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1

Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics that can be applied to the subsurface in the adjacent Anadarko and Ardmore basins. Numerous reports and guidebooks have been written concerning the Arbuckle Mountains. A few important general publications are provided in the list of selected references. The purpose of this handout is to provide general information on the geology of the Arbuckle Mountains and specific information on the four field trip stops, adapted from the literature. The four stops were at: (1) Sooner Rock and Sand Quarry; (2) Woodford Shale; (3) Hunton Anticline and Hunton Quarry; and (4) Tar Sands of Sulfur Area. As part of this report, two papers are included for more detail: Paleomagnetic dating of basinal fluid migration, base-metal mineralization, and hydrocarbon maturation in the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma and Laminated black shale-bedded chert cyclicity in the Woodford Formation, southern Oklahoma.

NONE

1991-11-17

2

The Deese and Collings ranch conglomerates of the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma: Evidence of strike-slip movement during the deformation stage of the southern Oklahoma Aulacogen  

SciTech Connect

It has been widely recognized that the Pennsylvanian conglomerates of the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma, record the deformation stage of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Two of these units are the Desmoinesian Deese Conglomerate, exposed in the Mill Creek Syncline area between the Reagan and Mill Creek fault zones, and the Middle Virgilian Collings Ranch Conglomerate, exposed along the Washita Valley fault zone in the Turner Falls area. The authors investigated clast size, geometry, and content, primary sedimentary structures, petrography, petrology, and diagenesis of the two conglomerate units, as well as the geometric relationship of their basins with nearby faults. Their evidence suggests that the two conglomerates were deposited as alluvial fans in basins formed by strike-slip movements. The Collings Ranch Conglomerate was deposited in a basin formed as the result of left-stepping along the nearby Washita Valley strike-slip fault zone. The Deese Conglomerate was deposited in a basin formed due to the combined effect of strike-slip and dip-slip movements along the Reagan and Mill Creek fault zones. In the Collings Ranch basin, the deposition was accomplished primarily by channel-fill and sieve deposits in the proximal region of the fan. The Deese Conglomerate was deposited as an alluvial fan or fans which included several channel deposits while, in the deeper parts of the basin, fine-grained materials and limestones were deposited. These observations and their possible interpretations suggest that the Washita Valley, Mill Creek, and Reagan fault zones have experienced substantial strike-slip movement during the deformation stage of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen.

Cemen, I.; Pybas, K.; Stafford, C.; Al-Shaieb, Z. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). School of Geology)

1993-02-01

3

Paleomagnetic dating of dedolomitization in Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle group limestones and Pennsylvanian Collings Ranch conglomerate, southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Paleomagnetic and petrographic techniques have been used to date dedolomitization in stratigraphic and tectonic dolomites exposed in the Arbuckle Mountains, southern Oklahoma. The authors examined red dedolomites and their dolomite precursors from the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group and dolomite clasts in the Pennsylvanian Collings Ranch Conglomerate. Authigenic hematite is associated with the dedolomite and precipitated as a result of the dedolomitization process. Dedolomite is associated with paleokarst and fractures, burrows, Liesegang bands, and red rims on conglomerate clasts.

Nick, K.E.; Elmore, R.D.

1988-02-01

4

Three-dimensional geologic model of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer of south-central Oklahoma encompasses more than 850 square kilometers and is the principal water resource for south-central Oklahoma. Rock units comprising the aquifer are characterized by limestone, dolomite, and sandstones assigned to two lower Paleozoic units: the Arbuckle and Simpson Groups. Also considered to be part of the aquifer is the underlying Cambrian-age Timbered Hills Group that contains limestone and sandstone. The highly faulted and fractured nature of the Arbuckle-Simpson units and the variable thickness (600 to 2,750 meters) increases the complexity in determining the subsurface geologic framework of this aquifer. A three-dimensional EarthVision (Trademark) geologic framework model was constructed to quantify the geometric relationships of the rock units of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the Hunton anticline area. This 3-D EarthVision (Trademark) geologic framework model incorporates 54 faults and four modeled units: basement, Arbuckle-Timbered Hills Group, Simpson Group, and post-Simpson. Primary data used to define the model's 54 faults and four modeled surfaces were obtained from geophysical logs, cores, and cuttings from 126 water and petroleum wells. The 3-D framework model both depicts the volumetric extent of the aquifer and provides the stratigraphic layer thickness and elevation data used to construct a MODFLOW version 2000 regional groundwater-flow model.

Faith, Jason R.; Blome, Charles D.; Pantea, Michael P.; Puckette, James O.; Halihan, Todd; Osborn, Noel; Christenson, Scott; Pack, Skip

2010-01-01

5

Climate Change Impacts on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Precipitation Variations  

E-print Network

Precipitation Variations on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Climate Change Impacts Cesalea N. Osborne Environmental Science Haskell Indian Nations University This project was sponsored by Kiksapa Consulting... through NASA CAN NNX10AU65A The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer spans five counties in south-central Oklahoma: Carter, Coal, Johnston, Murray, and Pontotoc Base Data • Aquifer study area, roads, rural/non-rural communities, state/county boundaries Methodology...

Osborne, Cesalea

2014-11-19

6

Paleomagnetic dating of dedolomitization in Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group limestones and Pennsylvanian Collings Ranch Conglomerate, southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Paleomagnetic and petrographic techniques have been used to date dedolomitization in stratigraphic and tectonic dolomites exposed in the Arbuckle Mountains, southern Oklahoma. The authors examined red dedolomites and their dolomite precursors from the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group and dolomite clasts in the Pennsylvanian Collings Ranch Conglomerate. Authigenic hematite is associated with the dedolomite and precipitated as a result of the dedolomitization process. Dedolomite is associated with paleokarst and fractures, burrows, Liesegang bands, and red rims on conglomerate clasts. Magnetic directions from these dedolomitized rocks range from Dec = 145/sup 0/ to 154/sup 0/ and Inc = 2/sup 0/ to 9/sup 0/, with ks greater than 50 and /alpha/95s less than 5. The directions are constrained by fold tests to be post-structural (Late Pennsylvanian to Early Permian) and in the Collings Ranch to post-depositional. These directions correspond to a reversed Pennsylvanian pole position and the magnetizations are interpreted as chemical remanent magnetizations (CRM) acquired when hematite precipitated during dedolomitization.

Nick, K.E.; Elmore, R.D.

1988-01-01

7

Paleokarstic phenomena of the Lower Ordovician red bed sequences of the Arbuckle group, southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oil and gas production has been reported recently from paleokarstic Arbuckle reservoirs in the Ardmore and Arkoma basin. The West Spring Creek and the Kindblade formations apparently exhibit karstic features. The most extensive surface exposure of these formations is on the southern flank of the Arbuckle anticline along Interstate 35 north of Ardmore, Oklahoma. The lithology is predominantly limestone, ranging from argillaceous mudstone to oolitic and/or bioclastic grainstones. However, minor amounts of sandstone were also observed.These lithologies are characteristic of various peritidal facies. Of particular interest in this outcrop are three distinct red bed zones. Although the zones are part of the repetitive shallowing-upward cycles that characterize the West Spring Creek Formation, ample evidence suggests the red beds represent subaerial exposure surfaces where karstification took place. Many of the thin bedded, rubbly mudstones and wackestones actually represent varieties of breccia commonly associated with karst. Collapse and crackle breccia are most commonly observed. Small solution channels and other vugs are usually completely occluded by calcite cement. However, solution cavities or vugs with diameters larger than 10 cm (3.9 in.) are lined with drusy calcite. Hematite-impregnated sediment occurs as thinly laminated infilling of solution vugs and cavities and also acts as a cementing agent of collapse breccias. Preliminary evidence suggests that karstification processes were active during Arbuckle deposition.

Musselman, J.L. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (United States))

1991-06-01

8

The geological significance of the boundary between the Fort Sill and Signal Mountain Formations in the lower Arbuckle Group (Cambrian)  

SciTech Connect

During the upper Cambrian, a transgression inundated the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen enveloping a landscape that consisted of hills of Cambrian-aged rhyolite up to 350 m in height. Initial deposits on this topography--the Reagan Formation--consist of siliciclastics that were deposited as alluvium and succeeding tidally-influenced marine sandstones and shales. The siliciclastics grains are made up of local rhyolite, quartz and authigenic glauconite. The overlying Honeycreek Formation is defined by the addition of carbonated detritus in the form of tidally-influenced pelmatozoan grainstones. The passage from the Honeycreek to the overlying Fort Sill Formation of the Arbuckle Group is marked by the incoming of beds of lime mudstone and the gradual disappearance of grainstones and siliciclastics. The contact between the Fort Sill and the overlying thinly-bedded dark grey bioclastic limestones of the Signal Mountain Formation is one of the most distinctive horizons in the Arbuckle Group. The contact evidently marks a substantial change in depositional environment. In detail the contact is sharp and shows evidence of minor erosion, although no karsting has been detected. The authors suggest that the contact surface records a regression, perhaps associated with dolomitization and followed by some erosion. A regression is also indicated by the local occurrence of a laminated tidal flat unit with traces of evaporites that outcrops in the far west of the Slick Hills immediately below the formation contact. They suggest that the Signal Mountains as a transgressive unit, incorporating siliciclastics transported into the area during the regression. It has been suggested that the unconformity reflects localized tectonism associated with the evolution of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. On the other hand the surface may correlate with a craton--wide Sauxian' hiatus.

Hosey, R.; Donovan, R.N. (Texas Christian Univ., Ft Worth, TX (United States). Geology Dept.)

1993-02-01

9

Effects of municipal ground-water withdrawals on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma consists of a thick sequence of folded and faulted carbonate and clastic rocks of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age. Fractures and karst features locally increase the aquifer's capacity to transmit and store ground water. The aquifer is a principal source of water for municipal and rural users. A hydrologic study was conducted to evaluate the effects of municipal ground-water withdrawal from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer on local ground-water levels and discharge from nearby springs and streams in south-central Pontotoc County. A municipal well was pumped for 63 hours at an average rate of 1,170 gallons per minute. A maximum observed drawdown of 0.3 feet was recorded half a mile from the pumping well. Drawdown was observed as far as 1.2 miles from the pumping well. No measurable response was observed at any of the surface-water-discharge measurement sites; however, recharge from precipitation may have masked any decreases in discharge caused by the pumping. Simultaneous pumping of two municipal wells for 241 hours at average rates of 1,170 and 2,730 gallons per minute resulted in a maximum observed drawdown of 1.3 feet recorded at an average distance of 0.80 miles from the pumping wells. The most distant drawdown observed was at an average distance 1.1 miles from the pumped wells. Less that 2 days after pumping stopped, increases in springflow were recorded at two springs; it is unknown whether these discharge responses reflect the effects of recharge from precipitation, or the combined effects of precipitation and the cessation of ground-water withdrawal. The effects of the stress tests on the hydrologic system were offset by recharge from concurrent precipitation. The maximum observed drawdown represents about 6 percent of the median natural water-level fluctuation during the study period. The effect of drawdown could become critical during extended periods of low precipitation, if water levels are already near the bottom of domestic wells in the area. However, a comparison of maximum observed drawdown (1.3 ft) with the minimum saturated thickness of fresh ground water (1,500 ft) suggests that municipal pumping had little effect on the amount of ground water stored in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the study area. This evaluation is based on the limited pumping rates and times of the stress tests.

Savoca, M.E.; Bergman, D.L.

1994-01-01

10

Geochemical Investigation of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, South-Central Oklahoma, 2004-06  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A geochemical reconnaissance investigation of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma was initiated in 2004 to characterize the ground-water quality at an aquifer scale, to describe the chemical evolution of ground water as it flows from recharge areas to discharge in wells and springs, and to determine the residence time of ground water in the aquifer. Thirty-six water samples were collected from 32 wells and springs distributed across the aquifer for chemical analysis of major ions, trace elements, isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, dissolved gases, and age-dating tracers. In general, the waters from wells and springs in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer are chemically suitable for all regulated uses, such as public supplies. Dissolved solids concentrations are low, with a median of 347 milligrams per liter (mg/L). Two domestic wells produced water with nitrate concentrations that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's nitrate maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 mg/L. Samples from two wells in the confined part of the aquifer exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) for chloride of 250 mg/L and the SMCL of 500 mg/L for dissolved solids. Water samples from these two wells are not representative of water samples from the other wells and springs completed in the unconfined part of the aquifer. No other water samples from the Arbuckle-Simpson geochemical reconnaissance exceeded MCLs or SMCLs, although not every chemical constituent for which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established a MCL or SMCL was analyzed as part of the Arbuckle-Simpson geochemical investigation. The major ion chemistry of 34 of the 36 samples indicates the water is a calcium bicarbonate or calcium magnesium bicarbonate water type. Calcium bicarbonate water type is found in the western part of the aquifer, which is predominantly limestone. Calcium magnesium bicarbonate water is found in the eastern part of the aquifer, which is predominantly a dolomite. The major ion chemistry for these 34 samples is consistent with a set of water-rock interactions. Rainfall infiltrates the soil zone, where the host rock, limestone or dolomite, dissolves as a result of uptake of carbon dioxide gas. Some continued dissolution of dolomite and precipitation of calcite occur as the water flows through the saturated zone. The major ion chemistry of the two samples from wells completed in the confined part of the aquifer indicates the water is a sodium chloride type. Geochemical inverse modeling determined that mixing of calcite-saturated recharge water with brine and dissolving calcite, dolomite, and gypsum accounts for the water composition of these two samples. One of the two samples, collected at Vendome Well in Chickasaw National Recreation Area, had a mixing fraction of brine of about 1 percent. The brine component of the sample at Vendome Well is likely to account for the relatively large concentrations of many of the trace elements (potassium, fluoride, bromide, iodide, ammonia, arsenic, boron, lithium, selenium, and strontium) measured in the water sample. Carbon-14, helium-3/tritium, and chlorofluorocarbons were used to calculate ground-water ages, recharge temperatures, and mixtures of ground water in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. Thirty four of 36 water samples recharged the aquifer after 1950, indicating that water is moving quickly from recharge areas to discharge at streams and springs. Two exceptions to this classification were noted in samples 6 and 15 (Vendome Well). Ground-water ages determined for these two samples by using carbon-14 are 34,000 years (site 6) and 10,500 years (site 15). Concentrations of dissolved argon, neon, and xenon in water samples were used to determine the temperature of the water when it recharged the aquifer. The mean annual air temperature at Ada, Oklahoma, is 16 degrees Celsius (C) and the median temperature of the 30 reconnaissance water samples was 18.1 C. The av

Christenson, Scott; Hunt, Andrew G.; Parkhurst, David L.

2009-01-01

11

Paleomagnetism of the Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Group and associated deposits in the southern Oklahoma Aulacogen: Evidence for block rotations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The magnetization in hydrocarbon-impregnated Arbuckle Group limestones from the southern margin of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen (Limestone Hills) is secondary and resides in magnetite. The magnetization (Declination/Inclination=128°/2°, ?95=7.6°, k=79) fails a fold test and is post Pennsylvanian. The corresponding pole position (146°E, 30°N), however, does not coincide with the post-Pennsylvanian Apparent Polar Wander Path (APWP). Some Permian speleothems that fill caves in these rocks contain magnetizations that are also anomalous. Shallow remanent inclinations from the folded limestones and speleothems suggest that the most likely time of remanence acquisition was the Permian. The directions are at least 30° in declination from the expected directions based on the inferred ages of the magnetizations. This discrepancy can be explained by a horizontal counterclockwise rotation, consistent with left-lateral wrench faulting, during deformation of the aulacogen.

Elmore, R. Douglas; Nick, Kevin E.; Cochran, Karen A.; Crawford, Lisa D.

1988-04-01

12

Inexpensive cross-flow hydropower turbine at Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric Project  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the first three and half years of operation and maintenance on the Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric Project. Located on a flashy mountain stream in northern California, the project was designed, built and tested through a Cooperative Agreement between the US DOE and OTT Engineering, Inc. (OTT). The purpose of the Agreement is to build and intensively test an inexpensive American-made cross-flow turbine and to provide information to the DOE on the cost, efficiency, operation, and maintenance of the unit. It requires that OTT document for DOE a summary of the complete operating statistics, operation and maintenance cost, and revenues from power sales for a two-year operating period. Several unique events occurred between the initial start-up (December 1986) and the beginning of the 1989 generation season (October 1988) that delayed the first year's full operation and provided unique information for a demonstration project of this type. Accordingly, this report will discuss certain major problems experienced with the design, operation and maintenance, and energy production, as well as the operation and maintenance costs and value of the power produced for the first three and half years of operation. 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1991-07-01

13

STUDY OF THE ARBUCKLE-SIMPSON AQUIFER  

EPA Science Inventory

A study directed by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and funded by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation will investigate the hydrogeology of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in south-central Oklahoma. The five year study will involve field investigations including the installation of ne...

14

Folding at two different scales of the Paradox anticline in the Ordovician Cool Creek Formation, Arbuckle Group, Slick Hills, southwestern Oklahoma: A paleomagnetic fold test study.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The carbonates in the Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Group, part of the southern Oklahoma aulacogen, has been the subject of previous paleomagnetic studies with a focus primarily on their origin of the magnetizations. Most previous studies indicate late Paleozoic magnetizations that reside in hematite. However, Elmore et al. (1988) conducted a paleomagnetic study of the Arbuckle Group carbonates from the Slick Hills area utilizing six sites from a north-plunging tightly folded Paradox anticline. Alternating field and thermal demagnetization results from their study indicated a post-tilting remanence that resides primarily in magnetite. Also, based on the difference between the observed and expected remanence directions, they suggested a possible 30° block rotation. As a continuation of their work, this paleomagnetic study was conducted to corroborate the observed 30° rotations utilizing more sites from the Paradox anticline and the use of a more sensitive 2G Cryogenic magnetometer. In addition, the major focus of this paleomagnetic study is to examine the relationship between the timing of remanence acquisition with respect to the primary (F1) and the secondary (F2) folds of the Paradox anticline. To this extent, oriented samples of carbonates have been collected from the Ordovician Cool Creek Formation of the Paradox anticline from the Slick Hills area from both the F1 and the F2 folds. Low temperature demagnetization protocols have been carried out on these samples to remove the effects of multidomain magnetite grains thereby isolating better the characteristic remanence components. Post-low temperature cleaning, the thermal step-demagnetization procedure isolates primarily two components: 1.) a low-temperature steep downward viscous remanent magnetization; and, 2.) a high-temperature characteristic remanent magnetization component, residing primarily in magnetite, with shallow remanence directions scattered towards the east-south-east to south-east. Fold test results indicate a post-tilting remanence for the F1 major folding of the Paradox anticline similar to that observed by Elmore et al. (1988). However, an interesting new observation is the paleomagnetic fold test results from the F2 fold that indicates a syntilting remanent magnetization. In addition, the south-easterly scattered shallow remanence directions from these Ordovician Cool Creek carbonates substantiates a possible 30° rotation that is likely attributed to the left-lateral wrench faulting observed in this area.

Pannalal, S. J.; Zechmeister, M. S.; Elmore, D. R.

2007-12-01

15

Geochemistry of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma provides water for public supply, farms, mining, wildlife conservation, recreation, and the scenic beauty of springs, streams, and waterfalls. A new understanding of the aquifer flow system was developed as part of the Arbuckle-Simpson Hydrology Study, done in 2003 through 2008 as a collaborative research project between the State of Oklahoma and the Federal government. The U.S. Geological Survey collected 36 water samples from 32 wells and springs in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in 2004 through 2006 for geochemical analyses of major ions, trace elements, isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, dissolved gases, and dating tracers. The geochemical analyses were used to characterize the water quality in the aquifer, to describe the origin and movement of ground water from recharge areas to discharge at wells and springs, and to determine the age of water in the aquifer.

Christenson, Scott; Hunt, Andrew G.; Parkhurst, David L.; Osborn, Noel I.

2009-01-01

16

Characterizing the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer through electrical methods Kumar Ramachandran*, Bryan Tapp, Tayler Rigsby and Erin Lewallen  

E-print Network

Characterizing the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer through electrical methods Kumar Ramachandran*, Bryan Tapp, Tayler Rigsby and Erin Lewallen The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma Summary The Arbuckle-Simpson in the future. As part of an ongoing study to map and characterize the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer, an electrical

Ramachandran, Kumar

17

CHALLENGES OF THE ARBUCKLE-SIMPSON STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer underlies more than 500 square miles in south central Oklahoma. The aquifer is the source of many springs, including Byrds Mill Spring, Ada's primary drinking water source, and those in the Chickasaw National Recreation Area. The aquifer supplies wa...

18

Source of shallow Simpson Group Oil in Murray County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oils produced from the Simpson Group (Middle Ordovician) in three shallow fields located north of the Arbuckle Mountains in Murray County, Oklahoma, have widely differing compositions: SW Sandy Creek, 28.9° API, 0.57% sulfur; Davis NE, 25.9° API, 0.72% sulfur; Sulfur NW, 16.4° API, 1.44% sulfur. From gas chromatography and biomarker analysis, they determined that the oils were derived from the

I. Zemmels; D. M. Tappmeyer; C. C. Walters

1987-01-01

19

Testing a Mahalanobis distance model of black bear habitat use in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Regional wildlife-habitat models are commonly developed but rarely tested with truly independent data. We tested a published habitat model for black bears {Ursus americanus) with new data collected in a different site in the same ecological region (i.e., Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma, USA). We used a Mahalanobis distance model developed from relocations of black bears in Arkansas to produce a map layer of Mahalanobis distances on a study area in neighboring Oklahoma. We tested this modeled map layer with relocations of black bears on the Oklahoma area. The distributions of relocations of female black bears were consistent with model predictions. We conclude that this modeling approach can be used to predict regional suitability for a species of interest.

Hellgren, E.C.; Bales, S.L.; Gregory, M.S.; Leslie, D.M., Jr.; Clark, J.D.

2007-01-01

20

A geographic analysis of the status of mountain lions in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geographic distribution of sightings and sign of mountain lions (Puma concolor) in Oklahoma was investigated. Mail survey questionnaires were sent to natural resource professionals throughout Oklahoma to gather temporal and spatial information on sightings of mountain lions from 1985 to 1995. We used a geographic information system (GIS) to compare locations of sightings and sign in the state with ecoregions, deer harvest, human population densities, locations of licensed owners and breeders of mountain lions, and generalized topography. Sightings and sign of mountain lions occurred significantly more often in the Central Rolling Red Plains than elsewhere in the state. Sightings of mountain lions increased with total deer harvest statewide (R2=0.828, P<0.001). Numbers of sightings of mountain lions were correlated negatively with density of the human population (R2=0.885, P=0.017). Surveys are a valuable method to assess the status of rare wildlife species when other methods are not available and when those receiving the survey are qualified.

Pike, J.R.; Shaw, J.H.; Leslie, D.M., Jr.; Shaw, M.G.

1999-01-01

21

Water Decisions for Sustainability of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in south-central Oklahoma, situated in the heart of the Chickasaw Nation, is the state's only sole-source groundwater basin and sustains the Blue River, the state's only freeflowing river. The recent comprehensive hydrological studies of the aquifer indicate the need for sustainable management of the amount of water extracted. However, the question of how to deal with that management in the face of increasing drought vulnerability, diverse demands, and climate variability and change remains. Water management carries a further imperative to be inclusive of tribal and non-tribal interests. To address these issues, this interdisciplinary project takes an integrated approach to understanding risk perceptions and water decisions for sustainability of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer. Our interdisciplinary research asks: How do stakeholders in the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer perceive drought risks across weather and climate scales, and how do these perceptions guide water management decisions given (i) diverse cultural beliefs, (ii) valued hydrologic services, (iii) past drought experience, and (iv) uncertainties in future projection of precipitation and drought? We will use ethnographic methods to diagnose how cultural values and beliefs inform risk perceptions, and how this in turn guides decision making or ignites conflict across different sectors and stakeholder groups. Further, the characterization of drought risk will be examined in the context of historic meteorological and hydrologic events, as well as climate variability and change. This will identify which risks are prioritized, and under what conditions, in regional decision making or water-related conflicts.

Lazrus, H.; Mcpherson, R. A.; Morss, R. E.; PaiMazumder, D.; Silvis, V.; Towler, E.

2012-12-01

22

Relationship of facies and sequence stratigraphy to Paleokarst and fracture overprints in the carbonates of the Arbuckle Group in the evaluation of exploration and horizontal drilling potential  

SciTech Connect

The mid-continent region, especially in Oklahoma and Arkansas, contains thick dolomite Paleozoic carbonate sections with karstic character. These sections commonly exhibit strong structural overprints, including intense fracturing, due primarily to Pennsylvanian orogenies. The Arbuckle Group is compose of multiple parasequences that are the result of cyclic peritidal deposition on a broad shallow shelf. Sequence stratigraphy evaluation indicates that significant unconformities or disconformities occur within the Arbuckle Group along third-order sequence boundaries. Arbuckle carbonates were subjected to very early dolomitization (Ordovician through Devonian). Sequences in which intercrystalline porosity was developed with little or no vuggy porosity usually have low permeability and effective porosity. However, these dolomitic sequences are quite susceptible to fracturing and they may produce in structural traps. These fractured sequences in the Arbuckle also are particularly susceptible to karstification associated with multiple unconformities, especially in areas where there has been significant orogenic activity such as the Criner uplift in southern Oklahoma. Fracturing and subsequent karstification have significant influence on porosity development and can produce extremely heterogeneous reservoirs. Exploration for oil and gas in the Arbuckle Group has been a difficult task. Problems with seal and source along with complex diagenetic and structural histories still plague efforts to understand Arbuckle reservoir development. There is new evidence that dolomitization, fracturing and karstification may be related to particular sequence positions and their related facies and disconformities. Innovative advances in geologic concepts, such as sequence stratigraphy, and in techniques, such as horizontal drilling, may lead to new discoveries in the Arbuckle Group.

Fritz, R.D.; Wilson, J.L.; Medlock, P.L.; Kuykendall, M.D. (MASERA Corp., Tulsa, OK (United States))

1993-09-01

23

Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A report on the research activities at the USDA-ARS, Plant Science Research Laboratory in Stillwater, Oklahoma, were compiled for WERA-066 Meeting that was held in Ft. Collins, Colorado, February 13, 2008. Research presentations included barley breeding research, sorghum breeding research, wheat br...

24

Paleomagnetism and age of Mafic Plutons, Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A paleomagnetic reconnaissance (43 samples) of the Raggedy Mountain Gabbro Group, which is comprised of a layered complex of anorthosites, anorthositic gabbros, and massive gabbro, shows: (1) stable remanent magnetization and (2) consistent directions which differ significantly from those of the nearby Cambrian Wichita Granite Group, with exception of one site near the granite contact. These results suggest a Precambiran age for the gabbro group. The difference in pole positions between the granitic and mafic groups demonstrates that the plutonic episodes responsible for the mafic and granitic magmas are significantly separated in time. Models of formation of the Wichita aulacogen should be altered to account for the difference in time between the mafic and silicic plutonism.

Roggenthen, William M.; Fischer, Joseph F.; Napoleone, Giovanni; Fischer, Alfred G.

1981-02-01

25

Post-carboniferous tectonics in the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma: Evidence from side-looking radar imagery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Anadarko Basin of western Oklahoma is a WNW-ESE elongated trough filled with of Paleozoic sediments. Most models call for tectonic activity to end in Pennsylvanian times. NASA Shuttle Imaging Radar revealed a distinctive and very straight lineament set extending virtually the entire length of the Anadarko Basin. The lineaments cut across the relatively flat-lying Permian units exposed at the surface. The character of these lineaments is seen most obviously as a tonal variation. Major streams, including the Washita and Little Washita rivers, appear to be controlled by the location of the lineaments. Subsurface data indicate the lineaments may be the updip expression of a buried major fault system, the Mountain View fault. Two principal conclusions arise from this analysis: (1) the complex Mountain View Fault system appears to extend southeast to join the Reagan, Sulphur, and/or Mill Creek faults of the Arbuckle Mountains, and (2) this fault system has been reactivated in Permian or younger times.

Nielsen, K. C.; Stern, R. J.

1985-01-01

26

Nature of migrabitumen and their relation to regional thermal maturity, Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two grahamite and three impsonite localities are within an 82-km-long segment of the Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma. Grab samples were collected to study the petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the migrabitumen at the grahamite-impsonite transition and the relation of the migrabitumen to the regional thermal maturity pattern. Maximum and random bitumen reflectance values increased from 0.75 to 1.80% from west to east, consistent with the regional thermal maturation trend. Mean bireflectance values increased from 0.04 to 0.38%. The two grahamite samples are classified at the grahamite-impsonite boundary with conflicting petrographic (bitumen reflectance) and bulk chemical (volatile matter) maturity indicators. The regional maturation trend, based on vitrinite reflectance and bitumen reflectance values, was confirmed by a detailed geochemical investigation of bitumen extracts. Although biomarker analyses were influenced by extensive biodegradation effects, molecular parameters based on the phenanthrenes, dibenzothiophenes, and tricyclic terpanes were identified as useful maturity indicators.

Cardott, Brian J.; Ruble, Tim E.; Suneson, Neil H.

1993-01-01

27

Rb-Sr Isotopic Systematics of Felsic Igneous Rocks, Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently determined Rb-Sr isotopic characteristics of twelve of the recognized felsic units of the Cambrian Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen, which crop out in the Wichita Mountains of the southwestern Oklahoma, give some clues to the petrogenesis of these felsic units. 1) Plots of 87Rb/86Sr vs. 87Sr/86Sr form subsets yielding dates of 516 Ma and 522 Ma, discrepancies of about 10 to 20 Ma from the U-Pb zircon age for the Mount Scott Granite of 534 Ma, probably attributable to a systematic loss of radiogenic 87Sr for these units. 2) The Mount Scott Granite and related units (n=7) including Medicine Park Granite and Saddle Mountain Granite give a probable pseudoisochron of 516\\pm4{}Ma and an initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7045\\pm4{}, indicating derivation from a primitive mantle source with little crustal contamination. 3) A well-regressed line of 522\\pm2{} Ma with an initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7059\\pm7{} is shown by the Long Mountain Granite (n=3), one of the finer-grained western granites, and the Fort Sill Section of the Carlton Rhyolite (n=2) in the eastern Wichitas, which indicates that both were possibly derived contemporaneously from a mixed crustal-mantle source. 4) The Lugert Granite of the western Wichitas has variable and relatively high 87Sr/86Sr initials at 516 Ma probably indicating heterogeneous crustal sources. Interpretation of these data can be made with the following scenario: The earliest known felsic unit is the Carlton Rhyolite, Fort Sill Section. This must have been generated mostly from crustal melting around large mafic plutons in the mid- to lower crust. Crustal melting around the mafic plutons continued to generate liquids rising to the emplacement position, e.g., Long Mountain Granite. Following this, the host magma for the Mount Scott set of units originated dominantly by fractional crystallization from the mafic plutons. Subsequently, additional mafic magma must have moved into the lower- to mid-crust, at some other stratigraphic level, melting a more heterogeneous mixture of rock types to yield the Lugert Granite. Thus, in this rather narrow rift zone, felsic magmas of varying origin, but similar chemistry, have risen to the same emplacement level.

Min, K.; Gilbert, M. C.

2001-12-01

28

Petrologic evolution of plagioclase-rich cumulates from the Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma: Effects upon magnetic remanence properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Glen Mountains layered complex (GMLC) of the Wichita Mountains of Oklahoma is a coarse-grained analog to Layer 3 gabbros of the sea floor. The slowly cooled, mafic, layered complex developed in the site of an aulacogen, which is interpreted as a failed, intracontinental rift. The remanent magnetism of rocks of the layered complex is extremely stable due to the presence of magnetic inclusions in the major phases, primarily plagioclase. The early formation of plagioclase facilitated the formation of these magnetically important inclusions. Petrologic processes that promote the formation of magnetically stable mineralogic inclusions in coarsegrained gabbros should be operative in oceanic slow-spreading ridges. Therefore, the contribution of magnetization of Layer 3 gabbros should be greater in slower spreading ridges than in faster spreading ridges because of their differences in petrologic evolution.

Scofield, N.; Roggenthen, W. M.

