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Sample records for arc cryostats final

  1. Current Lead System of the SuperKEKB Final Focus SC Magnet Cryostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Z. G.; Ohuchi, N.; Tsuchiya, K.; Arimoto, Y.; Higashi, N.; Yamaoka, H.; Kondou, Y.; Kawai, M.

    To energize the SuperKEKB final focus superconducting (SC) magnets, 110 current leads in total will be equipped in the two service cryostats. For the SC quadrupoles and solenoids, 22 leads are the conventional vapor cooled type and the others for the SC correction coils employ an HTS section at the cold ends. The qualification program on the leads is being carried out at KEK as the cryogenic acceptance test prior to installation. This paper presents the thermal and electrical results of the cryogenic tests.

  2. Final Design and Experimental Validation of the Thermal Performance of the LHC Lattice Cryostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourcey, N.; Capatina, O.; Parma, V.; Poncet, A.; Rohmig, P.; Serio, L.; Skoczen, B.; Tock, J.-P.; Williams, L. R.

    2004-06-01

    The recent commissioning and operation of the LHC String 2 have given a first experimental validation of the global thermal performance of the LHC lattice cryostat at nominal cryogenic conditions. The cryostat designed to minimize the heat inleak from ambient temperature, houses under vacuum and thermally protects the cold mass, which contains the LHC twin-aperture superconducting magnets operating at 1.9 K in superfluid helium. Mechanical components linking the cold mass to the vacuum vessel, such as support posts and insulation vacuum barriers are designed with efficient thermalisations for heat interception to minimise heat conduction. Heat inleak by radiation is reduced by employing multilayer insulation (MLI) wrapped around the cold mass and around an aluminium thermal shield cooled to about 60 K. Measurements of the total helium vaporization rate in String 2 gives, after substraction of supplementary heat loads and end effects, an estimate of the total thermal load to a standard LHC cell (107 m) including two Short Straight Sections and six dipole cryomagnets. Temperature sensors installed at critical locations provide a temperature mapping which allows validation of the calculated and estimated thermal performance of the cryostat components, including efficiency of the heat interceptions.

  3. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-04ER86191 Hydrogen Cryostat for Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-05-07

    The project was to develop cryostat designs that could be used for muon beam cooling channels where hydrogen would circulate through refrigerators and the beam-cooling channel to simultaneously refrigerate 1) high-temperature-superconductor (HTS) magnet coils, 2) cold copper RF cavities, and 3) the hydrogen that is heated by the muon beam. In an application where a large amount of hydrogen is naturally present because it is the optimum ionization cooling material, it was reasonable to explore its use with HTS magnets and cold, but not superconducting, RF cavities. In this project we developed computer programs for simulations and analysis and conducted experimental programs to examine the parameters and technological limitations of the materials and designs of Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) components (magnet conductor, RF cavities, absorber windows, heat transport, energy absorber, and refrigerant).The project showed that although a hydrogen cryostat is not the optimum solution for muon ionization cooling channels, the studies of the cooling channel components that define the cryostat requirements led to fundamental advances. In particular, two new lines of promising development were opened up, regarding very high field HTS magnets and the HS concept, that have led to new proposals and funded projects.

  4. Cryostat and CCD for MEGARA at GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Domínguez, E.; Ferrusca, D.; Tulloch, S.; Velázquez, M.; Carrasco, E.; Gallego, J.; Gil de Paz, A.; Sánchez, F. M.; Vílchez Medina, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is the new integral field unit (IFU) and multi-object spectrograph (MOS) instrument for the GTC. The spectrograph subsystems include the pseudo-slit, the shutter, the collimator with a focusing mechanism, pupil elements on a volume phase holographic grating (VPH) wheel and the camera joined to the cryostat through the last lens, with a CCD detector inside. In this paper we describe the full preliminary design of the cryostat which will harbor the CCD detector for the spectrograph. The selected cryogenic device is an LN2 open-cycle cryostat which has been designed by the "Astronomical Instrumentation Lab for Millimeter Wavelengths" at INAOE. A complete description of the cryostat main body and CCD head is presented as well as all the vacuum and temperature sub-systems to operate it. The CCD is surrounded by a radiation shield to improve its performance and is placed in a custom made mechanical mounting which will allow physical adjustments for alignment with the spectrograph camera. The 4k x 4k pixel CCD231 is our selection for the cryogenically cooled detector of MEGARA. The characteristics of this CCD, the internal cryostat cabling and CCD controller hardware are discussed. Finally, static structural finite element modeling and thermal analysis results are shown to validate the cryostat model.

  5. Specification for the Reattachment of the EC North Cryostat Heads

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, R.; /Fermilab

    1991-03-20

    This Engineering Note defines technical requirements and the scope of work for reattachment of the heads of the North EC cryostat This work is to be done in the D-Zero. Assembly Building (DAB) at Fermilab and is expected to begin around May 15, 1991. The task consists primarily of welding four heads onto a 17-foot diameter stainless steel double-wall pressure/varuum vessel. Nominal thicknesses of the welds are all 5/8-inch. Root passes are to be made by TIG welding and the balance by MIG welding. No radiography is required; other NDE per ASME Code, Section VIII, Div. 1. All work is to be done in accordance with the Rules of the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors (ANSI/NB-23), and repairs to the inner vessel are to be documented by the R-1 form exeruted by the Contractorts Authorized Inspector. The Contractor will be expected to work two shifts per day, five days per week to support the Fermilab schedule. Details of the cryostat are given on Fermi1ab Drawings 3740.220-ME-222256, Rev. R, 3740.224-ME-273071, and 3740.224-ME-273039. The cryostat was fabricated by Process Engineering, Inc. ofPlaistow, NH in 1989-90. The heads were removed using hand-held air-arc gouging equipment. As a result the welding grooves are not straight and their widths are not uniform, In some places the width may be as wide as 1-inch. For the purposes of quotation, the Contractor should assume a uniform weld groove as shown in Figure 1. The amount of weld metal to be deposited for this geometry is estimated to be 500 lbs. Upon completion, the final contract price will be determined by the following formula: Final Price = Contract Price x (lbs of weld metal deposited/500). Methods of determining the amount ofweld metal deposited will be agreed upon before award of the contract.

  6. CRYOSTAT (18-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The CRYOSTAT is an autonomously working rack mounted equipment. It provides two thermostat chambers, independently controlled by a processor via on/off switching of the current through peltier elements. The temperature profiles of the freezer and stabilizer are subdivided in a common number of steps, each one with a preprogrammable temperature gradient or at constant temperature. Core parameters can be reprogrammed by crew interaction in case of rescheduling the CRYOSTAT operation time due to changed mission requirements or contingency. Actions of the CRYOSTAT (e.g., opening the slide), the steps, actual temperature of the thermostat chambers, experiment time, and the housekeeping data are recorded on a built-in RAM and a tape. In each thermostat chamber, a specific sample container can be inserted which consists of a transparent Plexiglas block accommodating seven crystallization experiments.

  7. Vibration measurement in the KAGRA cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Naticchioni, L.; Khalaidovski, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Majorana, E.; Sakakibara, Y.; Tokoku, C.; Suzuki, T.; Kimura, N.; Koike, S.; Uchiyama, T.; Kawamura, S.

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese gravitational wave observatory KAGRA will be operated at cryogenic temperatures to reduce thermal noise. Four main mirrors and their suspension systems, called cryogenic payloads, will be cooled in the cryostat. Vibrations of the cryostat and the cryocooler can contaminate the output of the detector. One of the noise paths is the heat link made from the pure soft metal between the cryogenic payload and cryocoolers to cool the payload. In order to evaluate this noise amplitude, we measured the vibration of the radiation shield at cryogenic temperatures at the cryostat production site in Yokohama, Japan. For this measurement, we developed cryogenic accelerometers. Based on the result of this measurement, we calculated the noise in the KAGRA interferometer. Our results show that with the current design, the seismic noise goal formulated for KAGRA cannot be achieved. Finally, we present a possible design optimization that is meant to reach the nominal sensitivity of the detector.

  8. Small Business Innovations (Cryostat)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    General Pneumatics Corporation, Scottsdale, AZ, developed an anti- clogging cryostat that liquifies gases by expansion for high pressure through a nozzle to produce cryorefrigeration based on their Kennedy Space Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) work to develop a Joule-Thomson (JT) expansion valve that is less susceptible to clogging by particles or condensed contaminants in the flow than a non-contaminating compressor in a closed cycle Linde-Hampson cryocooler used to generate cryogenic cooling for infrared sensors, super conductors, supercooled electronics and cryosurgery.

  9. Implementation of Submerged Arc Welding Training. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowick, Earl; Todd, John

    A unit on submerged arc welding (SAW) was developed and integrated into the welding program at Seattle Central Community College (Washington) during the period December 1983 through May 1984. During this time, 10 major users of SAW in the area were contacted and mailed questionnaires. Follow up consisted of telephone calls and personal contact as…

  10. The low-cost cryostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronson, J. C.

    1970-01-01

    Inexpensive method of fabricating cryostats uses polyurethane, super insulation, fiber glass, and cardboard/plywood. Cryostat weighs 1/10 of Dewar, occupies about same volume, is easy to handle, requires no metal parts, and can be formed into virtually any configuration.

  11. Platelet-cooled plasma arc torch. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    In this 12-month program sponsored by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Aerojet designed, fabricated, and tested six platelet cooled electrodes for a Retech 75T (90 MW) plasma arc torch capable of processing mixed radioactive waste. Two of the electrodes with gas injection through the electrode wall demonstrated between eight and forty times the life of conventional water cooled electrodes. If a similar life increase can be produced in a 1 Mw size electrode, then electrodes possessing thousands, rather than hundreds, of hours of life will be available to DOE for potential application to mixed radioactive waste processing.

  12. Specification for the Reattachment of the EC South Cryostat Heads

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, R.; /Fermilab

    1991-08-01

    This Engineering Note defines technical requirements and the scope of work for reattachment of the heads of the South EC cryostat. This work is to be done in the clean room at the D-Zero Assembly Building (DAB) at Fermilab.and is expected to begin around September 15, 1991. The task consists primarily of welding four heads onto a 17-foot diameter stainless steel double-wall pressure/vacuum vessel. Nominal thicknesses of the welds are all 5/8-inch. Root passes are to be made by TIG welding and the balance by MIG welding. No radiography is required; other NDE per ASME Code, Section VIII, Div. 1. All work is to be done in accordance with the Rules of the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors (ANSI/NB-23), and repairs to the inner vessel are to be documented by the R-1 form executed by the Contractor's Authorized Inspector. The Contractor will be expected to work two shifts per day, five days per week to support the Fermilab schedule. Details of the cryostat are given on Fermilab Drawings 3740.220-ME-222256, Rev. R, 3740.224-ME-273071, and 3740.224-ME-273039. The cryostat was fabricated by Process Engineering, Inc. of Plaistow, NH in 1989-90. The heads were removed using hand-held air-arc gouging equipment. As a result the welding grooves are not straight and their widths are not uniform. In some places the width maybe as wide as 1-inch. For the purposes of quotation, the Contractor should assume a uniform weld groove as shown in Figure 1. The amount of weld metal to be deposited for this geometry is estimated to be 500 lbs. Upon completion, the final contract price will be determined by the following formula: Final Price = Contract Price x (lbs of weld metal deposited/500). Methods of determining the amount of weld metal deposited will be agreed upon before award of the contract.

  13. Low cost cryostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A cryostat for use in a low or a substantially gravity-free environment adapted to cool an experiment through the use of helium 2, or helium in its super fluid state is characterized by a number of interchangeable daughter dewars and helium supply or mother dewar. A low pressure venting system is provided for converting helium contained in the mother dewar to a superfluid state for use as a primary cryogen. Each daughter dewar is adapted to be removably mounted in mated relation on the mother dewar and is characterized by support for an experiment package, a source of helium to be employed as a secondary cryogen. A heat pipe is suspended from each daughter dewar and adapted to be extended into the mother dewar for facilitating cooling of the secondary cryogen. A transfer of heat from the package to the primary cryogen, via the secondary cryogen, is accommodated as a film flow of helium 2 progresses from the heat pipe to the experiment dewar.

  14. MEGARA cryostat advanced design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrusca, D.; Castillo-Domínguez, Edgar; Velázquez, M.; Gil de Paz, A.; Carrasco, E.; Gallego, J.; Cedazo, R.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.

    2014-08-01

    MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is an optical Integral-Field Unit and Multi-Object Spectrograph designed for the GTC (Gran Telescopio de Canarias) 10.4m telescope in La Palma. MEGARA project has already passed preliminary design review and the optics critical design review, first-light it is expected to take place at the end of 2016. MEGARA is a development under a GRANTECAN contract. In this paper we summarize the current status of the LN2 open-cycle cryostat which has been designed by the "Astronomical Instrumentation Lab for Millimeter Wavelengths" at the Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE) and emphasize the key parts of the system that have updated since the Preliminary Design, the main activities related to acceptance, integration, fabrication and maintenance plans which fit into the overall structure of the management plan of MEGARA are also described. The cryogenic work package of MEGARA has completed all the design stages and is ready for its Critical Design Review and then proceed to fabrication.

  15. Development of the Facet Cryostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, A.; Shields, P.; Jirmanus, M.

    1999-01-01

    A proof of concept prototype cryostat has been developed to demonstrate the ability to accommodate low temperature science investigations within the constraints of the Hitchhiker siderail carrier on the Space Shuttle.

  16. Design of the VLPC Cryostats

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russell A.

    2001-07-19

    A short profile (40 cm), long length (2.50 m) rectangular helium cryostat has been designed, built and tested for maintaining electronic chips at a stable 9.0 Kelvin temperature. Heat load, and thermal stresses were major design considerations. The distance from room temperature to liquid nitrogen intercept temperature is only 8 centimeters. Liquid nitrogen temperature to liquid helium temperature occurs in 13 centimeters. An alloy known as Invar, 36% Nickel, balance Iron, was used to fabricate the vessel walls and liquid nitrogen heat intercept tubing because of it's low coefficient of thermal expansion. The cryostat accepts fifty-one, 3.5 cm x 42.5 cm devices that extend 26.7 cm into the cryostat. Tight clearance fits to the liquid nitrogen and liquid helium intercepts are maintained. Gaseous helium is used within the cryostat for heat transfer.

  17. Cryostat with Foil and MLI

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Peter K.F.; Gung, Chen-yu

    2005-10-06

    Induction cores are used to accelerate heavy ion beam array, which are built around the outer diameter of the cryostat housing the superconducting quadruple array. Compact cryostat is highly desirable to reduce the cost of the induction cores. Recent experiences in fabrication of a cryostat for single beam transport revealed that it is possible to reduce the spacing in the cryostat vacuum jacket by using low-emissivity thermal insulation material instead of conventional MLI. However, it is labor-intensive to install the new type of insulation as compared with using MLI. It is promising to build a cost-effective compact cryostat for quadruple magnet array for heavy ion beam array transport by using low-emissivity material combined with conventional MLI as radiation insulation. A matrix of insulation designs and tests will be performed as the feasibility study and for the selection of the optimal thermal insulation as the Phase I work. The selected mixed insulation will be used to build prototype compact cryostats in the Phase II project, which are aiming for housing quadruple doublet array. In this STTR phase I study, a small cryostat has been designed and built to perform calorimetric characterization of the heat load in a liquid helium vessel insulated with a vacuum layer with a nominal clearance of 3.5 mm. The vacuum clearance resembled that used in the warm-bore beam tube region in a prototype cryostat previously built for the heavy ion beam transport experiment. The vacuum clearance was geometrically restricted with a heater shell with the temperature controlled at near 300 K. Various combinations of radiation and thermal shields were installed in the tight vacuum clearance for heat load measurements. The measured heat loads are reported and compared with previous test result using a compact vacuum layer. Further developments of the thermal insulations used in the present study are discussed. The compact cryostat with foil and MLI insulation may be used in the

  18. Helium pressures in RHIC vacuum cryostats and relief valve requirements from magnet cooling line failure

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the RHIC magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, would pressurize the insulating vacuum in the magnet and transfer line cryostats. Insufficient relief valves on the cryostats could cause a structural failure. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the vacuum cryostat and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed to calculate the helium pressure inside the cryostat. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces were included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Existing relief valve sizes were reviewed to make sure that the maximum stresses, caused by the calculated maximum pressures inside the cryostats, did not exceed the allowable stresses, based on the ASME Code B31.3 and ANSYS results. The conclusions are as follows: (1) The S/F simulation results show that the highest internal pressure in the cryostats, due to the magnet line failure, is {approx}37 psig (255115 Pa); (2) Based on the simulation, the temperature on the cryostat chamber, INJ Q8-Q9, could drop to 228 K, which is lower than the material minimum design temperature allowed by the Code; (3) Based on the ASME Code and ANSYS results, the reliefs on all the cryostats inside the RHIC tunnel are adequate to protect the vacuum chambers when the magnet cooling lines fail; and (4) In addition to the pressure loading, the thermal deformations, due to the temperature decrease on the cryostat chambers, could also cause a high stress on the chamber, if not properly supported.

  19. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, R.J.; Pollina, R.J. |

    1992-08-01

    The problems connected with gas side corrosion for the design of the lA4 (POC) channel hardware are explored and results of gas side wear rate tests in the Textron Mark VII facility are presented. It is shown that the proposed designs meet a 2000 hour lifetime criterion based upon these materials tests. Improvement in cathode lifetime is demonstrated with lower voltage intercathode gaps. The corrosion of these materials is discussed and it is shown how lifetimes are dependent upon gap voltage and average metal temperature. The importance of uniformity of slagging to the durability of the anode wall is demonstrated. The wear mechanism of the anodes in the MHD channel is analyzed. In addition to gas-side corrosion, the results of specific water corrosion tests of sidewall materials are discussed. All of the tests reported here were carried out to confirm the gas-side performance and the manufacturability of anode and sidewall designs and to address questions posed about the durability of tungsten-copper on the waterside. the results of water corrosion tests of the tungsten copper alloy sidewall material are presented to show that with proper control of waterside pH and, if necessary, dissolved oxygen, one can obtain reliable performance with no degradation of heat transfer with this material. The final choice of materials was determined primarily by the outcome of these tests and also by the question of the manufacturability of the prospective designs.

  20. Optical tuning in the arcs and final focus sections of the Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bambade, P.S.

    1989-03-01

    In this thesis, we present the experimental tuning procedures developed for the Arcs and for the Final Focus Section of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Such tuning is necessary to maximize the luminosity, by minimizing the beam size at the interaction point, and to reduce backgrounds in the experiment. In the final Focus Section, the correction strategy must result from the principles of the optical design, which is based on cancellations between second order aberrations, and on the ability to measure micron-size beams typical of the SLC. In the Arcs, the corrections were designed after the initial commissioning, to make the system more error-tolerant, through a modification in the optical design, and to enable adjustments of the beam phase-space a the injection to the Final Focus System, through a harmonic perturbation technique inspired from circular accelerators. Although the overall optimization of the SLC is not entirely finished, an almost optimal set-up has been achieved for the optics of the Arcs and of the Final Focus Section. Beams with transverse sizes close to the nominal ones, of a few microns, have been obtained at the interaction point. We present and discuss our results and the optical limits to the present performance. 24 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Safety analysis results for cryostat ingress accidents in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, B.J.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Petti, D.A.

    1997-06-01

    Accidents involving the ingress of air, helium, or water into the cryostat of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak design have been analyzed with a modified version of the MELCOR code for the ITER Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-1). The air ingress accident is the result of a postulated breach of the cryostat boundary into an adjoining room. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed air mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, but that the partial vacuum in the adjoining room must be accommodated in the building design. The water ingress accident is the result of a postulated magnet arc that results in melting of a Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) coolant pipe, discharging PHTS water and PHTS water activated corrosion products and HTO into the cryostat. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed water mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, that the cryostat pressure remains below design limits, and that the corrosion product and HTO releases are well within the ITER release limits. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Safety analysis results for cryostat ingress accidents in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, B.J.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Petti, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Accidents involving the ingress of air or water into the cryostat of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak design have been analyzed with a modified version of the MELCOR code for the ITER Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-1). The air ingress accident is the result of a postulated breach of the cryostat boundary into an adjoining room. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed air mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, but that the partial vacuum in the adjoining room must be accommodated in the building design. The water ingress accident is the result of a postulated magnet arc that results in melting of a Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) coolant pipe, discharging PHTS water and PHTS water activated corrosion products and HTO into the cryostat. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed water mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, that the cryostat pressure remains below design limits, and that the corrosion product and HTO releases are well within the ITER release limits.

  3. Safety Analysis Results for Cryostat Ingress Accidents in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, B. J.; Cadwallader, L. C.; Petti, D. A.

    1997-06-01

    Accidents involving the ingress of air, helium, or water into the cryostat of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak design have been analyzed with a modified version of the MELCOR code for the ITER Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-1). The air ingress accident is the result of a postulated breach of the cryostat boundary into an adjoining room. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed air mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, but that the partial vacuum in the adjoining room must be accommodated in the building design. The water ingress accident is the result of a postulated magnet arc that results in melting of a Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) coolant pipe, discharging PHTS water and PHTS water activated corrosion products and HTO into the cryostat. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed water mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, that the cryostat pressure remains below design limits, and that the corrosion product and HTO releases are well within the ITER release limits.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell processing using plasma arc spray deposition techniques. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, E.R.; Spengler, C.J.; Herman, H.

    1991-07-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in conjunction with the Thermal Spray Laboratory of the State University of New York, Stony Brook, investigated the fabrication of a gas-tight interconnect layer on a tubular solid oxide fuel cell with plasma arc spray deposition. The principal objective was to determine the process variables for the plasma spray deposition of an interconnect with adequate electrical conductivity and other desired properties. Plasma arc spray deposition is a process where the coating material in powder form is heated to or above its melting temperature, while being accelerated by a carrier gas stream through a high power electric arc. The molten powder particles are directed at the substrate, and on impact, form a coating consisting of many layers of overlapping, thin, lenticular particles or splats. The variables investigated were gun power, spray distance, powder feed rate, plasma gas flow rates, number of gun passes, powder size distribution, injection angle of powder into the plasma plume, vacuum or atmospheric plasma spraying, and substrate heating. Typically, coatings produced by both systems showed bands of lanthanum rich material and cracking with the coating. Preheating the substrate reduced but did not eliminate internal coating cracking. A uniformly thick, dense, adherent interconnect of the desired chemistry was finally achieved with sufficient gas- tightness to allow fabrication of cells and samples for measurement of physical and electrical properties. A cell was tested successfully at 1000{degree}C for over 1,000 hours demonstrating the mechanical, electrical, and chemical stability of a plasma-arc sprayed interconnect layer.

  5. The role of continental margins in the final stages of arc formation: Constraints from teleseismic tomography of the Gibraltar and Calabrian Arc (Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argnani, Andrea; Cimini, Giovanni Battista; Frugoni, Francesco; Monna, Stephen; Montuori, Caterina

    2016-05-01

    The deep seismicity and lateral distribution of seismic velocity in the Central Western Mediterranean, point to the existence under the Alboran and Tyrrhenian Seas of two lithospheric slabs reaching the mantle transition zone. Gibraltar and Calabrian narrow arcs correspond to the slabs. Similarities in the tectonic and mantle structure of the two areas have been explained by a common subduction and roll-back mechanism, in which the two arcs are symmetrical end members. We present a new 3-D tomographic model at mantle scale for the Calabrian Arc and compare it with a recently published model for the Gibraltar Arc by Monna et al. (2013a). The two models, calculated with inversion of teleseismic phase arrivals, have a scale and parametrization that allow for a direct comparison. The inclusion in both inversions of ocean bottom seismometer broadband data improves the resolution of the areas underlying the seafloor networks. This additional information is used to resolve the deep structure and constrain the reconstruction of the Central Western Mediterranean geodynamic evolution. The Gibraltar tomography model suggests that the slab is separated from the Atlantic oceanic domain by a portion of African continental margin, whereas the Calabrian model displays a continuous oceanic slab that is connected, via a narrow passage (~ 350 km), to the Ionian basin oceanic domain. Starting from the comparison of the two models we propose the following interpretation: within the Mediterranean geodynamic regime (dominated by slab rollback) the geometry of the African continental margin, located on the lower plate, represents a critical control on the evolution of subduction. As buoyant continental lithosphere entered the subduction zones, slab pull caused tears in the subducted lithosphere. This tectonic response, which occurred in the final stages of arc evolution and was strongly controlled by the paleogeography of the subducted plates, explains the observed differences between the

  6. Simple fiber optic coupled luminescence cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, G. D.; Ortiz, T. P.; Costello, A. L.; Brozik, J. A.; Kenney, J. W.

    2002-12-01

    An easy to fabricate, easy to operate, miniature liquid helium insert cryostat has been designed for variable low-temperature luminescence investigations in the 2.7-77 K region with minimal liquid helium consumption. The cryostat, which can be used inside of a standard liquid helium storage Dewar, is optically coupled both to the luminescence spectrophotometer and to the chosen luminescence excitation source (laser or conventional) by a single 1 mm fused silica fiber optic cable. This extremely simple and compact optical system is designed to give highly reproducible luminescence excitation and collection efficiencies for quantitative luminescence intensity studies. Temperature control in the cryostat is achieved through the dynamic balance of up to three distinct heating/cooling processes: raising or lowering the cryostat with respect to the liquid helium level in the Dewar, heating the cryostat with a small resistance heater, or pumping on the cryostat for sub-4.2 K temperatures. The cryostat can operate effectively throughout the 2.7-77 K range in liquid helium storage Dewars containing less than a liter of liquid helium. The wide range of spectroscopic experiments that this novel optical cryostat design can support is illustrated by a temperature-dependent zero field splitting luminescence lifetime study of Ru(bpy)3Cl2, a temperature-dependent relative luminescence intensity (quantum yield) study of Ru(bpy)3Cl2, and a temperature-dependent luminescence vibronic fine structure study of Ti(Cp)2(NCS)2.

  7. Analysis Supporting MSFC Cryostat Testing Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Winfred A., Jr.; Jenkins, Rhonald M.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained from an analysis of the NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center (MSFC) cryostat testing unit. A finite element model was generated to determine both temperature distribution and stress distribution in the cryostat testing unit for load conditions supplied by MSFC. This report contains the results of that analysis.

  8. Thermal architecture of the Clover cryostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grainger, William F.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter; Chase, Simon; Kiernan, Brian; North, Chris E.

    2010-07-01

    We discuss the Clover cryostats, which are dry cryostats containing three stages of cooling; a pulse tube cooler, a sorption fridge and a continuous miniature dilution refrigerator. We describe the thermal architecture of the system and present thermal data for the various stages including its performance when tilted.

  9. Final Design And Manufacturing of the PEP II High Energy Ring Arc Bellows Module

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Nadine R.; Kulikov, Artem; Corlett, John; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-09-01

    A novel RF shield bellows module developed at SLAC has been successfully manufactured and installed in the PEP-II High Energy Ring (HER). Tests indicate that the module meets its performance and operational requirements. The primary function of the bellows module is to allow for thermal expansion of the chambers and for lateral, longitudinal and angular offsets due to tolerances and alignment, while providing RF continuity between adjoining chambers. An update on the Arc bellows module for the PEP-II High Energy Ring is presented. Final design, manufacturing issues, material and coating selection, and tribological and RF testing are discussed. Performance and operational requirements are also reviewed. The RF shield design has been proven during assembly to allow for large manufacturing tolerances without reducing the mechanical spring force below required values. In addition, the RF shield maintains electrical contact even with large misalignments across the module.

  10. A new cryostat for precise temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, B.; Zhou, G.; Liu, L. Q.; Zhang, X.; Xiong, L. Y.; Li, Q.

    2013-09-01

    Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocoolers are often used in cryostat as cold sources. It has advantages of simple structure and low operating cost as well as disadvantages of vibration and temperature oscillation, which are fatal for some applications that are very sensitive to temperature stability at low temperature. To solve the problem, a thermal analysis model which is used to simulate heat transfer in the cryostat is built and discussed. According to the analysis results, a cryostat that can provide variable temperature (4-20 K) for the accurate temperature control experiments is designed and manufactured. In this cryostat, a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sheet is used as a thermal damper to reduce the temperature oscillation, with which, the temperature oscillation of the sample cooling holder is less than 4 mK at the 20 K region.

