later fractures are cemented with nonferroan, brightly luminescent cement.

  14. STUDY OF THE ARBUCKLE-SIMPSON AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study directed by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and funded by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation will investigate the hydrogeology of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in south-central Oklahoma. The five year study will involve field investigations including the installation of ne...

  15. Geochemistry of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christenson, Scott; Hunt, Andrew G.; Parkhurst, David L.; Osborn, Noel I.

    2009-01-01

    The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma provides water for public supply, farms, mining, wildlife conservation, recreation, and the scenic beauty of springs, streams, and waterfalls. A new understanding of the aquifer flow system was developed as part of the Arbuckle-Simpson Hydrology Study, done in 2003 through 2008 as a collaborative research project between the State of Oklahoma and the Federal government. The U.S. Geological Survey collected 36 water samples from 32 wells and springs in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in 2004 through 2006 for geochemical analyses of major ions, trace elements, isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, dissolved gases, and dating tracers. The geochemical analyses were used to characterize the water quality in the aquifer, to describe the origin and movement of ground water from recharge areas to discharge at wells and springs, and to determine the age of water in the aquifer.

  16. CHALLENGES OF THE ARBUCKLE-SIMPSON STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer underlies more than 500 square miles in south central Oklahoma. The aquifer is the source of many springs, including Byrds Mill Spring, Ada's primary drinking water source, and those in the Chickasaw National Recreation Area. The aquifer supplies wa...

  17. Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In this unusually clear view, the Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma are framed on the north by Lake Eufaula on the South Canadian River, and on the south by the Red River. Clouds formed by upslope winds border both the north and south sides of the synclines (in a syncline the rock layers dip toward the center of the structure). Toward the west, densely forested mountains give way to gently rolling, less rocky terrain and a drier climate. The mountains centered on Broken Bow, in the lower right corner of the scene, display abundant timber clearcuts that are being regenerated.

  18. Balanced cross section through Wilburton gas field, Latimer County, Oklahoma: Implications for Ouachita deformation and Arbuckle (Cambro-Ordovician) exploration in Arkoma basin

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, W.K.; Ratliff, R.A. )

    1989-08-01

    A computer-balanced regional cross section allows several new interpretations for the structural development of the Wilburton gas field. The gas-productive deep Arbuckle structure is interpreted to be in the hanging wall of a high-angle, south-dipping reverse fault. This fault may be a reactivated normal fault based on Pennsylvanian lower Atokan thickness changes and by analogy to comparable extensional faults to the north. Overlying the Arbuckle fault block is an imbricated thrust sheet containing Pennsylvanian Spiro and Cromwell sandstone reservoirs where gas production has been established from both the hanging wall and footwall fault blocks. The main thrust originates from a detachment zone within Mississippian shales to the south and ramps over the deeper Arbuckle fault block along the southern margin of the field. Minimum horizontal displacement of the hanging wall Spiro cutoff is 2.3 mi (3.7 km). This estimate is significantly smaller than that shown by previously published sections through the area, yet is still too large to be adequately accommodated by blind thrusting north of Wilburton field. Well and surface data indicate that much of the displacement instead may have been accommodated by north-dipping backthrusts. Although poorly constrained, at least some fault movement on the Arbuckle reverse fault appears to postdate the overlying thrust-faulted structures.

  19. Wheelerodemus muhlenbergiae, a new genus and new species of Blissidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Lygaeoidea) from Oklahoma and Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract.— The new blissid genus Wheelerodemus is described to accommodate the new species W. muhlenbergiae, based on specimens collected on the grasses Muhlenbergia lindheimeri and M. reverchonii from the Arbuckle Mountains in southcentral Oklahoma and the Edward’s Plateau in westcentral Texas. Bec...

  20. Syndeformational magnetization in the Ordovician Bigfork Chert at Black Knob Ridge, western Ouachita Mountains, southern Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegeist, Tony K.; Fruit, David J.; Elmore, R. D.

    1992-04-01

    Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic results from unweathered samples of the Ordovician Bigfork Chert at Black Knob Ridge in southern Oklahoma indicate the presence of a pervasive magnetization residing in magnetite that has a southeast and steep down direction. The results from small- and medium-scale folds indicate the magnetization was acquired during or after Carboniferous folding. The declination in sites along Black Knob Ridge shows a north to south 28° counter-clockwise shift. The Bigfork Chert at Black Knob Ridge was folded and thrusted along the Ti Valley fault system in the late Paleozoic. The laterally equivalent Viola Limestone in front of the thrust and in the Arbuckle Mountains contains a late Paleozoic magnetization with a shallow inclination that can be used as a reference for comparison with the Bigfork Chert at Black Knob Ridge. Based on the comparison, the steep inclinations in the rocks at Black Knob Ridge are interpreted to be primarily the result of rotation around a horizontal axis as a result of thrusting. The declination change along the ridge is also interpreted to be the result of rotational movements during thrusting. The pervasive magnetization at Black Knob Ridge is interpreted to have been acquired during deformation. The low thermal history of the Bigfork Chert suggests that the pervasive component is a chemical remanent magnetization (CRM), although a strain-related mechanism cannot be definitely ruled out. The CRM may be related to fluid migration through fractures produced during folding and thrusting. Alternatively, anin-situ chemical process not triggered by externally-derived fluids may have caused the remagnetization.

  1. BLACK FORK MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, ARAKANSAS AND OKLAHOMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mary H.

    1984-01-01

    Black Fork Mountain Roadless Area covers about 21 sq mi in the Ouachita National Forest in Polk County, Arkansas and LeFlore County, Oklahoma. On the basis of a mineral survey the area has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Stone and sand and gravel suitable for construction purposes occur in the Jackfork Sandstone and the Stanley Shale which also occur outside the roadless area. Although the potential for gas and oil is unknown and no resource potential was identified, some investigators believe that there is a possibility for the occurrence of gas and oil in the roadless area.

  2. Watershed morphology of highland and mountain ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Splinter, D.K.; Dauwalter, D.C.; Marston, R.A.; Fisher, W.L.

    2011-01-01

    The fluvial system represents a nested hierarchy that reflects the relationship among different spatial and temporal scales. Within the hierarchy, larger scale variables influence the characteristics of the next lower nested scale. Ecoregions represent one of the largest scales in the fluvial hierarchy and are defined by recurring patterns of geology, climate, land use, soils, and potential natural vegetation. Watersheds, the next largest scale, are often nested into a single ecoregion and therefore have properties that are indicative of a given ecoregion. Differences in watershed morphology (relief, drainage density, circularity ratio, relief ratio, and ruggedness number) were evaluated among three ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma: Ozark Highlands, Boston Mountains, and Ouachita Mountains. These ecoregions were selected because of their high-quality stream resources and diverse aquatic communities and are of special management interest to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. One hundred thirty-four watersheds in first-through fourth-order streams were compared. Using a nonparametric, two-factor analysis of variance (?? = 0.05) we concluded that the relief, drainage density, relief ratio, and ruggedness number all changed among ecoregion and stream order, whereas circularity ratio only changed with stream order. Our study shows that ecoregions can be used as a broad-scale framework for watershed management. ?? 2011 by Association of American Geographers.

  3. Submarine-fan sedimentation, Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Moiola, R.J.; Shanmugam, G.

    1984-09-01

    More than 10,000 m (32,808 ft) of interbedded sandstones and shales comprise the Upper Mississippian and Lower Pennsylvanian flysch succession (Stanley, Jackfork, Johns Valley, Atoka) in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma. Deposited primarily by turbidity current and hemipelagic processes in bathyal and abyssal water depths, these strata formed major submarine-fan complexes that prograded in a westward direction along the axis of an elongate remnant ocean basin that was associated with the collision and suturing of the North American and African-South American plates. A longitudinal fan system is visualized as the depositional framework for these strata, which were deposited in a setting analogous to the modern Bengal fan of the Indian Ocean. Facies analysis of the Jackfork formation indicates that inner fan deposits are present in the vicinity of Little Rock, Arkansas; middle fan channel and interchannel deposits occur at DeGray Dam and Friendship, Arkansas; and outer fan depositional-lobe deposits are present in southeastern Oklahoma. Boulder-bearing units (olistostromes), many with exotic clasts, were shed laterally into the Ouachita basin. They occur throughout the flysch succession and in all fan environments (i.e., inner, middle, and outer). This relationship may serve as a useful criterion for recognizing analogous longitudinal fan systems in the rock record.

  4. Geochemistry of Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle limestone, Oklahoma: Implications for diagenetic. delta. sup 18 O alteration and secular. delta. sup 13 C and sup 87 Sr/ sup 86 Sr variation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Guoqiu; Land, L.S. )

    1991-10-01

    Isotopic analyses of 227 limestone samples from the Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Group, Oklahoma, document slow secular changes in the chemistry of the limestones. From late Cambrian to early Ordovician, the {delta}{sup 18}O values of the limestones increase from {minus}10{per thousand} to {minus}7{per thousand} (PDB); {delta}{sup 13}C values decrease from 0{per thousand} to {minus}2{per thousand} (PDB); and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios decrease from 0.7091 to 0.7088. The light {delta}{sup 18}O values suggest that all Arbuckle limestones underwent diagenetic alteration, probably caused by meteoric water recharged during the development of the overlying, pre-middle Ordovician unconformity. The gradual {delta}{sup 18}O increase from late Cambrian to early Ordovician reflects reduced {sup 18}O depletion with decreasing burial temperature during alteration, although the presence of additional primary secular {delta}{sup 18}O variation cannot be ruled out. The {delta}{sup 13}C and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr variations, in accord with {delta}{sup 13}C and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr variations in the literature, represent primary secular variations. The variations indicate that the {delta}{sup 13}C value and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of early Paleozoic surface seawater decreased from late Cambrian to early Ordovician. The {delta}{sup 13}C variation during this time period seems to correlate with sea-level variation. Specifically, during sea-level fall, an increase in the rate of oxidation of organic matter caused {sup 13}C depletion of inorganic bicarbonate in seawater. As a result, early Ordovician carbonates, probably deposited during the regression stage of the latest Precambrian to latest early Ordovician cycle, became {sup 13}C depleted, relative to late Cambrian carbonates. The decrease of seawater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from late Cambrian to early Ordovician may have resulted from decreased riverine Sr input caused by decreased rate of continental weathering.

  5. Source of shallow Simpson Group Oil in Murray County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zemmels, I.; Tappmeyer, D.M.; Walters, C.C. )

    1987-02-01

    Oils produced from the Simpson Group (Middle Ordovician) in three shallow fields located north of the Arbuckle Mountains in Murray County, Oklahoma, have widely differing compositions: SW Sandy Creek, 28.9{degree} API, 0.57% sulfur; Davis NE, 25.9{degree} API, 0.72% sulfur; Sulfur NW, 16.4{degree} API, 1.44% sulfur. From gas chromatography and biomarker analysis, they determined that the oils were derived from the same source and that the differences in composition are due to biodegradation of the oils in the shallow reservoirs. A comparison of the biomarker assemblage of the Simpson Group oils to several other oils produced in the Arbuckle Mountain area showed that the Simpson Group assemblage highly resembled the assemblage of a Woodford Formation oil (Devonian) but had no similarity to a Viola Formation oil (upper Middle Ordovician). The Simpson Group oils also differed markedly from an oil produced from the Arbuckle Group (Lower Ordovician) in the nearby, shallow Southeast Hoover field. Their data suggest that the source of the shallow Simpson Group oils is the Woodford Formation located in the downthrown Mill Creek syncline south and west of these fields. A large vertical migration along faults or within the fault block is implied by this geometry. However, the Arbuckle Group oil from the Southeast Hoover field, south of the syncline, has a different source.

  6. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranganu, Constantin

    Twenty new heat flow values are incorporated, along with 40 previously published data, into a heat flow map of Oklahoma. The new heat flow data were estimated using previous temperature measurements in boreholes made by American Petroleum Institute researchers and 1,498 thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings. The mean of 20 average thermal gradients is 30.50sp°C/km. In general, thermal gradients increase from SW (14.11sp°C/km) to NE (42.24sp°C/km). The range of 1,498 in situ thermal conductivity measurements (after corrections for anisotropy, in situ temperature, and porosity) is 0.90-6.1 W/m-K; the average is 1.68 W/m-K. Estimated near-surface heat flow (±20%) at 20 new sites in Oklahoma varies between 22 ± 4 mW/msp2 and 86 ± 17 mW/msp2; the average is 50 mW/msp2. Twenty-seven new heat-generation estimates, along with 22 previously published data, are used to create a heat generation map of Oklahoma. The range of heat production estimates is 1.1-3.5 muW/msp3, with an average of 2.5 muW/msp3. The heat flow regime in Oklahoma is primarily conductive in nature, except for a zone in northeast. Transient effects due to sedimentary processes and metamorphic/igneous activity, as well as past climatic changes, do not significantly influence the thermal state of the Oklahoma crust. Heat flow near the margins of the Arkoma and Anadarko Basins may be depressed or elevated by 5-13 mW/msp2 by refraction of heat from sedimentary rocks of relatively low thermal conductivity (1-2 W/m-K) into crystalline basement rocks of relatively high thermal conductivity (˜3-4 W/m-K). The heat generation-heat flow relationship shows a modest correlation. The relatively high heat flow (˜70-80 mW/msp2) in part of northeastern Oklahoma suggests that the thermal regime there may be perturbed by regional groundwater flow originating in the fractured outcrops of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the Arbuckle Mountains.

  7. Simpson reservoirs in Arkoma basin and Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma and Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Suhm, R.W.

    1983-08-01

    The Simpson Group and its equivalents are shown to have reservoir potential in the Arkoma basin and Ouachita overthrust region of Oklahoma and Arkansas. The Simpson in Oklahoma, the Everton/St. Peter in Arkansas, and the Crystal Mountain/Mazarn/Blakely of the Ouachitas were studied in outcrop, and from well cuttings and logs to derive an understanding of 1) their stratigraphic relationships, 2) the nature and distribution of Simpson reservoir sands, 3) depositional and source environments, and 4) geologic history. Regional cross sections, sand distribution maps, and paleogeographic maps are used to illustrate these ideas and to point out areas favorable for oil and gas exploration.

  8. Testing a Mahalanobis distance model of black bear habitat use in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hellgren, E.C.; Bales, S.L.; Gregory, M.S.; Leslie, David M., Jr.; Clark, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Regional wildlife-habitat models are commonly developed but rarely tested with truly independent data. We tested a published habitat model for black bears {Ursus americanus) with new data collected in a different site in the same ecological region (i.e., Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma, USA). We used a Mahalanobis distance model developed from relocations of black bears in Arkansas to produce a map layer of Mahalanobis distances on a study area in neighboring Oklahoma. We tested this modeled map layer with relocations of black bears on the Oklahoma area. The distributions of relocations of female black bears were consistent with model predictions. We conclude that this modeling approach can be used to predict regional suitability for a species of interest.

  9. 33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla. 208.29 Section 208.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.29 Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla. The...

  10. 33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla. 208.29 Section 208.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.29 Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla. The...

  11. A geographic analysis of the status of mountain lions in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, J.R.; Shaw, J.H.; Leslie, David M., Jr.; Shaw, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    The geographic distribution of sightings and sign of mountain lions (Puma concolor) in Oklahoma was investigated. Mail survey questionnaires were sent to natural resource professionals throughout Oklahoma to gather temporal and spatial information on sightings of mountain lions from 1985 to 1995. We used a geographic information system (GIS) to compare locations of sightings and sign in the state with ecoregions, deer harvest, human population densities, locations of licensed owners and breeders of mountain lions, and generalized topography. Sightings and sign of mountain lions occurred significantly more often in the Central Rolling Red Plains than elsewhere in the state. Sightings of mountain lions increased with total deer harvest statewide (R2=0.828, P<0.001). Numbers of sightings of mountain lions were correlated negatively with density of the human population (R2=0.885, P=0.017). Surveys are a valuable method to assess the status of rare wildlife species when other methods are not available and when those receiving the survey are qualified.

  12. Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A report on the research activities at the USDA-ARS, Plant Science Research Laboratory in Stillwater, Oklahoma, were compiled for WERA-066 Meeting that was held in Ft. Collins, Colorado, February 13, 2008. Research presentations included barley breeding research, sorghum breeding research, wheat br...

  13. Structural style and timing of Late Paleozoic basement uplifts in southern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.G. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Proposed theories of deformation in southern Oklahoma presently involve large-scale basement thrusting or large magnitudes of strike slip. As more and better seismic data and well control have become available, a predominant interpretation of the structural style is emerging. This style is characterized by a large basement overhang along the mountain fronts, created by major reverse dip-slip (thrust) faults. Additionally, these reverse faults may have an antithetic back-thrust on the hanging wall. In cross section, this style appears as a wedge-uplift that is often mistakenly interpreted to represent the upper portion of a flower structure created by wrench-faulting. Structural uplifts in southern Oklahoma developed as a result of Late Paleozoic Wichita, Ouachita and Arbuckle orogenies. Emplacement of the thin-skinned Ouachita thrust belt occurred during the Ouachita orogeny (Mississippian through Middle Pennsylvanian). Basement-involved compressional uplifts of the Wichita Mountains and Criner Hills were initially uplifted during the Wichita orogeny (Late Mississippian to Early Pennsylvanian), while the Arbuckle anticline and Tishomingo uplift reached their culmination during the Arbuckle orogeny (Middle to Late Pennsylvanian). Evidence for the timing of these uplifts are the various conglomerates and unconformities preserved in the subsurface, and occasionally exposed at the surface. Age-dating of these unconformities strongly suggests a sequence of deformation in which the culmination of uplift progressed generally from south to north through time. This sequence is also suggested by deformation of the thin-skinned Ouachita thrust belt by basement-involved structures of the Arbuckle orogeny.

  14. Water Decisions for Sustainability of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazrus, H.; Mcpherson, R. A.; Morss, R. E.; PaiMazumder, D.; Silvis, V.; Towler, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in south-central Oklahoma, situated in the heart of the Chickasaw Nation, is the state's only sole-source groundwater basin and sustains the Blue River, the state's only freeflowing river. The recent comprehensive hydrological studies of the aquifer indicate the need for sustainable management of the amount of water extracted. However, the question of how to deal with that management in the face of increasing drought vulnerability, diverse demands, and climate variability and change remains. Water management carries a further imperative to be inclusive of tribal and non-tribal interests. To address these issues, this interdisciplinary project takes an integrated approach to understanding risk perceptions and water decisions for sustainability of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer. Our interdisciplinary research asks: How do stakeholders in the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer perceive drought risks across weather and climate scales, and how do these perceptions guide water management decisions given (i) diverse cultural beliefs, (ii) valued hydrologic services, (iii) past drought experience, and (iv) uncertainties in future projection of precipitation and drought? We will use ethnographic methods to diagnose how cultural values and beliefs inform risk perceptions, and how this in turn guides decision making or ignites conflict across different sectors and stakeholder groups. Further, the characterization of drought risk will be examined in the context of historic meteorological and hydrologic events, as well as climate variability and change. This will identify which risks are prioritized, and under what conditions, in regional decision making or water-related conflicts.

  15. Source rock geochemistry and liquid and solid petroleum occurrences of the Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiale, J. A.

    Crude oils, solid bitumens and potential oil source rocks of the frontal and central Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma are examined. The organic matter in each of these materials is characterized, and oils are correlated to potential source rocks in the Ouachita Mountains. Four Ouachita Mountain oils and seven solid bitumens (grahamite and impsonite) are analyzed. The oils are paraffinic and range from 31.8 to 43.1 API gravity. The oils are thermally mature and generally unaltered. All four oils are commonly sourced, by n-alkane, sterane and hopane distributions, stable isotope ratios, infrared spectra and vanadium/nickel ratios. A common source for the solid bitumens is also suggested by isotope ratios and pyrolyzate characteristics. An origin due to crude oil biodegradation is suggested for these solids, based on carbon isotope ratios, elemental analyses, and sterane distributions of the solid bitumen pyrolyzates.

  16. 33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.29 Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the... Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles in the interest of flood control as follows: (a) Flood control...

  17. 33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.29 Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the... Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles in the interest of flood control as follows: (a) Flood control...

  18. 33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla. 208.29 Section 208.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla. The Bureau of Reclamation, or its designated agent, shall operate the Arbuckle... in excess of bankfull on Rock Creek downstream of the lake and on the Washita River, from...

  19. Source rock geochemistry and liquid and solid petroleum occurrences of the Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Curiale, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Crude oils, solid bitumens and potential oil source rocks of the Frontal and Central Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma were examined. The purposes of this study are to characterize the organic matter in each of these materials, and to correlate oils to potential source rocks in the Ouachita Mountains. Four Ouachita Mountain oils and seven solid bitumens (grahamite and impsonite were analyzed. The oils are paraffinic and range from 31.8 to 43.1 API gravity. Results indicate that the oils are thermally mature and generally unaltered. All four oils are commonly sourced, as suggested by n-alkane, sterane and hopane distributions, stable isotope ratios, infrared spectra and vanadium/nickel ratios. A common source for the solid bitumens is also suggested by isotope ratios and pyrolyzate characteristics. An origin due to crude oil biodegradation is suggested for these solids, based on carbon isotope ratios, elemental analyses, and sterane distributions of the solid bitumen pyrolyzates. Several stratigraphic intervals in the Ouachita Mountains possess adequate source potential for petroleum generation, based on contents of total organic carbon and extractable organic matter. Devonian rocks are oil-generative. The entire Paleozoic section examined is thermally mature enough to have generated oil, being located at about the middle of the oil window. In general, the best oil source potential is present in upper Ordovician (Polk Creek/Womble) rocks. Oil-source rock correlation techniques indicate that oils examined from the Frontal and Central Ouachita Mountains have a Siluro-Ordovician (Missouri Mountain-Polk Creek-Womble) source.

  20. Regional contemporaneity of eustatic, subsidence, and tectonic events in the Middle-Upper Ordovician of the Appalachians and Ouachita orogens and the southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, S.C.; Bergstroem, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    On-going graptolite and conodont studies in the Southern Appalachians, the Ouachitas, and the Arbuckle Mountains have revealed contemporaneity of important geological events of regional significance. Reassessment of previous graptolite biostratigraphy has resulted in a revised zonation that has solved some correlation problems and is tied to the Midcontinent and North Atlantic conodont zonations. These zonations are used to date significant geological events in geographically separate regions during two time intervals in the Middle-Upper Ordovician. The base of the graptolite shale succession (Athens) in the Southern Appalachians (Alabama-Tennessee) belongs to the G. teretiusculus Zone, or locally (Georgia) possibly a slightly older unit, and marks the initial shelf-basin development and uplift of source areas to the east reflecting a phase of the Taconic Orogeny. The bases of the Womble and Woods Hollow shales in the Ouachita Orogen represent about the same level. Slightly younger N. gracilis Zone strata tend to be transgressive throughout the world and appear to represent a global eustatic event. In the Arbuckle Mountains this event is reflected by the Tulip Creek Shale. A major subsidence event in the Oklahoma aulacogen, contemporaneous with the regression, produced a transgressive lithofacies sequence represented by the lower Viola Springs Formation in the Arbuckle Mountains. The regressive and subsidence events appear to have been coeval with the emplacement of the Taconic allochthon and Hamburg Klippe in the Northern Appalachians.

  1. Correlation of oil and asphaltite in Quachita mountain region of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Curiale, J.A.; Harrison, W.E.

    1981-11-01

    Several chemical characteristics of oils and asphaltites in the frontal and central Ouachita Mountains have been examined. Results indicate that the three oils and six asphaltites examined from Atoka, Pittsburg, and Pushmataha counties in southeastern Oklahoma originated from a common source. Carbon isotope ratios for oil and asphaltite suggest that the asphaltite is neither a protopetroleum nor a thermally degraded crude oil. Results of metallic and elemental analyses are consistent with an oil alteration origin for Ouachita solid bitumens. It is proposed that low-temperature, near-surface alteration phenomena, such as biodegradation and water washing, have degraded crude oil to produce asphaltite in the frontal and central areas. These results suggest that previous assumptions of a high temperature history are unwarranted.

  2. Nature of migrabitumen and their relation to regional thermal maturity, Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardott, Brian J.; Ruble, Tim E.; Suneson, Neil H.

    1993-01-01

    Two grahamite and three impsonite localities are within an 82-km-long segment of the Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma. Grab samples were collected to study the petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the migrabitumen at the grahamite-impsonite transition and the relation of the migrabitumen to the regional thermal maturity pattern. Maximum and random bitumen reflectance values increased from 0.75 to 1.80% from west to east, consistent with the regional thermal maturation trend. Mean bireflectance values increased from 0.04 to 0.38%. The two grahamite samples are classified at the grahamite-impsonite boundary with conflicting petrographic (bitumen reflectance) and bulk chemical (volatile matter) maturity indicators. The regional maturation trend, based on vitrinite reflectance and bitumen reflectance values, was confirmed by a detailed geochemical investigation of bitumen extracts. Although biomarker analyses were influenced by extensive biodegradation effects, molecular parameters based on the phenanthrenes, dibenzothiophenes, and tricyclic terpanes were identified as useful maturity indicators.

  3. Post-carboniferous tectonics in the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma: Evidence from side-looking radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. C.; Stern, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Anadarko Basin of western Oklahoma is a WNW-ESE elongated trough filled with of Paleozoic sediments. Most models call for tectonic activity to end in Pennsylvanian times. NASA Shuttle Imaging Radar revealed a distinctive and very straight lineament set extending virtually the entire length of the Anadarko Basin. The lineaments cut across the relatively flat-lying Permian units exposed at the surface. The character of these lineaments is seen most obviously as a tonal variation. Major streams, including the Washita and Little Washita rivers, appear to be controlled by the location of the lineaments. Subsurface data indicate the lineaments may be the updip expression of a buried major fault system, the Mountain View fault. Two principal conclusions arise from this analysis: (1) the complex Mountain View Fault system appears to extend southeast to join the Reagan, Sulphur, and/or Mill Creek faults of the Arbuckle Mountains, and (2) this fault system has been reactivated in Permian or younger times.

  4. Channelized, sand-rich, deep-sea fan deposit, lower Atoka formation (Pennsylvanian), Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma and Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Sprague, A.R.G.

    1984-04-01

    The lower member of the Pennsylvanian Atoka Formation exposed in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma and Arkansas is part of a thick (more than 10,000 m or 32,800 ft) turbidite sequence deposited in a remnant ocean basin (the Ouachita geosyncline) during the Carboniferous. Paleocurrent data indicate a predominantly longitudinal sediment dispersal pattern westward down the basin axis. The absence of deposits of major depositional lobes and the extensive development (both vertically and laterally) of a channelized (distributary channel) fan environment suggest that current submarine-fan models are not generally applicable to this deposit.

  5. Channelized, sand-rich, deep-sea fan deposit, lower Atoka formation (Pennsylvanian), Ouachita mountains, Oklahoma and Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Sprague, A.R.G.

    1984-04-01

    The lower member of the Pennsylvanian Atoka Formation exposed in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma and Arkansas is part of a thick (more than 10,000 m or 32,800 ft) turbidite sequence deposited in a remnant ocean basin (the Ouachita geosyncline) during the Carboniferous. Paleocurrent data indicate a predominantly longitudinal sediment dispersal pattern westward down the basin axis. The absence of deposits of major depositional lobes and the extensive development (both vertically and laterally) of a channelized (distributary channel) fan environment suggest that current submarine-fan models are not generally applicable to this deposit.

  6. Cenozoic denudation of the Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma, and southern mid-continent: apatite fission-track thermochronology constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Jennifer E.; Kelley, Shari A.; Bergman, Steven C.

    1999-05-01

    Eight new apatite fission-track (AFT) analyses of igneous rocks constrain the low-temperature thermal history of the Wichita Mountains in southwestern Oklahoma. The apparent AFT ages for Mount Scott, which range from 101±14 to 146±45 Ma, display no systematic variation as a function of elevation. AFT age ranges for the rhyolite at Bally Mountain and Mount Sheridan Gabbro are 136±36 to 160±25 Ma and 209±26 to 222±36 Ma, respectively. The mean track lengths for the Wichita Mountain samples range from 11.8 to 13.4 ?m with standard deviations of 1.8-3.4 ?m, and the track-length distributions are broad with relatively few tracks longer than 14 ?m. The AFT age and length data are best fit by a thermal history involving heating of the basement rocks to temperatures of at least 115°C prior to Late Jurassic time, denudation and associated cooling between Late Jurassic and Albian in response to the opening of the Gulf of Mexico, burial by 0.5-1.5 km of Cretaceous sedimentary rocks, and finally cooling due to denudation starting 55-25 Ma and continuing to the present. The thermal history recorded in the AFT data from the Wichita Mountains is similar to thermal histories derived from AFT thermochronology studies along the Ouachita Trend and in the Anadarko Basin. The new data, when combined with AFT data from the Ouachita Deformation Belt, the Anadarko Basin, the eastern Sangre de Cristo Mountains in New Mexico, and the eastern margins of the Wet Mountain and Front Range in Colorado, reveal an interesting pattern of post-Cretaceous denudation in the mid-continent. The amount of Neogene denudation increases westward from about 1 km to 3 km between southwestern Oklahoma and the eastern Sangre de Cristo Mountains in east-central New Mexico, and the timing of onset of denudation decreases from 55-25 Ma in the east to 35-12 Ma toward the west. Along the Southern Rocky Mountains-High Plains boundary, the amount of denudation decreases northward from about 3 km in the eastern Sangre de Cristo Mountains to ˜1 km along the east side of the Front Range. Post-Laramide isostatic adjustment of the High Plains, the development of the Rio Grande rift, and a shift towards a drier climate with seasonal, intense thunderstorms on the High Plains may all have contributed to the observed pattern of Cenozoic denudation in the southern mid-continent.

  7. Dynamics of a recolonizing population of black bears in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, S.L.; Hellgren, E.C.; Leslie, David M., Jr.; Hemphill, J., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding how populations expand to recolonize former habitats is important to restoration efforts in wildlife management and conservation. Translocation of black bears (Ursus americanus) to Arkansas in the 1950s and 1960s has led to recolonization of former bear range in Oklahoma, with substantial increases in distribution and abundance of the species in Oklahoma over the last 15 years. We studied demographics of black bears in southeastern Oklahoma from May 2001 to November 2002 to provide insight into characteristics of recolonizing populations of large carnivores. We trapped 51 black bears (22 M, 29 F) 77 times and radiocollared 25 female bears. Sex ratios of adults and cubs were skewed toward females, and the age structure was younger than observed in other unharvested populations. Survival of adult females was estimated at 0.9??0.1, and fertility was estimated at 0.77 female young/female/year. Density on the study area was estimated at 0.21 bears/km2 and the current finite growth rate (??) of the study population was estimated to be 1.11/year. Demographic characteristics of the Oklahoma population of black bears were similar to those of other recolonizing populations of large carnivores.

  8. Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, D.R.

    1997-03-01

    Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) presented a novel reinterpretation of the Jackfork Group in the DeGray Spillway and Kiamichi Mountain sections, Arkansas and Oklahoma, suggesting that thick-bedded sandstones in these sections, previously interpreted as turbidites, are debris-flow deposits. Careful assessment of this reinterpretation is critical because the Jackfork serves as a classic North American sediment-gravity flow sequence and because the techniques of Shanmugam and Moiola (1995), if applied widely, would lead to reinterpretation, and in my view, misinterpretation, of virtually every sediment-gravity flow sequence in the geologic record. In this discussion, I focus on only three of the many issues raised by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995): (1) their rejection of the concept of high density turbidity currents; (2) their description of the Jackfork Group in DeGray Spillway; and (3) their criteria for distinguishing between turbidites and debris-flow deposits.

  9. Rotation of fold axes during southerly directed thrusting, Broken Bow Uplift, Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qingming; Nielsen, K.C. )

    1993-02-01

    The Broken Bow Uplift has been subdivided into four large structures: Hochatown dome, Carter Mountain anticlinorium, Linson Creek synclinorium, and Cross Mountain anticlinorium. Detailed geological mapping of lower Paleozoic units in the western portion of Carter Mountain anticlinorium has revealed three fault zones from north to south: North Bee Creek fault zone (NBCFZ), South Carter Creek fault zone (SCCFZ), and Dyer Mountain fault zone (DMFZ). These fault zones separate two anticlines: Carter Mountain anticline and Brigham anticline. DMFZ is the tectonic contact between the Carter Mountain Anticlinorium and Hochatown dome to the south. The earliest folds in Hochatown dome are overturned, tight to isoclinal, subhorizontal with planar limbs and sharp hinges that trend east-west. The Carter Mountain and Brigham anticlines are interpreted to be associated with these earliest folds. As DMFZ is approached from Hochatown dome, fold axes plunge 15--20[degree] to WNW. The folds within the fault zones have been significantly rotated and plunge at 30--55[degree] to northwest or north. Within the South Carter Creek fault zone, a horse block is developed around a thick folded sequence of Arkansas Novaculite with fold hinge trending 350[degree]/50[degree]. The fold axes data clearly show concentration trending in northwest direction. However there is a scatter of data with orientations trending due north as well as to northeast. A model of earlier fold axes rotation as a result of simple shear associated with inferred southerly directed thrusting has been proposed to explain the geometric relationship described above. The best fit great circle for the rotated fold axis data has an orientation of 95[degree]/55[degree]N. This calculated plane represents the plane of flattening associated with the southerly directed thrusting.

  10. Three-dimensional seismic interpretation from the triangle zone of the frontal Ouachita mountains and Arkoma basin, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Valderrama, M.H.; Nielsen, K.C.; McMechan, G.A.