1986-11-01

29

Spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance in the forested landscape of Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma  

E-print Network

and southeastern Oklahoma and examined approximately 6000 km2 of forest between 150 and 800 m elevation. Normalized Difference Vegeation Index (NDVI) difference values were calculated using two Landsat 7 ETM+ scenes to identify NDVI changes that potentially...

Isaacs, Rachel E.

2009-05-15

30

COCORP profiling across the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen: Overthrusting of the Wichita Mountains and compression within the Anadarko Basin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

COCORP (Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling) deep reflection profiles recorded across the Wichita Mountains and Anadarko Basin suggest that significant crustal shortening occurred in the final stages of the evolution of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. The crystalline rocks of the Wichita Mountains were thrust in Pennsylvanian time northeastward over sedimentary rocks of the Anadarko Basin along a series of faults with moderate (average 30° to 40°) and southwesterly dips. These faults can be traced possibly as deep as 20 to 24 km. Listric thrust faults and hanging-wall anticlines developed in the sedimentary rocks of the basin. These features contrast with conventional interpretations of Pennsylvanian structures as the result of predominantly vertical movements along high-angle faults, and they suggest that Pennsylvanian downwarping of the Anadarko Basin was at least partially due to thrust loading. Truncations of reflections from Cambrian-Ordovician rocks in the deepest part of the basin suggest normal faulting, which would support ideas of an early extensional stage in the aulacogen cycle. The distinctive Precambrian layering seen on earlier COCORP data recorded south of the Wichita Mountains cannot be recognized under the Anadarko Basin, and the Proterozoic basin containing that layering may have been bounded on its north side by a Precambrian fault. This inferred fault was probably twice reactivated during formation of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen—once during late Precambrian(?)-Early Cambrian extension, and again during Pennsylvanian compression. The popular view that aulacogens originated from radial rifting of updomed, homogeneous continental crust is probably too simplified, and a more important constraint on their location and development may be the nature of pre-existing lines of weakness. *Present address: Department of Earth Sciences, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 OEZ, England

Brewer, J. A.; Good, R.; Oliver, J. E.; Brown, L. D.; Kaufman, S.

1983-02-01

31

33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...as they govern use of flood control storage capacity...modification in time of flood by the District Engineer...desirable on the basis of conditions at the time. Such...Arbuckle Dam. (e) Flood control operation shall...section are subject to the condition that releases...

2011-07-01

32

33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...as they govern use of flood control storage capacity...modification in time of flood by the District Engineer...desirable on the basis of conditions at the time. Such...Arbuckle Dam. (e) Flood control operation shall...section are subject to the condition that releases...

2012-07-01

33

33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...as they govern use of flood control storage capacity...modification in time of flood by the District Engineer...desirable on the basis of conditions at the time. Such...Arbuckle Dam. (e) Flood control operation shall...section are subject to the condition that releases...

2013-07-01

34

33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...as they govern use of flood control storage capacity...modification in time of flood by the District Engineer...desirable on the basis of conditions at the time. Such...Arbuckle Dam. (e) Flood control operation shall...section are subject to the condition that releases...

2014-07-01

35

Geology Fieldnotes: Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides information about the Chickasaw National Recreation Area including geology, park maps, visitor information, photographs, and links for more details. The human attraction to the water found there(streams, lakes, and springs), human history, the old mountains (300 million years old - Carboniferous) formed by the Arbuckle uplift, and sedimentary rock deposits are highlighted.

36

POTENTIAL AND VULNERABILITY OF THE ARBUCKLE-SIMPSON AQUIFER  

EPA Science Inventory

The presentation will cover topics including the potential recharge area for the Arbuckle Simpson Aquifer, the variability in discharge rates and the susceptibility of the ground water to contamination by various sources. ...

37

THE SOURCE, POTENTIAL & VULNERABILITY OF THE ARBUCKLE SIMPSON AQUIFER  

EPA Science Inventory

The presentation will cover topics including the potential recharge area for the Arbuckle Simpson Aquifer, the variability in discharge rates and the susceptibility of the ground water to contamination by various sources. ...

38

POTENTIAL AND VULNERABILITY OF THE ARBUCKLE SIMPSON AQUIFER  

EPA Science Inventory

The presentation will cover topics including the potential recharge area for the Arbuckle Simpson Aquifer, the variability in discharge rates and the susceptibility of the ground water to contamination by various sources....

39

POTENTIAL AND VULNERABILITY OF THE ARBUCKLE SIMPSON ACQUIFER  

EPA Science Inventory

Presentation will cover topics including the potential recharge area for the Arbuckle Simpson Acquifer, the variability in discharge rates, and the susceptibility of the ground water to contamination by various sources....

40

Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic study of the Glen Mountains layered complex: initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

SciTech Connect

Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic data for rocks and minerals of the Glen Mountains layered complex (GMLC), a midcontinent mafic layered intrusion in the Wichita Mountains of southwestern Oklahoma, constrain the time of initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen and provide information on the chemistry of the early Paleozoic mantle. Four whole-rock samples define a Rb-Sr isochron corresponding to a maximum crystallization age of 577 +/- 165 Ma and an initial Sr isotopic composition of 0.70359 +/- 2. A three-point Sm-Nd mineral-whole-rock (internal) isochron for an anorthositic gabbro provides a crystallization age of 528 +/- 29 Ma. These data suggest that the GMLC was emplaced into the southern Oklahoma aulacogen during the initial phase of rifting along the southern margin of the North American craton in the early Paleozoic. This Sm-Nd internal isochron age is within analytical uncertainty of U-Pb zircon ages for granites and rhyolites from the Wichita Mountains; therefore, mafic and felsic magmatism may have been contemporaneous within the rift during the early stages of development. Hybrid rocks and composite dikes in the Wichita Mountains provide field evidence for contemporaneous mafic and felsic magmas. Initial Sr and Nd isotopic data suggest that magmas parental to the GMLC were derived from a depleted mantle source. However, Nd isotopic data for the GMLC plot distinctly below data for the depleted mantle source cited by DePaolo and thus suggest that the parental magmas of the GMLC were either contaminated by Proterozoic crust of the southern midcontinent or were derived from a heterogenous mantle source region that had variable initial Nd isotopic compositions.

Lambert, D.D.; Unruh, D.M.; Gilbert, M.C.

1988-01-01

41

Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic study of the Glen Mountains layered complex: Initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic data for rocks and minerals of the Glen Mountains layered complex (GMLC), a midcontinent mafic layered intrusion in the Wichita Mountains of southwestern Oklahoma, constrain the time of initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen and provide information on the chemistry of the early Paleozoic mantle. Four whole-rock samples define a Rb-Sr isochron corresponding to a maximum crystallization age of 577 ±165 Ma and an initial Sr isotopic composition of 0.70359 ±2. These whole-rock analyses do not define a Sm-Nd isochron; rather, they display a significant range in initial Nd isotopic composition (?Nd = 3.63-5.35). A three-point Sm-Nd mineral-whole-rock (internal) isochron for an anorthositic gabbro provides a crystallization age of 528 ±29 Ma. These data suggest that the GMLC was emplaced into the southern Oklahoma aulacogen during the initial phase of rifting along the southern margin of the North American craton in the early Paleozoic. This Sm-Nd internal isochron age is within analytical uncertainty of U-Pb zircon ages for granites and rhyolites from the Wichita Mountains; therefore, mafic and felsic magmatism may have been contemporaneous within the rift during the early stages of development. Hybrid rocks and composite dikes in the Wichita Mountains provide field evidence for contemporaneous mafic and felsic magmas. Initial Sr and Nd isotopic data suggest that magmas parental to the GMLC were derived from a depleted mantle source. However, Nd isotopic data for the GMLC plot distinctly below data for the depleted mantle source cited by DePaolo and thus suggest that the parental magmas of the GMLC were either contaminated by Proterozoic crust of the southern midcontinent or were derived from a heterogeneous mantle source region that had variable initial Nd isotopic compositions.

Lambert, David D.; Unruh, D. M.; Gilbert, M. Charles

1988-01-01

42

Paleomagnetism of paleozoic asphaltic deposits in southern Oklahoma, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Paleomagnetic measurements on asphaltic samples from two formations in southern Oklahoma have been performed. A bioclastic unit from the Boggy Formation, known as the Buckhorn asphalt, exhibited a stable, characteristic remanent moment (RM) after A.F. demagnetization between 5-20 mT. We infer from our data that very fine, possibly authigenic magnetite, like that shown to have a genetic relationship with the migration through rocks of hydrocarbons [Elmore et al., 1987], is the primary RM carrier in these samples. The tilt corrected paleopole for the Buckhorn asphalt (121.9 E; 43.5N; ?p=1.3 ?m=2.3) falls on the Early Permian Apparent Polar Wander Path for North America of Irving and Irving [1982], using a 30 Ma window (270-280 Ma). Because the Boggy Form-ation, containing the Buckhorn asphalt, was depos-ited during the Late Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian), we interpret the data to indicate magnetization during minor uplift in the Early Permian of the Arbuckle Mountain region. The RM appears to have been acquired at this time, probably as the result of magnetite production facilitated by the introduction time of sulfate reducing bacteria.

Ellwood, Brooks B.; Crick, Rex E.

1988-05-01

43

Devitrification of the Carlton Rhyolite in the Blue Creek Canyon area, Wichita Mountains, southwestern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Cambrian Carlton Rhyolite is a sequence of lava flows and ignimbrites extruded in association with rifting in the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. Rhyolite exposed in the Blue Creek Canyon area consists of a single, originally glassy, porphyritic lava flow > 300 m thick. Abundant flow banding is deformed by variably oriented flow folds present on both outcrop and thin-section scales. A variety of complex texture record the cooling, degassing, and devitrification history of the flow. Acicular Fe, Ti-oxide crystallites aligned in the flow banding document nucleation and limited crystal growth during flow. Spherical microvesicles and larger lithophysal cavities up to 10 cm long crosscut flow banding, showing that degassing continued after flow had ceased. Pseudomorphs of quartz after cristobalite and tridymite are present on cavity walls and are products of high-T vapor-phase crystallization. Devitrification textures overprint the flow banding and developed in two stages. Primary devitrification occurred during initial cooling and formed spherulitic intergrowths in distinct areas bound by sharp devitrification fronts. Spherulites nucleated on phenocrysts, vesicles, and flow bands and show evidence of multiple episodes of growth. Rhyolite outside of the devitrification fronts initially remained glassy but underwent later, low-T hydration to form perlitic texture, which was followed by prolonged secondary devitrification to form extremely fine-grained, equigranular quartzofeldspathic mosaics. Snowflake texture (micropoikilitic quartz surrounding randomly oriented alkali feldspar) developed during both primary and secondary devitrification. Spherical bodies up to 30 cm across are present in discrete horizons within the flow and weather out preferentially from the host rhyolite.

Bigger, S.E. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Geology); Hanson, R.E. (Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1993-02-01

44

Mountains  

SciTech Connect

This book covers the following topics: Above the forest: the alpine tundra; Solar energy, water, wind and soil in mountains; Mountain weather; Mountain building and plate tectonics; Mountain walls: forming, changing, and disappearing; Living high: mountain ecosystems; Distribution of mountain plants and animals; On foot in the mountains: how to hike and backpack; Ranges and peaks of the world. Map and guidebook sources, natural history and mountain adventure trips, mountain environmental education centers and programs, and sources of information on trails for the handicapped are included.

Fuller, M.

1989-01-01

45

Earthquake activity in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma is one of the most seismically active areas in the southern Mid-Continent. From 1897 to 1988, over 700 earthquakes are known to have occurred in Oklahoma. The earliest documented Oklahoma earthquake took place on December 2, 1897, near Jefferson, in Grant County. The largest known Oklahoma earthquake happened near El Reno on April 9, 1952. This magnitude 5.5 (mb) earthquake was felt from Austin, Texas, to Des Moines, Iowa, and covered a felt area of approximately 362,000 km{sup 2}. Prior to 1962, all earthquakes in Oklahoma (59) were either known from historical accounts or from seismograph stations outside the state. Over half of these events were located in Canadian County. In late 1961, the first seismographs were installed in Oklahoma. From 1962 through 1976, 70 additional earthquakes were added to the earthquake database. In 1977, a statewide network of seven semipermanent and three radio-telemetry seismograph stations were installed. The additional stations have improved earthquake detection and location in the state of Oklahoma. From 1977 to 1988, over 570 additional earthquakes were located in Oklahoma, mostly of magnitudes less than 2.5. Most of these events occurred on the eastern margin of the Anadarko basin along a zone 135 km long by 40 km wide that extends from Canadian County to the southern edge of Garvin County. Another general area of earthquake activity lies along and north of the Ouachita Mountains in the Arkoma basin. A few earthquakes have occurred in the shelves that border the Arkoma and Anadarko basins.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman (USA))

1989-08-01

46

Sterane distribution of solid bitumen pyrolyzates. Changes with biodegradation of crude oil in the Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Solid bitumens (grahamite and impsonite) of southeastern Oklahoma have been shown to originate from near-surface alteration of crude oil (Curiale, 1981; Curiale and Harrison, 1981). Pyrolysis of these solids has been employed to compare the sterane distribution of geographically proximate oils to that of the bitumens. The ratio of rearranged to regular steranes is higher in the pyrolyzates than in the oils, a finding consistent with a bitumen origin due to biodegradation of oil. The remaining presence of steranes, particularly regular steranes, in the bitumens suggests that sterane occlusion may have occurred prior to or during the alteration process, thus removing tetracyclic compounds from the influence of microbial attack. These data suggest that pyrolysis- GC MS offers a viable approach to correlation problems involving solid bitumens. ?? 1983.

Curiale, J.A.; Harrison, W.E.; Smith, G.

1983-01-01

47

Ames Hole Oklahoma: Impact-formed petroleum reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Ames Hole is a 16 km wide circular subsurface structure centered at 361{degrees}5{prime}north, 098{degrees}12{prime}west in Major County, northern Oklahoma. An impact origin is confirmed by the presence of shock metamorphosed mineral grains and impact melt rocks recovered from drill cores and by a negative Bouger gravity anomaly over its center. Buried about three km deep, the structure is composed of shattered, central zone of uplifted Precambrian granite and Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle dolomite surrounded by two concentric rims of fractured and brecciated Arbuckle dolomite. The crater is filled with, and covered by, marine sediments of the middle Ordovician Oil Creek shale. The crater was formed during Ordovician time in a shallow sea on the northern shelf of the Anadarko Basin. Restricted water circulation and anoxic conditions within the deep crater promoted precipitation of plankton-rich sediments. This Oil Creek shale became both the source and the sealing rocks for hydrocarbons which migrated into underlying porous target rocks fractured during the impact event. About one hundred wells within the area underlain by the Ames Hole astroblem presently produce nearly half of Oklahoma`s oil and gas.

Mchone, J.F. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

1996-12-31

48

Oklahoma Today  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published since the 1950s, Oklahoma Today is a production of several state agencies, and it is designed to showcase various cultural, historical, and social aspects of Oklahoma. Over the past several years, Oklahoma State University has digitized back issues of the magazine, and visitors can now read all the way back to the first issue from 1956. Visitors can browse back issues by decade, and they can also perform key-word searches. First-time visitors should start by reading through the spring 1960 issue, which contains pieces on rattlesnakes, Oklahoma wildflowers, and the Washington Irving Trail. While the name Washington Irving may not be commonly associated with Oklahoma, the author spent part of 1832 wandering through the state with a Native American guide. More recent issues feature profiles of singer Vince Gill and Route 66.

49

Hydrogeology of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Murray County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Travertine District (Park) of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, operated and maintained by the National Park Service, is near the City of Sulphur in south-central Oklahoma. The Park was established in 1902 because of its unique hydrologic setting, which includes Rock Creek, Travertine Creek, numerous mineralized and freshwater springs, and a dense cover of riparian vegetation. Since the turn of the century several flowing artesian wells have been drilled within and adjacent to the Park. Discharge from many of these springs and the numbers of flowing wells have declined substantially during the past 86 years. To determine the cause of these declines, a better understanding of the hydrologic system must be obtained. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, has appraised hydrologic information obtained for the Park from several studies conducted during 1902-87. The principal geologic units referred to in this report are the Arbuckle Group and the overlying Simpson Group. These rocks are of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age and are composed of dolomitic limestone, with some sandstones and shales in the Simpson Group. Surface geologic maps give a general understanding of the regional subsurface geology, but information about the subsurface geology within the Park is poor. The Simpson and Arbuckle aquifers are the principal aquifers in the study area. The two aquifers are not differentiated readily in some parts of the study area because of the similarity of the Simpson and Arbuckle rocks; thus, both water-bearing units are referred to frequently as the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The aquifers are confined under the Park, but are unconfined east and south of the Park. Precipitation on the outcrop area of the Arbuckle aquifer northeast and east of the Park recharges the freshwater springs (Antelope and Buffalo Springs) near the east boundary of the Park. The source of water from mineralized springs located in the central part of the Park, and flowing wells within and north of the Park, is believed to be a mix of waters from rocks of the Arbuckle and Simpson Groups. The source of water from two highly mineralized springs, Bromide and Medicine, that ceased to flow in the early 1970?s is believed to be from the Simpson Group. Water-quality characteristics reflect the sources of ground water in the study area. The highly mineralized springs near the western end of the Park are a sodium chloride type with dissolved solids greater than 4,500 mg/L. The freshwater springs near the eastern end of the Park are a calcium bicarbonate type with total dissolved solids of less than 400 mg/L. Flow from the artesian wells has declined substantially during the past 86 years and the wells are estimated to currently discharge only about 10 percent of the total flow reported in 1939. The depletion is believed to be caused by a gradual lowering of the hydraulic head within the aquifer. The influence on the hydrologic system of local municipal and industrial pumping from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer is difficult to discern because the system is much more sensitive to precipitation than to pumpage. Ground-water levels and spring flows in this region respond rapidly to precipitation. The effects of withdrawals from the City of Sulphur and Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company power-plant water-well fields are not discernible at wells and springs. The hydrologic system may be influenced by pumping, particularly during extended dry periods of several years, but the impact of pumping on the system cannot be determined without further investigation.

Hanson, Ronald L.; Cates, Steven W.

1994-01-01

50

New constraints on the age and depositional rates of initial flysch sedimentation in the Stanley Group, Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma and Arkansas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The transition from a 'starved basin' to classic orogenic flysch deposition of Paleozoic strata in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma and Arkansas and the absolute timing of mountain building events associated with the Ouachita Orogeny have long been unresolved problems in the region. The Mississippian Stanley Group is an important sedimentary unit within the Paleozoic strata because, unlike the other Paleozoic units in the Ouachita Mountains, the Stanley Group contains several dateable tuffaceous units. LA-ICPMS analyses of zircons from 5 tuffaceous units show progressively younger weighted average ages: Beaver's Bend Tuff (328.3±2.9 Ma), Hatton Tuff (327.5±3.8 Ma), lower Mud Creek Tuff (321.9±2.0 Ma), upper Mud Creek Tuff (326±3.2Ma) and Chickasaw Creek Tuff (320.6±2.7Ma). The exception is the upper Mud Creek Tuff (326 Ma), which has a more significant detrital component when compared to the other tuffaceous units. The ages of the Beaver's Bend, Hatton, lower and upper Mud Creek tuffs agree with previously reported biostratigraphic data found in the lower 500m of the Stanley Group (Ethington, 1989), which suggest an early Mississippian age for its lower boundary. The top 250 meters contain the Chickasaw Creek tuff (320.6±2.7 Ma) which indicates a late Mississippian age for the top of the Stanley Group. The transition from a 'starved basin' is marked by a sudden increase in clastic detritus entering the Ouachita Trough. A regional hiatus (Noble, 1993) is known to exist at the boundary between the base of the Stanley Group and the upper Devonian Arkansas Novaculite. The tuff ages, coupled with the biostratigraphic data, indicate that sedimentation rates were low (<20m/Ma) through the deposition of the Beaver's Bend tuff (328.3±2.9 Ma), after which sedimentation rates increased to >2500m/Ma by the time the Chickasaw Creek tuff (320.6±2.7Ma) was deposited. The sedimentation rates remain high (~900m/Ma) through the deposition of the stratigraphically higher units: Jackfork Group, Johns Valley and Atoka formations which are all considered to be pre-orogenic (King, 1961). These new data constrain the timing of significant increases in sedimentation rates in a remnant ocean basin (Ouachita trough) that are likely associated with longitudinal transport (e.g. Graham et al., 1975) and dispersal of sediment from sequential (diachronous) collision. Ethington, R.L., Finney, S.C., and Repetski, J.E., 1989, The Geology of North America, Volume F-2; Noble, P.J., 1993 Geology, v. 21, p. 315-318; King, P.B., 1961, Volume 6120: Austin, Texas, The University of Texas, p. 175-190; Graham, S.A., Dickinson, W.R., and Ingersoll, R.V., 1975, GSA Bulletin, v. 86, p. 273-286.

Shaulis, B. J.; Lapen, T. J.; Casey, J. F.; Reid, D.

2011-12-01

51

Software Documents: Comparison and Measurement Tom Arbuckle, Adam Balaban, Dennis K. Peters and Mark Lawford  

E-print Network

Software Documents: Comparison and Measurement Tom Arbuckle, Adam Balaban, Dennis K. Peters of Newfoundland, St. John's NL, Canada A1B 3X5. Email: dpeters@engr.mun.ca §Department of Computing and Software@mcmaster.ca Abstract-- For some time now, researchers have been seeking to place software measurement on a more firmly

Lawford, Mark

52

THE OKLAHOMA MESONET  

EPA Science Inventory

The Oklahoma Mesonet, operated and maintained by the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, is Oklahoma's premier climatological data collection system. For the area covered, which includes the entire state, no other system within the United States or internationally has the degree of ...

53

Earthquake activity in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oklahoma is one of the most seismically active areas in the southern Mid-Continent. From 1897 to 1988, over 700 earthquakes are known to have occurred in Oklahoma. The earliest documented Oklahoma earthquake took place on December 2, 1897, near Jefferson, in Grant County. The largest known Oklahoma earthquake happened near El Reno on April 9, 1952. This magnitude 5.5 (mb)

K. V. Luza; J. E. Jr. Lawson

1989-01-01

54

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture  

E-print Network

's Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources promotes sustainable land use and embraces the landOklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma agriculture affects each of us every day, young and old, whether we live in largely rural regions or the state

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

55

Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic geophysical survey data, Hunton anticline, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a digital data release for multiple geophysical surveys conducted in the Hunton anticline area of south-central Oklahoma. The helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic surveys were flown on March 16–17, 2007, in four areas of the Hunton anticline in south-central Oklahoma. The objective of this project is to improve the understanding of the geohydrologic framework of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The electromagnetic sensor for the helicopter electromagnetic survey consisted of six different transmitter-receiver orientations that measured the earth's electrical response at six distinct frequencies from approximately 500 Hertz to approximately 115,000 Hertz. The electromagnetic measurements were converted to electrical resistivity values, which were gridded and plotted on georeferenced maps. The map from each frequency represents a different depth of investigation for each area. The range of subsurface investigation is comparable to the depth of shallow groundwater. The four areas selected for the helicopter electromagnetic study, blocks A–D, have different geologic and hydrologic settings. Geophysical and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey studies are being used by modelers and resource managers to develop groundwater resource plans for the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer.

Smith, Bruce D.; Smith, David V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maryla; Blome, Charles D.; Hill, Patricia

2011-01-01

56

Texas-Oklahoma  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

article title:  Texas-Oklahoma Border     View ... SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images ... The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, ...

2014-05-15

57

Petrological and Geochemical Studies of Samples from the Nicor Chestnut 18-4 Drill Core, AMES Impact Structure, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The near-circular 15-km-diameter Ames structure is located at 36 degrees 15' N and 98 degrees 12' W in southeastern Major County (NW Oklahoma). The structure, which is set in Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle dolomite, consists of two concentric rims, an outer rim, which is about 1.5 to 3 km wide, and an inner "rim". The rocks of the outer rim consist mainly of fractured and brecciated Arbuckle dolomite. The inner "ring" (about 5 km in diameter) seems to be the eroded remnant of a central structural uplift, with rocks comprising brecciated Precambrian granite and Arbuckle dolomite. The depression is covered by Middle Ordovician Oil Creek shale. The structure is penetrated by a number of oil- and gas-producing wells in the crater rim and the central uplift. The production from these wells indicate that Ames represents one of the largest - if not the largest - single oil fields in Oklahoma. Currently the structural disturbance is buried beneath almost 3000 m of sedimentary rock. The origin of the structure has been intensely debated since the discovery of the structural anomaly, but geophysical and geological, as well as petrological and geochemical data provide very good evidence that it was formed by impact, and not by volcanism or even more esoteric processes. In the present study, we analyzed 17 samples, including impact melt breccia, from the Nicor Chestnut 18-4 core. These samples represent the largest and best examples of impact melt breccias and melt rock obtained so far from the Ames structure. One important result of the petrographic analyses is the observation that not all carbonate rocks postdate the impact, but some were clearly present among the target rocks. The chemical composition of the impact melt breccias is similar to that of other melt rocks from the Dorothy 1-19 core, as well as to the target granite, with variable carbonate admixtures. Some impact melt rocks are enriched in siderophile elements, indicating a possible meteoritic component.

Koeberl, C.; Reimold, W. U.

1996-03-01

58

Oklahoma Forestry Services  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Forestry Services (OFS) is "to conserve, enhance and protect the forest resources of Oklahoma for present and future generations." As part of this mission the OFS website contains information about fire reports, tree and forest health, and water quality. First-time visitors should start their journey through the site by clicking on the "Oklahoma's Forests" section. Here they will find information about Oklahoma's major forest types, the ecoregions of Oklahoma, and several Trees of Oklahoma fact sheets. Back on the homepage, visitors can learn about upcoming workshops and events, read a list of forestry bulletins, and find out about the Forest Heritage Center Museum. Residents of Oklahoma may also wish to look through the "Home and Community Trees" area to learn more about planning their own trees and Arbor Day related activities.

59

A review of Arbuckle Group strata in Kansas from a sedimentologic perspective: Insights for future research from past and recent studies  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Arbuckle Group and equivalent-age rocks (Cambrian and Lower Ordovician) represent an important record of sediment deposition in the history of the North American continent and they contain important accumulations of hydrocarbons (oil and gas) and base metal deposits. This is true for Kansas as well where Arbuckle strata account for approximately 40% of the volume of produced petroleum and known reserves. However, in comparison to their counterparts in other areas, such as the Ellenburger and Knox, Arbuckle rocks in Kansas remain relatively understudied, especially with respect to sedimentology and diagenesis. The Arbuckle is present in the subsurface in most of Kansas and is absent only in areas of northeastern and northwestern Kansas, and over ancient uplifts and buried Precambrian highs. Arbuckle rocks thicken from north to south and are up to 1,390 feet in the southeastern corner of Kansas. Arbuckle Group and equivalent-age rocks from Kansas and surrounding areas are similar, consisting of platform deposits dominated by ramp-type subtidal to peritidal carbonates (mostly dolomitized) which can be subdivided into cycles, less than 0.5 m to 40 m thick, based on facies type and depositional patterns. Recent studies from central Kansas show that major depositional facies consist of coarse-grained packstones/ grainstones, fine-grained packstones/wackestones/mudstones, stromatolites-thrombolites, intraclastic conglomerate and breccia, and shale. In addition, secondary features include dolomitization, breccia, fracture, and conglomerate related to early subaerial exposure and later karst, burial or structural processes, silicification, and local mineralization. Arbuckle and equivalent strata in the Midcontinent were affected by prolonged subaerial exposure that began immediately after Arbuckle deposition, forming the sub-Tippecanoe to sub-Absaroka unconformity. Favorable reservoir qualities generally are thought to be related directly to basement structural elements and karstic features from the post-Arbuckle subaerial exposure event. Although most production in Kansas is from the top of the Arbuckle, some early and recent studies indicate that the Arbuckle is not a simple homogeneous reservoir, that complex vertical and lateral heterogeneities exist including both nonporous and porous horizons in the formation, and that high probability exist of locating additional oil with improved reservoir characterization. Although fracture and vuggy porosity contribute importantly to the production of Arbuckle strata, recent observations indicate a significant amount of porosity (about 50%) in many cores is controlled by depositional facies and dolomitization. Studies of Arbuckle and equivalent-age strata from other areas indicate that Arbuckle strata and diagenetic processes are complex and that porosity/permeability patterns are related to a number of processes. These studies underscore the importance of continued study of Arbuckle rocks in Kansas for improved reservoir characterization. Ongoing and future geologic studies of Arbuckle rocks in Kansas are being directed toward: (1) Continued sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and sequence stratigraphic analyses incorporating core, well log, and seismic data; (2) petrophysical studies. Initial studies indicate that core plug petrophysical properties are controlled by matrix grain size and that upscalling from plug to whole-core and drill-stem test data can identify and quantify the relative contribution of karstic, fracture and matrix porosity and permeability: (3) Regional and local structural analyses and mapping of the upper Arbuckle surface to provide more details on the contribution of structural features and karst paleogeomorphology to reservoir character; and (4) diagenetic and geochemical studies focusing especially on the timing of, and processes associated with, dolomitization and karstification events and their contributions to creating or occluding porosity.

Franseen, E.K.

2000-01-01

60

Hydrocarbon Research Program of the University of Oklahoma Energy Center: Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this research program was to develop, edit, maintain, utilize and make publicly available a computerized Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma. Task 13 funded the collecting and computerizing of oil and gas completion report data available for the southeastern corner of Oklahoma (the Ouachita Mountain and Arkoma Basin areas), as well as supplemental

Mankin

1988-01-01

61

Gravity investigations of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geological configuration of the Arbuckle Uplift in the vicinity of Chickasaw National Recreation Area in south-central Oklahoma plays a governing role in the distribution of fresh and mineral springs within the park and in the existence of artesian wells in and around the park. A confining layer of well-cemented conglomerate lies immediately below the surface of the recreation area, and groundwater migrates from an area of meteoric recharge where rocks of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer crop out as close as two kilometers to the east of the park. Prominent, Pennsylvanian-aged faults are exposed in the aquifer outcrop, and two of the fault traces project beneath the conglomerate cover toward two groups of springs within the northern section of the park. We conducted gravity fieldwork and analysis to investigate the subsurface extensions of these major faults beneath Chickasaw National Recreation Area. By defining gravity signatures of the faults where they are exposed, we infer that the Sulphur and Mill Creek Faults bend to the south-west where they are buried. The South Sulphur Fault may project westward linearly if it juxtaposes rocks that have a density contrast opposite that of that fault's density configuration in the Sulphur Syncline area. The Sulphur Syncline, whose eastern extent is exposed in the outcrop area of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, does not appear to extend beneath Chickasaw National Recreation Area nor the adjacent City of Sulphur. The South Sulphur Fault dips steeply northward, and its normal sense of offset suggests that the Sulphur Syncline is part of a graben. The Mill Creek Fault dips vertically, and the Reagan Fault dips southward, consistent with its being mapped as a thrust fault. The Sulphur and Mill Creek Synclines may have formed as pull-apart basins in a left-lateral, left-stepping strike-slip environment. The character of the gravity field of Chickasaw National Recreation Area is different from the lineated gravity field in the area of Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer outcrop. This change in character is not due to the presence of the overlying conglomerate layer, which is quite thin (<100 m) in the area of the park with the springs. The presence of relatively high-density Precambrian basement rocks in a broader region suggests that significant gravity anomalies may arise from variations in basement topography. Understanding of the geological configuration of Chickasaw National Recreation Area can be improved by expanding the study area and by investigating complementary geophysical and borehole constraints of the subsurface.

Scheirer, Daniel S.; Scheirer, Allegra Hosford

2006-01-01

62

MIXED HERONRIES OF OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this 3-year study were to locate mixed heronries in Oklahoma, census breeding pairs of each species, and indentify site characteristics that may be important to heron ecology. During the study, 17 mixed heronries, containing a total of six ardeid species, were found in Oklahoma. The majority of heronries (82%) were located within the oak-woodland fauna region. Other

G. William Sallee

1982-01-01

63

Oklahoma Tribes: A History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the…

Gover, Kevin

1977-01-01

64

Pride in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is intended to be used as background material by social studies and history classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on Oklahoma's heritage. It includes background information on the land and people of Oklahoma (geology, climate, topography, vegetation, animals, prehistoric peoples, French explorers,…

Moore, Gordon; Blackburn, Bob L.