  11. Cryostat for testing RF power couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Champion, M.S.; Koepke, K.P.; Misek, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    Similar to the power leads of accelerator superconducting magnets, the power couplers of accelerator superconducting cavities are components that link room temperature to superfluid helium temperature for the purpose of energy transfer. Instead of conducting kiloamperes of current they guide megawatts of RF power between those two temperatures. In this paper we describe a cryostat designed for testing the performance of these components and measuring their heat loads. A special feature of this cryostat is its minimum liquid inventory that considerably simplifies safety related requirements. This cryostat is part of a Fermilab facility contributing to the international collaboration working on TESLA (TeV Electron Superconducting Linear Accelerator). This facility is now operational and we will be presenting specifications as well as performance data on the cryostat as well as the first pair of power couplers tested with it.

  12. The LINC-NIRVANA IR cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laun, W.; Baumeister, H.; Bizenberger, P.

    2006-06-01

    The MPIA is leading an international consortium of institutes building an instrument called LINC-NIRVANA. The instrument will combine the light from the two 8.4 m primary mirrors of the LBT. The beam combiner will operate at wavelengths between 1.1 and 2.4 microns, using a Hawaii2 detector. A volume of about 1.6 m high with a diameter of about 0.65 m is required for the cold optics. The size of the instrument and the high requirements on vibrations brought us to a new approach for the cooling of the cryostat, which has never been tried in astronomy. The cryostat will be cooled by a flow of Helium gas. The cooler which cools the gas will be placed far away on a different level in the telescope building. The cold helium will be fed through long vacuum isolated transfer lines to the instrument cryostat. Inside the cryostat a tube will be wrapped around the mounting structure of the cold optics. The first hardware arrived at the MPIA in 2005 and the system will soon be tested in our labs.

  13. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  14. Throttling Cryogen Boiloff To Control Cryostat Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    An improved design has been proposed for a cryostat of a type that maintains a desired low temperature mainly through boiloff of a liquid cryogen (e.g., liquid nitrogen) at atmospheric pressure. (A cryostat that maintains a low temperature mainly through boiloff of a cryogen at atmospheric pressure is said to be of the pour/fill Dewar-flask type because its main component is a Dewar flask, the top of which is kept open to the atmosphere so that the liquid cryogen can boil at atmospheric pressure and cryogenic liquid can be added by simply pouring it in.) The major distinguishing feature of the proposed design is control of temperature and cooling rate through control of the flow of cryogen vapor from a heat exchanger. At a cost of a modest increase in complexity, a cryostat according to the proposal would retain most of the compactness of prior, simpler pour/fill Dewar-flask cryostats, but would utilize cryogen more efficiently (intervals between cryogen refills could be longer).

  15. Cryostat design for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H.

    1990-09-01

    The cryostat of an SSC dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the cold mass assembly. It serves to support the cold mass accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation (MLI) system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course their 25 year expected life. This paper describes the design of the current SSC collider dipole magnet cryostat and includes discussions on the thermal, structural, and dynamic considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  16. ASME Code Calculations for the CC Cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, R.D.; /Fermilab

    1987-11-04

    This engineering note contains the ASHE Code calculations for the CC Cryostat prepared by the manufacturer, Richmond-Lox Equipment Company. Most of these were taken from calculations initially prepared by Fermilab personne1and pub1ished in Eng. Note 68.

  17. SSC 50 mm collider dipole cryostat design

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H.

    1992-04-01

    The cryostat of a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the magnet assembly itself. It serves to support the magnet accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations, and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course of their expected operating life. This paper describes the design of the current SSC dipole magnet cryostat and includes discussions on the structural and thermal considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems.

  18. Insulation-Testing Cryostat With Lifting Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James; Dokos, Adam; Scholtens, Brekke; Nagy, Zoltan; Augustynowicz, Stanislaw

    2010-01-01

    The figure depicts selected aspects of an apparatus for testing thermal-insulation materials for cryogenic systems at temperatures and under vacuum or atmospheric conditions representative of those encountered in use. This apparatus, called "Cryostat-100," is based on the established cryogen-boil-off calorimeter method, according to which the amount of heat that passes through an insulation specimen to a cryogenic fluid in a container, and thus the effective thermal conductance of the specimen, is taken to be proportional to the amount of the cryogenic fluid that boils off from the container. The design of Cryostat-100 is based partly on, and incorporates improvements over, the design of a similar prior apparatus called "Cryostat-1" described in "Improved Methods of Testing Cryogenic Insulation Materials" (KSC-12107 & KSC- 12108), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 24, No. 12 (December 2000), page 46. The design of Cryostat-100 also incorporates the best features of two other similar prior apparatuses called "Cryostat-2" (also described in the cited prior article) and "Cryostat- 4." Notable among the improvements in Cryostat-100 is the addition of a lifting mechanism that enables safe, rapid, reliable insertion and removal of insulation specimens and facilitates maintenance operations that involve lifting. As in Cryostat-1, the cold mass is a vertical stainless-steel cylindrical vessel subdivided into a larger measurement vessel with smaller thermal-guard vessels at both ends. During operation, all three vessels are kept filled with liquid nitrogen near saturation at ambient pressure (temperature .77.4 K). The cold mass of Cryostat-100 has a length of 1 m and diameter of 168 mm. Each specimen has a corresponding nominal length and inner diameter and a nominal thickness of 25.4 mm. Specimens that are shorter and have thicknesses between 0 and 50 mm are also acceptable. Bulk-fill, foam, clam-shell, multilayer insulation, and layered materials can be tested over a very wide range

  19. Polystyrene cryostat facilitates testing tensile specimens under liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shogan, R. P.; Skalka, R. J.

    1967-01-01

    Lightweight cryostat made of expanded polystyrene reduces eccentricity in a tensile system being tested under liquid nitrogen. The cryostat is attached directly to the tensile system by a special seal, reducing misalignment effects due to cryostat weight, and facilitates viewing and loading of the specimens.

  20. Design and Fabrication of Cryostat Interface and Electronics for High Performance Antimatter Trap (HI-PAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gerald A.

    1999-01-01

    Included in Appendix I to this report is a complete set of design and assembly schematics for the high vacuum inner trap assembly, cryostat interfaces and electronic components for the MSFC HI-PAT. Also included in the final report are summaries of vacuum tests, and electronic tests performed upon completion of the assembly.

  1. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Cryogenic Line Routing: Refrigerator to VLPC Cryostats & Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1994-10-04

    This engineering note documents the proposed cryogenic line routing from the liquid helium (LHe) refrigeration plant to the detector solenoid and VLPC cryostats. Many figures are included to aid in understanding the route. As an appendix, I include some general comments relevant to the topic. Also listed are a number of routing options that were considered before the proposed route was finalized.

  2. Paleomagnetism of the Cantabria-Asturias Arc: Kinematics of arc formation and implications for final collisional adjustments within the Pangea supercontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Arlo Brandon

    The Cantabria-Asturias Arc (CAA) of SW Europe is a highly curved Variscan belt that formed along the ancient plate boundary between Gondwana and Laurussia during the assembly of Pangea. To construct a viable kinematic and tectonic model for CAA formation, a paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and structural study of two Devonian carbonate formations was undertaken to distinguish the discrete stages of deformation that the are experienced. The combination of these approaches provides a method for dating the complex deformation history experienced by the CAA and sheds new light on the mechanism of orogen-related remagnetizations and, and particularly, arc formation. The Devonian carbonates acquired three late Paleozoic remagnetizations during the Variscan orogeny of northern Spain. Rock magnetic data and SEM analyses reveal that the three late Paleozoic remagnetizations are chemical remanent magnetizations, likely facilitated by the presence of fluids. The fluids, whether externally or internally derived, were activated as a response to orogeny based on the acquisition of remagnetizations subsequent to local Variscan deformation phases. The protracted deformation history increased fluid mobility as a product of tectonic thickening, tectonically induced permeability, and/or gravity-driven flow. The paleomagnetic and structural data show that the CAA experienced true (˜100%) oroclinal bending of an originally linear belt in a two-stage tectonic history. This history represents two regional compression phases: (1) east-west compression in the Late Carboniferous and (2) north-south compression in the Permian (both in present-day coordinates). The later compression phase reflects the northward movement of Gondwana and its final collision with Laurussia. The new paleomagnetic data and this tectonic scenario argue against previously proposed syn-thrusting rotation, wrenching and indentor models for the formation of the CAA, because rotation

  3. HINS Superconducting Lens and Cryostat Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Page, T.M.; DiMarco, J.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is involved in the development of a 60 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. A prototype solenoid cryostat was built and tested at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. This paper discusses the test results of the prototype and compares the measured and estimated performance of the cryostat. We also present the methods and results for measuring and fiducializing the axis of the solenoid lens.

  4. Building Bigger, Better Instruments with Dry Cryostats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Voellmer, George

    2010-01-01

    The cylindrical instrument volume allowable n SOFIA is large, comprising perhaps 400 liters at 4K. However, the cryogen accommodation to enable this environment consumes roughly 20% of the volume, and worsens rues, airworthiness/safety, and handling/operation, Present-day pulse tube coolers have negligible cold volumes, provide adequate cooling powers, and reach colder temperatures than stored cryogen. In addition, they permit safer, more reliable, lower maintenance instrument operation. While the advantages of dry cryostats are well-known and commonly used in labs and ground-based astronomical facilities, SOFIA would require some charges in accommodations to permit a pulse tube cooler to operate on board, Whil e these changes are not negligible, we present our investigation into the feasibility and desirability of making SOFIA a dry cryostat-capable observatory

  5. Cryostat including heater to heat a target

    DOEpatents

    Pehl, R.H.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.

    1990-09-11

    A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vessel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism. 2 figs.

  6. Insulation Testing Using Cryostat Apparatus with Sleeve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    1999-01-01

    The method and equipment of testing continuously rolled insulation materials is presented in this paper. Testing of blanket and molded products is also facilitated. Materials are installed around a cylindrical copper sleeve using a wrapping machine. The sleeve is slid onto the vertical cold mass of the cryostat. The gap between the cold mass and the sleeve measures less than 1 mm. The cryostat apparatus is a liquid nitrogen boiloff calorimeter system that enables direct measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value) of the insulation system at any vacuum level between 5 x 10(exp -5) and 760 torr. Sensors are placed between layers of the insulation to provide complete temperature-thickness profiles. The temperatures of the cold mass (maintained at 77.8 kelvin (K)), the sleeve (cold boundary temperature (CBT)), the insulation outer surface (warm boundary temperature (WBT)), and the vacuum can (maintained at 313 K by a thermal shroud) are measured. Plots of CBT, WBT, and layer temperature profiles as functions of vacuum level show the transitions between the three dominant heat transfer modes. For this cryostat apparatus, the measureable heat gain is from 0.2 to 20 watts. The steady-state measurement of k-value is made when all temperatures and the boiloff rate are stable.

  7. Building the BICEP3 Test Cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Samantha; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Thompson, Keith L.; Grayson, James; Karpel, Ethan; Monticue, Val; Kuo Group/Bicep3 Collaboration Team

    2016-03-01

    BICEP3, a ground-based telescope stationed in the South Pole, currently employs a cryostat to observe the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background, the earliest light in the Universe, by using devices that take advantage of the superconductivity transition of titanium. The cryostat consists of staggered temperature stages at 300 K, 50 K, 4 K, 2 K, 350 mK, and 250 mK that are maintained by both a pulse tube and three stage helium (He4-He3-He3) sorption refrigerator. However, currently the helium refrigerator is experiencing unanticipated heat loading which is decreasing the fridge cycle hold time and thus the number of hours that BICEP3 can observe for in a given period of time. To address this issue, this past summer I worked at Stanford University to construct a thermally-similar cryostat that will be used to test the thermal conductivities of its various internal components at subKelvin temperatures and determine the source of this heat loading.

  8. A cryostat device for liquid nitrogen convection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Charles; Duchesne, Alexis; Caps, Herve

    2015-11-01

    When a horizontal layer of expansible fluid heated from below is submitted to a large vertical temperature gradient, one can observe convective cells. This phenomenon is the so-called Rayleigh-Bénard instability. In the literature, this instability is mainly studied when the entire bottom surface of a container heats the liquid. Under these conditions, the development of regularly spaced convective cells in the liquid bulk is observed. Cooling applications led us to consider this instability in a different geometry, namely a resistor immersed in a bath of cold liquid. We present here experiments conducted with liquid nitrogen. For this purpose, we developed a cryostat in order to be able to perform Particle Image Velocimetry. We obtained 2D maps of the flow and observed, as expected, two Rayleigh-Bénard convective cells around the heater. We particularly investigated the vertical velocity in the central column between the two cells. We compared these data to results we obtained with silicone oil and water in the same geometry. We derived theoretical law from classical models applied to the proposed geometry and found a good agreement with our experimental data. This project has been financially supported by ARC SuperCool contract of the University of Liege.

  9. The Safety System of the Herschel Cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfermann, M.; Jahn, G.; Hohn, R.; Ruehe, W.; Jewell, C.

    2004-06-01

    The cryostat for the `Herschel Space Observatory' for the European Space Agency (ESA) science program, planned for a launch with Ariane 5 in 2007, is designed for 6 days ground hold time and 3.5 years lifetime in orbit. The system comprises two tanks containing about 346 kg of liquid and superfluid Helium, with two cryogenic cold safety valves and burst disks, surrounded by three vapor cooled shields and a vacuum vessel. The safety system is two faults tolerant with three independent paths for pressure relief. The analyses of failure modes and resulting mass flows and the safety elements of the cryogenic system will be discussed.

  10. Final Scientific/Technical Report "Arc Tube Coating System for Color Consistency"

    SciTech Connect

    Buelow, Roger; Jenson, Chris; Kazenski, Keith

    2013-03-21

    DOE has enabled the use of coating materials using low cost application methods on light sources to positively affect the output of those sources. The coatings and light source combinations have shown increased lumen output of LED fixtures (1.5%-2.0%), LED arrays (1.4%) and LED powered remote phosphor systems Philips L-Prize lamp (0.9%). We have also demonstrated lifetime enhancements (3000 hrs vs 8000 hrs) and shifting to higher CRI (51 to 65) in metal halide high intensity discharge lamps with metal oxide coatings. The coatings on LEDs and LED products are significant as the market is moving increasingly more towards LED technology. Enhancements in LED performance are demonstrated in this work through the use of available materials and low cost application processes. EFOI used low refractive index fluoropolymers and low cost dipping processes for application of the material to surfaces related to light transmission of LEDs and LED products. Materials included Teflon AF, an amorphous fluorinated polymer and fluorinated acrylic monomers. The DOE SSL Roadmap sets goals for LED performance moving into the future. EFOI's coating technology is a means to shift the performance curve for LEDs. This is not limited to one type of LED, but is relevant across LED technologies. The metal halide work included the use of sol-gel solutions resulting in silicon dioxide and titanium dioxide coatings on the quartz substrates of the metal halide arc tubes. The coatings were applied using low cost dipping processes.

  11. Capital requirements for the transportation of energy materials: 1979 ARC estimates. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-13

    This report contains TERA's estimates of capital requirements to transport natural gas, crude oil, petroleum products, and coal in the United States by 1990. The low, medium, and high world-oil-price scenarios from the EIA's Mid-range Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), as used in the 1979 Annual Report to Congress (ARC), were provided as a basis for the analysis and represent three alternative futures. TERA's approach varies by energy commodity to make best use of the information and analytical tools available. Summaries of transportation investment requirements through 1990 are given. Total investment requirements for three modes (pipelines, rails, waterways and the three energy commodities can accumulate to a $49.9 to $50.9 billion range depending on the scenario. The scenarios are distinguished primarily by the world price of oil which, given deregulation of domestic oil prices, affects US oil prices even more profoundly than in the past. The high price of oil, following the evidence of the last year, is projected to hold demand for oil below the recent past.

  12. Heat transfer design and performance of a helium cryostat operating at 6.5 K

    SciTech Connect

    Gasteyer, T.H.; Krempetz, K.J.; Lee, A.; Rucinski, R.A.; Stefanik, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    A liquid helium cryostat has been designed and operated for the purpose of testing visible light photon counter (VLPC) chips at 6.5 K. To achieve the desired operational characteristics for the VLPC devices their operating temperature is restricted to 6.5 K +/{minus} 0.1 K. They will be used in a scintillating fiber tracker being proposed as part of an upgrade of the D(0) detector at Fermilab. The final version of the scintillating fiber tracker will contain roughly 100,000 VLPC channels. Two cryostats with identical thermal design (a 128 channel and a 3072 channel design) have been built to perform the initial VLPC testing. The heat transfer needed to maintain the VLPC at its operating temperature occurs by conduction across an annular helium gas gap to a liquid helium reservoir. Helium boiloff is used to intercept conduction heat leak to the liquid reservoir. ANSYS finite element heat transfer analysis was utilized in the thermal design of the cryostat. The cryostat design and thermal performance (predicted and measured) are presented.

  13. The CUORE cryostat: commissioning and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V.; Alduino, C.; Alessandria, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Bucci, C.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cappelli, L.; Cereseto, R.; Chott, N.; Copello, S.; Cremonesi, O.; Cushman, J. S.; D’Addabbo, A.; Davis, C. J.; Dell’Oro, S.; Drobizhev, A.; Franceschi, M. A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Guetti, M.; Ligi, C.; Napolitano, T.; Nucciotti, A.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Pattavina, L.; Rusconi, C.; Santone, D.; Taffarello, L.; Terranova, F.; Wallig, J.; Wise, T.; Uttaro, S.

    2016-05-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) will search for the 0vββ decay in 130Te using a cryogenic array of TeO2 bolometers, operated at a base temperature of ~10mK. CUORE will consist of a closely packed array of 19 towers each containing 52 crystals, for a total mass of 741kg. The detector assembly is hosted in one of the largest cryostats ever constructed and will be cooled down to base temperature using a custom-built cryogen free dilution refrigerator. The CUORE cryostat along with the pulse tube based dilution refrigerator has been already commissioned at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and a record base temperature, on a cubic meter scale, of ~6mK was achieved during one of the integration runs. We present the results from integration runs, characterizing the system and the cooling performance of the dilution refrigerator, effectively showcasing its stability at base temperature for the expected thermal load.

  14. Extreme argon purity in a large, non-evacuated cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Tope, Terry; Adamowski, Mark; Carls, B.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Skup, E.; Stancari, M.; Yang, T.

    2014-01-29

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) show promise as scalable devices for the large detectors needed for long-baseline neutrino oscillation physics. Over the last several years at Fermilab a staged approach to developing the technology for large detectors has been developed. The TPC detectors require ultra-pure liquid argon with respect to electronegative contaminants such as oxygen and water. The tolerable electronegative contamination level may be as pure as 60 parts per trillion of oxygen. Three liquid argon cryostats operated at Fermilab have achieved the extreme purity required by TPCs. These three cryostats used evacuation to remove atmospheric contaminants as the first purification step prior to filling with liquid argon. Future physics experiments may require very large detectors with tens of kilotonnes of liquid argon mass. The capability to evacuate such large cryostats adds significant cost to the cryostat itself in addition to the cost of a large scale vacuum pumping system. This paper describes a 30 ton liquid argon cryostat at Fermilab which uses purging to remove atmospheric contaminants instead of evacuation as the first purification step. This cryostat has achieved electronegative contamination levels better than 60 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent. The results of this liquid argon purity demonstration will strongly influence the design of future TPC cryostats.

  15. Cryostat Filling Limitations for Proposed Ar Dewar Pressure Increase

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-07-23

    In order to significantly decrease the amount of time required to fill the cryostats, it is desired to raise the setpoint of the 'operating' relief valve on the argon storage dewar to 20 psig from its existing 16 psig setting. This additional pressure increases the flow to the cryostats and will overwhelm the relief capacity if the temperature of the modules within these vessels is warm enough. Using some conservative assumptions and simple calculations within this note, the maximum average temperature that the modules within each cryostat can be at prior to filling from the storage dewar with liquid argon is at least 290 K.

  16. Design Evolution and Analysis of the ITER Cryostat Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Han; Song, Yuntao; Wang, Songke

    2015-12-01

    The cryostat is a vacuum tight container enveloping the entire basic systems of the ITER tokamak machine, including a vacuum vessel, a superconducting magnet and thermal shield etc. It is evacuated to a pressure of 10-4 Pa to limit the heat transfer via gas conduction and convection to the cryogenically cooled components. Another important function of cryostat is to support all the loads from the tokamak to the concrete floor of the pit by its support system during different operational regimes and accident scenarios. This paper briefly presents the design evolution and associated analysis of the cryostat support system and the structural interface with the building.

  17. D-Zero Cryostat Supplemental Rupture Disc

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.T.; /Fermilab

    1987-08-03

    The common relief and rupture disc vent line requires a double disc assembly with vented interspace for accurate disc burst pressures. The first disc must take pump and purge vacuum loading, but be set to operate at 110% of the MAWP, 18.3 psig (ASME code). The available solution is 18.3 psig with a burst tolerance of +/- psig. The interspace should be locally vented by a flow limiting vent valve to decouple the vent line backpressure from the vessel rupture disc. The second disc must take the worst case vent line backpressure, the steady state value found in D-Zero engineering note 3740.000-EN-63 with all three cryostats simultaneously venting at the fire condition into the 4-inch x 6-inch and 6-inch x 8-inch sections. This value is less than 2 psid. The maximum rupture value for the second disc must be less than the minimum rupture value for the first disc less 2 psid i.e. < 16.3.

  18. Series-Produced Helium II Cryostats for the Lhc Magnets: Technical Choices, Industrialisation, Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncet, A.; Parma, V.

    2008-03-01

    Assembled in 8 continuous segments of approximately 2.7 km length each, the He II cryostats for the 1232 cryodipoles and 474 Short Straight Sections (SSS housing the quadrupoles) must fulfill tight technical requirements. They have been produced by industry in large series according to cost-effective industrial production methods to keep expenditure within the financial constraints of the project and assembled under contract at CERN. The specific technical requirements of the generic systems of the cryostat (vacuum, cryogenic, electrical distribution, magnet alignment) are briefly recalled, as well as the basic design choices leading to the definition of their components (vacuum vessels, thermal shielding, supporting systems). Early in the design process emphasis was placed on the feasibility of manufacturing techniques adequate for large series production of components, optimal tooling for time-effective assembly methods, and reliable quality assurance systems. An analytical review of the costs of the cryostats from component procurement to final assembly, tests and interconnection in the machine is presented and compared with initial estimates, together with an appraisal of the results and lessons learned.

  19. Test VLPC Cryostat: Programming and Configuration of Cryogenic and Temperature Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Zaczek, M.; /Fermilab

    1997-08-11

    Currently, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is in the midst of a site wide upgrade. Here at D-Zero, one of the components of this upgrade will be the construction of two 48 cassette VLPC cryostats which will be the heart of the new magnetic central fiber tracker. A VLPC or Visible Light Photon Counter is a device that allows physicists to more accurately calculate the origins of particles ejected during a proton - anti-proton collision in the detector. Inside the detector is an optical fiber barrel which surrounds the collision point. When an ejected particle strikes a fiber the result is the release of photons which travel along the fiber until they reach the bottom of a cassette hitting the VLPC chip. These impacts result in voltages which are read by the VLPC chips and sent to the computer for future analysis. From these voltages, physicists can determine the origins of the particles, their charges, their speeds and other information as well. Within the last few months a test VLPC bas been built at D-Zero. This VLPC is comprised of four rectangular cassettes each equipped with heating elements, RTDs and 1024 VLPC chips. This particular configuration is unique here at Fermilab. Other VLPC cryostats that have been built were usually cylindrical in their geometry. The purpose of this test VLPC is to have on hand a reliable model to aid in understanding the complexities involved in running such devices at approximately 10K, as well as to prepare for the eventual 48 cassette VLPCs to come. In particular, an important aspect of this test phase is to check the engineering involved so that the final cryostats are designed correctly. Also, this test cryostat will enable us to check each of the cassettes to be used in the final cryostat and correct any problems before hand. This engineering note has been written in order to describe the setup of the VLPC as it pertains to the programming, configuration and control of all of the cryogenic and temperature instruments

  20. First scientific application of the membrane cryostat technology

    SciTech Connect

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Baller, Bruce R.; Barger, Robert K.; Chi, Edward C.; Davis, Ronald P.; Johnson, Bryan D.; Kubinski, Bob M.; Najdzion, John J.; Rucinski, Russel A.; Schmitt, Rich L.; Tope, Terry E.; Mahoney, Ryan; Norris, Barry L.; Watkins, Daniel J.; McCluskey, Elaine G.; Stewart, James

    2014-01-29

    We report on the design, fabrication, performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with IHI Corporation (IHI). Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon, and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the purity requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation and using only a controlled gaseous argon purge; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon during filling, purification, and maintenance mode using mole sieve and copper filters from the Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator (LAPD) R and D project. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion oxygen equivalent. This paper gives the requirements, design, construction, and performance of the LBNE membrane cryostat prototype, with experience and results important to the development of the LBNE detector.

  1. Continuous Flow Cryostat for X-Ray Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, T.-C.; Linden, Peter J. E. M. van der; Glatzel, Pieter; Lapras, Christophe; Krzyzowski, Michael

    2010-06-23

    A continuous Helium flow cryostat was designed and built by Cryovac GMbH to specifications given by ESRF beamline ID26. The beamline has constructed a high energy resolution X-ray emission spectrometer using multiple spherically bent analyser crystals, together with the sample and detector on a vertical Rowland circle. The double shrouded cryostat has a low profile designed to fit into the spectrometer setup, the lowest detector position allows for a Bragg angle of 85 degrees with a 1 meter diameter Rowland circle. The cryostat has a temperature range of 5 to 300 Kelvin on the sample holder which is cooled by static Helium exchange gas. The cryostat has triple windows for beam entrance, transmission and fluorescence; the latter offers an opening angle of 80 degrees horizontally and 50 degrees vertically. The cryostat can be configured to work in two different operation modes: translation or rotation. The translation mode offers a displacement of 50 mm to accommodate multiple samples on the sample holder. The rotation mode is used for polarisation studies on single crystals.We show recent results obtained on Chromium containing molecular complexes; data collection was done at a temperature of 10 Kelvin to avoid radiation damage.

  2. Results of the BETS Survey of the CC Cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, R.D.; /Fermilab

    1988-01-07

    This Engineering Note presents results of dimensional surveys of the CC Cryostat. The surveys were performed by members of the Fermilab Alignment Group using a computerized optical system known as BETS. The coordinate system used is described on page 1 of the note. Locations of the support bosses in the inner vessel are given on pages 2 and 3. The bosses control the position of the module array within the cryostat. Locations of the center cylinders (bores) and bypass tubes in both vessels are given on pages 2 and 4 through 6. Elevations and locations of the nozzles on top of the cryostat are given on page 9. Measurements of the stack-up heights of the support stanchions are given on page 13. Raw BETS data are included in Appendix A of the Note.

  3. A closed-cycle 1 K refrigeration cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Lichtenwalter, Ben; Friebel, Aaron; Tang, Hong X.

    2014-11-01

    A 1 K closed-cycle cryostat has been developed to provide continuous cooling to a photon detector below 2 K. A two-stage 4 K pulse tube cryocooler is used to liquefy evacuated vapor from a 1 K pumping port to form a closed-cycle refrigeration loop. A 1 K instrumentation chamber, attached to the 1 K cooling station, is designed to operate with helium inside and provide more uniform cooling. The design of the cryostat has no direct mechanical contact between the pulse tube cryocooler heat exchangers and the 1 K cooling station resulting in almost no vibration transfer to instrumentation chamber. The cryostat can reach a no-load temperature of 1.62 K and provide 250 mW cooling power at 1.84 K.

  4. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  5. A top loading 2 Kelvin test cryostat for SRF cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Kedzie, M.; Kelly, M. P.; Gerbick, S. M.; Fuerst, J. D.; Shepard, K. W.; Physics

    2009-01-01

    A new large 2 Kelvin test cryostat is being commissioned at Argonne National Laboratory. This system will have a full time connection to the 4.5 Kelvin ATLAS refrigerator and, with integrated J-T heat exchanger, will allow continuous 2 Kelvin operation. The large diameter was chosen to accommodate essentially all of today's superconducting cavities and the top loading design facilitates clean room assembly. The commissioning run will be with a coaxial half wave cavity to be followed by testing with 1.3 GHz single-cell elliptical cavities. Details of the initial engineering cool down on the cryostat are presented.

  6. Lazy arc consistency

    SciTech Connect

    Schiex, T.; Gaspin, C.; Regin, J.C.; Verfaillie, G.