    1996-08-01

    Analysis of 28.5 km{sup 2} of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data from the triangle zone of the Ouachita fold-and-thrust belt and the foreland Arkoma basin reveals structural details not recognized previously in conventional two-dimensional (2-D) seismic data. The data indicate that the frontal Kiowa syncline in the Arkoma basin has been passively uplifted by blind thrusting at the Morrowan Wapanucka Limestone level, and that smaller wavelength folds are produced by thrusting at shallower levels in the Atoka Formation. Faulting at deeper levels in the Hunton and Arbuckle groups has been traditionally interpreted as normal, but our analysis of this data set indicates that, in this area, normal faults were reactivated during the Ouachita orogeny as reverse faults, and the changes in fault separation can be followed along strike. These faults show the same trend as the overlying thrusts and are normal or have minor inversion where the overlying thrusts have small displacement. These faults have been completely inverted where the overlying thrusts have more displacement, suggesting a genetic relation between the Wapanucka thrusts and the inversion of the Hunton and Arbuckle faults. Four reflections were chosen for analysis: one reflection in the lower Atoka Formation, two reflections repeated in the Wapanucka Limestone, and a fourth reflection in the Hunton Group. All of these surfaces exhibit the same geometry with the fold axes plunging to the southwest. Variations in bearing and plunge of fold axes in the Wapanucka Limestone can be directly correlated to changes in displacement and ramp height along strike. The similarity between surface geometries suggests that the last deformation took place at deeper levels in the Hunton and Arbuckle groups and folded the overlying thrusts. Reactivation of Atokan normal faults at deeper levels in the Arkoma basin and Ouachita subthrust play may be more widespread than previously recognized.

  11. POTENTIAL AND VULNERABILITY OF THE ARBUCKLE SIMPSON AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation will cover topics including the potential recharge area for the Arbuckle Simpson Aquifer, the variability in discharge rates and the susceptibility of the ground water to contamination by various sources.

  12. THE SOURCE, POTENTIAL & VULNERABILITY OF THE ARBUCKLE SIMPSON AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation will cover topics including the potential recharge area for the Arbuckle Simpson Aquifer, the variability in discharge rates and the susceptibility of the ground water to contamination by various sources.

  13. POTENTIAL AND VULNERABILITY OF THE ARBUCKLE SIMPSON ACQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will cover topics including the potential recharge area for the Arbuckle Simpson Acquifer, the variability in discharge rates, and the susceptibility of the ground water to contamination by various sources.

  14. POTENTIAL AND VULNERABILITY OF THE ARBUCKLE-SIMPSON AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation will cover topics including the potential recharge area for the Arbuckle Simpson Aquifer, the variability in discharge rates and the susceptibility of the ground water to contamination by various sources.

  15. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic study of the Glen Mountains layered complex: initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.D.; Unruh, D.M.; Gilbert, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic data for rocks and minerals of the Glen Mountains layered complex (GMLC), a midcontinent mafic layered intrusion in the Wichita Mountains of southwestern Oklahoma, constrain the time of initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen and provide information on the chemistry of the early Paleozoic mantle. Four whole-rock samples define a Rb-Sr isochron corresponding to a maximum crystallization age of 577 +/- 165 Ma and an initial Sr isotopic composition of 0.70359 +/- 2. A three-point Sm-Nd mineral-whole-rock (internal) isochron for an anorthositic gabbro provides a crystallization age of 528 +/- 29 Ma. These data suggest that the GMLC was emplaced into the southern Oklahoma aulacogen during the initial phase of rifting along the southern margin of the North American craton in the early Paleozoic. This Sm-Nd internal isochron age is within analytical uncertainty of U-Pb zircon ages for granites and rhyolites from the Wichita Mountains; therefore, mafic and felsic magmatism may have been contemporaneous within the rift during the early stages of development. Hybrid rocks and composite dikes in the Wichita Mountains provide field evidence for contemporaneous mafic and felsic magmas. Initial Sr and Nd isotopic data suggest that magmas parental to the GMLC were derived from a depleted mantle source. However, Nd isotopic data for the GMLC plot distinctly below data for the depleted mantle source cited by DePaolo and thus suggest that the parental magmas of the GMLC were either contaminated by Proterozoic crust of the southern midcontinent or were derived from a heterogenous mantle source region that had variable initial Nd isotopic compositions.

  16. Devitrification of the Carlton Rhyolite in the Blue Creek Canyon area, Wichita Mountains, southwestern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bigger, S.E. . Dept. of Geology); Hanson, R.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-02-01

    The Cambrian Carlton Rhyolite is a sequence of lava flows and ignimbrites extruded in association with rifting in the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. Rhyolite exposed in the Blue Creek Canyon area consists of a single, originally glassy, porphyritic lava flow > 300 m thick. Abundant flow banding is deformed by variably oriented flow folds present on both outcrop and thin-section scales. A variety of complex texture record the cooling, degassing, and devitrification history of the flow. Acicular Fe, Ti-oxide crystallites aligned in the flow banding document nucleation and limited crystal growth during flow. Spherical microvesicles and larger lithophysal cavities up to 10 cm long crosscut flow banding, showing that degassing continued after flow had ceased. Pseudomorphs of quartz after cristobalite and tridymite are present on cavity walls and are products of high-T vapor-phase crystallization. Devitrification textures overprint the flow banding and developed in two stages. Primary devitrification occurred during initial cooling and formed spherulitic intergrowths in distinct areas bound by sharp devitrification fronts. Spherulites nucleated on phenocrysts, vesicles, and flow bands and show evidence of multiple episodes of growth. Rhyolite outside of the devitrification fronts initially remained glassy but underwent later, low-T hydration to form perlitic texture, which was followed by prolonged secondary devitrification to form extremely fine-grained, equigranular quartzofeldspathic mosaics. Snowflake texture (micropoikilitic quartz surrounding randomly oriented alkali feldspar) developed during both primary and secondary devitrification. Spherical bodies up to 30 cm across are present in discrete horizons within the flow and weather out preferentially from the host rhyolite.

  17. Sand distribution, facies relationships, and structural styles of the Spiro Formation, frontal Ouachita Mountains, southeastern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hinde, L.K. )

    1991-03-01

    Ongoing gas exploration in the overthrusted portion of the Arkoma basin continues to demonstrate the excellent reservoir characteristics of the early Atokan Spiro Formation. This activity is providing valuable new data for a comprehensive surface-to-subsurface study. The Spiro Formation represents a mixed carbonate and terrigenous clastic platform complex that consists of laterally interfingering sandstone, shale, and limestone. Three sand bar tracts can be delineated within the Spiro based primarily on surface control. The easternmost tract is the most areally extensive, and it is characterized by sand thickness in excess of 150 ft. South of the present-day Pine Mountain fault, terrigenous clastic and spiculitic slope and basinal sediments accumulated, whereas east of the surface exposures (along the frontal zone), the Spiro grades into a shale facies. Late Pennsylvanian thrust faulting produced a narrow belt of fault repeated sequences that crop out only in the frontal Ouachita Mountains. Differences in thrusting styles between the easter and western parts of the outcrop belt reflect variations in lithologic character and probably in subthrust structure. Palinspastic restoration of thrust sheets established a basis to extend paleodepositional trends and sand bar geometries from the surface into the subsurface.

  18. Probable reservoir facies of the Wapanucka Limestone (Morrowan), frontal Ouachita Mountains, southeastern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mauldin, D.L )

    1991-08-01

    Considerable recent exploration and significant discoveries in the frontal Ouachita Mountains can be attributed to structural and stratigraphic relationships within the overthrust belt. Although, most of the production has been from the early Atokan Spiro Formation, the late Morrowan Wapanucka Formation has locally proven to be a gas reservoir. Surface imbrications allow outcrop study of the Wapanucka lithofacies and form a basis for predicting the character of rocks in the subthrust region. Repetitive sequences of platform, platform margin, and basinal facies characterize the Wapanucka Formation in outcrop. These sequences record several southward progradations of the ramp-like shelf margin. Oolitic and bioclastic calcarenites accumulated on the shallow shelf, while algal micrites developed near the shelf edge. Spiculitic limestones characterize the platform margin, and slope and basinal depositional environments are inferred for the noncalcareous spiculites and shale. Within the Wapanucka, several facies are potentially hydrocarbon reservoir rocks. These include oolitic grainstone and spiculitic packstone. The former lithology might preserve primary porosity, while the latter facies could develop significant fracture porosity in certain structural configurations. Thus, mapping their surface extent is significant because well control and seismic data do not provide this kind of information. However, detailed surface work in association with the subsurface geology can aid in locating potential hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  19. Atokan (Pennsylvanian) Berlin field: genesis of recycled detrital dolomite reservoir, deep Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lyday, J.R.

    1985-11-01

    The Berlin gas field in Beckham County, Oklahoma, was discovered in 1977 and is the largest Atoka (Pennsylvanian) hydrocarbon accumulation in the Anadarko basin. It is an overpressured reservoir 15,000 ft (4572 m) deep and occupies a surface area of 41 mi/sup 2/ (106 km/sup 2/). The reservoir rock consists primarily of recycled, detrital Arbuckle Dolomite (Cambrian-Ordovician), and contains ultimate recoverable reserves of 242 to 362 bcf (6850 to 10,250 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/). The Arbuckle Dolomite and limited exposures of Precambrian granite rocks were eroded from the Amarillo-Wichita mountains during the Atokan and were deposited as a terrigenous, sandy dolomite clastic wedge adjacent to the uplift. During the late Atokan, the Elk City structure was uplifted and subaerially exposed in the vicinity of the northern limit of the dolomite clastic wedge. The detrital dolomite on the structure was concurrently eroded and recycled northward as a shallow marine fan delta. Subsequent recrystallization destroyed the detrital depositional texture and created the present intercrystalline porosity. The deep Elk City structure consists of an upthrust block bounded by the late Atokan unconformity which is genetically associated with the Berlin fan delta. The present relief on the upthrust block and overlying anticlinal folds was formed during post-Atokan growth of the structure. The Berlin field provides a model of a large, localized detrital deposit derived from uplift and erosion of a prominent structure, and it is an example of the potential for large detrital stratigraphic traps around the perimeters of prominent structures containing crestal unconformities. 14 figures, 1 table.

  20. A comparison of the arcuate fold and thrust belts of the western Alps and Carpathian Mountains to the Ouachita arcuate fold and thrust belt, southeastern Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Bradley D.

    The Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma contain an arcuate bend, which has been compared to three arcuate bends within the Western Alps (Jura Arc, southern portion of the Western Alps, and the Western Alps, proper) and the Carpathian Mountains. Each of these arcuate bends have been compared using five criteria, which are: (1) orogenic evolution, (2) arc type, (3) fault geometries (map and cross sectional), (4) sedimentology, and (5) gravity profiles (where available). This study investigated several aspects of the Ouachita Mountains that had not previously been defined. Published literature was used to help characterize the geologic evolution and sediment provenance of the Ouachita Mountains, while other components were defined through field investigations and laboratory examinations. As a result of this work, the Ouachita Mountains were found to be the product of a W-directed/Mariana-type subduction zone. Results of this study also indicate that the arcuate bend of the Ouachita Mountains is probably a primary arc, due to the lack of evidence for along-strike shearing that is typically associated with an orocline. Map view fault geometries indicate an oblique collision (˜45°) occurred during the orogenic process while cross-sectional fault geometries in the research area are similar to adjacent structural cross sections and indicate a W-directed/Mariana-type subduction zone. The gravity profile examined was inconclusive, however, it was indicative a W-directed/Mariana-type subduction zone. The Ouachita arcuate bend most closely compares with the Carpathian Mountains based on the evidence presented in this study. They were both the product of a W-directed/Mariana-type subduction zone and have similar fault geometries. The arcuate bends of the Western Alps do not compare to the Ouachita arcuate bend, however, due to dissimilarities between fault geometries, as well as the fact that the Western Alps are a product of an E-directed/Chilean-type subduction zone. Evidence presented in this study only allows for suggestions to be made but, further research must be conducted before conclusions can be drawn.

  1. Earthquake activity in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. )

    1989-08-01

    Oklahoma is one of the most seismically active areas in the southern Mid-Continent. From 1897 to 1988, over 700 earthquakes are known to have occurred in Oklahoma. The earliest documented Oklahoma earthquake took place on December 2, 1897, near Jefferson, in Grant County. The largest known Oklahoma earthquake happened near El Reno on April 9, 1952. This magnitude 5.5 (mb) earthquake was felt from Austin, Texas, to Des Moines, Iowa, and covered a felt area of approximately 362,000 km{sup 2}. Prior to 1962, all earthquakes in Oklahoma (59) were either known from historical accounts or from seismograph stations outside the state. Over half of these events were located in Canadian County. In late 1961, the first seismographs were installed in Oklahoma. From 1962 through 1976, 70 additional earthquakes were added to the earthquake database. In 1977, a statewide network of seven semipermanent and three radio-telemetry seismograph stations were installed. The additional stations have improved earthquake detection and location in the state of Oklahoma. From 1977 to 1988, over 570 additional earthquakes were located in Oklahoma, mostly of magnitudes less than 2.5. Most of these events occurred on the eastern margin of the Anadarko basin along a zone 135 km long by 40 km wide that extends from Canadian County to the southern edge of Garvin County. Another general area of earthquake activity lies along and north of the Ouachita Mountains in the Arkoma basin. A few earthquakes have occurred in the shelves that border the Arkoma and Anadarko basins.

  2. Sterane distribution of solid bitumen pyrolyzates. Changes with biodegradation of crude oil in the Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiale, Joseph A.; Harrison, William E.; Smith, Garmon

    1983-03-01

    Solid bitumens (grahamite and impsonite) of southeastern Oklahoma have been shown to originate from near-surface alteration of crude oil ( CURIALE, 1981; CURIALE and HARRISON, 1981). Pyrolysis of these solids has been employed to compare the sterane distribution of geographically proximate oils to that of the bitumens. The ratio of rearranged to regular steranes is higher in the pyrolyzates than in the oils, a finding consistent with a bitumen origin due to biodegradation of oil. The remaining presence of steranes, particularly regular steranes, in the bitumens suggests that sterane occlusion may have occurred prior to or during the alteration process, thus removing tetracyclic compounds from the influence of microbial attack. These data suggest that pyrolysis- GC/MS offers a viable approach to correlation problems involving solid bitumens.

  3. Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.L. Jr.

    1997-03-01

    Shanmugam and Moiola (1994a, b, 1995) have generated substantial controversy and reexamination of what was originally thought to be a well-understood stratigraphic interval of deep-water origin in the Carboniferous Jackfork Group of Arkansas and Oklahoma. This reexamination of interpretation is good in that it forces sedimentologists, sequence stratigraphers, and reservoir geologists to reconsider their understanding of deep-water processes and products, usage of scientific terms to communicate interpretations, and the economic consequences of being nearly right or certainly wrong. Examination of Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) prompts brief comments on three issues: (1) the classification of a sedimentary deposit based on the sedimentary process during the final moments of deposition, (2) the use of apparently irrelevant analogs to interpret depositional and postdepositional processes and products, and (3) the regional interpretation of overall depositional environment from very specific and very local observations of sedimentary products.

  4. Sterane distribution of solid bitumen pyrolyzates. Changes with biodegradation of crude oil in the Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curiale, J.A.; Harrison, W.E.; Smith, G.

    1983-01-01

    Solid bitumens (grahamite and impsonite) of southeastern Oklahoma have been shown to originate from near-surface alteration of crude oil (Curiale, 1981; Curiale and Harrison, 1981). Pyrolysis of these solids has been employed to compare the sterane distribution of geographically proximate oils to that of the bitumens. The ratio of rearranged to regular steranes is higher in the pyrolyzates than in the oils, a finding consistent with a bitumen origin due to biodegradation of oil. The remaining presence of steranes, particularly regular steranes, in the bitumens suggests that sterane occlusion may have occurred prior to or during the alteration process, thus removing tetracyclic compounds from the influence of microbial attack. These data suggest that pyrolysis- GC MS offers a viable approach to correlation problems involving solid bitumens. ?? 1983.

  5. Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Above the forest: the alpine tundra; Solar energy, water, wind and soil in mountains; Mountain weather; Mountain building and plate tectonics; Mountain walls: forming, changing, and disappearing; Living high: mountain ecosystems; Distribution of mountain plants and animals; On foot in the mountains: how to hike and backpack; Ranges and peaks of the world. Map and guidebook sources, natural history and mountain adventure trips, mountain environmental education centers and programs, and sources of information on trails for the handicapped are included.

  6. Heat flow in Oklahoma and the south central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranganu, Constantin; Lee, Youngmin; Deming, David

    1998-11-01

    We report 23 new heat flow values in the state of Oklahoma and combine these with previously reported values to create heat flow maps of Oklahoma and the central United States. In general, thermal gradients increase from southwestern Oklahoma (minimum, 14°C km-1) to northeastern Oklahoma (maximum, 42°C km-1); the mean thermal gradient in central Oklahoma is 31°C km-1. We made 1498 thermal-conductivity measurements on drill cuttings from oil and gas wells. Heat flow in Oklahoma varies between 22 and 86 m W m-2; the average is about 50 m W m-2. Heat flow is relatively low (30-40 m W m-2) in southwest Oklahoma and is relatively high (70-80 m W m-2) in one section of east central Oklahoma. We also report 27 new estimations of radioactive heat production in basement rocks and combine these with 22 previously published data to create a map of basement heat production in Oklahoma. Heat production values range from 1.1 to 3.5 ?W m-3, with an average of 2.5 ?W m-3. Geologic evidence suggests that the present-day thermal regime is not significantly affected by sedimentation, erosion, or metamorphic/igneous activity and is essentially in a near steady state condition. Heat flow in Oklahoma appears to be largely controlled by heat production in basement rocks, although the correlation between heat flow and heat production is not strong. An area of high heat flow (70-80 m W m-2) in east central Oklahoma may be related to regional groundwater flow through the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer.

  7. Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Bouma, A.H.; DeVries, M.B.; Stone, C.G.

    1997-03-01

    The contribution by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) on the depositional processes of the Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group (Formation) in Arkansas and Oklahoma highlights a few important processes that are often overlooked. Their work on the fabric of some high-density flow deposits is interesting in light of the debate over the nature of these types of deposits (Lowe, 1982; Hiscott, 1994). However, we disagree with some of the observations and interpretations they use in making their argument for a new depositional model, and submit that (1) turbidity current deposits (turbidites) are a major lithofacies component in the DeGray Spillway cut is not difficult, and (4) because it is not necessary to preserve conventional dogma, a change in nomenclature is more appropriate than a change in depositional models. Finally, their call for application of their debris-flow model to the North Sea, Gulf of Mexico, offshore Nigeria, and elsewhere is disturbing because they would have the petroleum industry relinquish the idea of predictability in deep-water reservoirs.

  8. Rotation of fold-hinge lines associated with simple shear during southerly directed thrusting, Ouachita Mountains, southeastern Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingming; Nielsen, Kent C.

    1995-06-01

    The Broken Bow uplift in southeastern Oklahoma contains the oldest rocks exposed in Ouachita orogenic belts and has experienced tour phases of deformation. First generation folds are tight, overturned, Sverging. and have a well developed slaty cleavage. Second-generation folds are coaxial with first-generation structures, are open to tight, are inclined, and reveal S-vergence. Northerly dipping faults truncate second generation fold limbs. Third-phase structures, including recumbent folds and pencil structures, are interpreted to be contemporaneous with S-directed thrusting. The hinges of earlier folds documented in the area least affected by thrusting are horizontal and trend E-W. The hinges of folds of the same generation within fault zones plunge 30-50 ° toward the north or northwest. Thus, it is concluded that the earlier folds have been passively rotated during S-direeted thrusting, as have the contemporaneous folds and pencil structures. A simple-shear model associated with S-directed thrusting is proposed to explain these geometrical relations. The rotated fold hinges provide quantifiable shear-strain gauges which can be used to quantify shear strain in the Broken Bow uplift as well as in other orogenic belts. A model for shear-strain calculation is developed using the general geometric relationship between fold-hinge lines, the shear direction, and the shear plane.

  9. Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Slatt, R.M.; Weimer, P.; Stone, C.G.

    1997-03-01

    The {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} deep-water outcrops of the Pennsylvanian upper Jackfork Group in the Ouachita Mountains of west-central Arkansas, recently discussed by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995), are especially significant to the petroleum industry because they have long been used as an analog to fine-grained, deep-water clastic reservoirs throughout the world. Numerous industry, academic, and government geoscientists have studied these outcrops for many years. As Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) point out, several interpretations of these outcrops have been made through the years. These changing interpretations coincide with the evolution of knowledge about deep-marine sedimentation and reservoirs. These outcrops have been constantly reexamined as petroleum geoscientists have brought their global exploration and production experience to the field.

  10. Alterations in the non-clay-mineral fraction of pelitic rocks the diagenetic to low-grade metamorphic transition, Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma and Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Totten, M.W.; Blatt, H. . School of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-09-01

    The transformation of smectite to illite has been cited by many authors as a source of silica during diagenesis of mudrocks. Illites themselves, however, undergo chemical changes as they recrystallize into micas during high-grade diagenesis/low-grade metamorphism. Average compositions of phyllosilicates from the literature suggest that an equivalent amount of silica is available from transformation of illite to muscovite as from illitization of smectites. The fate of silica released by this process has not been reported, but could be a major contributor to the silt-size quartz population. The quartz and feldspar fraction of pelites from the Stanley Shale (Mississippian) in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma and Arkansas was separated using sodium bisulfate fusions. The mineralogy and the grain-size distribution of this fraction were determined using standard petro-graphic and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Bulk rock samples were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) methods. The data obtained were related to illite crystallinity and vitrinite reflectance as reported by Guthrie el al. (1986) and Houseknecht and Matthews (1985). The authors results are consistent with reported differences between quartz in schists and their shale precursors, and suggest that release of silica during diagenesis of phyllosilicates continues after the smectite-illite transformation. This silica precipitates as quartz within the pelite, consistent with the suggestion by Blatt (1987) that metapelites are the source of abundant silt-size quartz. The lack of whole-rock chemical variation with thermal maturity implies closed-system behavior across much of the pelite-to-metapelite transition.

  11. Relationships among vitrinite reflectance, illite crystallinity, and organic geochemistry in Carboniferous strata, Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma and Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, J.M.; Houseknecht, D.W.; Johns, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Ouachita Mountains contain a thick section of Carboniferous strata that display an extreme range in thermal maturity as determined by vitrinite reflectance. Clay mineralogy, illite crystallinity, and organic geochemistry of shales from those strata are systematically related to thermal maturity. Shales of the Stanley, Jackfork, and Atoka formations are predominantly composed of illite and chlorite with minor occurrences of mixed-layer clays (restricted to samples characterized by mean vitrinite reflectance less than 1.5%) and pyrophyllite (restricted to samples characterized by mean vitrinite reflectance greater than 2.7%). Illite crystallinity is significantly related to vitrinite reflectance (R/sub 0/). Weaver's illite sharpness ratio (SR) increases with increasing R/sub 0/: log (SR) = 0.28 + 0.08 (R/sub 0/); whereas Kubler's illite crystallinity index (CI) decreases with increasing R/sub 0/: log (CI) = 1.01 = 0.07 (R/sub 0/). Plots of bitumen ratio (bitumen/total organic carbon) vs. vitrinite reflectance, Weaver's illite sharpness ratio, and Kubler's crystallinity index all reveal hydrocarbon generation-preservation curves that define submature, mature, and supermature zones with regard to a liquid hydrocarbon window. These results suggest that, in the absence of vitrinite, illite crystallinity can be used quantitatively to estimate levels of thermal maturity and cautiously to approximate hydrocarbon generation-preservation stages of potential source rocks. 8 figures.

  12. Petroleum production and exploration in Ouachita region of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Suneson, N.H.; Campbell, J.A.

    1989-03-01

    Petroleum production in the Ouachita region of southeastern Oklahoma occurs in three geographic areas parallel to regional structure. The frontal gas, central oil, and central gas belts are distinguished by differences in structural setting, reservoir strata, and types of hydrocarbons. In the frontal belt, nearly 1 trillion ft/sup 3/ of dry gas has been produced from thrusted and subthrust Morrowan and Atokan sandstone and carbonate reservoirs. Over 8000 bbl of oil have been produced in the central oil belt, southeast of the Ti Valley fault. Structures consist of imbricate thrusts and isoclinal to overturned folds. The fields are typically small, associated with asphaltite or tar sands, and produce from Carboniferous sandstone reservoirs. Farther southeast, small fields within the central gas belt have produced minor gas from Ordovician, Devonian, and Mississippian reservoirs. Six Ordovician through Mississippian Ouachita-facies shales are potential petroleum source rocks and occur in the middle to lower part of the oil window. However, Devonian and Mississippian strata are composed primarily of terrestrial organic matter and are probably gas prone. Oil in Carboniferous reservoirs probably migrated upward stratigraphically from older sources. Recent exploration has focused on extending production from Pennsylvanian reservoirs in the frontal gas belt. However, a significant Arbuckle discovery (ARCO 2 Yourman) and a Broken Bow uplift test (Sohio 1-22 Weyerhauser) in 1987 indicate that Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group carbonates may be prospective beneath all of the Oklahoma Ouachitas. Near-future rank-wildcat exploration will probably focus on subthrust, structurally and stratigraphically favorable Arbuckle plays.

  13. New constraints on the age and depositional rates of initial flysch sedimentation in the Stanley Group, Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma and Arkansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaulis, B. J.; Lapen, T. J.; Casey, J. F.; Reid, D.

    2011-12-01

    The transition from a 'starved basin' to classic orogenic flysch deposition of Paleozoic strata in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma and Arkansas and the absolute timing of mountain building events associated with the Ouachita Orogeny have long been unresolved problems in the region. The Mississippian Stanley Group is an important sedimentary unit within the Paleozoic strata because, unlike the other Paleozoic units in the Ouachita Mountains, the Stanley Group contains several dateable tuffaceous units. LA-ICPMS analyses of zircons from 5 tuffaceous units show progressively younger weighted average ages: Beaver's Bend Tuff (328.3±2.9 Ma), Hatton Tuff (327.5±3.8 Ma), lower Mud Creek Tuff (321.9±2.0 Ma), upper Mud Creek Tuff (326±3.2Ma) and Chickasaw Creek Tuff (320.6±2.7Ma). The exception is the upper Mud Creek Tuff (326 Ma), which has a more significant detrital component when compared to the other tuffaceous units. The ages of the Beaver's Bend, Hatton, lower and upper Mud Creek tuffs agree with previously reported biostratigraphic data found in the lower 500m of the Stanley Group (Ethington, 1989), which suggest an early Mississippian age for its lower boundary. The top 250 meters contain the Chickasaw Creek tuff (320.6±2.7 Ma) which indicates a late Mississippian age for the top of the Stanley Group. The transition from a 'starved basin' is marked by a sudden increase in clastic detritus entering the Ouachita Trough. A regional hiatus (Noble, 1993) is known to exist at the boundary between the base of the Stanley Group and the upper Devonian Arkansas Novaculite. The tuff ages, coupled with the biostratigraphic data, indicate that sedimentation rates were low (<20m/Ma) through the deposition of the Beaver's Bend tuff (328.3±2.9 Ma), after which sedimentation rates increased to >2500m/Ma by the time the Chickasaw Creek tuff (320.6±2.7Ma) was deposited. The sedimentation rates remain high (~900m/Ma) through the deposition of the stratigraphically higher units: Jackfork Group, Johns Valley and Atoka formations which are all considered to be pre-orogenic (King, 1961). These new data constrain the timing of significant increases in sedimentation rates in a remnant ocean basin (Ouachita trough) that are likely associated with longitudinal transport (e.g. Graham et al., 1975) and dispersal of sediment from sequential (diachronous) collision. Ethington, R.L., Finney, S.C., and Repetski, J.E., 1989, The Geology of North America, Volume F-2; Noble, P.J., 1993 Geology, v. 21, p. 315-318; King, P.B., 1961, Volume 6120: Austin, Texas, The University of Texas, p. 175-190; Graham, S.A., Dickinson, W.R., and Ingersoll, R.V., 1975, GSA Bulletin, v. 86, p. 273-286.

  14. THE OKLAHOMA MESONET

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Oklahoma Mesonet, operated and maintained by the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, is Oklahoma's premier climatological data collection system. For the area covered, which includes the entire state, no other system within the United States or internationally has the degree of ...

  15. Left-lateral intraplate deformation along the ancestral rocky mountains: Implications for late paleozoic plate motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnik, Roy T.

    1986-12-01

    North America underwent synchronous orogenic events during the late Paleozoic along its eastern margin (Alleghanian orogeny), southern margin (Ouachita orogeny), and within the southwestern part of the continent (Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny). All three orogenies were initiated in the late Mississippian to early Pennsylvanian, reached the greatest intensity in the middle Pennsylvanian, and ended in the early Permian. The Alleghanian and Ouachita orogenies have been related to the closing of the proto-Atlantic and the collision between North America and South America-Africa: it is here proposed that the Ancestral Rocky Mountains were produced by a collision between eastern North America and Africa. The Ancestral Rockies were formed as the result of reactivation of the Wichita megashear, a preexisting zone of weakness that extends from southern Oklahoma to eastern Utah. Previous plate tectonic models have implied that the megashear was a zone of right-lateral strike-slip faulting and north-northwest-directed compression. However, structural and stratigraphic data from Oklahoma and Texas suggest that the Wichita megashear was a major left-lateral fault zone formed under east-northeast-oriented compression. Palinspastic reconstruction of pre-mid-Devonian strata across the megashear in Texas indicates that 120 to 150 km of left slip occurred during the Desmoinesian (middle Pennsylvanian). The proposed plate tectonic model for the Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny includes: (1) movement of the North American plate eastward from a spreading center in the proto-Pacific; (2) closing of the proto-Atlantic Ocean; (3) collision of North America-Europe (Laurussia) and South America-Africa (Gondwana) resulting in the Hercynian, Alleghanian, and Ouachita orogenies; (4) differential movement across the Wichita megashear and formation of a left-lateral strike-slip fault zone (Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny) as the result of east-west compression within the North American plate: (5) relative northward movement of Gondwana against Laurussia producing the Marathon and Arbuckle orogenies; and (6) development of a subduction zone to the west of the North American continent.

  16. Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic geophysical survey data, Hunton anticline, south-central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Bruce D.; Smith, David V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maryla; Blome, Charles D.; Hill, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    This report is a digital data release for multiple geophysical surveys conducted in the Hunton anticline area of south-central Oklahoma. The helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic surveys were flown on March 16–17, 2007, in four areas of the Hunton anticline in south-central Oklahoma. The objective of this project is to improve the understanding of the geohydrologic framework of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The electromagnetic sensor for the helicopter electromagnetic survey consisted of six different transmitter-receiver orientations that measured the earth's electrical response at six distinct frequencies from approximately 500 Hertz to approximately 115,000 Hertz. The electromagnetic measurements were converted to electrical resistivity values, which were gridded and plotted on georeferenced maps. The map from each frequency represents a different depth of investigation for each area. The range of subsurface investigation is comparable to the depth of shallow groundwater. The four areas selected for the helicopter electromagnetic study, blocks A–D, have different geologic and hydrologic settings. Geophysical and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey studies are being used by modelers and resource managers to develop groundwater resource plans for the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer.

  17. Intraplate magmatism related to opening of the southern Iapetus Ocean: Cambrian Wichita igneous province in the Southern Oklahoma rift zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Richard E.; Puckett, Robert E.; Keller, G. Randy; Brueseke, Matthew E.; Bulen, Casey L.; Mertzman, Stanley A.; Finegan, Shane A.; McCleery, David A.

    2013-08-01

    Southern Oklahoma and adjacent parts of Texas contain an extensive igneous province emplaced during Early Cambrian rifting within the Southern Oklahoma rift zone. The rift zone was initiated in association with the opening of the southern Iapetus Ocean during Rodinia supercontinent breakup and later became the site of a series of linked uplifts and basins as a result of late Paleozoic inversion. Igneous rocks within the rift are referred to as the Wichita province and are present mostly in the subsurface, although critical exposures occur in the Wichita and Arbuckle Mountains in southwestern and southern Oklahoma. Wells drilled into basement in the region provide a wealth of information on the distribution and relations of the major igneous units in the upper crust, and geophysical data provide important constraints on deeper levels of the rift zone. The upper parts of the igneous rift fill comprise the Carlton Rhyolite Group, which has an estimated subsurface areal extent of ~ 40,000 km2, and the related Wichita sheet granites, which intrude the lower parts of the rhyolite succession. These rocks have A-type characteristics and were emplaced after intrusion, tilting and uplift of a large tholeiitic layered mafic complex; smaller bodies of gabbro also intruded the layered complex after it was tilted. U-Pb zircon and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology indicates the felsic rocks and at least some of the mafic units were emplaced in a relatively narrow time frame at ~ 539-530 Ma. Basalts and intermediate lavas are present only in the subsurface. Our new work shows these lavas to have tholeiitic to mildly alkaline compositions and to be more extensive than previously realized, forming thick successions that both underlie and are intercalated with the rhyolites. Diabase dikes were intruded into older crust during initial opening of the rift, and a suite of late diabase intrusions also cuts the rhyolites and granites, indicating that mafic magma was supplied to the rift throughout its igneous history. Geophysical data show that an enormous mass of mafic rock occupies deeper parts of the rift, extending to depths of at least 10 km beneath the surface. The total volume of igneous rock emplaced within the rift is estimated to be in excess of 250,000 km3. Detailed studies of Carlton Rhyolite exposures in the Wichita Mountains, complemented by work on drill cuttings from basement wells, indicate that lava flows up to 400 m thick make up major parts of the rhyolitic succession. The generally limited exposures of these rhyolite lavas in the Wichita Mountains are interpreted to be remnants of laterally extensive flow units similar to those documented from other A-type felsic provinces. Trace element abundances define three distinct geochemical groups of rhyolite, suggesting derivation from three different sources or magma reservoirs. Flows belonging to the different geochemical groups are intercalated in the Wichita Mountains exposures, which may indicate that laterally extensive flows from separate magma chambers came to rest on top of one another during accumulation of the rhyolitic volcanic pile.