65

State summaries: Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, Oklahoma mines produced both industrial minerals and coal. No metals were mined in the state. Based on value, leading industrial minerals include crushed stone followed by cement, construction sand and gravel, industrial sand and gravel, iodine and gypsum. The Oklahoma Department of Mines (ODOM) reported that more than 343 mine operators produced nonfuel minerals from 405 mines in the state. However, 530 mining permitted sites were on file. The Oklahoma Miner Training Institute (OMTI) held 239 classes for 33,768 classroom hours of instruction, in which 84 coal miners and 4,587 metal/nonmetal miners were trained.

Krukowski, S.T.

2006-01-01

66

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-print Network

OKLAHCJ1A INDUSTRIAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM* Wayne C. Turner Richard E. Webb James M. Phillips Trevor A. Viljoen School of Industrial Engineering and Management Oklahoma Department of Energy Oklahoma State University Stillwater...

Turner, W. C.; Webb, R. E.; Phillips, J. M.; Viljoen, T. A.

1979-01-01

67

Oklahoma seismic network. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Energy Center

1993-07-01

68

State Documents Collection in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A questionnaire was distributed to a selected group of Oklahoma academic, public, and special libraries to survey their patterns of acquisition, organization, and reference use of Oklahoma state documents collections. Findings revealed serious deficiencies in the provision of current, comprehensive, and well organized collections of Oklahoma

Tomberlin, Irma R.

69

Dynamic Simulation of Pilot Scale CO2 Injection in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer at Wellington Field in Southern Kansas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Arbuckle Group saline aquifer is a thick (>800 ft) and deeply buried (>3,500 ft) siliceous dolomite with interbedded shales. This aquifer is part of the Paleozoic-age Ozark Plateau Aquifer System (OPAS) in southern Kansas. It is identified as an excellent candidate for geological CO2 storage due to its location and proximity to major CO2 emission sources, high storage capacity potential, and multiple overlying sealing units, which can ensure safe CO2 storage for the long term. A DOE sponsored pilot-scale project has been funded in which 40,000 metric tons of CO2 from a nearby biofuel plant will be injected in the lower part of the Arbuckle reservoir over a period of 9 months at Wellington field in Sumner County, KS. This work focuses on development of various dynamic simulation scenarios in order to assess potential risks in support of the EPA class VI (CO2 sequestration) well permit application. The key objective is to estimate the resulting rise in pore fluid pressure, the extent of CO2 plume migration, and geomechanical and geochemical stability of the formation rock and any structural features that may be present. The over arching goal for the EPA is to ensure that the injected CO2 does not negatively impact the underground sources of drinking water in the area. A detailed geocellular model of the Arbuckle reservoir was produced based on the existing well-logs, seismic data, drill stem tests, step rate test, core analysis, and geochemical evaluations. The data from this modeled was upscaled to the CMG-based dual-permeability compositional model. Base case and alternative dynamic model simulations were conducted by varying key reservoir properties of the formation fluids, rock, and structural features.

Holubnyak, Y.; Watney, W. L.; Rush, J.; Birdie, T. R.; Fazelalavi, M.; Raney, J.

2013-12-01

70

Strengthening Oklahoma Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Established by the state legislature in 1980, the Oklahoma Citizens' Commission on Education (OCCE) aimed to evaluate the state's schools and prescribe goals for its future educational system. This report presents OCCE's recommendations and background materials. The first section comprises OCCE's 42 recommendations and statements, with supporting…

Oklahoma Citizens' Commission on Education, Oklahoma City.

71

Geologic provinces of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The geologic provinces of Oklahoma are mainly the product of tectonics and attendant sedimentation of Pennsylvanian age. Most boundaries are structural; thus, the provinces map is a generalized tectonic map. Permian and post-Paleozoic strata tend to mask those structures, but most of those strata have been removed by erosion, except in the Anadarko Basin and the Wichita Uplift provinces. The

R. A. Northcutt; J. A. Campbell

1995-01-01

72

Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mission of Oklahoma EPSCoR is to make Oklahoma researchers more successful in competing for research funding. Specific goals, objectives, and strategies were developed for each federal EPSCoR program, based on federal and state needs. A theme of stimulating collaboration among campuses and building on common research strengths is a strong component of the Oklahoma EPSCoR strategic plan. It extends also to our relationships with the federal agencies, and wherever possible, Oklahoma EPSCoR projects are developed collaboratively with federal research laboratories and program offices. Overall, Oklahoma EPSCoR seeks to capitalize on unique research capabilities and opportunities. The NASA EPSCoR Program in Oklahoma was developed through this grant as a joint effort between Oklahoma EPSCoR and the NASA Oklahoma Space Grant Consortium (OSGC). The major goal of the Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR Plan established in 1996 is to develop an academic research enterprise directed towards a long-term, self-sustaining, nationally competitive capability in areas of mutual self-interest to NASA and Oklahoma. Our final technical summary pie chart demonstrates the strong successes we have achieved during this period as a result of the award.

Snowden, Victoria Duca

2002-01-01

73

Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 46th state, Oklahoma, presents its unusual history with the online version of The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. The Encyclopedia was prepared by over 500 "university-based scholars and independent historians and scholars," and was a joint effort by The Oklahoma Historical Society and Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center. Visitors can click on the "Table of Contents" link near the bottom of the homepage to "Browse Entries Alphabetically", "Browse Entries Chronologically", or "Browse Entries by Subject". Browsing via chronology introduces visitors to Oklahoma starting with the "Precontact Era", through the "Westward Expansion" and on to "Twentieth Century to Present". Subject categories include "African Americans", "Farming", "Military", and "Petroleum". When searching, visitors will be taken to the Electronic Publishing Center Search Page, so they will need to choose the specific collection, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, from the drop down box, to confine the search to the Encyclopedia.

74

Oklahoma Digital Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A team of talented librarians at the Oklahoma State University Library have created this collection of 3,600 maps, a true find for those with an interest in Sooner history, geography, culture, and more. The cartographic resources are divided into four collections, including the WPA Collection and the USGS Collection. This first collection consists of almost 2,400 detailed county maps produced in the 1930s by the Works Progress Administration and the Oklahoma Tax Commission to determine real estate values. Moving on, the USGS Collection is made up of 300 detailed maps generated from 1892 to the 1950s documenting topographical conditions throughout the state. Interested parties can view all of the maps here via a nice digital image tool and are also welcome to search across the entire collection by keyword.

75

Oklahoma Healthy Homes Initiative  

PubMed Central

Compelling scientific evidence suggests that a strong association exists between housing-related hazards and the health and safety of their residents. Health, safety, and environmental hazards (such as asthma and allergy triggers), unintentional injury hazards, lead-based paint hazards, and poor indoor air quality are interrelated with substandard housing conditions. This article describes a Healthy Homes initiative to address these hazards in a coordinated fashion in the home, rather than taking a categorical approach, even in the presence of multiple hazards. It also provides an overview of Oklahoma's Healthy Homes initiative and its pilot project, the Tulsa Safe and Healthy Housing Project, which is currently administered in Tulsa in collaboration with Children First, Oklahoma's Nurse-Family Partnership program. This pilot project seeks to open new areas of research that can lead to a greater understanding of environmental health issues related to substandard housing in the United States, which will eventually make homes safer and healthier. PMID:21563709

Khan, Fahad

2011-01-01

76

OklahomaState  

Cancer.gov

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY, OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY is inviting applications for two full-time, Assistant Professor, tenure track positions in Quantitative Psychology and Clinical Health Psychology or Behavior Medicine beginning August, 2015. Candidates are expected to have a strong background in and dedication to scholarly activity, and to interact well with colleagues and students. They must also demonstrate the capacity to maintain a high quality research program leading to scholarly productivity in the form of professional publications, presentations, and grantsmanship.

77

THE BATS OF THE OUACHITA MOUNTAINS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey was conducted from June, 1982 through January, 1989 to determine the occurrence of bat species in the Ouachita Mountain region of west-central Arkansas and southeastern Oklahoma, with emphasis on censusing lands managed by the USDA Forest Service, Ouachita National Forest. Seven genera and 13 species of bats in the families Vespertilionidae and Molossidae were captured. Species represented included:

GARY A. HEIDT

78

Observations on the capability of the Criner fault, southern Oklahoma  

E-print Network

originated in the Ordovician rocks of the Criner Hills during the early Pennsylvanian Wichita Orogeny. Renewed deformation is documented to have occurred during the late Pennsylvanian Arbuckle Orogeny, forming the Criner fault. Concern about the capability...

Williamson, Shawn Collin

1996-01-01

79

78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Statement for Tulsa--Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln, Creek...Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Rail Division intend to prepare an EIS pursuant...for the State of Oklahoma High-Speed Rail Initiative: Tulsa--Oklahoma City...

2013-05-28

80

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE  

E-print Network

ON NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF SUPERCELLS AND TORNADOES OF THE 3 MAY 1999 OKLAHOMA TORNADO OUTBREAK A DISSERTATION ON NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF SUPERCELLS AND TORNADOES OF THE 3 MAY 1999 OKLAHOMA TORNADO OUTBREAK A DISSERTATION. Alan Shapiro provided many helpful comments on various aspects of my work, and we've had many

Xue, Ming

81

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE 3DVAR AND CLOUD ANALYSIS WITH WSR-88D Level-II DATA of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy By Ming Hu Norman, Oklahoma 2005 #12;2 3DVAR AND CLOUD, but not least, I could not have fulfilled my dream here without the support and sacrifice of my family. My

Xue, Ming

82

Ecoregions and stream morphology in eastern Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Broad-scale variables (i.e., geology, topography, climate, land use, vegetation, and soils) influence channel morphology. How and to what extent the longitudinal pattern of channel morphology is influenced by broad-scale variables is important to fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In the last couple of decades, there has been an increase in the amount of interdisciplinary research between fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In a historical context, fluvial geomorphologists are more apt to use physiographic regions to distinguish broad-scale variables, while stream ecologists are more apt to use the concept of an ecosystem to address the broad-scale variables that influence stream habitat. For this reason, we designed a study using ecoregions, which uses physical and biological variables to understand how landscapes influence channel processes. Ecoregions are delineated by similarities in geology, climate, soils, land use, and potential natural vegetation. In the fluvial system, stream form and function are dictated by processes observed throughout the fluvial hierarchy. Recognizing that stream form and function should differ by ecoregion, a study was designed to evaluate how the characteristics of stream channels differed longitudinally among three ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma, USA: Boston Mountains, Ozark Highlands, and Ouachita Mountains. Channel morphology of 149 stream reaches was surveyed in 1st- through 4th-order streams, and effects of drainage area and ecoregion on channel morphology was evaluated using multiple regressions. Differences existed (? ? 0.05) among ecoregions for particle size, bankfull width, and width/depth ratio. No differences existed among ecoregions for gradient or sinuosity. Particle size was smallest in the Ozark Highlands and largest in the Ouachita Mountains. Bankfull width was larger in the Ozark Highlands than in the Boston Mountains and Ouachita Mountains in larger streams. Width/depth ratios of the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands were not statistically different. Significant differences existed, however, between the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands when compared individually to the Ouachita Mountains. We found that ecoregions afforded a good spatial structure that can help in understanding longitudinal trends in stream reach morphology surveyed at the reach scale. The hierarchy of the fluvial system begins within a broad, relatively homogenous setting that imparts control on processes that affect stream function. Ecoregions provide an adequate regional division to begin a large-scale geomorphic study of processes in stream channels.

Splinter, Dale K.; Dauwalter, Daniel C.; Marston, Richard A.; Fisher, William L.

2010-10-01

83

Ecoregions and stream morphology in eastern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Broad-scale variables (i.e., geology, topography, climate, land use, vegetation, and soils) influence channel morphology. How and to what extent the longitudinal pattern of channel morphology is influenced by broad-scale variables is important to fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In the last couple of decades, there has been an increase in the amount of interdisciplinary research between fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In a historical context, fluvial geomorphologists are more apt to use physiographic regions to distinguish broad-scale variables, while stream ecologists are more apt to use the concept of an ecosystem to address the broad-scale variables that influence stream habitat. For this reason, we designed a study using ecoregions, which uses physical and biological variables to understand how landscapes influence channel processes. Ecoregions are delineated by similarities in geology, climate, soils, land use, and potential natural vegetation. In the fluvial system, stream form and function are dictated by processes observed throughout the fluvial hierarchy. Recognizing that stream form and function should differ by ecoregion, a study was designed to evaluate how the characteristics of stream channels differed longitudinally among three ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma, USA: Boston Mountains, Ozark Highlands, and Ouachita Mountains. Channel morphology of 149 stream reaches was surveyed in 1st- through 4th-order streams, and effects of drainage area and ecoregion on channel morphology was evaluated using multiple regressions. Differences existed (?????0.05) among ecoregions for particle size, bankfull width, and width/depth ratio. No differences existed among ecoregions for gradient or sinuosity. Particle size was smallest in the Ozark Highlands and largest in the Ouachita Mountains. Bankfull width was larger in the Ozark Highlands than in the Boston Mountains and Ouachita Mountains in larger streams. Width/depth ratios of the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands were not statistically different. Significant differences existed, however, between the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands when compared individually to the Ouachita Mountains. We found that ecoregions afforded a good spatial structure that can help in understanding longitudinal trends in stream reach morphology surveyed at the reach scale. The hierarchy of the fluvial system begins within a broad, relatively homogenous setting that imparts control on processes that affect stream function. Ecoregions provide an adequate regional division to begin a large-scale geomorphic study of processes in stream channels. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

Splinter, D.K.; Dauwalter, D.C.; Marston, R.A.; Fisher, W.L.

2010-01-01

84

Shallow seismic reflection profile of the Meers fault, Comanche County, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

.J., The Meers fault tectonic activity in south- western Oklahoma, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG ICR-4852, 1-25, A1-A25, 1987. McLean, R., and Stearns, D.W., Fault analysis in the Wichita Mountains [Abs. ], AAPG Bull. 67, 511-512, 1983. Miller...

Myers, Paul B.; Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

1987-07-01

85

Geochemical and Mineralogical Investigation for Carbon Capture and Storage, Within the Arbuckle Aquifer, Kansas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A class VI permit site under U.S. Department of Energy has been proposed for carbon sequestration in south-central Kansas. In an effort to maintain environmental stability three wells have been drilled to basement rock, two being near the injection site, KGS 1-32 and KGS 1-28, and one being to the western annex, Cutter KGS #1. The western annex site, Cutter, is being utilized as a cross-comparison for mineralogical, geochemical, and structural component to the eastern sites in Wellington. A link will be determined of the continuity of three zones of interest: the Mississippian pay zone (3670'-3700'), a potential baffle zone in the upper Arbuckle (4400'-4550'), and the proposed CO2 injection zone (4900'-5050'). 11 depths within Cutter have been swabbed, and samples taken to investigate the chemistry of the subsurface formation water. The different depths will allow for a quantitative determination of how the brine composition varies with depth, and also provides a baseline for future monitoring. Initial chemical analysis by ICP-OES and HR-ICP-MS show a hyper saline brine (50,000-190,000TDS), dominated by Cl, Na, and Ca ions. pH ranges from 6.4 to 7.5, and total alkalinity from 124 and 378 mg/L of HCO¬3-. One complex, yet intriguing, species is Iron. It could potentially allow for further precipitation of the CO2¬ from the formation of Fe carbonates, such as siderite. Cores and thin sections were taken from a variety of depths ranging from 3681.9' to 5176.9' (Wellington) and 5564.3' to 7540.2' (Cutter). Dominant mineralogy consists of dolomite with varying forms of silicic intrusions, usually in the form of chert nodules with sulfide minerals and argillaceous materials in between. Extensive vugs and microfractures allow for varying porosity within each interval. Pay zone rocks typically display fine-grained cherty dolomite with subhedral to euhedral dolomite rhombs as well as oil stains oriented in parallel blotches. Characteristics such as high porosity and small grain size could potentially lead to quicker reactions with CO2 saturated brine, releasing oil trapped in pore spaces and leading to enhanced oil recovery. The rocks of the baffle zone are characterized by a low porosity dolomitic packstone with increasing abundance of chert, argillaceous materials, and sulfide minerals towards the bottom of the zone. Baffle zone relative impermeability could also allow for improved CO2 reactivity as it would have more time to react with formation minerals. The injection zone is generally composed of dolomite with siliceous nodules that slightly increases with depth. Explicit heterogeneity exists at carbonate-chert boundaries usually occurring in fractures and heavily influencing CO2 to mobilize in a convoluted, potentially lateral fashion. Flow through experiments have been conducted in order to determine reactivity and stability of the overlying cap rocks and baffle zone. Reservoir characterization is determined through geochemical modeling, and will need to be extensively studied in order to properly determine the feasibility for carbon sequestration in Kansas. With the potential for 2.7 billion tones of CO2 to be stored in Kansas, this project could allow Kansas to play a major role in the quest for environmental stability.

Datta, S.; Campbell, B.; Vega, M.; Barker, R. L.; Holubnyak, E.; Watney, W. L.

2013-12-01

86

Geochemical and Microbiological Characterization of the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer, a Potential CO2 Storage Reservoir; Implications for Hydraulic Separation and Caprock Integrity  

E-print Network

82 Geochemical and Microbiological Characterization of the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer, a Potential CO2 Storage Reservoir; Implications for Hydraulic Separation and Caprock Integrity BY Aimee Scheffer B.S., University of Colorado M.../KUCR, W. L. Watney, PI, and funded by DOE/NETL and cost-sharing partners. Disclaimer: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof...

Scheffer, Aimee

2012-12-31

87

Recognition and regional correlation of impact-related {open_quotes}Ames Crater{close_quotes} Arbuckle and Simpson reservoir lithofacies  

SciTech Connect

The concentric structural feature known as the {open_quotes}Ames Hole{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Ames Crater{close_quotes}, located on the northern shelf of the Anadarko Basin, contains several heterogeneous and uniquely associated hydrocarbon reservoirs, as well as a locally thick (craterfilling) Middle Ordovician (Simpson shale) source rock. Critical diagnostic structural and morphological features, along with petrographic and shock metamorphism evidence, strongly support and impact origin of the structure. Principle crater reservoirs include extremely brecciated, fractured, and faulted, Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Group dolomites, Pre-Cambrian granodiorities, devitrified pseudo-pyroclastic (impact melt) rocks, and a rather homogenous, dolomitic ejecta-fallout breccia, which is present along the rim and flanks of the crater. Stratigraphic trapping of hydrocarbons associated with the presence of reservoir-quality ejecta-fallout lithologies unconformably present in the upper portion of the Arbuckle Group, and in reworked, arkosic/dolomitic impact-related lithofacies within the overlying basal Simpson Group, may exist both locally and regionally relative to the {open_quotes}Ames Crater{close_quotes}. Calibration of log-rock characteristics of ejecta-fallout reservoir lithofacies from key crater rim wells provides the basis for field-wide and regional inferences about lithologies, reservoir quality, and related production characteristics. An awareness and understanding of impact-related {open_quotes}Ames Crater{close_quotes} Arbuckle and Simpson lithofacies should lead to refinement of regional Lower and Middle Ordovician stratigraphy, and create renewed exploration strategies for potential stratigraphic traps.

Kuykendall, M.D. [Solid Rock Resources, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States)

1995-09-01

88

Industrial extension, the Oklahoma way  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oklahoma has established a customer-driven industrial extension system. A publicly-chartered, private non-profit corporation, the Oklahoma Alliance for Manufacturing Excellence, Inc. (`the Alliance') coordinates the system. The system incorporates principles that Oklahoma manufacturers value: (1) decentralization and local accessibility; (2) coordinated existing resources; (3) comprehensive help; (4) interfirm cooperation; (5) pro-active outreach; (6) self- help and commitment from firms; (7) customer governance; and (8) performance accountability. The Oklahoma system consists of: (1) a network of locally-based broker/agents who work directly with manufacturers to diagnose problems and find appropriate assistance; (2) a group of industry sector specialists who collect and disseminate sector specific technological and market intelligence to the broker/agents and their clients; (3) all the specialized public and private sector resources coordinated by the system; and (4) a customer- driven coordination and evaluation mechanism, the Alliance.

Farrell, Edmund J.

1994-03-01

89

Oklahoma and American Indian Imagery  

E-print Network

In the late 1980s and early 1990s marketing firms conducted an in-depth examination of the general public's image of Oklahoma as part of their efforts to make the state a profitable tourist destination. This study found ...

Anderson, William Brett

2011-12-31

90

Geothermal resource assessment in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

In September 1980, the Oklahoma Geological Survey began a program to assess the geothermal potential of the state. The program, thus far, consists of: the preparation of a detailed geothermal-gradient map of Oklahoma at a scale of 1:500,000; and site-specific investigations of gradient and subsurface conditions in areas that appear to have geothermal potential. Two areas where recent mapping showed

M. L. Prater; P. K. Cheung; K. V. Luza; W. E. Harrison

1981-01-01

91

Relations between extensional tectonics and magmatism within the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Variations in the geometry, distribution and thickness of Cambrian igneous and sedimentary units within southwest Oklahoma are related to a late Proterozoic - early Paleozoic rifting event which formed the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. These rock units are exposed in the Wichita Mountains, southwest Olkahoma, located on the northern margin of a Proterozoic basin, identified in the subsurface by COCORP reflection data. Overprinting of the Cambrian extensional event by Pennyslvanian tectonism obsured the influence of pre-existing basement structures and contrasting basement lithologies upon the initial development of the aulacogen.

McConnell, D. A.; Gilbert, M. C.

92

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-9017 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Tommy Puffinbarger Extension Educator, Alfalfa County Oklahoma State

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

93

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. Oklahoma—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective... Oklahoma—1997 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS (Primary and...

2013-07-01

94

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. Oklahoma—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective...otherwise noted. Oklahoma—Ozone (8-Hour Standard)...

2012-07-01

95

Recent developments at Wilburton field, Latimer County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Recent deeper drilling in Wilburton field has resulted in new production from the Spiro, Cromwell, and Arbuckle formations in a structurally high fault block in situ beneath the old field pay in the overthrusted Spiro. ARCO Oil and Gas Company first found production from Spiro in situ beneath a low-angle thrust fault in Sec. 36, T5N, R17E. Nine wells now produce from this reservoir. Two wells have been completed below the Spiro in the in-situ Cromwell reservoir, and others are thought to be productive. Three wells are currently being drilled for insitu Spiro and Cromwell. Structural data generated by drilling the in-situ Spiro and Cromwell pays revealed a southwest-dipping, upthrown fault block with nearly 2,000 ft of vertical relief. ARCO tested this feature with their ARCO 2 Yourman well in Sec. 15, T5N, R18E, discovering prolific gas production from the Arbuckle. The Arbuckle reservoir consists largely of vugs and solution-enlarged fractures in a clean dolostone. Conventional neutron-density logs show very low porosity, but cores and formation microscanner images reveal the vugs, some of which are several inches across. Permeability is created by a pervasive system of younger fractures and microfaults. All current production is from the uppermost 700 ft of the Arbuckle, with a gas column of at least 1,100 ft. To date, six Arbuckle wells have been completed, two are in completion, and two are being drilled.

Hook, R.C. (Anadarko Petroleum Corp., Oklahoma City, OK (USA))

1989-08-01

96

MISR Scans the Texas-Oklahoma Border  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These MISR images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images on the left, from top to bottom, are from the 70-degree forward viewing camera, the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera, and the 70-degree aftward viewing camera. The higher brightness, bluer tinge, and reduced contrast of the oblique views result primarily from scattering of sunlight in the Earth's atmosphere, though some color and brightness variations are also due to differences in surface reflection at the different angles. The longer slant path through the atmosphere at the oblique angles also accentuates the appearance of thin, high-altitude cirrus clouds.

On the right, two areas from the nadir camera image are shown in more detail, along with notations highlighting major geographic features. The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, and prairies, the Red River and the Canadian River are important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and flow eastward, their waters eventually discharging into the Mississippi River.

A smoke plume to the north of the Ouachita Mountains and east of Lake Eufaula is visible in the detailed nadir imagery. The plume is also very obvious at the 70-degree forward view angle, to the right of center and about one-fourth of the way down from the top of the image.

MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2000-01-01

97

Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma Authors from the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University in at least 27 states, ranging from Nebraska to New Jersey on the north and from New Mexico to Florida

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

98

the university of oklahoma Annual Report  

E-print Network

the university of oklahoma ADVENTURE A Year Of Annual Report July 2005 ­ June 2006 #12;Board S S I O N Statement The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History at the University of Oklahoma Conducting and disseminating research to increase knowledge Teaching university students to develop critical

Oklahoma, University of

99

Oklahoma Higher Education: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A major headline in recent years has been that cash-strapped state governments are cutting back support for many services, including public higher education. Oklahoma is no different. Indeed, in the most recent state budget crafted by Oklahoma policymakers, Oklahoma's public colleges and universities received a 5.8 percent cut in state…

Denhart, Matthew; Matgouranis, Christopher

2011-01-01

100

Petrography, geochemistry, and 40Ar-39Ar ages of impact melt rocks and breccias from the Ames Impact Structure, Oklahoma: The Nicor Chestnut 18-4 drill core  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 15-km-diameter Ames structure in northwestern Oklahoma is located 2.75 km below surface in Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle dolomite, which is overlain by Middle Ordovician Oil Creek Formation shale. The feature is marked by two concentric ring structures, with the inner ring of about 5 km diameter probably representing the collapsed remnant of a structural uplift composed of brecciated Precambrian granite and Arbuckle dolomite. Wells from both the crater rim and the central uplift are oil- and gas-producing, making Ames one of the economically important impact structures. Petrographic, geochemical, and age data were obtained on samples from the Nicor Chestnut 18-4 drill core, off the NW flank of the central uplift. These samples represent the largest and best examples of impact melt breccia obtained so far from the Ames structure. They contain carbonate rocks which, therefore, are derived from the target sequence. The chemical composition of the impact melt breccias is similar to that of target granite, with variable carbonate admixture. Some impact melt rocks are enriched in siderophile elements indicating the possible presence of a meteoritic component. Based on stratigraphic arguments, the age of the crater was estimated at 470 Ma. Previous 40Ar-39Ar dating attempts of impact melt breccias from the Dorothy 1-19 core yielded plateau ages of about 285 Ma, which is in conflict with the stratigraphic age. The new 40Ar-39Ar age data obtained on the melt breccias from the Nicor Chestnut core by UV laser spot analysis, resulted in a range of ages with maxima around 300 Ma. These data could reflect processes related either the regional Nemaha Uplift or resetting due to hot brines active on a midcontinent-wide scale, perhaps in related to the Alleghenian and Ouachita orogenies. The age data indicate an extended burial phase associated with thermal overprint during Late Pennsylvanian-Permian.

Koeberl, Christian; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Kelley, Simon P.

2001-05-01

101

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES CODE -1 THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

of the University of Oklahoma is charged in the Constitution of the State of Oklahoma with governing the University of the United States and the State of Oklahoma and the University of Oklahoma Student Association. Those. Student Rights Students of the University of Oklahoma are guaranteed certain rights by the Constitutions

Oklahoma, University of

102

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school…

Ingraham, Sandy

103

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of children in Oklahoma. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school…

Ingraham, Sandy

104

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '98.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school dropouts; and (8)…

Oklahoma Inst. for Child Advocacy, Inc., Oklahoma City. Oklahoma Kids Count.

105

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus TORNADO Safety Information GENERAL INFORMATION OU is very concerned about the safety and well-being of everyone associated with the Norman Campus. During tornado season, we work to provide timely severe weather safety information that we hope will be carefully

Oklahoma, University of

106

Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources  

E-print Network

E-1014 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University E-1014 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural.S. Department of Agriculture, the Director of Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, Oklahoma State University

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

107

Biogeography, ecoregions, and geomorphology affect fish species composition in streams of eastern Oklahoma, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stream fish assemblages are structured by biogeographical, physical and biological factors acting on different spatial scales.\\u000a We determined how physical factors, geomorphology and stream habitat, influenced fish species composition (presence–absence)\\u000a in eastern Oklahoma, USA relative to the ecoregion and biogeographic effects previously reported. We sampled fish assemblages\\u000a and surveyed geomorphology and habitat at 107 stream sites in the Boston Mountains,

Daniel C. Dauwalter; Dale K. Splinter; William L. Fisher; Richard A. Marston

2008-01-01

108

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

/Wildlife and Fisheries Consultant Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation Shannon I. Ferrell Extension Agricultural Economics Specialist Department of Agricultural Economics Oklahoma State University Dwayne Elmore Extension Wildlife net income is often greater than traditional agricultural uses alone. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

109

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

county OCES agricultural educator or Joe Armstrong, OSU Extension Weeds Specialist, at (405) 744Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University PSS-2779 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

110

Mountain Biking  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Announcing a new WWW page for Mountain Biking enthusiasts. This page focuses on mountain biking in the San Francisco Bay area (including descriptions of several local trails), but also contains links to descriptions of mountain biking in other areas, including Pittsburgh, Colorado, Utah and New Zealand.

111

Mountain Age  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about processes that affect the shape of mountains. While determining the relative age of mountains involves a variety of complex interacting factors, this probe is designed to determine if students consider weathering factors or if they intuitively believe taller mountains are older.

Francis Eberle

2005-01-01

112

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University PSS-2161 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Jason Warren Soil Conservation Extension Specialist Kevin Meeks

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

113

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University BAE-1109 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Carol Jones Stored Products Engineering Specialist Edmond Bonjour

Jones, Carol

114

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-9016 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Dwayne Elmore Extension Wildlife Specialist, OSU Terry Bidwell

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

115

9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History  

E-print Network

9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma from the Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair! We are pleasedK ­ 12th) · Song in Native American Language (PreK ­ 12th) NEW for 2011

Oklahoma, University of

116

University of Oklahoma [INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY] The University of Oklahoma |IP Policy 1  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma [INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY] The University of Oklahoma |IP Policy 1 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY 3.27.1 PREAMBLE (A) The people of the State of Oklahoma may reasonably expect and Nation. Such new industry creates greater employment opportunities for citizens of the State

Oklahoma, University of

117

Risk across disciplines: An interdisciplinary examination of water and drought risk in South-Central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Drought is a challenge faced by communities across the United States, exacerbated by growing demands on water resources and climate variability and change. The Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer (ASA) in south-central Oklahoma, situated in the heart of the Chickasaw Nation, is the state's only sole-source groundwater basin and sustains the Blue River, the state's only free-flowing river. The recent comprehensive hydrological studies of the aquifer indicate the need for sustainable management of the amount of water extracted. However, the question of how to deal with that management in the face of increasing drought vulnerability, diverse demands, and climate variability and change remains. Water management carries a further imperative to be inclusive of tribal and non-tribal interests. To examine this question, we are conducting an investigation of drought risk from multiple disciplines. Anthropological data comes from stakeholder interviews that were designed to investigate conflict over water management by understanding how people perceive risk differently based on different opinions about the structure of the resource, varying levels of trust in authorities, and unequal access to resources. . The Cultural Theory of Risk is used to explain how people view risks as part of their worldviews and why people who hold different worldviews disagree about risks associated with water availability. Meteorological analyses of longitudinal data indicate periods of drought that are noted in stakeholder interviews. Analysis of stream gauge data investigates the influence of climate variability on local hydrologic impacts, such as changing groundwater levels and streamflows, that are relevant to planning and management decisions in the ASA. Quantitative assessment of future drought risk and associated uncertainty and their effect on type and scale of future economic and social impacts are achieved by combining elements of statistical and dynamical downscaling to improve predictions of local impacts using Hybrid Statistical-Dynamical Downscaling Technique.

Lazrus, H.; Paimazumder, D.; Towler, E.; McPherson, R. A.