    1996-12-31

    Arc consistency filtering is widely used in the framework of binary constraint satisfaction problems: with a low complexity, inconsistency may be detected and domains are filtered. In this paper, we show that when detecting inconsistency is the objective, a systematic domain filtering is useless and a lazy approach is more adequate. Whereas usual arc consistency algorithms produce the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, when it exists, we propose a method, called LAC{tau}, which only looks for any arc consistent sub-domain. The algorithm is then extended to provide the additional service of locating one variable with a minimum domain cardinality in the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, without necessarily computing all domain sizes. Finally, we compare traditional AC enforcing and lazy AC enforcing using several benchmark problems, both randomly generated CSP and real life problems.

  7. Development of membrane cryostats for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, D.; Bremer, J.; Gendotti, A.; Geynisman, M.; Hentschel, S.; Loew, T.; Mladenov, D.; Montanari, C.; Murphy, S.; Nessi, M.; Norris, B.; Noto, F.; Rubbia, A.; Sharma, R.; Smargianaki, D.; Stewart, J.; Vignoli, C.; Wilson, P.; Wu, S.

    2015-12-01

    A new collaboration is being formed to develop a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located at the Surf Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, the detector will be located inside cryostats filled with 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon (less than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). To qualify the membrane technology for future very large-scale and underground implementations, a strong prototyping effort is ongoing: several smaller detectors of growing size with associated cryostats and cryogenic systems will be designed and built at Fermilab and CERN. They will take physics data and test different detector elements, filtration systems, design options and installation procedures. In addition, a 35 ton prototype is already operational at Fermilab and will take data with single-phase detector in early 2016. After the prototyping phase, the multi-kton detector will be constructed. After commissioning, it will detect and study neutrinos from a new beam from Fermilab. These cryostats will be engineered, constructed, commissioned, and qualified by an international engineering team. This contribution presents the on-going effort on the development of the cryostats and details the requirements and the current status of the design.

  8. Two low-cost, modular sub-λ test cryostats

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J. D.; Kaluzny, J. A.

    2014-01-29

    Two general-purpose liquid helium (LHe) test cryostats have been developed in support of a major upgrade to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The cryostats are capable of sustained operation below 1.8 K and currently support tests of prototype superconducting rf (srf) cavities for the APS Upgrade’s Short Pulse X-ray (SPX) initiative. To save cost, two existing test vessels were reconditioned: one “bucket dewar” supporting bare cavity tests and one shielded vacuum vessel with an integral LHe reservoir for jacketed/dressed cavity tests. A new feedbox containing a heat exchanger and associated valves was also designed and fabricated to support either cryostat. The resulting modular design permits tests on a wide variety of srf cavities in various states of completion, minimizing cost and maximizing use of the hardware. Together with a dedicated vacuum pump, control system, and helium supply via storage dewar or cryoplant, these cryostats are vital to the srf cavity development effort within the APS Upgrade.

  9. Majorana One-Tonne Cryostat Cooling Conceptual Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Douglas J.; Orrell, John L.; Fast, James E.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2011-02-17

    This report evaluates the conceptual plans for a one-tonne (S4) cryostat cooling design. This document is based upon previous design work and experimental results used to evaluate the current MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR (MJD) thermal design. A feasibility study of a cooling system for S4 based on the MJD thermosyphon experiment is presented. The one-tonne experiment will be a scaled up version of the MJD. There will be many cryostats for the S4 experiment. In this document a cryostat with up to 19 strings of Germanium crystals is analyzed. Aside from an extra outer ring of crystals, the geometry of both systems’ cryostats is very similar. The materials used in the fabrication of both ultra-low background experiments will be underground electroformed copper. The current MJD uses a two-phase liquid-gas cooling system to ensure constant operating temperature. This document presents a theoretical investigation of a cooling system for the S4 experiment and evaluates the heat transfer performance requirements for such a system.

  10. Variable-Temperature Cryostat For Radiation-Damage Testing Of Germanium Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, Samuel R.; Puc, Bernard P.

    1992-01-01

    Variable-temperature cryostats developed to study radiation damage to, and annealing of, germanium gamma-ray detectors. Two styles: one accommodates large single detector and one accommodates two medium-sized detectors. New cryostats allow complete testing of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detectors without breaking cryostat vacuum and removing detectors for annealing.

  11. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  12. Cryostat "UV" Relief Valve Selection and Process Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.T.; Wintercorn, S.J.; /Fermilab

    1987-08-11

    This report describes the selection of the relief valves for the D-Zero cryostats. The selection was based on the flow requirements calculated in D-Zero engineering note 3740.214,224-EN-6 under fire conditions (1200 F, no vacuum) for the central cryostat; 264 SCFM. This value was calculated from section 5.3.5 of 'Pressure Relief Device Standards; S 1.3-Compressed Gas Storage Containers', published by the Compressed Gas Association, Inc. The flow calculated above is far greater than the required fire condition flow capacity of 264 SCFM. The improbable 70 F flow temperature value of 738 SCFM is still much greater than the required fire capacity. The flow capacity of the paralleled supplemental rupture disc is 2640 SCFM, independently greater than the fire condition flow requirement.

  13. Gas permeation and performance of an FRP cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Toichi; Nishijima, Shigehiro; Fujioka, Kouji; Kuraoka, Yasurou

    The causes of degradation in the vacuum within an FRP cryostat, a device useful in aerospace engineering because of its light weight, were studied experimentally from a materials science standpoint. It was found that gas diffusion practically does not occur at cryogenic temperatures. When gas permeation is induced at low temperatures, the main result is a gas leak due to a crack caused by thermal shock or thermal contraction. Reducing the bubbles in the FRP material during its manufacture should increase its crack resistance. Gas diffusion is a problem at room temperature because the helium gas diffusion rate is large considering the degree of vacuum. Increasing the glass content decreases the diffusion rate. Outgassing from FRP consists mainly of water from the FRP material. Baking reduces the water content in the FRP and increases its suitability for cryostats.

  14. Preliminary design of the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Goins, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    For the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) to achieve the performance goals set forth, the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) coil systems must operate in a cryogenic temperature regime. The cryostat has been designed to provide and maintain this environment. The preliminary design activity is addressing the design issues and interfaces necessary to provide a cryogenic vessel that will maintain a maximum temperature differential of 8{degree}C between the outer vessel wall and the ambient test cell conditions; operate in a pressure range of +5 psig to {minus}2 psig; accommodate numerous penetrations, including cooling, diagnostic, and gravity support items; and maintain a maximum leak rate of gaseous nitrogen at 1 l/s at 1 atm. Conceptually, the cryostat consists of thermal insulation sandwiched between an inner primary stainless steel pressure vessel and a thin outer stainless steel wall. Design activities have concentrated on determining the size and shape of the primary vessel wall and selecting the best candidate thermal insulation materials for future irradiation testing. The following shapes of the upper and lower cryostat structure were analyzed: a standard ASME torispherical domed top and bottom; a nonstandard domed top and bottom; and a 2{degree} sloped conical top and bottom contour. Screening of candidate insulation materials was based on lowest thermal conductivity over the range of temperatures anticipated in the CIT environment; low material cost and apparent ease of assembly; and survivability of material in the CIT irradiation environment. This paper presents the configuration development of the cryostat used to maintain the cryogenic temperature environment for CIT. 3 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Evaluation of ASD systems for electric arc furnace and argon oxygen decarburization refiner baghouse fans. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Adjustable speed drive (ASD) control of the baghouse fans for Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) and Argon Oxygen Decarburization Vessel (AOD) can improve operations, reduce the degree of dust generation, and provide significant energy savings. The purpose of the project was to quantify the benefits, both in energy savings and other process improvements and to demonstrate the methodology of applying adjustable speed drives, to two baghouse fans from a system perspective. The report describes the approach to accomplishing the ASD equipment installation, the test procedure and methodology and provides the test results and economic return. The test results indicated that by using ASDs to control the extraction fan air flow for the EAF and AOD, the following benefits would be achieved on an annual basis: EAF annual energy savings, 267,929 kWh valued at $11,575; EAF dust reduction, overall, 2--3%; EAF dust reduction, during the flatbath period, 35%; and AOD annual energy savings, 1,443,078 kWh valued at $62,341.

  16. Recirculating 1-K-Pot for Pulse-Tube Cryostats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, Christopher T.; Naylor, Bret J.; Prouve, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A paper describes a 1-K-pot that works with a commercial pulse tube cooler for astrophysics instrumentation testbeds that require temperatures <1.7 K. Pumped liquid helium-4 cryostats were commonly used to achieve this temperature. However, liquid helium-4 cryostats are being replaced with cryostats using pulse tube coolers. The closed-cycle 1K-pot system for the pulse tube cooler requires a heat exchanger on the pulse tube, a flow restriction, pump-out line, and pump system that recirculates helium-4. The heat exchanger precools and liquefies helium- 4 gas at the 2.5 to 3.5 K pulse tube cold head. This closed-cycle 1-K-pot system was designed to work with commercially available laboratory pulse tube coolers. It was built using common laboratory equipment such as stainless steel tubing and a mechanical pump. The system is self-contained and requires only common wall power to operate. The lift of 15 mW at 1.1 K and base temperature of 0.97 K are provided continuously. The system can be scaled to higher heat lifts of .30 to 50 mW if desired. Ground-based telescopes could use this innovation to improve the efficiency of existing cryo

  17. Construction of a Para-Ortho Hydrogen Test Cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, J.; Haberstroh, Ch.

    2010-04-01

    In a prospective hydrogen economy it is necessary to verify the para concentration of the employed hydrogen. In case of a short storage time of about a few days only it has been shown that a partial conversion into para-hydrogen gives an optimized overall efficiency. Hence, an easy and reliable method of measuring the para-hydrogen concentration is needed. In this paper, the concept and construction of a small test cryostat are described and first results are presented. The measuring principle is based on a catalytic induced adiabatic ortho-para conversion of a hydrogen gas flow starting from a known temperature. The operation of the system only requires a certain amount of liquid nitrogen as coolant. To determine the concentration of para-hydrogen it is only necessary to measure the temperature of the gas before and after the adiabatic catalyst cell. The measuring cryostat is used for further investigation of the spontaneous para-ortho conversion in the supercritical state. In addition, the design of the cryostat allows the investigation of different catalyst materials regarding the catalytic activity and possible degradation by using a known para concentration for the measurement.

  18. Beam to Shell Temperature Differencees for the CC Cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, R.; /Fermilab

    1991-02-05

    This note documents the calculation of stresses resulting from temperature differences between the CC cryostat shell and the module array support beams, and the calculation of corresponding maximum allowable temperature differences to be monitored during the cooldown of the cryostat. A finite element model of a portion of the inner vessel shell was analyzed for a uniform temperature change. The shell was assumed to be completely restrained by the support beams. A maximum allowable temperature difference was determined based on limits on secondary stress ranges prescribed by the ASME Code (Section VID, Division 2). The maximum allowable difference between the cryostat shell and the support beams was found to vary from about 18K near room temperature to about 30K as the shell temperature approaches liquid argon temperature. The allowable values are tabulated below and plotted in Figure 1. The variation results from the decrease in the coefficient of thermal expansion of stainless steels at lower temperatures. As shown in the plot, the variation is roughly linear. Note that although the shell is assumed to be at the lower temperature in Fig. 1, the limitation on temperature difference will also apply during warmup, when the shell will likely be warmer than the beams.

  19. Initial Component Testing for a Germanium Array Cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Keillor, Martin E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fast, James E.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Seifert, Allen

    2009-06-01

    This report describes progress on the construction of two ultra-low-background cryostats that are part of the NA-22 funded “Radionuclide Laboratories” (RN Labs) project. Each cryostat will house seven high-purity germanium crystals (HPGe). These cryostats are being built from a limited set of materials that are known to have very low levels of radioactive impurities. The RN Labs instrument is designed to take advantage of low background performance, high detection efficiency, and γ-γ coincidence signatures to provide unprecedented gamma spectroscopy sensitivity. The project is focused on improving gamma analysis capabilities for nuclear detonation detection (NDD) applications. The instrument also has the potential for basic nuclear physics research. Section 1 provides the background for the project. Section 2 discusses germanium crystal acceptance testing. Design problems were found after the first delivery of new detectors from the vendor, Canberra Semiconductors. The first four crystals were returned for repair, resulting in a delay in crystal procurement. Section 3 provides an update on copper electroforming. In general, electroforming parts for RN Labs has proceeded smoothly, but there have been recent problems in electroforming three large copper parts necessary for the project. Section 4 describes the first round of testing for the instrument: anti-cosmic scintillator testing, electronics testing, and initial vacuum testing. Section 5 concludes with an overall description of the state of the project and challenges that remain.

  20. Superfluid helium cryostat for the SIRTF cryogenic telescope assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volz, Stephen M.; Schweickart, Russell B.; Heurich, Bruce

    2003-03-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is the last of NASA's four great observatories, scheduled for launch in January 2003. At the heart of the SIRTF Observatory is the Cryogenic Telescope Assembly (CTA) that provides a 1.4 K heat sink for the SIRTF Science Instruments while cooling the telescope to as low as 5.5 K in order to achieve thea low photon background. This unique cryogenic/thermal system provides the necessary cooling through passive means combined with vapor cooling by the helium gas vented from a 360 liter superfluid helium cryostat. The passive cooling is made possible by the favorable thermal environment achieved in an Earth-trailing solar orbit, with the payload millions of miles from the Earth. The SIRTF Cryostat and integrated CTA have just completed an extended period of cryogenic system performance testing. This testing included mission lifetime assessment, luanch hold capability and in situ characterization and performance measurements of the porous plug liquid-vapor phase separator. We also encountered and recovered from an ice contamination incident within the cryostat. We report here the system and component test results. We also provide recommendations and lessons learned through the operations of the SIRTF system.

  1. Nomenclature of SLC Arc beamline components

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J.; Weng, W.T.

    1986-04-10

    This note defines I and C formal names for beamline components in the Arc as specified in the TRANSPORT decks ARCN FINAL and ARCS FINAL of June 5, 1985. The formal name consists of three fields: the primary name, the zone and the unit number. The general principles and guidelines are explained in Reference 1. The rationale and the final resolutions of the naming conventions for the Arc are explained.

  2. Cryostat system for investigation on new neutron moderator materials at reactor TRIGA PUSPATI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dris, Zakaria bin; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz bin; Hamid, Nasri A.; Azman, Azraf; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Yazid, Hafizal

    2016-01-01

    A simple continuous flow (SCF) cryostat was designed to investigate the neutron moderation of alumina in high temperature co-ceramic (HTCC) and polymeric materials such as Teflon under TRIGA neutron environment using a reflected neutron beam from a monochromator. Cooling of the cryostat will be carried out using liquid nitrogen. The cryostat will be built with an aluminum holder for moderator within stainless steel cylinder pipe. A copper thermocouple will be used as the temperature sensor to monitor the moderator temperature inside the cryostat holder. Initial measurements of neutron spectrum after neutron passing through the moderating materials have been carried out using a neutron spectrometer.

  3. Very low force cooling contacts for the ISO cryostat cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaellig, R.; Seidel, A.

    1990-03-01

    The infrared Space Observatory (ISO) cryostat cover, which will be ejected from the satellite after a period of 10-15 days in orbit, needs passive cooling of its thermal shields to minimize heat input to the cryostat and to maintain a temperature on the innermost shield of 25 K or less. This passive cooling is provided by spring loaded thermal contacts which are also used for ejection of the cover after release of the clampband device that keeps the cover closed during launch. So as not to disturb the satellite attitude control and to limit the load on the mechanical cover shield supports, the force of a single thermal contact was limited to 25-35 N. An experimental program was conducted to measure the thermal contact conductance of various combinations of two shapes and three materials. Typical measured conductance and heat transfer coefficients for the gold treated copper sphere/flat aluminum plane combination are: 2.54 W/sq cm K and 1.8 mW/K at a contact temperature of 8 K and a force of 25 N, with a pressure of 3.5 x 10 to the 8th Pa.

  4. Design of the multilayer insulation system for the Superconducting Super Collider 50mm dipole cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H.; Schoo, C.J.

    1991-03-01

    The development of the multilayer insulation (MLI) system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 50 mm collider dipole cryostat is an ongoing extension of work conducted during the 40 mm cryostat program. While the basic design of the MLI system for the 50 mm cryostat resembles that of the 40 mm cryostat, results from measurements of MLI thermal performance below 80K have prompted a re-design of the MLI system for the 20K thermal radiation shield. Presented is the design of the MLI system for the 50 mm collider dipole cryostat, with discussion focusing on system performance, blanket geometry, cost-effective fabrication techniques, and built-in quality control measures that assure consistent thermal performance throughout the SSC accelerator. 16 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Mu2e production solenoid cryostat conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.M.; Peterson, T.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    Mu2e is a muon-to-electron conversion experiment being designed by an international collaboration of more than 65 scientists and engineers from more than 20 research institutions for installation at Fermilab. The experiment is comprised of three large superconducting solenoid magnet systems, production solenoid (PS), transport solenoid (TS) and detector solenoid (DS). A 25 kW, 8 GeV proton beam strikes a target located in the PS creating muons from the decay of secondary particles. These muons are then focused in the PS and the resultant muon beam is transported through the TS towards the DS. The production solenoid presents a unique set of design challenges as the result of high radiation doses, stringent magnetic field requirements, and large structural forces. This paper describes the conceptual design of the PS cryostat and will include discussions of the vacuum vessel, thermal shield, multi-layer insulation, cooling system, cryogenic piping, and suspension system.

  6. Passive vibration isolation for SITELLE's closed cycle cooled cryostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baril, Marc; Benedict, Tom; Barrick, Gregory; Ho, Kevin

    2012-09-01

    The SITELLE Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer system being developed by l'Université Laval at ABB-Bomem will require two identical CCD detector systems. Our requirements for the cryogenic system for these cameras are: cooling to below 190 K, extremely low vibrational input from the cryogenic system (<1 mg RMS from 0-2 kHz), hands-off operation over long periods of time and low original capital outlay and continued operation cost. These constraints drove towards the selection of a Polycold PCC cooled system which exhibits relatively low vibrational noise and can efficiently achieve the required cooling power in our target temperature range. This paper will present work performed to passively mitigate high frequency vibrations imparted by the Polycold PCC cryo-head on the detector cryostat.

  7. Cloud Arcs

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... causing much of the air near the centers of the arcs to rise. This air spreads out horizontally in all directions as it rises and ... is now quite weak and on meeting the undisturbed air it can rise again slightly - possibly assisting in the formation of new small cumulus ...

  8. Preliminary Design of the Vacuum System for FAIR Super FRS Quadrupole Magnet Cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, J.; Pal, G.; Datta, A.; Sarma, P. R.; Bhunia, U.; Roy, S.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Nandi, C.; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    The Super-Conducting Fragment Separator (Super FRS) of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI Darmstadt is a large-acceptance superonducting fragment separator. The separator consists of large dipole, quadrupole and hexapole superconducting magnets. The long quadrupole magnet cryostat houses the helium chamber, which has the magnet iron and NbTi superconducting coil. The magnet weighs about 30 tons. The helium chamber is enclosed in vacuum inside the magnet cryostat. Multilayer Insulation (MLI) will be wrapped around the thermal shield to reduce radiation loss. Polyster of MLI comprises the major component responsible for outgassing. In order to reduce outgassing, pumping at elevated temperatures has to be carried out. In view of the large size and weight of the magnet, a seal off approach might not be operationally feasible. Continuous pumping of the cryostat has also been examined. Pump has been kept at a distance from the magnet considering the effect of stray magnetic fields. Oil free turbo molecular pump and scroll pump combination will be used to pump down the cryostat. The ultimate heat load of the cryostat will be highly dependent on the pressure attained. Radiation and conduction plays an important role in the heat transfer at low temperatures. This paper presents the vacuum design of the long quadrupole magnet cryostat and estimates the heat load of the cryostat.

  9. Reduction of helium loss from a superconducting accelerating cavity during initial cool-down and cryostat exchange by pre-cooling the re-condensing cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, B. E.; Minehara, E. J.; Hayashizaki, N.; Oshima, N.; Suzuki, R.

    2015-03-01

    A Zero-Boil-Off (ZBO) cryostat is designed to realize a compact, stand-alone cryogenic system for the AIST superconducting accelerator (SCA). Under normal operation there is no evaporative helium loss from the cryomodule and therefore operating costs associated with the supply of liquid helium can be eliminated. The only significant loss of helium from the module occurs during the initial cavity cool-down procedure or when the re-condensing cryostat is replaced. It takes about 3 h to cool down the cryostat head from room temperature (300 K) to 4 K. During this time around 100 L of liquid helium is lost due to evaporation. By pre-cooling the cryostat inside a low heat load vacuum tube before transfer to the cryomodule, this evaporative loss could be essentially eliminated, significantly reducing the volume of liquid helium required for the initial cryomodule cool-down. The pre-cooling system also provides an efficient method to test the cryostat prior to use.

  10. Note: Simple leak sealing technique for ultra-high vacuum cryostat by using freezable liquid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Seong; Kim, Ji-Ho; Lyo, In-Whan

    2015-05-01

    Here we introduce a simple, low-cost, contamination-free, and highly reliable technique for sealing an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) cryostat by using cryogenically freezable liquid. We demonstrate it by sealing an UHV cryostat with dry leaks in the high vacuum range; ethanol was utilized to fill and block the leakage pathways through the subsequent in situ solidification by LN2. The seal is reversible and can be maintained as long as the cryostat is kept at cryogenic temperature. PMID:26026566

  11. D0 CC Cryostat Test Cooldown - Cooldown Time

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J.D.; /Fermilab

    1987-08-19

    The D0 CC Cryostat is to be cold tested with LN{sub 2}. Calculations show that the time required for the 12.5 ton stainless steel inner vessel to reach equilibrium is around 5 hours if the vessel is cooled by introducing liquid into a nozzle at the bottom. The heat transfer calculations contain many assumptions. As a result, the vessel will be cooled by spraying LN{sub 2} through a nozzle at the vessel top, providing as fast a cooldown as desired. Although calculations of the bottom-fill cooldown method indicate a reasonable cooldown time, the assumption of uniform gas temperature (absence of stratification) is vital to the analysis and in fast may not be valid. Initially, as liquid is introduced into the bottom of the vessel, it will boil rapidly creating large amounts of cold gas which then cool the walls above. As the vessel bottom cools and LN{sub 2} begins to pool, however, the boiloff rate could decrease significantly. Thus the cold gas assumed in the free convection calculations is not generated. For this reason and in the interest of a speedy cooldown it has been decided to fill the vessel by spraying LN{sub 2} in through a nozzle in the vessel top.

  12. Construction and Testing of a Low-power Cryostat for MARS

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Day, Anthony R.; Fast, James E.; Fuller, Erin S.

    2007-10-01

    A low-power cryostat was designed and built for the Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project for the purpose of housing a close-packed high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector array of 14 HPGe detectors. The power consumption of the cold mass in the cryostat was measured to be 4.07(11) watts, sufficient for 5.5 days of continuous operation using only 8 liters of liquid nitrogen. Temperatures throughout the cryostat were measured by platinum resistance temperature detectors. These measurements were used to determine the emissivity of the copper used in the floating radiation shield and outer cryostat wall, which was constructed using chemically cleaned and passivated copper metal. Using a PNNL-developed passivation process, an emissivity of 2.5(3)% was achieved for copper.

  13. Use of circumferential tangential cryostat sections of the intestine in the diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease

    PubMed Central

    Emery, John L.; Finch, Ethel; Lister, James

    1967-01-01

    Technical and staining methods are described for making tangential sections using a specially prepared chuck surface in a cryostat. The method gives a rapid definitive diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease in children. Images PMID:4177091

  14. A 3He Cryostat for Scientific Measurements in Pulsed High Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaoliang; Li, Liang; Liu, Mengyu; Zuo, Huakun; Peng, Tao

    A top loading 3He cryostat has been developed for scientific experiments with a 60 T pulsed magnetic field facility at Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. The cryostat consists of a 4He bath cryostat, a 3He insert and a closed circulation system for 3He gas handling. To eliminate the eddy current heating during the pulse, the tail of the 3He insert with a vacuum space at the bottom is made from fiberglass tubing coated with epoxy. The 3He bath is separated from the 4He bath with the vacuum space. The 4He bath cryostat provides cooling power to condense 3He gas by a neck tube on top of the tail. Experimental results have shown that the sample can be cooled down to 385 mK and kept cold for more than 150 second by one-shot cooling, which is sufficiently long for an experiment in a pulsed high magnetic field.

  15. Model SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) dipole magnet cryostat assembly at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.

    1989-03-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) magnet development program includes the design, fabrication and testing of full length model dipole magnets. A result of the program has been the development of a magnet cryostat design. The cryostat subsystems consist of cold mass connection-slide, suspension, thermal shields, insulation, vacuum vessel and interconnections. Design details are presented along with model magnet production experience. 6 refs., 13 figs.

  16. Deep Cryogenic Low Power 24 Bits Analog to Digital Converter with Active Reverse Cryostat

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Turqueti, Marcos; Prestemon, Soren; Albright, Robert

    2015-07-15

    LBNL is developing an innovative data acquisition module for superconductive magnets where the front-end electronics and digitizer resides inside the cryostat. This electronic package allows conventional electronic technologies such as enhanced metal–oxide–semiconductor to work inside cryostats at temperatures as low as 4.2 K. This is achieved by careful management of heat inside the module that keeps the electronic envelop at approximately 85 K. This approach avoids all the difficulties that arise from changes in carrier mobility that occur in semiconductors at deep cryogenic temperatures. There are several advantages in utilizing this system. A significant reduction in electrical noise from signalsmore » captured inside the cryostat occurs due to the low temperature that the electronics is immersed in, reducing the thermal noise. The shorter distance that signals are transmitted before digitalization reduces pickup and cross-talk between channels. This improved performance in signal-to-noise rate by itself is a significant advantage. Another important advantage is the simplification of the feedthrough interface on the cryostat head. Data coming out of the cryostat is digital and serial, dramatically reducing the number of lines going through the cryostat feedthrough interface. It is important to notice that all lines coming out of the cryostat are digital and low voltage, reducing the possibility of electric breakdown inside the cryostat. This paper will explain in details the architecture and inner workings of this data acquisition system. It will also provide the performance of the analog to digital converter when the system is immersed in liquid helium, and in liquid nitrogen. Parameters such as power dissipation, integral non-linearity, effective number of bits, signal-to-noise and distortion, will be presented for both temperatures.« less

  17. Deep Cryogenic Low Power 24 Bits Analog to Digital Converter with Active Reverse Cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turqueti, Marcos; Prestemon, Soren; Albright, Robert

    LBNL is developing an innovative data acquisition module for superconductive magnets where the front-end electronics and digitizer resides inside the cryostat. This electronic package allows conventional electronic technologies such as enhanced metal-oxide-semiconductor to work inside cryostats at temperatures as low as 4.2 K. This is achieved by careful management of heat inside the module that keeps the electronic envelop at approximately 85 K. This approach avoids all the difficulties that arise from changes in carrier mobility that occur in semiconductors at deep cryogenic temperatures. There are several advantages in utilizing this system. A significant reduction in electrical noise from signals captured inside the cryostat occurs due to the low temperature that the electronics is immersed in, reducing the thermal noise. The shorter distance that signals are transmitted before digitalization reduces pickup and cross-talk between channels. This improved performance in signal-to-noise rate by itself is a significant advantage. Another important advantage is the simplification of the feedthrough interface on the cryostat head. Data coming out of the cryostat is digital and serial, dramatically reducing the number of lines going through the cryostat feedthrough interface. It is important to notice that all lines coming out of the cryostat are digital and low voltage, reducing the possibility of electric breakdown inside the cryostat. This paper will explain in details the architecture and inner workings of this data acquisition system. It will also provide the performance of the analog to digital converter when the system is immersed in liquid helium, and in liquid nitrogen. Parameters such as power dissipation, integral non-linearity, effective number of bits, signal-to-noise and distortion, will be presented for both temperatures.