  18. Geologic map of Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Murray County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, Charles D.; Lidke, David J.; Wahl, Ronald R.; Golab, James A.

    2013-01-01

    This 1:24,000-scale geologic map is a compilation of previous geologic maps and new geologic mapping of areas in and around Chickasaw National Recreation Area. The geologic map includes revisions of numerous unit contacts and faults and a number of previously “undifferentiated” rock units were subdivided in some areas. Numerous circular-shaped hills in and around Chickasaw National Recreation Area are probably the result of karst-related collapse and may represent the erosional remnants of large, exhumed sinkholes. Geospatial registration of existing, smaller scale (1:72,000- and 1:100,000-scale) geologic maps of the area and construction of an accurate Geographic Information System (GIS) database preceded 2 years of fieldwork wherein previously mapped geology (unit contacts and faults) was verified and new geologic mapping was carried out. The geologic map of Chickasaw National Recreation Area and this pamphlet include information pertaining to how the geologic units and structural features in the map area relate to the formation of the northern Arbuckle Mountains and its Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The development of an accurate geospatial GIS database and the use of a handheld computer in the field greatly increased both the accuracy and efficiency in producing the 1:24,000-scale geologic map.

  19. Pride in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gordon; Blackburn, Bob L.

    This booklet is intended to be used as background material by social studies and history classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on Oklahoma's heritage. It includes background information on the land and people of Oklahoma (geology, climate, topography, vegetation, animals, prehistoric peoples, French explorers,…

  20. Pride in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gordon; Blackburn, Bob L.

    This booklet is intended to be used as background material by social studies and history classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on Oklahoma's heritage. It includes background information on the land and people of Oklahoma (geology, climate, topography, vegetation, animals, prehistoric peoples, French explorers,…

  1. A review of Arbuckle Group strata in Kansas from a sedimentologic perspective: Insights for future research from past and recent studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franseen, E.K.

    2000-01-01

    Arbuckle Group and equivalent-age rocks (Cambrian and Lower Ordovician) represent an important record of sediment deposition in the history of the North American continent and they contain important accumulations of hydrocarbons (oil and gas) and base metal deposits. This is true for Kansas as well where Arbuckle strata account for approximately 40% of the volume of produced petroleum and known reserves. However, in comparison to their counterparts in other areas, such as the Ellenburger and Knox, Arbuckle rocks in Kansas remain relatively understudied, especially with respect to sedimentology and diagenesis. The Arbuckle is present in the subsurface in most of Kansas and is absent only in areas of northeastern and northwestern Kansas, and over ancient uplifts and buried Precambrian highs. Arbuckle rocks thicken from north to south and are up to 1,390 feet in the southeastern corner of Kansas. Arbuckle Group and equivalent-age rocks from Kansas and surrounding areas are similar, consisting of platform deposits dominated by ramp-type subtidal to peritidal carbonates (mostly dolomitized) which can be subdivided into cycles, less than 0.5 m to 40 m thick, based on facies type and depositional patterns. Recent studies from central Kansas show that major depositional facies consist of coarse-grained packstones/ grainstones, fine-grained packstones/wackestones/mudstones, stromatolites-thrombolites, intraclastic conglomerate and breccia, and shale. In addition, secondary features include dolomitization, breccia, fracture, and conglomerate related to early subaerial exposure and later karst, burial or structural processes, silicification, and local mineralization. Arbuckle and equivalent strata in the Midcontinent were affected by prolonged subaerial exposure that began immediately after Arbuckle deposition, forming the sub-Tippecanoe to sub-Absaroka unconformity. Favorable reservoir qualities generally are thought to be related directly to basement structural elements and karstic features from the post-Arbuckle subaerial exposure event. Although most production in Kansas is from the top of the Arbuckle, some early and recent studies indicate that the Arbuckle is not a simple homogeneous reservoir, that complex vertical and lateral heterogeneities exist including both nonporous and porous horizons in the formation, and that high probability exist of locating additional oil with improved reservoir characterization. Although fracture and vuggy porosity contribute importantly to the production of Arbuckle strata, recent observations indicate a significant amount of porosity (about 50%) in many cores is controlled by depositional facies and dolomitization. Studies of Arbuckle and equivalent-age strata from other areas indicate that Arbuckle strata and diagenetic processes are complex and that porosity/permeability patterns are related to a number of processes. These studies underscore the importance of continued study of Arbuckle rocks in Kansas for improved reservoir characterization. Ongoing and future geologic studies of Arbuckle rocks in Kansas are being directed toward: (1) Continued sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and sequence stratigraphic analyses incorporating core, well log, and seismic data; (2) petrophysical studies. Initial studies indicate that core plug petrophysical properties are controlled by matrix grain size and that upscalling from plug to whole-core and drill-stem test data can identify and quantify the relative contribution of karstic, fracture and matrix porosity and permeability: (3) Regional and local structural analyses and mapping of the upper Arbuckle surface to provide more details on the contribution of structural features and karst paleogeomorphology to reservoir character; and (4) diagenetic and geochemical studies focusing especially on the timing of, and processes associated with, dolomitization and karstification events and their contributions to creating or occluding porosity.

  2. Gravity investigations of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, south-central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheirer, Daniel S.; Scheirer, Allegra Hosford

    2006-01-01

    The geological configuration of the Arbuckle Uplift in the vicinity of Chickasaw National Recreation Area in south-central Oklahoma plays a governing role in the distribution of fresh and mineral springs within the park and in the existence of artesian wells in and around the park. A confining layer of well-cemented conglomerate lies immediately below the surface of the recreation area, and groundwater migrates from an area of meteoric recharge where rocks of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer crop out as close as two kilometers to the east of the park. Prominent, Pennsylvanian-aged faults are exposed in the aquifer outcrop, and two of the fault traces project beneath the conglomerate cover toward two groups of springs within the northern section of the park. We conducted gravity fieldwork and analysis to investigate the subsurface extensions of these major faults beneath Chickasaw National Recreation Area. By defining gravity signatures of the faults where they are exposed, we infer that the Sulphur and Mill Creek Faults bend to the south-west where they are buried. The South Sulphur Fault may project westward linearly if it juxtaposes rocks that have a density contrast opposite that of that fault's density configuration in the Sulphur Syncline area. The Sulphur Syncline, whose eastern extent is exposed in the outcrop area of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, does not appear to extend beneath Chickasaw National Recreation Area nor the adjacent City of Sulphur. The South Sulphur Fault dips steeply northward, and its normal sense of offset suggests that the Sulphur Syncline is part of a graben. The Mill Creek Fault dips vertically, and the Reagan Fault dips southward, consistent with its being mapped as a thrust fault. The Sulphur and Mill Creek Synclines may have formed as pull-apart basins in a left-lateral, left-stepping strike-slip environment. The character of the gravity field of Chickasaw National Recreation Area is different from the lineated gravity field in the area of Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer outcrop. This change in character is not due to the presence of the overlying conglomerate layer, which is quite thin (<100 m) in the area of the park with the springs. The presence of relatively high-density Precambrian basement rocks in a broader region suggests that significant gravity anomalies may arise from variations in basement topography. Understanding of the geological configuration of Chickasaw National Recreation Area can be improved by expanding the study area and by investigating complementary geophysical and borehole constraints of the subsurface.

  3. Texas-Oklahoma

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... notations highlighting major geographic features. The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing ... NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science ...

  4. Oklahoma seismic network. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. |

    1993-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

  5. Geologic provinces of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Northcutt, R.A.; Campbell, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    The geologic provinces of Oklahoma are mainly the product of tectonics and attendant sedimentation of Pennsylvanian age. Most boundaries are structural; thus, the provinces map is a generalized tectonic map. Permian and post-Paleozoic strata tend to mask those structures, but most of those strata have been removed by erosion, except in the Anadarko Basin and the Wichita Uplift provinces. The location of most of Oklahoma`s oil and gas resources are either influenced by, or are the direct result of Pennsylvanian tectonics and sedimentation patterns. Therefore, the present study also defines provinces in the subsurface on the basis of geological criteria. The authors have attempted to use the originally published names for the recognized provinces. However, we have also used the most geologically correct names, i.e., Nemaha Uplift, Nemaha Fault Zone, and Central Oklahoma Fault, in lieu of Nemaha {open_quotes}Ridge.{close_quotes} Oklahoma is separated into five major uplifts and five major basins. The Gulf Coastal Plain is not included in this study because it is a veneer of Cretaceous cover that masks significant structures. Faults are the most common boundary element. Although their precise age commonly is known only approximately, their geographic location is less controversial, except in detail. Stratigraphic/structural boundaries are based on less precise geological information. The major example of a surface stratigraphic/structural boundary is the southwestern limit of the Ozark Uplift in eastern Oklahoma. Stratigraphic/structural boundaries in the subsurface are commonly based on structural or isopachous contours from well or geophysical data, or on a structural trend, as well as the experience of the authors. Basement structure is preferred. An example is the boundary that separates the Marietta Basin from adjacent geologic elements.

  6. Oklahoma and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Oklahoma and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead the…

  7. Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Victoria Duca

    2002-01-01

    The mission of Oklahoma EPSCoR is to make Oklahoma researchers more successful in competing for research funding. Specific goals, objectives, and strategies were developed for each federal EPSCoR program, based on federal and state needs. A theme of stimulating collaboration among campuses and building on common research strengths is a strong component of the Oklahoma EPSCoR strategic plan. It extends also to our relationships with the federal agencies, and wherever possible, Oklahoma EPSCoR projects are developed collaboratively with federal research laboratories and program offices. Overall, Oklahoma EPSCoR seeks to capitalize on unique research capabilities and opportunities. The NASA EPSCoR Program in Oklahoma was developed through this grant as a joint effort between Oklahoma EPSCoR and the NASA Oklahoma Space Grant Consortium (OSGC). The major goal of the Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR Plan established in 1996 is to develop an academic research enterprise directed towards a long-term, self-sustaining, nationally competitive capability in areas of mutual self-interest to NASA and Oklahoma. Our final technical summary pie chart demonstrates the strong successes we have achieved during this period as a result of the award.

  8. Heat flow and heat production in the Arkoma Basin and Oklahoma Platform, southeastern Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngmin; Deming, David; Chen, Kevin F.

    1996-11-01

    Subsurface temperature and thermal gradients along a north-south cross section through the Arkoma Basin and the Oklahoma Platform in southeastern Oklahoma were estimated from 345 bottom hole temperatures from 199 oil and gas wells. The average geothermal gradient in the southern part of the basin near the Ouachita Front is 20°C/km, exceeds 30°C/km in the middle part of the basin, and is 24°C/km on the Oklahoma Platform to the north. Drill cuttings obtained from 11 oil and gas wells were used for 843 thermal conductivity measurements. Thermal conductivity data, corrected to in situ conditions, were used to estimate heat flow. Estimated heat flow (±20%) in the deep part of the Arkoma Basin near the Ouachita Front is 35-40 mW/m2 and increases systematically northward to 60-65 mW/m2 on the Oklahoma Platform. Average heat production, estimated from gamma ray logs, is 2.3 ± 0.2 ?W/m3 for basement rocks underlying the Arkoma Basin and 2.8 ± 0.1 ?W/m3 for basement rocks in the Oklahoma Platform area. Numerical models show that heat refraction from the less conductive sedimentary rocks (˜1.6 W/m°K) of the Arkoma Basin to the more conductive crystalline rocks (˜3.0 W/m°K at 25°C) of the Oklahoma Platform and the Ouachita Mountains accounts for about 5-10 mW/m2 of the observed 20-30 mW/m2 decrease in heat flow from north to south. Changes in crustal heat production related to compositional changes and crustal thinning account for another 5-15 mW/m2 of the observed heat flow change. If the remaining 0-20 mW/m2 difference in heat flow is attributed to heat transport by topographically driven groundwater flow, the average basin-scale permeability of the Arkoma Basin and the Oklahoma Platform can be no greater than 10-15 m2. Results of this study are not generally supportive of theories which invoke topographically driven regional groundwater flow from the Arkoma Basin in Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian time (˜290 Ma) to explain the genesis of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, paleothermal anomalies, and regional diagenesis in the North American midcontinent.

  9. Dynamic Simulation of Pilot Scale CO2 Injection in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer at Wellington Field in Southern Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holubnyak, Y.; Watney, W. L.; Rush, J.; Birdie, T. R.; Fazelalavi, M.; Raney, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Arbuckle Group saline aquifer is a thick (>800 ft) and deeply buried (>3,500 ft) siliceous dolomite with interbedded shales. This aquifer is part of the Paleozoic-age Ozark Plateau Aquifer System (OPAS) in southern Kansas. It is identified as an excellent candidate for geological CO2 storage due to its location and proximity to major CO2 emission sources, high storage capacity potential, and multiple overlying sealing units, which can ensure safe CO2 storage for the long term. A DOE sponsored pilot-scale project has been funded in which 40,000 metric tons of CO2 from a nearby biofuel plant will be injected in the lower part of the Arbuckle reservoir over a period of 9 months at Wellington field in Sumner County, KS. This work focuses on development of various dynamic simulation scenarios in order to assess potential risks in support of the EPA class VI (CO2 sequestration) well permit application. The key objective is to estimate the resulting rise in pore fluid pressure, the extent of CO2 plume migration, and geomechanical and geochemical stability of the formation rock and any structural features that may be present. The over arching goal for the EPA is to ensure that the injected CO2 does not negatively impact the underground sources of drinking water in the area. A detailed geocellular model of the Arbuckle reservoir was produced based on the existing well-logs, seismic data, drill stem tests, step rate test, core analysis, and geochemical evaluations. The data from this modeled was upscaled to the CMG-based dual-permeability compositional model. Base case and alternative dynamic model simulations were conducted by varying key reservoir properties of the formation fluids, rock, and structural features.

  10. Oklahoma Healthy Homes Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fahad

    2011-01-01

    Compelling scientific evidence suggests that a strong association exists between housing-related hazards and the health and safety of their residents. Health, safety, and environmental hazards (such as asthma and allergy triggers), unintentional injury hazards, lead-based paint hazards, and poor indoor air quality are interrelated with substandard housing conditions. This article describes a Healthy Homes initiative to address these hazards in a coordinated fashion in the home, rather than taking a categorical approach, even in the presence of multiple hazards. It also provides an overview of Oklahoma's Healthy Homes initiative and its pilot project, the Tulsa Safe and Healthy Housing Project, which is currently administered in Tulsa in collaboration with Children First, Oklahoma's Nurse-Family Partnership program. This pilot project seeks to open new areas of research that can lead to a greater understanding of environmental health issues related to substandard housing in the United States, which will eventually make homes safer and healthier. PMID:21563709

  11. Oklahoma Healthy Homes initiative.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fahad

    2011-01-01

    Compelling scientific evidence suggests that a strong association exists between housing-related hazards and the health and safety of their residents. Health, safety, and environmental hazards (such as asthma and allergy triggers), unintentional injury hazards, lead-based paint hazards, and poor indoor air quality are interrelated with substandard housing conditions. This article describes a Healthy Homes initiative to address these hazards in a coordinated fashion in the home, rather than taking a categorical approach, even in the presence of multiple hazards. It also provides an overview of Oklahoma's Healthy Homes initiative and its pilot project, the Tulsa Safe and Healthy Housing Project, which is currently administered in Tulsa in collaboration with Children First, Oklahoma's Nurse-Family Partnership program. This pilot project seeks to open new areas of research that can lead to a greater understanding of environmental health issues related to substandard housing in the United States, which will eventually make homes safer and healthier. PMID:21563709

  12. Is Oklahoma getting drier?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B.; Fan, T.; Xi, B.

    2010-12-01

    Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) models, especially the Community Land Model (CLM), show a continue reduction of soil moisture over Oklahoma region from 1980 to 2008. When the top 3.5 meter of surface is considered, the total water amounts estimated from models are within the ranges of 145-150, 140-145, 135-140, and 130-135 kg/m2 for the years of 1980-1986, 1987-1993, 1994-2000, and 2001-2008, respectively. A statistically significant decreasing trend of annual mean soil moisture is also found, indicating the region may experience a continuous drying period. Although the moisture change could be related to many factors, precipitation and evaporation potentially are the two dominant meteorological variables in determining the soil moisture variation. The rainfall amounts simulated by CLM are compared well with the satellite observations of Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). Both exhibit significant decreases in the region from 1980 to 2008. The CLM rainfalls also agree well with the available in-situ rainfall measurements during 1997 to 2007 from the Oklahoma Mesonet, which consist of 120 stations over the Oklahoma. For evaporation, currently there are no reliable direct observations during the time period studied. Limited satellite observations from the Princeton land surface data set indicate likely increase of evaporation. The soil moisture and temperature from SGP has records starting 1997, which is not enough to show the trend because of large variability. But both SRB and ISCCP surface net radiative flux from 1983 to 2008 shows an increasing trend. This could support the idea of increase in evaporation. The general decreases in precipitation and possible enhancements in evaporation would reduce land surface water storage. The reduced soil moisture could have considerable impact on land surface vegetation. For the Oklahoma region, this change would have a great potential in influence of regional agriculture and society.

  13. 78 FR 78318 - Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma AGENCY: Federal... City. While the Commission instituted a freeze on the acceptance of full power television rulemaking.... Sec. 1.415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television. Federal Communications...

  14. 75 FR 18048 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ...We, the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM), are approving an amendment to the Oklahoma regulatory program (Oklahoma program) under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA or the Act). The Oklahoma Department of Mines (ODM, Oklahoma, or department) made revisions to its rules regarding circumstances under which a notice of violation may have an......

  15. Ecoregions and stream morphology in eastern Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splinter, Dale K.; Dauwalter, Daniel C.; Marston, Richard A.; Fisher, William L.

    2010-10-01

    Broad-scale variables (i.e., geology, topography, climate, land use, vegetation, and soils) influence channel morphology. How and to what extent the longitudinal pattern of channel morphology is influenced by broad-scale variables is important to fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In the last couple of decades, there has been an increase in the amount of interdisciplinary research between fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In a historical context, fluvial geomorphologists are more apt to use physiographic regions to distinguish broad-scale variables, while stream ecologists are more apt to use the concept of an ecosystem to address the broad-scale variables that influence stream habitat. For this reason, we designed a study using ecoregions, which uses physical and biological variables to understand how landscapes influence channel processes. Ecoregions are delineated by similarities in geology, climate, soils, land use, and potential natural vegetation. In the fluvial system, stream form and function are dictated by processes observed throughout the fluvial hierarchy. Recognizing that stream form and function should differ by ecoregion, a study was designed to evaluate how the characteristics of stream channels differed longitudinally among three ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma, USA: Boston Mountains, Ozark Highlands, and Ouachita Mountains. Channel morphology of 149 stream reaches was surveyed in 1st- through 4th-order streams, and effects of drainage area and ecoregion on channel morphology was evaluated using multiple regressions. Differences existed (? ? 0.05) among ecoregions for particle size, bankfull width, and width/depth ratio. No differences existed among ecoregions for gradient or sinuosity. Particle size was smallest in the Ozark Highlands and largest in the Ouachita Mountains. Bankfull width was larger in the Ozark Highlands than in the Boston Mountains and Ouachita Mountains in larger streams. Width/depth ratios of the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands were not statistically different. Significant differences existed, however, between the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands when compared individually to the Ouachita Mountains. We found that ecoregions afforded a good spatial structure that can help in understanding longitudinal trends in stream reach morphology surveyed at the reach scale. The hierarchy of the fluvial system begins within a broad, relatively homogenous setting that imparts control on processes that affect stream function. Ecoregions provide an adequate regional division to begin a large-scale geomorphic study of processes in stream channels.

  16. Ecoregions and stream morphology in eastern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Splinter, D.K.; Dauwalter, D.C.; Marston, R.A.; Fisher, W.L.

    2010-01-01

    Broad-scale variables (i.e., geology, topography, climate, land use, vegetation, and soils) influence channel morphology. How and to what extent the longitudinal pattern of channel morphology is influenced by broad-scale variables is important to fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In the last couple of decades, there has been an increase in the amount of interdisciplinary research between fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In a historical context, fluvial geomorphologists are more apt to use physiographic regions to distinguish broad-scale variables, while stream ecologists are more apt to use the concept of an ecosystem to address the broad-scale variables that influence stream habitat. For this reason, we designed a study using ecoregions, which uses physical and biological variables to understand how landscapes influence channel processes. Ecoregions are delineated by similarities in geology, climate, soils, land use, and potential natural vegetation. In the fluvial system, stream form and function are dictated by processes observed throughout the fluvial hierarchy. Recognizing that stream form and function should differ by ecoregion, a study was designed to evaluate how the characteristics of stream channels differed longitudinally among three ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma, USA: Boston Mountains, Ozark Highlands, and Ouachita Mountains. Channel morphology of 149 stream reaches was surveyed in 1st- through 4th-order streams, and effects of drainage area and ecoregion on channel morphology was evaluated using multiple regressions. Differences existed (?????0.05) among ecoregions for particle size, bankfull width, and width/depth ratio. No differences existed among ecoregions for gradient or sinuosity. Particle size was smallest in the Ozark Highlands and largest in the Ouachita Mountains. Bankfull width was larger in the Ozark Highlands than in the Boston Mountains and Ouachita Mountains in larger streams. Width/depth ratios of the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands were not statistically different. Significant differences existed, however, between the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands when compared individually to the Ouachita Mountains. We found that ecoregions afforded a good spatial structure that can help in understanding longitudinal trends in stream reach morphology surveyed at the reach scale. The hierarchy of the fluvial system begins within a broad, relatively homogenous setting that imparts control on processes that affect stream function. Ecoregions provide an adequate regional division to begin a large-scale geomorphic study of processes in stream channels. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Digital atlas of Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rea, A.H.; Becker, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    This compact disc contains 25 digital map data sets covering the State of Oklahoma that may be of interest to the general public, private industry, schools, and government agencies. Fourteen data sets are statewide. These data sets include: administrative boundaries; 104th U.S. Congressional district boundaries; county boundaries; latitudinal lines; longitudinal lines; geographic names; indexes of U.S. Geological Survey 1:100,000, and 1:250,000-scale topographic quadrangles; a shaded-relief image; Oklahoma State House of Representatives district boundaries; Oklahoma State Senate district boundaries; locations of U.S. Geological Survey stream gages; watershed boundaries and hydrologic cataloging unit numbers; and locations of weather stations. Eleven data sets are divided by county and are located in 77 county subdirectories. These data sets include: census block group boundaries with selected demographic data; city and major highways text; geographic names; land surface elevation contours; elevation points; an index of U.S. Geological Survey 1:24,000-scale topographic quadrangles; roads, streets and address ranges; highway text; school district boundaries; streams, river and lakes; and the public land survey system. All data sets are provided in a readily accessible format. Most data sets are provided in Digital Line Graph (DLG) format. The attributes for many of the DLG files are stored in related dBASE(R)-format files and may be joined to the data set polygon attribute or arc attribute tables using dBASE(R)-compatible software. (Any use of trade names in this publication is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.) Point attribute tables are provided in dBASE(R) format only, and include the X and Y map coordinates of each point. Annotation (text plotted in map coordinates) are provided in AutoCAD Drawing Exchange format (DXF) files. The shaded-relief image is provided in TIFF format. All data sets except the shaded-relief image also are provided in ARC/INFO export-file format.

  18. Promoting School Readiness in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gormley, William T., Jr.; Gayer, Ted

    2005-01-01

    The results of the research, conducted on Oklahoma's universal Pre-kindergarten (Pre-k) program, on children of Tulsa Public Schools (TPS), the largest school district in the state to increase the school readiness are presented.

  19. Cerulean Warbler occurrence and habitat use of Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leslie, David M., Jr.; O'Connell, Timothy J.; Cavalieri, Vincent S.

    2011-01-01

    Dendroica cerulea (Cerulean Warbler) is a migrant songbird that has declined rangewide in recent decades. We surveyed 150 sites in 2006–2007 to determine if this species still occupied its former breeding range in Oklahoma. We located Cerulean Warblers at 5 sites and confirmed breeding on north slopes of two heavily forested ridges in the Ouachita Mountains. We did not encounter Cerulean Warblers in any bottomland hardwoods, despite the former widespread distribution and abundance of the species in such habitats. While habitat loss and degradation may limit occurrence of Cerulean Warbler in some areas, the pattern of decline for this species at the edge of its range in Oklahoma is also consistent with abandonment of peripheral range as the range-wide population declines.

  20. Geochemical and Mineralogical Investigation for Carbon Capture and Storage, Within the Arbuckle Aquifer, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, S.; Campbell, B.; Vega, M.; Barker, R. L.; Holubnyak, E.; Watney, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    A class VI permit site under U.S. Department of Energy has been proposed for carbon sequestration in south-central Kansas. In an effort to maintain environmental stability three wells have been drilled to basement rock, two being near the injection site, KGS 1-32 and KGS 1-28, and one being to the western annex, Cutter KGS #1. The western annex site, Cutter, is being utilized as a cross-comparison for mineralogical, geochemical, and structural component to the eastern sites in Wellington. A link will be determined of the continuity of three zones of interest: the Mississippian pay zone (3670'-3700'), a potential baffle zone in the upper Arbuckle (4400'-4550'), and the proposed CO2 injection zone (4900'-5050'). 11 depths within Cutter have been swabbed, and samples taken to investigate the chemistry of the subsurface formation water. The different depths will allow for a quantitative determination of how the brine composition varies with depth, and also provides a baseline for future monitoring. Initial chemical analysis by ICP-OES and HR-ICP-MS show a hyper saline brine (50,000-190,000TDS), dominated by Cl, Na, and Ca ions. pH ranges from 6.4 to 7.5, and total alkalinity from 124 and 378 mg/L of HCO¬3-. One complex, yet intriguing, species is Iron. It could potentially allow for further precipitation of the CO2¬ from the formation of Fe carbonates, such as siderite. Cores and thin sections were taken from a variety of depths ranging from 3681.9' to 5176.9' (Wellington) and 5564.3' to 7540.2' (Cutter). Dominant mineralogy consists of dolomite with varying forms of silicic intrusions, usually in the form of chert nodules with sulfide minerals and argillaceous materials in between. Extensive vugs and microfractures allow for varying porosity within each interval. Pay zone rocks typically display fine-grained cherty dolomite with subhedral to euhedral dolomite rhombs as well as oil stains oriented in parallel blotches. Characteristics such as high porosity and small grain size could potentially lead to quicker reactions with CO2 saturated brine, releasing oil trapped in pore spaces and leading to enhanced oil recovery. The rocks of the baffle zone are characterized by a low porosity dolomitic packstone with increasing abundance of chert, argillaceous materials, and sulfide minerals towards the bottom of the zone. Baffle zone relative impermeability could also allow for improved CO2 reactivity as it would have more time to react with formation minerals. The injection zone is generally composed of dolomite with siliceous nodules that slightly increases with depth. Explicit heterogeneity exists at carbonate-chert boundaries usually occurring in fractures and heavily influencing CO2 to mobilize in a convoluted, potentially lateral fashion. Flow through experiments have been conducted in order to determine reactivity and stability of the overlying cap rocks and baffle zone. Reservoir characterization is determined through geochemical modeling, and will need to be extensively studied in order to properly determine the feasibility for carbon sequestration in Kansas. With the potential for 2.7 billion tones of CO2 to be stored in Kansas, this project could allow Kansas to play a major role in the quest for environmental stability.

  1. Subsidence and thermal history of Southern Oklahoma aulacogen: implications for petroleum exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Feinstein, S.

    1981-12-01

    Reconstructed subsidence curves and the thermal history of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen support the concept of thermally controlled isostatic subsidence for the formation of the basin and indicate the significance of this concept for petroleum exploration. Two mechanisms - initial elastic flexure, followed by detachment and differential subsidence of the aulacogen - are inferred from the subsidence curves. Two methods have been used for reconstruction of the thermal history. A tectonophysics model in combination with a history of basin evolution demonstrates that geothermal gradient and depth-of-burial were dynamic variables during the subsidence stage; maximum paleotemperatures were attained during Sylvan (Late Ordovician) time near the close of subsidence; and most of the Arbuckle Group had been subjected to the temperature conditions of oil formation (the oil liquid window) prior to the possible phase of fluid migration in Sylvan time. The second method, involving reconstruction of the geothermal history on the basis of geothermometry (palynomorph carbonization), suggests: (1) paleotemperatures exerted a significant effect on the level of organic metamorphism in the sedimentary rocks; (2) the geothermal gradient varied during the subsidence stage; (3) paleotemperatures were higher than those predicted by the theoretical model and support the hypothesis of formation of the basin by thermally controlled subsidence, and the application of this concept for petroleum exploration.

  2. Recognition and regional correlation of impact-related {open_quotes}Ames Crater{close_quotes} Arbuckle and Simpson reservoir lithofacies

    SciTech Connect

    Kuykendall, M.D.

    1995-09-01

    The concentric structural feature known as the {open_quotes}Ames Hole{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Ames Crater{close_quotes}, located on the northern shelf of the Anadarko Basin, contains several heterogeneous and uniquely associated hydrocarbon reservoirs, as well as a locally thick (craterfilling) Middle Ordovician (Simpson shale) source rock. Critical diagnostic structural and morphological features, along with petrographic and shock metamorphism evidence, strongly support and impact origin of the structure. Principle crater reservoirs include extremely brecciated, fractured, and faulted, Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Group dolomites, Pre-Cambrian granodiorities, devitrified pseudo-pyroclastic (impact melt) rocks, and a rather homogenous, dolomitic ejecta-fallout breccia, which is present along the rim and flanks of the crater. Stratigraphic trapping of hydrocarbons associated with the presence of reservoir-quality ejecta-fallout lithologies unconformably present in the upper portion of the Arbuckle Group, and in reworked, arkosic/dolomitic impact-related lithofacies within the overlying basal Simpson Group, may exist both locally and regionally relative to the {open_quotes}Ames Crater{close_quotes}. Calibration of log-rock characteristics of ejecta-fallout reservoir lithofacies from key crater rim wells provides the basis for field-wide and regional inferences about lithologies, reservoir quality, and related production characteristics. An awareness and understanding of impact-related {open_quotes}Ames Crater{close_quotes} Arbuckle and Simpson lithofacies should lead to refinement of regional Lower and Middle Ordovician stratigraphy, and create renewed exploration strategies for potential stratigraphic traps.

  3. Oklahoma's Federally-Recognized Indian Tribes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City. Indian Education Section.

    This document compiles lesson plans, classroom activities, and facts from previous Oklahoma state publications about Oklahoma's American Indian peoples. "Oklahoma's Indian People: Images of Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow" contains brief presentations and related class activities and writing assignments about the histories of approximately 29…

  4. Oklahoma Higher Education: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denhart, Matthew; Matgouranis, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A major headline in recent years has been that cash-strapped state governments are cutting back support for many services, including public higher education. Oklahoma is no different. Indeed, in the most recent state budget crafted by Oklahoma policymakers, Oklahoma's public colleges and universities received a 5.8 percent cut in state…

  5. 75 FR 47650 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00042

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00042 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 08/03... determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Oklahoma. Contiguous...

  6. 75 FR 30871 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00038 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA..., McIntosh, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie, Seminole. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans...

  7. 76 FR 24555 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00045

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00045 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA... Loans Only): Oklahoma: Bryan, Choctaw, Coal, Johnston, Pittsburg, Pushmataha. The Interest Rates...

  8. 78 FR 42147 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00073

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00073 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 4117-DR), dated 06/28/2013. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes and flooding..., Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Okmulgee, Pittsburg, Pottawatomie, Pushmataha, Seminole. The Interest Rates...

  9. 77 FR 26598 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00059

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00059 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma. Incident... Counties: Oklahoma: Dewey, Ellis, Harper, Major, Woods. The Interest Rates are: Percent For Physical...

  10. 78 FR 31998 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00071

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00071 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA... and Economic Injury Loans): Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie. Contiguous...

  11. MISR Scans the Texas-Oklahoma Border

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These MISR images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images on the left, from top to bottom, are from the 70-degree forward viewing camera, the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera, and the 70-degree aftward viewing camera. The higher brightness, bluer tinge, and reduced contrast of the oblique views result primarily from scattering of sunlight in the Earth's atmosphere, though some color and brightness variations are also due to differences in surface reflection at the different angles. The longer slant path through the atmosphere at the oblique angles also accentuates the appearance of thin, high-altitude cirrus clouds.

    On the right, two areas from the nadir camera image are shown in more detail, along with notations highlighting major geographic features. The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, and prairies, the Red River and the Canadian River are important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and flow eastward, their waters eventually discharging into the Mississippi River.