2013-12-01

118

Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Imaging, Digital Mapping and Immersion Visualization of Evaporite Karst in Western Oklahoma investigates a novel and innovative procedure that combines electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), digital mapping

119

Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tomographic Imaging, Digital Mapping and Immersion Visualization of Evaporite Karst in Western Oklahoma mapping and immersion visualization hardware and software to provide a digital image of subsurface conduit

120

Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Oklahoma, 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Oklahoma for 2010. Oklahoma made progress in narrowing achievement gaps for most major subgroups on the End-of-Instruction (EOI) test in Algebra I. Trends in achievement gaps could not be determined for other grades in math, or for any grades in reading, because the state…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

121

PDC Bits Find Applications in Oklahoma Drilling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drilling in Oklahoma is difficult by any standards. Polycrystalline diamond cutter (PDC) bits, with proven success drilling soft, homogenous formations common in the North Sea and U.S. Gulf Coast regions, have found some significant ''spot'' applications in Oklahoma. Applications qualified by bit design and application development over the past two (2) years include slim hole drilling in the deep Anadarko

L. A. Offenbacher; J. D. McDermaid; C. R. Patterson

1983-01-01

122

Onion transplant production system for Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Onions are a valuable specialty crop. Unfortunately, commercially available transplants in Oklahoma are often produced in a different area of the country and shipped into Oklahoma, resulting in a limited cultivar selection, non-adapted cultivars, poor crop stands, high bolting incidence, and low pro...

123

75 FR 18048 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oklahoma Department of Mines (ODM, Oklahoma, or...other changes to permit design or plans, but such revision...necessary approval of designs or plans but such permit...regulation under the Mine Safety and Health Act...12866--Regulatory Planning and Review This...

2010-04-09

124

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Assistant Professor The School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Oklahoma State University is pleased to invite applications for six areas of mechanical and aerospace engineering are encouraged to apply. Applicants with a research

125

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30

126

76 FR 59766 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00056  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Oklahoma County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/30/2011 through 09/01/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-27

127

Adult Education in the State of Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of adult education in Oklahoma has followed the general American pattern. After World War II, several Oklahoma public schools began adult education programs and later took advantage of Federally supported vocational and literacy programs. However, differing attitudes toward educational purpose and financing between eastern and…

Harrison, Arthur Reading

128

Thermal conditions in the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Heat flow, bottom-hole temperature (BHT), and thermal conductivity data are used to evaluate the present thermal conditions in the Anadarko basin. Heat flow values decrease from 54-62 mWm{sup {minus}2} in the northern part of the basin to 39-53 mWm{sup {minus}2} in the southern portion of the basin. The variation in the regional conductive heat flow is controlled by basin geometry and by the distribution of radiogenic elements in the basement. The heat flow, thermal conductivity, and lithologic information were combined to construct a 3-D model of the temperature structure of the Anadarko basin. The highest temperatures sedimentary rocks older than Pennsylvanian are offset 35 km north-northwest of the deepest part of the basin. This offset is related to the regional increase in heat flow to the north and to the presence of high thermal conductivity granite wash adjacent to the Wichita Mountains. A plot of the temperature difference between the equilibrium temperatures estimated from the model and the measured BHTs as a function of depth is remarkably similar to the published correction curve for BHTs for wells in Oklahoma. Vitrinite reflectance and apatite fission-track (FT) data are used to estimate the paleogeothermal conditions in the basin. Published vitrinite reflectance values are consistent with a past geographic temperature distribution comparable to the observed distribution with the maximum values offset from the basin axis. FT analysis of sandstones from wells in the southeastern portion of the basin indicates that subsurface temperatures were at least 30C higher than at present, suggest the possibility of substantial erosion in this area.

Kelley, S.A.; Gallardo, J.D.; Carter, L.C.; Blackwell, D.D. (Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States))

1991-03-01

129

Did Divorces Decline after the Oklahoma City Bombing?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995 was an act of terrorism that had many potential influences on the city and state, including influences on families. We analyzed divorce data from 1985 to 2000 for all 77 counties in Oklahoma to assess the divorce response to the Oklahoma City bombing. Our prediction was that divorce rates in Oklahoma would…

Nakonezny, Paul A.; Reddick, Rebecca; Rodgers, Joseph Lee

2004-01-01

130

Restoration of One-Room School Facilities in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Within the last 4 years, four one-room school houses have been restored for use as educational museum facilities. These include the Pleasant Valley School in Stillwater, Oklahoma; the Rose Hill School at Perry, Oklahoma; the old school located on the grounds of the Harn Homestead Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; and the Old Roll School, located…

McKinley, Kenneth H.

131

Mountain Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you've ever wanted to turn your hiking skills into helpful information, the Mountain Watch section of the Appalachian Mountain Club website may be of great interest. The site is designed to turn hikers into "citizen scientists" who can "aid in the collection of data that measures the ecological health of our mountains." The site contains four areas (including "Mountain Plants" and "Mountain Weather") where visitors can submit their own recent findings and observations. First-time visitors will need to fill out the volunteer data section, and this takes just a few minutes. After this, visitors will receive a password which will allow them to report on alpine flowers, air quality, and related subjects. Visitors can also read the observations of others, and read up on their "Naturalist Blog".

132

REGISTRATION PACKET 9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair  

E-print Network

REGISTRATION PACKET 9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair, Lists, and Entry Forms to: Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair For questions about the ONAYLF, forms

Oklahoma, University of

133

Mountain Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mountain Watch is a group of ongoing trail-side citizen science programs that track reproductive (flower/fruit development) plant phenology of a small set of alpine and forest plants in the U.S.'s Eastern Appalachian mountains and other northeast areas. The program encourages hikers, families, school groups and conservationists to help scientists make observations along the trails on the timing of plant flower and fruit development for inclusion in a long-term study to understand how shifts in climate trends may impact mountain flora. Resources to help teachers get started are available at the website.

2014-05-14

134

Mountain Weather  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mountains can be awe-inspiring both for the vistas they provide and for the weather events and long-term climate systems they support. This interactive feature illustrates how a moisture-laden air mass interacts with a mountain slope to produce characteristic patterns of precipitation over the mountain and surrounding areas. Viewers can see how clouds and precipitation form as the air mass ascends the windward side of the peak, and observe the rain shadow created on the leeward side by the descending, warmed, and moisture-depleted air. A background essay and list of discussion questions supplement the interactive feature.

135

Mountain Gorillas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This module focuses on the population of mountain gorillas living in the central highland area of Africa. The module looks at human activity around the gorilla habitat and how that activity is threatening the survival of the remaining gorillas.

2012-08-03

136

77 FR 26598 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00059  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes and Hail. DATES: Effective April 26, 2012. Incident Period: April 13, 2012 through April 15, 2012. Physical Loan...

2012-05-04

137

PDC bits find applications in Oklahoma drilling  

SciTech Connect

Drilling in Oklahoma is difficult by any standards. Polycrystalline diamond cutter (PDC) bits, with proven success drilling soft, homogenous formations common in the North Sea and U.S. Gulf Coast regions, have found some significant ''spot'' applications in Oklahoma. Applications qualified by bit design and application development over the past two (2) years include slim hole drilling in the deep Anadarko Basin, deviation control in Southern Oklahoma, drilling on mud motors, drilling in oil base mud, drilling cement, sidetracking, coring and some rotary drilling in larger hole sizes. PDC bits are formation sensitive, and care must be taken in selecting where to run them in Oklahoma. Most of the successful runs have been in water base mud drilling hard shales and soft, unconsolidated sands and lime, although bit life is often extended in oil-base muds.

Offenbacher, L.A.; McDermaid, J.D.; Patterson, C.R.

1983-02-01

138

76 FR 23522 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...limitations affecting post-mine contours; adding a subsidence...Oklahoma Department of Mines, 2915 N. Classen...minimum criteria and design certification. Their...relation to the underground mine workings. The full...12866--Regulatory Planning and Review This...

2011-04-27

139

76 FR 77578 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00057  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 12/07/2011. Incident: Earthquakes. Incident Period: 11/05/2011 and continuing. Effective Date: 12/07/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-12-13

140

77 FR 61651 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00067  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Multiple Wildfires. Incident Period: 07/30/2012 Through 08/12/2012. Effective Date: 10/01/2012. Physical Loan...

2012-10-10

141

Mountain Mash  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learners model the processes that formed some of Earth's largest mountain ranges: the Himalayas, the Andes, and the Alps. Using layers of clay to represent continental plates, learners push the clay together to see model mountains form. When learners set up a free account at Kinetic City, they can answer bonus questions at the end of the activity as a quick assessment. As a larger assessment, learners can complete the Smart Attack game after they've completed several activities.

2012-06-26

142

Mountain Building  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site offers several sets of questions for students to answer about where mountain ranges are located and why they are where they are. Many of the questions have links to more information and/or images. Questions address the role of plate tectonics in the process of mountain building. A computer isn't necessary to answer the questions, but is highly recommended so that the students can use the links provided. These questions require some prior knowledge of the content.

143

Mountain Weather  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this interactive resource students slide a bar across the screen and view the steps in the water cycle as a water-laden air mass hits a mountain range. They see how clouds and precipitation form as the air mass ascends the windward side of the mountain, and observe the rain shadow created on the leeward side by the descending, warmed, and moisture-depleted air.

144

Digital geologic map of Beaver County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set consists of digital data and accompanying documentation for the surficial geology of Beaver County, Oklahoma. The original data are from the Hydrogeologic Map, sheet 1 of 3, included in the U.S. Geological Survey publication, Reconnaissance of the Water Resources of Beaver County, Oklahoma, Hydrologic Investigations Atlas HA-450, Morton and Goemaat, 1973. The geology was compiled by S.L. Schoff, 1953.

Cederstrand, J.R.

1997-01-01

145

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas  

SciTech Connect

Uranium resources of the Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Five areas of uranium favorability were delineated. Diagenetically altered, quartzose and sublithic, eolian and marginal-marine sandstones of the Permian Rush Springs Formation overlying the Cement Anticline are favorable for joint-controlled deposits in sandstone, non-channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits, and Texas roll-front deposits. Three areas contain lithologies favorable for channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits: arkosic sandstones and granule conglomerates of the Permian Post Oak Conglomerate south of the Wichita Mountains; subarkosic and sublithic Lower Permian fluvio-deltaic and coastal-plain sandstones of the eastern Red River Valley; and subsurface arkosic, subarkosic, and sublithic alluvial-fan and fan-delta sandstones of the Upper Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian sequence in the eastern Hollis Basin. The coarse-grained facies of the Cambrian Quanah Granite and genetically related aplite and pegmatite dikes in the Wichita Mountains are favorable for orthomagmatic and autometasomatic deposits, respectively.

Al-Shaieb, Z.; Thomas, R.G.; Stewart, G.F.

1982-04-01

146

Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this grant was to increase the awareness of students of space sciences and commerce through experimentation. This objective was carried out through the award and administration, by OSIDA, the Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority, of eleven smaller grants to fund thirteen projects at schools determined by competitive application. Applications were graded on potential outreach, experimentation objectives and impact on students' awareness of space sciences. We chose projects from elementary, middle and high schools as well as colleges that would encourage students through research and experimentation to consider education and careers in related disciplines. Each organization did not receive an equal share of the grant; instead, OSIDA distributed the money to each project based on the organization's need. A copy of the dispersement record is enclosed with this final grant report. The projects covered topics such as: space colonization, space stations, constellations, model rocketry, and space commerce.

2002-01-01

147

High School to College-Going Rates for Oklahoma High School Graduates to Oklahoma Colleges: Linear College-Going Rate, Combined College-Going Rate. Oklahoma High School Educational Indicators Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four tables report on college-going rates for high school graduates in Oklahoma from 1989 to 1993. The report cites the Oklahoma State Department of Education and the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education as data sources. The tables report on "Linear College-Going Rates" of those who go directly from Oklahoma high schools to Oklahoma

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

148

A transgression-regression event during the deposition of the Upper Cambrian Honey Creek formation in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

SciTech Connect

The transgression that inundated the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen during the upper Cambrian enveloped a landscape that consisted of hills of rhyolite up to 350 m in high. Initial deposits on this topography have been interpreted as alluvium. These, together with succeeding tidally-influenced marine siliciclastics form the Reagan Formation. The siliciclastics grains are made up of fragments of local origin (i.e., rhyolite), quartz (derived from a distal source) and authigenic glauconite. The upward passage from the Reagan to the Honeycreek Formation is defined by the addition to the siliciclastics of carbonate detritus in the form of tidally-influenced grainstones, mostly composed of pelmatozoan fragments. The passage from the Honeycreek to the overlying Fort Sill Formation of the Arbuckle Group is marked by the incoming of beds of lime mudstone and the gradual disappearance of grainstones and siliciclastics. Evidence of the existence of rhyolite topography (i.e., an archipelago) can be detected to within 50 m of the top of the Fort Sill. While the overall facies pattern undoubtedly records a widespread transgression, a newly-discovered slightly angular unconformity within the lower part of the Honeycreek is best interpreted as a record of a temporary regression. Three distinctive lithologies are involved in this relationship: the lowest beds are light grey cross-bedded pelmatozoan grainstones with minor amounts of quartz and rhyolite grains. Syntaxial cements at the base of this unit are homogenous under cathode luminescence, while cements near the top display up to 27 zones of reflectance, interpreted as a fluctuating marine-meteoric groundwater imprint. The overlying bed is a red-brown mud-supported limestone that contains abundant angular rhyolite pebbles and a rich trilobite fauna. Some of the pebbles are coated by pelmatozoans.

McElmoyl, C.; Donovan, R.N. (Texas Christian Univ., Ft. Worth, TX (United States). Geology Dept.)

1993-02-01

149

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-2874 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http and Management Terrence G. Bidwell Professor and Extension Specialist Rangeland Ecology and Management Case R

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

150

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University HLA-6435 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Landscaping and Gardening for Birds David Hillock Assistant Extension Specialist, Consumer Horticulturist Mike

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

151

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University EPP-7461 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Brad Kard Extension Pesticide Coordinator Kevin Shelton Extension Coordinator Charles Luper Extension

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

152

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University HLA-6430 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Stephanie A. Smith Entomology and Wildlife Extension Program Assistant Ron Masters Extension Wildlife

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

153

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-9201 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http,theproductionofaquaticanimalsandplants under controlled conditions, is the fastest growing form of alternative agriculture in the United States

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

154

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University EPP-7602 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Eric Rebek Associate Professor/State Extension Specialist Horticultural Entomology Jennifer Olson

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

155

Organic petrology of epi-impsonite at Page, Oklahoma, U.S.A.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Impsonite (asphaltic pyrobitumen) occurs as fracture-filling veins cutting massive sandstone in the frontal Ouachita Mountains near Page, Oklahoma. The Page impsonite formed from low-temperature alteration of crude oil. Mean maximum bitumen reflectance in oil immersion (Rmax) of seven samples is 1.41-1.96%. Mean apparent bireflectance of these samples is 0.15-0.54%. The Page deposit classifies at the upper end of epi-impsonite in the generic classification for solid bitumen, based on physical, chemical, and optical characteristics, and as post-oil with unlimited migration in the genetic classification for solid bitumen. ?? 1991.

Cardott, B.J.

1991-01-01

156

Service Assessment Mother's Day Weekend Tornado in Oklahoma and  

E-print Network

impact was in northeast Oklahoma and southwest Missouri. A tornado, rated EF4 on the Enhanced Fujita scale, moved southeast from the town of Picher, Oklahoma, into southwest Missouri. The tornado caused 21

157

The early planning and development of Oklahoma City  

E-print Network

An analysis of the planning, development, and implementation of Oklahoma City's Grand Boulevard. In the early days of 1909, a plan emerged to build an expansive parks and boulevard system to encircle Oklahoma City. Such ...

Humphreys, Blair D. (Blair David)

2009-01-01

158

25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Railroads in Oklahoma. 169.24 Section 169...RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS § 169.24 Railroads in Oklahoma. (a) The Act...otherwise determined by the Secretary, railroad rights-of-way in Oklahoma...

2010-04-01

159

Social and Economic Consequences of Indian Gaming in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The balancing framework of Indian gaming as it operates in Oklahoma constrains Oklahoma Indian nations from operating facilities according to the dictates of the marketplace on a large-scale Class III basis. Indian gaming actually brings substantial net economic benefits to the state, contrary to claims that Oklahoma Indian gaming benefits come at…

Grant, Kenneth W., II; Spilde, Katherine A.; Taylor, Jonathan B.

2004-01-01

160

Why Norman?: Meteorology Comes to University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Why Norman?: Meteorology Comes to University of Oklahoma by John M. Lewis A presentation at the 50th Anniversary University of Oklahoma's School of Meteorology October 8, 2010 #12;2 Extended Abstract A review of the University of Oklahoma's (OU's) meteorology program/department over its first 15 years

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

161

Drought and grazing effects on Oklahoma phlox (Polemoniaceae, Phlox oklahomensis)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Oklahoma phlox (Phlox oklahomensis Wherry) is endemic to Butler, Chautauqua, Comanche, Cowley, and Elk Counties of Kansas and Woods and Woodward Counties of Oklahoma. The species comprises populations of a few scattered individuals to several hundred in mixed-grass prairie sites in Oklahoma where co...

162

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES CODE -1 THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

of the University of Oklahoma is charged in the Constitution of the State of Oklahoma with governing the University of the United States and the State of Oklahomaand the University of Oklahoma StudentAssociation. Those documents Rights Students of the University of Oklahomaare guaranteed certain rights by the Constitutions

Oklahoma, University of

163

77 FR 74689 - Land Acquisitions; Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs...acres of land in trust for the Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma on December 6, 2012. FOR...acres of land into trust for the Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma under the authority of...

2012-12-17

164

Mountain Sickness  

Microsoft Academic Search

I HAVE just come back from a journey in the region of the Andes, and in looking over the numbers of NATURE, which had accumulated during my absence, I came across the extract, which you make in your notes of February 21, from the Revue Scientifique, on the subject of mountain sickness. I cannot agree with M. Kronecker's statement that

George Griffith

1895-01-01

165

Oklahoma City, Canadian River, OK, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This view of Oklahoma City, OK (35.5N, 97.5W) surrounded by the grasslands of the central plains, is detailed enough to use as a map of the major highways and throughfares within the city and surrounding area. Tinker Air Force Base and Will Rogers International Airport as well as Lakes Hefner, Stanley Draper and nearby recreation areas. The smaller community of Norman, on the banks of the Canadian River to the south, is home to the University of Oklahoma.

1991-01-01

166

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

to be found in canola grown in Oklahoma are the army cutworm and the diamondback moth. Army cutworm (Euxoa auxiliaris) Description and Life History: Army cutworm moths (Figure 1) have a wingspan of 1 to 1½ inches

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

167

Mountain Building  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is part of a series of lessons in a continuing study of change. It is designed to give students hands-on experience manipulating and controlling the variables involved in the process of soil erosion. They will be able to identify variables that influence rates of change and use group consensus to design and build what they believe to be the strongest mountain possible.

1998-01-01

168

Mountains: An Overview.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces the lessons from "Mountain: A Global Resource" that were developed by the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) and The Mountain Institute for use by NCSS members and their students. Provides an overview that introduces the mountains, mountain cultures, historical perceptions, and the geographical importance of mountains. (CMK)

Byers, Alton; Gilligan, Nancy; Golston, Syd; Linville, Rex

1999-01-01

169

Eliminating Barriers to Dual Enrollment in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Policy, financial, and transportation barriers have limited participation in dual enrollment for marginalized (low-socioeconomic, first-generation, and ethnic minority) students in Oklahoma. This chapter presents a collaborative effort by education and community leaders that has successfully eliminated these barriers and increased the number of…

Roach, Rick; Gamez Vargas, Juanita; David, Kevin M.

2015-01-01

170

Oklahoma Curriculum Guide for Teaching Safety Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed by classroom teachers, university professors, and personnel from the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this guide is an effort to assist teachers in locating and utilizing safety materials as well as to assist them in developing well-balanced safety programs for the children and young people in the state. The preschool and…

Oklahoma Curriculum Improvement Commission, Oklahoma City.

171

REGENTS' POLICY MANUAL THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

.7.6 College of Law Library 2.8 Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History Collections Management Policy 2.4.2 Advertising and Promotion 3.4.3 Endorsement Prohibited 3.4.4 Purchasing Advertising 3.4.5 University Name

Oklahoma, University of

172

House Damage from 2011 Oklahoma Earthquake  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

House damage in central Oklahoma from the magnitude 5.6 earthquake on Nov. 6, 2011. Research conducted by USGS geophysicist Elizabeth Cochran and her university-based colleagues suggests that this earthquake was induced by injection into deep disposal wells in the Wilzetta North field....

173

SIMULATION OF PEANUT GROWTH IN OKLAHOMA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two peanut growth models of varying complexity were calibrated for Oklahoma varieties and growing conditions. Both models predicted pod growth quite well. The models were then used to simulate the effects of various soil moisture levels on peanut growth. The more complex model has potential as a management tool.

Grosz, Gerald D.; Elliott, Ronald L.; Young, James H.

1986-01-01

174

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center  

E-print Network

to give the Certification of Birth/Care of a Newborn form to your health care provider for completionThe University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center HUMAN RESOURCES Dear On we were notified that you (FMLA). The purpose of this letter is to provide you with the form your health care provider needs

Oklahoma, University of

175

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center  

E-print Network

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center HUMAN RESOURCES Dear On we were notified that you). The purpose of this letter is to provide you with the form your health care provider to complete and return. Your leave is not approved as FMLA until we have received the Certification of Birth/Care of a Newborn

Oklahoma, University of

176

Public Library Service to Children in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because of the low density of its population and subsequent low property tax support, library service in Oklahoma is based on the multicounty library operating as a single unit. With the help of federal funds, such units now cover one-third of the state and 60 percent of its population utilizing branch libraries and bookmobile service. Service to…

Wentroth, Mary Ann

177

University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology Rapid-response Graduate Degree Application Form This application form is used by the School of Meteorology to provide a rapid, no-cost response to the applicant on prospects to be admitted to the School of Meteorology for pursuit of a graduate degree. The applicant should

Oklahoma, University of

178

Electromagnetic Radiation from Severe Storms in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of observing the radiation from lightning discharge processes indicated that major radio frequency electrical activity was associated with the tornado-producing severe storms that struck Oklahoma City during this period. Rates of occurrence of atmospherics at frequencies from 10 kHz to above 3 MHz were observed by using short time constant circuits to preserve the burst nature of the

WILLIAM L. TAYLOR

1973-01-01

179

Women of Oklahoma, 1890-1920.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book examines the lives of representative White, Black, and American Indian women on the Oklahoma frontier after the abrupt opening of Indian Territory to non-Indian settlement in 1889. Drawing on primary sources, particularly diaries and letters, it focuses on the intersection of race, gender, class, and culture in the relationships among…

Reese, Linda Williams

180

State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Oklahoma. The state uses a State Aid Formula to determine the appropriation of funds to various districts. Along with the aid formula, the state collects revenue from the following sources: compensatory programs, special education, vocational programs, transportation…

Slosburg, Tucker

2010-01-01

181

77 FR 53247 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00063  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/2012. Incident: Freedom Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 through 08/14/2012. Effective Date: 08/22/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-08-31

182

76 FR 60959 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00055  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Pawnee County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/07/2011 through 08/14/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-30

183

77 FR 61652 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00066  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Luther Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 Through 08/10/2012. Effective Date: 10/01/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-10-10

184

State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

2009-01-01

185

Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

. The vast number of landfill sites and ubiquitous nature of alluvial deposits make the results of this study stability of the Canadian River adjacent to the Norman, Oklahoma landfill. The USGS provided access to the extensive data already collected at the site as well as assistance with obtaining cores for the project

186

Oklahoma BEEF Incorporated (OBI) Bull Delivery Sheet Central bull testing at Oklahoma BEEF, Incorporated, is managed and supervised with the emphasis on the performance, health, and safety of the bulls; however, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

for Oklahoma Cattle *Out of state cattle must comply with Oklahoma Animal Health requirements Date TestedOklahoma BEEF Incorporated (OBI) Bull Delivery Sheet Central bull testing at Oklahoma BEEF, injury, sickness, death, or any other cause while the bulls are at the central test station. Delivery

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

187

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Uranium favorability of the Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface geologic studies were supplemented by aerial radiometric surveys and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. A total of 1537 rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples were analyzed for 30 elements. Environments favorable for sandstone-type uranium deposits are present in the Cretaceous Antlers and Woodbine Formations, Pennsylvanian arkoses, and the Permian Wichita-Albany Group. The Antlers Formation is locally radioactive; and rock, stream-sediment, and ground-water samples show uranium enrichment. Dip-oriented sand belts may contain subsurface uranium deposits. Arkosic wedges in the Pennsylvanian Strawn, Canyon, and Cisco Groups were partially derived from a favorable Wichita Mountain source, were highly permeable, and contained downdip reductants; gamma-ray logs showed some anomalies. The Permian Wichita-Albany Group contained small uranium occurrences. The Woodbine Formation had an excellent uranium source in updip volcaniclastic correlatives, good permeability, and organic precipitants; but there is little direct evidence of uranium occurrences. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits are limestones and shales of Cambrian to Pennsylvanian age, Pennsylvanian sandstones derived from a Ouachita source, Lower Cretaceous shales, limestones, and sandstones, Upper Cretaceous marine strata, and sparse Cenozoic sediments. Unevaluated environments include Precambrian granites and metasediments of the buried Muenster Arch.

Hobday, D.K.; Rose, F.G. Jr.

1982-08-01

188

Cadillac Mountain Summit  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

An image of the summit of Cadillac Mountain. At 1,528 feet in elevation, Cadillac Mountain is the highest point in Acadia National Park, and is composed of a unique granite, the Cadillac Mountain granite unit....

189

Cadillac Mountain Summit Panorama  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

A panorama of the summit of Cadillac Mountain. At 1,528 feet in elevation, Cadillac Mountain is the highest point in Acadia National Park, and is composed of a unique granite, the Cadillac Mountain granite unit....

190

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever  

MedlinePLUS

... more information on enabling JavaScript. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ... Rickettsia rickettsii bacteria, which cause Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Credit: CDC Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a ...

191

Mountain Barriers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 6-8. This lesson focuses on the changes that occur when mountains rise, thus changing the climate of the area and the plants and animals that live there. Students perform an experiment to observe differences in hot and cold air that help cause this phenomenon. It includes objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, performing extensions, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, audio vocabulary, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

192

Mountain Stage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mountain Stage, a famous Charleston, West Virginia, venue where folk musicians play, is broadcast on National Public Radio, and can be heard on the NPR website, simply by clicking on "Listen", next to the artist's picture and brief bio. Visitors wishing to read more about the artist's musical history can click on the name of the artist next to their picture. Included in the history is their set list for the broadcast show. Visitors can comment on each artist's show, or recommend it to other visitors, by clicking on the icons at the bottom of each brief bio on the homepage.

193

40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control...Control Regions § 81.124 North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air...

2010-07-01

194

78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor, South Texas to Oklahoma...improved high- speed intercity passenger rail service along an 850-mile corridor...Level EIS, the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study (Study) also includes...

2013-03-13

195

High School to College-Going Rates for Oklahoma High School Graduates to Oklahoma Colleges. Oklahoma High School Indicators Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The counts from the current annual report and reports of the previous two years have been combined to provide a three-year average Oklahoma college-going rate. This report includes single-year reports that are provided for each of the three years used to construct the average college-going rates: the college-going rate for 1995-96, 1996-97, and…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

196

A digital geologic map database for the state of Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This dataset is a composite of part or all of the 12 1:250,000 scale quadrangles that make up Oklahoma. The result looks like a geologic map of the State of Oklahoma. But it is only an Oklahoma shaped map clipped from the 1:250,000 geologic maps. This is not a new geologic map. No new mapping took place. The geologic information from each quadrangle is available within the composite dataset.

Heran, William D.; Green, Gregory N.; Stoeser, Douglas B.

2003-01-01

197

Largest Dinosaur Ever Discovered Found in Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Originally discovered in a remote corner of Oklahoma in 1994, the fossil of what may have been the largest creature to ever walk the earth has been excavated by a research team from the University of Oklahoma. Dubbed Sauroposeidon proteles, or "thunder lizard," the dinosaur was almost 100 feet long, with a 39 foot neck and weighing over 50 tons, so big that it would have created minor seismic activity just by walking, according to scientists. The new find is about 110 million years old and consists of neck vertebrae, some almost five feet in length, together with neck ribs nearly twelve feet long. The find is also significant because it may shed light on the last of the North American sauropods, who died out about 100 million years ago. A paper on this new find is scheduled to appear in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. The sites listed provide information and background material about this momentous discovery.

de Nie, Michael Willem.

198

Helminth fauna of waterfowl in central Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Free-ranging waterfowl wintering in and migrating through central Oklahoma were collected and examined for intestinal helminths. Seventy-one ducks, including mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), American widgeons (Anas americana), blue-winged teal (Anas discors), and green-winged teal (Anas crecca) were examined; 64 (90.1%) harbored one or more species of metazoa. Six cestodes, 6 trematodes, 6 nematodes, and 1 acanthocephalan were identified, An experimental, non-flying population of ducks was established and monitored to determine the extent of helminth transmission in central Oklahoma. Seven species of helminths were acquired by the sentinel birds during the study. The significance of the parasites recovered and variations in prevalence and species composition of the infections are discussed as they relate to the life cycles of the parasites and the ecology of the hosts. PMID:7373725

Shaw, M G; Kocan, A A

1980-01-01

199

Passive electrical measurements from three Oklahoma tornados  

Microsoft Academic Search

Passive electrical measurement of three tornados in the Oklahoma area have been made and are being reported upon. The measurements made include point discharge current, 18.5-kc\\/s sferics, along with 10-, 50-, 100-, and 175-kc\\/s, and 30-Mc\\/s sferics. The preceding measurements of tornados are compared with a typical local thunderstorm. In this comparison, it is shown that the electrical discharges within

P. A. Silberg

1965-01-01

200

N3280RDCOTTONWOODRD PayneOklahoma 11  

E-print Network

51 2 54 11 51 49 4 11 2 11 10 72 51 96 26 47 51 2651 26 76 76 26 4 32 11 26 3 11 26 10 72 51 31 26 51 11 2626 72 11 49 10 11 26 11 26 96 76 26 41 11 76 51 1011 74 31 51 11 SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY Soil Survey Area: Payne County, Oklahoma Spatial Version of Data: 2 Soil Map Compilation Scale: 1

Ghajar, Afshin J.

201

Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)  

SciTech Connect

The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma�¢����s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

2012-02-29

202

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2  

E-print Network

#12;#12;DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2 DAM SAFETY MODIFICATION3 &4 Environmental Assessment Pine Creek Dam, Oklahoma Dam Safety Modification & Interim Risk Reduction Measure and risk reduction measures necessary to correct structural and maintenance deficiencies of Pine Creek Dam

US Army Corps of Engineers

203

FIRST YEAR BIOMASS PRODUCTION FROM CRP ACREAGE IN WESTERN OKLAHOMA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The primary objective of this research was to determine the biomass/bioenergy yield and economic value of typical CRP land in northwestern Oklahoma. Three CRP locations were identified in cooperation with the NRCS District Conservationist stationed at Buffalo, Oklahoma. Within each location, a sit...

204

Certification Standards Adopted by the Oklahoma State Board of Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents the standards adopted by the Oklahoma State Board of Education for qualification and certification of persons for instructional, supervisory, and administrative positions and services in Oklahoma public schools. Included are rules and regulations governing the issuance and revocation of certificates for county…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

205

Color Variation Among Northern Flickers Collected in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The eastern (yellow-shafted) race of the northern flicker (Colaptes auratus auratus) is resident in Oklahoma. Except at the western end of the panhandle where it breeds, the western (red-shafted) race (C. a. cafer) occupies the state only during migration and winter. The two races interbreed widely. A total of 179 northern flicker (Colaptes auratus) specimens from Oklahoma were examined for

Vickie A. Ivey; Jack D. Tyler

206

The Oklahoma PN/ADN Articulation Project Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to a critical nursing shortage in the state of Oklahoma, the Oklahoma Practical Nursing (PN)/Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Articulation Project Coordinating Committee was formed in spring 1990 to develop a proposal for program articulation. A curriculum matrix was designed and adopted for use by five regional subcommittees which…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

207

75 FR 23280 - Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Alcohol Control Ordinance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Indian Affairs Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Alcohol Control Ordinance AGENCY: Bureau of Indian...publishes the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma's Alcohol Control Ordinance, which was adopted...CB-64-2010 enacted on March 13, 2010. The Alcohol Control Ordinance regulates and...