  18. Deep Cryogenic Low Power 24 Bits Analog to Digital Converter with Active Reverse Cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Turqueti, Marcos; Prestemon, Soren; Albright, Robert

    2015-07-15

    LBNL is developing an innovative data acquisition module for superconductive magnets where the front-end electronics and digitizer resides inside the cryostat. This electronic package allows conventional electronic technologies such as enhanced metal–oxide–semiconductor to work inside cryostats at temperatures as low as 4.2 K. This is achieved by careful management of heat inside the module that keeps the electronic envelop at approximately 85 K. This approach avoids all the difficulties that arise from changes in carrier mobility that occur in semiconductors at deep cryogenic temperatures. There are several advantages in utilizing this system. A significant reduction in electrical noise from signals captured inside the cryostat occurs due to the low temperature that the electronics is immersed in, reducing the thermal noise. The shorter distance that signals are transmitted before digitalization reduces pickup and cross-talk between channels. This improved performance in signal-to-noise rate by itself is a significant advantage. Another important advantage is the simplification of the feedthrough interface on the cryostat head. Data coming out of the cryostat is digital and serial, dramatically reducing the number of lines going through the cryostat feedthrough interface. It is important to notice that all lines coming out of the cryostat are digital and low voltage, reducing the possibility of electric breakdown inside the cryostat. This paper will explain in details the architecture and inner workings of this data acquisition system. It will also provide the performance of the analog to digital converter when the system is immersed in liquid helium, and in liquid nitrogen. Parameters such as power dissipation, integral non-linearity, effective number of bits, signal-to-noise and distortion, will be presented for both temperatures.

  19. Performance and results of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    2015-07-15

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the puritymore » requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.« less

  20. Performance and results of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    2015-07-15

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the purity requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.

  1. Design of the fill/transfer station cryostat for the OMEGA cryogenic target system

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, C.R.; Charmin, C.M.; Del Bene, J.V.; Hoffmann, E.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Anteby, I.

    1997-09-01

    General Atomics is designing, testing and fabricating a system for supplying cryogenic targets for the University of Rochester`s OMEGA laser system. A prototype system has demonstrated the filling of 1 mm diameter, 3 {micro}m wall plastic spheres to 111 MPa (1,100 atm) with deuterium and then cooling to 18 K to condense the fuel. The production design must be capable of routinely filling and cooling targets with a 50/50 mix of deuterium and tritium and transferring them to a device which places the targets into the focus of 60 laser beams. This paper discusses the design and analysis of the production Fill/Transfer Station cryostat. The cryostat has two major components, a fixed base and a removable dome. The joint between the base and the dome is similar to a bayonet fitting and is sealed by a room temperature elastomeric o-ring. Since the cryostat must be housed in a glovebox, its design is driven strongly by maintenance requirements. To reach the equipment inside the cryostat, the dome is simply unbolted and lifted. The inside of the cryostat is maintained at 16 K by a closed loop helium flow system. Gaseous helium at about 1.4 MPa (200 psi) flows through tubes which are brazed to the inner walls. Cooling is provided by several cryocoolers which are located external to the cryostat. Liquid nitrogen is used as a heat intercept and to precool the helium gas.

  2. SSC 50mm collider dipole cryostat single tube support post conceptual design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.

    1991-08-01

    Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet cold masses are connected to the cryostat vacuum vessel at five places equally spaced along their length. Five supports limit sag of the cold assembly due to its own weight to a level consistent with the final magnet alignment specifications. The supports currently used in the 50mm dipoles being built at Fermilab and Brookhaven are adaptations of the design developed during the 40mm design program at Fermilab. The design essentially consists of two composite tubes nested within each other as a means of maximizing the thermal path length. In addition it provides an ideal way to utilize materials best suited for the temperature range over which they must operate. Filament would S-glass is used between 300K and 80K. Filament would graphite fiber is used between 80K and 20K and between 20K and 4.5K. S-glass is a better thermal performer above approximately 40 K. Graphite composites are ideally suited for operation below 40K.

  3. Performance of thermal shields of LHD cryostat cooled by gaseous helium with parallel paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imagawa, S.; Tamura, H.; Yanagi, N.; Sekiguchi, H.; Mito, T.; Satow, T.

    2002-05-01

    The Large Helical Device is the largest cryogenic apparatus for a research of fusion plasma. Thermal shields are installed to reduce heat loads to the superconducting coils. Since the total area is very wide, seamless pipes were adopted to reduce the possibility of helium leakage, and parallel cooling path is indispensable to reduce the pressure drop. Temperature differences between parallel paths will be enlarged with the procedure of cool-down, but the final temperature should be determined uniquely by each heat load in the case of gaseous helium. The number of parallel paths of the thermal shields for the plasma vacuum vessel and the cryostat vessel are set to 20 and 10, respectively, to form the periodic symmetry. The pipes were attached on the segmented plates of SUS316 by metal cleats mechanically and by high conductive epoxy resin thermally. The maximum temperature difference between the outlets of the paths was enlarged with the procedure of cool-down, but it was saturated within 40% of the average temperature rise. This difference is allowable in this system, and the temperature differences are coincide the difference of area due to the irregular shape.

  4. Study of the influence of filler wire carbon and residual element content on the mechanical properties of mechanized gas-metal-arc-welds: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The individual and interactive roles of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen and residual or tramp elements such as titanium, chromium, copper, sulfur, phosphorus, aluminum, arsenic, tin, and antimony on weld metal mechanical properties in pipeline steels are poorly documented. Further, most of the research has been done with the submerged-arc process. Systematic studies of the microstructures and toughnesses of GMAW welds are limited. A better understanding of the effects of carbon and the residual elements on weld metal toughnesses is needed so that appropriate filler wires can be produced. Accordingly, the objective of this research program was to attempt to determine the reason for the variable toughness of mechanized gas-metal-arc (GMA) girth welds and to identify means of improving toughness levels, particularly CTOD test values. This report is available from the American Gas Association Order Processing Department, 1515 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 2209-2470 (703/841-8558). 5 refs., 36 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  6. Design and Test of the CC Cryostat Head Cart

    SciTech Connect

    Jaques, Al; /Fermilab

    1989-08-08

    This Engineering Note documents the design of the stand to be used to transport the CC Cryostat heads into the D-Zero clean room. Due to the width of the clean room access door, the heads will have to be upright to fit through. This head cart will hold the heads upright and wheel them into the clean room on a guided track. Before the wheels are placed on the heat cart, it will be used as a stand to place the heads on for the purpose of test fitting the super insulation. The head cart will not only be structurally sufficient to support the weight of the heads but also stiff enough to allow a maximum deflection of 1/2-inch at the end of the 48-inch cylinder. The heaviest head assembly weighs about 9000 pounds. Following A.I.S.C. specifications and using a 9000 pound design load, the head cart was initially designed and built and later modified in order to meet the deflection requirements. Bending and tension stresses were limited to two thirds the yield strength. Weld and shear stresses are limited to 0.4*Fy. The C7 X 12.25 channels, the L2.5 X 2.5 X 0.25 angles adn the 1/2-inch plate are all A36 steel. In order to validate the need for an end plate in the 48-inch cylinder, an ANSYS model was created of the cylinder itself to determine it's rigidity under a point load applied at it's outer end. Appendix D contains the results which demonstrate the rigidity of the cylinder-end plate assembly. Also included is a Frame-Mac simulation of the head cart which was used to estimate the deflection at the cylinder end. A load test was performed to 133% of the rated capacity, or 12,000 pounds. The test load was incrementally applied using a crane and hook scale. A graph of deflection vs. load is shown in Appendix E. A spreader beam was designed and built to properly test the head cart. Stress calculations for this test spreader beam are included in Appendix C.

  7. Design development for the 50mm Superconducting Super Collider dipole cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H.

    1991-03-01

    The cryostat of a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the magnet assembly itself. It serves to support the magnet accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations, and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course their expected operating life. This paper describes the design of the current 50mm SSC collider dipole cryostat and includes discussions on the structural and thermal considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems. Where appropriate, comparisons will be made with the 40mm cryostat. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Weld arc simulator

    DOEpatents

    Burr, Melvin J.

    1990-01-30

    An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  9. Development of a Compact Eleven Feed Cryostat for the Patriot 12-m Antenna System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaudoin, Christopher; Kildal, Per-Simon; Yang, Jian; Pantaleev, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    The Eleven antenna has constant beam width, constant phase center location, and low spillover over a decade bandwidth. Therefore, it can feed a reflector for high aperture efficiency (also called feed efficiency). It is equally important that the feed efficiency and its subefficiencies not be degraded significantly by installing the feed in a cryostat. The MIT Haystack Observatory, with guidance from Onsala Space Observatory and Chalmers University, has been working to integrate the Eleven antenna into a compact cryostat suitable for the Patriot 12-m antenna. Since the analysis of the feed efficiencies in this presentation is purely computational, we first demonstrate the validity of the computed results by comparing them to measurements. Subsequently, we analyze the dependence of the cryostat size on the feed efficiencies, and, lastly, the Patriot 12-m subreflector is incorporated into the computational model to assess the overall broadband efficiency of the antenna system.

  10. A portable cryostat for the cold transfer of polarized solid HD targets: HDice-I

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, C. D.; Bade, C.; Blecher, M.; Caracappa, A.; D'Angelo, A.; Deur, A.; Dezern, G.; Glueckler, H.; Hanretty, C.; Ho, D.; Honig, A.; Kageya, T.; Khandaker, M.; Laine, V.; Lincoln, F.; Lowry, M. M.; Mahon, J. C.; O'Connell, T.; Pap, M.; Peng, P.; Preedom, B.; Sandorfi, A. M.; Seyfarth, H.; Stroeher, H.; Thorn, C. E.; Wei, X.; Whisnant, C. S.

    2014-02-01

    We developed a device with moveable liquid nitrogen and liquid helium volumes that is capable of reaching over 2 m into the coldest regions of a cryostat or dilution refrigerator and reliably extracting or installing a target of solid, polarized hydrogen deuteride (HD). This Transfer Cryostat incorporates a cylindrical neodymium rare-earth magnet that is configured as a Halbach dipole, which is maintained at 77 K and produces a 0.1 T field around the HD target. Multiple layers provide a hermetic 77 K-shield as the device is used to maintain a target at 2 K during a transfer between cryostats. Our tests with frozen-spin HD show very little polarization loss for either H (-1±2%, relative) or D (0±3%, relative) over typical transfer periods. Multiple target transfers with this apparatus have shown an overall reliability of about 95% per transfer, which is a significant improvement over earlier versions of the device.

  11. A portable cryostat for the cold transfer of polarized solid HD targets: HDice-I

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Christopher D.; Sandorfi, Andy M.; Bade, C.; Blecher, M.; Caracappa, A.; D'Angelo, A.; Deur, A.; Dezern, G.; Glueckler, H.; Hanretty, C.; Ho, D.; Kageya, T.; Khandaker, M.; Laine, V.; Lincoln, F.; Lowry, M. M.; Mahon, J. C.; Connell, T. O.; Peng, P.; Preedom, B.; Seyfarth, H.; Stroeher, H.; Thorn, C. E.; Wei, X.; Whisnant, C. S.

    2014-02-01

    A device has been developed with moveable liquid nitrogen and liquid helium volumes that is capable of reaching over two meters into the coldest regions of a cryostat or dilution refrigerator and reliably extracting or installing a target of solid, polarized hydrogen deuteride (HD). This Transfer Cryostat incorporates a cylindrical neodymium rare-earth magnet that is configured as a Halbach dipole, which is maintained at 77 K and produces a 0.1 T field around the HD target. Multiple layers provide a hermetic 77 K-shield as the device is used to maintain a target at 2 K during a transfer between cryostats. Tests with frozen-spin HD show negligible polarization loss for either H or D over typical transfer periods. Multiple target transfers with this apparatus have shown an overall reliability of about 95% per transfer, which is a significant improvement over earlier versions of the device.

  12. Commissioning of the 4 K Outer Cryostat for the CUORE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, E.; Alessandria, F.; Biassoni, M.; Bucci, C.; Ceruti, G.; Chiarini, A.; Clemenza, M.; Cremonesi, O.; Datskov, V.; Dossena, S.; Faverzani, M.; Franceschi, M. A.; Gaigher, R.; Gorla, P.; Guetti, M.; Ligi, C.; Napolitano, T.; Nucciotti, A.; Pelosi, A.; Perego, M.; Previtali, E.; Sisti, M.; Taffarello, L.; Terranova, F.

    2014-09-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a 1-ton scale bolometric experiment. The CUORE detector is an array of 988 TeO crystals arranged in a cylindrical, compact, and granular structure of 19 towers. These detectors will need a base temperature lower than 10 mK in order to meet the performance specifications. To cool the CUORE detector, a large cryogen free cryostat with five pulse tubes and one custom designed high power dilution refrigerator has been designed. The three vessels that form the outer shell of the CUORE cryostat were produced in 2012 and are now assembled in the Gran Sasso National Laboratories (LNGS). We report here the detailed description of the 4 K outer cryostat for the CUORE experiment together with the results of the validation tests done at the production site in 2012 and of the first commissioning to 4 K at LNGS in 2013.

  13. CLAES cryostat on-orbit performance versus ground test predictions. [Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Greg A.; Burriesci, Larry G.; Naes, Larry G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) launched on September 12, 1991 aboard the NASA Goddard's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite the purpose of which is to measure the global concentrations of stratospheric species and their temperature, as a function of altitude. Particular attention is given to the design-level thermal predictions and their correlation to the results of ground tests, and to the on-orbit performance of CLAES. Also presented are data on the cryostat's thermal performance during ground operations, at spacecraft integration and during launch preparations. The CLAES functional block diagram and the cryostat schematic diagram are included.

  14. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  15. Design of a horizonal liquid helium cryostat for refrigerating a flying superconducting magnet in a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y. Y.

    1982-01-01

    The design of a horizontal liquid helium cryostat for refrigerating a flying superconducting magnet in a wind tunnel is presented. The basic principles of magnetic suspension theory are described and theoretical calculations of the superconducting magnet are provided. The experimental results of the boil-off of liquid nitrogen and liquid helium in the cryostat are reported.

  16. Design And Performance Analysis Of The Claes NE/CO2 Cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naes, L. G.; Horsley, W. J.; Ngai, C. S.; Read, D. C.; Nast, T. C.

    1988-04-01

    The Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES)1 is one of nine instruments that will fly aboard the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS)2 in the fall of 1991. CLAES is an earth-limb viewing instrument that requires cryogenic cooling of its focal plane (<15.0K), spectrometer (<30K), telescope (<150K), and baffles (<180K) in order to achieve the required performance sensitivity. Initially, the CLAES baseline design incorporated a single-stage solid hydrogen cryostat to perform the necessary cooling, however, after the Challenger shuttle disaster, the UARS and CLAES Project Offices investigated the feasibility of incorporating a completely inert cryogen system for CLAES. The result of this study showed that a dual stage Ne/CO2 cryostat would meet all sensor cooling requirements, provided that a significant increase in weight could be accommodated. In December '86, the Ne/CO2 design was adopted as the new cryostat baseline for CLAES. The focal plane and spectrometer are conductively cooled to the solid neon (13.2 K) while the telescope and internal baffles are cooled by the CO2 (121.8K). This paper describes the design and performance of the Ne/CO2 cryostat.

  17. New vertical cryostat for the high field superconducting magnet test station at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Craen, A.; Atieh, S.; Bajko, M.; Benda, V.; Rijk, G. de; Favre, G.; Giloux, C.; Minginette, P.; Parma, V.; Perret, P.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Viret, P.; Hanzelka, P.

    2014-01-29

    In the framework of the R and D program for new superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator upgrades, CERN is building a new vertical test station to test high field superconducting magnets of unprecedented large size. This facility will allow testing of magnets by vertical insertion in a pressurized liquid helium bath, cooled to a controlled temperature between 4.2 K and 1.9 K. The dimensions of the cryostat will allow testing magnets of up to 2.5 m in length with a maximum diameter of 1.5 m and a mass of 15 tons. To allow for a faster insertion and removal of the magnets and reducing the risk of helium leaks, all cryogenics supply lines are foreseen to remain permanently connected to the cryostat. A specifically designed 100 W heat exchanger is integrated in the cryostat helium vessel for a controlled cooling of the magnet from 4.2 K down to 1.9 K in a 3 m{sup 3} helium bath. This paper describes the cryostat and its main functions, focusing on features specifically developed for this project. The status of the construction and the plans for assembly and installation at CERN are also presented.

  18. New vertical cryostat for the high field superconducting magnet test station at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vande Craen, A.; Atieh, S.; Bajko, M.; Benda, V.; de Rijk, G.; Favre, G.; Giloux, C.; Hanzelka, P.; Minginette, P.; Parma, V.; Perret, P.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Viret, P.

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the R&D program for new superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator upgrades, CERN is building a new vertical test station to test high field superconducting magnets of unprecedented large size. This facility will allow testing of magnets by vertical insertion in a pressurized liquid helium bath, cooled to a controlled temperature between 4.2 K and 1.9 K. The dimensions of the cryostat will allow testing magnets of up to 2.5 m in length with a maximum diameter of 1.5 m and a mass of 15 tons. To allow for a faster insertion and removal of the magnets and reducing the risk of helium leaks, all cryogenics supply lines are foreseen to remain permanently connected to the cryostat. A specifically designed 100 W heat exchanger is integrated in the cryostat helium vessel for a controlled cooling of the magnet from 4.2 K down to 1.9 K in a 3 m3 helium bath. This paper describes the cryostat and its main functions, focusing on features specifically developed for this project. The status of the construction and the plans for assembly and installation at CERN are also presented.

  19. Recondensation performance of liquid helium cryostat for a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Park, Jin Yong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-01

    Cryostat performance is essential for the stable operation of a superconducting magnet. A closed-cycle liquid helium cryostat was adopted for use for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source by recondensing liquid helium vapor. The goal was to maintain the liquid helium filled reservoir at a constant level without transferring any liquid helium during the normal operation of the ECR ion source. To accomplish this, Gifford-McMahon (GM) refrigerators, which have two cold heads, were installed on the top of the cryostat. The cooling power of the GM cryocooler is 1.5 W at the second stage and 50 W at the first stage. Each stage was connected to the liquid helium reservoir, a radiation shield including high-Tc current lead, and related items. Before commissioning the ECR ion source, a preliminary evaluation of the recondensation performance was carried out with the magnet in partial operation. The design of the cryostat, its fabrication, and the experimental results are reported.

  20. Two low-cost, modular sub-λ test cryostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, J. D.; Kaluzny, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Two general-purpose liquid helium (LHe) test cryostats have been developed in support of a major upgrade to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The cryostats are capable of sustained operation below 1.8 K and currently support tests of prototype superconducting rf (srf) cavities for the APS Upgrade's Short Pulse X-ray (SPX) initiative. To save cost, two existing test vessels were reconditioned: one "bucket dewar" supporting bare cavity tests and one shielded vacuum vessel with an integral LHe reservoir for jacketed/dressed cavity tests. A new feedbox containing a heat exchanger and associated valves was also designed and fabricated to support either cryostat. The resulting modular design permits tests on a wide variety of srf cavities in various states of completion, minimizing cost and maximizing use of the hardware. Together with a dedicated vacuum pump, control system, and helium supply via storage dewar or cryoplant, these cryostats are vital to the srf cavity development effort within the APS Upgrade.

  1. Low-cost insulation system for cryostats eliminates need for a vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, H. F.

    1964-01-01

    In order to eliminate the hazard caused by residual air trapped between the concentric shells of a cryostat, these annular spaces are pressurized with helium gas. This system is more economical than the use of powdered insulation maintained at low vacuums.

  2. Cryostat design for the Superconducting Super Collider 50mm aperture dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H. ); Tsavalas, Y.P. . Medical Systems)

    1990-09-01

    The cryostat of an SSC dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the cold mass assembly. It serves to support the cold mass accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation (MLI) system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course their 25 year expected life. This paper describes the design of the current SSC collider dipole magnet cryostat and includes discussions on the thermal, structural, and dynamic considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. A Cryogen-free Cryostat for Scientific Experiment in Pulsed High Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaoliang; Li, Liang; Zuo, Huakun; Liu, Mengyu; Peng, Tao

    Traditional cryostats for scientific experiments in pulsed high magnetic fields use liquid helium as the cooling source. To reduce the running cost and to increase the operational efficiency, a cryogen-free cryostat based on a GM cryocooler has been developed for a 60 T pulsed field measurement cell at Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. A double layer temperature-control insert was designed to obtain a stable temperature in the sample chamber of the cryostat. In order to eliminate the sample temperature fluctuation caused by the eddy current heating during the pulse, the inner layer is made from a fiberglass tubing with an epoxy coating. Different from the traditional cryostat, the sample and the temperature controller are not immerged in the 4He bath. Instead, they are separated by helium gas under sub-atmospheric pressure, which makes the heat transfer smoother. At the sample position, a resistance heater wound with antiparallel wires is mounted on the inner layer to heat the sample. Using the temperature-control insert, the temperature can be controlled with an accuracy of ±0.01 K in the range of 1.4 K-20 K, and ±0.05 K between 20 K and 300 K.

  4. SSC dipole log manget model cryostat design and initial production experience

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Carson, J.A.; Engler, N.H.; Gonczy, J.D.; Nicol, T.H.

    1986-06-01

    The SSC dipole magnet development program includes the design and construction of full length magnet models for heat leak and magnetic measurements and for the evaluation of the performance of strings of magnets. The design of the model magnet cryostat is presented and the production experiences for the initial long magnet model, a heat leak measurement device, are related.

  5. Majorana One-Tonne Cryostat Cooling Conceptual Feasibility Study Rev 1

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Douglas J.; Fast, James E.; Orrell, John L.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2011-06-27

    This report evaluates the conceptual plans for a cryostat cooling design for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR (MJD) one-tonne (S4) experiment. This document is based upon previous design work and experimental results used to evaluate the current MJD thermal design. A feasibility study of a cooling system for S4 based on the MJD thermosiphon experiment is presented. The one-tonne experiment will be a scaled up version of the MJD. There will be many cryostats in the S4 experiment. In this document a cryostat with up to 19 strings of germanium crystals is analyzed. Aside from an extra outer ring of crystals, the geometry of the cryostat for S4 is very similar to that for the MJD thermosiphon experiment. The materials used in the fabrication of both of these ultra-low background experiments will be underground-electroformed copper. The current MJD uses a two-phase liquid-gas cooling system to provide constant operating temperature. This document presents a theoretical investigation of a cooling system for the S4 experiment and evaluates the heat transfer performance requirements for such a system.

  6. Design and commissioning of vertical test cryostats for XFEL superconducting cavities measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Polinski, J.; Chorowski, M.; Duda, P.; Bozhko, Y.; Petersen, B.; Schaffran, J.

    2014-01-29

    The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL), now under construction at DESY in Hamburg, will make an extensive use of 1.3 GHz superconducting cavities aimed at accelerating the electrons to the energy of 17.5 GeV. The cavities will be operated at 2 K with the use of saturated HeII. Prior to their assembly in accelerator cryomodules, the RF performance of the cavities will be cold-tested in two dedicated vertical cryostats. Each cryostat allows a simultaneous testing of 4 cavities mounted on a dedicated insert. The cryostats are equipped with external lines allowing their supply with liquid helium and further conversion of the helium into superfluid He II. The paper describes the test stand flow scheme, the technical key elements, including a recuperative heat exchanger, and the cold commissioning. The thermodynamic analysis of the cryostat cool down and steady-state operation is given. A Second Law of Thermodynamics based theoretical model of the heat exchanger performance, and the model experimental validation, is presented.

  7. Development of a Cryostat to Characterize Nano-scale Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Mathew; Matheny, Matthew; Knudsen, Jasmine

    2016-03-01

    We have designed and constructed a low-noise vacuum cryostat to be used for the characterization of nano-scale superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Such devices are very sensitive to magnetic fields and can measure changes in flux on the order of a single electron magnetic moment. As a part of the design process, we calculated the separation required between the cryogenic preamplifier and superconducting magnet, including a high-permeability magnetic shield, using a finite-element model of the apparatus. The cryostat comprises a vacuum cross at room temperature for filtered DC and shielded RF electrical connections, a thin-wall stainless steel support tube, a taper-sealed cryogenic vacuum can, and internal mechanical support and wiring for the nanoSQUID. The Dewar is modified with a room-temperature flange with a sliding seal for the cryostat. The flange supports the superconducting 3 Tesla magnet and thermometry wiring. Upon completion of the cryostat fabrication and Dewar modifications, operation of the nanoSQUIDs as transported from our collaborator's laboratory in Israel will be confirmed, as the lead forming the SQUID is sensitive to oxidation and the SQUIDs must be shipped in a vacuum container. After operation of the nanoSQUIDs is confirmed, the primary work of characterizing their high-speed properties will begin. This will include looking at the measurement of relaxation oscillations at high bandwidth in comparison to the theoretical predictions of the current model.

  8. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  9. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  10. [Arc welder's lung].

    PubMed

    Molinari, Luciana; Alvarez, Clarisa; Semeniuk, Guillermo B

    2010-01-01

    Pneumoconiosis of electric arc welder or siderotic pneumoconiosis was described by Doig and McLaughlin in 1936 as a lung disease caused by chronic inhalation of iron fumes in electric arc welders. We present a case report of electric arc welder siderosis associated with high levels of ferritin, without findings of iron deposit in any other organ. PMID:21163741

  11. Arc distribution and motion during the vacuum arc remelting process as detected with a magnetostatic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodside, Rigel

    Currently, the temporal arc distribution across the ingot during the vacuum arc remelting (VAR) process is not a known or monitored parameter. It is has previously been shown that arcs can spatially constrict during VAR, and this constriction can lead to undesired defects in the material. Additionally, correct accounting for the heat flux, electric current flux, and mass flux into the ingot are critical to achieving realistic solidification models of the VAR process. An arc position measurement system capable of locating slow moving arcs and determining the arc distribution within an industrial VAR furnace was developed. The system is based on non-invasive magnetic field measurements and VAR specific forms of the magnetostatic Biot-Savart Law. Electromagnetic finite element modeling assists the analysis. The measurement system was installed on an industrial VAR furnace at the ATI facility in Albany, OR. Data were taken during the commercial production of titanium alloy. Although more arcs were present than could be resolved with the number of sensors applied, overall arc distribution shifts were detected. Arc distribution and motion during the final production of Ti-6Al-4V were examined. It is shown that several characteristic arc distribution modes can develop. This behavior was not apparent in the existing signals used to control the furnace, indicating the measurement system provides new information. Finally, a solidification model was used to assess the potential impact of the different arc distribution modes. It is shown the magnetohydrodynamic stirring patterns in the molten pool are affected, which results in localized variations in solidification times in particular at the side wall.

  12. Linear volcanic segments in the Sunda Arc, Indonesia: Implications for arc lithosphere control upon volcano distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, C. G.; Pacey, A.; McCaffrey, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    The overall curvature of many subduction zones is immediately apparent and the term island arc betrays the common assumption that subduction zone magmatism occurs in curved zones. This assumption can be expressed by approximating island arcs as segments of small circles on the surface of a sphere. Such treatments predict that the location of arc volcanoes is related to their vertical separation from the slab (in fact, the depth to seismicity in the slab) and require that the primary control on the locus of magmatism lies either within the subducted slab or the mantle wedge that separates the subducted and overriding lithospheric plates. The concept of curved arcs ignores longstanding observations that magmatism in many subduction systems occurs as segments of linearly arranged volcanic centres. Further evidence for this distribution comes from the close relationship between magmatism and large scale, arc-parallel fabrics in some arcs. Similarly, exposures of deep arc crust or mantle often reveal elongation of magmatic intrusions sub-parallel to the inferred trend of the arc. The Sunda Arc forms the Indonesian islands from Sumatra to Alor and provides an important test for models of volcano distribution for several reasons. First, Sunda has hosted abundant historic volcanic activity. Second, with the notable exception of Krakatau, every volcano in the arc is subaerial from base to cone and, therefore, can be readily identified where there is a suitable extent of local mapping that can be used to ground-truth satellite imagery. Third, there are significant changes in the stress regime along the length of the arc, allowing the influence of the upper plate to be evaluated by comparison of different arc segments. Finally, much of the Sunda Arc has proved difficult to accommodate in models that try to relate volcano distribution to the depth to the subducted slab. We apply an objective line-fitting protocol; the Hough Transform, to explore the distribution of volcanoes

  13. Electrical Evaluation Of Welding Machines Based On The Arc Properties. Application To SMAW, GMAW And GTAW Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, V.; Martínez, A.; Manjabacas, M. C.; Coello, J.; Calatayud, A.