    A smoke plume to the north of the Ouachita Mountains and east of Lake Eufaula is visible in the detailed nadir imagery. The plume is also very obvious at the 70-degree forward view angle, to the right of center and about one-fourth of the way down from the top of the image.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  12. Recent developments at Wilburton field, Latimer County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, R.C. )

    1989-08-01

    Recent deeper drilling in Wilburton field has resulted in new production from the Spiro, Cromwell, and Arbuckle formations in a structurally high fault block in situ beneath the old field pay in the overthrusted Spiro. ARCO Oil and Gas Company first found production from Spiro in situ beneath a low-angle thrust fault in Sec. 36, T5N, R17E. Nine wells now produce from this reservoir. Two wells have been completed below the Spiro in the in-situ Cromwell reservoir, and others are thought to be productive. Three wells are currently being drilled for insitu Spiro and Cromwell. Structural data generated by drilling the in-situ Spiro and Cromwell pays revealed a southwest-dipping, upthrown fault block with nearly 2,000 ft of vertical relief. ARCO tested this feature with their ARCO 2 Yourman well in Sec. 15, T5N, R18E, discovering prolific gas production from the Arbuckle. The Arbuckle reservoir consists largely of vugs and solution-enlarged fractures in a clean dolostone. Conventional neutron-density logs show very low porosity, but cores and formation microscanner images reveal the vugs, some of which are several inches across. Permeability is created by a pervasive system of younger fractures and microfaults. All current production is from the uppermost 700 ft of the Arbuckle, with a gas column of at least 1,100 ft. To date, six Arbuckle wells have been completed, two are in completion, and two are being drilled.

  13. Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingraham, Sandy

    This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school…

  14. Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma Inst. for Child Advocacy, Inc., Oklahoma City. Oklahoma Kids Count.

    This Kids Count report details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical report is based on eight indicators of child well being: (1) economic distress; (2) percent low birthweight infants; (3) infant mortality rate; (4) births to teens; (5) child abuse and neglect rates; (6) child and teen death rate;…

  15. Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '98.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma Inst. for Child Advocacy, Inc., Oklahoma City. Oklahoma Kids Count.

    This Kids Count report details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school dropouts; and (8)…

  16. Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '96.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingraham, Sandy

    This data book presents findings of the Kids Count Project on current conditions faced by Oklahoma children age birth through 18. This second annual factbook organizes state and county data over a period of time to enable conditions for children in each county to be compared and ranked. The benchmark indicators studied include low birthweight…

  17. Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingraham, Sandy

    This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of children in Oklahoma. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school…

  18. Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingraham, Sandy

    This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school…

  19. What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase II State Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano Research Laboratory, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Phase II provides a more detailed examination of classroom variables important to achievement in Oklahoma schools. Where Phase I addressed all nine of the Oklahoma essential elements using survey data, Phase II focuses on what occurs in Oklahoma classrooms primarily using data from principal interviews, classroom observations (on-site), and video…

  20. 75 FR 68398 - Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad, LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Texas, Oklahoma...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... Surface Transportation Board Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad, LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad Company Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad, LLC (TOE), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to acquire from Texas,...

  1. Literature of the Plains and Mountains: Programs for Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesmith, Lorraine, Comp.

    A 1-year project in Colorado, Kansas, and Oklahoma is designed to assist rural librarians in implementing humanities programming for adults; "Literature of the Plains and Mountains" is one of three packets compiled for the project. The packet is designed to provide a step-by-step guide for the librarian with little or no experience in adult…

  2. Women of the Plains and Mountains: Programs for Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesmith, Lorraine, Comp.

    Rural librarians in Colorado, Kansas, and Oklahoma are involved in a 1-year project designed to assist them in implementing humanities programming for adults; "Women of the Plains and Mountains" is one of three packets compiled for the project. The packet is designed to provide a step-by-step guide for the librarian with little or no experience in…

  3. Heritage of the Plains and Mountains: Programs for Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesmith, Lorraine, Comp.

    Thirty rural libraries in Colorado, Kansas, and Oklahoma have been selected to participate in a 1-year project to assist public librarians in implementing humanities programming for adults; "Heritage of the Plains and Mountains" is one of three packets compiled for the project. The packet is designed to provide a step-by-step guide for the…

  4. Risk across disciplines: An interdisciplinary examination of water and drought risk in South-Central Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazrus, H.; Paimazumder, D.; Towler, E.; McPherson, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Drought is a challenge faced by communities across the United States, exacerbated by growing demands on water resources and climate variability and change. The Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer (ASA) in south-central Oklahoma, situated in the heart of the Chickasaw Nation, is the state's only sole-source groundwater basin and sustains the Blue River, the state's only free-flowing river. The recent comprehensive hydrological studies of the aquifer indicate the need for sustainable management of the amount of water extracted. However, the question of how to deal with that management in the face of increasing drought vulnerability, diverse demands, and climate variability and change remains. Water management carries a further imperative to be inclusive of tribal and non-tribal interests. To examine this question, we are conducting an investigation of drought risk from multiple disciplines. Anthropological data comes from stakeholder interviews that were designed to investigate conflict over water management by understanding how people perceive risk differently based on different opinions about the structure of the resource, varying levels of trust in authorities, and unequal access to resources. . The Cultural Theory of Risk is used to explain how people view risks as part of their worldviews and why people who hold different worldviews disagree about risks associated with water availability. Meteorological analyses of longitudinal data indicate periods of drought that are noted in stakeholder interviews. Analysis of stream gauge data investigates the influence of climate variability on local hydrologic impacts, such as changing groundwater levels and streamflows, that are relevant to planning and management decisions in the ASA. Quantitative assessment of future drought risk and associated uncertainty and their effect on type and scale of future economic and social impacts are achieved by combining elements of statistical and dynamical downscaling to improve predictions of local impacts using Hybrid Statistical-Dynamical Downscaling Technique.

  5. Onion transplant production system for Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onions are a valuable specialty crop. Unfortunately, commercially available transplants in Oklahoma are often produced in a different area of the country and shipped into Oklahoma, resulting in a limited cultivar selection, non-adapted cultivars, poor crop stands, high bolting incidence, and low pro...

  6. 76 FR 59766 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00056

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00056 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  7. Organic vegetable weed control research in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lane Agriculture Research Center is operated by Oklahoma State University and the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Located in southeastern Oklahoma, 13 resident scientists work cooperatively to develop production practices for organic vegetable production. On...

  8. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  9. 77 FR 37728 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00060

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00060 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 4064-DR), dated 06/14/2012. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes,...

  10. 75 FR 11949 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00035

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00035 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1883-DR), dated 03/05/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm. Incident Period:...

  11. 76 FR 30224 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00047

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00047 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Oklahoma (FEMA-- 1985--DR), dated 05/13/2011. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and...

  12. 75 FR 10330 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00034

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00034 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1876-DR), dated 02/25/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm. Incident Period:...

  13. 76 FR 33394 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00051

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00051 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Oklahoma (FEMA-- 1988--DR), dated 05/27/2011. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding....

  14. 75 FR 35103 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00040 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is... State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1917-DR), dated 06/11/2010. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, and...

  15. 40 CFR 81.424 - Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oklahoma. 81.424 Section 81.424 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.424 Oklahoma. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  16. 75 FR 45679 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00043

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00043 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1926-DR), dated 07/26/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Beaver, Cimarron, Lincoln, Logan, Major,...

  17. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Oklahoma, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Oklahoma for 2010. Oklahoma made progress in narrowing achievement gaps for most major subgroups on the End-of-Instruction (EOI) test in Algebra I. Trends in achievement gaps could not be determined for other grades in math, or for any grades in reading, because the state…

  18. Restoration of One-Room School Facilities in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, Kenneth H.

    Within the last 4 years, four one-room school houses have been restored for use as educational museum facilities. These include the Pleasant Valley School in Stillwater, Oklahoma; the Rose Hill School at Perry, Oklahoma; the old school located on the grounds of the Harn Homestead Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; and the Old Roll School, located…

  19. Arsenic-related water quality with depth and water quality of well-head samples from production wells, Oklahoma, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, Carol J.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Greer, James R.; Smith, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey well profiler was used to describe arsenic-related water quality with well depth and identify zones yielding water with high arsenic concentrations in two production wells in central and western Oklahoma that yield water from the Permian-aged Garber-Wellington and Rush Springs aquifers, respectively. In addition, well-head samples were collected from 12 production wells yielding water with historically large concentrations of arsenic (greater than 10 micrograms per liter) from the Garber-Wellington aquifer, Rush Springs aquifer, and two minor aquifers: the Arbuckle-Timbered Hills aquifer in southern Oklahoma and a Permian-aged undefined aquifer in north-central Oklahoma. Three depth-dependent samples from a production well in the Rush Springs aquifer had similar water-quality characteristics to the well-head sample and did not show any substantial changes with depth. However, slightly larger arsenic concentrations in the two deepest depth-dependent samples indicate the zones yielding noncompliant arsenic concentrations are below the shallowest sampled depth. Five depth-dependent samples from a production well in the Garber-Wellington aquifer showed increases in arsenic concentrations with depth. Well-bore travel-time information and water-quality data from depth-dependent and well-head samples showed that most arsenic contaminated water (about 63 percent) was entering the borehole from perforations adjacent to or below the shroud that overlaid the pump. Arsenic concentrations ranged from 10.4 to 124 micrograms per liter in 11 of the 12 production wells sampled at the well head, exceeding the maximum contaminant level of 10 micrograms per liter for drinking water. pH values of the 12 well-head samples ranged from 6.9 to 9. Seven production wells in the Garber-Wellington aquifer had the largest arsenic concentrations ranging from 18.5 to 124 micrograms per liter. Large arsenic concentrations (10.4-18.5) and near neutral to slightly alkaline pH values (6.9-7.4) were detected in samples from one well in the Garber-Wellington aquifer, three production wells in the Rush Springs aquifer, and one well in an undefined Permian-aged aquifer. All well-head samples were oxic and arsenate was the only species of arsenic in water from 10 of the 12 production wells sampled. Arsenite was measured above the laboratory reporting level in water from a production well in the Garber-Wellington aquifer and was the only arsenic species measured in water from the Arbuckle-Timbered Hills aquifer. Fluoride and uranium were the only trace elements, other than arsenic, that exceeded the maximum contaminant level for drinking water in well-head samples collected for the study. Uranium concentrations in four production wells in the Garber-Wellington aquifer ranged from 30.2 to 99 micrograms per liter exceeding the maximum contaminant level of 30 micrograms per liter for drinking water. Water from these four wells also had the largest arsenic concentrations measured in the study ranging from 30 to 124 micrograms

  20. Petroleum geochemistry of Texas and Oklahoma oils from the Marathon/Ouachita fold belt

    SciTech Connect

    Curiale, J.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The Marathon uplift of west Texas and the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma and Arkansas comprise the surface expressions of a Paleozoic orogenic belt extending across the south-central United States. A century of petroleum exploration in the Marathon and Ouachita exposures has yielded several oil discoveries. In this study, detailed molecular, elemental, and isotopic data are presented for nine Texas oils, five Oklahoma oils, and four Oklahoma solid bitumens, all associated with thrust belt rocks of the Marathons and Ouachitas. Oil-oil and oil-solid bitumen correlations are proposed, and the character of the organic matter in the source rock(s) is deduced from the chemistry of the oils and solid bitumens. All 18 samples are sourced from the same (or very similar) organic matter. This indicates that they are probably cogenetic, despite geographic separations of hundreds of miles. Chemical differences in these samples derive from secondary effects, including biodegradation (e.g., solid bitumens) and differing levels of thermal maturity. The occurrence of unusual chemical compounds (certain bisnor- and trisnor-hopanes) in all samples probably indicates the presence of anaerobic bacteria in the depositional environment. Source deductions from oil chemistry suggest that an Ordovician unit is responsible for these oils and solid bitumens. This conclusion is consistent with previous literature suggesting an Upper Ordovician source for Oklahoma Ouachita oils and supports tectonic reconstructions of the region during Ordovician time.

  1. 75 FR 42173 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00041

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 07/13/2010. Incident: Tornadoes, Severe Storms, Straight Line Winds and Flooding. Incident Period: 06/13/2010 through...

  2. Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to increase the awareness of students of space sciences and commerce through experimentation. This objective was carried out through the award and administration, by OSIDA, the Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority, of eleven smaller grants to fund thirteen projects at schools determined by competitive application. Applications were graded on potential outreach, experimentation objectives and impact on students' awareness of space sciences. We chose projects from elementary, middle and high schools as well as colleges that would encourage students through research and experimentation to consider education and careers in related disciplines. Each organization did not receive an equal share of the grant; instead, OSIDA distributed the money to each project based on the organization's need. A copy of the dispersement record is enclosed with this final grant report. The projects covered topics such as: space colonization, space stations, constellations, model rocketry, and space commerce.

  3. Seismicity of the salt areas of Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Racine, D.; Klouda, P.

    1980-02-01

    The results of a seismicity study of the salt deposit areas of Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and Louisiana are presented. The study was conducted using some of the short-period seismic data recorded on film at the Wichita Mountain Observatory (WMSO), located in southern Oklahoma, during the years 1961 through 1968. Only data recorded on Sundays were analyzed to minimize the confusion of quarry blasts. All major quarries within 400 km of WMSO were located and some of the known blasts were studied for distinguishing characteristics. Inquiries were made to the appropriate state agencies for data to produce a list of historical seismic events which occurred during the 1961 to 1968 period. A salt deposit composite map of the areas was also produced and all historical and previously unreported events, as well as the known quarries, were plotted on this base map.

  4. OKLAHOMA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our contribution to this annual newsletter is a summary of research accomplishments in the past year in germplasm enhancement for aphid resistance in barley and wheat at the USDA-ARS Plant Science and Water Conservation Research Laboratory , Stillwater, OK. Russian Wheat aphid, Greenbug, Bird Cherr...

  5. 78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... implementing NEPA and the FRA's Procedures for Considering Environmental Impacts as set forth in 64 FR 28545...) for the State of Oklahoma High-Speed Rail Initiative: Tulsa--Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor... currently has no passenger rail service. This corridor is part of the South Central High Speed Rail...

  6. The Oklahoma State Study of Oklahoma's Public Higher Education Physical Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G., Ed.; And Others

    This project examines policies related to facilities at public institutions of higher education in Oklahoma in the context of a current legislative debate over a bond issue to fund facilities. The last bond issue for Oklahoma higher education was in 1968. Verification of a representative sample of 27 campus master plans validated an earlier…

  7. What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase III Action Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano Research Laboratory, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This document contains the Phase III report from the "What Works in Oklahoma Schools" study. As opposed to describing the findings from the study that was conducted, it provides a tool-kit that can be used by Oklahoma principals and teachers to determine the best courses of action for their schools and classrooms. The tools provided in this report…

  8. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shaieb, Z.; Thomas, R.G.; Stewart, G.F.

    1982-04-01

    Uranium resources of the Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Five areas of uranium favorability were delineated. Diagenetically altered, quartzose and sublithic, eolian and marginal-marine sandstones of the Permian Rush Springs Formation overlying the Cement Anticline are favorable for joint-controlled deposits in sandstone, non-channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits, and Texas roll-front deposits. Three areas contain lithologies favorable for channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits: arkosic sandstones and granule conglomerates of the Permian Post Oak Conglomerate south of the Wichita Mountains; subarkosic and sublithic Lower Permian fluvio-deltaic and coastal-plain sandstones of the eastern Red River Valley; and subsurface arkosic, subarkosic, and sublithic alluvial-fan and fan-delta sandstones of the Upper Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian sequence in the eastern Hollis Basin. The coarse-grained facies of the Cambrian Quanah Granite and genetically related aplite and pegmatite dikes in the Wichita Mountains are favorable for orthomagmatic and autometasomatic deposits, respectively.

  9. Christmas Mountains

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Christmas Mountains     View Larger Image ... New Brunswick. Located above image center are the Christmas Mountains, a region of old-growth forest nestled in a remote wilderness. Within ... and in frozen lakes and rivers appears in hues of blue and white. The picture includes parts of eastern Maine at the left and Quebec's ...

  10. Cambrian Magmatism Along the Southern Laurentian Margin: New Petrologic Constraints from Well Cuttings in the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, J. M.; Brueseke, M. E.; Mertzman, S. A.; Puckett, R. E., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatism in the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen (SOA) is associated with >250,000 km3 of early Cambrian aged mafic-silicic intrusives and effusive products possibly related to the opening of the Iapetus Ocean. In the vicinity of the Arbuckle Mts., thick mafic to intermediate lava packages interbedded with rhyolite lavas and sedimentary strata are exposed in the subsurface and penetrated by oil and gas exploration wells. We have sampled cuttings from six wells exposed along the strike of the SOA with the aim of petrographically, geochemically, and isotopically characterizing the rocks to better understand their tectonomagmatic affinity. Cuttings were observed under a binocular microscope to ensure textural homogeneity; XRF bulk chemistry from these samples show that they are relatively unaltered based on analytical totals and alteration indices. The samples plot as basalts to andesites (e.g., 47-64 wt. % SiO2) and are primarily tholeiitic. On discrimination diagrams, these samples fall in "intraplate" fields, consistent with continental basalt volcanism, including flood basalt eruptions. These lavas show Zr/Nb values ranging from 6.8 to 11.1, K/Nb values ranging from 300-600, and Ba/Nb values ranging from 10-20, which are similar to EM1 OIB. The samples also show trace element patterns consistent with OIB-like mantle sources when normalized to primitive mantle, and similar geochemical traits to the Roosevelt Gabbros that crop out along strike of the SOA in the Wichita Mts.. Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope analysis is ongoing. Chemostratigraphic variations show the possibility of several lava packages. The geochemical analyses of the SOA lava flows provide insight into how these magmas formed as well as what tectonic regime (e.g., lower-mantle derived plume, upper-mantle extension, or "leaky" transform fault) produced the volcanism that affected the southern margin of Laurentia during the formation of the SOA; we favor the involvement of a deep mantle plume.

  11. A transgression-regression event during the deposition of the Upper Cambrian Honey Creek formation in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    SciTech Connect

    McElmoyl, C.; Donovan, R.N. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-02-01

    The transgression that inundated the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen during the upper Cambrian enveloped a landscape that consisted of hills of rhyolite up to 350 m in high. Initial deposits on this topography have been interpreted as alluvium. These, together with succeeding tidally-influenced marine siliciclastics form the Reagan Formation. The siliciclastics grains are made up of fragments of local origin (i.e., rhyolite), quartz (derived from a distal source) and authigenic glauconite. The upward passage from the Reagan to the Honeycreek Formation is defined by the addition to the siliciclastics of carbonate detritus in the form of tidally-influenced grainstones, mostly composed of pelmatozoan fragments. The passage from the Honeycreek to the overlying Fort Sill Formation of the Arbuckle Group is marked by the incoming of beds of lime mudstone and the gradual disappearance of grainstones and siliciclastics. Evidence of the existence of rhyolite topography (i.e., an archipelago) can be detected to within 50 m of the top of the Fort Sill. While the overall facies pattern undoubtedly records a widespread transgression, a newly-discovered slightly angular unconformity within the lower part of the Honeycreek is best interpreted as a record of a temporary regression. Three distinctive lithologies are involved in this relationship: the lowest beds are light grey cross-bedded pelmatozoan grainstones with minor amounts of quartz and rhyolite grains. Syntaxial cements at the base of this unit are homogenous under cathode luminescence, while cements near the top display up to 27 zones of reflectance, interpreted as a fluctuating marine-meteoric groundwater imprint. The overlying bed is a red-brown mud-supported limestone that contains abundant angular rhyolite pebbles and a rich trilobite fauna. Some of the pebbles are coated by pelmatozoans.

  12. Percentile Distributions of Median Nitrite Plus Nitrate as Nitrogen, Total Nitrogen, and Total Phosphorus Concentrations in Oklahoma Streams, 1973-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggard, Brian E.; Masoner, Jason R.; Becker, Carol J.

    2003-01-01

    Nutrients are one of the primary causes of water-quality impairments in streams, lakes, reservoirs, and estuaries in the United States. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed regional-based nutrient criteria using ecoregions to protect streams in the United States from impairment. However, nutrient criteria were based on nutrient concentrations measured in large aggregated nutrient ecoregions with little relevance to local environmental conditions in states. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is using a dichotomous process known as Use Support Assessment Protocols to define nutrient criteria in Oklahoma streams. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board is modifying the Use Support Assessment Protocols to reflect nutrient informa-tion and environmental characteristics relevant to Oklahoma streams, while considering nutrient information grouped by geographic regions based on level III ecoregions and state boundaries. Percentile distributions of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorous concentrations were calculated from 563 sites in Oklahoma and 4 sites in Arkansas near the Oklahoma and Arkansas border to facilitate development of nutrient criteria for Oklahoma streams. Sites were grouped into four geographic regions and were categorized into eight stream categories by stream slope and stream order. The 50th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus concentrations were greater in the Ozark Highland ecoregion and were less in the Ouachita Mountains ecoregion when compared to other geographic areas used to group sites. The 50th percentiles of median concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus were least in first, second, and third order streams. The 50th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations in the Ozark Highland and Ouachita Mountains ecoregions were least in first, second, and third order streams with streams slopes greater than 17 feet per mile. Nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen and total nitrogen criteria determined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for the Ozark Highland ecoregion were less than the 25th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus concentrations in the Ozark Highland ecoregion calculated for this report. Nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen and total nitrogen criteria developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for the Ouachita Mountains ecoregion were similar to the 25th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen and total nitrogen concentrations in the Ouachita Mountains ecoregion calculated for this report. Nitrate as nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations currently (2002) used in the Use Support Assessment Protocols for Oklahoma were greater than the 75th percentiles of median nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations calculated for this report.

  13. Annual Employment Outcomes Report. Oklahoma State System of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

    This study examined the percentage of Oklahoma residents who graduate from Oklahoma public colleges and universities and remain in the state, and the impact of educational level on salaries. Data on Oklahoma state system degree recipients from 1992-1993 through 1996-1997 were obtained from the State Regents' Unitized Data System. It was found that…

  14. Muriel Wright: Telling the Story of Oklahoma Indian Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cesar, Dana; Smith, Joan K.; Noley, Grayson

    2004-01-01

    The Wright family, descended from the patriarch Allen Wright, who arrived in the new Choctaw Nation after surviving the "Trail of Tears," played an important role in Oklahoma politics and society. Following removal to Oklahoma, Allen went on to become Principal Chief of the Choctaw Nation and gave the name, Oklahoma, to the southwest territory. He…

  15. Drought and grazing effects on Oklahoma phlox (Polemoniaceae, Phlox oklahomensis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oklahoma phlox (Phlox oklahomensis Wherry) is endemic to Butler, Chautauqua, Comanche, Cowley, and Elk Counties of Kansas and Woods and Woodward Counties of Oklahoma. The species comprises populations of a few scattered individuals to several hundred in mixed-grass prairie sites in Oklahoma where co...

  16. 25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Railroads in Oklahoma. 169.24 Section 169.24 Indians....24 Railroads in Oklahoma. (a) The Act of February 28, 1902 (32 Stat. 43), authorizes right-of-way.... Except when otherwise determined by the Secretary, railroad rights-of-way in Oklahoma granted under...

  17. 75 FR 32491 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1917-DR), dated May 24, 2010, and related... in certain areas of the State of Oklahoma resulting from severe storms, tornadoes, and straight-...

  18. 78 FR 40819 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4... Oklahoma (FEMA--4117-DR), dated 05/20/ 2013. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes and flooding. Incident... INFORMATION: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated...

  19. 75 FR 15755 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00034

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00034 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1876-DR), dated 02/25/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Oklahoma, dated 02/25/2010, is hereby amended to...

  20. 75 FR 11904 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1876-DR), dated February 25, 2010, and related... the damage in certain areas of the State of Oklahoma resulting from a severe winter storm during...

  1. 75 FR 15755 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00035

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00035 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1883-DR), dated 03/05/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Oklahoma, dated 03/05/2010, is hereby amended to...

  2. 78 FR 45282 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 5... Oklahoma (FEMA--4117--DR), dated 05/20/ 2013. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes and Flooding. Incident... INFORMATION: The notice of the President's major disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated...

  3. 75 FR 15450 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1883-DR), dated March 5, 2010, and related... in certain areas of the State of Oklahoma resulting from a severe winter storm during the period...

  4. 78 FR 33464 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR), dated 05/20/ 2013. Incident: Severe Storms and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 05/18...: The notice of the President's major disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated...

  5. 75 FR 45648 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... SECURITY Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency... the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1926-DR), dated July 26, 2010, and related determinations. DATES... certain areas of the State of Oklahoma resulting from severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds,...

  6. 75 FR 42173 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1917-DR), dated 06/11/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Oklahoma, dated...

  7. 76 FR 37166 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00050

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00050 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Oklahoma (FEMA--1989--DR), dated 06/06/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and... OKLAHOMA, dated 06/06/2011 is hereby amended to include the following areas as adversely affected by...

  8. 76 FR 50535 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00052 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR), dated 06/21/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Oklahoma, dated...

  9. 78 FR 36556 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR), dated May 20, 2013, and related... determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Oklahoma resulting from severe storms...

  10. 78 FR 45282 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00073

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00073 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA--4117--DR), dated 06/28/2013. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of OKLAHOMA, dated 06/28/2013,...

  11. 77 FR 41195 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4064-DR), dated June 14, 2012, and related... determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Oklahoma resulting from severe storms,...

  12. 76 FR 36559 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1985-DR), dated May 13, 2011, and related... determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Oklahoma resulting from a severe winter storm...

  13. 75 FR 32821 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00038 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Oklahoma (FEMA--1917--DR), dated 05/24/ 2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Straight-Line Winds.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma,...

  14. 76 FR 27076 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1970-DR), dated April 22, 2011, and related... have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Oklahoma resulting from severe...

  15. Social and Economic Consequences of Indian Gaming in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Kenneth W., II; Spilde, Katherine A.; Taylor, Jonathan B.

    2004-01-01

    The balancing framework of Indian gaming as it operates in Oklahoma constrains Oklahoma Indian nations from operating facilities according to the dictates of the marketplace on a large-scale Class III basis. Indian gaming actually brings substantial net economic benefits to the state, contrary to claims that Oklahoma Indian gaming benefits come at…

  16. 76 FR 44030 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1988-DR), dated May 27, 2011, and related... determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Oklahoma resulting from severe storms...

  17. 25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Railroads in Oklahoma. 169.24 Section 169.24 Indians....24 Railroads in Oklahoma. (a) The Act of February 28, 1902 (32 Stat. 43), authorizes right-of-way.... Except when otherwise determined by the Secretary, railroad rights-of-way in Oklahoma granted under...

  18. Organic petrology of epi-impsonite at Page, Oklahoma, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardott, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    Impsonite (asphaltic pyrobitumen) occurs as fracture-filling veins cutting massive sandstone in the frontal Ouachita Mountains near Page, Oklahoma. The Page impsonite formed from low-temperature alteration of crude oil. Mean maximum bitumen reflectance in oil immersion (Rmax) of seven samples is 1.41-1.96%. Mean apparent bireflectance of these samples is 0.15-0.54%. The Page deposit classifies at the upper end of epi-impsonite in the generic classification for solid bitumen, based on physical, chemical, and optical characteristics, and as post-oil with unlimited migration in the genetic classification for solid bitumen. ?? 1991.

  19. A Legal Analysis of Litigation against Oklahoma Educators and School Districts under the Oklahoma Governmental Tort Claims Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacefield, Kevin Lee

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation analyzed public court decisions in cases against Oklahoma school districts and their employees involving sovereign immunity claims filed under Oklahoma's Governmental Tort Claims Act. The questions addressed were: (1) How have the Oklahoma courts interpreted the Governmental Tort Claims Act, (Okla. Stat. tit. 51 Section 151 et…

  20. A Legal Analysis of Litigation against Oklahoma Educators and School Districts under the Oklahoma Governmental Tort Claims Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacefield, Kevin Lee

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation analyzed public court decisions in cases against Oklahoma school districts and their employees involving sovereign immunity claims filed under Oklahoma's Governmental Tort Claims Act. The questions addressed were: (1) How have the Oklahoma courts interpreted the Governmental Tort Claims Act, (Okla. Stat. tit. 51 Section 151 et…

  1. Minerals yearbook, 1992: Oklahoma. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Zelten, J.E.; Arndt, R.H.

    1994-03-01

    The value of Oklahoma nonfuel mineral production was nearly $252.6 million in 1992, a decrease of $22.9 million from that reported to the U.S. Bureau of Mines by State mineral producers in 1991. The value of the top three commodities produced, crushed stone, portland cement, and construction sand and gravel, exceeded $168.8 million and comprised almost 67% of the State's total nonfuel mineral value. Although rebounding from the recessionary period, the growth curve for several minerals produced in the State was minimal, and for several others it moved downward. Oklahoma ranked 35th nationally in total nonfuel mineral value. The State ranked 26th nationally in the production of industrial minerals, contributing about 1.38% of the $20.7 billion revenues received. Oklahoma ranked first in the Nation in crude gypsum production, second in the production of tripoli, and was the only domestic source of iodine.

  2. Geochemical and mineralogical characterization of the Arbuckle aquifer with laboratory flow cell experiments under supercritical conditions: Implications for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, R. L.; Watney, W. L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Strazisar, B. R.; Kelly, L.; Ford, S. K.; Datta, S.

    2011-12-01

    The deep saline aquifer in south-central Kansas has been proposed as a potential site for geologic storage for CO2. Two wells (KGS 1-32 and 1-28) have been drilled to the basement to provide data for a site specific determination of the storage potential of the Arbuckle. The entirety of the Arbuckle (~4100-5100 ft) was cored to provide rock samples for description and flow cell experiments. Initial examination of the formation rocks show heterogeneity throughout the core samples that makes evident the need for careful examination of the formation to ensure accurate geochemical modeling in determining the storage capacity and extent of mineralization within injection rocks. The dominant mineralogy in the proposed CO2 injection zone is dolomitic limestone with sporadic large cherty nodules. Presence of extensive vugs and micro fractures are common at some depths. Thin section and XRD data have provided the specific mineral assemblage of each core plug. Drill stem test water samples were collected from 8 depths throughout the aquifer to describe the changing chemistry of water with depth. Initial chemical analysis show a hyper saline brine (range~50,000 - 190,000 TDS) dominated by Cl, Na and Ca. Elemental ratios of Cl:Br, Na:Cl and Ca:Sr are what is expected of a typical saline aquifer system. The swabbed water from 4995 to 5020 ft gave a constant pH of 4.76 for the entire period of pumping and field results show high sulfate concentrations (>200 mg/L). Laboratory experiments carried out at the National Energy Technology Laboratory at formation temperatures and pressures using formation core plugs and collected brine to identify the major reaction that can be anticipated when supercritical CO2 is in place. Formation brine is injected into the core plugs and supercritical CO2 is added thereafter. The effluent is collected as a time series of 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 32, 48 and 72 hours and analyzed for major, trace elements and anions by ICP-OES and IC to see the chemical change. The flow experiments at supercritical temperatures and pressures allow us to determine extent of mineral carbonation, mineral dissolution reactions and observed breakthrough curves help constrain reaction rates.

  3. Mammals of Red Slough Wildlife Management Area, with comments on McCurtain County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roehrs, Zachary P.; Lack, Justin B.; Stanley, Craig E., Jr.; Seiden, Christopher J.; Bastarache, Robert; Arbour, W. David; Hamilton, Meredith J.; Leslie, David M., Jr.; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    Red Slough Wildlife Management Area (RSWMA) is located in the southeastern corner of Oklahoma, McCurtain County, and represents the extreme northwestern extent of the South Central Plains (SCP) ecoregion. Previous mammal research in southeastern Oklahoma has focused mostly on the Ouachita Mountains to the north of RSWMA. As a result, of the 69 species of mammals potentially occurring in McCurtain County, only 48 species represented by 599 voucher specimens reside in natural history collections. We present results from a mammal survey of RSWMA conducted from December 2009 to August 2010. We captured 574 non-volant small mammals in 9,115 trap-nights, 11 bats in 17 net-nights, and seven salvaged meso-mammals resulting in 157 voucher specimens of 22 mammal species, including the first specimen of Castor canadensis for McCurtain County, and photographic vouchers for eight additional species from RSWMA. These results provide a baseline for future studies on RSWMA and substantially increase our natural history knowledge for many relatively under-studied mammals in southeastern Oklahoma

  4. Stratigraphic variations in the Carboniferous section across the Arkansas-Oklahoma State Line Arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Tyler D.

    The State Line Arch is represented by a structural high that trends through the study area in a loose alignment with the Arkansas-Oklahoma state line. Evidence of the arch extending further to the north includes a structural high and stratigraphic variation at an outcrop on Highway 59 near Evansville Mountain in Crawford County, Arkansas. The exact timing of the formation of the arch remains undetermined, but upper Devonian thinning at the top of the arch indicates the structure is pre-Mississippian. The reason for the development of the arch is poorly understood, but evidence linking Mississippian-aged Waulsortian mounds to Precambrian Spavinaw granite structures of northeastern Oklahoma and southwestern Missouri suggests Precambrian basement structures may extend into the study area. The structural nature of the arch provided an environment favorable to carbonate build-up during deposition of the Mississippian interval. A previously unidentified limestone unit measuring 175 feet thick likely represents the transgressive phase of a transgressive-regressive sequence responsible for the deposition of the Mayes Group of northeastern Oklahoma. Growth on the downthrown side of the Muldrow-Mulberry Fault system may indicate earlier movement than previous studies have suggested on the east-west trending normal faults of the Arkoma Basin. A possible roll-over anticline structure may exist to the south of the Muldrow-Mulberry fault system.