2010-05-03

208

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

in Oklahoma. - Decision Support Model for Evaluating Alternative Water Supply Infrastructure Scenarios (Dr their water supply infrastructure needs and will further assist in planning and locating funding for needed Pricing Protocol for Oklahoma Water Planning: Lake Tennkiller Case Study Project Number: 2007OK78B Start

209

Anderson Productions Cruisin' Oklahoma US 66 video archive Transcripts  

E-print Network

:38:00 ­ 14:39:26 from Hi8#9. See ¾" #O. BC-metal 60ml. 26 TC 14:39:26 ­ 15:27:17 from Hi8#9, Phillips ¾". See'd. 26 Oct 1993. 7 Central Oklahoma Christian Home geriatric park. c/a's Will Rogers. 8 Oklahoma

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

210

The University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) Tuberculosis Testing and Certification  

E-print Network

The University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) Tuberculosis Testing and Certification As part of the University of Oklahoma has adopted a Tuberculosis Testing Policy, effective August 16, 2007. All staff and faculty that fit any of the criteria listed below must comply with the Tuberculosis Testing Requirement

Oklahoma, University of

211

Needs Assessment for Oklahoma Academic Librarians: Summary Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma Chapter of the Association of College and Research Libraries (OK-ACRL) and the Oklahoma Library Association, College and University Division (OLA-CUD) co-sponsored a survey of professional academic librarians to obtain institutional and background data on their characteristics, their preferences for academic professional association…

McClure, Charles R.

212

Management of Sclerotinia and southern blights in Oklahoma peanuts  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Although peanut acres in Oklahoma have declined in recent years, the peanut crop remains an important economic crop for those who choose to grow it. A major problem for Oklahoma peanut production is to grow the crop profitably. Yield limiting factors such as diseases, adverse weather conditions, w...

213

The University of Oklahoma 15-PASSENGER VAN POLICY  

E-print Network

. Limit the number of passengers, when passenger transport is necessary, to 8 passengers, I. Require allThe University of Oklahoma 15-PASSENGER VAN POLICY I. POLICY STATEMENT AND SCOPE The safe travel, at the University of Oklahoma is the goal of this policy. This policy applies to the discontinuance of 15-passenger

Oklahoma, University of

214

IMPLICATIONS OF NEW ARSENIC STANDARDS ON OKLAHOMA WATER RESOURCES  

EPA Science Inventory

The new national standard for arsenic in drinking water supplies, slated to take effect in 2006, is having an unexpected impact on a number of Oklahoma communities. Currently, several municipalities in north central Oklahoma are in compliance with existing arsenic standards (50 ...

215

Oklahoma's Indian People: Images of Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to be combined with the social studies curriculum, this guide promotes awareness of American Indian contributions to Oklahoma's development and cultural heritage. Lessons help students in grades 6 through 9 strengthen powers of critical thinking, practice writing skills, and develop creative expression, while learning about Oklahoma's 34…

Chisholm, Anita, Ed.

216

78 FR 36556 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...amounts as you find necessary for Federal disaster assistance and administrative expenses...Individual Assistance and assistance for debris removal and emergency protective measures...Coordinating Officer for this major disaster. The following areas of the State...as adversely affected by this major disaster: Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma...Oklahoma, and......

2013-06-18

217

ELECTION AGREEMENT FOR Oklahoma Teachers' Retirement System (OTRS)  

E-print Network

By completing this form you are choosing to participate in the Oklahoma Teachers' Retirement System (OTRSELECTION AGREEMENT FOR Oklahoma Teachers' Retirement System (OTRS) For Hourly­Paid Employee information to help you make an informed decision. The University may not advise you as to whether

Oklahoma, University of

218

Biology and epidemiology of peanut soilborne pathogens in Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Pressure from soil borne diseases limits yields and increases production costs to Oklahoma peanut growers. Sclerotinia blight, caused by the fungus Sclerotinia minor, and southern blight, caused by the fungus Sclerotium rolfsii, are the most economically damaging peanut diseases in Oklahoma. The c...

219

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

concluded the fourth year of our 4.5-year project to update the Oklahoma Comprehensive Water Plan. We worked for inclusion in the revised Water Plan. · OWRRI director, Dr. Will Focht, served as Past into the efficacy of ADCP for measuring sediment load in Oklahoma streams under both low and high discharge

220

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

soils tend to collapse and prairie dogs avoid The black-tailed prairie dog is a keystone species species of prairie dogs and the only species that occurs in Oklahoma. They are highly social burrowing by grasses, while the center is made up of forbs and dwarf shrubs. Many wildlife species utilize these areas

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

221

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

increased disposable income to be spent in the community. What the Entrepreneur Must Do With the economic a 1994 survey found that 125,000 Oklahoma home-based businesses generated over $3 billion in income. What successful business. The owner, through the sale of products and services, generates income from which

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

222

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

on all grasses, except during very cold winters. The fungus overwinters as dormant thread-like fungal of true spores does not occur. Therefore, spread of this fungus can are mild and prolonged periods of high humidity exist. In Oklahoma, infection of susceptible grasses begins

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

223

Oklahoma Aerospace Intellectual Capital/Educational Recommendations: An Inquiry of Oklahoma Aerospace Executives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to conduct detailed personal interviews with aerospace industry executives/managers from both the private and military sectors from across Oklahoma to determine their perceptions of intellectual capital needs of the industry. Interviews with industry executives regarding…

Nelson, Erin M.

2010-01-01

224

DISABILITIES IN OKLAHOMA--ESTIMATES AND PROJECTIONS, REPORT OF THE OKLAHOMA SURVEY OF DISABILITIES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO PROVIDE REASONABLY ACCURATE ESTIMATES OF THE NUMBER AND TYPES OF DISABLED PERSONS AND THEIR NEEDS AS A BASIS FOR BOTH PRESENT AND FUTURE PLANNING. PERSONAL INTERVIEWS WERE CONDUCTED WITH ADULT RESPONDENTS IN 3,000 HOUSEHOLDS IN OKLAHOMA, A RANDOM SAMPLE STATIFIED ON THE RURAL-URBAN DIMENSION. DATA FROM 2,058…

BOHLEBER, MICHAEL E.

225

Shallow subsurface geological investigation near the Meers fault, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Meers fault is part of a complex system of northwest-trending faults forming the boundary between the Wichita Mountains (south) and the Anadarko basin (north). The frontal fault system is dominated by moderately dipping to steeply dipping reverse faults which have a combined net vertical displacement of over 9 km. Of these faults, the Meers fault has a Pennsylvanian-Permian throw of about 2 km. The Meers fault trends N. 60[degree]W. and displaces Permian conglomerate and shale for a distance of at least 26 km, from near the Comanche-Kiowa County boundary to East Cache Creek. At the northwest end of the fault trace, the fault displaces limestone-pebble conglomerates (Post Oak), whereas at the southeast end siltstones and calcrete-bearing shales of the Hennessey are displaced. Multiple radiocarbon ages of soil-humus samples from 2 Canyon Creek trenches (S24, T4N, R13W) show the last surface faulting occurred 1,200--1,300 yr ago. In 1988--89, the Oklahoma Geological Survey drilled 4 core holes to basement in the vicinity of the trench sites. The holes were drilled along a 200-m-long transect normal to the strike of the Meers fault. Two holes were drilled on the north side of the fault and penetrated highly fractured and altered rhyolite at about 58 m. A third hole drilled 25 m south of the fault, intersected weathered and sheared gabbro at 58 m. The basement material in the fourth hole consisted of dark greenish brown, highly fractured and sheared rock. The drill holes encountered Permian, poorly sorted, matrix-supported, 0.5--3 m thick, conglomerate interbedded with shale and siltstone. Drill holes 1--3 contained 3--5 m thick, granite cobble-boulder, clast supported conglomerate resting on rhyolite and/or gabbro. The core-hole information suggests the Meers-fault zone is at least 200 meters wide.

Luza, K.V. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States))

1993-02-01

226

Digital-map grids of mean-annual precipitation for 1961-90, and generalized skew coefficients of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital report contains two digital-map grids of data that were used to develop peak-flow regression equations in Tortorelli, 1997, 'Techniques for estimating peak-streamflow frequency for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 97-4202. One data set is a grid of mean annual precipitation, in inches, based on the period 1961-90, for Oklahoma. The data set was derived from the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model) mean annual precipitation grid for the United States, developed by Daly, Neilson, and Phillips (1994, 'A statistical-topographic model for mapping climatological precipitation over mountainous terrain:' Journal of Applied Meteorology, v. 33, no. 2, p. 140-158). The second data set is a grid of generalized skew coefficients of logarithms of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma streams less than or equal to 2,510 square miles in drainage area. This grid of skew coefficients is taken from figure 11 of Tortorelli and Bergman, 1985, 'Techniques for estimating flood peak discharges for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 84-4358. To save disk space, the skew coefficient values have been multiplied by 100 and rounded to integers with two significant digits. The data sets are provided in an ASCII grid format.

Rea, A.H.; Tortorelli, R.L.

1997-01-01

227

Biological assessment of environmental flows for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Large-scale patterns in fish assemblage structure and functional groups are influenced by alterations in streamflow regime. In this study, we defined an objective threshold for alteration for Oklahoma streams using a combination of the expected range of 27 flow indices and a discriminant analysis to predict flow regime group. We found that fish functional groups in reference flow conditions had species that were more intolerant to flow alterations and preferences for stream habitat and faster flowing water. In contrast, altered sites had more tolerant species that preferred lentic habitat and slower water velocity. Ordination graphs of the presence and functional groups of species revealed an underlying geographical pattern roughly conforming to ecoregions, although there was separation between reference and altered sites within the larger geographical framework. Additionally, we found that reservoir construction and operation significantly altered fish assemblages in two different systems, Bird Creek in central Oklahoma and the Kiamichi River in southeastern Oklahoma. The Bird Creek flow regime shifted from a historically intermittent stream to one with stable perennial flows, and changes in fish assemblage structure covaried with changes in all five components of the flow regime. In contrast, the Kiamichi River flow regime did not change significantly for most flow components despite shifts in fish assemblage structure; however, most of the species associated with shifts in assemblage structure in the Kiamichi River system were characteristic of lentic environments and were likely related more to proximity of reservoirs in the drainage system than changes in flow. The spatial patterns in fish assemblage response to flow alteration, combined with different temporal responses of hydrology and fish assemblage structure at sites downstream of reservoirs, indicate that interactions between flow regime and aquatic biota vary depending on ecological setting. This supports the notion that regional variation in natural flow regimes could affect the development of flow recommendations.

Fisher, William L.; Seilheimer, Titus S.; Taylor, Jason M.

2012-01-01

228

Naturally occurring hepatozoonosis in coyotes from Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Nine of 16 free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) from central Oklahoma (USA) had naturally acquired infections of Hepatozoon americanum. Infections were confirmed by recognition of tissue stages closely resembling H. americanum in skeletal and cardiac muscle. At the time coyotes were collected they were infested with a variety of ticks, including adult Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum). We propose that the high prevalence of H. americanum in this small sample of free-ranging coyotes and the ability of these same animals to harbor adult populations of A. maculatum is an important component of the epizootiology of canine hepatozoonosis in North America. PMID:10073352

Kocan, A A; Breshears, M; Cummings, C; Panciera, R J; Ewing, S A; Barker, R W

1999-01-01

229

University of Oklahoma: History of Science Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Oklahoma Libraries have done a wonderful job with their history of science collections. Visitors to the site will find seven collections here to keep their minds busy. Their number includes "Copernicus's De revolutionibus" and "Scientific Instruments and Historical Artifacts." Of course this first volume is nothing less than a classic, presenting Copernicus's evidence and arguments in support of heliocentric theory. This volume also contains extensive marginalia from a circle of astronomers located in Paris in the decade following the book's publication in 1543. Moving on, the "Scientific Instruments and Historical Artifacts" area contains 16 wonderful items, including an ancient Mesopotamian cuneiform tablet and videos of historically significant refractometers.

2012-09-21

230

Oklahoma High School Indicators Project. High School to College-Going Rates for Oklahoma High School Graduates to Oklahoma Colleges: Linear College-Going Rate, Combined College-Going Rate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides a single-year rate and a 3-year average of the Oklahoma college-going rate. The average linear college-going rate for Oklahoma colleges in 1993-94 was 43.9 percent of the Oklahoma high school graduates from 1990-91, 1991-92, and 1992-93. Of 1992-93 high school graduates, 44.7 percent went directly to an Oklahoma college the…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

231

Acute mountain sickness  

MedlinePLUS

High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... Acute mountain sickness is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you climb ...

232

Mammoth Mountain Earthquakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

By watching this National Geographic video, you will learn about the seismic activity of Mammoth Mountain. Located in the eastern Sierra Mountains, everyday earthquakes shake the region and there are signs of an imminent volcanic eruption.

2010-01-01

233

How Mountains are Formed  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students investigate how mountains are formed. Concepts include the composition and structure of the Earth's tectonic plates and tectonic plate boundaries, with an emphasis on plate convergence as it relates to mountain formation. Students learn that geotechnical engineers design technologies to measure movement of tectonic plates and mountain formation, as well as design to alter the mountain environment to create safe and dependable roadways and tunnels.

Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

234

Mountains Majesty: Ecosystems of the Rocky Mountains  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Traveling from the East, one can see the towering snow-covered peaks of the Rocky Mountains long before reaching foothills. But to fully appreciate these mountains, one must venture into them and experience up close the colorful bursts of summer wildflowers, the glittering leaves of the quaking aspen, the cold clear alpine streams and lakes, and the distinctive sweet scent of the ponderosa pine. Scientists from the Bureau of Land Management provide an in-depth look at the management issues and diversity of plants, animals, and habitats of the Rocky Mountains.

Betsy Wooster

2004-11-01

235

75 FR 15450 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...disaster. The following areas of the State of Oklahoma have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster: Alfalfa, Caddo, Cleveland, Comanche, Cotton, Delaware, Dewey, Ellis, Grady, Greer, Harmon, Haskell, Hughes,...

2010-03-29

236

AN OKLAHOMA WEATHER MODIFICATION PROGRAM STATUS REPORT AND PROJECT REVIEW  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent history of the Oklahoma Weather Modification Program (OWMP) is presented, the 2001 field program summarized, and the current status of the statewide rainfall stimulation and hail suppression program reported. Some suggestions for program improvement are also enumerated.

Timothy E. Sedlock; Nathan R. Kuhnert; Rebecca L. Resler; Michael E. Mathis; Bruce A. Boe; Brian Vance

237

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Oklahoma Underground Storage Tank Regulation Act...Chapter 25: Underground Storage Tanks, Subchapter 9: Inspections, Testing, and Monitoring Part 1: Inspections Part 5: Penalties...Chapter 27: Petroleum Storage Tank Release...

2010-07-01

238

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology  

E-print Network

Resources to Support Educational Programs EDUC 5993 Instructional Effectiveness in Higher Education Thesis Development EPSY 5963: Developing Resources to Support Educational Programs Sample Electives for nonOKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology M. S. ~ Educational

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

239

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Spoken Language Performance  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Spoken Language Performance Category Description Students are invited to present spoken language performances in Native American languages. Traditional are welcome. Please remember the point of the ONAYLF is to demonstrate Native American language use

Oklahoma, University of

240

ACULEATA HYMENOPTERA OF SAND MOUNTAIN AND BLOW SAND MOUNTAINS, NEVADA  

E-print Network

ACULEATA HYMENOPTERA OF SAND MOUNTAIN AND BLOW SAND MOUNTAINS, NEVADA R. W. Rust1, L. !\\1. Hanks collected from Sand !\\1ountain and Blow Sand Mountains, Nevada. Four species are considered new to science and none are considered endemic to ei ther dune area. Sand Mountain and Blow Sand Mountains were visited 19

Hanks, Lawrence M.

241

Soil moisture determination study. [Guymon, Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Soil moisture data collected in conjunction with aircraft sensor and SEASAT SAR data taken near Guymon, Oklahoma are summarized. In order to minimize the effects of vegetation and roughness three bare and uniformly smooth fields were sampled 6 times at three day intervals on the flight days from August 2 through 17. Two fields remained unirrigated and dry. A similar pair of fields was irrigated at different times during the sample period. In addition, eighteen other fields were sampled on the nonflight days with no field being sampled more than 24 hours from a flight time. The aircraft sensors used included either black and white or color infrared photography, L and C band passive microwave radiometers, the 13.3, 4.75, 1.6 and .4 GHz scatterometers, the 11 channel modular microwave scanner, and the PRT5.

Blanchard, B. J.

1979-01-01

242

SFC to cease operations at Gore, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

On February 16, Sequoyah Fuels Corporation (SFC) formally notified the Nuclear Regulatory Commission it intends to terminate operations and commence decommissioning at its uranium conversion facility at Gore, Oklahoma. SFC officially requested that its NRC operating license be terminated July 31, 1993. SFC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of General Atomics Corporation (GA), will be responsible for the estimated $21.2-million decommissioning plan. GA has contended that it is not financially liable for the cleanup but stated it would be available to offer financial assistance if needed. Over the proposed 10-year cleanup schedule, GA said SFC can finance the decommissioning by drawing on SFC's estimated $70-million in revenue from a fee-for-contract agreement in its recently formed joint-venture with AlliedSignal Inc., called ConverDyn.

Not Available

1993-03-01

243

27 CFR 9.108 - Ozark Mountain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Jefferson City, Missouri (1955, revised 1970); (3) Springfield, Missouri (1954...1958, revised 1973); (6) Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma (1978); (7...of Fort Gibson, Oklahoma (on the Fort Smith map); (viii) Then southward...

2010-04-01

244

Mountain Building Learning Module  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This learning module was designed to be used with a college course in physical geography. Subject matter covered includes these four categories: folded mountains, volcanic mountains, fault block mountains, and granitic batholiths. It also covers complex mountain chains formed at convergent plate boundaries, where they are folded and faulted and intruded by volcanic features. Complex mountains include Andean-type (ocean-continent) plate boundaries and Himalayan-type (continent-continent) plate boundaries. Mountains such as the Coast Ranges of California are believed to have formed by the accretion (addition) of crustal blocks called foreign terranes. This module also covers the process called isostatic adjustment. It contains a study guide and outline notes, study questions about California geomorphic provinces, place names of landforms handout, and practice quizzes. A feature of the module is a web exploration section with links to fifteen outside sites that augment the instruction.

Rita Haberlin

245

The Verkhoyansk Mountains  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Verkhoyansk Mountains mark the eastern edge of the Central Siberian Plateau in Russia. This true-color MODIS image from November 13, 2001, shows the mountains (top and right) covered in snow. Following the curve of the mountains, the frozen Aldan River traces an east, then north, then westward path across the landscape, which brings it to the Lena River, the much larger river beginning at image left. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

2002-01-01

246

77 FR 34975 - Seminole Nation of Oklahoma-Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Affairs Seminole Nation of Oklahoma--Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance AGENCY...publishes the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma--Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance. The...the Seminole Nation Code of Laws and the Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance...

2012-06-12

247

Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources  

E-print Network

E-1025 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Burning in the Growing Season Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences Associate, Natural Resource Ecology and Management Dwayne Elmore Assistant Professor and Extension

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

248

The Meers Fault in Southern Oklahoma: Holocene Movements on a Fault with Pennsylvanian and Cambrian Linages  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Meers fault and subparallel fault strands in southern Oklahoma is the southernmost element of the complex and massive (>10 km of throw) frontal fault zone that forms the boundary between the Anadarko basin, which is the deepest intra-continental basin in the United States, and the uplifted Cambrian igneous rocks of the Wichita Mountains. The Wichita uplift is evidence of extraordinary Pennsylvanian intra-plate deformation along the trend of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen, which is a classic example of a failed and massively inverted rift. The Meers Fault is the best-documented Holocene fault scarp east of Colorado and probably represents reactivation of a Pennsylvanian oblique thrust that in turn is likely to be an inverted Cambrian normal fault. The magnitude of these structures is shown on images from 3-D industry seismic reflection data ~25 km northwest of the northwestern mapped extent of the Meers fault that indicate the Pennsylvanian structure, or a northern strand of it, has a reverse throw of ~6km at depth. The fault displays a conspicuous and continuous scarp that is at least 25 km long and is evident in air photos and 1:100,000 scale geologic mapping, but this feature is not well mapped in detail beyond the area of trenching studies conducted in the 1980's. In the Holocene, 3-5 m of vertical surface displacement has been documented and left-lateral strike slip displacement on the fault is 2-3 times greater than the vertical displacement. During this movement, Quaternary soils along the fault were folded and ruptured, and the scarp has dammed small gullies where fine-grained alluvium has collected and has been used in the dating efforts. The most recent movement occurred (1100-1300 y ago) with a variety of earlier events having been proposed. As such, this fault represents one of the highest potential seismic hazards in the central/eastern United States.

Keller, G. R.; Holland, A. A.; Luza, K.; Oldow, J. S.; Crain, K.

2011-12-01

249

Dynamics of Mountain Pine  

E-print Network

). The primary reason for this impact is that the mountain pine beetle is one of a handful of bark beetles et al., 2001; Munson et al., 2004). A complex of bark beetles are killing ponderosa pine16 Dynamics of Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreaks Justin Heavilin and James Powell Utah State

Powell, James

250

Mountain chickadee (Poecile gambeli)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli), a small, cavity-nesting songbird, is one of the most common birds of montane and coniferous forest from southern Arizona and Baja California north to British Columbia and the Yukon territory. This publication describes the life history of the Mountain Chickadee.

McCallum, D. Archibald; Grundel, Ralph; Dahlsten, Donald L.

1999-01-01

251

ROCKY MOUNTAIN Research Station  

E-print Network

ROCKY MOUNTAIN Research Station New Publications October­ December 2003 What's Inside . . . · RAWS mailing of New Publications? Check the Rocky Mountain Research Station's Web site for regular updates former INT or RM reports, 2. Follow steps 1, 2, and 3 previous. write report number in space provided (e

252

MARBLE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, CALIFORNIA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Marble Mountain Wilderness is located in the north-central Klamath Mountains of northern California. Geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral investigations indicate that the wilderness has areas of probable and substantiated resource potential for placer gold, for chromite, and for marble. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuel resources.

Donato, Mary M.; Hale, William N.

1984-01-01

253

Learn To Read and the World Opens Wide. Oklahoma Literacy Media Packet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This packet, which is intended for literacy program leaders throughout Oklahoma, contains the materials developed by the Literacy Office of the Oklahoma Department of Libraries for its 1995 literacy awareness campaign. The first third of the packet is a project guide that includes the following materials: overview of Oklahoma's first statewide…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Libraries, Oklahoma City.

254

FEDERAL ORDER Domestic Quarantine of Counties in Oklahoma and Tennessee for  

E-print Network

FEDERAL ORDER Domestic Quarantine of Counties in Oklahoma and Tennessee for Imported Fire Ant (IFA discussion with the State Plant Regulatory Official of Oklahoma and Tennessee. Effective immediately determinations have been made by the APHIS Administrator in reference to Oklahoma and Tennessee. The 7 CFR 301

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

255

OKLAHOMA 4-H ANNUAL REPORT 2008 The Four H's for 99 Years.  

E-print Network

Oklahoma 4-H Youth Development Charles Cox Assistant Director, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service and 4-H Program Leader 205 4-H Youth Development Bldg. Stillwater, OK 74078 http://oklahoma4h University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

256

Mountain Promise page 1 Mountain Promise  

E-print Network

health care for WV communities page 15 #12;Mountain Promise page 2 duction and use of ozoneMeasuring economic progressMeasuring economic progress What defines sustainable development? WWWWW continued on page World War II. It has been used by economists and policy makers as a primary indicator of the nation

Baltisberger, Jay H.

257

Early petroleum exploration, Rocky Mountain region, USA  

SciTech Connect

Historically, geology exposed on the flanks of Rocky Mountain uplifts has given unique opportunities to integrate surface and subsurface data to understand the petroleum geology of the intermontane basins. Exploration evolved from drilling near seeps to mapping of surface anticlines, to use of geophysics and subsurface data acquired by drilling. Oil seeps were first recorded by explorers in Wyoming in 1832 (Dallas dome, Wind River basin) and 1847 (Absaroka thrust, southwest area). Oil skimmed from springs was used for medicinal purposes and sold for wagon lubrication. The first commercial well was drilled in 1862 by an oil seep 9 mi north of Florence, Colorado. Subsequent drilling led to the discovery of the Florence field which has now produced more than 15,000,000 barrels of oil. Production is from fractured Cretaceous shale in a tilted graben with a fault trap on the updip side. Early fields were geologically diverse and reports describing the accumulations developed concepts that guided exploration in the region. The following fields illustrate the wide range of trapping conditions. (1) Faults and fractures on homoclinal dip: Florence-Oil Creek area (1862) and Boulder (1901), Colorado; Uinta basin, Utah. (2) Closed anticline: Dallas dome (1884) and Salt Creek (1908), Wyoming; Rangely (1902), Colorado. (3) Stratigraphic change on anticlinal plunge or regional dip: Moorcroft (1888) and Shannon (1889), Wyoming. (4) Syncline: Mexican Hat (1907), Utah; Blanco gas field (1926), New Mexico. (5) Unconformity: Kevin-Sunburst (1922), Montana. Techniques and ideas developed in areas peripheral to the Rocky Mountains also influence exploration in the overall region, especially Kansas, Oklahoma, and Canada.

Weimer, R.J.

1991-03-01

258

Mountains and Moving Plates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These are the lecture notes for a class on plate tectonics and mountain building which is taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The course describes the connections between the earth's tectonic plates, earthquakes, and its many mountain ranges. Topics include basic geography, the structure of the earth's interior, the relationships between the seismic cycle, volcanism, and plate movements, erosion of mountains, and mass wasting. Links are provided to additional resources, including aerial photos of geologic features, an interactive map of geology and topography of the United States, and a glossary.

259

Water-level changes in the Ogallala aquifer, northwestern Oklahoma.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ogallala aquifer, that part of the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma, is part of a regional aquifer system that underlies parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. In 1978 the US Geological Survey began a 5- year study of the High Plains regional aquifer system to provide hydrologic information for evaluation of the effects of long-term development of the aquifer and to develop a capability for predicting aquifer response to various ground-water-management alternatives (Weeks, 1978). -from Author

Havens, J.S.

1985-01-01

260

Oklahoma State University proposed Advanced Technology Research Center. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the construction and equipping of the proposed Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

NONE

1995-06-01

261

Oklahoma blast forces unsettling design questions  

SciTech Connect

The bomb that brought down a government building in Oklahoma City killed hundreds of people after it was detonated near the building`s key supports. The blast has reopened a long-simmering debate on safety by design. Structurally, it`s not practical to designing bomb-proof buildings. But it is possible to engineer a structure to deform rather than go through immediate progressive collapse. Delaying collapse gives occupants extra time to evacuate. And that could mean the difference between life and death. The construction material of choice really {open_quotes}depends on the height of the building and the lateral load resisting system,{close_quotes} says Charles H. Thornton of Thornton-Tomasetti/Engineers, New York City. But whether in steel or reinforced concrete, moment-resisting frames, which are inherently redundant, give horizontal components the ability to take reversals of stress common in explosions, he says. Simple frames do not. {open_quotes}They go down like a house of cards,{close_quotes} says Thornton. In reinforced concrete moment frames, beam reinforcing steel is continuous. In simple reinforced concrete frames, beam rebar only penetrates the column for a determined number of inches based on the length of the span. And it is absent from the mid-span of the beam. In a blast from below, the beam, its top usually in compression and bottom in tension, deflects up, throwing the beam top into tension. With no rebar, it loses structural integrity, and falls apart. With rebar, it has a chance of surviving. If a building is not designed for blasts, a steel frame might be better under a reasonably small bomb because steel has equal capacity in tension and compression, and concrete has capacity only in compression, says Thornton.

NONE

1995-05-01

262

Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal responsibility. The most frequently identified curriculum need across all aviation disciplines was that of communication skills.

Kutz, Mary N. Hill

263

Smoky Mountain Field School  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Tennessee Division of Continuing Education contains the home page for the Smoky Mountain Field School which offers supervised wilderness adventures for people of all ages and levels of experience. http://www.ce.utk.edu/Smoky/

264

YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect

The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

A.M. Simmons

2004-04-16

265

Organic contaminants in mountains.  

PubMed

The study of organic contaminants at high altitudes is motivated by the potential risk that they pose to humans living in, or depending on resources derived from, mountains and to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in alpine areas. Mountains are also ideal settings to study contaminant transport and behavior along gradients of climate and surface cover. Information on organic contaminants in mountains is compiled from the literature and synthesized, with a focus on atmospheric transport and deposition, contaminant dynamics in alpine lakes and aquatic organisms, and concentration differences with altitude. Diurnal mountain winds, in connection with enhanced deposition at higher elevations caused by low temperatures and high precipitation rates, conspire to make mid-latitude mountains become convergence zones for selected persistent organic chemicals. In particular, the more volatile constituents of contaminant mixtures seem to become enriched, relative to the less volatile constituents at higher altitudes. For selected contaminants, concentration inversions (i.e., concentrations that increase with elevation) have been observed. A notable difference between cold trapping in high latitudes and high altitudes is the likely importance of precipitation. High rates of snow deposition in mid- and high-latitude mountains may lead to a large contaminant release during snowmelt. Regions above the tree line often have little capacity to retain the released contaminants, suggesting the potential for a highly dynamic contaminant fate situation during the snow-free season with significant revolatilization and runoff. The chemical and environmental factors that control the orographic cold trapping of organic contaminants should be examined further by measuring and comparatively interpreting concentration gradients along several mountain slopes with widely different characteristics. Future efforts should further focus on the bioaccumulation and potential effects of contaminants in the upper trophic levels of alpine food chains, on measuring more water-soluble, persistent organic contaminants, and on studying how climate change may affect contaminant dynamics in mountain settings. PMID:15707037

Daly, Gillian L; Wania, Frank

2005-01-15

266

The University of Oklahoma Independent Contractor Form (ICF)  

E-print Network

be reviewed and approved by Human Resources BEFORE services are provided. Important Notice: The University of Oklahoma reserves the right to reclassify the contractor's status to that of an employee in accordance on the methods used to provide your service as long as it produces the desired results? 2. Training - Will you

Oklahoma, University of

267

STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY -1 The University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY - 1 The University of Oklahoma STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY Revised and Responsibilities Code, and the Student Alcohol Policy. (1) All fraternities, sororities, and residence halls shall be dry. Alcoholic beverages will not be allowed inside fraternity houses, sorority houses and OU

Oklahoma, University of

268

Oklahoma Native Plant Record Volume 11, December 2011  

E-print Network

OF REMOVAL OF JUNIPERUS VIRGINIANA L. TREES AND LITTER FROM A CENTRAL OKLAHOMA GRASSLAND Jerad S. Linneman1 1, ordination ABSTRACT We studied species composition after Juniperus virginiana tree and litter removal dynamics (Facelli and Pickett 1991b). Within the tallgrass prairie region, eastern redcedar (Juniperus

Palmer, Michael W.

269

The University of Oklahoma Office of Human Resources  

E-print Network

) Divorce or legal separation from the employee; or 4) The employee becomes entitled to Medicare. Dependent's hours of employment with the university; 3) The employee's divorce or legal separation; 4) The employee the responsibility to inform The University of Oklahoma Office of Human Resources in writing of a divorce, legal

Oklahoma, University of

270

Field Evaluation of a Near Zero Energy Home in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The authors evaluated a zero energy home built by Ideal Homes in Edmond, Oklahoma, that included an extensive package of energy-efficient technologies and a photovoltaic array for site electricity generation. The home was part of a Building America research project in partnership with the Building Science Consortium to exhibit high efficiency technologies while keeping costs within the reach of average home buyers.

Hendron, R.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

2008-08-01

271

Annual report of the University of Oklahoma Employee Benefits Committee  

E-print Network

employees. Wellness initiative: The EBC has been one of a number of voices on campus encouraging more University initiatives for employee wellness. In its RFP for the health insurance contract, the UniversityAnnual report of the University of Oklahoma Employee Benefits Committee Academic Year 2008-09 Once

Oklahoma, University of

272

Estimating bioenergy feedstock potential of red cedar in western Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Red cedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) is an invasive species that seriously degrades tallgrass prairie and adjacent landscapes in the southern plains region of the US with an estimated 8 million acres impacted in the state of Oklahoma alone. This study is part of a larger project to improve grassland...