    2009-11-01

    In this work, a methodology to obtain the electrical behavior of arc welding equipments is presented. The method is based on the electrical arc fundamentals and it is applied to Shielding Metal Arc Welding and to Gas Metal Arc Welding processes. For the first one, different arc points are achieved by practicing several arc lengths. For MIG process, different arc lengths are made by changing the feel wire velocity. Arc current and voltage are measured for the different arc length in both cases. Finally, a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding equipment has been used to obtain the electrical arc characteristics as a function of arc length. Different considerations about the thermal and electrical principles related to the arc behavior have been made.

  14. Numerical investigations of arc behaviour in gas metal arc welding using ANSYS CFX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnick, M.; Fuessel, U.; Hertel, M.; Spille-Kohoff, A.; Murphy, A. B.

    2011-06-01

    Current numerical models of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are trying to combine magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models of the arc and volume of fluid (VoF) models of metal transfer. They neglect vaporization and assume an argon atmosphere for the arc region, as it is common practice for models of gas tungsten arc welding. These models predict temperatures above 20 000 K and a temperature distribution similar to tungsten inert gas (TIG) arcs. However, current spectroscopic temperature measurements in GMAW arcs demonstrate much lower arc temperatures. In contrast to TIG arcs they found a central local minimum of the radial temperature distribution. The paper presents a GMAW arc model that considers metal vapour and which is in a very good agreement with experimentally observed temperatures. Furthermore, the model is able to predict the local central minimum in the radial temperature and the radial electric current density distributions for the first time. The axially symmetric model of the welding torch, the work piece, the wire and the arc (fluid domain) implements MHD as well as turbulent mixing and thermal demixing of metal vapour in argon. The mass fraction of iron vapour obtained from the simulation shows an accumulation in the arc core and another accumulation on the fringes of the arc at 2000 to 5000 K. The demixing effects lead to very low concentrations of iron between these two regions. Sensitive analyses demonstrate the influence of the transport and radiation properties of metal vapour, and the evaporation rate relative to the wire feed. Finally the model predictions are compared with the measuring results of Zielińska et al.

  15. Design and Operation of A Setup with A Camera and Adjustable Mirror to Inspect the Sense-Wire Planes of the Time Projection Chamber Inside the MicroBooNE Cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Carls, Benjamin; Horton-Smith, Glenn; James, Catherine C.; Kubinski, Robert M.; Pordes, Stephen; Schukraft, Anne; Strauss, Thomas

    2015-08-26

    Detectors in particle physics, particularly when including cryogenic components, are often enclosed in vessels that do not provide any physical or visual access to the detectors themselves after installation. However, it can be desirable for experiments to visually investigate the inside of the vessel. The MicroBooNE cryostat hosts a TPC with sense-wire planes, which had to be inspected for damage such as breakage or sagging. This inspection was performed after the transportation of the vessel with the enclosed detector to its final location, but before filling with liquid argon. Our paper describes an approach to view the inside of the MicroBooNE cryostat with a setup of a camera and a mirror through one of its cryogenic service nozzles. The paper also describes the camera and mirror chosen for the operation, the illumination, and the mechanical structure of the setup. It explains how the system was operated and demonstrates its performance.

  16. Rethinking Recycling in Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.; Behn, M. D.; Jagoutz, O.

    2012-12-01

    Hacker et al EPSL 2011 and Behn et al Nature Geosci 2011 investigated pathways for return of buoyant, subducted material to arc crust. These include (1) diapirs rising into the hot mantle wedge, with extensive melts adding a component to arc magmas, (2) flow of material back up a relatively cold "subduction channel", adding solids to the lower crust and small-degree partial melts to the upper crust, (3) flow from the forearc along the base of arc crust, and (4) imbrication of forearc material into arc crust. These processes add felsic, incompatible-element-rich components to arc crust. The flux of incompatible elements such as Th in arc lavas, thought to be mainly recycled from subducted sediments, is > sediment subduction flux. There are large uncertainties: arc crustal growth rates are imprecise; young, primitive arc lavas may not be representative of magmatic flux into arc crust; sediment subduction flux may have varied. Nevertheless, this result is found for all arcs examined, using recently published growth rates. Perhaps arc growth rates that include subduction erosion are systematically overestimated. Instead or in addition, maybe significant Th comes from material other than sediments. Here, we consider the implications of pathways 1-4 for arc growth rates and incompatible element enrichment, in the context of subduction erosion and arc-arc collision. Subducting arc lithologies can become separated, with only felsic components returned to arc crust. Buoyant lithologies are mobile in viscous instabilities at > 700-800°C. Whereas thin layers such as sediments may become mobile all at once, instabilities may periodically strip the hottest parts from the top of thick buoyant layers, replacing them with hot mantle. In arc-arc collision, the top of a subducting plate starts at about 0°C on the seafloor, so heating is slow. In subduction erosion, forearc material in the subducting package can be > 200°C before erosion so buoyant lithologies reach 700-800

  17. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  18. Monitoring ARC services with GangliARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, D.; Karpenko, D.

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring of Grid services is essential to provide a smooth experience for users and provide fast and easy to understand diagnostics for administrators running the services. GangliARC makes use of the widely-used Ganglia monitoring tool to present web-based graphical metrics of the ARC computing element. These include statistics of running and finished jobs, data transfer metrics, as well as showing the availability of the computing element and hardware information such as free disk space left in the ARC cache. Ganglia presents metrics as graphs of the value of the metric over time and shows an easily-digestable summary of how the system is performing, and enables quick and easy diagnosis of common problems. This paper describes how GangliARC works and shows numerous examples of how the generated data can quickly be used by an administrator to investigate problems. It also presents possibilities of combining GangliARC with other commonly-used monitoring tools such as Nagios to easily integrate ARC monitoring into the regular monitoring infrastructure of any site or computing centre.

  19. The CUORE Cryostat: A 1-Ton Scale Setup for Bolometric Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, C.; Alduino, C.; Alessandria, F.; Biassoni, M.; Bucci, C.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cappelli, L.; Chott, N. I.; Copello, S.; D'Addabbo, A.; Dell'Oro, S.; Drobizhev, A.; Franceschi, M. A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Napolitano, T.; Nucciotti, A.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pattavina, L.; Rusconi, C.; Santone, D.; Singh, V.; Taffarello, L.; Terranova, F.; Uttaro, S.

    2015-12-01

    The cryogenic underground observatory for rare events (CUORE) is a 1-ton scale bolometric experiment whose detector consists of an array of 988 TeO_2 crystals arranged in a cylindrical compact structure of 19 towers. This will be the largest bolometric mass ever operated. The experiment will work at a temperature around or below 10 mK. CUORE cryostat consists of a cryogen-free system based on pulse tubes and a custom high power dilution refrigerator, designed to match these specifications. The cryostat has been commissioned in 2014 at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories and reached a record temperature of 6 mK on a cubic meter scale. In this paper, we present results of CUORE commissioning runs. Details on the thermal characteristics and cryogenic performances of the system will be also given.

  20. The CUORE Cryostat: A 1-Ton Scale Setup for Bolometric Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, C.; Alduino, C.; Alessandria, F.; Biassoni, M.; Bucci, C.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cappelli, L.; Chott, N. I.; Copello, S.; D'Addabbo, A.; Dell'Oro, S.; Drobizhev, A.; Franceschi, M. A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Napolitano, T.; Nucciotti, A.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Pattavina, L.; Rusconi, C.; Santone, D.; Singh, V.; Taffarello, L.; Terranova, F.; Uttaro, S.

    2016-08-01

    The cryogenic underground observatory for rare events (CUORE) is a 1-ton scale bolometric experiment whose detector consists of an array of 988 TeO_2 crystals arranged in a cylindrical compact structure of 19 towers. This will be the largest bolometric mass ever operated. The experiment will work at a temperature around or below 10 mK. CUORE cryostat consists of a cryogen-free system based on pulse tubes and a custom high power dilution refrigerator, designed to match these specifications. The cryostat has been commissioned in 2014 at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories and reached a record temperature of 6 mK on a cubic meter scale. In this paper, we present results of CUORE commissioning runs. Details on the thermal characteristics and cryogenic performances of the system will be also given.

  1. Characterisation of a cryostat using simultaneous, single-beam multiple-surface laser vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissinger, Thomas; Charrett, Thomas O. H.; James, Stephen W.; Adams, Alvin; Twin, Andrew; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2016-06-01

    A novel range-resolved interferometric signal processing technique that uses sinusoidal optical frequency modulation is applied to multi-surface vibrometry, demonstrating simultaneous optical measurements of vibrations on two surfaces using a single, collimated laser beam, with a minimum permissible distance of 3.5 cm between surfaces. The current system, using a cost-effective laser diode and a fibre-coupled, downlead insensitive setup, allows an interferometric fringe rate of up to 180 kHz to be resolved with typical displacement noise levels of 8 pm . Hz-0 5. In this paper, the system is applied to vibrometry measurements of a table-top cryostat, with concurrent measurements of the optical widow and the sample holder target inside. This allows the separation of common-mode vibrations of the whole cryostat from differential vibrations between the window and the target, allowing any resonances to be identified.

  2. A simplified generic cryostat thermal model for predicting cryogen mass and lifetime. [of cryogenic space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, G. C.; Tsuyuki, G. T.

    1992-01-01

    This study presents a simple generic cryostat thermal model developed for predicting cryogen mass and the lifetime of cryogenic space telescopes. The model is based on a lumped parameter representation of eight nodes and over 35 conductors. The major telescope Dewar components represented as nodes are the main cryogen tank, the three vapor-cooled shields, the outer shell, barrel baffle, and the barrel baffle heat exchanger. The input to the model consists of the vapor-cooled shield, support straps and instrument cable geometry, and the cryostat heat loads from the instrument and through the aperture. The predictions from the model were compared with those from the more detailed models of IRAS, COBE, and SIRTF. Correlation of the helium flow rates of the IRAS and COBE Dewars was 12 percent above the actual flight or ground test data and for SIRTF it was less than 2 percent of the prediction from the detailed model.

  3. Ultrasound in arc welding: a review.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Tiago Vieira; Bohórquez, Carlos Enrique Niño

    2015-02-01

    During the last decade, the introduction of ultrasound techniques in arc welding with the intention of improving the operational performance and technical characteristics of the welding processes have been studied intensively. In this work is presented a broad review of the literature surrounding the utilization of this technique. Firstly, we discuss the use of traditional mechanical transducers to generate ultrasound in arc welding. Furthermore, we describe the various methods and their application in arc-welding processes. After, is presented a recent method of introducing ultrasonic energy in arc welding, which forms a potential alternative to the use of traditional mechanical type transducers. This method was originally developed in the late 1990s and is called arc with ultrasonic excitation of current. Here, the arc acts not only as a thermal source but also as an emission mechanism for ultrasound, acting directly on the weld pool. We presented and discussed various innovative concepts based on this method, which allows the introduction of ultrasonic energy in the arc welding without the need of any auxiliary device of welding. In addition, we also presented the variations of this method reported in the literature. Finally, we have described the respective effects attributed to the use of this method in the welding of different materials using various welding processes. PMID:25455190

  4. Design of a horizontal test cryostat for superconducting RF cavities for the FREIA facility at Uppsala University

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, N. R.; Thermeau, J.-P.; Bujard, P.; Junquera, T.; Hermansson, L.; Kern, R. Santiago; Ruber, R.

    2014-01-29

    Uppsala University is constructing a large scale facility, called FREIA (Facility for Research Instrumentation and Accelerator Development). FREIA includes a helium liquefier and an accelerator test facility and has the capacity to test superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavities with the same RF system and RF power level as in an accelerator. A central element of FREIA is a horizontal test cryostat connected in closed loop to a helium liquefier. This cryostat can house two fully equipped (tuners, piezo, power coupler, helium tank) superconducting cavities to perform full RF high power tests and operate at temperatures between 1.8 K and 4.2 K. The cryostat is designed to accommodate a large array of superconducting cavities and magnets, among which the European Spallation Source (ESS) type spoke and high-β elliptical cavities as well as TESLA/ILC type elliptical cavities. The present status of the project and the design of the cryostat are reported.

  5. Long arc stabilities with various arc gas flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, K.; Takeda, K.; Sugimoto, M.; Noguchi, Y.

    2014-11-01

    A new arc torch for use in magnetically driven arc device was developed with a commercially available TIG welding arc torch. The torch has a water-cooling system to the torch nozzle and has a nozzle nut to supply a swirling-free plasma gas flow. Its endurance against arc thermal load is examined. Features of its generated arc are investigated.

  6. Making and breaking an Island arc: a new perspective from the Oligocene Kyushu-Palau arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Taylor, R. N.; Yuasa, M.; Ohara, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR) is a 2000km long remnant island arc that is separated from the active Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc system by a series of spreading and rift basins. In this study we present 40Ar/39Ar ages and geochemical data for new samples taken from the entire length of the Kyushu-Palau arc. As such, this data provides the first comprehensive evaluation of temporal and spatial changes that are present in an Eocene-Oligocene island arc. Kyushu-Palau arc geochemistry is evaluated alongside new data from the conjugate arc which is stranded within the IBM fore-arc. Boninitic magmatism gave way to transitional arc suites including high-Mg andesites at c. 45 Ma (Ishizuka et al., 2006). After the transitional 45-41 Ma period, a mature arc system developed through the Eocene-Oligocene time: This volcanism is now preserved as the KPR. Dating results from 33 sites indicate that the KPR was active between 25 and 43 Ma, but the majority of the exposed volcanism occurred in the final phase of this arc, between 25 and 27 Ma. Unlike the IBM, the KPR has only limited systematic along-arc trends and does not include any of the strongly HIMU lavas found to the south of Izu-Bonin. Two components found along the KPR are found to have geochemistry that suggests an origin in the supra-subduction mantle rather than from the descending ocean crust. Firstly, in the south of the arc, EM-2-like lavas are present where the West Philippine Basin was in the final stages of spreading. Secondly, EM-1-like lavas are present in a restricted section of the arc, suggesting a localised heterogeneity. Subduction flux beneath the KPR generally imparted a Pb isotope vector towards low Δ8/4 (<15) and moderate 206Pb/204Pb (>19). This is a similar trend to the Eocene/Oligocene lavas found on the eastern side of the basins which split the arc at 25Ma. Another geochemical heterogeneity is found at the KPR-Daito Ridge intersection where arc magmatism occurred on pre-existing Daito Ridge crust: a

  7. The thermal design, characterization, and performance of the SPIDER long-duration balloon cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S. J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, S. A.; Chiang, H. C.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Dore, O.; Filippini, J. P.; Fraisse, A. A.; Gambrel, A.; Gandilo, N. N.; Hasselfield, M.; Halpern, M.; Hilton, G.; Holmes, W.; Hristov, V. V.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kermish, Z.; MacTavish, C. J.; Mason, P. V.; Megerian, K.; Moncelsi, L.; Montroy, T. E.; Morford, T. A.; Nagy, J. M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Shariff, J. A.; Soler, J. D.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.; Wiebe, D. V.; Young, E.

    2015-12-01

    We describe the SPIDER flight cryostat, which is designed to cool six millimeter-wavelength telescopes during an Antarctic long-duration balloon flight. The cryostat, one of the largest to have flown on a stratospheric payload, uses liquid 4 He to deliver cooling power to stages at 4.2 and 1.6 K. Stainless steel capillaries facilitate a high flow impedance connection between the main liquid helium tank and a smaller superfluid tank, allowing the latter to operate at 1.6 K as long as there is liquid in the 4.2 K main tank. Each telescope houses a closed cycle 3 He adsorption refrigerator that further cools the focal planes down to 300 mK. Liquid helium vapor from the main tank is routed through heat exchangers that cool radiation shields, providing negative thermal feedback. The system performed successfully during a 17 day flight in the 2014-2015 Antarctic summer. The cryostat had a total hold time of 16.8 days, with 15.9 days occurring during flight.

  8. A closed cycle-cryostat for high-field Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janoschka, A.; Svenconis, G.; Schünemann, V.

    2010-03-01

    A closed cycle-cryostat coupled to a Mössbauer spectrometer has been installed at the University of Kaiserslautern and is in full operation since march 2007. The setup is equipped with a low vibrating two-stage pulse tube cooler and has a cool down time of 48 h. The sample can be top loaded without the need to shut off the refrigerator. With the static helium exchange gas in the variable temperature insert the sample may be cooled down from room temperature to 50 K within several hours. Dynamic exchange gas with external supply of gaseous helium is used to cool the sample down to 2 K. The superconducting self-shielding split-coil generates a magnetic field of up to 5 Tesla and a stray field of ca. 60 mT at the outer cryostat walls. Mössbauer measurements can be performed in perpendicular or parallel field orientations. The sample holder and the Mössbauer drive are rigidly connected to the cryostat. In this way a line width of the two inner α-Fe lines of 0.32 mm/s has been currently achieved.

  9. The cryostat for the GRAVITY beam combiner instrument at the VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, M.; Haussmann, F.; Kellner, S.; Hofmann, R.; Eder, J.; Eisenhauer, F.; Lizon, J.-L.; Thummes, G.; Weisz, H.

    2012-07-01

    GRAVITY is a second generation VLTI instrument for high-precision narrow-angle astrometry and phase-referenced interferometric imaging in the astronomical K-band. The cryostat of the beam combiner instrument provides the required temperatures for the various subunits ranging from 40K to 290K with a milli-Kelvin temperature stability for some selected units. The bath cryostat is cooled with liquid nitrogen and makes use of the exhaust gas to cool the main optical bench to an intermediate temperature of 240K. The fringe tracking detector will be cooled separately by a single-stage pulse tube cooler to a temperature of 40K. The pulse tube cooler is optimized for minimum vibrations. In particular its warm side is connected to the 80K reservoir of the LN2 cryostat to minimize the required input power. All temperature levels are actively stabilized by electric heaters. The cold bench is supported separately from the vacuum vessel and the liquid nitrogen reservoir to minimize the transfer of acoustic noise onto the instrument.

  10. Operating parameters of liquid helium transfer lines used with continuous flow cryostats at low sample temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, N.; Welker, D.; Haberstroh, Ch; Hesse, U.; Krzyzowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Continuous flow cryostats are used to cool samples to a variable temperature level by evaporating a cryogen, e.g. liquid helium (LHe). For this purpose LHe is usually stored outside the cryostat in a mobile dewar and supplied through a transfer line. In general, the complete setup has to be characterised by the lowest possible consumption of LHe. Additionally, a minimum sample temperature can be favourable from an experimental point of view. The achievement of both requirements is determined by the respective cryostat design as well as by the transfer line. In the presented work operating data, e.g. the LHe consumption during cooldown and steady state, the minimum sample temperature, and the outlet quality are analysed to characterise the performance of a reference transfer line. In addition, an experimental transfer line with built-in pressure sensors has been commissioned to examine the pressure drop along the transfer line, too. During the tests LHe impurities occurred which restricted a steady operation.

  11. An Optical Cryostat for Use in Microscopy Cooled by Stirling-Type Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liubiao, Chen; Qiang, Zhou; Xiaoshuang, Zhu; Yuan, Zhou; Junjie, Wang

    The few products of an optical cryostat for use in microscopy in commercialapplications are generally cooled by liquid nitrogen, liquid helium or cryocoolers such as G-M cryocooler or G-M type pulse tube cryocooler (PTC). Sometimes it is not convenient to use G-M cryocooler or G-M type PTC because of its noise and big size; and in some places, liquid nitrogen, especially liquid helium, is not easily available. To overcome this limitation, an optical cryostat for use in microscopy cooled by a Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler (SPTC) has been designed, built and tested. The refrigerator system SPTC is an important component of the optical cryostat; it has the advantages of compactness, high efficiency, and low vibration. For simplification and compactness, single-stage configuration with coaxial arrangement was employed in the developed SPTC. In order to lower the vibration, the separated configuration was adopted; its compressor and pulse tube are connected with a flexible connecting tube. At present, a lowest temperature of 20 K could be achieved. The temperature fluctuation can be controlled at ±10 mK by adjusting the input electric power to the compressor; and some considerations for further improvement will also be described in this paper.

  12. NASA GRC and MSFC Space-Plasma Arc Testing Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T,; Hillard, G. Barry; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2005-01-01

    . Finally, the necessity of testing will be emphasized, not to the exclusion of modeling, but as part of a complete strategy for determining when and if arcs will occur, and preventing them from occurring in space.

  13. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius. PMID:26558995

  14. A modified cryostat for photo-electrical characterization of porous materials in controlled atmosphere at very low gas dosage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultrera, Alessandro; Amato, Giampiero; Boarino, Luca; Lamberti, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    We developed an integrated system for photo-electrical characterization of materials for sensing applications in strictly controlled environment conditions. The peculiar aspect of this setup is the capability of a fine-tuned gas dosage and a fast dynamic chamber pressure control, coupled with current and voltage sensing within a modified cryostat. To illustrate the capabilities of our system we have characterised both p+-type mesoporous silicon (meso-PS) membranes and nano-crystalline mesoporous titanium dioxide (nc-TiO2) films. In particular, as a main topic is presented a well-resolved characterization of mesoporous silicon electrical conductivity changes induced by presence of ethanol. At low pore filling level adsorbate-shunted conduction is avoided, while dielectric screening effects on frozen doping centres are observable. Beside we presented observation of mesoporous titanium dioxide photo-conductivity as a function of different gas pressure reporting opposite effects of relatively low- and high-pressure regimes. High reproducibility provided by the system is discussed as a final remark.

  15. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Hillary

    1995-03-06

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  16. Simplified Methodology to Estimate the Maximum Liquid Helium (LHe) Cryostat Pressure from a Vacuum Jacket Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    The aircraft-based Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a platform for multiple infrared astronomical observation experiments. These experiments carry sensors cooled to liquid helium temperatures. The liquid helium supply is contained in large (i.e., 10 liters or more) vacuum-insulated dewars. Should the dewar vacuum insulation fail, the inrushing air will condense and freeze on the dewar wall, resulting in a large heat flux on the dewar's contents. The heat flux results in a rise in pressure and the actuation of the dewar pressure relief system. A previous NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) assessment provided recommendations for the wall heat flux that would be expected from a loss of vacuum and detailed an appropriate method to use in calculating the maximum pressure that would occur in a loss of vacuum event. This method involved building a detailed supercritical helium compressible flow thermal/fluid model of the vent stack and exercising the model over the appropriate range of parameters. The experimenters designing science instruments for SOFIA are not experts in compressible supercritical flows and do not generally have access to the thermal/fluid modeling packages that are required to build detailed models of the vent stacks. Therefore, the SOFIA Program engaged the NESC to develop a simplified methodology to estimate the maximum pressure in a liquid helium dewar after the loss of vacuum insulation. The method would allow the university-based science instrument development teams to conservatively determine the cryostat's vent neck sizing during preliminary design of new SOFIA Science Instruments. This report details the development of the simplified method, the method itself, and the limits of its applicability. The simplified methodology provides an estimate of the dewar pressure after a loss of vacuum insulation that can be used for the initial design of the liquid helium dewar vent stacks. However, since it is not an exact

  17. [Possibility of the morphometry of the neuronal body and nucleus in cryostat sections of nerve tissue].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, I B

    1982-02-01

    A method of fixation by the Carnoy liquid and of gallocyanine staining is proposed in order to obtain clear-cut boundaries of the neuron body, nucleus and nucleolus in cryostat sections of non-fixed frozen nerve tissue, for subsequent morphometry of the body and nucleus of nerve cells. In the resulting sections, the clearness of boundaries of the body and nucleus in a neuron is sufficient for measuring its diameter with the coefficient of variation not exceeding 2.5%. PMID:7041376

  18. RF status of superconducting module development suitable for CW operation: ELBE cryostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichert, J.; Büchner, A.; Büttig, H.; Gabriel, F.; Michel, P.; Möller, K.; Lehnert, U.; Schneider, Ch.; Stephan, J.; Winter, A.

    2006-02-01

    For the ELBE electron linear accelerator a superconducting accelerating module was developed and is now in routine operation. The cryostat contains two TESLA cavities (1.3 GHz) and is designed for continuous-wave (CW) operation with an accelerating gradient of 10 MV/m and a maximum average beam current of 1 mA. For the RF power two 10 kW klystrons are used. Special tuners, power couplers, low-level RF control, cryogenic control systems and safety systems were developed. Engineering design, operation parameters and experience with the module are discussed.

  19. BEC-Cryostat Interface: A Novel Platform for Hybrid Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Date, Aditya; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Schwab, Keith; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2015-05-01

    We present our experimental progress towards the implementation of a unique BEC-cryostat interface. This apparatus allows for the control and manipulation of ultracold atoms in close proximity to cryogenic surfaces. Such a system enables us to realize a hybrid quantum system consisting of a BEC strongly coupled magnetically to an ultra-high Q mechanical resonator, thus enabling precise atomic sensing of mechanical motion. Furthermore, the unprecedented sensitivities afforded by our atomic system open avenues to surface studies of correlated electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures. This work is supported by the DARPA QuASAR program through a grant from the ARO.

  20. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome.

  1. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1989-05-09

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome. 3 figs.

  2. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  3. Metal halide arc discharge lamp having short arc length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzeroll, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A metal halide arc discharge lamp includes a sealed light-transmissive outer jacket, a light-transmissive shroud located within the outer jacket and an arc tube assembly located within the shroud. The arc tube assembly includes an arc tube, electrodes mounted within the arc tube and a fill material for supporting an arc discharge. The electrodes have a spacing such that an electric field in a range of about 60 to 95 volts per centimeter is established between the electrodes. The diameter of the arc tube and the spacing of the electrodes are selected to provide an arc having an arc diameter to arc length ratio in a range of about 1.6 to 1.8. The fill material includes mercury, sodium iodide, scandium tri-iodide and a rare gas, and may include lithium iodide. The lamp exhibits a high color rendering index, high lumen output and high color temperature.

  4. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  5. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  6. Filtered cathodic arc source

    SciTech Connect

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    Disclosed is a continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45{degrees} to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  7. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  8. A vibration free closed-cycle 1 K cryostat with a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Lichtenwalter, Ben

    2014-01-01

    A 1 K closed-cycle cryostat, pre-cooled by a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler, has been developed. The Cryomech PT410 pulse tube cryocooler liquefies helium in a vacuum insulated sleeve at a pressure of ˜1 atm. Liquid helium flows through a JT valve and into a 1 K pot that is evacuated by a vacuum pump. The discharged gas from the vacuum is routed to the top of the sleeve to be liquefied. This design accomplishes closed-cycle 1 K refrigeration and provides continuous cooling below 2 K. Using two XDS10 vacuum pumps and with the JT valve optimized for maximum cooling capacity, the 1 K cooling station can reach a no-load temperature of 1.51 K and provide a capacity of 225 mW at 1.76 K. The temperature oscillations on the 4 K and 1 K cooling stations are ± 3 mK. The cryostat is designed so that there is no direct mechanical contact between the pulse tube cryocooler heat exchangers and the 1 K cooling station. This design feature enables exceptionally low vibration operation at the 1 K cooling station.

  9. Pulse tube refrigerator cryostat with an intrinsic top-loading system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koettig, T.; Moldenhauer, S.; Thürk, M.; Seidel, P.

    2006-06-01

    The authors have undertaken basic research and prototype developments of four-valve pulse-tube refrigerators (FVPTR) since several years. Two single-stage FVPTR in coaxial and U-shaped arrangement have been designed for maximum refrigeration power at cooling temperatures below 30 K. The heat flow through a thermal link between the pulse tube and the regenerator is the determining difference between the U-shaped and the coaxial configuration. The intrinsic heat flux has a complex influence on the cooler performance, e.g. the cooling power, the temperature distribution within the pulse tube and the dynamic losses. Based on these results we propose a design study of a coaxial FVPTR with an intrinsic top-loading system. This cryostat is most suitable for measurements and analytical applications with even low maintenance costs. The main advantage for the operator is the rapid sample exchange while the refrigerator is operating. The process takes only a matter of minutes. Thus the time to cool successive samples is greatly reduced over cold finger cryostats.