  5. Left-lateral intraplate deformation along the Amarillo-Wichita Uplift. Texas Panhandle and Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Budnik, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The west-northwest trending Amarillo-Wichita Uplift in the Texas Panhandle and southwestern Oklahoma was produced as a result of recurrent large-scale intraplate deformation during the Late Paleozoic Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny. The area was broadly folded in the Late Devonian to Early Mississippian. Cambrian through Devonian units were downwarped into the Anadarko Basin, truncated by erosion, and unconformably overlain by Upper Devonian to Mississippian strata. To the south, Mississippian units overlie Ordovician strata and Precambrian basement along the axis of the Texas Arch. Strike-slip faulting along the axis of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen formed the Amarillo-Wichita Uplift during the Pennsylvanian. In the Texas Panhandle, the uplift has been internally deformed into a series of pull-apart grabens which are filled with up to 1500 m of Pennsylvanian arkosic debris. The Whittenburg Trough, a large pull-apart basin along the southwest flank of the uplift, contains about 2300 m of syntectonic deposits. Erosional edges of older units beneath the Mississippian are presently offset 120 km in a left-lateral sense along the uplift. Pre-Mississippian units located in the Hardeman Basin of southwestern Oklahoma originally aligned with those in the western Anadarko Basin of the Texas Panhandle. Restoration to the pre-faulting configuration also realigns offset Proterozoic basement terranes. The orientation of strike-slip and reverse faults and related folds indicate northeast-southwest directed compression during the Pennsylvanian.

  6. A climatic guide for North Central Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.M.

    1991-06-01

    This guide provides some climatological data pertaining to central and north central Oklahoma. The information was derived from standard reference material to reflect what general surface meteorological characteristics exist in that region. It is intended to assist those individuals involved in the implementation of the first ARM site in that locale. A similar guide already exists for the region involved in Kansas entitled, ``One Regional ARM Guide for Climatic Evaluation``. The Oklahoma Kansas area was selected as the first site from the process reported in the ``Identification, Recommendation and Justification of Potential Locales for ARM Sites``.

  7. A climatic guide for North Central Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.M.

    1991-06-01

    This guide provides some climatological data pertaining to central and north central Oklahoma. The information was derived from standard reference material to reflect what general surface meteorological characteristics exist in that region. It is intended to assist those individuals involved in the implementation of the first ARM site in that locale. A similar guide already exists for the region involved in Kansas entitled, One Regional ARM Guide for Climatic Evaluation''. The Oklahoma Kansas area was selected as the first site from the process reported in the Identification, Recommendation and Justification of Potential Locales for ARM Sites''.

  8. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Central Oklahoma Aquifer in central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkle, D.L.; Christenson, S.C.; Rea, Alan

    1997-01-01

    ARC/INFO export files The data sets in this report include digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of Cleveland, Lincoln, Logan, Oklahoma, Payne, and Pottawatomie Counties. The Central Oklahoma aquifer includes the alluvial and terrace deposits along major streams, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations, and the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups. The Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits consist of unconsolidated clay, silt, sand, and gravel. The Permian-age Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations consist of sandstone with interbedded siltstone and mudstone. The Permian-age Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups consist of sandstone, shale, and thin limestone. The Central Oklahoma aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma where the aquifer is used extensively for municipal, industrial, commercial, and domestic water supplies. Most of the usable ground water within the aquifer is from the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations. Substantial quantities of usable ground water also are present in the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups, and in alluvial and terrace deposits associated with the major streams. The aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity and recharge values, and ground-water level elevation contours are from previously published reports.

  9. State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slosburg, Tucker

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Oklahoma. The state uses a State Aid Formula to determine the appropriation of funds to various districts. Along with the aid formula, the state collects revenue from the following sources: compensatory programs, special education, vocational programs, transportation…

  10. Ethnicity and Identity in Northeastern Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roark, Sue N.

    The origins of the Oklahoma Delaware reflect a complex history of migration, forced relocation, and punitive concentration. Though 36 tribal identities survive today, they are not of equal cultural coherence. Among the Delaware, there is no simple relation between socioeconomic status, level of acculturation, and factional membership. Rather, the…

  11. House Damage from 2011 Oklahoma Earthquake

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    House damage in central Oklahoma from the magnitude 5.6 earthquake on Nov. 6, 2011. Research conducted by USGS geophysicist Elizabeth Cochran and her university-based colleagues suggests that this earthquake was induced by injection into deep disposal wells in the Wilzetta North field....

  12. A century of induced earthquakes in Oklahoma?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, Susan E.; Page, Morgan T.

    2015-01-01

    Seismicity rates have increased sharply since 2009 in the central and eastern United States, with especially high rates of activity in the state of Oklahoma. Growing evidence indicates that many of these events are induced, primarily by injection of wastewater in deep disposal wells. The upsurge in activity has raised two questions: What is the background rate of tectonic earthquakes in Oklahoma? How much has the rate varied throughout historical and early instrumental times? In this article, we show that (1) seismicity rates since 2009 surpass previously observed rates throughout the twentieth century; (2) several lines of evidence suggest that most of the significant earthquakes in Oklahoma during the twentieth century were likely induced by oil production activities, as they exhibit statistically significant temporal and spatial correspondence with disposal wells, and intensity measurements for the 1952 El Reno earthquake and possibly the 1956 Tulsa County earthquake follow the pattern observed in other induced earthquakes; and (3) there is evidence for a low level of tectonic seismicity in southeastern Oklahoma associated with the Ouachita structural belt. The 22 October 1882 Choctaw Nation earthquake, for which we estimate Mw 4.8, occurred in this zone.

  13. 76 FR 31670 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street, SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  14. 78 FR 23622 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00070

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00070 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite...

  15. 76 FR 38263 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster OK-00052 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street,...

  16. State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slosburg, Tucker

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Oklahoma. The state uses a State Aid Formula to determine the appropriation of funds to various districts. Along with the aid formula, the state collects revenue from the following sources: compensatory programs, special education, vocational programs, transportation…

  17. Native Americans in Oklahoma, K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Patricia; And Others

    The study unit on American Indians in Oklahoma for grades K-6 provides suggested multi-curriculum activities and resources for educators to use as an introduction for all students, Indian and non-Indian. Goals of the multi-curriculum based study unit include: (1) developing an awareness of the origin of Native American culture; (2) making the…

  18. Goals for Education. Challenge to Lead: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board adopted Challenge to Lead education goals to focus and hold attention on educational improvement in its 16 states. This report provides an overview of Oklahoma's progress toward meeting these important goals. Challenge to Lead asserts: "With almost half of the new jobs created in America in the 1990s, SREB…

  19. Bilingual Family School Project (Adair County, Oklahoma).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Central Region Educational Lab. Corp., Little Rock, AR.

    A survey of educational needs by the South Central Region Educational Laboratory assigned high priority to provision of bilingual preschool experiences for Cherokee Indian children and to home-school-community involvement of their parents. Established in March 1968, the Bilingual Family School in Adair County, Oklahoma, developed criterion…

  20. Nutritional Risk among Oklahoma Congregate Meal Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, Kimberly K.; Hermann, Janice R.; Warde, William D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine if there were differences by demographic variables in response rates to Nutrition Screening Initiative (NSI) Checklist statements reported by over 50% of Oklahoma Older Americans Act Nutrition Program (OAANP) congregate meal participants categorized at high nutritional risk based on cumulative NSI Checklist scores. Design:…

  1. DISTRIBUTION OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN OKLAHOMA LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a data report presenting the species and abundance of phytoplankton in the 15 lakes sampled by the National Eutrophication Survey in the State of Oklahoma. Results from the calculation of several water quality indices are also included (Nygaard's Trophic State Index, Palm...

  2. Eliminating Barriers to Dual Enrollment in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Rick; Gamez Vargas, Juanita; David, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Policy, financial, and transportation barriers have limited participation in dual enrollment for marginalized (low-socioeconomic, first-generation, and ethnic minority) students in Oklahoma. This chapter presents a collaborative effort by education and community leaders that has successfully eliminated these barriers and increased the number of…

  3. Oklahoma Handbook: Child Nutrition Programs. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    Nutrition concepts, school food service guidelines, and related materials (such as nutrition charts, menu planning worksheets, and student survey forms) are provided in this nutrition handbook. Prepared by the Oklahoma State Department of Education's School Lunch Section, the handbook consists of nine sections that are organized in outline format.…

  4. Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators Journal 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Malinda Hendricks, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators 2009 Journal includes the following four peer reviewed articles: (1) The Changing Role of Grandparents (Fred D. Hammond, III, Terry E. Spigner, Charolette Myles-Nixon, and Pauline Holloway); (2) Pedagogical Agent Instructional Design Challenges (Jon Martens); (3) Differences in Relatedness across…

  5. Oklahoma Handbook: Child Nutrition Programs. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    Nutrition concepts, school food service guidelines, and related materials (such as nutrition charts, menu planning worksheets, and student survey forms) are provided in this nutrition handbook. Prepared by the Oklahoma State Department of Education's School Lunch Section, the handbook consists of nine sections that are organized in outline format.…

  6. SIMULATION OF PEANUT GROWTH IN OKLAHOMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grosz, Gerald D.; Elliott, Ronald L.; Young, James H.

    1986-01-01

    Two peanut growth models of varying complexity were calibrated for Oklahoma varieties and growing conditions. Both models predicted pod growth quite well. The models were then used to simulate the effects of various soil moisture levels on peanut growth. The more complex model has potential as a management tool.

  7. Eliminating Barriers to Dual Enrollment in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Rick; Gamez Vargas, Juanita; David, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Policy, financial, and transportation barriers have limited participation in dual enrollment for marginalized (low-socioeconomic, first-generation, and ethnic minority) students in Oklahoma. This chapter presents a collaborative effort by education and community leaders that has successfully eliminated these barriers and increased the number of…

  8. 78 FR 66671 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... conditions of approval of the Oklahoma program in the January 19, 1981, Federal Register (46 FR 4902). You... balance--siltation structures; cessation orders; alternative enforcement--general provisions; criminal... response to this document, you must go to the address listed below during normal business hours,...

  9. 77 FR 34890 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ..., 1981, Federal Register (46 FR 4902). You can also find later actions concerning the Oklahoma program... information; facilities or structures used in common; hydrologic balance--siltation structures; cessation... the address listed below during normal business hours, Monday through Friday, excluding holidays....

  10. 77 FR 61652 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00066

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Luther Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 Through 08/10/2012. Effective Date: 10/01/2012. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 11/30/2012. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date:...

  11. 77 FR 61651 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00067

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Multiple Wildfires. Incident Period: 07/30/2012 Through 08/12/2012. Effective Date: 10/01/2012. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 11/30/2012. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date:...

  12. 76 FR 77578 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00057

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 12/07/2011. Incident: Earthquakes. Incident Period: 11/05/2011 and continuing. Effective Date: 12/07/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 02/06/2012. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date:...

  13. 76 FR 23522 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ..., Federal Register (46 FR 4902). You can also find later actions concerning the Oklahoma program and program...-mine contours; adding a subsidence allegation reporting requirement; and adding a requirement for bond... water balance (precipitation runoff versus lake evaporation) showing that the length of time for...

  14. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

  15. Tone and Accent in Oklahoma Cherokee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uchihara, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of the tonal and accentual system of Oklahoma Cherokee, which has six possible pitch patterns occurring on a syllable: low, high, low-high, high-low, lowfall and superhigh. This study attempts to provide a comprehensive description and analyses of these patterns: their distribution, their source, the principles which…

  16. Oklahoma Curriculum Guide for Teaching Safety Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma Curriculum Improvement Commission, Oklahoma City.

    Developed by classroom teachers, university professors, and personnel from the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this guide is an effort to assist teachers in locating and utilizing safety materials as well as to assist them in developing well-balanced safety programs for the children and young people in the state. The preschool and…

  17. The Oklahoma Report: An Update on Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    Information about education in Oklahoma beginning with the 1989-90 school year and continuing through December of 1990 is presented in a concise and usable format. This document is an overview of information useful to the public. Sections include: (1) common education recognitions and achievements; (2) 1990 school legislation; (3) educational…

  18. 77 FR 25872 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... Mines all instances of alleged subsidence within 30 calendar days. The report must be in writing. The report must identify the location of the alleged subsidence in relation to the underground mine workings... the Act). Oklahoma revised its regulations regarding subsidence allegation reporting requirements...

  19. Jackfork Group, southeastern Oklahoma: New gas play in the Ouachita overthrust

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1996-11-01

    Recent discovery of natural gas in sandstones of the Jackfork Group of southeastern Oklahoma has led to revised interpretations of hydrocarbon potential in the Ouachita thrust province of eastern Oklahoma. Jackfork reservoirs consist of fine to very fine grained, submarine-fan lobe sandstones with low matrix permeability and porosity. Production is dependent upon natural fractures, enhanced in most cases by artificial stimulation. Individual wells have produced at rates of 1.3-5.7 Mcf per day and possess estimated reserves in the range of 2.0-7.6 Gcf. Hyperbolic decline suggests gas contribution from the matrix, possibly due to the presence of microfractures. Drilling has concentrated on two subsidiary thrust blocks in the hanging wall of the Ti Valley thrust, southern Latimer County. However, recent outcrop, petrographic, and sedimentological analyses have shown that traditional depositional models of the Jackfork are overly limited and that potential Jackfork reservoirs exist across a broad area to the south of the current play. Such analyses have revealed the existence of thick, medium-coarse-grained channel sequences at a number of localities in the Lynn Mountain syncline. Similar sequences may also exist well to the south, in the Boktukola syncline, where thick sand intervals have been identified. Petrographic study of samples from the Lynn Mountain syncline suggests that channel sequences may have significantly higher reservoir quality than is found in productive Jackfork sandstones to the north. Traditional assumptions postulating low regional hydrocarbon potential for the Jackfork therefore stand in need of revision.

  20. Oil and gas fields of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Burchfield, M.R.

    1984-04-01

    At the end of April 1983, there were 3088 active oil and/or gas fields in the state of Oklahoma, as well as 32 officially named abandoned fields, according to the Nomenclature Committee of the Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association. Oil and/or gas fields are located in 73 of Oklahoma's 77 countries, and represent over 4 million acres (1.5 million ha.) in surface area. The Oklahoma Geological Survey has prepared a new, up-to-date map of all officially named oil and/or gas fields in the state, at a scale of 1:500,000. Each field is outlined, assigned an index number for reference, and designated by color code as either an oil field, gas field, or combination oil and gas field. As an improvement over oil and gas field maps available from commercial sources, the OGS has attempted to define better the geographic boundaries of each field. An alphabetical listing of all fields with their reference numbers and locations is featured on the map, along with a listing of smaller fields that have been combined into Oklahoma's major oil and gas ''trends''. The map is designed for use as a reference by all oil and gas professionals in the state. The OGS oil and gas field map has been prepared in conjunction with the development of a computerized oil and gas field file for Oklahoma. Production of updated versions of the map in future years will be facilitated by digitization of information shown on the present map.

  1. Caucasus Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Often regarded as the southeastern border of Europe, the Caucasus Mountains can be seen here stretching from the Black Sea (left) to the Caspian Sea (right). The mountain range spans 700 miles (1125 km), crossing the countries of Russian Federation, Georgia, and Azerbaijan from left to right respectively. With a snowline of approximately 11,000 feet and peaks such as Mt. Elbrus, that reach 15,000 feet, much of the snow visible in this image is present year round. Also visible in this image are apparent phytoplankton blooms in the Caspian Sea, marked by blue-green swirls.

  2. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hobday, D.K.; Rose, F.G. Jr.

    1982-08-01

    Uranium favorability of the Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface geologic studies were supplemented by aerial radiometric surveys and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. A total of 1537 rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples were analyzed for 30 elements. Environments favorable for sandstone-type uranium deposits are present in the Cretaceous Antlers and Woodbine Formations, Pennsylvanian arkoses, and the Permian Wichita-Albany Group. The Antlers Formation is locally radioactive; and rock, stream-sediment, and ground-water samples show uranium enrichment. Dip-oriented sand belts may contain subsurface uranium deposits. Arkosic wedges in the Pennsylvanian Strawn, Canyon, and Cisco Groups were partially derived from a favorable Wichita Mountain source, were highly permeable, and contained downdip reductants; gamma-ray logs showed some anomalies. The Permian Wichita-Albany Group contained small uranium occurrences. The Woodbine Formation had an excellent uranium source in updip volcaniclastic correlatives, good permeability, and organic precipitants; but there is little direct evidence of uranium occurrences. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits are limestones and shales of Cambrian to Pennsylvanian age, Pennsylvanian sandstones derived from a Ouachita source, Lower Cretaceous shales, limestones, and sandstones, Upper Cretaceous marine strata, and sparse Cenozoic sediments. Unevaluated environments include Precambrian granites and metasediments of the buried Muenster Arch.

  3. Dam-breach analysis and flood-inundation mapping for selected dams in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and near Atoka, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shivers, Molly J.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Grout, Trevor S.; Lewis, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    Digital-elevation models, field survey measurements, hydraulic data, and hydrologic data (U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations North Canadian River below Lake Overholser near Oklahoma City, Okla. [07241000], and North Canadian River at Britton Road at Oklahoma City, Okla. [07241520]), were used as inputs for the one-dimensional dynamic (unsteady-flow) models using Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System (HEC–RAS) software. The modeled flood elevations were exported to a geographic information system to produce flood-inundation maps. Water-surface profiles were developed for a 75-percent probable maximum flood dam-breach scenario and a sunny-day dam-breach scenario, as well as for maximum flood-inundation elevations and flood-wave arrival times at selected bridge crossings. Points of interest such as community-services offices, recreational areas, water-treatment plants, and wastewater-treatment plants were identified on the flood-inundation maps.

  4. Update on hantavirus in Oklahoma: are we missing cases?

    PubMed

    Smithee, L; Bos, J; Mallonee, S; Nisbett, R A; Crutcher, J M

    2007-05-01

    Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) was first recognized in 1993. Through July 6, 2005, 396 cases have been reported in the US, including 50 from Kansas, Texas, and Oklahoma. We report the second case of HPS in Oklahoma and present data from rodent testing to support the presence of hantaviruses across Oklahoma. We examined Oklahoma death certificates for 1999-2003 for possible unreported HPS cases. The rate of death in young adults 15-49 years due to acute respiratory distress syndrome was 69% higher and the death rate due to unspecified respiratory failure was three times higher in the grassland area of Oklahoma as compared to the non-grassland. It appears the highest risk of HPS is in the Oklahoma grasslands but Sin Nombre virus is present in the non-grassland area as well. We request physician collaboration in detection and reporting of HPS cases and present brief recommendations for prevention. PMID:17557601

  5. A digital geologic map database for the state of Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heran, William D.; Green, Gregory N.; Stoeser, Douglas B.

    2003-01-01

    This dataset is a composite of part or all of the 12 1:250,000 scale quadrangles that make up Oklahoma. The result looks like a geologic map of the State of Oklahoma. But it is only an Oklahoma shaped map clipped from the 1:250,000 geologic maps. This is not a new geologic map. No new mapping took place. The geologic information from each quadrangle is available within the composite dataset.

  6. Oklahoma's fetal and infant mortality review projects.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Suzanna; Dillard, Julie; McNeal, Kelli; Rask, Pam; VanBuskirk, Kelly; Webb, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    In Oklahoma, the infant mortality rate is higher than the national rate. Fetal Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) is an effective perinatal systems intervention. FIMR gathers information from medical, social, and community sources taking a comprehensive look at how well these systems are serving women and infants. It is important to understand that FIMR is a method to develop community-based plans to reduce fetal and infant mortality. It is not a quick-fix solution to a complex problem, a research study, an institutional review, or a system for assigning blame or responsibility for a death. FIMR has been instrumental in identifying what health care providers, community leaders, and citizens can do to improve the health and lives of babies in Oklahoma. Key steps include: (1.) Data abstraction (2.) A home interview (3.) A review of individual case summaries (4.) Development of community-based solutions and interventions designed to improve service systems and resources PMID:25790593

  7. Oklahoma's Ouachita area beginning to stir

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1991-02-18

    This paper reports on exploration of Ouachita rocks of southeastern Oklahoma. Wells are completed or planned in the Potato Hills, Moyers, and Atoka areas of the Ouachita Province. Deep and shallow drilling will start soon in a 9 sq mile area in the Potato Hills area of southern Latimer County. The shallow drilling program will consist of eight wells to about 6,000 ft to assess potential in Ordovician Big Fork, Womble, and Mississippian-Devonian Arkansas Novaculite.

  8. 76 FR 34799 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00050

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ...This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR), dated 06/06/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 05/22/2011 through 05/25/2011. Effective Date: 06/06/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 08/05/2011. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date:...

  9. Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)

    SciTech Connect

    S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

    2012-02-29

    The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma’s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

  10. Mountains: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Alton; Gilligan, Nancy; Golston, Syd; Linville, Rex

    1999-01-01

    Introduces the lessons from "Mountain: A Global Resource" that were developed by the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) and The Mountain Institute for use by NCSS members and their students. Provides an overview that introduces the mountains, mountain cultures, historical perceptions, and the geographical importance of mountains. (CMK)

  11. IMPLICATIONS OF NEW ARSENIC STANDARDS ON OKLAHOMA WATER RESOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The new national standard for arsenic in drinking water supplies, slated to take effect in 2006, is having an unexpected impact on a number of Oklahoma communities. Currently, several municipalities in north central Oklahoma are in compliance with existing arsenic standards (50 ...

  12. 75 FR 6404 - Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of the Presidential declaration of an emergency for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-3308-EM), dated January 30, 2010, and...

  13. 76 FR 9040 - Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of the Presidential declaration of an emergency for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-3316-EM), dated February 2, 2011, and...

  14. Need 3 Quick Credits to Play Ball? Call Western Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Brad

    2012-01-01

    Western Oklahoma State College's name comes up whenever athletes get themselves in a jam: They've failed a class. They've dropped another. Maybe they're just short on credits. But they still want to play. Western Oklahoma gives them a chance, offering three credits in two weeks--and for less than $400. Almost as appealing: The community college…

  15. Management of Sclerotinia and southern blights in Oklahoma peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although peanut acres in Oklahoma have declined in recent years, the peanut crop remains an important economic crop for those who choose to grow it. A major problem for Oklahoma peanut production is to grow the crop profitably. Yield limiting factors such as diseases, adverse weather conditions, w...

  16. Fiscal Equity of Teacher Salaries and Compensation in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiden, Jeffrey; Evans, Nancy O.

    2009-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated the degree to which financial resources supporting teachers was equitably distributed in Oklahoma. Teachers are an important resource and their importance is being increasingly emphasized as educators attempt to increase student achievement. Every student educated in Oklahoma should have an equal right to…

  17. Oklahoma's Indian People: Images of Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Anita, Ed.

    Designed to be combined with the social studies curriculum, this guide promotes awareness of American Indian contributions to Oklahoma's development and cultural heritage. Lessons help students in grades 6 through 9 strengthen powers of critical thinking, practice writing skills, and develop creative expression, while learning about Oklahoma's 34…

  18. Profiles 1999 State Report. Oklahoma Educational Indicators Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City. Office of Accountability.

    The Oklahoma Educational Indicators Program is a system developed under the Oklahoma Education Reform Act of 1990 to assess the performance of public schools and school systems. "Profiles 1999" consists of state, district, and school components. Each component divides the information presented into three major reporting categories: (1) community…

  19. 76 FR 44345 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... adversely affected by this major disaster: Canadian, Delaware, Grady, Kingfisher, Logan, and McClain... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR), dated June 6, 2011, and...

  20. Need 3 Quick Credits to Play Ball? Call Western Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Brad

    2012-01-01

    Western Oklahoma State College's name comes up whenever athletes get themselves in a jam: They've failed a class. They've dropped another. Maybe they're just short on credits. But they still want to play. Western Oklahoma gives them a chance, offering three credits in two weeks--and for less than $400. Almost as appealing: The community college…

  1. The Oklahoma PN/ADN Articulation Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

    In response to a critical nursing shortage in the state of Oklahoma, the Oklahoma Practical Nursing (PN)/Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Articulation Project Coordinating Committee was formed in spring 1990 to develop a proposal for program articulation. A curriculum matrix was designed and adopted for use by five regional subcommittees which…

  2. Certification Standards Adopted by the Oklahoma State Board of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This document presents the standards adopted by the Oklahoma State Board of Education for qualification and certification of persons for instructional, supervisory, and administrative positions and services in Oklahoma public schools. Included are rules and regulations governing the issuance and revocation of certificates for county…

  3. Oklahoma's Indian People: Images of Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Anita, Ed.

    Designed to be combined with the social studies curriculum, this guide promotes awareness of American Indian contributions to Oklahoma's development and cultural heritage. Lessons help students in grades 6 through 9 strengthen powers of critical thinking, practice writing skills, and develop creative expression, while learning about Oklahoma's 34…

  4. A STUDY OF MIGRANT WORKERS IN SOUTHWEST OKLAHOMA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TINNEY, MILTON W.

    A STUDY OF MIGRANT WORKERS IN THE 5 SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA COUNTIES OF GREER, HARMON, JACKSON, KIOWA, AND TILLMAN WAS CONDUCTED IN 1964 BY THE OKLAHOMA STATE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE. APPROXIMATELY 15,000 AGRICULTURAL MIGRANTS COME INTO THE AREA EACH YEAR. THE SURVEY FOUND THAT THESE PEOPLE WERE PREDOMINATELY SPANISH-SPEAKING FROM TEXAS, EARNED LESS THAN…

  5. Parasitism of aphids in canola fields in central Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter canola, Brassica napus L., production in Oklahoma has increased from essentially 0 ha in 2001 to 40,500 ha in 2011, and acreage is expected to continue to increase. Three aphid species typically infest canola fields in central Oklahoma, the turnip aphid Lypaphis erysimi (Kaltenbach), the cab...

  6. Fiscal Equity of Teacher Salaries and Compensation in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiden, Jeffrey; Evans, Nancy O.

    2009-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated the degree to which financial resources supporting teachers was equitably distributed in Oklahoma. Teachers are an important resource and their importance is being increasingly emphasized as educators attempt to increase student achievement. Every student educated in Oklahoma should have an equal right to…

  7. Biology and epidemiology of peanut soilborne pathogens in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pressure from soil borne diseases limits yields and increases production costs to Oklahoma peanut growers. Sclerotinia blight, caused by the fungus Sclerotinia minor, and southern blight, caused by the fungus Sclerotium rolfsii, are the most economically damaging peanut diseases in Oklahoma. The c...

  8. Needs Assessment for Oklahoma Academic Librarians: Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Charles R.

    The Oklahoma Chapter of the Association of College and Research Libraries (OK-ACRL) and the Oklahoma Library Association, College and University Division (OLA-CUD) co-sponsored a survey of professional academic librarians to obtain institutional and background data on their characteristics, their preferences for academic professional association…

  9. 75 FR 23280 - Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Alcohol Control Ordinance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Alcohol Control Ordinance AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma's Alcohol... Bill CB-64-2010 enacted on March 13, 2010. The Alcohol Control Ordinance regulates and controls...

  10. 40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Oklahoma obtains... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oklahoma State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.86...

  11. 76 FR 9346 - Arkansas Oklahoma Gas Corporation; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Arkansas Oklahoma Gas Corporation; Notice of Filing Take notice that on January 14, 2011, Arkansas Oklahoma Gas Corporation (AOG) filed to request a case-specific waiver...

  12. PHYSICAL FACILITIES FOR HIGHER EDUCATION IN OKLAHOMA. SELF-STUDY OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN OKLAHOMA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COFFELT, JOHN J.; WALKER, CHARLES R.

    THE REPORT IS A SELF-STUDY OF THE PHYSICAL FACILITIES OF 21 INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN OKLAHOMA. IT INVOLVED THE STUDY OF SUCH TOPICS AS--(1) THE INVENTORY AND EVALUATION OF EXISTING LAND AND BUILDINGS ACCORDING TO CURRENT AND REPLACEMENT VALUE, AGE, QUALITY AND FUTURE USE, (2) THE INVENTORY OF ASSIGNABLE SPACE BY SQUARE FOOTAGE,…

  13. DISABILITIES IN OKLAHOMA--ESTIMATES AND PROJECTIONS, REPORT OF THE OKLAHOMA SURVEY OF DISABILITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOHLEBER, MICHAEL E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO PROVIDE REASONABLY ACCURATE ESTIMATES OF THE NUMBER AND TYPES OF DISABLED PERSONS AND THEIR NEEDS AS A BASIS FOR BOTH PRESENT AND FUTURE PLANNING. PERSONAL INTERVIEWS WERE CONDUCTED WITH ADULT RESPONDENTS IN 3,000 HOUSEHOLDS IN OKLAHOMA, A RANDOM SAMPLE STATIFIED ON THE RURAL-URBAN DIMENSION. DATA FROM 2,058…

  14. Oklahoma Aerospace Intellectual Capital/Educational Recommendations: An Inquiry of Oklahoma Aerospace Executives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Erin M.

    2010-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to conduct detailed personal interviews with aerospace industry executives/managers from both the private and military sectors from across Oklahoma to determine their perceptions of intellectual capital needs of the industry. Interviews with industry executives regarding…

  15. Goals for Oklahoma Higher Education. Self-Study of Higher Education in Oklahoma; Report 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffelt, John J.; And Others

    This report contains the findings, conclusions and recommendations that emerged from a study of "Functions and Goals of Oklahoma Higher Education." Many individuals and groups were involved in the process which culminated in this report, including a 600-member citizens' group, a special 140-member citizens' advisory committee, several hundred…

  16. Oklahoma Aerospace Intellectual Capital/Educational Recommendations: An Inquiry of Oklahoma Aerospace Executives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Erin M.

    2010-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to conduct detailed personal interviews with aerospace industry executives/managers from both the private and military sectors from across Oklahoma to determine their perceptions of intellectual capital needs of the industry. Interviews with industry executives regarding…

  17. Cadillac Mountain Summit

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    An image of the summit of Cadillac Mountain. At 1,528 feet in elevation, Cadillac Mountain is the highest point in Acadia National Park, and is composed of a unique granite, the Cadillac Mountain granite unit....

  18. Cadillac Mountain Summit Panorama

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A panorama of the summit of Cadillac Mountain. At 1,528 feet in elevation, Cadillac Mountain is the highest point in Acadia National Park, and is composed of a unique granite, the Cadillac Mountain granite unit....

  19. 2. EAGLE MOUNTAIN SWITCHYARD. EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP PLANT CAN BE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAGLE MOUNTAIN SWITCHYARD. EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP PLANT CAN BE SEEN THROUGH SWITCHYARD IN BACKGROUND. 165MM LENS. - Eagle Mountain Pump Plant, Ten miles north of Route 10, southeast of Eagle Mountain, Eagle Mountain, Riverside County, CA

  20. Biological assessment of environmental flows for Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, William L.; Seilheimer, Titus S.; Taylor, Jason M.

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale patterns in fish assemblage structure and functional groups are influenced by alterations in streamflow regime. In this study, we defined an objective threshold for alteration for Oklahoma streams using a combination of the expected range of 27 flow indices and a discriminant analysis to predict flow regime group. We found that fish functional groups in reference flow conditions had species that were more intolerant to flow alterations and preferences for stream habitat and faster flowing water. In contrast, altered sites had more tolerant species that preferred lentic habitat and slower water velocity. Ordination graphs of the presence and functional groups of species revealed an underlying geographical pattern roughly conforming to ecoregions, although there was separation between reference and altered sites within the larger geographical framework. Additionally, we found that reservoir construction and operation significantly altered fish assemblages in two different systems, Bird Creek in central Oklahoma and the Kiamichi River in southeastern Oklahoma. The Bird Creek flow regime shifted from a historically intermittent stream to one with stable perennial flows, and changes in fish assemblage structure covaried with changes in all five components of the flow regime. In contrast, the Kiamichi River flow regime did not change significantly for most flow components despite shifts in fish assemblage structure; however, most of the species associated with shifts in assemblage structure in the Kiamichi River system were characteristic of lentic environments and were likely related more to proximity of reservoirs in the drainage system than changes in flow. The spatial patterns in fish assemblage response to flow alteration, combined with different temporal responses of hydrology and fish assemblage structure at sites downstream of reservoirs, indicate that interactions between flow regime and aquatic biota vary depending on ecological setting. This supports the notion that regional variation in natural flow regimes could affect the development of flow recommendations.

  1. Shallow subsurface geological investigation near the Meers fault, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Luza, K.V. )

    1993-02-01

    The Meers fault is part of a complex system of northwest-trending faults forming the boundary between the Wichita Mountains (south) and the Anadarko basin (north). The frontal fault system is dominated by moderately dipping to steeply dipping reverse faults which have a combined net vertical displacement of over 9 km. Of these faults, the Meers fault has a Pennsylvanian-Permian throw of about 2 km. The Meers fault trends N. 60[degree]W. and displaces Permian conglomerate and shale for a distance of at least 26 km, from near the Comanche-Kiowa County boundary to East Cache Creek. At the northwest end of the fault trace, the fault displaces limestone-pebble conglomerates (Post Oak), whereas at the southeast end siltstones and calcrete-bearing shales of the Hennessey are displaced. Multiple radiocarbon ages of soil-humus samples from 2 Canyon Creek trenches (S24, T4N, R13W) show the last surface faulting occurred 1,200--1,300 yr ago. In 1988--89, the Oklahoma Geological Survey drilled 4 core holes to basement in the vicinity of the trench sites. The holes were drilled along a 200-m-long transect normal to the strike of the Meers fault. Two holes were drilled on the north side of the fault and penetrated highly fractured and altered rhyolite at about 58 m. A third hole drilled 25 m south of the fault, intersected weathered and sheared gabbro at 58 m. The basement material in the fourth hole consisted of dark greenish brown, highly fractured and sheared rock. The drill holes encountered Permian, poorly sorted, matrix-supported, 0.5--3 m thick, conglomerate interbedded with shale and siltstone. Drill holes 1--3 contained 3--5 m thick, granite cobble-boulder, clast supported conglomerate resting on rhyolite and/or gabbro. The core-hole information suggests the Meers-fault zone is at least 200 meters wide.