273

Degrees Conferred in Oklahoma Higher Education. 1974-1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These tables summarize degrees conferred in both state and private Oklahoma colleges and universities. They cover a period from 1973-75 and compare this period with previous semesters. Included are associate degrees, certificates, bachelors, first professional, and graduate degrees. Tables list students' sex, division of study, and field of study.…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

274

Annual Report, 1979-80: Oklahoma Cultural Understanding Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report describes a project in Oklahoma which tried to increase students' and the general public's awareness, understanding, and appreciation of the cultures of the world. In the project's first phase, 38 school districts and higher education institutions located throughout the state were surveyed to determine the need in the areas of…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

275

STATUS OF RARE AND ENDANGERED FRESHWATER MUSSELS IN SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

States is freshwater mussels (Family Unionidae; Strayer et al., 2004). The United States Fish ectoparasites on a fish host (McMahon and Bogan, 2001). These life-history characteristics have made them parSTATUS OF RARE AND ENDANGERED FRESHWATER MUSSELS IN SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA HEATHER S. GALBRAITH

Vaughn, Caryn

276

The northwest extension of the Meers Fault in southwestern Oklahoma  

E-print Network

). General Geologic History and Stratigraphy There are three stages in the geologic history of Southern Oklahoma (Ham et al. , 1964). During the first stage, an aulocogen is thought to have formed in the region as is evidenced by intrusion of diabase...

Cetin, Hasan

1991-01-01

277

Computational Logic in the Undergraduate Curriculum University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

searches the typical undergraduate curriculum in computer science for opportunities to include materialComputational Logic in the Undergraduate Curriculum Rex Page University of Oklahoma School of Computer Science Norman, OK 73019 USA +1 450 325 4042 page@ou.edu ABSTRACT Logic provides the mathematical

Page, Rex L.

278

Students' Perceptions of Bullying in Oklahoma Public Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We studied perceptions of Oklahoma public school students (n = 7,848) regarding bullying. Specifically, we asked for their thoughts about the seriousness of bullying, the hurtfulness of bullying, their involvement in bullying (as victim or perpetrator), their responses to being bullied or seeing someone else being bullied, and what they wanted…

Hughes, Patricia Paulsen; Middleton, Katherine M.; Marshall, David D.

2009-01-01

279

Hydrogen manufacture by Lurgi gasification of Oklahoma coal  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advantages and disadvantages of using the Lurgi gasification process to produce hydrogen from Oklahoma coal are listed. Special attention was given to the production of heat for the process; heat is generated by burning part of pretreated coal in the steam generator. Overall performance of the Lurgi process is summarized in tabular form.

1975-01-01

280

Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences  

E-print Network

E-1010 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural and Director Water Research and Extension Center J.D. Carlson Associate Researcher Biosystems and Agriculture Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist Natural Resource Ecology and Management Terrence G. Bidwell

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

281

How a School Coped with the Oklahoma City Bombing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Following the Oklahoma City bombing, fifth graders at a nearby elementary school coped with ensuing uncertainty, pain, and loss. They wrote appreciative letters to fire and rescue workers; shared personal stories with classmates; compiled an anthology of poems, prayers, and stories; attended an assembly to honor parents participating in rescue…

Aspy, David N.; Aspy, Cheryl B.

1996-01-01

282

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Native American Language Book  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Native American Language Book Category Description Students are invited to enter books in a Native American language. Please remember the point of the ONAYLF is to demonstrate Native American language use. Keep this in mind when creating your book or instructing students

Oklahoma, University of

283

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Category Description  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Film/Video Category Description Students are invited to send in original film or video creations that are in a Native American language or about Native American language. These must be primarily made by students. This category encourages the use of Native

Oklahoma, University of

284

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Language Advocacy Essay  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Language Advocacy Essay Category Description Students are invited to prepare an essay on the importance of Native American languages. Many entries contain introductions, sentences or words in the author's Native American language, but this essay should be primarily

Oklahoma, University of

285

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Masters Spoken Language Performance  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Masters Spoken Language Performance Category Description Students who have grown up speaking a Native American language in a Native American home. Students should use this opportunity to display their creativity and skill in using Native American

Oklahoma, University of

286

CONSENSUAL SEXUAL RELATIONS COMPLAINT FORM UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

CONSENSUAL SEXUAL RELATIONS COMPLAINT FORM UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA You do not have to use this form to receive assistance If you believe you have been sexually assaulted or harassed by any member it to the attention of the Sexual Misconduct Officer (SMO), and /or other University official. This form is to be used

Oklahoma, University of

287

Personal Touches Warm up Oklahoma City U.'s Campus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma City University prides itself on treating its faculty and staff members like family. It is the kind of place where new employees are welcomed in the president's house, staff members kick in to raise money when a colleague faces hard times, and promising young workers are offered flexible work schedules and free tuition to help them…

Mangan, Katherine

2009-01-01

288

Investigaciones en la producción orgánica de vegetales en Oklahoma, USA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Nationally recognized standards for certified organic farming were established in 2002 in the United States. This action stimulated increased scientific research on production methods that can be used in certified organic growing. In 2003, a multi-disciplinary scientific team in Oklahoma that cons...

289

77 FR 61466 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00063  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/ 2012. Incident: Freedom and Noble Wildfires. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 through 08/14/2012. Effective Date: 09/27/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-10-09

290

77 FR 63409 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00063  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/ 2012. Incident: Freedom and Noble Wildfires. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 through 08/14/2012. DATES: Effective Date: 10/05/2012. Physical Loan...

2012-10-16

291

Climate variability in Oklahoma - get ready for more  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Our climate is changing relatively rapidly now, with the most critical changes for agriculture in Oklahoma manifesting as increases in the number of intense rainfall events and prolonged droughts, wild swings in the winter and early spring between "too cold" and "too hot", and higher-than-previous o...

292

Improving Print Management at at the University of Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how business students at the University of Oklahoma improved the school's print management by initiating an alternative charging system, networking the printers, and choosing the right hardware and software. Reasons why the UnipriNT Print Management system was chosen to manage the computer lab's printing services are discussed. (GR)

Colaw, Lee M.

1999-01-01

293

Private Water Well Education for Adult Residents of Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The scope of this study involved an investigation into the education of the adult residents of Oklahoma regarding private water wells. The groundwater supply for the private resident is directly connected to a shared water source. This source of water can become contaminated by simple lack of education and proper maintenance of the well. Without…

Robbins, Sharon M.

2012-01-01

294

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology Ph.D. Program in Educational Psychology Program Description for Educational Psychology Option School Mission The mission of the School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology is to foster the development, integration

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

295

Oklahoma State University GENDER DISCRIMINATION/SEXUAL HARASSMENT IS PROHIBITED  

E-print Network

Oklahoma State University GENDER DISCRIMINATION/SEXUAL HARASSMENT IS PROHIBITED THE LAW Gender discrimination/sexual harassment is prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended, Title IX that gender discrimination and sexual harassment of students, staff, and faculty is prohibited. OSU subscribes

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

296

Emergency Department Impact of the Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study objective: To collect descriptive epidemiologic injury data on patients who suffered acute injuries after the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing and to describe the effect on metropolitan emergency departments. Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of victims seen for injury or illness related to the bombing at 1 of the 13 study hospitals from 9:02 AM

David E Hogan; Joseph F Waeckerle; Daniel J Dire; Scott R Lillibridge

1999-01-01

297

University of Oklahoma: Chemical, Biological, and Materials Engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Oklahoma offers information on research in the areas of bioengineering, polymers science and engineering, environmental engineering, and energy studies. Examples include the Engineering Virtual Library and the Chemical Engineering Virtual Library, related government research labs, discipline-specific groupings of Chemical Engineering online resources, and selected corporate Web pages.

298

University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect

The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances, or at the very highest energies. The outcomes of the group's combined experimental and theoretical research will be an improved understanding of nature, at the highest energies reachable, from which applications to technological innovation will surely result, as they always have from such studies in the past.

Skubic, Patrick L. [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

2013-07-31

299

Certified organic farming research and demonstration project by Oklahoma State University and USDA's Agricultural Research Service at Lane, Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In 2003, Oklahoma State University and USDA, Agricultural Research Service, South Central Agricultural Research Laboratory received organic certification for 8 acres at the Lane Agricultural Center, Lane, OK. The certified organic land was used to develop a cooperative project with a diversity of a...

300

Employment Advertising Request -University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) To place a University of Oklahoma employment advertisement with an external publication, complete and return  

E-print Network

Employment Advertising Request - University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) To place a University of Oklahoma employment advertisement with an external publication, complete and return this form to the Office, call Employment & Compensation Services at (405) 325-1826. Deadline for receipt of advertising requests

Oklahoma, University of

301

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2011, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental  

E-print Network

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2011, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for graduate assistants. The Delta Dental PPO­Point of Service program affords you access to two Delta Dental networks--Delta Dental

Oklahoma, University of

302

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2012, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for  

E-print Network

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2012, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for graduate assistants. The Delta Dental PPO­Point of Service program affords you access to two Delta Dental networks--Delta Dental

Oklahoma, University of

303

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 201 , Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for  

E-print Network

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 201 , Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for graduate assistants. The Delta Dental PPO­Point of Service program affords you access to two Delta Dental networks--Delta Dental

Oklahoma, University of

304

Technology 2000: Recommendations on the Utilization of Information Technology in the Oklahoma Higher Education System. A Report to the Oklahoma State Regents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the fall of 1996, as the expansion of Oklahoma's statewide communications and information network (OneNet) became fully implemented, the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education began a strategic planning initiative focused on the utilization of technology throughout the state's system of higher education. The planning process began with a…

Mingle, James R.

305

Pacific Mountain System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page guides the user through the Pacific Mountain System geologic province, one of the most geologically young and tectonically active in North America. The generally rugged, mountainous landscape of this province, which includes parts of Washington, Oregon, and California, provides evidence of ongoing mountain-building. One map shows the plate tectonic setting of the Pacific Mountain System which straddles the boundaries between several of Earth's moving plates. This province includes the active volcanoes of the Cascade Range and the young, steep mountains of the Pacific Border and the Sierra Nevada. The user can find out more with links to USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory, Seattle region earthquake hazards, or North Cascades National Park geology. Links are provided to a simple shaded relief map and to several other shaded relief maps including ones with National Park locations and with major and subprovince boundaries. Image gallery links are given to several national parks sites: Lassen Volcanic National Park, Yosemite National Park, and North Cascades National Park.

306

Estimated flood peak discharges on Twin, Brock, and Lightning creeks, Southwest Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The flash flood in southwestern Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993, was the result of an intense 3-hour rainfall on saturated ground or impervious surfaces. The total precipitation of 5.28 inches was close to the 3-hour, 100-year frequency and produced extensive flooding. The most serious flooding was on Twin, Brock, and Lightning Creeks. Four people died in this flood. Over 1,900 structures were damaged along the 3 creeks. There were about $3 million in damages to Oklahoma City public facilities, the majority of which were in the three basins. A study was conducted to determine the magnitude of the May 8, 1993, flood peak discharge in these three creeks in southwestern Oklahoma City and compare these peaks with published flood estimates. Flood peak-discharge estimates for these creeks were determined at 11 study sites using a step-backwater analysis to match the flood water-surface profiles defined by high-water marks. The unit discharges during peak runoff ranged from 881 cubic feet per second per square mile for Lightning Creek at SW 44th Street to 3,570 cubic feet per second per square mile for Brock Creek at SW 59th Street. The ratios of the 1993 flood peak discharges to the Federal Emergency Management Agency 100-year flood peak discharges ranged from 1.25 to 3.29. The water-surface elevations ranged from 0.2 foot to 5.9 feet above the Federal Emergency Management Agency 500-year flood water-surface elevations. The very large flood peaks in these 3 small urban basins were the result of very intense rainfall in a short period of time, close to 100 percent runoff due to ground surfaces being essentially impervious, and the city streets acting as efficient conveyances to the main channels. The unit discharges compare in magnitude to other extraordinary Oklahoma urban floods.

Tortorelli, R.L.

1996-01-01

307

From magic mountain to table mountain.  

PubMed

Prior to the introduction of chemotherapy, tuberculosis management relied upon aerotherapy, heliotherapy and good nutrition. This "treatment", exemplified by the regimen applied in Swiss and other European mountain resorts, is described by Thomas Mann in the book "The Magic Mountain". Tuberculosis chemotherapy began in 1944 with the introduction of streptomycin and para-amino-salicylic acid, later augmented by isoniazid. Early experience taught physicians that treatment must be given with multiple drugs to prevent emergence of resistance and that prolonged treatment adherence for 18-24 months was needed for a permanent cure of tuberculosis. Between 1970 and 1980 rifampicin was introduced and with pyrazinamide it made "short-course" treatment possible. For 30 years, a 6-month directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS) based on the three compounds isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide was the foundation of tuberculosis control strategies world-wide, and in recent years this was supplemented with ethambutol in view of increasing rates of isoniazid resistance. However, even 6 months of treatment is too long to easily ensure the compliance necessary to permanently cure tuberculosis. The recent spread of the HIV/AIDS epidemic has placed tuberculosis programmes under severe pressure and is accompanied by an increase in drug-resistance making tuberculosis virtually untreatable in some instances. In 2004 the first of a new generation of anti-tuberculosis drugs entered clinical evaluation. A series of clinical trials, often conducted at sites in Cape Town, South Africa, has shown them to be efficacious and hold promise of being able to shorten tuberculosis treatment and treat drug-resistant tuberculosis. Development and assessment of these drugs is ongoing but there is renewed hope that these new drugs and regimens will assist in finally conquering tuberculosis, preventing a return to Magic Mountain where sunshine and fresh air was all that could be offered to patients. PMID:22915310

Diacon, Andreas H; von Groote-Bidlingmaier, Florian; Donald, Peter R

2012-01-01

308

Mountain Road with Autumn Foliage  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

A mountain road and surrounding early autumn foliage photographed from a higher elevation in the Appalachian Mountains. The especially prominent orange leaves of a maple tree are in the foreground....

309

Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report  

E-print Network

Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report A Report to the West Virginia Bureau for Medical of Health and Human Resources, Bureau for Medical Services. #12; 1 Table of Contents I. EXECUTIVE .......................................................................................................................... 5 II. MOUNTAIN HEALTH CHOICES

Mohaghegh, Shahab

310

Mountain Home Well - Photos  

SciTech Connect

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

Shervais, John

2012-01-11

311

Mountain Home Well - Photos  

DOE Data Explorer

The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

Shervais, John

312

Himalayan Mountain Range, India  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Snow is present the year round in most of the high Himalaya Mountain Range (33.0N, 76.5E). In this view taken at the onset of winter, the continuous snow line can be seen for hundreds of miles along the south face of the range in the Indian states of Punjab and Kashmir. The snow line is at about 12,000 ft. altitude but the deep Cenab River gorge is easily delineated as a break along the south edge of the snow covered mountains. '

1981-01-01

313

Pinnacle Mountain Field Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students work in teams and on their own to determine the most likely origin of block fields on Pinnacle Mountain, central AR. Teams of two or three students collect and analyze field data on grain size, roughness, and orientation of boulders on Pinnacle Mountain. On their own, students research possible origins of block fields and interpret their results in a written report. This activity provides students with practice using field skills (including GPS/PDA experience), interpreting data, reading the literature, developing hypotheses, working in teams, and report writing. Designed for a geomorphology course

Margaret McMillan

314

Mountain Man Measurement Rendezvous  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this math lesson, learners participate in several activities where they apply measurement skills. Learners explore how the Mountain Men played an important part in the history of the American frontier and more importantly, how the Mountain Men used different techniques for making measurements in their daily activities. At the various stations, learners measure their jump distances, handfuls of "gold," water-soaked sponges, "buffalo chip" throws, arm spans, "stone" throws, "arrow" tosses, foot sizes, pots of beans, and "shooting" distances. This activity works well outside.

Utah LessonPlans

2012-10-22

315

STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

1984-01-01

316

Moving Beyond the Yucca Mountain  

E-print Network

Moving Beyond the Yucca Mountain Viability Assessment U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the sole location to be studied for possi- ble development of the Yucca Mountain site. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently published Viability As- sessment

317

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County, Roger Mills County, Texas County, Woods County, Woodward...

2010-07-01

318

North American mountain bromes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although native grasses are often desired and used for revegetation of disturbed areas, genetic differences may exist within and among natural and cultivated germplasm sources. This phylogeographic study compares geographic origin and genealogical linkages of 25 natural and cultivated germplasm sources of mountain brome (Bromus carinatus Hook. & Arn. [Poaceae]) from western North America. Significant variation among accessions (FST =

Alicia N Massa; Steven R Larson

2005-01-01

319

Severe acute mountain sickness.  

PubMed Central

The experiences of acute mountain sickness (AMS) as it has presented to a physician working in a general hospital at 1370 m in Kathmandu, nepal, are described. The features of 39 cases are analysed. It is suggested that AMS should be classified into benign and malignant forms. PMID:493196

Dickinson, J. G.

1979-01-01

320

ROCKY MOUNTAIN Research Station  

E-print Network

ROCKY MOUNTAIN Research Station New Publications July­ September 2003 What's Inside . . . · Hayman Research Station's Web site for regular updates on new publications at: http. write report number in space provided (e.g., INT-GTR-373). Without a card: 3. Cut off postcard and mail

321

Computing Mountain Passes  

E-print Network

typically potential energy surfaces for a system with xa and xb associated with stable ..... The mountain-pass theorem guarantees the existence of a critical point but does not ...... This concern motivates our study of the behavior ..... special credit for his comments and insights on the elastic string algorithm during the Erice.

2002-08-29

322

Melting Mountain Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The world's glaciers are shrinking at alarming rates, and many scientists believe it is due to changes in climate. Dr. Lonnie Thompson of Ohio State University and Dr. Douglas Hardy of UMass-Amherst discuss glaciers and how they melt, and pay special attention to Africa's tallest mountain, Mt. Kilimanjaro. "Changing Planet" is produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation.

NBC Learn

2010-10-07

323

DOE's Yucca Mountain Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is about the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the United States with a particular focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a repository site. Intended for readers who do not have a technical background, the booklet discusses why scientists and engineers think high-level nuclear waste may be disposed of safely underground. An…

Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

324

Carve That Mountain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students further investigate major landforms (e.g., mountains, rivers, plains, hills, oceans and plateaus). They build a three-dimensional model of a landscape depicting several of these landforms. Once they have built their model, they act as civil and transportation engineers to build a road through the landscape they have created.

Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

325

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

The West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma is one of few newly discovered oil fields in Oklahoma. Although profitable, the field exhibits several unusual characteristics. These include decreasing water-oil ratios, decreasing gas-oil ratios, decreasing bottomhole pressures during shut-ins in some wells, and transient behavior for water production in many wells. This report explains the unusual characteristics of West Carney Field based on detailed geological and engineering analyses. We propose a geological history that explains the presence of mobile water and oil in the reservoir. The combination of matrix and fractures in the reservoir explains the reservoir's flow behavior. We confirm our hypothesis by matching observed performance with a simulated model and develop procedures for correlating core data to log data so that the analysis can be extended to other, similar fields where the core coverage may be limited.

Mohan Kelkar

2002-03-31

326

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

Mohan Kelkar

2007-06-30

327

Aerobiology of Juniperus Pollen in Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pollen from members of the Cupressaceae are major aeroallergens in many parts of the world. In the south central and southwest United States, Juniperus pollen is the most important member of this family with J. ashei (JA) responsible for severe winter allergy symptoms in Texas and Oklahoma. In New Mexico, pollen from J. monosperma (JM) and other Juniperus species are important contributors to spring allergies, while J. pinchotii (JP) pollinates in the fall affecting sensitive individuals in west Texas, southwest Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico. Throughout this region, JA, JM, and JP occur in dense woodland populations. Generally monitoring for airborne allergens is conducted in urban areas, although the source for tree pollen may be forested areas distant from the sampling sites. Improved pollen forecasts require a better understanding of pollen production at the source. The current study was undertaken to examine the aerobiology of several Juniperus species at their source areas for the development of new pollen forecasting initiatives.

Levetin, Estelle; Bunderson, Landon; VandeWater, Pete; Luvall, Jeff

2014-01-01

328

NESTING ECOLOGY OF THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE IN SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

AssraAcr.-Loggerhead Shrike (Lank ludovicianus) nests were studied in southwestern Oklahoma from 1985 through 1988. Pairing began in late February to early March, and completed nests were found from 13 March to 20 June. Nesting peaked in mid-April, with second nestings from late May to late June. Average length of the nesting season was 11 weeks. Almost one-third of all nests

JACK D. TYLER

329

The Native American Studies Program at the University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

The Native American Studies Program at The University of Oklahoma Clara Sue Kidwell The Native American Studies (NAS) program at the University of Okla homa was approved by the State Regents for Higher Education in January of 1994..., and Music departments together with a group of courses offered under the NAS program rubric. The NAS courses include Tribal Sovereignty, Tribal Educational Policy, and Tribal Economic Development. The program has three full-time staff members: Dr. Clara...

Kidwell, Clara Sue

2001-03-01

330

Crinoids of the Francis Shale (Missourian) of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

collection but subsequently pur- chased and reposited at the University of Okla- homa. We are deeply obligated to Dr. CARL C. BRANSON, former Director of the Oklahoma Geo- logical Survey, for allowing us to study the material. Additional species reported here... large, not extending ap- preciably above summit of cup, faceted for two equidimensional tube plates; primibrach I low, primibrach 2 axillary, short; column large, pen- talobate, bearing long cirri in proximal region, lumen pentagonal in outline. SPECI ES...

Strimple, H. L.; Moore, R. C.

1971-11-30

331

Variable seismic response to fluid injection in central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismicity in Oklahoma since 2009 has been concentrated in the central portion of the state, in the areas of Jones, Prague, and Luther. These three regions account for ~75% of earthquakes in the 2009-2013 Oklahoma Geological Survey catalog. A swarm in the Jones region began in late 2008, with a maximum magnitude of 4.0, and activity continuing to the present. After relocation, the initially diffuse earthquakes in the Jones swarm delineate multiple subparallel faults. The Wilzetta fault zone ruptured in the Prague region in 2010 and again in 2011, with magnitudes up to Mw5.7, and the Luther region experienced two earthquakes of M4.4 and M4.2, with related aftershocks, in 2013. The earthquakes near Prague have previously been linked to wastewater disposal; here we show that the earthquakes near Jones and Luther may also be induced by deep disposal based on the upsurge in seismicity in central Oklahoma coupled with local relationships to pumping and reservoir structure. The timing of each sequence with respect to injection and the distribution of seismic activity differs, highlighting the variability in seismic response to fluid injection related to local permeability structure.

Keranen, K. M.; Hogan, C.; Savage, H. M.; Abers, G. A.; van der Elst, N.

2013-12-01

332

Mountain West Digital Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Formed as part of a consortium between universities, colleges, museums, and historical societies in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho, the Mountain West Digital Library contains dozens of digital collections whose content ranges far beyond that of the geographical area covered by the Mountain West region. On their homepage, visitors can learn about the "Featured Collection" and then browse all of the available collections via a list of partner institutions. All told, there are over 100 collections here, and visitors can search the entire archive for text, images, video, or audio clips. A couple of the collections should not be missed, including "Before Gaming: Las Vegas Centennial", which provides visual documentation of a (relatively) quiet Las Vegas before the emergence of gambling. Additionally, the Mormon publication "The Young Woman's Journal" provides insight into the lives of Mormon women in the early 20th century.

333

EASTERN PIONEER MOUNTAINS, MONTANA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Eight mining districts and numerous individual mines ring the eastern Pioneer Mountains, Beaverhead County, Montana, and are within 4 mi of the boundary of the eastern Pioneer area. Mineralized ground peripheral to these districts extends into the area at several places. Three of 12 molybdenum prospects in the Pioneer Mountains are within the eastern Pioneer area. Several areas of Paleozoic carbonate rocks are mineralized or favorably situated with respect to the Pioneer batholith. All such areas have probable resource potential. Detailed studies of structural and stratigraphic controls of ore deposition and its association with intrusive rocks of particular types and ages may be useful in providing the basis for a more precise resource assessment.

Pearson, Robert C.

1984-01-01

334

Mountain winds (revisited)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The prediction of extremely high wind speeds, at ground level on the downstream side of a mountain range, is possible by solving the initial value problem for a two-layered nonlinear shallow water model of the atmosphere. Three different numerical methods are described to find the solutions which may involve shocks: (1) the vonNeumann-Richtmyer artificial viscosity method, (2) a filtering scheme, and (3) a hybrid method.

Isaacson, E.; Zwas, G.

1980-01-01

335

Yucca Mountain repository approved  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At a quiet White House ceremony on 23 July, U.S. President George W. Bush signed into law House Joint Resolution 87, which approves the site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the development of a repository for disposing of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.White House spokesman Ari Fleischer called the signing “an important step forward on the way to a comprehensive policy for dealing with our nation's nuclear waste.”

Showstack, Randy

336

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Rocky Mountain spotted fever is an acute febrile illness transmitted to man by ticks infected with Rickettsia rickettsii. Usually sudden in onset, it is characterized by chills, headache, and fever lasting 2 or more weeks. A characteristic rash\\u000a appears on the extremities on about the 4th febrile day and spreads to the trunk. The exanthem and other anatomical manifestations\\u000a result

Aaron Milstone; J. Stephen Dumler

337

Yucca Mountain Milestone  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy project to determine if the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is suitable for geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste reached a major milestone in late April when a 25-foot-diameter tunnel boring machine ``holed through'' completing a five-mile-long, horseshoe-shaped excavation through the mountain. When the cutting-head of the giant machine broke through to daylight at the tunnel's south portal, it ended a 2 1/2-year excavation through the mountain that was completed ahead of schedule and with an outstanding safety record. Video of the event was transmitted live by satellite to Washington, DC, where it was watched by Secretary of Energy Frederico Pena and other high-level DOE officials, signifying the importance of the project's mission to find a repository for high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel produced by nuclear power plants. This critical undertaking is being performed by DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The tunnel is the major feature of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), which serves as an underground laboratory for engineers and scientists to help determine if Yucca Mountain is suitable to serve as a repository for the safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Morrison Knudsen's Environmental/Government Group is providing design and construction-management services on the project. The MK team is performing final design for the ESF and viability assessment design for the underground waste repository that will be built only if the site is found suitable for such a mission. In fact, if at anytime during the ESF phase, the site is found unsuitable, the studies will be stopped and the site restored to its natural state.

Hunt, Rod

1997-06-09

338

Funding for Local Government and Schools in Rural Oklahoma. ERS Staff Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oil, gas, and agriculture are the bases of rural Oklahoma's economy, and income from these sectors varied widely during the 1980s. This study investigated revenue sources and the effects of changing revenues for county and town governments and school systems in 36 rural Oklahoma counties. Major sources of local revenue were sales taxes, property…

Sloggett, Gordon; Doeksen, Gerald

339

Secondary Agricultural Education Teachers as Agents of Change in Oklahoma and the Adoption of Precision Agriculture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research indicates that precision agricultural education (PAE) in Oklahoma affects environmental quality, water conservation, and crop yields. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the nature and perceived effectiveness of PAE in Oklahoma secondary agricultural education classes. The study was framed by the diffusion of…

Nickeson, Beth

2013-01-01

340

Ooh La La! Oklahoma Culinary Programs Cook up Great Partnerships with French Counterparts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The dream of a Franco-Oklahoma partnership began over a year ago when Chantal Manes, now from the French Ministry of Education, visited Oklahoma. The Technologie Academie in Soissons, France, had a goal for all the career and technical students in the Picardie Region of France to have an international experience before completing their technical…

McCharen, Belinda

2009-01-01

341

Thirty-Fourth Annual Report of Indian Education in Eastern Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A narrative summary of program accomplishments, tabular data detailing program expenditures, and modifications of the negotiated contract between the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Oklahoma State Department of Education comprise the 1981 annual report of the Johnson-O'Malley (JOM) Indian Education Program in Eastern Oklahoma, which provides…

Butler, Bill

342

The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant  

E-print Network

The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant in meteorology, and the applicant's general character. If you need room for additional comments please feel free the completed form to: School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, 120 David L. Boren Blvd. Suite 5900

Oklahoma, University of

343

76 FR 5363 - Intent To Compromise Claim Against the State of Oklahoma Department of Education  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...United States Department of Education (Department) intends to compromise...the Oklahoma Department of Education (Oklahoma) now pending before...Counsel, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW...telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD), you may call...

2011-01-31

344

Twister! Employment responses to the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City tornado  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examined the impact of the 3 May 1999 tornado on the Oklahoma City labour market. We estimated time series models that allow for time-varying variance in employment growth. The models include intervention variables designed to capture the tornado's effect at initial impact as well as over the post-tornado period. In terms of total employment growth, the Oklahoma City

Bradley T. Ewing; Jamie B. Kruse; Mark A. Thompson

2009-01-01

345

An Evaluation of the Oklahoma Training for Child Care Careers Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The major purpose of this study was to evaluate the past achievements and current status of the Oklahoma Training for Child Care Careers (OTCCC) project in relation to the overall goals of providing child care training which is both accessible to and suitable for Oklahoma caregivers. Resources for the study were provided by a Title XX contract and…

Powell, Judith A.; And Others

346

Fire History in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma Michael C. Stambaugh & Richard P. Guyette &  

E-print Network

Fire History in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma Michael C. Stambaugh & Richard P. Guyette & Joseph history in northeastern Oklahoma on lands once occupied by the Cherokee Nation. A fire event chronology and their many fire cultures (Delcourt and Delcourt 1997). Fire history information has provided increased per

Stambaugh, Michael C

347

Distribution, Abundance, and Habitat Affinities of Oklahoma Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus): New Insight from Trapper Reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distributional records of the muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) are missing for much of Okla- homa. In the spring of 2005, I further investigated the status of Oklahoma muskrats by collecting surveys from Oklahoma fur trappers and United States Department of Agri- culture wildlife technicians (government trappers). Surveyed individuals were asked to give county locations of muskrat sightings\\/collections, as well as habitats

Brandon McDonald

2006-01-01

348

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2012-07-01

349

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2011-07-01

350

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2010-07-01

351

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2013-07-01

352

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2014-07-01

353

Status of the Oklahoma SOICC/NOICC Network. July 1, 1989 -June 30, 1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 1989-1990 status report of the Oklahoma State Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (SOICC) includes the following: mission statement; organization chart; information on SOICC publications, including a labor supply and demand report; a listing of occupations licensed in Oklahoma, and a note on a career tabloid; descriptions of the…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Oklahoma State Occupational Information Coordinating Committee.

354

Southwestern Association of Naturalists Feeding Ecology of Three Omnivorous Fishes in Lake Texoma (Oklahoma-Texas)  

E-print Network

Southwestern Association of Naturalists Feeding Ecology of Three Omnivorous Fishes in Lake Texoma OMNIVOROUS FISHES IN LAKE TEXOMA (OKLAHOMA-TEXAS) KEITHB. GIDO* Universityof Oklahoma,BiologicalStation and Departmentof Zoology,Norman, OK 73019 *Correspondent:kgido@ou.edu ABSTRACT-Feeding ecology of 3 omnivorous

Gido, Keith B.

355

BOARD OF REGENTS FOR THE OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL MARCH 7,2014  

E-print Network

Watkins Agriculture Research and Extension Center 83 Approval to Accept a Gift of Real Property 83MINUTES of the BOARD OF REGENTS FOR THE OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES for the MARCH AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES March 7. 2014 Items Pertaining to the Board of Regents for the Oklahoma A

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

356

76 FR 50753 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application OKNM 126630, Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...OKNM 126630) are available for review from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday: BLM New Mexico State Office, 301 Dinosaur Trail, Santa Fe, New Mexico; and BLM, Oklahoma Field Office, 7906 East 33rd Street Suite 101, Tulsa, Oklahoma....