  10. A Simple Dewar/Cryostat for Thermally Equilibrating Samples at Known Temperatures for Accurate Cryogenic Luminescence Measurements.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Phoebe G; Jagow, Devin M; Portune, Cameron M; Kenney, John W

    2016-01-01

    The design and operation of a simple liquid nitrogen Dewar/cryostat apparatus based upon a small fused silica optical Dewar, a thermocouple assembly, and a CCD spectrograph are described. The experiments for which this Dewar/cryostat is designed require fast sample loading, fast sample freezing, fast alignment of the sample, accurate and stable sample temperatures, and small size and portability of the Dewar/cryostat cryogenic unit. When coupled with the fast data acquisition rates of the CCD spectrograph, this Dewar/cryostat is capable of supporting cryogenic luminescence spectroscopic measurements on luminescent samples at a series of known, stable temperatures in the 77-300 K range. A temperature-dependent study of the oxygen quenching of luminescence in a rhodium(III) transition metal complex is presented as an example of the type of investigation possible with this Dewar/cryostat. In the context of this apparatus, a stable temperature for cryogenic spectroscopy means a luminescent sample that is thermally equilibrated with either liquid nitrogen or gaseous nitrogen at a known measureable temperature that does not vary (ΔT < 0.1 K) during the short time scale (~1-10 sec) of the spectroscopic measurement by the CCD. The Dewar/cryostat works by taking advantage of the positive thermal gradient dT/dh that develops above liquid nitrogen level in the Dewar where h is the height of the sample above the liquid nitrogen level. The slow evaporation of the liquid nitrogen results in a slow increase in h over several hours and a consequent slow increase in the sample temperature T over this time period. A quickly acquired luminescence spectrum effectively catches the sample at a constant, thermally equilibrated temperature. PMID:27501355

  11. EDITORIAL Metal vapour in atmospheric-pressure arcs Metal vapour in atmospheric-pressure arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Anthony B.

    2010-11-01

    determine Stark widths of spectral lines is discussed in a further contribution. Two papers address the calculation of important plasma data sets, in particular net radiative emission coefficients and diffusion coefficients, which are vital input for computational models. Four sophisticated computational modelling studies of the influence of metal vapour on gas-metal arc welding, gas-tungsten arc welding, and arc splitting in low-voltage circuit breakers are then presented. The final contribution describes the application of a multiscale computational model to investigate the important occupational health problem of the production of fume from the metal vapour produced in welding arcs. Overall, the papers presented give an overview of the state of the art of research into metal vapour in atmospheric-pressure arcs, and at the same time constitute real progress in this topical and important field.

  12. Episodicity in back-arc tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Stuart R.; Stegman, Dave; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2008-12-01

    The evolution of back-arc basins is tied to the development of the dynamics of the subduction system they are a part of. We present a study of back-arc basins and model their development by implementing 3D time-dependant computer models of subduction including an overriding plate. We define three types of episodicity: pseudo-, quasi- and hyper-episodicity, and find evidence of these in nature. Observations of back-arc basin ages, histories of spreading, quiescence and compression in the overriding plate give us an understanding of the time-development of these subduction zones and back-arc basins. Across the globe today, a number of trenches are advancing—the Izu-Bonin Trench, the Mariana Trench, the Japan Trench, the Java-Sunda Trench and the central portion of the Peru-Chile Trench (the Andes subduction zone). The Izu-Bonin, Mariana and Japan all have established back-arc basins, while the others have documented episodes of spreading, quiescence, compression or a combination of these. The combination of advancing and retreating trench motion places these subduction zones in the category of hyper-episodicity. Quasi-episodicity, in which the back-arc shifts between phases of rifting, spreading and quiescence, is the dominant form of episodic back-arc development in the present. We find this type of episodicity in models for which the system is dynamically consistent—that we have allowed the subducting plate's velocity to be determined by the sinking slabs' buoyancy. Quasi- and hyper-episodicity are only found in subduction zones with relatively high subducting plate velocities, between 6 and 9 cm/year. Finally, those subduction zones for which the subducting plate is moving slowly, such as in the Mediterranean or the Scotia Sea, experience only pseudo-episodicity, where the spreading moves linearly towards the trench but often does so in discrete ridge-jump events.

  13. The statistical difference between bending arcs and regular polar arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullen, A.; Fear, R. C.; Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Karlsson, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the Polar UVI data set by Kullen et al. (2002) of 74 polar arcs is reinvestigated, focusing on bending arcs. Bending arcs are typically faint and form (depending on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By direction) on the dawnside or duskside oval with the tip of the arc splitting off the dayside oval. The tip subsequently moves into the polar cap in the antisunward direction, while the arc's nightside end remains attached to the oval, eventually becoming hook-shaped. Our investigation shows that bending arcs appear on the opposite oval side from and farther sunward than most regular polar arcs. They form during By-dominated IMF conditions: typically, the IMF clock angle increases from 60 to 90° about 20 min before the arc forms. Antisunward plasma flows from the oval into the polar cap just poleward of bending arcs are seen in Super Dual Auroral Radar Network data, indicating dayside reconnection. For regular polar arcs, recently reported characteristics are confirmed in contrast to bending arcs. This includes plasma flows along the nightside oval that originate close to the initial arc location and a significant delay in the correlation between IMF By and initial arc location. In our data set, the highest correlations are found with IMF By appearing at least 1-2 h before arc formation. In summary, bending arcs are distinctly different from regular arcs and cannot be explained by existing polar arc models. Instead, these results are consistent with the formation mechanism described in Carter et al. (2015), suggesting that bending arcs are caused by dayside reconnection.

  14. Modeling of thermal plasma arc technology FY 1994 report

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, G.L.; Nguyen, H.D.; Paik, S.; McKellar, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    The thermal plasma arc process is under consideration to thermally treat hazardous and radioactive waste. A computer model for the thermal plasma arc technology was designed as a tool to aid in the development and use of the plasma arc-Joule beating process. The value of this computer model is to: (a) aid in understanding the plasma arc-Joule beating process as applied to buried waste or exhumed buried waste, (b) help design melter geometry and electrode configuration, (c) calculate the process capability of vitrifying waste (i.e., tons/hour), (d) develop efficient plasma and melter operating conditions to optimize the process and/or reduce safety hazards, (e) calculate chemical reactions during treatment of waste to track chemical composition of off-gas products, and composition of final vitrified waste form and (f) help compare the designs of different plasma-arc facilities. A steady-state model of a two-dimensional axisymmetric transferred plasma arc has been developed and validated. A parametric analysis was performed that studied the effects of arc length, plasma gas composition, and input power on the temperatures and velocity profiles of the slag and plasma gas. A two-dimensional transient thermo-fluid model of the US Bureau of Mines plasma arc melter has been developed. This model includes the growth of a slag pool. The thermo-fluid model is used to predict the temperature and pressure fields within a plasma arc furnace. An analysis was performed to determine the effects of a molten metal pool on the temperature, velocity, and voltage fields within the slag. A robust and accurate model for the chemical equilibrium calculations has been selected to determine chemical composition of final waste form and off-gas based on the temperatures and pressures within the plasma-arc furnace. A chemical database has been selected. The database is based on the materials to be processed in the plasma arc furnaces.

  15. Arcing in LEO - Does the Whole Array Discharge?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Hillard, G. Barry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional wisdom about solar array arcing in LEO is that only the parts the solar array that are swept over by the arc-generated plasma front are discharged in the initial arc. This limits the amount of energy that can be discharged. Recent work done at the NASA Glenn Research Center has shown that this idea is mistaken. In fact, the capacitance of the entire solar array may be discharged, which for large arrays leads to very large and possibly debilitating arcs, even if no sustained arc occurs. We present the laboratory work that conclusively demonstrates this fact by using a grounded plate that prevents the arc-plasma front from reaching certain array strings. Finally, we discuss the dependence of arc strength and arc pulse width on the capacitance that is discharged, and provide a physical mechanism for discharge of the entire array, even when parts of the array are not accessible to the arc-plasma front. Mitigation techniques are also presented.

  16. Arcing in LEO: Does the Whole Array Discharge?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Hillard, G. Barry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional wisdom about solar array arcing in LEO is that only the parts of the solar array that are swept over by the arc-generated plasma front are discharged in the initial arc. This limits the amount of energy that can be discharged. Recent work done at the NASA Glenn Research Center has shown that this idea is mistaken. In fact, the capacitance of the entire solar array may be discharged, which for large arrays leads to very large and possibly debilitating arcs, even if no sustained arc occurs. We present the laboratory work that conclusively demonstrates this fact by using a grounded plate that prevents the arc-plasma front from reaching certain array strings. Finally, we discuss the dependence of arc strength and arc pulse width on the capacitance that is discharged, and provide a physical mechanism for discharge of the entire array, even when parts of the array are not accessible to the arc-plasma front. Mitigation techniques are also presented.

  17. ALICE—ARC integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlik, C.; Gregersen, A. R.; Kleist, J.; Peters, A.; Saiz, P.

    2008-07-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a module implementing the functionalities necessary to achieve AliEn job submission and management to ARC enabled sites.

  18. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  19. Vacuum arc deposition devices

    SciTech Connect

    Boxman, R.L.; Zhitomirsky, V.N.

    2006-02-15

    The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

  20. Making and breaking an island arc: A new perspective from the Oligocene Kyushu-Palau arc, Philippine Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Osamu; Taylor, Rex N.; Yuasa, Makoto; Ohara, Yasuhiko

    2011-05-01

    The Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR) is a 2600 km long remnant island arc that is separated from the active Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc by a series of spreading and rift basins. We present 40Ar/39Ar ages and geochemical data for the entire length of the Kyushu-Palau arc as well as for the conjugate arc which is stranded within the IBM fore arc. New 40Ar/39Ar ages indicate that the KPR was active between 25 and 48 Ma, but the majority of the exposed volcanism occurred in the final phase, between 25 and 28 Ma. Rifting of the Kyushu-Palau arc to form the Shikoku and Parece Vela basins occurred simultaneously along the length of the arc (circa 25 Ma), and at a similar distance from the trench. Unlike the IBM, the KPR has only limited systematic along-arc geochemical trends. Two geochemical components within the KPR indicate an origin in the suprasubduction mantle. First, EM-1-like lavas are identified in a restricted section of the arc, suggesting a localized heterogeneity. Second, EM-2-like arc volcanoes formed on juvenile West Philippine Basin crust, potentially reflecting ingress of mantle from the then active EM-2 province which lies in the west. Another geochemical heterogeneity is found at the KPR-Daito Ridge intersection where the arc developed on preexisting Cretaceous Daito Ridge crust. The geochemical characteristics at this intersection likely result from the involvement of sub-Daito Ridge lithospheric mantle. Subduction flux beneath the KPR generally matches post-45 Ma Eocene/Oligocene lavas in the IBM fore arc, involving fluids and melts derived from altered igneous crust.

  1. Pulsed Long Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, N. Yu

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a method and an appliance for pulsed arc welding. The method supports dosage of energy required for melting each bead of electrode metal starting from the detachment of a bead. The appliance including a sensor to register bead detachment shows this moment due to the voltage burst in the arc space. Transferred beads of electrode metal are of similar size because of the dosage of energy used for melting each bead, as the consequence, the process is more stable and starting conditions to transfer electrode metal are similar, as the result, a produced weld is improved.

  2. Arc electrode interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, X.; Berns, D.; Heberlein, J.

    1994-01-01

    The project consisted of two parts: (1) the cathode interaction studies which were a continuation of previous work and had the objective of increasing our understanding of the microscopic phenomena controlling cathode erosion in arc jet thrusters, and (2) the studies of the anode attachment in arc jet thrusters. The cathode interaction studies consisted of (1) a continuation of some modeling work in which the previously derived model for the cathode heating was applied to some specific gases and electrode materials, and (2) experimental work in which various diagnostics was applied to the cathode. The specific diagnostics used were observation of the cathode tip during arcing using a Laser Strobe Video system in conjunction with a tele-microscope, a monochromator with an optical multichannel analyzer for the determination of the cathode temperature distribution, and various ex situ materials analysis methods. The emphasis of our effort was shifted to the cathode materials analysis because a parallel project was in place during the second half of 1993 with a visiting scientist pursuing arc electrode materials studies. As a consequence, the diagnostic investigations of the arc in front of the cathode had to be postponed to the first half of 1994, and we are presently preparing these measurements. The results of last year's study showed some unexpected effects influencing the cathode erosion behavior, such as increased erosion away from the cathode tip, and our understanding of these effects should improve our ability to control cathode erosion. The arc jet anode attachment studies concentrated on diagnostics of the instabilities in subsonic anode attachment arc jet thrusters, and were supplemental measurements to work which was performed by one of the authors who spent the summer as an intern at NASA Lewis Research Center. A summary of the results obtained during the internship are included because they formed an integral part of the study. Two tasks for 1994, the

  3. Energy losses in the D0 {beta} solenoid cryostat caused by current changes

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A.T.

    1993-11-01

    The proposed D0 {beta} solenoid is a superconducting solenoid mounted inside an aluminum tube which supports the solenoid winding over it`s full length. This aluminum support tube, also called bobbin, is therefore very tightly coupled to magnetic flux changes caused by solenoid current variations. These current changes in the solenoid, will cause answer currents to flow in the resistive bobbin wall and therefore cause heat losses. The insertion of an external dump resistor in the solenoid current loop reduces energy dissipation inside the cryostat during a quench and will shorten the discharge time constant. This note presents a simple electrical model for the coupled bobbin and solenoid and makes it easier to understand the circuit behavior and losses. Estimates for the maximum allowable rate of solenoid current changes, based on the maximum permissible rate of losses can be made using this model.

  4. Building and Testing a Superconductivity Measurement Platform for a Helium Cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Heath; Ostrander, Joshua; Wu, Jim; Ramos, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    Superconductivity experiments using Josephson junctions are an excellent environment to study quantum mechanics and materials science. A standard electrical transport technique uses filtered four wire measurement of these superconducting devices. We report our experience as undergraduates in a liberal arts college in building and testing an experimental platform anchored on the cold-finger of a helium cryostat and designed for performing differential conductance measurements in Josephson junctions. To filter out RF, we design, build and test cryogenic filters using ceramic capacitors and inductors and thermocoax cables. We also use fixed attenuators for thermal anchoring and use miniature connectors to connect wires and coax to a sample box. We report on progress in our diagnostic measurements as well as low-temperature tunneling experiments to probe the structure of the energy gap in both single- and multi-gapped superconductors. We acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation through NSF Grant DMR-1206561.

  5. Design and construction of a high temperature superconducting power cable cryostat for use in railway system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, M.; Muralidhar, M.; Suzuki, K.; Fukumoto, Y.; Ishihara, A.; Akasaka, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2013-10-01

    The primary objective of the current effort was to design and test a cryostat using a prototype five-meter long high temperature Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Oy (Bi-2223) superconducting dc power cable for railway systems. To satisfy the safety regulations of the Govt of Japan a mill sheet covered by super-insulation was used inside the walls of the cryostat. The thicknesses of various walls in the cryostat were obtained from a numerical analysis. A non-destructive inspection was utilized to find leaks under vacuum or pressure. The cryostat target temperature range was around 50 K, which is well below liquid nitrogen temperature, the operating temperature of the superconducting cable. The qualification testing was carried out from 77 down to 66 K. When using only the inner sheet wire, the maximum current at 77.3 K was 10 kA. The critical current (Ic) value increased with decreasing temperature and reached 11.79 kA at 73.7 K. This is the largest dc current reported in a Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Oy or YBa2Cu3Oy (Y-123) superconducting prototype cable so far. These results verify that the developed DC superconducting cable is reliable and fulfils all the requirements necessary for successful use in various power applications including railway systems. The key issues for the design of a reliable cryogenic system for superconducting power cables for railway systems are discussed.

  6. High-stability cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope based on a closed-cycle cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Hackley, Jason D.; Kislitsyn, Dmitry A.; Beaman, Daniel K.; Nazin, George V.; Ulrich, Stefan

    2014-10-15

    We report on the design and operation of a cryogenic ultra-high vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscope (STM) coupled to a closed-cycle cryostat (CCC). The STM is thermally linked to the CCC through helium exchange gas confined inside a volume enclosed by highly flexible rubber bellows. The STM is thus mechanically decoupled from the CCC, which results in a significant reduction of the mechanical noise transferred from the CCC to the STM. Noise analysis of the tunneling current shows current fluctuations up to 4% of the total current, which translates into tip-sample distance variations of up to 1.5 picometers. This noise level is sufficiently low for atomic-resolution imaging of a wide variety of surfaces. To demonstrate this, atomic-resolution images of Au(111) and NaCl(100)/Au(111) surfaces, as well as of carbon nanotubes deposited on Au(111), were obtained. Thermal drift analysis showed that under optimized conditions, the lateral stability of the STM scanner can be as low as 0.18 Å/h. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy measurements based on the lock-in technique were also carried out, and showed no detectable presence of noise from the closed-cycle cryostat. Using this cooling approach, temperatures as low as 16 K at the STM scanner have been achieved, with the complete cool-down of the system typically taking up to 12 h. These results demonstrate that the constructed CCC-coupled STM is a highly stable instrument capable of highly detailed spectroscopic investigations of materials and surfaces at the atomic scale.

  7. NOTE: Validation of optical coherence tomography in vivo using cryostat histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambichler, T.; Moussa, G.; Regeniter, P.; Kasseck, C.; Hofmann, M. R.; Bechara, F. G.; Sand, M.; Altmeyer, P.; Hoffmann, K.

    2007-03-01

    We aimed to validate for the first time optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements of epidermal thickness (ET) using cryopreparation for histology. OCT assessments of ET were performed on healthy skin using the algorithms as follows: first, peak-to-valley analysis of the A-scan (ET-OCT-V), second, line-traced image analysis of the B-scan (ET-OCT-IA). Histology was performed using cryostat sections which were also evaluated using the image analysis (ET-Histo). We selected 114 samples, including B-scans and corresponding histology, for method comparison between ET-OCT-IA and ET-Histo. Forty-two A-scans were available for method comparison between ET-OCT-V and ET-Histo. Bland and Altman plots revealed a marked bias with wide 95% limits of agreement for ET-OCT-V versus ET-Histo. Comparison of ET-OCT-IA versus ET-Histo revealed only a slight bias and narrow 95% limits of agreement. A-scan analysis for ET determination is linked to significant limitations and lacks agreement with histology. By contrast, we observed satisfactory agreement between ET-OCT-IA and ET-Histo indicating that both methods can be utilized interchangeably. OCT using the line-traced image analysis of the B-scan appears to be a valid and relatively practicable method for the determination of ET in vivo. Furthermore, the comparisons with the in vivo OCT profiles demonstrate that cryostat sectioning provides a better preservation of relative and absolute dimensions of skin layers than paraffin embedding.

  8. Summary of Stress Analysis of CC Cryostat w/o Stiffening Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wands, R.; /Fermilab

    1986-02-04

    A finite element model of the CC cryostat was used to investigate the stresses resulting in this structure under internal pressure (30 psi at the top of the vessel increasing linearly to 40 psi at the bottom) and weight loadings. Figures 1 and 2 show the model and relevant physical dimensions. The results are given in Table I. The stresses were extracted. from the nodal stress output for individual elements. The variation of stress over the element is some indication of mesh adequacy in the absence of additional results from a finer mesh. Based on this variation, the stresses output for the central cylinder and head appear to be quite good. The nodal stresses vary about 15% within the most highly stressed elements. The maximum stresses in the outer cylinder occur in the element defined by the four nodes used for support. Stresses within this element vary by a factor of {approx}2. It is fair to say that no detailed information on stresses in the shell at the support is available with this mesh. However, outer shell stresses away from the supports are well within the limits for SS 304 as given by Section VIII, Division 2, Appendix 4. A basic node map of the axisymmetric node pattern is shown in Fig. 3 as an aid in interpreting output. This pattern is repeated 25 times about the Y-axis, with an increment of 70 in node number, and an angular increment of 7.5{sup o}. It can be concluded from the stress results that stiffening rings are not necessary in the assembled central calorimeter cryostat due to the relatively short length of the vessel and the stiffening effects of the heads. Detailed stress results in the region of the supports will be investigated in the future with a refined local mesh.

  9. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  10. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  11. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  12. Gas tungsten arc welder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  13. Evolution of magnetically rotating arc into large area arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Li, Wan-Wan; Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Zha, Jun; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2015-06-01

    An arc channel tends to shrink due to its conductivity increasing with the increase of temperature. In this study, to generate large area arc plasma, we construct a magnetically rotating arc plasma generator, which mainly consists of a lanthanide tungsten cathode (13 mm in diameter), a concentric cylindrical graphite anode chamber (60 mm in diameter) and a solenoid coil for producing an axial magnet field. By controlling the cold gas flow, the magnetically rotating arc evolves from constricted mode to diffuse mode, which almost fills the whole arc chamber cross section. Results show that the diffuse arc plasma has better uniformity and stability. The formation mechanism of large area arc plasma is discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11035005, 11475174, and 50876101) and the Science Instrument Foundation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. Y201162).

  14. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, R.A.; Kotter, D.K.

    1997-05-13

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored. 2 figs.

  15. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, Richard A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1997-01-01

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.

  16. Differential preservation in the geologic record of intraoceanic arc sedimentary and tectonic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Records of ancient intraoceanic arc activity, now preserved in continental suture zones, are commonly used to reconstruct paleogeography and plate motion, and to understand how continental crust is formed, recycled, and maintained through time. However, interpreting tectonic and sedimentary records from ancient terranes after arc-continent collision is complicated by preferential preservation of evidence for some arc processes and loss of evidence for others. In this synthesis we examine what is lost, and what is preserved, in the translation from modern processes to the ancient record of intraoceanic arcs. Composition of accreted arc terranes differs as a function of arc-continent collision geometry. 'Forward-facing' collision can accrete an oceanic arc on to either a passive or an active continental margin, with the arc facing the continent and colliding trench- and forearc-side first. In a 'backward-facing' collision, involving two subduction zones with similar polarity, the arc collides backarc-first with an active continental margin. The preservation of evidence for contemporary sedimentary and tectonic arc processes in the geologic record depends greatly on how well the various parts of the arc survive collision and orogeny in each case. Preservation of arc terranes likely is biased towards those that were in a state of tectonic accretion for tens of millions of years before collision, rather than tectonic erosion. The prevalence of tectonic erosion in modern intraoceanic arcs implies that valuable records of arc processes are commonly destroyed even before the arc collides with a continent. Arc systems are most likely to undergo tectonic accretion shortly before forward-facing collision with a continent, and thus most forearc and accretionary-prism material in ancient arc terranes likely is temporally biased toward the final stages of arc activity, when sediment flux to the trench was greatest and tectonic accretion prevailed. Collision geometry and tectonic

  17. HOLLOW CARBON ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-10-11

    A device is described for producing an energetic, direct current, hollow, carbon-arc discharge in an evacuated container and within a strong magnetic field. Such discharges are particularly useful not only in dissociation and ionization of high energy molecular ion beams, but also in acting as a shield or barrier against the instreaming of lowenergy neutral particles into a plasma formed within the hollow discharge when it is used as a dissociating mechanism for forming the plasma. There is maintained a predetermined ratio of gas particles to carbon particles released from the arc electrodes during operation of the discharge. The carbon particles absorb some of the gas particles and are pumped along and by the discharge out of the device, with the result that smaller diffusion pumps are required than would otherwise be necessary to dispose of the excess gas.

  18. ARC and Melting Efficiency of Plasma ARC Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, J. C.; Nunes, A. C.; Evans, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    A series of partial penetration Variable Polarity Plasma Arc welds were made at equal power but various combinations of current and voltage on 2219 Aluminum. Arc efficiency was measured calorimetrically and ranged between 48% and 66% for the conditions of the welds. Arc efficiency depends in different ways on voltage and current. The voltage effect dominates. Raising voltage while reducing current increases arc efficiency. Longer, higher voltage arcs are thought to transfer a greater portion of arc power to the workpiece through shield gas convection. Melting efficiency depends upon weld pool shape as well as arc efficiency. Increased current increases the melting efficiency as it increases the depth to width ratio of the weld pool. Increased plasma gas flow does the same thing. Higher currents are thought to raise arc pressure and depress liquid at the bottom of the weld pool. More arc power then transfers to the workpiece through increasing plasma gas convection. If the power is held constant, the reduced voltage lowers the arc efficiency, while the pool shape change increases the melting efficiency,

  19. NASA GRC and MSFC Space-Plasma Arc Testing Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Hillard, G. Barry; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2007-01-01

    Tests of arcing and current collection in simulated space plasma conditions have been performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, for over 30 years and at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, for almost as long. During this period, proper test conditions for accurate and meaningful space simulation have been worked out, comparisons with actual space performance in spaceflight tests and with real operational satellites have been made, and NASA has achieved our own internal standards for test protocols. It is the purpose of this paper to communicate the test conditions, test procedures, and types of analysis used at NASA GRC and MSFC to the space environmental testing community at large, to help with international space-plasma arcing-testing standardization. Discussed herein are neutral gas conditions, plasma densities and uniformity, vacuum chamber sizes, sample sizes and Debye lengths, biasing samples versus self-generated voltages, floating samples versus grounded samples, test electrical conditions, arc detection, preventing sustained discharges during testing, real samples versus idealized samples, validity of LEO tests for GEO samples, extracting arc threshold information from arc rate versus voltage tests, snapover, current collection, and glows at positive sample bias, Kapton pyrolysis, thresholds for trigger arcs, sustained arcs, dielectric breakdown and Paschen discharge, tether arcing and testing in very dense plasmas (i.e. thruster plumes), arc mitigation strategies, charging mitigation strategies, models, and analysis of test results. Finally, the necessity of testing will be emphasized, not to the exclusion of modeling, but as part of a complete strategy for determining when and if arcs will occur, and preventing them from occurring in space.

  20. The Role of Water Vapor and Dissociative Recombination Processes in Solar Array Arc Initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofar, J.; Vayner, B.; Degroot, W.; Ferguson, D.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental plasma arc investigations involving the onset of arc initiation for a negatively biased solar array immersed in low-density plasma have been performed. Previous studies into the arc initiation process have shown that the most probable arcing sites tend to occur at the triple junction involving the conductor, dielectric and plasma. More recently our own experiments have led us to believe that water vapor is the main causal factor behind the arc initiation process. Assuming the main component of the expelled plasma cloud by weight is water, the fastest process available is dissociative recombination (H2O(+) + e(-) (goes to) H* + OH*). A model that agrees with the observed dependency of arc current pulse width on the square root of capacitance is presented. A 400 MHz digital storage scope and current probe was used to detect arcs at the triple junction of a solar array. Simultaneous measurements of the arc trigger pulse, the gate pulse, the arc current and the arc voltage were then obtained. Finally, a large number of measurements of individual arc spectra were obtained in very short time intervals, ranging from 10 to 30 microseconds, using a 1/4 a spectrometer coupled with a gated intensified CCD. The spectrometer was systematically tuned to obtain optical arc spectra over the entire wavelength range of 260 to 680 nanometers. All relevant atomic lines and molecular bands were then identified.

  1. Arc jet diagnostics tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Two objectives were addressed during a 10 week 1988 NASA/ASEE summer faculty fellowship at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). These objectives were the evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species in an arc jet environment, and the determination of atomic recombination coefficients for reaction cured glass (RCG) coated high temperature surface insulation (HRSI) materials subjected to simulated reentry conditions. Evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species provided some of the first measurements of point compositions in arc jet tunnel environments. A major objective of this project centered around the sampling residence time. A three staged vacuum sampling system pulled the molecules and atoms from the arc jet to a quadrupole ionization mass spectrometer in 400 milliseconds. Conditions investigated included a composition survey across the nozzle exit at 3 cm z-distance from the nozzle exit for 3 different currents. Also, a point composition survey was taken around a shock created by the presence of a blunt body.

  2. Thermal Performance of Aged and Weathered Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI) Materials Under Cryogenic Vacuum Conditions (Cryostat-4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center conducted long-term testing of SOFI materials under actual-use cryogenic conditions with Cryostat-4. The materials included in the testing were NCFI 24-124 (acreage foam), BX-265 (close-out foam, including intertank flange and bipod areas), and a potential alternate material, NCFI 27-68, (acreage foam with the flame retardant removed). Specimens of these materials were placed at two locations: a site that simulated aging (the Vehicle Assembly Building [VAB]) and a site that simulated weathering (the Atmospheric Exposure Test Site [beach site]). After aging/weathering intervals of 3, 6, and 12 months, the samples were retrieved and tested for their thermal performance under cryogenic vacuum conditions with test apparatus Cryostat-4.

  3. Cryostat design and analysis of the superconducting magnets for Jefferson Lab's 11-GEV/C super high momentum spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    P. Brindza, E. Sun, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design and analysis of the cryostats for the two cos(2theta) quadrupoles and the cos(theta) dipole. All the magnets are currently being bid for commercial fabrication. The results of finite element analysis for the magnet cryostat helium vessels and outer vacuum chambers which investigate the mechanical integrity under maximum allowable internal working pressure, maximum allowable external working pressure, and cryogenic temperature are discussed. The allowable stress criterion is determined based on the allowable stress philosophy of the ASME codes. The computed cryogenic heat load of the magnets is compared with the allowable cryogenic consumption budget. The presented cool-down time of the magnets was studied under the conditions of a limited supply rate and a controlled temperature differential of 50 K in the magnets.