  2. Digital-map grids of mean-annual precipitation for 1961-90, and generalized skew coefficients of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rea, A.H.; Tortorelli, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    This digital report contains two digital-map grids of data that were used to develop peak-flow regression equations in Tortorelli, 1997, 'Techniques for estimating peak-streamflow frequency for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 97-4202. One data set is a grid of mean annual precipitation, in inches, based on the period 1961-90, for Oklahoma. The data set was derived from the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model) mean annual precipitation grid for the United States, developed by Daly, Neilson, and Phillips (1994, 'A statistical-topographic model for mapping climatological precipitation over mountainous terrain:' Journal of Applied Meteorology, v. 33, no. 2, p. 140-158). The second data set is a grid of generalized skew coefficients of logarithms of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma streams less than or equal to 2,510 square miles in drainage area. This grid of skew coefficients is taken from figure 11 of Tortorelli and Bergman, 1985, 'Techniques for estimating flood peak discharges for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 84-4358. To save disk space, the skew coefficient values have been multiplied by 100 and rounded to integers with two significant digits. The data sets are provided in an ASCII grid format.

  3. Seismic exploration of Ouachita frontal fairway, southeastern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bertagne, A.J.; Leising, T.C. )

    1989-08-01

    The Ouachita frontal fairway is defined as the area approximately 12 mi north and 12 mi south of the outcrop of the Choctaw fault. The area has been the site of considerable recent exploration activity and significant discoveries. The major exploration targets, located beneath and north of the Choctaw fault, consist of Spiro (Pennsylvanian) reservoirs on thrusted structures and Arbuckle (Cambrian-Ordovician) carbonates on structurally high, fault-bounded blocks. Favorable trends and prospects can be defined using high-quality seismic data. Seismic data in the Fairway are typically acquired with a shothole dynamite source. Closely spaced geophone groups allow imaging of steep dips. In processing, care is taken when selecting migration velocities because the apparent size of a structure depends on the selected velocity. Seismic data should be interpreted simultaneously on migrated and unmigrated sections. Recently acquired two-dimensional data illustrate the structural style of the frontal fairway in the vicinity of the new discoveries.

  4. Crayfishes (Decapoda : Cambaridae) of Oklahoma: identification, distributions, and natural history.

    PubMed

    Morehouse, Reid L; Tobler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We furnish an updated crayfish species list for the state of Oklahoma (United States of America), including an updated and illustrated dichotomous key. In addition, we include species accounts that summarize general characteristics, life coloration, similar species, distribution and habitat, life history, and syntopic species. Current and potential distributions were analyzed using ecological niche models to provide a critical resource for the identification of areas with conservation priorities and potential susceptibility to invasive species. Currently, Oklahoma harbors 30 species of crayfish, two of which were recently discovered. Eastern Oklahoma has the highest species diversity, as this area represents the western distribution extent for several species. The work herein provides baseline data for future work on crayfish biology and conservation in Oklahoma and surrounding states. PMID:26176099

  5. 77 FR 61466 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00063

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/ 2012. Incident: Freedom and Noble Wildfires. Incident Period: 08/03.../2012 is hereby amended to expand the incident for this disaster to include the Noble Wildfire....

  6. 75 FR 19667 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00035

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00035 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... information in the original declaration remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance...

  7. 77 FR 54601 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Oklahoma resulting from the Freedom Wildfire during the period of August 3-14, 2012, is of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant a...

  8. 77 FR 63409 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00063

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ...This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/ 2012. Incident: Freedom and Noble Wildfires. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 through...

  9. SFC to cease operations at Gore, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    On February 16, Sequoyah Fuels Corporation (SFC) formally notified the Nuclear Regulatory Commission it intends to terminate operations and commence decommissioning at its uranium conversion facility at Gore, Oklahoma. SFC officially requested that its NRC operating license be terminated July 31, 1993. SFC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of General Atomics Corporation (GA), will be responsible for the estimated $21.2-million decommissioning plan. GA has contended that it is not financially liable for the cleanup but stated it would be available to offer financial assistance if needed. Over the proposed 10-year cleanup schedule, GA said SFC can finance the decommissioning by drawing on SFC's estimated $70-million in revenue from a fee-for-contract agreement in its recently formed joint-venture with AlliedSignal Inc., called ConverDyn.

  10. Oklahoma's recent earthquakes and saltwater disposal.

    PubMed

    Walsh, F Rall; Zoback, Mark D

    2015-06-01

    Over the past 5 years, parts of Oklahoma have experienced marked increases in the number of small- to moderate-sized earthquakes. In three study areas that encompass the vast majority of the recent seismicity, we show that the increases in seismicity follow 5- to 10-fold increases in the rates of saltwater disposal. Adjacent areas where there has been relatively little saltwater disposal have had comparatively few recent earthquakes. In the areas of seismic activity, the saltwater disposal principally comes from "produced" water, saline pore water that is coproduced with oil and then injected into deeper sedimentary formations. These formations appear to be in hydraulic communication with potentially active faults in crystalline basement, where nearly all the earthquakes are occurring. Although most of the recent earthquakes have posed little danger to the public, the possibility of triggering damaging earthquakes on potentially active basement faults cannot be discounted. PMID:26601200

  11. Mass casualties in the Oklahoma City bombing.

    PubMed

    Teague, David C

    2004-05-01

    The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was partially destroyed by a terrorist bomb on April 19, 1995. Injuries were sustained by 759 people, 168 of whom died. Fatalities occurred primarily among victims in the collapse zone of the federal building. Only 83 survivors required hospitalization. Twenty-two surviving victims sustained multiple fractures. Most victims arrived at local emergency departments by private vehicle within 2 hours. More severely injured survivors were transported by ambulance. The closer receiving hospitals used emergency department facilities and minor treatment areas. Few survivors were extricated from the bombing site more than 3 hours after the detonation. Mass casualty plans must provide for improved communications, diversion and retriage from facilities nearest the disaster site, and effective coordination of community and hospital resources. PMID:15187837

  12. Digital geologic map of Clinton Quadrangle, west-central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cederstrand, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    This data set consists of digital data and accompanying documentation for the surficial geology of the 1:250,000-scale Clinton quadrangle. The original data are from the Geologic Map, sheet 1 of 4, included in the Oklahoma Geological Survey publication, Reconnaissance of the water resources of the Clinton quadrangle, west-central Oklahoma, Hydrologic Atlas 5, Carr and Bergman, 1976. The geology was compiled by J.E. Carr, 1972, and R.O. Fay, 1975.

  13. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Mountain spotted fever is caused by the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii (R. Rickettsii) , which is carried by ticks. The ... Saunders; 2014:chap 212. Walker DH, Blaton LS. Rickettsia rickettsii and other spotted fever group rickettsiae (Rocky Mountain ...

  14. Lesson 2: Sacred Mountains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Alton; Gilligan, Nancy; Golston, Syd; Linville, Rex

    1999-01-01

    Presents a lesson in which the students are divided into four Mountain Study Teams in order to examine a sacred mountain. Explains that the students in each group assume a particular role, such as an historian or scientist. Provides a profile on the four mountains and a definition of the seven student roles. (CMK)

  15. 78 FR 72877 - Arkansas Electric Corporation v. Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Arkansas Electric Corporation v. Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company; Notice... Procedure of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206, Arkansas Electric Corporation (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company...

  16. Heat flow and thermal history of the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, L.S.; Kelley, S.A.; Blackwell, D.D.; Naeser, N.D.

    1998-01-01

    New heat-flow values for seven sites in the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma, were determined using high-precision temperature logs and thermal conductivity measurements from nearly 300 core plugs. Three of the sites are on the northern shelf, three sites are in the deep basin, and one site is in the frontal fault zone of the northern Wichita Mountains. The heat flow decreased from 55 to 64 mW/m2 in the north, and from 39 to 54 mW/m2 in the south, due to a decrease in heat generation in the underlying basement rock toward the south. Lateral lithologic changes in the basin, combined with the change in heat flow across the basin, resulted in an unusual pattern of thermal maturity. The vitrinite reflectance values of the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Woodford formation are highest 30-40 km north-northwest of the deepest part of the basin. The offset in highest reflectance values is due to the contrast in thermal conductivity between the Pennsylvanian "granite wash" section adjacent to the Wichita uplift and the Pennsylvanian shale section to the north. The geothermal gradient in the low-conductivity shale section is elevated relative to the geothermal gradient in the high-conductivity "granite wash" section, thus displacing the highest temperatures to the north of the deepest part of the basin. Apatite fission-track, vitrinite reflectance, and heat-flow data were used to constrain regional aspects of the burial history of the Anadarko basin. By combining these data sets, we infer that at least 1.5 km of denudation has occurred at two sites in the deep Anadarko basin since the early to middle Cenozoic (40 ?? 10 m.y.). The timing of the onset of denudation in the southern Anadarko basin coincides with the period of late Eocene erosion observed in the southern Rocky Mountains and in the northern Great Plains. Burial history models for two wells from the deep Anadarko basin predict that shales of the Woodford formation passed through the hydrocarbon maturity window by the end of the Permian section in the deep basin moved into the hydrocarbon maturity window during Mesozoic burial of the region. Presently, the depth interval of the main zone of oil maturation (% Ro = 0.7-0.9) is approximately 2800-3800 m in the eastern deep basin basin and 2200-3000 m in the western deep basin. The greater depth to the top of the oil maturity zone and larger depth range of the zone in the eastern part of the deep basin are due to the lower heat flow associated with more mafic basement toward the east. The burial history model for the northern shelf indicates that the Woodford formation has been in the early oil maturity zone since the Early Permian.

  17. Selected water-level records for Oklahoma, 1976-1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goemaat, Robert L.; Spiser, Dannie E.

    1979-01-01

    A systematic program to collect water-level records in Oklahoma began in 1937. The objectives of this program are (1) to provide long-term records of water-level fluctuations in representative wells, (2) to facilitate the prediction of water-level trends and indicate future availability of ground-water supplies, and (3) to provide information for use in basic research. Water-level data in table 1 are from wells that are measured annually, prior to the irrigation season to achieve the most natural representation of the static water level. Water level measurements listed in the column under 1976 may have been made during December 1975 or January, February, March, April, or May 1976. Measurements listed in the column 1977 may have been made during December 1976 or January, February, March, or April 1977. Figure 1 shows the counties and number of wells therein, where data were obtained for this report. Records of water levels in Oklahoma are collected through a cooperative program by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. The records are tabulated and published by the U.S. Geological Survey on an annual basis. The stratigraphic nomenclature and age determinations used in this report are those accepted by the Oklahoma Geological Survey and do not necessarily agree with those at the U.S. Geological Survey except for the Cheyenne Sandstone which is considered to be Purgatoire Sandstone by the Oklahoma Geological Survey (Robert O. Fay, Personal Communication, August 9, 1979).

  18. A proposed streamflow data program for Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohn, J.D.; Hoffman, G.L.

    1970-01-01

    An evaluation of the streamflow data available in Oklahoma has been made to provide guidelines for planning future data-collection programs. The basic steps in the evaluation procedure were (1) definition of the long-terms goals of the streamflow-data program in quantitative form, (2) examination and analysis of streamflow data to determine which goals have been met, and (3) consideration of alternate programs and techniques to meet the remaining goals. The study defines the individual relation between certain statistical streamflow characteristics and selected basin parameters. This relation is a multiple regression equation that could be used on a statewide basis to compute a selected natural-flow characteristic at any site on a stream. The study shows that several streamflow characteristics can be estimated within an accuracy equivalent to 10 years of record by use of a regression related to at least three climatic or basin parameters for any basin of 50 square miles or more. The study indicates that significant changes in the scope and character of the data-collection program would enhance the possibility of attaining the remaining goals. A streamflow-data program based on the guidelines developed in this study is proposed for the future.

  19. Computer stereograms of Oklahoma subsurface geology

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, H.W.

    1987-08-01

    Three-dimensional stereoscopic illustrations have not been a standard part of the subsurface geologist's tool kit. Now, the immense complexity of stereograms can be resolved by inexpensive software on a personal computer, with which the subsurface geologist can gain an entirely new viewpoint. These new illustrations yield new patterns, new relationships, and prospective anomalies. The illustrations are particularly helpful in areas of complex structural geology. This study presents a regional sampling of this new mode of geologic illustration; Oklahoma was chosen because of its wide variety of structural styles, the prolific reserves associated with those structures, and the abundance of geologic data. A statewide data base of 2806 structural elevations on the base of the Pennsylvanian System was digitized from scout-ticket tops. In addition, three detailed data bases of local structures were digitized, using all the available structural control plus interpreted points to aid the programming. Contour maps and block diagrams were constructed with readily available, inexpensive software, using kriging algorithms. Stereo pairs were created by rotating the blocks 4/sup 0/ within the computer program. The pairs were positioned 2.5 in. apart to match an average viewer's interpupillary distance. The three-dimensional blocks may be viewed with a stereoscope or with naked eyes focused on a distant point.

  20. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region and consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of...

  1. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region and consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of...

  2. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region and consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of...

  3. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region and consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of...

  4. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region and consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of...

  5. Report of the Oklahoma Higher Education Task Force on Student Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

    The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education appointed the Oklahoma Higher Education Task Force on Student Retention and charged the Task Force to: (1) review Oklahoma and national data on student attrition; (2) identify factors that contribute to student persistence in college; and (3) recommend specific initiatives to increase student…

  6. A Comparison of the Speech Patterns and Dialect Attitudes of Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakos, Jon

    2013-01-01

    The lexical dialect usage of Oklahoma has been well-studied in the past by the Survey of Oklahoma Dialects, but the acoustic speech production of the state has received little attention. Apart from two people from Tulsa and two people from Oklahoma City that were interviewed for the Atlas of North American English, no other acoustic work has been…

  7. A Comparison of the Speech Patterns and Dialect Attitudes of Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakos, Jon

    2013-01-01

    The lexical dialect usage of Oklahoma has been well-studied in the past by the Survey of Oklahoma Dialects, but the acoustic speech production of the state has received little attention. Apart from two people from Tulsa and two people from Oklahoma City that were interviewed for the Atlas of North American English, no other acoustic work has been…

  8. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.65 Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region,...

  9. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.65 Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region,...

  10. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.65 Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region,...

  11. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.65 Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region,...

  12. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.65 Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region,...

  13. 77 FR 34975 - Seminole Nation of Oklahoma-Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Seminole Nation of Oklahoma--Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance AGENCY... Oklahoma--Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance. The Ordinance regulates and controls the possession... of Oklahoma Amending Title 24 of the Seminole Nation Code of Laws and the Alcohol Control...

  14. 78 FR 36558 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 5 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Amendment No. 5 to Notice of a Major Disaster... notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR), dated May 20, 2013, and... for the State of Oklahoma is hereby amended to include the following area among those areas...

  15. 40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.124 North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial...

  16. 78 FR 41073 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 7 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Amendment No. 7 to Notice of a Major Disaster... notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR), dated May 20, 2013, and... for the State of Oklahoma is hereby amended to include the following areas among those...

  17. 78 FR 41074 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 6 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Amendment No. 6 to Notice of a Major Disaster... notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR), dated May 20, 2013, and... for the State of Oklahoma is hereby amended to include the following areas among those...

  18. 30 CFR 936.15 - Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OKLAHOMA § 936.15 Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments. The following is a list of the...

  19. Integrated geophysical investigations of linkages between Precambrian basement and sedimentary structures in the Ucayali basin, Peru; Fort Worth basin, Texas; and Osage County, Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elebiju, Olubunmi Olumide

    I conducted integrated geophysical studies within the Fort Worth basin, Texas; Osage County, Oklahoma, and the Ucayali basin, Peru. My studies are directed at understanding the relationships or links between Precambrian basement structures and sedimentary structures using these three areas as case studies. Links between basement structure, hydrocarbon reservoirs, and sedimentary sequences are not a new concept. Such relationships have been documented in the Paradox, Hardeman, Anadarko, Arkoma, Ardmore and Williston basins among others. Structures such as fault zones that can influence the formation of sedimentary basins and mineral deposits are often formed by intraplate tectonism. In order to compare the relationship between the Precambrian basement structures and sedimentary structures, I analyzed series of derivative and filtered maps of aeromagnetic and gravity data, which enhance basement structures, that were integrated with seismic data and seismic attribute data that enhance structures within the sedimentary sections. Other information such as well data and geologic information etc were also integrated. This integrated workflow facilitates the comparison of the links or relationships between the two structures. The results of the Fort Worth basin are presented in Chapter 3. The results of this integrated study show that the sedimentary structures within the study area are mainly related to basement structures because these structures are aligned parallel to anomalies identified on the high-resolution aeromagnetic (HRAM) data. The northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast orientations of sedimentary features are consistently parallel with Precambrian structural fabrics that are associated with structures such as the northeast trending Ouachita orogenic belt and the northwest trending Muenster Arch, which reactivated a late Cambrian/Late Precambrian faults. The knowledge gained in this study will impact oil and gas exploration and development within the study area because, the orientation of the natural and induced fractures can be predicted even if seismic data is limited or unavailable. In Chapter 4, the results of an integrated analysis that includes the use of 3D seismic data, seismic attributes, and derivative maps from potential field data to study the basement, Mississippi Chert and the Arbuckle Group of Osage County, Oklahoma are presented. The workflow employed in this study was effective in studying and identifying polygonal, highly coherent, and high amplitude lineaments that strike northwesterly and northeasterly within these reservoirs. Basement structure lineaments are found to be parallel in orientation with the trend of lineaments seen within the Mississippian Chert and the Arbuckle Group. The northwest-striking lineaments may be related to the late-Paleozoic tectonism that affected both the Precambrian and Paleozoic section of Osage County. Another part of this research investigated the large gravity and magnetic anomalies and their association with the Mid-Continent Rift System (MCRS). Results of this analysis revealed prominent northeast trending anomalies that suggest that the MCRS extends into northern Oklahoma. However, geochronological data for basement rocks suggest that this extension would have to be limited to intrusive bodies that have little or no subcrops. The integrated study conducted in the Ucayali basin of Peru revealed that the northwest-southeast trending lineaments interpreted as Precambrian basement structures are sub-parallel to the late Paleozoic fold and thrust belts that resulted from the shortening associated with the formation of the Andes. These fold and thrust belts are reactivated along the zones of weaknesses that already existed in the Precambrian basement. The east-northeast lineaments are located beneath the Fitzcarrald Arch locate above the buoyant Nazca ridge. I interpret these east-northeast lineaments as part of the Ene Pisco -- Abancay Fitzcarrald tectonic lineaments, which is one of the five tectonic domains in these region. Gravity modeling suggests that the crustal thickness and the subduction slab-dip beneath Peru increase from the north of the Ucayali basin towards the south. My 2-dimensional gravity model suggests that the crust thickness and Nazca plate dip increase southward within the Ucayali basin. These results also establish a correlation between known geologic features and the regional gravity anomalies.

  20. Structural evolution of the Ardmore basin, Oklahoma, U.S.A.: Progressive deformation in the foreland of the Ouachita collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granath, James W.

    1989-10-01

    Synthesis of oil field studies, seismic reflection data, and surface geology has resulted in a reconstruction of the Pennsylvanian evolution of the structural style of fault systems bordering and within the Ardmore Basin in south central Oklahoma. Faults bounding the margins of the basin were part of a broader left-lateral shear belt that affected southern Oklahoma during the early Pennsylvanian. The mid-Pennsylvanian and later zone of deformation contracted in southern Oklahoma to concentrate on the Washita Valley-Eola Robberson fault systems along the northern edge of the basin, and on the Criner Uplift-Healdton-Stephens County fault systems along the southern and western side of the basin. Deformation on the floor of the basin was amplified, with left-lateral strike-slip faults slicing the basin into a system of rhombohedral blocks. Deformation continued at least into Virgil time (late Pennsylvanian). A two-dimensional displacement field derived for the middle to late Pennsylvanian deformation reveals that a strong component of transpression affected both the basin-bounding faults and, by reason of the geometry of their connections to the west, the Wichita Mountain front as well. Broadly spread left-lateral shear evolved into crustal scale transpression during the Pennsylvanian Period. That progressive contraction of deformation and the change in style correlate with mid-Pennsylvanian approach and passage of the Ouachita collision along the Ouachita embayment (Thomas, 1983) on the southern margin of the North American craton. Inasmuch as the Ardmore Basin was located at the sharp internal corner of the embay ment, the coincidence suggests that the style of evolution records (1) early far-field influence of the approaching Ouachita collision during early Pennsylvanian, (2) passage of the suture during mid-Pennsylvanian, and (3) concentration of foreland deformation at the corner of the embayment as the Arkoma and Fort Worth flexural basins evolved to the south and east during late Pennsylvanian.

  1. Oklahoma geology, the challenge in a changing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.B. ); Tillman, B.L. )

    1993-02-01

    A diversity of geology and programs exists in Oklahoma which requires the SCS geologist to use a wide range of experience in order to contribute to the many existing programs. The US Soil Conservation Service geologist work force consists of Bob L. Tillman, Sedimentation Geologist, Chickasha, and Glen B. Miller, Engineering Geologist, Stillwater, Oklahoma. Their poster display illustrates channel erosion commonly encountered during planning investigations within Oklahoma. Channel erosion consists of the removal of soil and rock by a concentrated flow of water. It includes, but is not limited to, ephemeral gully erosion, streambank erosion, roadside erosion, and flood-plain scour. All contribute sediment to floodwater retarding structures and are important considerations in watershed planning. Each of these types of channel erosion are displayed and discussed on the poster display.

  2. Oklahoma City explosion effect on the district heating & cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    DeJong, V.

    1995-09-01

    On April 19, 1995, in Oklahoma City, a bomb destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Office Building. The building was served by the Trigen-Oklahoma City Energy Corporation, a district heating and cooling (DHC) company. This paper describes the effect on the system and actions taken by personnel to restore heating and cooling to other customers. Associated with the bomb blast was a failure of the main electrical bus to the DHC plant. This occurred approximately 12 1/2 hours later. The effects of this event are also described.

  3. Oklahoma State University proposed Advanced Technology Research Center. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the construction and equipping of the proposed Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  4. Water-level changes in the Ogallala aquifer, northwestern Oklahoma.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Havens, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Ogallala aquifer, that part of the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma, is part of a regional aquifer system that underlies parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. In 1978 the US Geological Survey began a 5- year study of the High Plains regional aquifer system to provide hydrologic information for evaluation of the effects of long-term development of the aquifer and to develop a capability for predicting aquifer response to various ground-water-management alternatives (Weeks, 1978). -from Author

  5. Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutz, Mary N. Hill

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal responsibility. The most frequently identified curriculum need across all aviation disciplines was that of communication skills.

  6. Oklahoma blast forces unsettling design questions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The bomb that brought down a government building in Oklahoma City killed hundreds of people after it was detonated near the building`s key supports. The blast has reopened a long-simmering debate on safety by design. Structurally, it`s not practical to designing bomb-proof buildings. But it is possible to engineer a structure to deform rather than go through immediate progressive collapse. Delaying collapse gives occupants extra time to evacuate. And that could mean the difference between life and death. The construction material of choice really {open_quotes}depends on the height of the building and the lateral load resisting system,{close_quotes} says Charles H. Thornton of Thornton-Tomasetti/Engineers, New York City. But whether in steel or reinforced concrete, moment-resisting frames, which are inherently redundant, give horizontal components the ability to take reversals of stress common in explosions, he says. Simple frames do not. {open_quotes}They go down like a house of cards,{close_quotes} says Thornton. In reinforced concrete moment frames, beam reinforcing steel is continuous. In simple reinforced concrete frames, beam rebar only penetrates the column for a determined number of inches based on the length of the span. And it is absent from the mid-span of the beam. In a blast from below, the beam, its top usually in compression and bottom in tension, deflects up, throwing the beam top into tension. With no rebar, it loses structural integrity, and falls apart. With rebar, it has a chance of surviving. If a building is not designed for blasts, a steel frame might be better under a reasonably small bomb because steel has equal capacity in tension and compression, and concrete has capacity only in compression, says Thornton.

  7. Public health assessment for Oklahoma Refining Company, Cyril, Caddo County, Oklahoma, Region 6. Cerclis No. OKD091598870. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-09

    The Oklahoma Refining Company site, near the town of Cyril, Caddo County, Oklahoma, is approximately 160 acres. Contaminants associated with the site include volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile compounds, heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and petroleum hydrocarbons. Heavy metals and PAHs are the primary contaminants at levels of health concern. During refinery operations, ambient air was likely to have been and could be a significant exposure pathway for on-site workers and off-site residents. Residents swimming in Gladys Creek downstream of the ORC site during refinery operations were likely to have been exposed to contaminants in surface water and sediment. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has concluded that the Oklahoma Refining Company site was a public health hazard during its past operation based on probable exposure during the release of wastes from the oil refinery process.

  8. The Verkhoyansk Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Verkhoyansk Mountains mark the eastern edge of the Central Siberian Plateau in Russia. This true-color MODIS image from November 13, 2001, shows the mountains (top and right) covered in snow. Following the curve of the mountains, the frozen Aldan River traces an east, then north, then westward path across the landscape, which brings it to the Lena River, the much larger river beginning at image left. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  9. Large-scale planting of North Carolina loblolly pine in Arkansas and Oklahoma: a case of gain versus risk

    SciTech Connect

    Lambeth, C.C.; Dougherty, P.M.; Gladstone, W.T.; McCullough, R.B.; Wells, O.O.

    1984-01-01

    Plantations established using 6 provenances and aged 5, 8, 9, or 25 years were measured in 1981. Soil moisture deficits (SMDs) were calculated for each test area using 1980 data. The fastest growing provenances were from E. of the Mississippi River, in particular those from coastal North Carolina and near the Gulf coast of Louisiana. There were only small differences in cold and drought resistance. No appreciable mortality was observed for stands with SMD of less than 32 cm. At higher SMDs, mortality and damage to needle tissues were greater, and always higher for North Carolina than for Arkansas or Oklahoma provenances. This indicates that coastal North Carolina pine, which evolved on poorly drained and deep soils, may experience greater mortality than the local sources under extreme drought, especially on the excessively drained and shallow soils in the Ouachita Mountains.

  10. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... altitude. If you have fluid in your lungs (pulmonary edema), treatment may include: Oxygen A high blood pressure ...

  11. Improving Print Management at at the University of Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colaw, Lee M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how business students at the University of Oklahoma improved the school's print management by initiating an alternative charging system, networking the printers, and choosing the right hardware and software. Reasons why the UnipriNT Print Management system was chosen to manage the computer lab's printing services are discussed. (GR)

  12. The General Degree Productivity and Retention of Oklahoma Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

    This report presents data regarding employment and retention within Oklahoma of college graduates. Two specific issues addressed are: (1) the general productivity of the degree fields at the bachelor's and associate degree levels; and (2) the proportion of Oklahomans who receive these degrees and remain in the state over time. Both the academic…

  13. Estimating bioenergy feedstock potential of red cedar in western Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red cedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) is an invasive species that seriously degrades tallgrass prairie and adjacent landscapes in the southern plains region of the US with an estimated 8 million acres impacted in the state of Oklahoma alone. This study is part of a larger project to improve grassland...

  14. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Oklahoma. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  15. Evaluation of Reflex (fomesafen) herbicide for watermelon in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective preemergence herbicides are needed for weed control in watermelon grown from transplants. Reflex (fomesafen) was found to be effective and to exhibit crop safety in southeast USA. Trials were conducted during 2011 and 2012 in southeast Oklahoma to determine if this product would be useful...

  16. Oklahoma School Grows from 85 to 473 Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gust, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of a Catholic K-8 school in Oklahoma. Reports that the school opened in 1990 and more than quintupled in size by 2001, making it the largest Catholic school in the state. Identifies the school's number one priority as its commitment to Catholicism. (NB)

  17. Private Water Well Education for Adult Residents of Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    The scope of this study involved an investigation into the education of the adult residents of Oklahoma regarding private water wells. The groundwater supply for the private resident is directly connected to a shared water source. This source of water can become contaminated by simple lack of education and proper maintenance of the well. Without…

  18. Oklahoma Library Technology Network Plan for Information Sharing and Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Libraries, Oklahoma City.

    This plan sets forth approaches for state-level assistance for Oklahoma libraries to exchange information and to share or acquire machine-readable information from public and private sources through telecommunications, as well as for access to these libraries for existing and future state informational databases. Objectives and requirements are…

  19. Personal Touches Warm up Oklahoma City U.'s Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Oklahoma City University prides itself on treating its faculty and staff members like family. It is the kind of place where new employees are welcomed in the president's house, staff members kick in to raise money when a colleague faces hard times, and promising young workers are offered flexible work schedules and free tuition to help them…

  20. Private Water Well Education for Adult Residents of Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    The scope of this study involved an investigation into the education of the adult residents of Oklahoma regarding private water wells. The groundwater supply for the private resident is directly connected to a shared water source. This source of water can become contaminated by simple lack of education and proper maintenance of the well. Without…

  1. Fungicides for organic cantaloupe production in Oklahoma: An initial assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungicides that are potentially useful in organic production were evaluated for foliar disease control in cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulates ’Israeli’) during 2009 at Lane, Oklahoma. Milstop (85% potassium bicarbonate), Neem oil, Bonide liquid copper (10% copper octanoate), Serenade (QST ...

  2. Successful Concurrent Programs: An EXCELerate Program in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Juanita Gamez; Roach, Rick; David, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the implementation and findings of a successful collaborative effort with the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education (OSRHE), Tulsa Community College (TCC), and two local public school districts, Tulsa Public Schools (TPS) and Union Public Schools (UPS). Known as EXCELerate, it's a five-semester dual enrollment pilot…

  3. 78 FR 36630 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration Processing, And Disbursement...

  4. 78 FR 36632 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport...

  5. Students' Perceptions of Bullying in Oklahoma Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Patricia Paulsen; Middleton, Katherine M.; Marshall, David D.

    2009-01-01

    We studied perceptions of Oklahoma public school students (n = 7,848) regarding bullying. Specifically, we asked for their thoughts about the seriousness of bullying, the hurtfulness of bullying, their involvement in bullying (as victim or perpetrator), their responses to being bullied or seeing someone else being bullied, and what they wanted…

  6. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Oklahoma's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  7. Soil Moisture-Based Drought Monitoring in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsner, T.; Scott, B. L.; Illston, B. G.

    2012-12-01

    Real-time drought monitoring is essential for early detection and adaptive management to mitigate the negative impacts of drought on communities and ecosystems in drought-prone locations like Oklahoma where the 2011 drought cost the state's economy over $1.5 billion from agricultural losses alone. Drought monitoring has been hampered by a lack of data on one crucial drought indicator: plant available water. Agricultural losses and, by extension, the economic impacts of drought, are strongly linked to plant available water. Plant available water (PAW) is the amount of soil moisture currently in the profile which is available for plant uptake. We have recently developed and launched a novel drought monitoring system for Oklahoma based on real-time PAW monitoring at >100 locations via the Oklahoma Mesonet. To our knowledge, this is the world's first large-scale PAW monitoring system and offers unmatched potential for improving the use of soil moisture measurements in drought monitoring. The Oklahoma system may serve as a prototype for the development of soil moisture-based drought monitoring systems in other locations or at the national level. This presentation will describe the system and demonstrate some applications of the data for drought monitoring, prediction, and mitigation.

  8. Oklahoma Advisory Council on Vocational Education. Seventh Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Advisory Council for Vocational-Technical Education, Oklahoma City.

    The report evaluates the effectiveness of Oklahoma's vocational programs, services, and activities for 1975. It includes a list of the 25 members of the Advisory Council, a summary of the status of current programs, the year's evaluation and recommendations, commendations, and a digest of comments made at regional meetings with school…

  9. Oklahoma National Distinguished Principals: A Case Study of Leadership Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Toni Rae

    2010-01-01

    Purpose, scope, and method of study: The purpose of this study was to examine the daily leadership practices of Oklahoma National Distinguished Principals to better understand how leadership performance is used to create and sustain productive change within schools. This qualitative study relied on a multiple case design utilizing participants…

  10. A Resource Manual for Speech and Hearing Programs in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    Administrative aspects of the Oklahoma speech and hearing program are described, including state requirements, school administrator role, and organizational and operational procedures. Information on speech and language development and remediation covers language, articulation, stuttering, voice disorders, cleft palate, speech improvement,…

  11. How a School Coped with the Oklahoma City Bombing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspy, David N.; Aspy, Cheryl B.

    1996-01-01

    Following the Oklahoma City bombing, fifth graders at a nearby elementary school coped with ensuing uncertainty, pain, and loss. They wrote appreciative letters to fire and rescue workers; shared personal stories with classmates; compiled an anthology of poems, prayers, and stories; attended an assembly to honor parents participating in rescue…

  12. Hydrogen manufacture by Lurgi gasification of Oklahoma coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of using the Lurgi gasification process to produce hydrogen from Oklahoma coal are listed. Special attention was given to the production of heat for the process; heat is generated by burning part of pretreated coal in the steam generator. Overall performance of the Lurgi process is summarized in tabular form.

  13. 77 FR 74689 - Land Acquisitions; Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... made a final agency determination to acquire approximately 127.65 acres of land in trust for the... the public of the Secretary's decision to acquire land in trust at least 30 days prior to...

  14. 76 FR 42723 - Land Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... made a final agency determination to acquire approximately 15 acres of land, known as ``OMDE Ponca City...) that notice be given to the public of the Secretary's decision to acquire land in trust at least...

  15. 76 FR 42723 - Land Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... made a final agency determination to acquire approximately 27.66 acres of land, known as ``OMDE Tulsa...(b) that notice be given to the public of the Secretary's decision to acquire land in trust at...