2011-08-16

357

A HISTORICAL REVIEW OF THE AEROSPACE ENGINEERING CURRICULUM AT OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

A HISTORICAL REVIEW OF THE AEROSPACE ENGINEERING CURRICULUM AT OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY E. A. Falk, the development and success of the Aerospace Engineering program at the Oklahoma State cannot be strictly. This paper focuses specifically on the history and development of the Aerospace Engineering curriculum

358

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil. Quarterly report No. 6  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30

359

Tornado-Related Deaths and Injuries in Oklahoma due to the 3 May 1999 Tornadoes  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the evening hours of 3 May 1999, 58 tornadoes occurred in Oklahoma. One tornado reached F5 intensity and left a widespread path of death, injury, and destruction in and around the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. Other communities across the state were also affected. Data on persons who died or were injured were collected from medical examiner reports, hospital medical

Sheryll Brown; Pam Archer; Elizabeth Kruger; Sue Mallonee

2002-01-01

360

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2012-07-01

361

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2011-07-01

362

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2013-07-01

363

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2010-07-01

364

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2014-07-01

365

The Oklahoma's Promise Program: A National Model to Promote College Persistence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a multi-method approach involving fixed effects and logistic regressions, this study examined the effect of the Oklahoma's Promise Program on student persistence in relation to the Pell and Stafford federal programs and according to socio-economic characteristics and class level. The Oklahoma's Promise is a hybrid state program that pays…

Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.

2013-01-01

366

Oklahoma Gardening Information Sheet (#3545) OETA air date: May 9 and 10, 2009  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Gardening Information Sheet (#3545) OETA air date: May 9 and 10, 2009 OETA airtime: Saturday 11:00 a.m., Sunday 3:30 p.m. This week on Oklahoma Gardening we visit TLC Florist and Greenhouses to present new annuals for the garden. Sun Coleus, Coleus hybrids Lemon Twist Kingswood Carnival Black Knight

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

367

Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, 1980-82  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the 1980-82 Climatic Years, the U. S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, collected ground-water level data in Oklahoma from 1,122 sites in 77 counties. This report presents this data.

Goemaat, Robert L.; Mize, Lionel D.; Spiser, Dannie E.

1983-01-01

368

Groundwater quality and water-well characteristics in the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma Jurisdictional Area, central Oklahoma, 1948--2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma, compiled historical groundwater-quality data collected from 1948 to 2011 and water-well completion information in parts of Lincoln, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties in central Oklahoma to support the development of a comprehensive water-management plan for the Tribe’s jurisdictional area. In this study, water-quality data from 155 water wells, collected from 1948 to 2011, were retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System database; these data include measurements of pH, specific conductance, and hardness and concentrations of the major ions, trace elements, and radionuclides that have Maximum Contaminant Levels or Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels in public drinking-water supplies. Information about well characteristics includes ranges of well yield and well depth of private water wells in the study area and was compiled from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board Multi-Purpose Well Completion Report database. This report also shows depth to water from land surface by using shaded 30-foot contours that were created by using a geographic information system and spatial layers of a 2009 potentiometric surface (groundwater elevation) and land-surface elevation. Wells in the study area produce water from the North Canadian River alluvial and terrace aquifers, the underlying Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation that compose the Garber–Wellington aquifer, and the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups. Water quality varies substantially between the alluvial and terrace aquifers and bedrock aquifers in the study area. Water from the alluvial aquifer has relatively high concentrations of dissolved solids and generally is used for livestock only, whereas water from the terrace aquifer has low concentrations of dissolved solids and is used extensively by households in the study area. Water from the bedrock aquifer also is used extensively by households but may have high concentrations of trace elements, including uranium, in some areas where groundwater pH is above 8.0. Well yields vary and are dependent on aquifer characteristics and well-completion practices. Well yields in the unconsolidated alluvial and terrace aquifers generally are higher than yields from bedrock aquifers but are limited by the thickness and extent of these river deposits. Well yields in the alluvium and terrace aquifers commonly range from 50 to 150 gallons per minute and may exceed 300 gallons per minute, whereas well yields in the bedrock aquifers commonly range from 25 to 50 gallons per minute in the western one-third of study area (Oklahoma County) and generally less than 25 gallons per minute in the eastern two-thirds of the study area (Lincoln and Pottawatomie Counties).

Becker, Carol J.

2013-01-01

369

The current state of electronic health record (EHR) use in Oklahoma.  

PubMed

There is ample evidence of the positive impact of electronic health records (EHR) on operational efficiencies and quality of care. Yet, growth in the adoption of EHR and sharing of information among providers has been slow. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 provides financial incentives for eligible providers to adopt and implement EHR. Until now, little information was available regarding the use of EHR in Oklahoma. Sponsored by the Oklahoma Health Information Exchange Trust (OHIET), this study reveals that the frequency of use of EHR among Oklahoma providers is near the national average. Although a large number of Oklahoma physicians have received Medicaid incentive payments for planned adoption, implementation, or upgrade of EHR systems, relatively few eligible providers in Oklahoma have been certified to receive Medicare incentive payments through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and even fewer have actually received these incentive payments. PMID:23620983

Khaliq, Amir A; Mwachofi, Ari K; Hughes, Danny R; Broyles, Robert W; Wheeler, Denna; Roswell, Robert H

2013-02-01

370

SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

371

State Income Tax Withholding -The University of Oklahoma Incomplete or inaccurate information can delay the processing of this form. The university complies with  

E-print Network

State Income Tax Withholding - The University of Oklahoma Incomplete or inaccurate information can of Oklahoma will not withhold Oklahoma state income taxes if you do not live or work in Oklahoma. We are required to withhold taxes for the state in which you live and work. To do this you will need to return

Oklahoma, University of

372

Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 1990–1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility.\\u000a In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced\\u000a fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientations—replacement theory, community

Joseph Lee Rodgers; Craig A. St. John; Ronnie Coleman

2005-01-01

373

Mountain Waves and Downslope Winds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mountain waves form above and downwind of topographic barriers and frequently pose a serious hazard to mountain aviation because of strong-to-extreme turbulence. This foundation module describes the features of mountain waves and explores the conditions under which they form. Like other foundation modules in the Mesoscale Primer, this module starts with a forecast scenario and concludes with a final exam. Rich graphics, audio narration, and frequent interactions enhance the presentation.

COMET

2004-01-07

374

Oklahoma State University Department of Animal Science: Goats  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This great informational website from Oklahoma State University's Department of Animal Science is all about goats (_Capra hircus_). The site provides subpages with photos and information for many breeds of goats from Alpine to Zhongwei. Site visitors can search for specific goat breeds by clicking on a letter of the alphabet or by perusing an alphabetical list of goat breeds. Links are also provided to other breeds of livestock including cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. Additionally, visitors can link to information on livestock breeds by region, livestock research, and to the Virtual Livestock Library.

1995-01-01

375

Sulfide mineralization and magnetization, Cement oil field, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geochemical, petrographic, and rock-magnetic studies were undertaken to investigate possible sources for reported positive aeromagnetic anomalies over the Cement oil field, Oklahoma. Ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite (monoclinic, Fe7S8 ), intergrown with more-abundant, nonmagnetic pyrite (FeS2), is present in well-cutting, core, and quarry samples at Cement, and it is the only identified source of possible enhanced magnetization in rocks over the field. Magnetite, found only in well cuttings from Cement, is contamination from drilling. Magnetite was considered previously by others to be the source of magnetic anomalies at Cement.

Reynolds, Richard L.; Fishman, Neil S.; Webring, Michael W.; Wanty, Richard B.; Goldhaber, Martin B.

1989-01-01

376

Lower Permian algal stromatolites from Kansas and Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Contributions—Paper 43 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Field and laboratory research on the Wellington For- mation has been supported by the National Science Foundation (Grants G-4150, G-7320, G-14141). Over a period of years TASCH has investigated some of the more obscure...-grained calcite, with clay and FIG. 1. Ostracode-pellet band from bed 14 of Wellington Formation at Loc. 8, Oklahoma. /. Vertical section of specimen showing laminated struc- ture and sag in zone between domes, X 1. 2. Detail of Fig. / showing circular...

Tasch, P.; Kidson, E.; Johnson, J. Harlan

1969-10-01

377

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil and ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on long data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time.

Kelkar, Mohan

2001-05-08

378

49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation... STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part...

2010-10-01

379

Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache  

MedlinePLUS

... Mountain Sickness, and Headache Print Email Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness, and Headache ACHE Newsletter Sign up for our ... entering your e-mail address below. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness, and Headache David W. Dodick, MD, FAHS, FRCP( ...

380

Landform Interpretation: Table Mountain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Working collaboratively, groups of students [3-4]develop hypotheses addressing the paleotopography of a Miocene river channel [Table Mountain Latite] and processes that have resulted in its current topographic expression. Students use observations/data gained from topographic maps [Sonora, Keystone, Melones Dam and Knight's Ferry 7.5 minute quadrangles], San Francisco-San Jose Regional Geological Map, aerial photos, and Google Earth [120 39 01W; 37 48 15N to 120 26 17W; 37 57 36N]. Using PowerPoint, students present and defend their hypotheses and plans for further research during the final week of the semester. Designed for a geomorphology course

Gene Pearson

381

Environmental Characteristics and Geographic Information System Applications for the Development of Nutrient Thresholds in Oklahoma Streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency has developed nutrient criteria using ecoregions to manage and protect rivers and streams in the United States. Individual states and tribes are encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to modify or improve upon the ecoregion approach. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board uses a dichotomous process that stratifies streams using environmental characteristics such as stream order and stream slope. This process is called the Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter15. The Use Support Assessment Protocols can be used to identify streams threatened by excessive amounts of nutrients, dependant upon a beneficial use designation for each stream. The Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter 15 uses nutrient and environmental characteristic thresholds developed from a study conducted in the Netherlands, but the Oklahoma Water Resources Board wants to modify the thresholds to reflect hydrologic and ecological conditions relevant to Oklahoma streams and rivers. Environmental characteristics thought to affect impairment from nutrient concentrations in Oklahoma streams and rivers were determined for 798 water-quality sites in Oklahoma. Nutrient, chlorophyll, water-properties, and location data were retrieved from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency STORET database including data from the U.S. Geological Survey, Oklahoma Conservation Commission, and Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Drainage-basin area, stream order, stream slope, and land-use proportions were determined for each site using a Geographic Information System. The methods, procedures, and data sets used to determine the environmental characteristics are described.

Masoner, Jason R.; Haggard, Brian E.; Rea, Alan

2002-01-01

382

Forest expansion in mountain ecosystems: \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among the main threats that mountain areas in industrialised countries are nowadays facing, land abandonment is by far the most important. Land abandonment is mainly due to marginalisation trends and it is closely associated with other processes such as depopulation and decline of mountain farming. The most evident consequence of such a situation is the phenomenon of forest expansion, due

Giorgio Conti; Laura Fagarazzi

383

YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT - A BRIEFING --  

SciTech Connect

This report has the following articles: Nuclear waste--a long-term national problem; Spent nuclear fuel; High-level radioactive waste; Radioactivity and the environment; Current storage methods; Disposal options; U.S. policy on nuclear waste; The focus on Yucca Mountain; The purpose and scope of the Yucca Mountain Project; The approach for permanently disposing of waste; The scientific studies at Yucca Mountain; The proposed design for a repository at Yucca Mountain; Natural and engineered barriers would work together to isolate waste; Meticulous science and technology to protect people and the environment; Licensing a repository; Transporting waste to a permanent repository; The Environmental Impact Statement for a repository; Current status of the Yucca Mountain Project; and Further information available on the Internet.

NA

2003-08-05

384

ESTIMATES OF CLOUD WATER DEPOSITION AT MOUNTAIN DEPOSITION AT MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM SITES IN THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS  

EPA Science Inventory

Cloud water deposition was estimated at three high elevation sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States (Whiteface Mountain, NY, Whitetop Mountain, VA, and Clingrnan's Dome, TN) from 1994 through 1999 as part of the Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro). ...

385

Rocky Mountain Online Archive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Rocky Mountain Online Archive contains archival collections in Colorado, Wyoming, and New Mexico from 20 participating institutions. To view a list of these institutions, visitors should click on the "About" tab at the top of the page, then click on the link "Participating Institutions". Visitors can click on the "Browse the Archive" tab at the top of the page to browse by institutions, subcategorized by Colorado, Wyoming and New Mexico, or by subjects, which includes the subcategories of subjects, genre, and places. The genres represented are "Audio-visual", "Correspondence", "Diaries", and "Photographs". Visitors may find the abundance of oral histories available under the "Audio-visual" tab very interesting to explore. The "Inventory of the Alamo Navajo Oral History Project 1977-1984", "Inventory of Italians of Albuquerque Oral History Project, 1995-1996", and "Guide to the North Poudre Irrigation Company Oral history Collection" are just some of the many available oral histories.

386

Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results  

SciTech Connect

Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

Gail Heath

2012-07-01

387

[Can medicine move mountains?].  

PubMed

For the author involvement with Paracelsus demands consideration of both, socio-cultural as well as historico-cultural aspects. Each generation has obtained a different picture of this famous physician from Einsiedeln. Around 1941 the progress initiated by Paracelsus has been emphasized, such as the assumed foundation of chemistry, chemotherapy, and the renewal of surgery, occupational medicine, balneology and many more. For the year 1941 (= 400th anniversary of Paracelsus death) a nationalistic perception of Paracelsus was typical. For National-Socialistic Germany, Paracelsus was the founder of a "German medicine" as a contrast to medicine oriented towards France and Jewish-Arabia. Paracelsus also was seen as a pioneer of the experiment and as opponent of medical dilettantism in a popular direction. The perception of Paracelsus of 1993 is completely different. Today Theophrastus from Hohenheim is seen in a post-modern perspective, not as the man of progress, but as one, who opposed to the medicine of his age a partial ancient natural medicine, including the arts of gypsies, witches and midwives. The magic and psychosomatic informations of Paracelsus are seen as precious compensation for losses that we had to accept in the progress of modern medicine. As a psychiatrist Paracelsus was involved with diseases that originated from a "misuse of credo". He reports about collective psychoses, for example those appearing in the group of anabaptists in St. Gallen. Misuse of credo derives from intended provocation of martyrium. To move mountains with one's faith is another pathologic imagination. A therapy should aim at the restitution of such a "mountain" moved by the ill patient. Paracelsus demands the greatest mercy in dealing with mentally ill patients. This disease is also a challenge for theology: "What gives harm to the body destroys the house of the eternal".(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8191181

Meier, P

1993-12-21

388

The distributed model intercomparison project - Phase 2: Motivation and design of the Oklahoma experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryThe Office of Hydrologic Development (OHD) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) conducted the second phase of the Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP 2). After DMIP 1, the NWS recognized the need for additional science experiments to guide its research-to-operations path towards advanced hydrologic models for river and water resources forecasting. This was accentuated by the need to develop a broader spectrum of water resources forecasting products (such as soil moisture) in addition to the more traditional river, flash flood, and water supply forecasts. As it did for DMIP 1, the NWS sought the input and contributions from the hydrologic research community. DMIP 1 showed that using operational precipitation data, some distributed models could indeed perform as well as lumped models in several basins and better than lumped models for one basin. However, in general, the improvements were more limited than anticipated by the scientific community. Models combining so-called conceptual rainfall-runoff mechanisms with physically-based routing schemes achieved the best overall performance. Clear gains were achieved through calibration of model parameters, with the average performance of calibrated models being better than uncalibrated models. DMIP 1 experiments were hampered by temporally-inconsistent precipitation data and few runoff events in the verification period for some basins. Greater uncertainty in modeling small basins was noted, pointing to the need for additional tests of nested basins of various sizes. DMIP 2 experiments in the Oklahoma (OK) region were more comprehensive than in DMIP 1, and were designed to improve our understanding beyond what was learned in DMIP 1. Many more stream gauges were located, allowing for more rigorous testing of simulations at interior points. These included two new gauged interior basins that had drainage areas smaller than the smallest in DMIP 1. Soil moisture and routing experiments were added to further assess if distributed models could accurately model basin-interior processes. A longer period of higher quality precipitation data was available, and facilitated a test to note the impacts of data quality on model calibration. Moreover, the DMIP 2 calibration and verification periods contained more runoff events for analysis. Two lumped models were used to define a robust benchmark for evaluating the improvement of distributed models compared to lumped models. Fourteen groups participated in DMIP 2 using a total of sixteen models. Ten of these models were not in DMIP 1. This paper presents the motivation for DMIP 2 Oklahoma experiments, discusses the major project elements, and describes the data and models used. In addition, the paper introduces the findings, which are covered in a companion results paper ( Smith et al., this issue). Lastly, the paper summarizes the DMIP 1 and 2 experiments with commentary from the NWS perspective. Future papers will cover the DMIP 2 experiments in the western USA mountainous basins.

Smith, Michael B.; Koren, Victor; Reed, Seann; Zhang, Ziya; Zhang, Yu; Moreda, Fekadu; Cui, Zhengtao; Mizukami, Naoki; Anderson, Eric A.; Cosgrove, Brian A.

2012-02-01

389

Mountain Tourism: Toward a Conceptual Framework  

Microsoft Academic Search

A conceptual framework is proposed to examine tourism and recreation issues in mountainous regions. First, six mountain-specific resource characteristics are discussed, which include diversity, marginality, difficulty of access, fragility, niche and aesthetics. It is argued that these characteristics are unique to mountainous regions and, as such, have specific implications for mountain recreation and tourism development. The paper then examines the

Raymond Chipeniuk

2005-01-01

390

Frontal passage and cold pool detection using Oklahoma Mesonet observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For over a dozen years the Oklahoma Mesonet network has provided surface observations at over 100 stations. These observations are used to analyze mass flux estimates from surface divergence, frontal passages, and cold pools, the latter defined herein as active regions where precipitation processes are creating near-surface cold air masses. Case studies are detailed and a 15-yr climatology of frontal passages and cold pools was computed in this research. Convergence, divergence, and precipitation are most strongly correlated in the summer months and least correlated in the winter months. Wet spring and summer days had the highest average convergence and divergence values while dry summer and fall days had the lowest average convergence and divergence. Frontal passages and cold pools are tracked throughout the Mesonet in various case studies, four of which are covered herein. The methodology is able to represent front location and cold pool areas quite well despite the low resolution of the Mesonet grid. The climatology of front and cold pool data yielded many similarities. Winter has the largest magnitude changes in DeltaT, DeltaP, and Deltah/cp while spring and fall had the largest magnitude change in Deltaqv. Summer has the lowest with the exception of spring DeltaT. Correlations between these variables are lowest in the more convectively active summer season. Convergence is roughly equal ahead of fronts from spring through fall; however, divergence is present in summer frontal passages earlier and stronger compared to the other seasons. Fronts and cold pools are most likely to occur in summer and spring with summer having the highest percentage of fronts which lead to cold pools. Fronts and cold pools are substantially more likely to occur during the late afternoon and early evening in the summer; other seasons had a slighter nocturnal increase in frequency. Western Oklahoma had higher frequencies of frontal passages and cold pools than Eastern Oklahoma with frontal passages having the stronger signal. These findings help identify seasonal, diurnal, and geographic distributions of fronts and cold pools and can be used in modeling studies to better the understanding of cold pool processes and parameterizations.

Lesage, Andrew T.

391

Depth-Duration Frequency of Precipitation for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A regional frequency analysis was conducted to estimate the depth-duration frequency of precipitation for 12 durations in Oklahoma (15, 30, and 60 minutes; 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours; and 1, 3, and 7 days). Seven selected frequencies, expressed as recurrence intervals, were investigated (2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years). L-moment statistics were used to summarize depth-duration data and to determine the appropriate statistical distributions. Three different rain-gage networks provided the data (15minute, 1-hour, and 1-day). The 60-minute, and 1-hour; and the 24-hour, and 1-day durations were analyzed separately. Data were used from rain-gage stations with at least 10-years of record and within Oklahoma or about 50 kilometers into bordering states. Precipitation annual maxima (depths) were determined from the data for 110 15-minute, 141 hourly, and 413 daily stations. The L-moment statistics for depths for all durations were calculated for each station using unbiased L-mo-ment estimators for the mean, L-scale, L-coefficient of variation, L-skew, and L-kur-tosis. The relation between L-skew and L-kurtosis (L-moment ratio diagram) and goodness-of-fit measures were used to select the frequency distributions. The three-parameter generalized logistic distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 15-, 30-, and 60-minute annual maxima; and the three-parameter generalized extreme-value distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 1-hour to 7-day annual maxima. The mean for each station and duration was corrected for the bias associated with fixed interval recording of precipitation amounts. The L-scale and spatially averaged L-skew statistics were used to compute the location, scale, and shape parameters of the selected distribution for each station and duration. The three parameters were used to calculate the depth-duration-frequency relations for each station. The precipitation depths for selected frequencies were contoured from weighted depth surfaces to produce maps from which the precipitation depth-duration-frequency curve for selected storm durations can be determined for any site in Oklahoma.

Tortorelli, Robert L.; Rea, Alan; Asquith, William H.

1999-01-01

392

Bald Mountain, Washington Plantation, Maine  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This guide provides information on the geology of Bald Mountain, an outstanding example of an unvegetated mountain summit in western Maine. Topics include the petrology of the metamorphic rocks exposed on the mountain (layered quartzite and schist), which preserve evidence of their sedimentary origin (graded bedding, cross-bedding). There is also information on the glacial history of the area, as indicated by the presence of glacial striations and erratics. For visitors, there is information on permission and access, directions, sampling information, and activities. References are included.

393

77 FR 15273 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision AGENCY: Environmental...implement its base hazardous waste management program. We authorized the...21. The Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (``OHWMA'')...

2012-03-15

394

78 FR 32161 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision AGENCY: Environmental...implement its base hazardous waste management program. We authorized the...21. The Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (``OHWMA'')...

2013-05-29

395

76 FR 18927 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision AGENCY: Environmental...implement its base hazardous waste management program. We authorized the...21. The Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (``OHWMA'')...

2011-04-06

396

Supreme Court standing requirements: Has Wyoming v. Oklahoma set the stage for future conflict  

SciTech Connect

In Wyoming v. Oklahoma, an Oklahoma law requiring its coal-fired electric utilities to burn a minimum ten percent mixture of Oklahoma-mined coal was struck down by the United States Supreme Court. Describing the law as [open quotes]protectionist and discriminatory,[close quotes] the Court struck it down as a violation of the Commerce Clause. The majority opinion first focused on the issues of Wyoming's standing to sue and the Supreme Court's power to assert its original jurisdiction. Then the majority performed a textbook Dormant Commerce Clause analysis of the Oklahoma statute, finding it virtually per se invalid. This paper reviews the case and discusses the possible implications of Supreme Court standing requirements.

Not Available

1993-01-01

397

JOB OPPORTUNITIES (SUBSURFACE PROTECTION AND REMEDIATION DIVISION, ADA, OKLAHOMA, NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY)  

EPA Science Inventory

This page lists job opportunities at NRMRL's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division (SPRD) located in Ada, Oklahoma. These include both EPA Postdoctoral Positions and National Research Council Postdoctoral Positions. SPRD's research programs include basic studies to enha...

398

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123...

2012-07-01

399

40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.124 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.124 North...

2013-07-01

400

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2014-07-01

401

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2013-07-01

402

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2012-07-01

403

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2011-07-01

404

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2013-07-01

405

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2014-07-01

406

40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125...

2012-07-01

407

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123...

2010-07-01

408

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2012-07-01

409

40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125...

2013-07-01

410

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123...

2013-07-01

411

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2011-07-01

412

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123...

2011-07-01

413

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2014-07-01

414

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2012-07-01

415

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2011-07-01

416

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2013-07-01

417

The association of pseudoephedrine sales restrictions on emergency department urine drug screen results in Oklahoma.  

PubMed

On June 15, 2004, Oklahoma became the first state to reclassify pseudoephedrine as a Schedule V drug. Arrests in Oklahoma for the manufacture of methamphetamines in clandestine laboratories precipitously declined. It was hypothesized that a decrease in methamphetamine use could be shown in the patient population in Oklahoma's largest emergency department. To test this hypothesis, all urine drug screen results in the Saint Francis Hospital Trauma Emergency Center from January 2003 through May 2005 were reviewed. There was a significant increase in the total tests performed and the percentage of positive test results for the amphetamine drug class (p = 0.0004, R2 = 0.3785) over time. These results suggest that methamphetamine usage has not decreased in the emergency department patient population. Possibly, methamphetamine usage in Oklahoma has not been impacted by the passage of HB 2176 due to an increase in drug trafficking of methamphetamine into the state. PMID:18183861

Brandenburg, M A; Brown, S J; Arneson, W L; Arneson, D L

2007-11-01

418

59 Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium 60 Barry Switzer Center  

E-print Network

CAMPUS MAP 59 Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium 60 Barry Switzer Center 61 Jones House 62 Training Center 67 Mosier Indoor Athletic Facility 68 Jacobs Track and Field Facility 69 Cate Center 70

Oklahoma, University of

419

76 FR 37827 - Notice of Proposed Audit Delegation Renewals for the States of Oklahoma and Montana  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...ONRR-2011-0018] Notice of Proposed Audit Delegation Renewals for the States of Oklahoma...ACTION: Notice of States' proposals for audit delegation renewals...Revenue (ONRR) renew current delegations of audit and investigation authority. This...

2011-06-28

420

A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

, Colorado ** University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (Manuscript received 16 July 2012, in final form 8 May, Oklahoma @ Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia & Cooperative Institute for Research

Ohta, Shigemi

421

The Agricultural Benefits of Salinity Control on the Red River of Texas and Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Salinity of the waters from the Red River and its major tributaries has virtually eliminated its use for irrigation of agricultural crops in Texas and Oklahoma. A chloride control project has been proposed whereby the source salt waters...

Laughlin, D. H.; Lacewell, R. D.; Moore, D. S.

422

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2010-07-01

423

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2010-07-01

424

76 FR 81838 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION...307(b)(2).) List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Air pollution control, Environmental protection, Incorporation by...

2011-12-29

425

76 FR 64065 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...concluded within the Cross State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR or Transport Rule) and...Analysis and Actions for the Cross State Air Pollution Rule II. Proposed Action A....

2011-10-17

426

77 FR 29275 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs'', Oklahoma's authorized hazardous waste program. The EPA will incorporate...EPA will enforce under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, commonly referred to as...

2012-05-17

427

Current Operating Income and Expenditures: Oklahoma State Colleges and Universities, Fiscal Year 1997-98.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains analyses of income and expenditures for Oklahoma state colleges and universities for the fiscal year 1997-98. Educational and General Part I Income was reported at $751,750,307 for the 25 Oklahoma institutions for 1997-98, an increase of 7.3% from income reported for the preceding year, and 25.7% over the previous three years.…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

428

Updated Distribution of Aedes albopictus in Oklahoma, and Implications in Arbovirus Transmission.  

PubMed

A series of statewide surveys were conducted in Oklahoma in the summers between 1991 and 2004 to identify the distribution of Aedes albopictus. Adult mosquitoes were identified in 63 counties, bringing the currently known distribution of Ae. albopictus in the state to 69 of 77 counties. The widespread presence of Ae. albopictus in Oklahoma has important current and future public and veterinary health implications for surveillance and control efforts. PMID:25843181

Noden, Bruce H; Coburn, Lisa; Wright, Russell; Bradley, Kristy

2015-03-01

429

Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, period of record to March 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the 1984-85 climatic years, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources, collected ground-water level data in Oklahoma from 1,018 sites in 76 of the State's 77 counties. This report is a compilation of all available data through March 1985 for each well currently in the network. Some of the data were collected as early as 1937.

Goemaat, Robert L.; Mize, Lionel D.; Madaj, Ambrose J.; Spiser, Dannie E.

1986-01-01

430

Geomorphic evidence for Late Cenozoic deformation, Wichita Moutains, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

-Early Pleistocene Southern High Plains surface (Harrell, 1987; Swanson, 1987). Existing literature maintains that Wichita Mountain landforms visible today were created prior to burial beneath permian sediments. In a comprehensive review of the Paleozoic history... of the Wichita Mountains, Swanson (1987) identified the Pennsylvanian Atokan and Permian Wolfcampian t g e Ul L tU E 13 Ul N 0 0 IU 0 13 0 C UI 0 E 0 Ul e N 0 Ul 0 C 4l E 4I 0 Cl 0 0 E 0 I3 13 0 0 4 0 0 Il IU 13 0 0 0 0 E 0 4 0...

Snell, Charles Burton

1989-01-01

431

Cambrian extensional tectonics and magmatism within the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tectonic evolution of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen is partially constrained by the petrological consequences of a bimodal igneous suite associated with the Cambrian rift. Mineralogical and compositional layers and erosional surfaces are recognized as initially subplanar, subhorizontal markers. The progressive rotation of these horizons can be explained by uniform-sense normal faulting. Magmatism, confined to the aulacogen trend, elevated the thermal gradient producing a crustal strength-anisotropy. This ensured the localization of the extension throughout the Cambrian rifting event. The presence of a substantial volume of mafic igneous rocks within the crust along the aulacogen's trend suggests that crustal attenuation was compensated for by the addition of mantle derived material during extension.

McConnell, D. A.; Gilbert, M. C.

1990-03-01

432

Comparing reactions to two severe tornadoes in one Oklahoma community.  

PubMed

The authors compared the effect of the 3 May 1999 F5 and 8 May 2003 F3 tornadoes on the community of Moore, Oklahoma, by canvassing damaged areas after both tornadoes and surveying residents. Significantly more 1999 than 2003 residents reported property damage and injuries. Television and tornado sirens were the most common warnings each year, however, more 1999 residents received and responded to television warnings. Importantly, storm shelters were used more frequently in 2003. Fifty-one per cent of residents who experienced both tornadoes took the same amount of protective action in 2003 as they had in 1999; 22% took less; and 27% took more. Residents who took less action said that the reason for doing so was inadequate warning and shelter. First-hand experience of tornadoes prompts people to heed warnings when adequate notification is received and to take effective protective action when adequate shelter is available. PMID:16108992

Comstock, R Dawn; Mallonee, Sue

2005-09-01

433

Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide  

SciTech Connect

Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

Not Available

2007-08-01

434

University of Oklahoma Libraries: Bass Business Oral Histories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Bass Business History Collection at the University of Oklahoma Libraries began in 1955, and since that time the collection has grown to include books, videos, journals and oral histories. The oral histories here include 24 interviews with business professors at the University about everything from the time management studies of Frederick Taylor to the development of organizational theory. Visitors can browse the alphabetical list of interviewees on the right-hand side of the page, and they have the option of listening to the interview or downloading it for later use. Also, visitors can browse the interviews by key names, words, or subjects. Finally, users can opt to sign up for updates when new interviews are added to this enticing collection.

435

Detection of Dirofilaria immitis and Ehrlichia species in coyotes (Canis latrans), from rural Oklahoma and Texas.  

PubMed

There is a lack of knowledge regarding the prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis and Ehrlichia spp. in coyotes in Oklahoma and Texas. Documenting the prevalence of these vector-borne disease agents in coyotes from Oklahoma and Texas underscores the importance of wild canids as reservoir hosts that infect companion animals and humans. To learn more about the sylvatic cycle of D. immitis and Ehrlichia spp. in coyotes from Oklahoma and Texas, we tested for infection with and exposure to, respectively, these disease agents. Coyote carcasses were collected opportunistically from animal control experts and hunters in seven counties in Oklahoma and Texas from January to March, 2010. Serum samples from 77 coyotes were tested with a commercial ELISA test. Five (6.5%) coyotes had D. immitis antigens, and four (5.2%) had antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. The overall prevalence of D. immitis was low relative to studies from the eastern United States. Little is known about the prevalence of Ehrlichia spp. throughout the United States, but coyotes from rural Oklahoma in the current study had a higher exposure rate than those reported from California, and a lower rate than data from an earlier study from Oklahoma. PMID:22448722

Paras, Kelsey L; Little, Susan E; Reichard, Mason V; Reiskind, Michael H

2012-07-01

436

The structure of mountain ranges  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The underlying structure - the tectonics - of mountain ranges is described. The question of what holds mountain ranges up is examined. Some ranges stand on plates of strong rock; others are buoyed by crustal roots reaching deep into the mantle. The latter may collapse if their flanks are not buttressed horizontally. The Tibetan plateau and the Andes are areas that may be undergoing such a collapse. The forces that create mountain ranges and support them are also considered with respect to the Alps, Himalayas and Rockies. The work of such pioneers as George Everest, J. H. Pratt and Britain's Astronomer Royal George B. Airy, leading to the first advances in understanding of the structure of mountains, is considered.