  4. Cryostat Design and Analysis of the Superconducting Magnets for Jefferson Lab's 11 Gev/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindza, P.; Sun, E.; Lassiter, S.; Fowler, M.

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design and analysis of the cryostats for the two cos(2θ) quadrupoles and the cos(θ) dipole. All the magnets are currently being bid for commercial fabrication. The results of finite element analysis for the magnet cryostat helium vessels and outer vacuum chambers which investigate the mechanical integrity under maximum allowable internal working pressure, maximum allowable external working pressure, and cryogenic temperature are discussed. The allowable stress criterion is determined based on the allowable stress philosophy of the ASME codes. The computed cryogenic heat load of the magnets is compared with the allowable cryogenic consumption budget. The presented cool-down time of the magnets was studied under the conditions of a limited supply rate and a controlled temperature differential of 50 K in the magnets.

  5. Low Temperature Scanning Probe Microscope(LT-SPM) operating in a Cryogen-Free Cryostat, 1.5-300K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karci, Ozgur; Dede, Munir; Bugoslavsky, Yury; Hall, Renny; Oral, Ahmet; Nanomagnetics Instruments Ltd. Team; Cryogenic Limited Team; Sabanci University Team

    2011-03-01

    We present the design of a Low Temperature Scanning Probe Microscope(LT-SFM) operating in a vibration-free cryogen-free cryostat. A 0.5W ultra now noise Pulse Tube cryocooler is integrated into the cryostat with a 9T magnet. Stick slip coarse approach mechanism is used to bring the sample in to close proximity of the sample. The sample can be moved in XY directions within 3 mm range, while the position is measured with capacitive encoder with 3 μ m accuracy. An improved fiber interferometer with ~ 12 fm/ √ Hz noise level is used to detect cantilever deflection. The resonance of the cantilever controlled by a digital Phase Locked Loop (PLL) integrated in our Control Electronics with 5mHz frequency resolution. We can achieve ~ 1 nm resolution in AFM mode & <10nm resolution in MFM mode. Results from different imaging modes; non-contact AFM, MFM, Piezoresponse, Conductive AFM etc. will be presented.

  6. Closing a quantum feedback loop for a superconducting qubit inside a cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Christian Kraglund; Kerckhoff, Joseph; Lehnert, Konrad W.; Chapman, Benjamin J.; Mølmer, Klaus

    Several quantum information protocols relies upon efficient feedback (or feed-forward) schemes. Recently, within the field of superconducting qubits, many experiments have shown tremendous progress towards high fidelity quantum feedback scheme. Some experiments work by traditional measurement based schemes where the classical output is processed on a classical ''computer'' before a signal is fed back to the qubits. Other approaches are working in a continuous coherent manner, where the full quantum description of the system creates an effective bath that relaxes the system into the desired state. This talk will present a different approach that aims to close a measurement based feedback loop inside a cryostat and, thus, the scheme works completely autonomous. This approach sidesteps many of the inefficiencies inherent in two-way communication between temperature stages in typical systems with room temperature controllers, and avoids increasing the cryogenic heat load. This controller may find a broad range of uses in multi-qubit systems, but here I analyze two specific demonstrative cases in single qubit-control and show simulations of the time evolution for the full system dynamics.

  7. Handling and analysis of ices in cryostats and glove boxes in view of cometary samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roessler, K.; Eich, G.; Heyl, M.; Kochan, H.; Oehler, A.; Patnaik, A.; Schlosser, W.; Schulz, R.

    1989-01-01

    Comet nucleus sample return mission and other return missions from planets and satellites need equipment for handling and analysis of icy samples at low temperatures under vacuum or protective gas. Two methods are reported which were developed for analysis of small icy samples and which are modified for larger samples in cometary matter simulation experiments (KOSI). A conventional optical cryostat system was modified to allow for transport of samples at 5 K, ion beam irradiation, and measurement in an off-line optical spectrophotometer. The new system consists of a removable window plug containing nozzles for condensation of water and volatiles onto a cold finger. This plug can be removed in a vacuum system, changed against another plug (e.g., with other windows (IR, VIS, VUV) or other nozzles). While open, the samples can be treated under vacuum with cooling by manipulators (cut, removal, sample taking, irradiation with light, photons, or ions). After bringing the plug back, the samples can be moved to another site of analysis. For handling the 30 cm diameter mineral-ice samples from the KOSI experiments an 80x80x80 cm glove box made out of plexiglass was used. The samples were kept in a liquid nitrogen bath, which was filled from the outside. A stream a dry N2 and evaporating gas from the bath purified the glove box from impurity gases and, in particular, H2O, which otherwise would condense onto the samples.

  8. Cryostat section assay of oestrogen and progesterone receptors in meningiomas: a clinicopathological study.

    PubMed Central

    Ironside, J W; Battersby, R D; Dangerfield, V J; Parsons, M A; Timperley, W R; Underwood, J C

    1986-01-01

    Oestrogen receptors and progesterone receptors were measured in the cytosols from cryostat sections of 45 meningiomas from 40 patients (12 men, 28 women) using an isoelectric focusing technique. Near fascimile adjacent sections from the same tissue blocks were stained and examined to determine the histological subtype of the neoplasms. Appreciable levels of progesterone receptor (greater than 10 fmol/mg cytosol protein) were present in 24 (53.3%) of of the neoplasms, but no clinically important oestrogen receptor was detected in any of the tumours. Competitive binding studies on control tissue confirmed the specificity of the assay procedures. No correlation was found between progesterone receptor state and the age, sex, or menopausal state of the patients, or the histological subtype and site of the neoplasms. Four of the patients studied had multiple intracranial neoplasms, which in two were of differing progesterone receptor state. The presence of specific progesterone receptor in meningioma cytosols raises the possibility of hormonal manipulation in the treatment of this group of neoplasms. PMID:3950031

  9. Further tests of the Argonne 3. 3-MJ pulsed superconducting coil and its nonmetallic cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Krieger, C.; McGhee, D.

    1983-05-01

    A split-pair superconducting coil of the Pulsed Cable Test Facility (PCTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been successfully tested both in DC and pulsing modes. At a peak operating current of 11 kA, the peak magnetic field and stored energy of the coil are 6.5 T and 3.3 MJ, respectively. In the pulsing test, the coil was charged to 10.55 kA in 1.0 s and discharged to zero in 1.6 s. The ac losses of the coil in this mode were 7.5 kJ/pulse. The coil is composed of two solenoids each with 22 layers and 9.14 turns per layer. The cable for the coil consists of 24, 19-strand NbTi subcables. The nonmetallic cryostat of the PCTF consists of two fiberglass reinforced polyester resin vessels. Developmental high current conductors can be tested under the PCTF pulsing magnetic fields in a form of pancake coils or as a short sample for the studies of pulsing effects.

  10. Spectroscopic study of the reaction of silver atoms with CO in a rotating cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Chenier, J.H.B.; Hampson, C.A.; Howard, J.A.; Mile, B.

    1988-05-19

    Reactions of /sup 107/Ag atoms with CO have been studied in inert hydrocarbon matrices in a rotating cryostat at cryogenic temperatures by EPR and FTIR spectroscopies. AgCO, bent Ag(CO)/sub 2/ two conformers of Ag(CO)/sub 3/, and cluster carbonyls Ag/sub n/(CO)/sub x/, where n greater than or equal to 5, are formed in adamantane. Magnetic parameters are reported for these silver carbonyls. IR spectra show the presence of a range of carbon monoxide complexes with single Ag atoms and Ag clusters, but the considerable overlapping of the bands from all these species precludes assignment other than that at 1952 cm/sup -1/ to planar Ag(CO)/sub 3/. In cyclohexane unambiguous EPR or FTIR evidence for mononuclear AG carbonyls is not obtained, but there are strong complex features in both spectra from a range of Ag cluster carbonyls AG/sub n/(CO)/sub x/ with n = 2-7.

  11. Mesh sensitivity study and optimization of fixed support for ITER torus and cryostat cryoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badgujar, S.; Vaghela, H.; Shah, N.; Bhattacharya, R.; Sarkar, B.

    2010-02-01

    The torus & cryostat cryoline of ITER cryodistribution system has been designed as per the process specifications. The cryoline is an ensemble of six process pipes, thermal shield, fixed, sliding support and outer jacket. The fixed support (FS), which also acts as the anchor for the bellows, is one of the most important part of the cryoline. The FS has to withstand the static weight of pipes as well as the spring and thrust forces arising from the bellows. The FS design has been optimized for the thermal, structural and for combined loads with thermal optimization criteria; less than 8 Watt at 100 K and less than 1.5 Watt at 4.5 K. ANSYS 10.0 has been used for the analysis and CATIA V5 R16 has been used for the modelling as well as geometry optimization. In order to bring the Von-Mises stress within the acceptable limit of 115 MPa, a detailed mesh sensitivity study has been carried out along with design optimization. The iterative process of mesh refinement continued till stress convergence is achieved. The stress analysis has been carried out for optimized mesh size. The paper will present the design methodology, construction details and the results of the analysis.

  12. A flying superconducting magnet and cryostat for magnetic suspension of wind-tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, C.; Goodyer, M. J.; Scurlock, R. G.; Wu, Y. Y.

    1984-01-01

    The engineering practicality of a persistent high-field superconducting solenoid cryostat as a magnetic suspension and balance system (MSBS) for wind-tunnel testing of aircraft and missile models is examined. The test apparatus is a simple solenoid of filamentary NbTi superconductor with a cupronickel matrix. The apparatus, with a length-to-diameter ratio of 6 to 1 and a radius of 32 mm, used a 0.25 mm wire with a critical current of 27 A in an external field of 6 T. The total heat inleak of 150 mW was achieved. Helium boiloff rates were tested over a range of operating conditions, including pitch attitudes from 10 deg nose down to 90 deg nose up; the rate was estimated as low, but the aerodynamic acceptability of venting gaseous helium has not been determined. It is shown that the effectiveness of the concept increases with increasing scale, and performance in excess of that of conventional ferromagnets is achievable with reduction in size and costs, and with aptness to transonic wind-tunnel testing. Detailed specifications and schematics are included.

  13. Modeling the pressure increase in liquid helium cryostats after failure of the insulating vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidt, C.; Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-01

    The pressure relief system of liquid helium cryostats requires a careful design, due to helium's low enthalpy of vaporization and due to the low operating temperature. Hazard analyses often involve the failure of the insulating vacuum in the worst-case scenario. The venting of the insulating vacuum and the implications for the pressure increase in the helium vessel, however, have not yet been fully analyzed. Therefore, the dimensioning of safety devices often requires experience and reference to very few experimental data. In order to provide a better foundation for the design of cryogenic pressure relief systems, this paper presents an analytic approach for the strongly dynamic process induced by the loss of insulating vacuum. The model is based on theoretical considerations and on differential equation modeling. It contains only few simplifying assumptions, which will be further investigated in future experiments. The numerical solutions of example calculations are presented with regard to the heat flux into the helium vessel, the helium pressure increase and the helium flow rate through the pressure relief device. Implications concerning two-phase flow and the influence of kinetic energy are discussed.

  14. Modeling the pressure increase in liquid helium cryostats after failure of the insulating vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Heidt, C.; Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-29

    The pressure relief system of liquid helium cryostats requires a careful design, due to helium's low enthalpy of vaporization and due to the low operating temperature. Hazard analyses often involve the failure of the insulating vacuum in the worst-case scenario. The venting of the insulating vacuum and the implications for the pressure increase in the helium vessel, however, have not yet been fully analyzed. Therefore, the dimensioning of safety devices often requires experience and reference to very few experimental data. In order to provide a better foundation for the design of cryogenic pressure relief systems, this paper presents an analytic approach for the strongly dynamic process induced by the loss of insulating vacuum. The model is based on theoretical considerations and on differential equation modeling. It contains only few simplifying assumptions, which will be further investigated in future experiments. The numerical solutions of example calculations are presented with regard to the heat flux into the helium vessel, the helium pressure increase and the helium flow rate through the pressure relief device. Implications concerning two-phase flow and the influence of kinetic energy are discussed.

  15. Radiation of long and high power arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Y.; Bauchire, J. M.; Hong, D.; Rabat, H.; Riquel, G.; Sanchez, F.; Gleizes, A.

    2015-10-01

    The operators working on electrical installations of low, medium and high voltages can be accidentally exposed to short-circuit arcs ranging from a few kA to several tens of kA. To protect them from radiation, according to the exposure limits, we need to characterize the radiation emitted by the powerful arc. Therefore, we have developed a general experimental and numerical study in order to estimate the spectral irradiance received at a given distance from the arc. The experimental part was based on a very long arc (up to 2 m) with high ac current (between 4 and 40 kA rms, duration 100 ms) using 3 kinds of metallic contacts (copper, steel and aluminium). We measured the irradiance received 10m from the axis of the arc, and integrated on 4 spectral intervals corresponding to the UV, visible, IRA  +  B and IRC. The theoretical part consisted of calculating the radiance of isothermal plasmas in mixtures of air and metal vapour, integrated over the same spectral intervals as defined in the experiments. The comparison between the theoretical and experimental results has allowed the defining of three isothermal radiation sources whose combination leads to a spectral irradiation equivalent to the experimental one. Then the calculation allowed the deduction of the spectral description of the irradiance over all the wavelength range, between 200 nm and 20 μm. The final results indicate that the influence of metal is important in the visible and UVA ranges whereas the IR radiation is due to the air plasma and surrounding hot gas and fumes.

  16. Arc melter demonstration baseline test results

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; Oden, L.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the test results and evaluation for the Phase 1 (baseline) arc melter vitrification test series conducted for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration program (BWID). Phase 1 tests were conducted on surrogate mixtures of as-incinerated wastes and soil. Some buried wastes, soils, and stored wastes at the INEL and other DOE sites, are contaminated with transuranic (TRU) radionuclides and hazardous organics and metals. The high temperature environment in an electric arc furnace may be used to process these wastes to produce materials suitable for final disposal. An electric arc furnace system can treat heterogeneous wastes and contaminated soils by (a) dissolving and retaining TRU elements and selected toxic metals as oxides in the slag phase, (b) destroying organic materials by dissociation, pyrolyzation, and combustion, and (c) capturing separated volatilized metals in the offgas system for further treatment. Structural metals in the waste may be melted and tapped separately for recycle or disposal, or these metals may be oxidized and dissolved into the slag. The molten slag, after cooling, will provide a glass/ceramic final waste form that is homogeneous, highly nonleachable, and extremely durable. These features make this waste form suitable for immobilization of TRU radionuclides and toxic metals for geologic timeframes. Further, the volume of contaminated wastes and soils will be substantially reduced in the process.

  17. Design and Operation of A Setup with A Camera and Adjustable Mirror to Inspect the Sense-Wire Planes of the Time Projection Chamber Inside the MicroBooNE Cryostat

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carls, Benjamin; Horton-Smith, Glenn; James, Catherine C.; Kubinski, Robert M.; Pordes, Stephen; Schukraft, Anne; Strauss, Thomas

    2015-08-26

    Detectors in particle physics, particularly when including cryogenic components, are often enclosed in vessels that do not provide any physical or visual access to the detectors themselves after installation. However, it can be desirable for experiments to visually investigate the inside of the vessel. The MicroBooNE cryostat hosts a TPC with sense-wire planes, which had to be inspected for damage such as breakage or sagging. This inspection was performed after the transportation of the vessel with the enclosed detector to its final location, but before filling with liquid argon. Our paper describes an approach to view the inside of themore » MicroBooNE cryostat with a setup of a camera and a mirror through one of its cryogenic service nozzles. The paper also describes the camera and mirror chosen for the operation, the illumination, and the mechanical structure of the setup. It explains how the system was operated and demonstrates its performance.« less

  18. Controlling Arc Length in Plasma Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit maintains arc length on irregularly shaped workpieces. Length of plasma arc continuously adjusted by control circuit to maintain commanded value. After pilot arc is established, contactor closed and transfers arc to workpiece. Control circuit then half-wave rectifies ac arc voltage to produce dc control signal proportional to arc length. Circuit added to plasma arc welding machines with few wiring changes. Welds made with circuit cleaner and require less rework than welds made without it. Beads smooth and free of inclusions.

  19. A method for eliminating Faraday rotation in cryostat windows in longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements.

    PubMed

    Polewko-Klim, A; Uba, S; Uba, L

    2014-07-01

    A solution to the problem of disturbing effect of the background Faraday rotation in the cryostat windows on longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect (LMOKE) measured under vacuum conditions and/or at low temperatures is proposed. The method for eliminating the influence of Faraday rotation in cryostat windows is based on special arrangement of additional mirrors placed on sample holder. In this arrangement, the orientation of the cryostat window is perpendicular to the light beam direction and parallel to an external magnetic field generated by the H-frame electromagnet. The operation of the LMOKE magnetometer with the special sample holder based on polarization modulation technique with a photo-elastic modulator is theoretically analyzed with the use of Jones matrices, and formulas for evaluating of the actual Kerr rotation and ellipticity of the sample are derived. The feasibility of the method and good performance of the magnetometer is experimentally demonstrated for the LMOKE effect measured in Fe/Au multilayer structures. The influence of imperfect alignment of the magnetometer setup on the Kerr angles, as derived theoretically through the analytic model and verified experimentally, is examined and discussed. PMID:25085126

  20. Thermal and structural performance of a single tube support post for the Superconducting Super Collider dipole magnet cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H.; Ruschman, M.K.; Schoo, C.J.

    1993-07-01

    The reentrant support post currently incorporated in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole cryostat has been shown to meet the structural and thermal requirements of the cryostat, both in prototype magnet assemblies and through component testing. However, the reentrant post design has two major drawbacks: tight dimensional control on all components, and cost driven by these tolerance constraints and a complex assembly procedure. A single tube support post has been developed as an alternative to the reentrant post design. Several prototype assemblies have been fabricated and subjected to structural testing. Compressive, tensile, and bending forces were applied to each assembly with deflection measured at several locations. A prototype support post has also been thermally evaluated in a heat leak measurement facility. Heat load to 4.2 K was measured with the intermediate post intercept operating at various temperatures while thermometers positioned along the conductive path of the post mapped thermal gradients. Results from these measurements indicate the single tube support post meets the design criteria for the SSC dipole magnet cryostat support system.

  1. Low vibration cooling using a pulse tube cooler and cryostat for the GRAVITY beam combiner instrument at the VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, M.; Haussmann, F.; Kellner, S.; Kern, L.; Eisenhauer, F.; Lizon, J.-L.; Dietrich, M.; Thummes, G.

    2014-07-01

    GRAVITY is a second generation VLTI instrument for high-precision narrow-angle astrometry and phase-referenced interferometric imaging in the astronomical K-band. The cryostat of the beam combiner instrument provides the required temperatures for the various subunits ranging from 40K to 290K with a milli-Kelvin temperature stability for some selected units. The bath cryostat is cooled with liquid nitrogen and makes use of the exhaust gas to cool the main optical bench to an intermediate temperature of 240K. The fringe tracking detector will be cooled separately by a single-stage pulse tube cooler to a temperature of 40K. The pulse tube cooler is optimized for minimum vibrations. In particular its warm side is connected to the 80K reservoir of the LN2 cryostat to minimize the required input power. All temperature levels are actively stabilized by electric heaters. The cold bench is supported separately from the vacuum vessel and the liquid nitrogen reservoir to minimize the transfer of acoustic noise onto the instrument.

  2. A method for eliminating Faraday rotation in cryostat windows in longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Polewko-Klim, A. Uba, S.; Uba, L.

    2014-07-15

    A solution to the problem of disturbing effect of the background Faraday rotation in the cryostat windows on longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect (LMOKE) measured under vacuum conditions and/or at low temperatures is proposed. The method for eliminating the influence of Faraday rotation in cryostat windows is based on special arrangement of additional mirrors placed on sample holder. In this arrangement, the orientation of the cryostat window is perpendicular to the light beam direction and parallel to an external magnetic field generated by the H-frame electromagnet. The operation of the LMOKE magnetometer with the special sample holder based on polarization modulation technique with a photo-elastic modulator is theoretically analyzed with the use of Jones matrices, and formulas for evaluating of the actual Kerr rotation and ellipticity of the sample are derived. The feasibility of the method and good performance of the magnetometer is experimentally demonstrated for the LMOKE effect measured in Fe/Au multilayer structures. The influence of imperfect alignment of the magnetometer setup on the Kerr angles, as derived theoretically through the analytic model and verified experimentally, is examined and discussed.

  3. Electrical Safety and Arc Flash Protections

    SciTech Connect

    R. Camp

    2008-03-04

    Over the past four years, the Electrical Safety Program at PPPL has evolved in addressing changing regulatory requirements and lessons learned from accident events, particularly in regards to arc flash hazards and implementing NFPA 70E requirements. This presentation will discuss PPPL's approaches to the areas of electrical hazards evaluation, both shock and arc flash; engineered solutions for hazards mitigation such as remote racking of medium voltage breakers, operational changes for hazards avoidance, targeted personnel training and hazard appropriate personal protective equipment. Practical solutions for nominal voltage identification and zero voltage checks for lockout/tagout will also be covered. Finally, we will review the value of a comprehensive electrical drawing program, employee attitudes expressed as a personal safety work ethic, integrated safety management, and sustained management support for continuous safety improvement.

  4. The volcanoes of an oceanic arc from origin to destruction: A case from the northern Luzon Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yu-Ming; Song, Sheng-Rong

    2013-09-01

    Volcanoes were created, grew, uplifted, became dormant or extinct, and were accreted as part of continents during continuous arc-continent collision. Volcanic rocks in Eastern Taiwan's Coastal Range (CR) are part of the northern Luzon Arc, an oceanic island arc produced by the subduction of the South China Sea Plate beneath the Philippine Sea Plate. Igneous rocks are characterized by intrusive bodies, lava and pyroclastic flows, and volcaniclastic rocks with minor tephra deposits. Based on volcanic facies associations, Sr-Nd isotopic geochemistry, and the geography of the region, four volcanoes were identified in the CR: Yuemei, Chimei, Chengkuangao, and Tuluanshan. Near-vent facies associations show different degrees of erosion in the volcanic edifices for Chimei, Chengkuangao, and Tuluanshan. Yuemei lacks near-vent rocks, implying that Yuemei's main volcanic body may have been subducted at the Ryukyu Trench with the northward motion of the Philippine Sea Plate. These data suggest a hypothesis for the evolution of volcanism and geomorphology during arc growth and ensuing arc-continent collision in the northern Luzon Arc, which suggests that these volcanoes were formed from the seafloor, emerging as islands during arc volcanism. They then became dormant or extinct during collision, and finally, were uplifted and accreted by additional collision. The oldest volcano, Yuemei, may have already been subducted into the Ryukyu Trench.

  5. APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Lingafelter, J.W.

    1960-04-01

    An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

  6. FusionArc optimization: A hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Matuszak, Martha M.; McShan, Daniel L.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Steers, Jennifer M.; Long, Troy; Edwin Romeijn, H.; Fraass, Benedick A.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To introduce a hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy/intensity modulated radiation therapy (VMAT/IMRT) optimization strategy called FusionArc that combines the delivery efficiency of single-arc VMAT with the potentially desirable intensity modulation possible with IMRT.Methods: A beamlet-based inverse planning system was enhanced to combine the advantages of VMAT and IMRT into one comprehensive technique. In the hybrid strategy, baseline single-arc VMAT plans are optimized and then the current cost function gradients with respect to the beamlets are used to define a metric for predicting which beam angles would benefit from further intensity modulation. Beams with the highest metric values (called the gradient factor) are converted from VMAT apertures to IMRT fluence, and the optimization proceeds with the mixed variable set until convergence or until additional beams are selected for conversion. One phantom and two clinical cases were used to validate the gradient factor and characterize the FusionArc strategy. Comparisons were made between standard IMRT, single-arc VMAT, and FusionArc plans with one to five IMRT/hybrid beams.Results: The gradient factor was found to be highly predictive of the VMAT angles that would benefit plan quality the most from beam modulation. Over the three cases studied, a FusionArc plan with three converted beams achieved superior dosimetric quality with reductions in final cost ranging from 26.4% to 48.1% compared to single-arc VMAT. Additionally, the three beam FusionArc plans required 22.4%-43.7% fewer MU/Gy than a seven beam IMRT plan. While the FusionArc plans with five converted beams offer larger reductions in final cost-32.9%-55.2% compared to single-arc VMAT-the decrease in MU/Gy compared to IMRT was noticeably smaller at 12.2%-18.5%, when compared to IMRT.Conclusions: A hybrid VMAT/IMRT strategy was implemented to find a high quality compromise between gantry-angle and intensity-based degrees of freedom. This

  7. FusionArc optimization: A hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning strategy

    PubMed Central

    Matuszak, Martha M.; Steers, Jennifer M.; Long, Troy; McShan, Daniel L.; Fraass, Benedick A.; Edwin Romeijn, H.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy/intensity modulated radiation therapy (VMAT/IMRT) optimization strategy called FusionArc that combines the delivery efficiency of single-arc VMAT with the potentially desirable intensity modulation possible with IMRT. Methods: A beamlet-based inverse planning system was enhanced to combine the advantages of VMAT and IMRT into one comprehensive technique. In the hybrid strategy, baseline single-arc VMAT plans are optimized and then the current cost function gradients with respect to the beamlets are used to define a metric for predicting which beam angles would benefit from further intensity modulation. Beams with the highest metric values (called the gradient factor) are converted from VMAT apertures to IMRT fluence, and the optimization proceeds with the mixed variable set until convergence or until additional beams are selected for conversion. One phantom and two clinical cases were used to validate the gradient factor and characterize the FusionArc strategy. Comparisons were made between standard IMRT, single-arc VMAT, and FusionArc plans with one to five IMRT/hybrid beams. Results: The gradient factor was found to be highly predictive of the VMAT angles that would benefit plan quality the most from beam modulation. Over the three cases studied, a FusionArc plan with three converted beams achieved superior dosimetric quality with reductions in final cost ranging from 26.4% to 48.1% compared to single-arc VMAT. Additionally, the three beam FusionArc plans required 22.4%–43.7% fewer MU/Gy than a seven beam IMRT plan. While the FusionArc plans with five converted beams offer larger reductions in final cost—32.9%–55.2% compared to single-arc VMAT—the decrease in MU/Gy compared to IMRT was noticeably smaller at 12.2%–18.5%, when compared to IMRT. Conclusions: A hybrid VMAT/IMRT strategy was implemented to find a high quality compromise between gantry-angle and intensity-based degrees of freedom

  8. Electric arc heater is self starting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. D.

    1966-01-01

    Remote method initiates an electric arc over a large range of gaps between two water-cooled electrodes of an arc-heated wind tunnel without disassembling the arc unit. This type of starting system can be used on both three-phase ac arc heaters and dc arc heaters.

  9. Electric arc welding gun

    DOEpatents

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  10. Critical current measurements of high Tc superconductors in a scanning low temperature cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, K.L.; O'Brien, T.K.