  16. 76 FR 42723 - Land Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; Osage Nation of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... made a final agency determination to acquire approximately 7.5 acres of land, known as the Skiatook... part 151.12(b) that notice be given to the public of the Secretary's decision to acquire land in...

  17. Climate variability in Oklahoma - get ready for more

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our climate is changing relatively rapidly now, with the most critical changes for agriculture in Oklahoma manifesting as increases in the number of intense rainfall events and prolonged droughts, wild swings in the winter and early spring between "too cold" and "too hot", and higher-than-previous o...

  18. 76 FR 41553 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00050

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00050 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... declaration remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James...

  19. The Quest for Equal Employment Opportunity in Oklahoma State Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights, Oklahoma City.

    This report summarizes the findings of recent hearings and field investigations on the employment of minorities and women in Oklahoma State government, and assesses whether or not the merit system has fulfilled its mandate for equal employment opportunity. It was found that a disproportionate number of females and minorities are concentrated in…

  20. Relationship between College Readiness, Oklahoma State Testing Program, and EXPLORE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: The study investigated the relationship between performance on the Oklahoma State Testing Program (OSTP) for grades 3-7 and the EXPLORE in math and reading for 586 students. The EXPLORE test, a part of the ACT, is given in the eighth grade and provides college readiness benchmarks and a national percentile ranking (NPR)…

  1. Firearm-related mortality in Oklahoma, 1985-1989.

    PubMed

    Archer, P J; Makintubee, S; Sells, K M

    1993-04-01

    To determine the extent of firearms as a cause of mortality, Oklahoma vital statistic records were analyzed. The annual mortality rate in Oklahoma between 1985 and 1989 was 20% higher than the U.S. rate. Firearms were the second leading cause of injury deaths; firearms were the leading cause of injury deaths among blacks and the leading cause of all deaths among blacks 15 to 29 years of age. Ninety-two percent of the firearm-related deaths were intentional; firearms accounted for 70% of suicides and 59% of homicides. The male death rate from firearms was 4.5 times the female death rate. Suicide rates were highest among white males 65 years and older; homicide rates peaked among black males 25 to 34 years of age. Residents of eastern Oklahoma had the highest rates. The magnitude and preventability of firearm-related deaths and injuries demand attention and collaboration from Oklahoma health care providers; public health, mental health, and education officials; and criminal justice professionals. PMID:8483028

  2. 75 FR 13236 - Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK AGENCY: Federal Communications... Congressional review Act, see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television,...

  3. 75 FR 5015 - Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK AGENCY: Federal Communications... procedures for comments, see 47 CFR 1.415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television, Television broadcasting. For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Federal Communications...

  4. Oklahoma Heritage Handbook: Youth Activities 1979-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Bruce E.

    This publication contains resources and suggestions to help K-12 teachers and students establish a Heritage Club and become involved with activities of the Oklahoma Historical Society (O.H.S.). The resources can easily be used or adapted for use by educators in other states. The publication begins by describing the divisions of the O.H.S. which is…

  5. Industrial unionism and the Oklahoma coal industry, 1870-1935

    SciTech Connect

    Sewall, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    This study traces the development of industrial unionism in Oklahoma's coal industry from the beginnings of the industry in 1870 to its decline in 1935. Chapter topics include the early years of the coal industry, life in the coal towns, and the series of strikes that occurred from 1894 to 1932. The study draws from both labor and management materials, but also from primary sources that reflect the role of both the state and federal governments during strikes. The study also utilizes the newspapers of the coal towns. They are a bountiful source on life in Oklahoma's coal towns. Study concludes that Oklahoma's coal towns were a perfect breeding ground for industrial unionism. Working in the most dangerous mines in the United States, the miners of Oklahoma turned to unionism in their efforts to improve working conditions and to secure a living wage. Above ground, the miners battled to break the company towns system. There the union achieved success in eliminating the company store and company housing, the two principal components of the company town system. At the same time, the miners created a union culture under which miners of all nationalities were welcome.

  6. The Oklahoma Amish: Survival of an Ethnic Subculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, William E.

    1981-01-01

    Focuses on ways that an Oklahoma Amish community creates, defines, maintains, and manipulates various symbols in an effort to deal with five problems that threaten the survival of Amish life: disenchanted youth, inroads of modernity, tourism, vanishing farm land, and governmental intervention. (Author/GC)

  7. Degrees Conferred in Oklahoma Higher Education. 1974-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

    These tables summarize degrees conferred in both state and private Oklahoma colleges and universities. They cover a period from 1973-75 and compare this period with previous semesters. Included are associate degrees, certificates, bachelors, first professional, and graduate degrees. Tables list students' sex, division of study, and field of study.…

  8. Evaluating Injury Prevention Programs: The Oklahoma City Smoke Alarm Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallonee, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Illustrates how evaluating the Oklahoma City Smoke Alarm Project increased its success in reducing residential fire-related injuries and deaths. The program distributed and tested smoke alarms in residential dwellings and offered educational materials on fire prevention and safety. Evaluation provided sound data on program processes and outcomes,…

  9. Degrees Conferred in Oklahoma Higher Education, 1981-82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

    Data on degrees conferred in 1981-1982 in Oklahoma colleges and universities are presented by sex and by field of study. Summary tables also show number of degrees and percentage distribution by racial and ethnic origin for each institution. Findings include the following: In 1981-1982, 18,725 degrees were conferred--4,560 associate degrees,…

  10. Personal Touches Warm up Oklahoma City U.'s Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Oklahoma City University prides itself on treating its faculty and staff members like family. It is the kind of place where new employees are welcomed in the president's house, staff members kick in to raise money when a colleague faces hard times, and promising young workers are offered flexible work schedules and free tuition to help them…

  11. 77 FR 61466 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00063

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ...This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/ 2012. Incident: Freedom and Noble Wildfires. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 through 08/14/2012. Effective Date: 09/27/2012. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 10/22/2012. EIDL Loan Application Deadline Date:...

  12. Research Training at the University of Oklahoma: An Opinion Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotsky, Ivan

    The extent to which research training is needed by Master of Public Administration (MPA) graduates at the University of Oklahoma, Advanced Programs, was investigated through the administration of a questionnaire to 38 August 1977 MPA degree recipients. The questionnaire contained 13 questions concerning where the student took most of his courses;…

  13. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Oklahoma's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Oklahoma is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  14. Infant Toddler Services through Community Collaboration: Oklahoma's Early Childhood Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Carla B.; Horm, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive, integrated services for infants, toddlers, and families are essential for optimal child development, and collaboration across systems is increasingly important to maximize limited resources. The authors describe three successful initiatives in Oklahoma that use a collaborative systems approach to providing direct services to young…

  15. Students' Perceptions of Bullying in Oklahoma Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Patricia Paulsen; Middleton, Katherine M.; Marshall, David D.

    2009-01-01

    We studied perceptions of Oklahoma public school students (n = 7,848) regarding bullying. Specifically, we asked for their thoughts about the seriousness of bullying, the hurtfulness of bullying, their involvement in bullying (as victim or perpetrator), their responses to being bullied or seeing someone else being bullied, and what they wanted…

  16. Field Evaluation of a Near Zero Energy Home in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, R.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

    2008-08-01

    The authors evaluated a zero energy home built by Ideal Homes in Edmond, Oklahoma, that included an extensive package of energy-efficient technologies and a photovoltaic array for site electricity generation. The home was part of a Building America research project in partnership with the Building Science Consortium to exhibit high efficiency technologies while keeping costs within the reach of average home buyers.

  17. University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Skubic, Patrick L.

    2013-07-31

    The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances, or at the very highest energies. The outcomes of the group's combined experimental and theoretical research will be an improved understanding of nature, at the highest energies reachable, from which applications to technological innovation will surely result, as they always have from such studies in the past.

  18. Comparative analysis of wind energy production in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermilova, Ekaterina Alexeevna

    Scope and method of study. In the last decades humanity has realized the necessity of developing alternative energy sources for its efficient economic development and simple survival in the future. During the last 30 years major improvements were made in renewable energy technologies and they started to become competitive with traditional energy sources (fossil fuels), especially with consideration of external costs. Among the renewable energy sources, wind energy is one of the cheapest and fastest growing nowadays. Oklahoma is a very promising site for wind energy development considering its excellent wind resources. Developing wind energy can allow not only electricity production for in-state consumption, but also exporting to other states. The development of wind energy could encourage economic growth with very few adverse impacts on the environment. However, traditional energy sources are still the cheapest and, thus, the introduction of the wind energy in Oklahoma should be critically analyzed from economic, ecological and social points of view. The goal of this study is to conduct analysis of wind energy electricity production in Oklahoma on the four main stages: (1) Investment Analysis from Private Perspective: Calculate present value net benefits for wind energy and traditional energy (natural gas), make sure that both of them are positive. (2) Investment Analysis from Social Perspective: Evaluate present value net private benefits (PVNPB) and present value net social benefit from both projects (PVNSB). (3) Government Subsidy Analysis: recognize the necessity of the subsidies and evaluate the amount of subsidies if any. (4) Investment Analysis from a Geographic Perspective: determine economic feasibility of wind power generation for 77 Oklahoma counties. Findings and conclusions. The final output of the study is the recommendations concerning wind energy development in Oklahoma with consideration of economic efficiency, ecological and social impacts. Study not only analyze possibilities for wind energy development in the state, but make recommendations on the county by county basis with consideration of wind power density, land cost, property tax and infrastructure development in each county.

  19. MARBLE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donato, Mary M.; Hale, William N.

    1984-01-01

    The Marble Mountain Wilderness is located in the north-central Klamath Mountains of northern California. Geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral investigations indicate that the wilderness has areas of probable and substantiated resource potential for placer gold, for chromite, and for marble. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuel resources.

  20. Certified organic farming research and demonstration project by Oklahoma State University and USDA's Agricultural Research Service at Lane, Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2003, Oklahoma State University and USDA, Agricultural Research Service, South Central Agricultural Research Laboratory received organic certification for 8 acres at the Lane Agricultural Center, Lane, OK. The certified organic land was used to develop a cooperative project with a diversity of a...

  1. A discussion of the depositional environment and silica sources of the novaculite in Broken Bow, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, P.F. . Earth and Planetary Sciences Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    There has been considerable research and speculation concerning the depositional environment for the silica sources of the Arkansas Novaculite in the Ouachita Mountains. Arkansas Novaculite conformably overlies Missouri Mountain Shale and underlies the Mississippian Stanley Shale group. Structural evidence in the Ouachita's supports a continent-continent collision and/or island arc subduction involving the continental margin of North America during Late Mississippian, after the novaculite sequence (Thomas, 1989, Appalachian-Ouachita orogen beneath the eastern gulf coastal plain, DNAG F-2). When considering the amount of silica required for deposition of massive and relatively pure silica-rich novaculite, the following were taken into account: (1) the source of the silica, (2) what environment will support silica-based marine life, and (3) what environmental conditions would account for thick, clean silica beds. Great quantities of silica most likely came from several sources. Structural evidence supports sources from the suspect Ouachita wedge and volcanic ash. Abundant fossil evidence suggests that a large portion of the silica source can be attributed to marine life such as radiolaria and sponge spicules. Though the role of metamorphic activity could be key in the formation of these novaculites, correlation of structural and sedimentary depositional features, and fossil evidence overwhelmingly indicate a marine environment for the silica source. The predisposition of radiolaria for an open ocean environment, the conodonts' restricted ranges, the preference of most siliceous sponges for a deep ocean environment, and the lack of stratigraphic evidence pointing to a shallowing of the seas, suggest that the Arkansas-Oklahoma novaculites from deep-marine radiolaria deposits with additional deposition from sedimentary sources.

  2. Environmental and hydrologic setting of the Ozark Plateaus study unit, Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adamski, James C.; Petersen, James C.; Freiwald, David A.; Davis, Jerri V.

    1995-01-01

    The environmental and hydrologic setting of the Ozark Plateaus National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) study unit and the factors that affect water quality are described in this report. The primary natural and cultural features that affect water- quality characteristics and the potential for future water-quality problems are described. These environmental features include climate, physio- graphy, geology, soils, population, land use, water use, and surface- and ground-water flow systems. The study-unit area is approximately 47,600 square miles and includes most of the Ozark Plateaus Province and parts of the adjacent Osage Plains and Mississippi Alluvial Plain in parts of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. The geology is characterized by basement igneous rocks overlain by a thick sequence of dolomites, limestones, sandstones, and shales of Paleozoic age. Land use in the study unit is predominantly pasture and forest in the southeastern part, and pasture and cropland in the northwestern part. All or part of the White, Neosho-lllinois, Osage, Gasconade, Meramec, St. Francis, and Black River Basins are within the study unit. Streams in the Boston Mountains contain the least mineralized water, and those in the Osage Plains contain the most mineralized water. The study unit contains eight hydrogeologic units including three major aquifers--the Springfield Plateau, Ozark, and St. Francois aquifers. Streams and aquifers in the study unit generally contain calcium or calcium-magnesium bicarbonate waters. Ground- and surface-water interactions are greatest in the Salem and Springfield Plateaus and least in the Boston Mountains and Osage Plains. Geology, land use, and population probably are the most important environmental factors that affect water quality.

  3. Oklahoma Ag in the Classroom, K-2. Book 1: Language Arts, Reading, Information Skills, Mathematics. Guides and Activities for Oklahoma Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Charles; And Others

    Oklahoma Ag in the Classroom is a program of the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture and the Cooperative Extension Service that aims at providing educators with opportunities to help youth understand the importance of agriculture in everyday life. This book includes a collection of ready-to-use teacher guides and activity sheets that can be used to…

  4. Estimated flood peak discharges on Twin, Brock, and Lightning creeks, Southwest Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tortorelli, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    The flash flood in southwestern Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993, was the result of an intense 3-hour rainfall on saturated ground or impervious surfaces. The total precipitation of 5.28 inches was close to the 3-hour, 100-year frequency and produced extensive flooding. The most serious flooding was on Twin, Brock, and Lightning Creeks. Four people died in this flood. Over 1,900 structures were damaged along the 3 creeks. There were about $3 million in damages to Oklahoma City public facilities, the majority of which were in the three basins. A study was conducted to determine the magnitude of the May 8, 1993, flood peak discharge in these three creeks in southwestern Oklahoma City and compare these peaks with published flood estimates. Flood peak-discharge estimates for these creeks were determined at 11 study sites using a step-backwater analysis to match the flood water-surface profiles defined by high-water marks. The unit discharges during peak runoff ranged from 881 cubic feet per second per square mile for Lightning Creek at SW 44th Street to 3,570 cubic feet per second per square mile for Brock Creek at SW 59th Street. The ratios of the 1993 flood peak discharges to the Federal Emergency Management Agency 100-year flood peak discharges ranged from 1.25 to 3.29. The water-surface elevations ranged from 0.2 foot to 5.9 feet above the Federal Emergency Management Agency 500-year flood water-surface elevations. The very large flood peaks in these 3 small urban basins were the result of very intense rainfall in a short period of time, close to 100 percent runoff due to ground surfaces being essentially impervious, and the city streets acting as efficient conveyances to the main channels. The unit discharges compare in magnitude to other extraordinary Oklahoma urban floods.

  5. Structural profiles of Ouachita Mountains, western Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Blythe, A.E.; Sugar, A.; Phipps, S.P.

    1988-07-01

    The Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma and Arkansas are the largest exposure of the Pennsylvania-age orogen rimming the southern margin of North America. The exposure consists of a thick Carboniferous flysch sequence overlying a thin early Paleozoic deep-water sequence and is generally interpreted to have been deformed in a south-dipping subduction zone. Two balanced cross sections (/approximately/ 40 km apart) of the Ouachita Mountains in western Arkansas are presented here, illustrating the regional structural style. Major features of the cross sections include (from north to south) (1) triangle zones along the northern border of the frontal thrust zone produced by imbrication at depth, (2) large-scale (/approximately/ 10-km wavelength) fault-propagation folds in the frontal thrust zone, formed primarily above normal faults that offset the basement and act as buttresses at depth, (3) a late-stage basement uplift along the reactivated Johns Valley normal fault system, resulting in the antiformal structure of the Benton uplift and backthrusts in the northern Benton uplift, and (4) small-scale (1-3 km) heavily faulted folds in the early paleozoic deepwater rocks exposed in the Benton uplift. Greenschist metamorphism in these rocks is attributed to the estimated 13 km of Carboniferous overburden, which was later eroded. Reconstructions of the late Paleozoic continental margin are made from the two cross sections. The reconstructed shelf-to-slope transition is interpreted to underlie the southern flank of the Benton uplift. Using modern analogs for the across-strike width of the shelf-to-slope transition, a minimum regional shortening estimate of 30-50% (110-155 km) is obtained for deep-water rocks currently exposed in the Benton uplift. 6 figures.

  6. Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, 1969-70

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.L.

    1972-01-01

    The investigation of the ground-water resources of Oklahoma by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board includes a continuing program to collect records of water levels in selected observation wells on a systematic basis. These water-level records: (1) provide an index to available ground-water supplies; (2) facilitate the prediction of trends in water levels that will indicate likely changes in storage; (3) aid in the prediction of the base flow of streams; (4) provide information for use in basic research; (5) provide long-time continuous records of fluctuations of water levels in representative wells; and (6) serve as a framework to which other types of hydrologic data my be related. Prior to 1956, measurements of water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma were included in water-supply papers published annually by the U.S. Geological Survey. Beginning with the 1956 calendar year, however, Geological Survey water-level reports will contain only records of a selected network of observation wells, and will be published at 5-year intervals. The first of this series, for the 1956-59 period was published in 1962. In addition to the water-supply papers, the U.S. Geological Survey, cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, has published the following informal reports on water levels in Oklahoma. Ground-water levels in observations wells in Oklahoma, 1956-60 Ground-water levels in observations wells in Oklahoma, 1961-62 Ground-water levels in observations wells in Oklahoma, 1963-64 Ground-water levels in observations wells in Oklahoma, 1965-66 Ground-water levels in observations wells in Oklahoma, 1967-68 Records of water-level measurements in wells in the Oklahoma Panhandle, 1966-70 Records of water-level measurements in wells in the Oklahoma Panhandle, 1971-72 The basic observation-well network in Oklahoma during the period 1969-70 included the following counties: Alfalfa, Beaver, Beckham, Caddo, Cimarron, Cleveland, Garfield, Garvin, Grady, Greer, Harmon, Jackson, Kingfisher, LeFlore, Major, Muskogee, Oklahoma, Payne, Pontotoc, Rogers, Sequoyah, Texas, Tillman, Wagoner, Washita, and Woodward. Table 2 includes the basic observation-well network and other wells measured by the U.S. Geological Survey. The data in this report were compiled and prepared for publication under the cooperative agreement for ground-water investigations in Oklahoma between the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Oklahoma Geological Survey, and the U.S. Geological Survey.

  7. Mountaineering fatalities on Denali.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott E; Campbell, Aaron D; Dow, Jennifer; Grissom, Colin K

    2008-01-01

    Mount McKinley, or Denali, is the tallest mountain in North America and attracts over 1,000 climbers annually from around the world. Since Denali is located within a national park, the National Park Service (NPS) manages mountaineering activities and attempts to maintain a balance of an adventurous experience while promoting safety. We retrospectively reviewed the fatalities on Denali from 1903 to 2006 to assist the NPS, medical personnel, and mountaineers improve safety and reduce fatalities on the mountain. Historical records and the NPS climber database were reviewed. Demographics, mechanisms, and circumstances surrounding each fatality were examined. Fatality rates and odds ratios for country of origin were calculated. From 1903 through the end of the 2006 climbing season, 96 individuals died on Denali. The fatality rate is declining and is 3.08/1,000 summit attempts. Of the 96 deaths, 92% were male, 51% occurred on the West Buttress route, and 45% were due to injuries sustained from falls. Sixty-one percent occurred on the descent and the largest number of deaths in 1 year occurred in 1992. Climbers from Asia had the highest odds of dying on the mountain. Fatalities were decreased by 53% after a NPS registration system was established in 1995. Although mountaineering remains a high-risk activity, safety on Denali is improving. Certain groups have a significantly higher chance of dying. Registration systems and screening methods provide ways to target at-risk groups and improve safety on high altitude mountains such as Denali. PMID:18331224

  8. Recreational mountain biking injuries.

    PubMed

    Aitken, S A; Biant, L C; Court-Brown, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    Mountain biking is increasing in popularity worldwide. The injury patterns associated with elite level and competitive mountain biking are known. This study analysed the incidence, spectrum and risk factors for injuries sustained during recreational mountain biking. The injury rate was 1.54 injuries per 1000 biker exposures. Men were more commonly injured than women, with those aged 30-39 years at highest risk. The commonest types of injury were wounding, skeletal fracture and musculoskeletal soft tissue injury. Joint dislocations occurred more commonly in older mountain bikers. The limbs were more commonly injured than the axial skeleton. The highest hospital admission rates were observed with head, neck and torso injuries. Protective body armour, clip-in pedals and the use of a full-suspension bicycle may confer a protective effect. PMID:20659880

  9. Karst in Permian evaporite rocks of western Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.S. )

    1993-02-01

    Bedded evaporites (gypsum and salt) of Permian age have been dissolved naturally by ground water to form a major evaporite-karst region in western Oklahoma. The Blaine Formation and associated evaporites comprise 100--800 ft of strata that dip gently into broad, structural basins. Outcropping gypsum, dolomite, and red-bed shales of the Blaine display typical karstic features, such as sinkholes, caves, disappearing streams, and springs. Large caves are developed in gypsum beds 10--30 ft thick at several places, and a major gypsum/dolomite karst aquifer provides irrigation water to a large region in southwestern Oklahoma, where salt layers above and below the Blaine Formation have been partly dissolved at depths of 30--800 ft below the land surface. Salt dissolution causes development of brine-filled cavities, into which overlying strata collapse, and the brine eventually is emitted at the land surface in large salt plains.

  10. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2002-03-31

    The West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma is one of few newly discovered oil fields in Oklahoma. Although profitable, the field exhibits several unusual characteristics. These include decreasing water-oil ratios, decreasing gas-oil ratios, decreasing bottomhole pressures during shut-ins in some wells, and transient behavior for water production in many wells. This report explains the unusual characteristics of West Carney Field based on detailed geological and engineering analyses. We propose a geological history that explains the presence of mobile water and oil in the reservoir. The combination of matrix and fractures in the reservoir explains the reservoir's flow behavior. We confirm our hypothesis by matching observed performance with a simulated model and develop procedures for correlating core data to log data so that the analysis can be extended to other, similar fields where the core coverage may be limited.

  11. Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2007-06-30

    Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

  12. Aerobiology of Juniperus Pollen in Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levetin, Estelle; Bunderson, Landon; VandeWater, Pete; Luvall, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Pollen from members of the Cupressaceae are major aeroallergens in many parts of the world. In the south central and southwest United States, Juniperus pollen is the most important member of this family with J. ashei (JA) responsible for severe winter allergy symptoms in Texas and Oklahoma. In New Mexico, pollen from J. monosperma (JM) and other Juniperus species are important contributors to spring allergies, while J. pinchotii (JP) pollinates in the fall affecting sensitive individuals in west Texas, southwest Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico. Throughout this region, JA, JM, and JP occur in dense woodland populations. Generally monitoring for airborne allergens is conducted in urban areas, although the source for tree pollen may be forested areas distant from the sampling sites. Improved pollen forecasts require a better understanding of pollen production at the source. The current study was undertaken to examine the aerobiology of several Juniperus species at their source areas for the development of new pollen forecasting initiatives.

  13. Organic contaminants in mountains.

    PubMed

    Daly, Gillian L; Wania, Frank

    2005-01-15

    The study of organic contaminants at high altitudes is motivated by the potential risk that they pose to humans living in, or depending on resources derived from, mountains and to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in alpine areas. Mountains are also ideal settings to study contaminant transport and behavior along gradients of climate and surface cover. Information on organic contaminants in mountains is compiled from the literature and synthesized, with a focus on atmospheric transport and deposition, contaminant dynamics in alpine lakes and aquatic organisms, and concentration differences with altitude. Diurnal mountain winds, in connection with enhanced deposition at higher elevations caused by low temperatures and high precipitation rates, conspire to make mid-latitude mountains become convergence zones for selected persistent organic chemicals. In particular, the more volatile constituents of contaminant mixtures seem to become enriched, relative to the less volatile constituents at higher altitudes. For selected contaminants, concentration inversions (i.e., concentrations that increase with elevation) have been observed. A notable difference between cold trapping in high latitudes and high altitudes is the likely importance of precipitation. High rates of snow deposition in mid- and high-latitude mountains may lead to a large contaminant release during snowmelt. Regions above the tree line often have little capacity to retain the released contaminants, suggesting the potential for a highly dynamic contaminant fate situation during the snow-free season with significant revolatilization and runoff. The chemical and environmental factors that control the orographic cold trapping of organic contaminants should be examined further by measuring and comparatively interpreting concentration gradients along several mountain slopes with widely different characteristics. Future efforts should further focus on the bioaccumulation and potential effects of contaminants in the upper trophic levels of alpine food chains, on measuring more water-soluble, persistent organic contaminants, and on studying how climate change may affect contaminant dynamics in mountain settings. PMID:15707037

  14. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  15. Characterizing Earthquake Clusters in Oklahoma Using Subspace Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, N. D.; Benz, H.; Aster, R. C.; McNamara, D. E.; Myers, E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Subspace detection is a powerful and adaptive tool for continuously detecting low signal to noise seismic signals. Subspace detectors improve upon simple cross-correlation/matched filtering techniques by moving beyond the use of a single waveform template to the use of multiple orthogonal waveform templates that effectively span the signals from all previously identified events within a data set. Subspace detectors are particularly useful in event scenarios where a spatially limited source distribution produces earthquakes with highly similar waveforms. In this context, the methodology has been successfully deployed to identify low-frequency earthquakes within non-volcanic tremor, to characterize earthquakes swarms above magma bodies, and for detailed characterization of aftershock sequences. Here we apply a subspace detection methodology to characterize recent earthquakes clusters in Oklahoma. Since 2009, the state has experienced an unprecedented increase in seismicity, which has been attributed by others to recent expansion in deep wastewater injection well activity. Within the last few years, 99% of increased Oklahoma earthquake activity has occurred within 15 km of a Class II injection well. We analyze areas of dense seismic activity in central Oklahoma and construct more complete catalogues for analysis. For a typical cluster, we are able to achieve catalog completeness to near or below magnitude 1 and to continuously document seismic activity for periods of 6 months or more. Our catalog can more completely characterize these clusters in time and space with event numbers, magnitudes, b-values, energy, locations, etc. This detailed examination of swarm events should lead to a better understanding of time varying earthquake processes and hazards in the state of Oklahoma.

  16. Uranium-Bearing Carbonaceous Nodules of Southwestern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, James Wilcott

    1956-01-01

    Uranium-bearing carbonaceous nodules have been found along the north flank of the Wichita uplift in southwestern Oklahoma. The carbonaceous nodules are black, hard, and predominantly nodular shaped. One specimen, by analyses, was found to contain approximately 42 percent carbon and 3 percent hydrogen. The uranium, vanadium, cobalt, arsenic, nickel, lead and iron contents each range between 1 and 10 percent. It is concluded that the carbonaceous nodules are epigenetic and that the organic and inorganic constituents were derived from, mobile soluttons.

  17. Rocky Mountain acidification study

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.H.; Galloway, J.N.; Schofield, C.; McFee, W.; Johnson, R.; McCarley, S.; Dise, N.; Herzog, D.

    1983-10-01

    The objectives of this report were to determine the sensitivity of watersheds characteristic of the Rocky Mountain Region and the relationship of watershed sensitivity to geology and soils; to evaluate the extent of current acidification and the potential for increasing acidification with increasing deposition of nitrate and sulfate; to evaluate the results of the preceding in terms of impacts on fish populations; and to develop recommendations for assessment of future trends in both changing water chemistry and impacts on fish populations. Areas selected for study included the Rocky Mountain National Ppark and Yellowstone National Park, exemplifying two different geologic types that are representative of a large portion of the Rocky Mountain region. Rocky Mountain National Park is primarily underlain by granite and Yellowstone National Park by volcanic materials. Sensitivity is primarily determined by bedrock geology and varies inversely with elevation. High-elevation lakes and streams in the central Rocky Mountain region are very sensitive to acidic deposition. With respect to fish populations there is currently no evidence of chronic acidification and thus no apparent impact on fisheries. However, the very low base cation concentration observed in the headwater drainages of Rocky Mountain National Park suggests extreme sensitivity to acidification. Waters in volcanic areas such as Yellowstone National Park are generally of high alkalinity and do not represent potentially sensitive habitats. 109 references, 31 figures, 24 tables.

  18. Red Fork sandstone of Oklahoma: depositional history and reservoir distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, J.W.; Fritz, R.D.; Johnson, C.

    1989-03-01

    The Middle Pennsylvanian Red Fork sandstone formed as a result of progradation across eastern Kansas and most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork is one of several transgressive-regressive sequences (cyclothems) developed within the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group. Sea level changes, together with varying subsidence, were dominant factors controlling the general stratigraphic (correlative) characteristics of the Red Fork interval. Progradation was episodic, with sand deposition in the more active part of the basin during lower sea level stands and valley-fill deposition in the more stable areas during sea level rises. A map of Red Fork sand trends reveals an alluvial-deltaic complex covering most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork consists primarily of alluvial-valley and plain (fluvial) bodies in the northernmost part of northeastern Oklahoma, alluvial-deltaic bodies in most of the remaining parts of the shelf area, and off-shelf submarine-fan and slope basinal-floor complexes within the deeper part of the Anadarko basin. Determination of reservoir trend and genesis requires integration of rock and log data. Logs need to be calibrated to cores in order to estimate depositional environments accurately and to make a reasonable assessment of diagenetic overprints. Much of the oil and gas has been trapped in stratigraphic traps, and a significant amount of oil is in channel sandstones with trends at high angles to the structural grain. In some areas, secondary clay, in particular chloritic clay, has resulted in microporosity, high water saturation, and correspondingly low resistivities in oil reserves.

  19. Chronology of migration by American coots in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eddleman, William R.; Knopf, Fritz L.; Patterson, Craig T.

    1985-01-01

    American coots (Fulica americana) were studied on large reservoirs in north-central Oklahoma in 1979-1982 to determine chronologies of migrations by age- and sex class. Coots began migrating into Oklahoma in mid-September, numbers peaked in early to mid-October, and few birds were seen after 1 November. Some late migrants appeared in mid-December. In spring, coots began migrating in late February, numbers peaked in mid-April, and the last birds were seen in mid-May. Generally, adult and juvenile males and juvenile female coots migrated simultaneously in autumn, but adult females completed migration by 1 November. A few juveniles and adult males migrated in December. Adult coots preceded yearlings in spring. Despite annual and between-lake differences in chronology of autumn migration, most coots migrated before waterfowl hunting season in Oklahoma. Coot hunting seasons in mid-latitude states should commence before the general waterfowl season where management goals are to increase hunter interest and the harvest of birds.

  20. Cancer Incidence and Staging among American Indians in Oklahoma

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Janis E.; Martinez, Sydney A.; Janitz, Amanda E.; Pate, Anne E.; Erb-Alvarez, Julie; Wharton, David F; Gahn, David; Tall, Vicki L.; Snider, Cuyler; Anderson, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background This study describes overall and site specific cancer incidence among AI/ANs compared to whites in Oklahoma and differences in cancer staging. Methods Age-adjusted incidence rates obtained from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry are presented for all cancer sites combined and for the most common cancer sites among AI/ANs with comparisons to whites. Percentages of late stage cancers for breast, colorectal, and melanoma cancers are also presented. Results AI/ANs had a significantly higher overall cancer incidence rate compared to whites (629.8/100,000 vs. 503.3/100,000), with a rate ratio of 1.25 (95% CI: 1.22, 1.28). There was a significant disparity in the percentage of late stage melanoma cancers between 2005 and 2009, with 14.0% late stage melanoma for whites and 20.0% for AI/ANs (p-value: 0.03). Conclusions Overall, there were cancer disparities between AI/ANs and whites in Oklahoma. Incidence rates were higher among AI/ANs for all cancers and many site specific cancers. PMID:24800463

  1. Digital Atlas of the Upper Washita River Basin, Southwestern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, Carol J.; Masoner, Jason R.; Scott, Jonathon C.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous types of environmental data have been collected in the upper Washita River basin in southwestern Oklahoma. However, to date these data have not been compiled into a format that can be comprehensively queried for the purpose of evaluating the effects of various conservation practices implemented to reduce agricultural runoff and erosion in parts of the upper Washita River basin. This U.S. Geological Survey publication, 'Digital atlas of the upper Washita River basin, southwestern Oklahoma' was created to assist with environmental analysis. This atlas contains 30 spatial data sets that can be used in environmental assessment and decision making for the upper Washita River basin. This digital atlas includes U.S. Geological Survey sampling sites and associated water-quality, biological, water-level, and streamflow data collected from 1903 to 2005. The data were retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System database on September 29, 2005. Data sets are from the Geology, Geography, and Water disciplines of the U.S. Geological Survey and cover parts of Beckham, Caddo, Canadian, Comanche, Custer, Dewey, Grady, Kiowa, and Washita Counties in southwestern Oklahoma. A bibliography of past reports from the U.S. Geological Survey and other State and Federal agencies from 1949 to 2004 is included in the atlas. Additionally, reports by Becker (2001), Martin (2002), Fairchild and others (2004), and Miller and Stanley (2005) are provided in electronic format.