Molnar, P.

1986-07-01

437

Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat  

SciTech Connect

Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 +/- 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters.

Mead, J.I.; Martin, P.S.; Euler, R.C.; Long, A.; Jull, A.J.T.; Toolin, L.J.; Donahue, D.J.; Linick, T.W.

1986-02-01

438

The Dilemma of Mountain Roads  

EPA Science Inventory

Mountain roads and trails are proliferating throughout developing Southeast Asia with severe but largely unrecognized long-term consequences related to effects of landslides and surface erosion on communities and downstream resources....

439

Snowslip Mountain Weather Station, MT  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

USGS Physical Scientist Erich Peitzsch sets up a weather station on Snowslip Mountain in Glacier National Park.  It provides meteorological data for avalanche forecasting and research, including wind speed and direction, air temperature, relative humidity, and net radiation measurements....

440

Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat  

PubMed Central

Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 ± 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters. Images PMID:16593655

Mead, Jim I.; Martin, Paul S.; Euler, Robert C.; Long, Austin; Jull, A. J. T.; Toolin, Laurence J.; Donahue, Douglas J.; Linick, T. W.

1986-01-01

441

Bibliography of Oklahoma hydrology; reports prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and principal cooperating agencies, 1901-93  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This bibliography lists reports on hydrology in Oklahoma prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and the principal State cooperating agencies, the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Included are citations of about 550 reports, abstracts, and journal articles issued from 1901 through July 1993. The reports are listed by agency and report type, and are indexed by author, subject, and USGS report number.

Havens, J. S., (compiler)

1993-01-01

442

High School to College-Going Rates: For Oklahoma High School Graduates to Oklahoma Colleges. Linear College-Going Rate, Combined College-Going Rate. Oklahoma High School Indicators Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report presents data on the rate of Oklahoma high school graduates going on to colleges within the state. Two kinds of rates are reported: (1) for students proceeding directly to college after high school graduation (linear), and (2) for students who have delayed college entry for a year or more after graduation. Tables present data on:…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

443

Cenozoic evidence of displacements along the Meers Fault, southwestern Oklahoma  

E-print Network

of the Wichita Mountains (from Gilbert and Donovan, 1982). years ago, an aulacogen is thought to have formed in the region as is evidenced by intrusion of diabase dikes and normal faulting (Brewer et al. , 1983; Hoffman et al. , 1974; Larson et al. , 1985...

Kientop, Gregory Allen

1988-01-01

444

Bibliography of Oklahoma hydrology; reports prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and principal cooperating agencies, 1901-88  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reports on the hydrology of Oklahoma have been issued by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1901. This bibliography lists reports on hydrology in Oklahoma prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and the principal State cooperating agencies, the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Of the nearly 350 reports issued from 1901 through 1988, about 200 have been concerned primarily with groundwater; the remainder have dealt with some aspect of surface water, water quality, or geology. The reports are listed by agency and report type, and are indexed both by author and subject. (USGS)

Havens, John S., (compiler)

1989-01-01

445

ROCKY MOUNTAIN JUNIPER  

E-print Network

mixed with Populus leaves this root tea became a liniment for stiff back or backaches (M c Clintock 1909, Johnston 1970, Hellson 1974). The Cheyennes steeped the leaves of the Rocky Mountain juniper and drank the resulting tea to relieve persistent coughing or a tickling in the throat. It was also believed to produce sedative effects that were especially useful for calming a hyperactive person. Cheyenne women drank juniper tea to speed delivery during childbirth (Grinnell 1962). The Cheyenne, along with the Flathead, Nez Perce, Kutenai, and Sioux, made a tea from juniper boughs, branches, and fleshy cones. The tea was used as a cure for colds, fevers, tonsillitis, and pneumonia (Hart 1976). As a cure for asthma, the Gros Ventres ate whole juniper berries or pulverized them and boiled them to make a tea. They also made a preparation from the leaves mixed with the root, which they applied topically to control bleeding (Kroeber 1908). The Crow drank this medicinal tea to check diarrhea and to stop lung or nasal hemorrhage. Crow women drank it after childbirth for cleansing and healing (Hart 1976). The wood of red cedar is very durable, and is used for lance shafts, bows, and other items. Flutes made from juniper wood were highly regarded by the

Juniperus Scopulorum Sarg; Plant Symbol Jusc

446

Geographic Information Systems Methods for Determining Drainage-Basin Areas, Stream-Buffered Areas, Stream Length, and Land Uses for the Neosho and Spring Rivers in Northeastern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geographic Information Systems have many uses, one of which includes the reproducible computation of environmental characteristics that can be used to categorize hydrologic features. The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality are investigating Geographic Information Systems techniques to determine partial drainage-basin areas, stream-buffer areas, stream length, and land uses (drainage basin and stream characteristics) in northeastern Oklahoma. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, documented the methods used to determine drainage-basin and stream characteristics for the Neosho and Spring Rivers above Grand Lake Of the Cherokees in northeastern Oklahoma and calculated the characteristics. The drainage basin and stream characteristics can be used by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality to aid in natural-resource assessments.

Masoner, Jason R.; March, Ferrella

2006-01-01

447

A comparison of the speech patterns and dialect attitudes of Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lexical dialect usage of Oklahoma has been well-studied in the past by the Survey of Oklahoma Dialects, but the acoustic speech production of the state has received little attention. Apart from two people from Tulsa and two people from Oklahoma City that were interviewed for the Atlas of North American English, no other acoustic work has been performed within the state. This dissertation begins to fill in these gaps by presenting twelve respondents interviewed by the Research on Dialects of English in Oklahoma (RODEO) project. For each speaker, a brief biography is given, including some of their regional and speech attitudes of Oklahoma. Then acoustic data from a wordlist and reading task are presented and compared. Analysis will consider plots of each speaker's vowel system as a whole, and will also examine many environments in isolation. These environments were chosen for their likely presence in Oklahoma, and include such dialect features as the Southern Shift, the pin/pen merger, the caught/cot merger, monophthongization of the PRICE vowel, and neutralization of tense vowels before /l./ After considering each respondent separately, some of their results will be pooled together to give a preliminary sense of the state of dialect within Oklahoma. Demographic variables such as age, gender, and urban/rural upbringing will be related to speakers' attitudes and acoustic production. This will serve two goals - first, to compare modern-day production to the findings of previous scholars, and second, to suggest a dialect trajectory for the state that could be studied further in additional research.

Bakos, Jon

448

Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A  

E-print Network

Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma. Detection of vibrations in sand by tarsal sense organs of the nocturnal scorpion Paruroctonus mesaensis sensilla (BCSS), which are groups of eight slits that are responsive to vibrational waves in sand (Brownell

Gaffin, Doug

449

Geohydrology and water quality of the Roubidoux Aquifer, northeastern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Roubidoux aquifer is an important source of freshwater for public supplies, commerce, industry, and rural water districts in northeastern Oklahoma. Ground-water withdrawals from the aquifer in 1981 were estimated to be 4.8 million gallons per day, of which about 90 percent was withdrawn in Ottawa County. Wells drilled at the beginning of the 20th century originally flowed at the land surface, but in 1981 water levels ranged from 22 to 471 feet below land surface. A large cone of depression has formed as a result of ground water withdrawals near Miami. Wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer have yields that range from about 100 to more than 1,000 gallons per minute. An aquifer test and a digital ground-water flow model were used to estimate aquifer and confining-layer hydraulic characteristics. Using these methods, the transmissivity of the aquifer was estimated to be within a range of 400 to 700 square feet per day. The leakance of the confining layer was determined to be within a range from 0 to 0.13 per day, with a best estimate value in a range from 4.3 x 10-8 to 7.7 x 10-8 per day. Analyses of water samples collected as part of this study and of water-quality data from earlier work indicate that a large areal change in major-ion chemistry occurs in ground water in the Roubidoux aquifer in northeastern Oklahoma. The ground water in the easternmost part of the study unit has relatively small dissolved-solids concentrations (less than 200 milligrams per liter) with calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate as the major ions. Ground water in the westernmost part of the study unit has relatively large dissolved-solids concentrations (greater than 800 milligrams per liter) with sodium and chloride as the major ions. A transition zone of intermediate sodium, chloride, and dissolved-solids concentrations exists between the easternmost and westernmost parts of the study unit. Three water-quality problems are apparent in the Roubidoux aquifer in northeast Oklahoma: (1) Contamination by mine water, (2) large concentrations of sodium and chloride, and (3) large radium-226 concentrations. Many wells in the mining area have been affected by mine-water contamination. At present (1990), all instances of ground-water contamination by mine water can be explained by faulty seals or leaky casings in wells that pass through the zone of mine workings and down to the Roubidoux aquifer. None of the data available to date demonstrate that mine water has migrated from the Boone Formation through the pores and fractures of the intervening geologic units to the Roubidoux aquifer. Ground water with large concentrations of sodium and chloride occurs at some depth throughout the study unit. In the eastern part of the study unit, chloride concentrations greater than 250 milligrams per liter are found at depths greater than approximately 1,200 to 1,500 feet. Data are too few to determine the depth to ground water with large concentrations of sodium and chloride in the southern and southwestern parts of the study unit. Large concentrations of gross-alpha radioactivity in ground water occur near the western edge of the transition zone. Generally, ground water with large concentrations of gross-alpha radioactivity was found to exceed the maximum contaminant level for radium-226. (available as photostat copy only)

Christenson, S.C.; Parkhurst, D.L.; Fairchild, R.W.

1990-01-01

450

Identification and Evaluation of Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic (Class 1 Oil) Reservoirs in Oklahoma: Yearly technical progress report for January 1December 31, 1996  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes a systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all FDD oil reservoirs in

M. K. Banken; R. Andrews

1997-01-01

451

Mountaineer`s gas facilities decision support system  

SciTech Connect

Mountaineer Gas Co. of Charleston, W.Va., is justifiably proud of its capacity to combine electronic maps with a full database of information about its facilities and customers, and use that mix to make the decisions required in operating a gas company with better information and more quickly. Determining when a pipeline needs replacement or repair used to take several days at Mountaineer. With the new system in place, the decision can be made in a matter of minutes. The paper describes the system and its development, then discusses adding customer information as the next step.

NONE

1997-02-01

452

A Study of Public Higher Education in the Oklahoma City Area with Special Focus on Community College Services. Report on the Delivery of Comprehensive Community College Services in Metropolitan Oklahoma City.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to a legislative mandate, a study was conducted to identify and address the basic factors which should be considered in the expansion of postsecondary educational opportunities in metropolitan Oklahoma City, with specific focus on the steps to be taken by Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC). Study findings, based on demographic…

Priest, Bill J.; And Others

453

Native Plants of Montara Mountain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

It is always inspiring to find websites that have been created by a committed individual who is passionate about the site's subject. Developed by naturalist Chuck Kozak, Native Plants of Montara Mountain is just that type of website. Mr. Kozak has assembled a nice online field guide of plants native to Montara Mountain, a northern spur of California's Santa Cruz Mountains. The guide organizes plants by Family and Scientific name, Common name, or Color and Type. Site visitors can also find plants by using the alphabetically organized Master Index. The numerous plant entries include clear photos and brief descriptions. Although the website focuses on the flora of a specific area, many of these plants can be found in other geographic regions as well. This site is also reviewed in the September 3, 2004 _NSDL Life Sciences Report_.

454

Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station  

SciTech Connect

A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

Lyles, Brad; McCurdy, Greg; Chapman, Jenny; Miller, Julianne

2012-01-01

455

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... Precautions Checkups: What to Expect Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever KidsHealth > Parents > Infections > Bacterial & Viral Infections > Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Print A A A Text Size What's in ...

456

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology  

MedlinePLUS

... 2010. Average annual incidence of Rocky Mountain spotted fever by age-group, 2000 through 2010: This figure ... are reported under a new category called Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis (including Rocky Mountain spotted fever). This change ...

457

Estimates of Cloud Water Deposition at Mountain Acid Deposition Program Sites in the Appalachian Mountains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cloud water deposition was estimated at three high-elevation sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States (Whiteface Mountain, NY; Whitetop Mountain, VA; and Clingman’s Dome, TN) from 1994 through 1999 as part of the Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro). This paper provides a summary of cloud water chemistry, cloud liquid water content, cloud frequency, estimates of cloud water

Ralph E. Baumgardner Jr; Selma S. Isil; Thomas F. Lavery; Christopher M. Rogers; Volker A. Mohnen

2003-01-01

458

75 FR 62840 - Award of a Single-Source Expansion Supplement to the University of Oklahoma, National Resource...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oklahoma, National Resource Center for Youth Services...Oklahoma, National Resource Center for Youth Services...administer the National Resource Center for Youth Development...foster care and young adults formerly in foster care...agencies to remain in contact with youth who may...

2010-10-13

459

Regional differences in food and nutrient intakes of college women from the United States: Oregon and Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diets of 83 American college women from Oregon and 116 from Oklahoma were compared for total energy and nutrient content, nutrient density, and food sources of nutrients. The Oregon women consumed diets closer to current dietary recommendations for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and iron deficiency anemia than did the Oklahoma women. They ate significantly more energy, protein,

Constance C. Georgiou; Andrea B. Arquitt

1992-01-01

460

Political Protest, Conflict, and Tribal Nationalism: The Oklahoma Choctaws and the Termination Crisis of 1959-1970  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma is headquartered in southeastern Oklahoma and has a tribal citizenry of just over 175,000. The tribal government currently compacts almost all of the tribe's Bureau of Indian Affairs and Indian Health Service program funding and runs dozens of tribal businesses that today fund more than 80 percent of the tribal…

Lambert, Valerie

2007-01-01

461

A Grid/Group Study of Gender Perceptions of the Culture of the Oklahoma Civil Air Patrol  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to describe member perceptions of the culture of the Oklahoma CAP using an online version of the Douglas Grid/Group typology. This study further described and compared differences in how men and women in the organization view its culture. All senior members of the Oklahoma CAP with a valid email address on file…

Wardlaw, Kelly Ann

2011-01-01

462

Current ReportOklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: osufacts.okstate.edu  

E-print Network

Sciences Department of Entomology & Plant Pathology Typically about half of the winter wheat in Oklahoma-7088 Rev. 0812 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Effect of Planting Date and Seed Treatment Entomologist Department of Entomology & Plant Pathology Department of Entomology & Plant Pathology Dr. Jeff

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

463

Oklahoma School Testing Program: Writing Assessment Component. 1993 Summary Report. Stanford Writing Assessment Program for Grades 7 and 10.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides an overview of the Oklahoma School Testing Program (OSTP) and summarizes students' average writing assessment scores from 1987 through 1993. In 1992, the Stanford Writing Assessment replaced the MAT-6 Writing Test as the instrument for measuring writing achievement for 7th and 10th graders in Oklahoma. Student papers were hand…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

464

Biodiversity of the Hengduan Mountains  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides data on plants and fungi from the Hengduan Mountains and adjacent areas of south-central China, including the Gaoligong Mountains and Tibetan Himalaya. The data were derived from georeferenced collections made on recent expeditions (1984-present) to the region, and include specimens with DNA tissue. Users can browse specimens by name; search by taxon, collector number, or date; or browse collecting localities in the database using Google Earth (TM). There is also information on expeditions and personnel, the Biodiversity of the Eastern Himalaya project, an image gallery, a multilingual gazetteer and thesaurus, and a map showing the historic Tibetan provinces of the region.

465

BLOOD MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mineral-resource survey of the Blood Mountain Roadless Area, Georgia, indicates that there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral and energy resources. Natural gas may be present at great depth, perhaps 5 mi down and below the overthrust sheets of the Blue Ridge Mountains, but presently available information is not adequate to evaluate the resource potential of this commodity. Further seismic studies and exploratory drilling are needed to evaluate the gas potential of this part of the Eastern Overthrust Belt.

Koeppen, Robert P.; Armstrong, Michelle K.

1984-01-01

466

Quantification of Juniperus Ashei Pollen Production for the Development of Forecasting Models  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Juniperus ashei pollen is considered one of the most allergenic species of Cupressaceae in North America. Juniperus ashei is distributed throughout central Texas, Northern Mexico, the Arbuckle Mountains of south central Oklahoma, and the Ozark Mountains of northern Arkansas and southwestern Missouri. The large amount of airborne pollen that J. ashei produces affects inhabitants of cities and towns adjacent to juniper woodland areas and because juniper pollen can be transported over long distances, it affects populations that are far away. In order to create a dynamic forecast system for allergy and asthma sufferers, pollen production must be estimated. Estimation of pollen production requires the estimation of male cone production. Two locations in the Arbuckle Mountains of Oklahoma and 4 locations in the Edwards Plateau region of Texas were chosen as sampling sites. Trees were measured to determine approximate size. Male to female ratio was determined and pollen cone production was estimated using a qualitative scale from 0 to 2. Cones were counted from harvested 1/8 sections of representative trees. The representative trees were measured and approximate surface area of the tree was calculated. Using the representative tree data, the number of cones per square meter was calculated for medium production (1) and high production (2) trees. These numbers were extrapolated to calculate cone production in other trees sampled. Calibration was achieved within each location's sub-plot by counting cones on 5 branches collected from 5 sides of both high production and medium production trees. The total area sampled in each location was 0.06 hectare and total cone production varied greatly from location to location. The highest production area produced 5.8 million cones while the lowest production area produced 72,000 cones. A single representative high production tree in the Arbuckle Mountains produced 1.38 million cones. The number of trees per location was relatively uniform, but the number of high cone production trees varied greatly. Although there is great diversity in the locations making it difficult to determine which factors are most important, cone production was well correlated with certain stand characteristics including trunk diameter.

Bunderson, L. D.; Levetin, E.

2010-01-01

467

Multispectral analysis of limestone, dolomite, and granite, Mill Creek, Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spectral reflectance and thermal emission data were collected at the Mill Creek, Oklahoma test site during NASA missions 132 and 133 in June 1970. The data were collected by three aircraft flown several times during the diurnal cycle at altitudes of 150 to 17,000 m above mean terrain. Reflectance of the main rock types (limestone, dolomite, and granite) was determined from the data collected using a 12-channel multispectral scanner during mission 133 and from thermal infrared images recorded during mission 132 on an RS-7 scanner from 17,000 m above terrain. A preliminary rock recognition map was generated automatically using data collected from 900 m above terrain. The discrimination provided by the map is reasonably accurate. Misidentification occurred in areas of unusually high dolomite reflectivity. High altitude thermal infrared (10 to 12 micrometers) images show regional folds and faults distinguished by the presence of thermally contrasting materials. Linear and curvilinear structural features two to three times smaller than the nominal 17 m resolution could be detected.

Rowan, L. C.; Watson, K.

1970-01-01

468

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we should be able to change the water-gas ratio in the reservoir and, hence, improve the productivity from the well. In our Engineering and Geological Analysis section, we present our rock typing analysis work which combines the geological data with engineering data to develop a unique rock characteristics description. The work demonstrates that it is possible to incorporate geological description in engineering analysis so that we can come up with rock types which have unique geological characteristics, as well as unique petrophysical characteristics. Using this rock typing scheme, we intend to develop a detailed reservoir description in our next quarterly report.

Mohan Kelkar

2005-07-01

469

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has displayed some unique production characteristics. These include high initial water-oil and gas-oil ratios, decline in those ratios over time and temporary increase in gas-oil ratio during pressure build up. The formation also displays highly complex geology, but surprising hydrodynamic continuity. This report addresses three key issues related specifically to West Carney Hunton field and, in general, to any other Hunton formation exhibiting similar behavior: (1) What is the primary mechanism by which oil and gas is produced from the field? (2) How can the knowledge gained from studying the existing fields can be extended to other fields which have the potential to produce? (3) What can be done to improve the performance of this reservoir? We have developed a comprehensive model to explain the behavior of the reservoir. By using available production, geological, core and log data, we are able to develop a reservoir model which explains the production behavior in the reservoir. Using easily available information, such as log data, we have established the parameters needed for a field to be economically successful. We provide guidelines in terms of what to look for in a new field and how to develop it. Finally, through laboratory experiments, we show that surfactants can be used to improve the hydrocarbons recovery from the field. In addition, injection of CO{sub 2} or natural gas also will help us recover additional oil from the field.

Mohan Kelkar

2005-02-01

470

Airborne Doppler lidar observations of convective phenomena in Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On 30 June 1981, the wind fields around a variety of convective clouds, ranging from large thunderstorm complexes to isolated cumulus congestus, were observed in Oklahoma using an airborne Doppler lidar operated by NASA. By steering the pulsed infrared laser beam alternately along differing horizontal directions, a network of independent radial velocity measurements is obtained, which permits high-resolution synthesis of the full horizontal wind vector field in a swath adjacent to the aircraft flight track. The bright reflections of the laser signal by cloud surfaces permit direct identification of the locus of cloud edges, information which is prerequisite to detailed study of the relationships between the winds inside and outside clouds. The horizontal wind fields derived from the lidar data reveal waves and vortices along the gust front of a storm which eventually produced a gust-front tornado, and cloud-scale convergence patterns around an isolated cumulus congestus. Despite the presence of some questionable data associated with undersampling and delayed recording of certain aircraft motion parameters, most of the lidar results appear consistent with cloud photographs made during the experiment, with surface meteorological data, with aircraft flight-level wind data, and with previous observational and theoretical work.

Mccaul, Eugene W., Jr.; Bluestein, Howard B.; Doviak, Richard J.

1987-01-01

471

Fluid injection triggering of 2011 earthquake sequence in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Significant earthquakes are increasingly occurring within the United States midcontinent, with nine having moment-magnitude (Mw) ?4.0 and five with Mw?5.0 in 2011 alone. In parallel, wastewater injection into deep sedimentary formations has increased as unconventional oil and gas resources are developed. Injected fluids may lower normal stress on existing fault planes, and the correlation between injection wells and earthquake locations led to speculation that many 2011 earthquakes were triggered by injection. The largest earthquake potentially related to injection (Mw5.7) struck in November 2011 in central Oklahoma. Here we use aftershocks to document the fault patterns responsible for the M5.7 earthquake and a prolific sequence of related events, and use the timing and spatial correlation of the earthquakes with injection wells and subsurface structures to show that the earthquakes were likely triggered by fluid injection. The aftershock sequence details rupture along three distinct fault planes, the first of which reaches within 250 meters of active injection wells and within 1 km of the surface. This earthquake sequence began where fluids are injected at low pressure into a depleted oil reservoir bound by faults that effectively seal fluid flow. Injection into sealed compartments allows reservoir pressure to increase gradually over time, suggesting that reservoir volume, in this case, controls the triggering timescale. This process allows multi-year lags between the commencement of fluid injection and triggered earthquakes.

Keranen, K. M.; Savage, H. M.; Abers, G. A.; Cochran, E. S.

2012-12-01

472

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The uranium favorability of the Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was determined by using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria; by subsurface studies of structure, facies distribution, and gamma-ray anomalies in well logs to a depth of 1500 m; and by surface studies involving extensive field sampling and radiometric surveying. These were supplemented by both aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. Favorable environments were identified in fluviodeltaic to fan-delta sandstones in the upper Strawn, Canyon, and Cisco Groups (Pennsylvania to Lower Permian), which occur exclusively in the subsurface. Evaluation was based on the presence of a good uranium source, abundant feldspar, good hydrogeologic characteristics, association with carbonaceous shales, presence of coal and oil fields, and anomalies in gamma logs. Additional favorable environments include deltaic to alluvial sandstones in the Wichita-Albany Group (Lower Permian), which crops out widely and occurs in the shallow subsurface. Evaluation was based on high uranium values in stream-sediment samples, a small uranium occurrence located during the field survey, anomalous gamma logs, good uranium source, and hydrogeologic characteristics. Unfavorable environments include Cambrian to Permian limestones and shales. Pennsylvanian to Permian fluviodeltaic systems that have poor uranium sources, and Permian, Cretaceous, and Pleistocene formations that lack features characteristic of known uranium occurrences.

Edwards, M.B.; Andersen, R.L.

1982-08-01

473

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we should be able to change the water-gas ratio in the reservoir and, hence, improve productivity from the well. In our Engineering and Geological Analysis section, we present our rock typing analysis work which combines the geological data with engineering data to develop a unique rock characteristics description. By using porosity as a variable, we can generate alternate rock type descriptions at logged wells. This procedure also allows us to quantify uncertainties in rock type description.

Mohan Kelkar

2005-10-01

474

Mountain Belts and the New Global Tectonics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of the sedimentary, volcanic, structural, and metamorphic chronology in mountain belts, and consideration of the implications of the new global tectonics (plate tectonics), strongly indicate that mountain belts are a consequence of plate evolution. It is proposed that mountain belts develop by the deformation and metamorphism of the sedimentary and volcanic assemblages of Atlantic-type continental margins. These assemblages result

John F. Dewey; John M. Bird

1970-01-01

475

27 CFR 9.94 - Howell Mountain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Howell Mountain. 9.94 Section 9.94 Alcohol...Viticultural Areas § 9.94 Howell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...described in this section is “Howell Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The...

2010-04-01

476

27 CFR 9.55 - Bell Mountain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bell Mountain. 9.55 Section 9.55 Alcohol...Viticultural Areas § 9.55 Bell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...described in this section is “Bell Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The...

2010-04-01

477

27 CFR 9.213 - Snipes Mountain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Snipes Mountain. 9.213 Section 9.213 Alcohol...Viticultural Areas § 9.213 Snipes Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...described in this section is “Snipes Mountain”. For purposes of part 4 of this...

2010-04-01

478

27 CFR 9.102 - Sonoma Mountain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sonoma Mountain. 9.102 Section 9.102 Alcohol...Viticultural Areas § 9.102 Sonoma Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...described in this section is “Sonoma Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The...

2010-04-01

479

27 CFR 9.80 - York Mountain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false York Mountain. 9.80 Section 9.80 Alcohol...Viticultural Areas § 9.80 York Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...described in this section is “York Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The...

2010-04-01

480

27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section 9.167 ...American Viticultural Areas § 9.167 Red Mountain (a) Name. The name of the...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps....

2010-04-01

481

Mountain Goat Software, LLC Una Introduccin a  

E-print Network

Mountain Goat Software, LLC Una Introducción a Scrum Mike Cohen Traducido: Ernesto Grafeuille Revisado y modificado: Pedro Cabalar Noviembre 2013 #12;Mountain Goat Software, LLC Estamos perdiendo la hacia atrás -pueden servir mejor a los actuales requisitos competitivos". #12;Mountain Goat Software

Cabalar, Pedro

482

27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section 9.167 ...American Viticultural Areas § 9.167 Red Mountain (a) Name. The name of the...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps....

2012-04-01

483

27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section 9.167 ...American Viticultural Areas § 9.167 Red Mountain (a) Name. The name of the...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps....

2011-04-01

484

27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section 9.167 ...American Viticultural Areas § 9.167 Red Mountain (a) Name. The name of the...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps....

2014-04-01

485

27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section 9.167 ...American Viticultural Areas § 9.167 Red Mountain (a) Name. The name of the...viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps....

2013-04-01

486

Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy; November 16-17, 1996; Bartlesville, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-three Native American tribal members, council members, and other interested parties gathered in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, to attend the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy on October 16 and 17 1996, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Tribes represented at the workshop included the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Hopi, Jicarilla Apache, Osage, Seminole, and Ute. Representatives of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) also attended. BDM-Oklahoma developed and organized the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy to help meet the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Domestic Gas and Oil Initiative to help Native American Tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing petroleum resources.

NONE

1999-04-27

487

SEASONAL GROWTH RATES OF FISHES IN RELATION TO CONDITIONS OF LAKE STRATIFICATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of lake stratification and hypolimnetic anoxia on growth of gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepidianum), white crappie (Pomoxis annularis), and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) was studied in Arbuckle Lake, Oklahoma. The percentage of total available fish habitat of Arbuckle Lake was decreased by anoxic conditions to 72.9% in 1973, 82.7% in 1974, and 72.7% in 1975. In 6 of 8

Glen E. Gebhart; Robert C. Summerfelt

488

33 CFR 208.29 - Arbuckle Dam and Lake of the Arbuckles, Rock Creek, Okla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...spillway and continued until the lake level recedes to elevation 885.3 when...for each day. Whenever the lake level rises to elevation 872 and releases for...thereafter in that manner until the lake level recedes to elevation 872....

2010-07-01

489

Good Practice Minotaur mountain trail  

E-print Network

Good Practice Minotaur mountain trail Coed y Brenin 1. Protected Characteristic category Age to the project to make it as inclusive as possible. For example: 1 | Good practice case studies | Equality and Diversity | 14/02/2012 #12;Good Practice case studies 2 | Good practice case studies | Equality

490

Gearing Up for Mountain Biking.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the gear system of a mountain bike to discover any redundancy in the many gear settings available to the cyclist. Suggests a best strategy for changing up through the gears on a typical 21-gear system and an adjustment to the available gears that would result in a smoother change. (Author/ASK)

Jahnke, Thomas; Hamson, Mike

1999-01-01

491

Anatomy of a Mountain Range.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides written tour of Colorado Rockies along San Juan Skyway in which the geological features and formation of the mountain range is explored. Discusses evidence of geologic forces and products such as plate tectonic movement and the Ancestral Rockies; subduction and the Laramide Orogeny; volcanism and calderas; erosion, faulting, land…

Chew, Berkeley

1993-01-01

492

Plate Borders and Mountain Building  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page features animations of four different types of plate boundaries, including one animation of the collision of two pieces of continental crust, forming steep mountain ranges. The animations are all presented in flash, and the plate convergence offers a useful, generic view of orogeny.

Schlumberger Excellence in Educational Development, Inc.

493

Trout Creek Mountain project, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Trout Creek Mountain experience is an example of how the land and the people can win by building bridges of understanding and common interest between concerned constituencies. Love of the land, its natural resources, and realization of a need for changing grazing practices to reverse the degradation of riparian areas were the common interests that caused environmentalists, ranchers, the

Doc Hatfield; Connie Hatfield

1995-01-01

494

Portrait of a Mountain Boy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Will McCall, noted educator and author, now in his ninetieth year, feels that the diary he wrote as an eight-year-old Kentucky mountain boy may be his most enduring work. Short excerpts from the diary are included. (Author/NQA)

Coogan, Mercy Hardie

1981-01-01

495

Mountainous Star Coral (Montastraea faveolata)  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

This colony of Mountainous Star Coral (Montastraea faveolata) is so large (about 3 feet across) that it must have been growing before the severe bleaching and disease episode in 2005/2006 that caused so much coral mortality on St. John's reefs....

496

Rocky Mountain Bio Lab: Wildflowers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video explores the work of environmentalist John Hart, a Professor of Environmental Science at U.C. Berkley. In the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, Dr. Hart has established an experimental laboratory in which he has artificially created and maintained a 3-degree increase in surface temperature of a plot of land, and documented the impact on plant species occupying the plot.

National Geographic

497

Rocky Great Mountains Southwest Plains  

E-print Network

to Improve Performance Teryl G. Grubbl A new propellant source necessitated further testing of the rocket and Construction Nets, recoilless rockets,and propellant were originally purchased from Wildlife Materials (WMI Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station Modifications of the Portable Rocket-Net Capture System

498

27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...series compiled in 1954. (2) Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma, 1:250,000 series...near Yoestown, Arkansas (or the Fort Smith map), the boundary proceeds: (2...county line to Jones Fork (on the Fort Smith map). (xvi) Then southward...

2011-04-01

499

27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...series compiled in 1954. (2) Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma, 1:250,000 series...near Yoestown, Arkansas (or the Fort Smith map), the boundary proceeds: (2...county line to Jones Fork (on the Fort Smith map). (xvi) Then southward...

2014-04-01

500

27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...series compiled in 1954. (2) Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma, 1:250,000 series...near Yoestown, Arkansas (or the Fort Smith map), the boundary proceeds: (2...county line to Jones Fork (on the Fort Smith map). (xvi) Then southward...

2013-04-01