  2. Chemical analyses of surface waters in Oklahoma, September - December, 1944

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1945-01-01

    Red River at Denison Dam, Texas Sport samples were collected at the remainder of the stations. The analyses of the spot samples were made largely in a laboratory provided by the Oklahoma A. & M. College, under the supervision of Dr. O.M. Smith, Head, Department of Chemistry; Dr. S.R. Wood, Associate Professor of Chemistry; and W.W. Hastings, U.S. Geological Survey. The daily samples were analyzed in the water resources laboratory of the Geological Survey at Austin, Texas. These data have been summarized in a report to the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, March 1, 1945. The streams of Oklahoma are classified into two major drainage basins: the Arkansas River and the Red River and their tributaries. The attached analyses are arranged in geographical order for their respective drainage basins, with records listed in downstream order for stations on the main stem first, followed by the analyses for the tributaries. When available, the mean daily discharge is given for the analyses.

  3. Groundwater quality and water-well characteristics in the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma Jurisdictional Area, central Oklahoma, 1948--2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, Carol J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma, compiled historical groundwater-quality data collected from 1948 to 2011 and water-well completion information in parts of Lincoln, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties in central Oklahoma to support the development of a comprehensive water-management plan for the Tribe’s jurisdictional area. In this study, water-quality data from 155 water wells, collected from 1948 to 2011, were retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System database; these data include measurements of pH, specific conductance, and hardness and concentrations of the major ions, trace elements, and radionuclides that have Maximum Contaminant Levels or Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels in public drinking-water supplies. Information about well characteristics includes ranges of well yield and well depth of private water wells in the study area and was compiled from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board Multi-Purpose Well Completion Report database. This report also shows depth to water from land surface by using shaded 30-foot contours that were created by using a geographic information system and spatial layers of a 2009 potentiometric surface (groundwater elevation) and land-surface elevation. Wells in the study area produce water from the North Canadian River alluvial and terrace aquifers, the underlying Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation that compose the Garber–Wellington aquifer, and the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups. Water quality varies substantially between the alluvial and terrace aquifers and bedrock aquifers in the study area. Water from the alluvial aquifer has relatively high concentrations of dissolved solids and generally is used for livestock only, whereas water from the terrace aquifer has low concentrations of dissolved solids and is used extensively by households in the study area. Water from the bedrock aquifer also is used extensively by households but may have high concentrations of trace elements, including uranium, in some areas where groundwater pH is above 8.0. Well yields vary and are dependent on aquifer characteristics and well-completion practices. Well yields in the unconsolidated alluvial and terrace aquifers generally are higher than yields from bedrock aquifers but are limited by the thickness and extent of these river deposits. Well yields in the alluvium and terrace aquifers commonly range from 50 to 150 gallons per minute and may exceed 300 gallons per minute, whereas well yields in the bedrock aquifers commonly range from 25 to 50 gallons per minute in the western one-third of study area (Oklahoma County) and generally less than 25 gallons per minute in the eastern two-thirds of the study area (Lincoln and Pottawatomie Counties).

  4. From magic mountain to table mountain.

    PubMed

    Diacon, Andreas H; von Groote-Bidlingmaier, Florian; Donald, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of chemotherapy, tuberculosis management relied upon aerotherapy, heliotherapy and good nutrition. This "treatment", exemplified by the regimen applied in Swiss and other European mountain resorts, is described by Thomas Mann in the book "The Magic Mountain". Tuberculosis chemotherapy began in 1944 with the introduction of streptomycin and para-amino-salicylic acid, later augmented by isoniazid. Early experience taught physicians that treatment must be given with multiple drugs to prevent emergence of resistance and that prolonged treatment adherence for 18-24 months was needed for a permanent cure of tuberculosis. Between 1970 and 1980 rifampicin was introduced and with pyrazinamide it made "short-course" treatment possible. For 30 years, a 6-month directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS) based on the three compounds isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide was the foundation of tuberculosis control strategies world-wide, and in recent years this was supplemented with ethambutol in view of increasing rates of isoniazid resistance. However, even 6 months of treatment is too long to easily ensure the compliance necessary to permanently cure tuberculosis. The recent spread of the HIV/AIDS epidemic has placed tuberculosis programmes under severe pressure and is accompanied by an increase in drug-resistance making tuberculosis virtually untreatable in some instances. In 2004 the first of a new generation of anti-tuberculosis drugs entered clinical evaluation. A series of clinical trials, often conducted at sites in Cape Town, South Africa, has shown them to be efficacious and hold promise of being able to shorten tuberculosis treatment and treat drug-resistant tuberculosis. Development and assessment of these drugs is ongoing but there is renewed hope that these new drugs and regimens will assist in finally conquering tuberculosis, preventing a return to Magic Mountain where sunshine and fresh air was all that could be offered to patients. PMID:22915310

  5. 40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.126 Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.126 Section 81.126 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  6. 40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125 Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section 81.125 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  7. 40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125 Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section 81.125 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  8. 40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125 Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section 81.125 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  9. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Tulsa Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist of the territorial area encompassed by...

  10. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Tulsa Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist of the territorial area encompassed by...

  11. 40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123 Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81.123 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  12. 40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.126 Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.126 Section 81.126 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  13. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Tulsa Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist of the territorial area encompassed by...

  14. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Tulsa Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist of the territorial area encompassed by...

  15. 40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.126 Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.126 Section 81.126 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  16. 40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123 Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81.123 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  17. 40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125 Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section 81.125 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  18. 40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123 Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81.123 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  19. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Tulsa Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist of the territorial area encompassed by...

  20. 40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.126 Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.126 Section 81.126 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  1. 40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.126 Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.126 Section 81.126 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  2. 40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123 Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81.123 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  3. 40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125 Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section 81.125 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  4. 40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123 Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81.123 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION......

  5. A Comparison of the Preferred Teaching Styles of Oklahoma Aviation Maintenance Instructors and Flight Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Deann Marie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the preferred teaching styles of Oklahoma aviation maintenance instructors and flight instructors. The scope of this study included maintenance instructors in CareerTech schools (Part 147 programs) and ground/flight instructors in Part 141 flight schools in Oklahoma. The methodology included administering…

  6. A Comparison of the Preferred Teaching Styles of Oklahoma Aviation Maintenance Instructors and Flight Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Deann Marie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the preferred teaching styles of Oklahoma aviation maintenance instructors and flight instructors. The scope of this study included maintenance instructors in CareerTech schools (Part 147 programs) and ground/flight instructors in Part 141 flight schools in Oklahoma. The methodology included administering…

  7. A Program of Education for Exceptional Children in Oklahoma: Bulletin S.E. No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City. Curriculum Div.

    Intended for special education personnel, the handbook sets forth the Oklahoma state program for the education of handicapped, gifted, and talented children. Aspects covered include the number of special needs students in Oklahoma, state laws pertaining to the education of exceptional children, state department of education regulations, mediation…

  8. 78 FR 73858 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Oklahoma

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... of Environmental Quality, Water Quality Division, 707 N. Robinson, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73101-1677; and United States Environmental Protection Agency, Region 6, Drinking Water Section (6WQ-SD), 1445... has adopted three EPA drinking water rules, namely the: (1) Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface...

  9. 75 FR 9895 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Oklahoma

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... and published in the Federal Register at 72 FR 57782 on October 10, 2007. Oklahoma has adopted the LCR... effective protection of public health by reducing exposure to lead in drinking water. EPA has determined... AGENCY Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Oklahoma AGENCY: United...

  10. 77 FR 15343 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Oklahoma has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant Final authorization to the State...

  11. 78 FR 32223 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Oklahoma has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant Final authorization to the State...

  12. 76 FR 70940 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Infrastructure...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    .... The Oklahoma Statewide Air Quality Surveillance Network was approved by EPA at 37 FR 10842, 10887 and revised on March 28, 1979 (44 FR 18490) and January 12, 1981 (46 FR 2655). Oklahoma's monitoring network... NAAQS: 110(a)(2)(A), (B), (C), (D)(ii), (E), (F), (G), (H), (J), (K), (L), and (M). EPA is...

  13. ("un")Doing the Next Generation Science Standards: Climate Change Education Actor-Networks in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colston, Nicole M.; Ivey, Toni A.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory research investigated how science education communities of practice in Oklahoma engage in translations of climate change education (CCE). Applications of actor-network theory to educational policymaking facilitate this analysis of the spaces of prescription and spaces of negotiation that characterize CCE in Oklahoma. Informed by…

  14. Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, 1980-82

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goemaat, Robert L.; Mize, Lionel D.; Spiser, Dannie E.

    1983-01-01

    In the 1980-82 Climatic Years, the U. S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, collected ground-water level data in Oklahoma from 1,122 sites in 77 counties. This report presents this data.

  15. Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, 1982-83 climatic years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goemaat, R.L.; Mize, L.D.; Spiser, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    In the 1982-83 climatic years, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources, collected ground-water level data in Oklahoma from 1,087 sites in 77 counties. This report presents those data points.

  16. Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, 1983-84 climatic year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goemaat, R.L.; Mize, L.D.; Spiser, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    During the 1983-84 climatic years, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, collected ground-water level data in Oklahoma from 1,083 sites in 77 counties. This report presents those data points.

  17. 76 FR 19004 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Oklahoma has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under...

  18. Oklahoma School Finance: A Study with Recommendations. Final Report, Special Joint Committee on School Finance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Legislature, Oklahoma City.

    The funding of public elementary and secondary schools in Oklahoma is examined in this report. In accordance with legislative requirements, a Special Joint Committee of the Oklahoma Legislature undertook an assessment of the current school finance formula for state aid and made recommendations on changes needed to provide equitable funding for…

  19. Funding for Local Government and Schools in Rural Oklahoma. ERS Staff Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloggett, Gordon; Doeksen, Gerald

    Oil, gas, and agriculture are the bases of rural Oklahoma's economy, and income from these sectors varied widely during the 1980s. This study investigated revenue sources and the effects of changing revenues for county and town governments and school systems in 36 rural Oklahoma counties. Major sources of local revenue were sales taxes, property…

  20. The Oklahoma's Promise Program: A National Model to Promote College Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.

    2013-01-01

    Using a multi-method approach involving fixed effects and logistic regressions, this study examined the effect of the Oklahoma's Promise Program on student persistence in relation to the Pell and Stafford federal programs and according to socio-economic characteristics and class level. The Oklahoma's Promise is a hybrid state program that pays…

  1. Status of the Oklahoma SOICC/NOICC Network. July 1, 1989 -June 30, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Oklahoma State Occupational Information Coordinating Committee.

    This 1989-1990 status report of the Oklahoma State Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (SOICC) includes the following: mission statement; organization chart; information on SOICC publications, including a labor supply and demand report; a listing of occupations licensed in Oklahoma, and a note on a career tabloid; descriptions of the…

  2. 76 FR 25322 - Oklahoma Rose Water LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Oklahoma Rose Water LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application... 30, 2010, Oklahoma Rose Water LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal...

  3. ("un")Doing the Next Generation Science Standards: Climate Change Education Actor-Networks in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colston, Nicole M.; Ivey, Toni A.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory research investigated how science education communities of practice in Oklahoma engage in translations of climate change education (CCE). Applications of actor-network theory to educational policymaking facilitate this analysis of the spaces of prescription and spaces of negotiation that characterize CCE in Oklahoma. Informed by…

  4. The Fiscal Impact of Tax-Credit Scholarships in Oklahoma. School Choice Issues in the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlob, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This analysis examines the demographics of the special needs population in public and private schools in Oklahoma and estimates the impact on school enrollments providing tax credit funded scholarship grants for special needs students. The author and his colleagues develop a model that shows how the expenditures of Oklahoma's school districts vary…

  5. 33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208.28 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of...

  6. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma. 208.27 Section 208.27 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.27 Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma. The...

  7. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma. 208.27 Section 208.27 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.27 Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma. The...

  8. 33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208.28 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FLOOD CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of...

  9. Secondary Agricultural Education Teachers as Agents of Change in Oklahoma and the Adoption of Precision Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickeson, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that precision agricultural education (PAE) in Oklahoma affects environmental quality, water conservation, and crop yields. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the nature and perceived effectiveness of PAE in Oklahoma secondary agricultural education classes. The study was framed by the diffusion of…

  10. Status of the Oklahoma SOICC/NOICC Network. July 1, 1989 -June 30, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Oklahoma State Occupational Information Coordinating Committee.

    This 1989-1990 status report of the Oklahoma State Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (SOICC) includes the following: mission statement; organization chart; information on SOICC publications, including a labor supply and demand report; a listing of occupations licensed in Oklahoma, and a note on a career tabloid; descriptions of the…

  11. Ooh La La! Oklahoma Culinary Programs Cook up Great Partnerships with French Counterparts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCharen, Belinda

    2009-01-01

    The dream of a Franco-Oklahoma partnership began over a year ago when Chantal Manes, now from the French Ministry of Education, visited Oklahoma. The Technologie Academie in Soissons, France, had a goal for all the career and technical students in the Picardie Region of France to have an international experience before completing their technical…

  12. DNA contents in Texas bluegrass (Poa arachnifera) selected in Texas and Oklahoma determined by flow cytometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Texas bluegrass (Poa arachnifera Torr.) is a dioecious, perennial, cool-season grass native to southern Kansas, Oklahoma, western Arkansas and most of Texas. Its major use has been for forage on rangelands in Texas and Oklahoma. More recently, interspecific hybrids between Texas bluegrass and Kentuc...

  13. Multidisciplinary Approach to Identify and Mitigate the Hazard from Induced Seismicity in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, A. A.; Keller, G. R., Jr.; Darold, A. P.; Murray, K. E.; Holloway, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Oklahoma has experienced a very significant increase in seismicity rates over the last 5 years with the greatest increase occurring in 2014. The observed rate increase indicates that the seismic hazard for at least some parts of Oklahoma has increased significantly. Many seismologists consider the large number of salt-water disposal wells operating in Oklahoma as the largest contributing factor to this increase. However, unlike many cases of seismicity induced by injection, the greatest increase is occurring over a very large area, about 15% of the state. There are more than 3,000 disposal wells currently operating within Oklahoma along with injection volumes greater than 2010 rates. These factors add many significant challenges to identifying potential cases of induced seismicity and understanding the contributing factors well enough to mitigate such occurrences. In response to a clear need for a better geotechnical understanding of what is occurring in Oklahoma, a multi-year multidisciplinary study some of the most active areas has begun at the University of Oklahoma. This study includes additional seismic monitoring, better geological and geophysical characterization of the subsurface, hydrological and reservoir modeling, and geomechanical studies to better understand the rise in seismicity rates. The Oklahoma Corporation Commission has added new rules regarding reporting and monitoring of salt-water disposal wells, and continue to work with the Oklahoma Geological Survey and other researchers.

  14. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil. Quarterly report No. 6

    SciTech Connect

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  15. The Oklahoma's Promise Program: A National Model to Promote College Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.

    2013-01-01

    Using a multi-method approach involving fixed effects and logistic regressions, this study examined the effect of the Oklahoma's Promise Program on student persistence in relation to the Pell and Stafford federal programs and according to socio-economic characteristics and class level. The Oklahoma's Promise is a hybrid state program that pays…

  16. 77 FR 29275 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 272 Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... in the regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs'', Oklahoma's... under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, commonly referred to as the Resource Conversation and Recovery...

  17. 75 FR 36609 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 272 Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... in the regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs'', Oklahoma's... under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, commonly referred to as the Resource Conversation and Recovery...

  18. 77 FR 46994 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 272 Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... in the regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs'', Oklahoma's... under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, commonly referred to as the Resource Conversation and Recovery...

  19. 30 CFR 936.25 - Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 936.25 Section 936.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OKLAHOMA § 936.25 Approval...

  20. 30 CFR 936.20 - Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Oklahoma abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 936.20 Section 936.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OKLAHOMA § 936.20 Approval of...

  1. Funding for College: Analysis of the Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program (OHLAP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Maria E.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the significance of the Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program (OHLAP). This state reform was initiated to give tuition assistance to students seeking a higher education. This review of the OHLAP found interesting advantages and disadvantages to students and to the state of Oklahoma. This study found…

  2. 76 FR 10043 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency... notice of an emergency declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-3316-EM), dated February 2, 2011,...

  3. 78 FR 36558 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of a Major Disaster... the notice of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR), dated May 20, 2013,...

  4. 78 FR 36558 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of a Major Disaster... notice of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR), dated May 20, 2013, and...

  5. 75 FR 9424 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency... notice of an emergency declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-3308-EM), dated January, 30, 2010,...

  6. A Descriptive Study of the Nature of Oklahoma Public School Superintendent Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose, Scope, and Method of Study. The purpose of this study was to determine the nature of Oklahoma public school superintendent evaluations. Based on the perceptions of public school superintendents serving in independent school districts in Oklahoma, this study sought to describe the procedures by which superintendents are evaluated. The…

  7. 75 FR 6021 - Arkansas Oklahoma Gas Corporation; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Arkansas Oklahoma Gas Corporation; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval January 29, 2010. Take notice that on January 15, 2010, Arkansas Oklahoma Gas Corporation (AOG) filed...

  8. Professors, Presidents, and Politicians. Civil Rights and the University of Oklahoma, 1890-1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, George Lynn

    Civil rights and academic freedom at the University of Oklahoma from 1890-1968 are examined by George Lynn Cross, president of Oklahoma University in the critical period from 1943 to 1968. The struggle for human rights is examined from the perspectives of teachers, students, administrators, and the community. Chapters include: "The Pioneer…

  9. 76 FR 29255 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1970-DR), dated April 22, 2011... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster...., Washington, DC 20472, (202) 646-3886. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The notice of a major disaster...

  10. 77 FR 61424 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... notice of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated August 22, 2012, and related... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major...

  11. 76 FR 31622 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1970-DR), dated April 22, 2011... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster...., Washington, DC 20472, (202) 646-3886. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The notice of a major disaster...

  12. An Evaluation of the Oklahoma Training for Child Care Careers Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Judith A.; And Others

    The major purpose of this study was to evaluate the past achievements and current status of the Oklahoma Training for Child Care Careers (OTCCC) project in relation to the overall goals of providing child care training which is both accessible to and suitable for Oklahoma caregivers. Resources for the study were provided by a Title XX contract and…

  13. Secondary Agricultural Education Teachers as Agents of Change in Oklahoma and the Adoption of Precision Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickeson, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that precision agricultural education (PAE) in Oklahoma affects environmental quality, water conservation, and crop yields. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the nature and perceived effectiveness of PAE in Oklahoma secondary agricultural education classes. The study was framed by the diffusion of…

  14. SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

  15. Mountain Home Well - Photos

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shervais, John

    2012-01-11

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  16. WILSON MOUNTAINS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromfield, Calvin S.; Williams, Frank E.

    1984-01-01

    The Wilson Mountains Wilderness consists of about 68 sq mi in the San Miguel Mountains in southwestern Colorado. Based on a mineral survey two areas in the wilderness have a probable mineral-resource potential. One area is on the east margin of the area in the Trout Lake mining district, and the other is near the center of the area, the Mount Wilson mining district. Both areas have had a modest base and (or) precious metal production from narrow veins and have a probable potential for the occurrence of similar deposits. Of more significance is a probable mineral-resource potential for disseminated copper mineralization in the Mount Wilson mining district.

  17. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  18. Mountain Road with Autumn Foliage

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A mountain road and surrounding early autumn foliage photographed from a higher elevation in the Appalachian Mountains. The especially prominent orange leaves of a maple tree are in the foreground....

  19. Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline Utilization and Cessation Among American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Sydney A.; Beebe, Laura A.; Campbell, Janis E.

    2016-01-01

    Background American Indians in Oklahoma have higher rates of tobacco use (29.2%) than any other racial group in the state. The Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline provides free cessation services to all Oklahomans and implements strategies specifically aimed at increasing the utilization and effectiveness of cessation services for American Indians. Purpose To explore Helpline utilization patterns as well as outcomes, such as participant satisfaction and success in quitting, for American Indians. The utilization patterns and outcomes for American Indians were compared to that of the white population from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2013, to determine whether the Helpline is equally effective among American Indians compared to whites. Methods Helpline utilization data from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2013, were analyzed in the fall of 2013 to identify patterns and compare differences between American Indian and white Helpline registrants. Four- and 7-month follow-up survey data were used to compare outcomes related to satisfaction with services and quit rates. Results During the 3-year study period, 10.6% of registrants who enrolled in an intervention were American Indian (11,075) and 71.2% were white (74,493). At the 7-month follow-up survey, 31.7% of American Indians reported having used no tobacco in the past 30 days compared to 36.5% of whites, but the differences were not statistically significant between racial groups. Conclusions The Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline is equally effective for American Indian and white tobacco users who register for Helpline services. PMID:25528707

  20. Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goemaat, Robert L.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of the observation-well program are (1) to provide long-term records of water-level fluctuations in representative wells, (2) to facilitate the prediction of water-level trends and indicate the future availability of ground-water supplies, and (3) to provide information for use in basic research. These selected records serve as a framework to which other types of hydrologic data may be related. The stratigraphic nomenclature and age determinations used in this report are those accepted by the Oklahoma Geological Survey and do not necessarily agree with those of the U.S. Geological Survey.

  1. Sulfide mineralization and magnetization, Cement oil field, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Richard L.; Fishman, Neil S.; Webring, Michael W.; Wanty, Richard B.; Goldhaber, Martin B.

    1989-01-01

    Geochemical, petrographic, and rock-magnetic studies were undertaken to investigate possible sources for reported positive aeromagnetic anomalies over the Cement oil field, Oklahoma. Ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite (monoclinic, Fe7S8 ), intergrown with more-abundant, nonmagnetic pyrite (FeS2), is present in well-cutting, core, and quarry samples at Cement, and it is the only identified source of possible enhanced magnetization in rocks over the field. Magnetite, found only in well cuttings from Cement, is contamination from drilling. Magnetite was considered previously by others to be the source of magnetic anomalies at Cement.

  2. Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, Mohan

    2001-05-08

    This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil and ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on long data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time.

  3. The Mountaineer Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egerton, John; Gaillard, Frye

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the new Appalachian movement, based on the assumption that mountain people are a distinct and maligned cultural minority; the people of Appalachia, white, black and red, have begun to strike back against the dam-builders, strip-miners, and others they say are gouging out the region's mineral resources by the cheapest means possible no…

  4. DOE's Yucca Mountain Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is about the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the United States with a particular focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a repository site. Intended for readers who do not have a technical background, the booklet discusses why scientists and engineers think high-level nuclear waste may be disposed of safely underground. An…

  5. DOE's Yucca Mountain Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is about the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the United States with a particular focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a repository site. Intended for readers who do not have a technical background, the booklet discusses why scientists and engineers think high-level nuclear waste may be disposed of safely underground. An…

  6. Yucca Mountain tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This is a compilation of petrographic slides detailing the microstructure and petrographic character of the tuff deposits associated with the Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. It describes crystal structures, clay alterations, and mineral associations. The paper contains a description of the petrographic thin-sections but contains no narrative or conclusions of what the slides suggest with regards to the facility.

  7. The Mountaineer Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egerton, John; Gaillard, Frye

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the new Appalachian movement, based on the assumption that mountain people are a distinct and maligned cultural minority; the people of Appalachia, white, black and red, have begun to strike back against the dam-builders, strip-miners, and others they say are gouging out the region's mineral resources by the cheapest means possible no…

  8. White Mountain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulu, Tupou L.; And Others

    This illustrated reader is part of a series designed for use in the Alaska State-Operated Schools' bilingual education program. The reader describes in story form some aspects of life, primarily hunting, fishing and related activities, among natives of the White Mountain region of Alaska. The text is provided in both English and Inupiat and is…

  9. Freshness in the Mountains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Kay Slattery; Clauss, Judith Enz

    2000-01-01

    Situated in a western mountain range, the North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching is a residential facility that houses teachers seeking intellectual refreshment. The center pays all expenses, aiming to advance teaching as an art and a profession via seminars and a relaxed atmosphere. (MLH)

  10. The Strongest Mountain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monnes, Colleen

    2004-01-01

    The article describes an activity for the author's fifth-grade students called "build the strongest mountain." To them, it was not a lesson--it was a challenge. To the author, it was an activity that turned a run-of-the-mill Earth science unit into a terrific opportunity for students to demonstrate their knowledge of erosion and develop…

  11. The Strongest Mountain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monnes, Colleen

    2004-01-01

    The article describes an activity for the author's fifth-grade students called "build the strongest mountain." To them, it was not a lesson--it was a challenge. To the author, it was an activity that turned a run-of-the-mill Earth science unit into a terrific opportunity for students to demonstrate their knowledge of erosion and develop…

  12. Mountain-Plains Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health…

  13. Mountain-Plains Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health…

  14. Mountains: top down.

    PubMed

    Woodwell, George M

    2004-11-01

    Mountainous regions offer not only essential habitat and resources, including water, to the earth's more than 6 billion inhabitants, but also insights into how the global human habitat works, how it is being changed at the moment as global climates are disrupted, and how the disruption may lead to global biotic and economic impoverishment. At least 600 million of the earth's more than 6 billion humans dwell in mountainous regions. Such regions feed water into all the major rivers of the world whose valleys support most of the rest of us. At least half of the valley dwellers receive part or all of their water from montane sources, many from the melt water of glaciers, others from the annual snow melt. Glaciers are retreating globally as the earth warms as a result of human-caused changes in the composition of the atmosphere. Many are disappearing, a change that threatens municipal water supplies virtually globally. The warming is greatest in the higher latitudes where the largest glaciers such as those of Greenland and the Antarctic Continent have become vulnerable. The melting of ice in the northern hemisphere raises serious concerns about the continued flow of the Gulf Stream and the possibility of massive climatic changes in Scandinavia and northern Europe. Mountains are also biotic islands in the sea life, rich in endemism at the ecotype level. The systematic warming of the earth changes the environment out from under these genetically specialized strains (ecotypes) which are then maladapted and vulnerable to diseases of all types. The process is systematic impoverishment in the pattern conspicuous on mountain slopes with increasing exposure to climatic extremes. It is seen now in the increased mortality and morbidity of plants as climatic changes accumulate. The seriousness of the global climatic disruption is especially clear in any consideration of mountains. It can and must be addressed constructively despite the adamancy of the current US administration. PMID:15575181

  15. Digital mountains: toward development and environment protection in mountain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaobo

    2007-06-01

    Former studies on mountain system are focused on the department or subject characters, i.e. different department and branches of learning carry out researches only for their individual purposes and with individual characters of the subject of interests. As a whole, their investigation is lacking of comprehensive study in combination with global environment. Ecological environment in mountain regions is vulnerable to the disturbance of human activities. Therefore, it is a key issue to coordinate economic development and environment protection in mountain regions. On the other hand, a lot of work is ongoing on mountain sciences, especially depending on the application of RS and GIS. Moreover, the development of the Digital Earth (DE) provides a clue to re-understand mountains. These are the background of the emergence of the Digital Mountains (DM). One of the purposes of the DM is integrating spatial related data and information about mountains. Moreover, the DM is a viewpoint and methodology of understanding and quantifying mountains holistically. The concept of the DM is that, the spatial and temporal data related to mountain regions are stored and managed in computers; moreover, manipulating, analyzing, modeling, simulating and sharing of the mountain information are implemented by utilizing technologies of RS, GIS, GPS, Geo-informatic Tupu, computer, virtual reality (VR), 3D simulation, massive storage, mutual operation and network communication. The DM aims at advancing mountain sciences and sustainable mountain development. The DM is used to providing information and method for coordinating the mountain regions development and environment protection. The fundamental work of the DM is the design of the scientific architecture. Furthermore, construct and develop massive databases of mountains are the important steps these days.

  16. Groundwater Flow in Mountain Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Diana; Voeckler, Hendrik; Welch, Laurie

    2014-05-01

    Mountain watersheds are unique high-relief environments that exhibit geological, landscape, climate, and other characteristics that are distinctive from other types of watersheds/basins. As such, they give rise to complex groundwater systems that circulate water over a range of spatial and temporal scales. This presentation highlights the results of two modeling studies that were conducted to investigate deep groundwater flow processes within mountain watersheds in British Columbia, Canada. The first study focuses on a headwater catchment, and demonstrates that extending the model domain into the bedrock and allowing groundwater to exit the catchment does not compromise the calibration. Deep groundwater loss is estimated at up to 6% of the annual water balance. The second study focuses on deep groundwater flow within the mountain block, which contributes to mountain front recharge. Mountain front recharge is an important source of water to valley-bottom aquifers. Mountain front recharge derives from both mountain streams, which gain water as baseflow from deeply circulating groundwater, and mountain block recharge, which is the subsurface discharge of deep groundwater from the bedrock mountain block to the valley bottom sediments. Baseflow in the mountain streams is found to be sensitive to changes in groundwater recharge across the mountain block.

  17. Permian karst topography in the Wichita uplift, southwestern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, R.N. Busbey, A.B. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-02-01

    The Wichita uplift in southwestern Oklahoma is one part of a record of Pennsylvania and early Permian deformation that affected the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. As a result of a partial inversion, the Lower Paleozoic section of this aulacogen was sequentially stripped off an uplift between the Wichita uplift and the Anadarko basin, resulting in the exposure of ultrabasic rocks deep in the Cambrian igneous fill of the aulacogen. Following the late Paleozoic tectonism, the topography of the uplift was entombed beneath Permian sediments and remained essentially undisturbed until exhumation during the present erosional cycle. Modern erosion is gradually exposing this topography, permitting morphometric analysis of the Permian hill forms. Because of the variation of lithology in the uplift, it is possible to isolate the effects of weathering processes such as intense hydrolysis of the igneous rocks (producing, among other features, or topography) and limestone dissolution, in the form of a surface and subsurface karst imprint. The latter process resulted in a network of small caves that are essentially fissures eroded along tectonic fractures. These small caves can be found in all the exposed areas of limestone. They are particularly noteworthy for three reasons: in at least five examples they contain a complex fauna of Permian vertebrates (mostly fragmentary), speleothems in some examples contain hydrocarbon inclusions, derived from the underlying Anadarko basin, some of the caves yield evidence of post burial evolution in the form of clay infiltration from the surface and brine flushing from the underlying Anadarko basin.

  18. Improved Estimates of Evapotranspiration at Oklahoma Mesonet Sites (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basara, J. B.; Illston, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) of the United States is a region of dynamic weather and climate. In addition, the SGP region has demonstrated significant coupling between the land surface and atmospheric processes across varying spatial and temporal scales during the warm season. As such, mesocsale events including deep convection as well as regional drought and pluvial periods are impacted by land-atmosphere inter actions and gradients in the surface conditions. With the establishment of the Oklahoma Mesonet in 1994 and subsequent upgrades to the sensors deployed at the over 100 sites across the state, near real-time, collocated observations of soil and atmospheric variables have been collected, quality assured, and archived. At the same time additional observing systems and field campaigns have increased the breadth of the information gathered on soil, vegetation, and atmospheric processes across the SGP region. Such datasets have led (a) to numerous studies that have increased the understanding of how land-atmosphere interactions impact the local weather and climate of the SGP region and (b) new techniques to link in situ observations with remote sensing to provide improved understanding of surface-atmosphere exchange. Most recently, Oklahoma Mesonet soil and atmospheric observations have been combined with near real-time land surface conditions via MODIS remotely sensed data to improve estimates of evapotranspiration at local and regional scales, understand the dynamics of flash drought, and address the water budget of the region.

  19. Fatal injuries in Oklahoma: descriptive epidemiology using Medical Examiner data.

    PubMed

    Goodman, R A; Herndon, J L; Istre, G R; Jordan, F B; Kelaghan, J

    1989-09-01

    To characterize mortality associated with injuries and other health problems in Oklahoma, we examined data from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the State of Oklahoma for the years 1978 through 1984. Each year, approximately 1,500 and 800 deaths resulted from unintentional injury (UI) and intentional injury (ie, suicide and homicide), respectively. The medical examiner (ME) data differed substantially from the state's vital statistics (VS); over the seven years, the ME records showed 2,021 (16%) fewer UI deaths than did the VS, as well as 24 (1%) more cases of suicide and 499 (23%) more cases of homicide. Rates for UI and suicide were highest for young adults and for the elderly; in contrast, rates for homicide were highest for young adults, and then decreased with age. For each of the three categories of injury-related deaths, rates for male subjects were approximately three times those for female subjects; rates also varied by race-ethnic group. Deaths due to UI and homicide occurred more often in the summer and on weekends, though suicides did not vary by month and were slightly more common on weekdays. This study indicates that ME data represent an important source of epidemiologic information for the surveillance and study of injury-related mortality. PMID:2772684

  20. Environmental Characteristics and Geographic Information System Applications for the Development of Nutrient Thresholds in Oklahoma Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masoner, Jason R.; Haggard, Brian E.; Rea, Alan

    2002-01-01

    The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency has developed nutrient criteria using ecoregions to manage and protect rivers and streams in the United States. Individual states and tribes are encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to modify or improve upon the ecoregion approach. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board uses a dichotomous process that stratifies streams using environmental characteristics such as stream order and stream slope. This process is called the Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter15. The Use Support Assessment Protocols can be used to identify streams threatened by excessive amounts of nutrients, dependant upon a beneficial use designation for each stream. The Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter 15 uses nutrient and environmental characteristic thresholds developed from a study conducted in the Netherlands, but the Oklahoma Water Resources Board wants to modify the thresholds to reflect hydrologic and ecological conditions relevant to Oklahoma streams and rivers. Environmental characteristics thought to affect impairment from nutrient concentrations in Oklahoma streams and rivers were determined for 798 water-quality sites in Oklahoma. Nutrient, chlorophyll, water-properties, and location data were retrieved from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency STORET database including data from the U.S. Geological Survey, Oklahoma Conservation Commission, and Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Drainage-basin area, stream order, stream slope, and land-use proportions were determined for each site using a Geographic Information System. The methods, procedures, and data sets used to determine the environmental characteristics are described.