    1991-01-01

    Maintaining uniformity of properties over long distances is one of the fabrication problems encountered with the new high {Tc} superconductors. Uniform properties are crucial in long tapes or wires with high critical current since local nonuniformities can limit the current carrying capacity of the whole piece. Transport critical currents in high {Tc} superconductors are conventionally measured with the contact 4-point probe DC current-voltage technique. This technique requires contact with the sample and and spatially averages over the region between the two voltage contacts. Two techniques have been used to infer the critical state model. The first uses the net magnetization of a suitably shaped sample in an external magnetic field. The second combines a DC magnetic field with AC induced currents to infer spatial flux profiles. The AC magnetization technique offers an advantage in that it is noncontacting; however, it also averages the measurement over a large area and requires that the sample be shaped and positioned such that it exhibits zero demagnetizing factor. This paper describes a measurement technique and a scanning cryostat assembly that are capable of determining local critical current in a tape or wire with high resolution and without any direct sample electrical contact. A small compensated coil was used to induce AC currents in slab-shaped samples. The coil was situated near the surface on one side of the slab. With this method, the AC probe can be used as a noncontacting dissipation probe, replacing the voltage probe in the 4-point contact method, when an externally driven transport current is used, or by itself as a local critical state generator and dissipation detector. The results are shown to be meaningful even when the internal magnetic field is not uniform due to shape demagnetizing effects. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Nitrite Reductase and Nitric-oxide Synthase Activity of the Mitochondrial Molybdopterin Enzymes mARC1 and mARC2*

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney E.; Tejero, Jesús; Sun, Bin; Gauthier, Marc C.; Thomas, John; Ragireddy, Venkata; Merchant, Bonnie A.; Wang, Jun; Azarov, Ivan; Basu, Partha; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component (mARC) proteins are molybdopterin-containing enzymes of unclear physiological function. Both human isoforms mARC-1 and mARC-2 are able to catalyze the reduction of nitrite when they are in the reduced form. Moreover, our results indicate that mARC can generate nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite when forming an electron transfer chain with NADH, cytochrome b5, and NADH-dependent cytochrome b5 reductase. The rate of NO formation increases almost 3-fold when pH was lowered from 7.5 to 6.5. To determine if nitrite reduction is catalyzed by molybdenum in the active site of mARC-1, we mutated the putative active site cysteine residue (Cys-273), known to coordinate molybdenum binding. NO formation was abolished by the C273A mutation in mARC-1. Supplementation of transformed Escherichia coli with tungsten facilitated the replacement of molybdenum in recombinant mARC-1 and abolished NO formation. Therefore, we conclude that human mARC-1 and mARC-2 are capable of catalyzing reduction of nitrite to NO through reaction with its molybdenum cofactor. Finally, expression of mARC-1 in HEK cells using a lentivirus vector was used to confirm cellular nitrite reduction to NO. A comparison of NO formation profiles between mARC and xanthine oxidase reveals similar Kcat and Vmax values but more sustained NO formation from mARC, possibly because it is not vulnerable to autoinhibition via molybdenum desulfuration. The reduction of nitrite by mARC in the mitochondria may represent a new signaling pathway for NADH-dependent hypoxic NO production. PMID:24500710

  12. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  13. TAMA. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, H.

    1994-06-03

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  14. Of Eggs and Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Thomas, P. C.; Helfenstein, P.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Hedman, M. M.; Agarwal, M.

    2012-10-01

    New scenarios for the origins of Saturn’s rings/interior moons have directed scientific attention to the region just exterior to Saturn’s main rings. Four satellites (Aegaeon = Ae; Anthe = An; Methone = Me; Pallene = Pa) discovered by the Cassini mission on either side of Mimas’s orbit perhaps comprise a distinct class of ring-moon. They are tiny (R = 0.3-2.5 km); three (AeAnMe) are trapped in co-rotation resonances with Mimas and reside within ring-arcs; and at least two (MePa) have remarkably regular shapes. Images with pixel scales as fine as 27 m taken in May 2012 reveal Methone to be ovoid within 10 m (from sub-pixel limb detection) and devoid of any craters (>130 m) across its 9 km2 of surface; Pallene and even tiny Aegaeon have similar appearances in lesser-quality images. Numerical simulations demonstrate that particles comprising the surrounding ring-arcs populate the same resonances as their embedded moons; escape speeds from the moons are < 0.5 m/s, smaller than the 2 m/s that dynamically characterize the resonant well. We investigate the gentle transfer of particles back and forth between the ring-arcs and any embedded bodies. In this environment, the moons’ shapes are smooth equipotentials; electrostatic effects may also determine how grains settle to surfaces. Considering these shapes to represent equipotential surfaces for rotating, tidally distorted, homogeneous bodies, we infer mean satellite densities of 250+/-60 (Pa), 310+/-30 (Me), and 540+/-120 (Ae) kg m-3. About half of Methone’s leading hemisphere is covered by a sharply bounded, lemon-shaped, relatively dark region, having a form reminiscent of Mimas’s thermal anomaly (Howett et al. 2011). Its (601 nm) albedo is 13% lower than the bounding brighter material. An irregularly shaped, even-darker (by 4%) blotch straddles the apex of the moon’s motion. Impacts with circum-planetary meteoroids and plasma are likely responsible for these features.

  15. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  16. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  17. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  18. An arc-sequencing algorithm for intensity modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, D. M.; Cao, D.; Afghan, M. K. N.; Earl, M. A.

    2007-02-15

    Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is an intensity modulated radiation therapy delivery technique originally proposed as an alternative to tomotherapy. IMAT uses a series of overlapping arcs to deliver optimized intensity patterns from each beam direction. The full potential of IMAT has gone largely unrealized due in part to a lack of robust and commercially available inverse planning tools. To address this, we have implemented an IMAT arc-sequencing algorithm that translates optimized intensity maps into deliverable IMAT plans. The sequencing algorithm uses simulated annealing to simultaneously optimize the aperture shapes and weights throughout each arc. The sequencer enforces the delivery constraints while minimizing the discrepancies between the optimized and sequenced intensity maps. The performance of the algorithm has been tested for ten patient cases (3 prostate, 3 brain, 2 head-and-neck, 1 lung, and 1 pancreas). Seven coplanar IMAT plans were created using an average of 4.6 arcs and 685 monitor units. Additionally, three noncoplanar plans were created using an average of 16 arcs and 498 monitor units. The results demonstrate that the arc sequencer can provide efficient and highly conformal IMAT plans. An average sequencing time of approximately 20 min was observed.

  19. Recent advances in vacuum arc ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Dickinson, M.R.; MacGill, R.A.; Oks, E.M.

    1995-07-01

    Intense beams of metal ions can be formed from a vacuum arc ion source. Broadbeam extraction is convenient, and the time-averaged ion beam current delivered downstream can readily be in the tens of milliamperes range. The vacuum arc ion source has for these reasons found good application for metallurgical surface modification--it provides relatively simple and inexpensive access to high dose metal ion implantation. Several important source developments have been demonstrated recently, including very broad beam operation, macroparticle removal, charge state enhancement, and formation of gaseous beams. The authors have made a very broad beam source embodiment with beam formation electrodes 50 cm in diameter, producing a beam of width {approximately}35 cm for a nominal beam area of {approximately}1,000 cm{sup 2}, and a pulsed Ti beam current of about 7 A was formed at a mean ion energy of {approximately}100 keV. Separately, they`ve developed high efficiency macroparticle-removing magnetic filters and incorporated such a filter into a vacuum arc ion source so as to form macroparticle-free ion beams. Jointly with researchers at the High Current Electronics Institute at Tomsk, Russia, and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung at Darmstadt, Germany, they`ve developed a compact technique for increasing the charge states of ions produced in the vacuum arc plasma and thus providing a simple means of increasing the ion energy at fixed extractor voltage. Finally, operation with mixed metal and gaseous ion species has been demonstrated. Here, they briefly review the operation of vacuum marc ion sources and the typical beam and implantation parameters that can be obtained, and describe these source advances and their bearing on metal ion implantation applications.

  20. Design and fabrication of a cryostat for low temperature mechanical testing for the Mechanical and Materials Engineering group at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles Santillana, I.; Betemps, R.; Gerardin, A.; Guinchard, M.; Langeslag, S. A. E.; Sgobba, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical testing of materials at low temperatures is one of the cornerstones of the Mechanical and Materials Engineering (MME) group at CERN. A long tradition of more than 20 years and a unique know - how of such tests has been developed with an 18 kN double-walled cryostat. Large campaigns of material qualification have been carried out and the mechanical behaviour of materials at 4 K has been vastly studied in sub - size samples for projects like LEP, LHC and its experiments. With the aim of assessing the mechanical properties of materials of higher strength and/or issued from heavy gauge products for which testing standardized specimens of larger cross section might be more adapted, a new 100 kN cryostat capable of hosting different shapes of normalized samples has been carefully designed and fabricated inhouse together with the associated tooling and measurement instrumentation. It has been conceived to be able to adapt to different test frames both dynamic and static, which will be of paramount importance for future studies of fracture mechanics at low temperatures. The cryostat features a double-walled vessel consisting of a central cylindrical section with a convex lower end and a flat top end closure. The transmission of the load is guaranteed by a 4 column system and its precise monitoring is assured by an internal load cell positioned next to the sample in the load train. This innovative approach will be discussed together with other nonconventional instrumentation solutions. A validation of the whole system has been carried out, where bending efforts on instrumented samples have been measured. Additionally, dedicated tooling has been fabricated for the device's optimization. The preliminary results obtained confirm an excellent performance of the system and enhance the analysis of materials under extreme conditions with state of the art instrumentation.

  1. NASARC - NUMERICAL ARC SEGMENTATION ALGORITHM FOR A RADIO CONFERENCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    service areas that are sufficiently separated geographically so that co-location or near co-location of their space stations will permit a user-specified downlink performance criterion to be satisfied. Pairwise compatibility between systems is assessed on the basis of the satellite separation required to meet this criterion. NASARC2 examines all groups of compatible administrations with their corresponding arc segments and computes a common predetermined arc. After an orbital slot of sufficient size has been found, NASARC2 calculates the required orbital separation between the critical group and its potential east and west neighbors and determines predetermined arc placement accordingly. NASARC3 updates and extends the feasible orbital locations for predetermined arcs associated with compatible groups of service areas to provide flexibility for rearrangement if necessary. NASARC4 performs rearrangement of predetermined arc segments where rearrangement will provide increased total arc available for subsequent placement of additional predetermined arcs and produces the final output report of the NASARC package. In addition to planning assumed homogeneous systems, NASARC can take into account such factors as rain attenuation, individual antenna parameters, power calculation options, minimum power values, different required carrier-to-interface ratios, variable grouping criteria, and affiliated sets of service areas. The modules allow the baseline assumptions to be modified, some on an individual service area basis. NASARC array dimensions have been structured to fit within the currently available 12MB memory capacity of the International Frequency Registration Board computer facility. NASARC was written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 and developed on an AMDAHL 5860 running under the IBM VM operating system. The package requires 8.1MB of central memory. NASARC (version 4.0) was written in 1988. IBM and VM are registered trademarks of International Business Machines. AMDAHL 5860

  2. Cryostatic influence of formvar coatings on sizing of the stabilizer in composite NbTi-Cu superconductors. [for magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspi, S.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, Y. I.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1978-01-01

    Often undesirable low energy densities are associated with extreme safety measures (e.g. cryostatic stability) in large superconducting magnets. Therefore, a medium-sized, formvar-coated composite NbTi alloy, Cu-stabilized, has been studied (48 filaments, approximately square cross section about 1/5 cm thickness). Thermal quench behavior (caused by heating) was investigated in various fluid states of He4, including pressurized and superfluid He4. The data obtained support existence of a particular coating thickness ('limiting' thickness) with the property that thermal boundary conditions of uncoated superconductors at a quench are not deteriorated.

  3. Intraoceanic Arc Tectonic and Sedimentary Processes: Translation from Modern Activity to Ancient Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draut, A. E.; Clift, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    Records of ancient intraoceanic arc activity, now preserved in continental suture zones, are used to reconstruct paleogeography, plate motion, collision and accretion events, and to understand how continental crust is formed, recycled, and maintained through time. However, interpreting tectonic and sedimentary records after arc-continent collision is complicated by preservation of evidence for some processes and loss of evidence for others. We examine what is lost, and what is preserved, in the translation from modern processes to the ancient record of oceanic subduction zones. Composition of accreted arc terranes differs as a function of arc-continent collision geometry. ';Forward-facing' collision can accrete an oceanic arc onto either a passive or an active continental margin, with the arc facing the continent and colliding trench- and forearc-side first. In ';backward-facing' collision, involving two subduction zones with similar polarity, the arc collides backarc-first with an active continental margin. The preservation of evidence for contemporary sedimentary and tectonic arc processes in the geologic record depends greatly on how well the various parts of the arc survive collision and orogeny in each case. Preservation of arc terranes likely is biased towards those that were in tectonic accretion for tens of millions of years before collision, rather than tectonic erosion. The prevalence of tectonic erosion in modern oceanic subduction zones implies that valuable records of arc processes are commonly destroyed even before collision with a continent. Arc systems are most likely to undergo tectonic accretion shortly before forward-facing collision with a continent, and thus most forearc and accretionary-prism material in ancient arc terranes likely is temporally biased toward the final stages of arc activity, when sediment flux to the trench was greatest. Collision geometry and tectonic erosion vs. accretion are important controls on the ultimate survival of

  4. Coordination between Drosophila Arc1 and a specific population of brain neurons regulates organismal fat.

    PubMed

    Mosher, Jeremy; Zhang, Wei; Blumhagen, Rachel Z; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Hesselberth, Jay R; Reis, Tânia

    2015-09-15

    The brain plays a critical yet incompletely understood role in regulating organismal fat. We performed a neuronal silencing screen in Drosophila larvae to identify brain regions required to maintain proper levels of organismal fat. When used to modulate synaptic activity in specific brain regions, the enhancer-trap driver line E347 elevated fat upon neuronal silencing, and decreased fat upon neuronal activation. Unbiased sequencing revealed that Arc1 mRNA levels increase upon E347 activation. We had previously identified Arc1 mutations in a high-fat screen. Here we reveal metabolic changes in Arc1 mutants consistent with a high-fat phenotype and an overall shift toward energy storage. We find that Arc1-expressing cells neighbor E347 neurons, and manipulating E347 synaptic activity alters Arc1 expression patterns. Elevating Arc1 expression in these cells decreased fat, a phenocopy of E347 activation. Finally, loss of Arc1 prevented the lean phenotype caused by E347 activation, suggesting that Arc1 activity is required for E347 control of body fat. Importantly, neither E347 nor Arc1 manipulation altered energy-related behaviors. Our results support a model wherein E347 neurons induce Arc1 in specific neighboring cells to prevent excess fat accumulation. PMID:26209258

  5. Arc spot grouping: An entanglement of arc spot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Shin; Hwangbo, Dogyun; Ohno, Noriyasu; Tsventoukh, Mikhail M.; Barengolts, Sergey A.

    2014-12-21

    In recent experiments, clear transitions in velocity and trail width of an arc spot initiated on nanostructured tungsten were observed on the boundary of the thick and thin nanostructured layer regions. The velocity of arc spot was significantly decreased on the thick nanostructured region. It was suggested that the grouping decreased the velocity of arc spot. In this study, we try to explain the phenomena using a simple random walk model that has properties of directionality and self-avoidance. And grouping feature was added by installing an attractive force between spot cells with dealing with multi-spots. It was revealed that an entanglement of arc spot cells decreased the spot velocity, and spot cells tend to stamp at the same location many times.

  6. Ionospheric composition in SAR-arcs. [Stable Auroral Red Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Banks, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    Theoretical ion and electron density profiles in the SAR-arc region are calculated using a model of the ionosphere based on the coupled continuity, momentum, and energy equations for O(+), NO(+), and O2(+). It is found that an increase in the reaction O(+) + N2 yields NO(+) + N, which results from enhanced N2 vibrational excitation due to the high electron temperatures found in SAR arcs, can cause a reduction in F-region electron densities by up to a factor of two. The increase in the O(+) + N2 reaction rate is shown to result in a marked change in the ion composition in SAR arcs, with NO(+) being an important ion up to altitudes of about 350 km at night. Since observed electron-density depressions in SAR arcs generally vary between factors of two and seven, it is concluded that the increase in the O(+) + N2 reaction rate cannot account for these depressions by itself.

  7. Arc spot grouping: An entanglement of arc spot cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Shin; Hwangbo, Dogyun; Ohno, Noriyasu; Tsventoukh, Mikhail M.; Barengolts, Sergey A.

    2014-12-01

    In recent experiments, clear transitions in velocity and trail width of an arc spot initiated on nanostructured tungsten were observed on the boundary of the thick and thin nanostructured layer regions. The velocity of arc spot was significantly decreased on the thick nanostructured region. It was suggested that the grouping decreased the velocity of arc spot. In this study, we try to explain the phenomena using a simple random walk model that has properties of directionality and self-avoidance. And grouping feature was added by installing an attractive force between spot cells with dealing with multi-spots. It was revealed that an entanglement of arc spot cells decreased the spot velocity, and spot cells tend to stamp at the same location many times.

  8. The ALMA Regional Centers (ARC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, P.; Hibbard, J.; Okumura, S. K.; Braatz, J.

    2011-04-01

    ALMA is an international facility, a partnership between Europe, East Asia, and North America, in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. As such, ALMA will serve a worldwide community of astronomers. To interface with the geographically distributed user community, the partners have established three ALMA Regional Centers, or ARCs. The ARCs provide the primary gateway to ALMA for the user community. The ARCs are staffed by scientists with expertise in radio astronomy and interferometry, and their purpose is to work with the community of astronomers to maximize the scientific productivity of the telescope.

  9. Percussive arc welding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hollar, Jr., Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    A percussive arc welding apparatus includes a generally cylindrical actuator body having front and rear end portions and defining an internal recess. The front end of the body includes an opening. A solenoid assembly is provided in the rear end portion in the internal recess of the body, and an actuator shaft assembly is provided in the front end portion in the internal recess of the actuator body. The actuator shaft assembly includes a generally cylindrical actuator block having first and second end portions, and an actuator shaft having a front end extending through the opening in the actuator body, and the rear end connected to the first end portion of the actuator block. The second end portion of the actuator block is in operational engagement with the solenoid shaft by a non-rigid connection to reduce the adverse rebound effects of the actuator shaft. A generally transversely extending pin is rigidly secured to the rear end of the shaft. One end of the pin is received in a slot in the nose housing sleeve to prevent rotation of the actuator shaft during operation of the apparatus.

  10. Arc of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Adam Vai

    2011-07-01

    Born in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, the author had a 20 year career in diplomacy, political affairs, and development policy analysis at the Pacific Islands Forum, the United Nations in New York; the Prime Minister's Department in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and in the Foreign Ministry of PNG. He has also been involved in theatre for over a decade in PNG, and participated in a three-month program at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre Center in Connecticut, USA. He is currently the Business Development Manager at the Torres Strait Regional Authority (Commonwealth) on Thursday Island. Since 1975 the Australian government's overseas development policy has supported various sectoral programs in its neighbouring countries, in particular Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. The "creative" field has not been prominent in this strategy. While natural resources and the sports sectors have gained much greater attention, in terms of being viable international commercial enterprises, the arts, have remained stagnant. In this paper the need for joint programs genuinely supporting "wellbeing" and promoting social enterprise throughout the "arc of opportunity" is described to harness Melanesian creativity to compete successfully in world-markets, starting with penetration of the largest economy at its door-step: Australia. PMID:21878026

  11. ARC syndrome in preterm baby.

    PubMed

    Elmeery, A; Lanka, K; Cummings, J

    2013-10-01

    A preterm female infant born of 32 weeks gestational age was presenting with musculoskeletal abnormalities, and cholestasis that later on resolved. Later on, she developed renal tubular acidosis (RTA), poor weight gain, unexplained intermittent fever and recurrent spontaneous bleeding episodes. ARC is an acronym that stands for arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction and cholestasis. ARC syndrome is a rare disorder that is difficult to diagnose and is associated with poor outcomes. We present a case of ARC syndrome in an infant with a history of failure to thrive, early cholestasis and RTA. There are many unique features about this case that should add to our understanding of this genetic condition. To our knowledge this is the first identified case of ARC syndrome in a preterm infant. Although the specific mutation found in our patient has not been reported previously, the type and location of this mutation is consistent with our genetic understanding of this disorder. PMID:24071963

  12. Arc detector uses fiber optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, E. J.; Leech, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Arc detector for protecting high-power microwave klystron oscillators uses fiber optics connected to remote solid-state light-sensing circuits. Detector is more reliable, smaller, and sensitive than other systems that locate detector in waveguide.

  13. Arc-heater performance research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, Charles E.; Durgapal, Prabha

    1994-01-01

    The tasks performed can be divided into the following categories: an analysis of the electric arc phenomena, especially near the electrodes; a parametric study of arcjet performance by means of a computer code (ARCFLO) and verification with experimental data where possible; the development of a data acquisition system to collect the above experimental data using Ames arc-jets; and a study of the critical components (electrodes and constrictor disks) and suggestions of how to improve their performance.

  14. Design of a 2 Slot VLPC Cryostat Cooled by a Cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russell A.; /Fermilab

    2004-04-22

    The conceptual design and preliminary engineering calculations have been completed for a two cassette cryostat. This report summarizes the design. A cryocooler is permanently mounted in the center of a stainless steel, 0.75 inch thick top lid. The cryocooler sits upon a spacer which raises the cooling stage elevations to favorably match the cassette heat intercept elevations. The top lid (32.0-inch outside diameter) mates to a 24-inch pipe size flange with o-ring. The 24-inch pipe size vacuum vessel with end plate has a minimum internal depth of 16-inch to give adequate clearance for the depth of the cryocooler and multilayer insulation blankets. Support stand legs elevate the container to a convenient height and allow for placement of the AFE power supply underneath. Two cassette slots are located on either side of the cryocooler. The slots are positioned parallel to each other, 10.5-inch center to center (6 standard cassette slot widths) so that the standard 8 slot AFE backplane can be used. The slot opening through the lid is approximately 1.422-inch x 16.782-inch. A 0.016-inch thick titanium (Ti-6AI-4V) envelope with sealing lip is inserted through lid and defines the gas helium boundary that the VLPC cassette resides. The internal dimensions of the titanium envelope are 1.390-inch x 16.75-inch x 10.531-inch deep. When the cassette is inserted the clearances will be 0.015-inch on the long side, 0.063-inch on the short side, and 0.032-inch at the bottom. The cassette gasket seals against the top lip of the titanium envelope. A soft gasket or thin vacuum sealant tape seals the underside of the titanium envelope to the top surface of the lid. A clamping hold down bar may be necessary to make this vacuum seal. Gas helium for the cassette space is supplied through a fitting and port that is added to the cassette bulkhead assembly. This is the only modification necessary the standard D-Zero cassette. Evacuation and backfilling and then stagnant positive pressure are

  15. Heat transfer in GTA welding arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huft, Nathan J.

    Heat transfer characteristics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) arcs with arc currents of 50 to 125 A and arc lengths of 3 to 11 mm were measured experimentally through wet calorimetry. The data collected were used to calculate how much heat reported to the cathode and anode and how much was lost from the arc column. A Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) macro was written to further analyze the data and account for Joule heating within the electrodes and radiation and convection losses from the arc, providing a detailed account of how heat was generated and dissipated within the system. These values were then used to calculate arc efficiencies, arc column voltages, and anode and cathode fall voltages. Trends were noted for variances in the arc column voltage, power dissipated from the arc column, and the total power dissipated by the system with changing arc length. Trends for variances in the anode and cathode fall voltages, total power dissipated, Joule heating within the torches and electrodes with changing arc current were also noted. In addition, the power distribution between the anode and cathode for each combination of arc length and arc current was examined. Keywords: Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, GTAW, anode fall, cathode fall, heat transfer, wet calorimetry

  16. Note: Triggering behavior of a vacuum arc plasma source.

    PubMed

    Lan, C H; Long, J D; Zheng, L; Dong, P; Yang, Z; Li, J; Wang, T; He, J L

    2016-08-01

    Axial symmetry of discharge is very important for application of vacuum arc plasma. It is discovered that the triggering method is a significant factor that would influence the symmetry of arc discharge at the final stable stage. Using high-speed multiframe photography, the transition processes from cathode-trigger discharge to cathode-anode discharge were observed. It is shown that the performances of the two triggering methods investigated are quite different. Arc discharge triggered by independent electric source can be stabilized at the center of anode grid, but it is difficult to achieve such good symmetry through resistance triggering. It is also found that the triggering process is highly correlated to the behavior of emitted electrons. PMID:27587176

  17. Note: Triggering behavior of a vacuum arc plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, C. H.; Long, J. D.; Zheng, L.; Dong, P.; Yang, Z.; Li, J.; Wang, T.; He, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    Axial symmetry of discharge is very important for application of vacuum arc plasma. It is discovered that the triggering method is a significant factor that would influence the symmetry of arc discharge at the final stable stage. Using high-speed multiframe photography, the transition processes from cathode-trigger discharge to cathode-anode discharge were observed. It is shown that the performances of the two triggering methods investigated are quite different. Arc discharge triggered by independent electric source can be stabilized at the center of anode grid, but it is difficult to achieve such good symmetry through resistance triggering. It is also found that the triggering process is highly correlated to the behavior of emitted electrons.

  18. Muon acceleration with RLA and non-scaling FFAG ARCS

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, V.S.; Trbojevic, D.; Bogacz, A.

    2010-05-23

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are the most likely means to achieve the rapid acceleration of short-lived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. In this paper, we present a novel return-arc optics design based on a Non Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) lattice that allows 5 and 9 GeV/c muons of both charges to be transported in the same string of magnets. The return arcs are made up of super cells with each super cell consisting of three triplets. By employing combined function magnets with dipole, quadrupole, sextupole and octupole magnetic field components, each super cell is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both 5 and 9 GeV/c muon momenta. This solution would reduce the number of arcs by a factor of 2, simplifying the overall design.

  19. Muon Acceleration with RLA and Non-scaling FFAG Arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliy Morozov,Alex Bogacz,Dejan Trbojevic

    2010-05-01

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are the most likely means to achieve the rapid acceleration of shortlived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. In this paper, we present a novel return-arc optics design based on a Non Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) lattice that allows 5 and 9 GeV/c muons of both charges to be transported in the same string of magnets. The return arcs are made up of super cells with each super cell consisting of three triplets. By employing combined function magnets with dipole, quadrupole, sextupole and octupole magnetic field components, each super cell is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both 5 and 9 GeV/c muon momenta. This solution would reduce the number of arcs by a factor of 2, simplifying the overall design.

  20. [Spectra and thermal analysis of the arc in activating flux plasma arc welding].

    PubMed

    Chai, Guo-Ming; Zhu, Yi-Feng

    2010-04-01

    In activating flux plasma arc welding the welding arc was analyzed by spectra analysis technique, and the welding arc temperature field was measured by the infrared sensing and computer image technique. The distribution models of welding arc heat flow density of activating flux PAW welding were developed. The composition of welding arc affected by activated flux was studied, and the welding arc temperature field was studied. The results show that the spectral lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are the main spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The spectra lines of weld metal are inappreciable in the spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The gas particle is the main in the conventional plasma welding arc. The conventional plasma welding arc is gas welding arc. The spectra lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are intensified in the activating flux plasma welding arc, and the spectra lines of Ti, Cr and Fe elements are found in the activating flux plasma welding arc. The welding arc temperature distribution in activating flux plasma arc welding is compact, the outline of the welding arc temperature field is narrow, the range of the welding arc temperature distribution is concentrated, the welding arc radial temperature gradient is large, and the welding arc radial temperature gradient shows normal Gauss distribution. PMID:20545181

  1. A Novel Arc Fault Detector for Early Detection of Electrical Fires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Rencheng; Yang, Jianhong; Liu, Canhua; Chen, Shouhong; Zhang, Fujiang

    2016-01-01

    Arc faults can produce very high temperatures and can easily ignite combustible materials; thus, they represent one of the most important causes of electrical fires. The application of arc fault detection, as an emerging early fire detection technology, is required by the National Electrical Code to reduce the occurrence of electrical fires. However, the concealment, randomness and diversity of arc faults make them difficult to detect. To improve the accuracy of arc fault detection, a novel arc fault detector (AFD) is developed in this study. First, an experimental arc fault platform is built to study electrical fires. A high-frequency transducer and a current transducer are used to measure typical load signals of arc faults and normal states. After the common features of these signals are studied, high-frequency energy and current variations are extracted as an input eigenvector for use by an arc fault detection algorithm. Then, the detection algorithm based on a weighted least squares support vector machine is designed and successfully applied in a microprocessor. Finally, an AFD is developed. The test results show that the AFD can detect arc faults in a timely manner and interrupt the circuit power supply before electrical fires can occur. The AFD is not influenced by cross talk or transient processes, and the detection accuracy is very high. Hence, the AFD can be installed in low-voltage circuits to monitor circuit states in real-time to facilitate the early detection of electrical fires. PMID:27070618

  2. A Novel Arc Fault Detector for Early Detection of Electrical Fires

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Rencheng; Yang, Jianhong; Liu, Canhua; Chen, Shouhong; Zhang, Fujiang

    2016-01-01

    Arc faults can produce very high temperatures and can easily ignite combustible materials; thus, they represent one of the most important causes of electrical fires. The application of arc fault detection, as an emerging early fire detection technology, is required by the National Electrical Code to reduce the occurrence of electrical fires. However, the concealment, randomness and diversity of arc faults make them difficult to detect. To improve the accuracy of arc fault detection, a novel arc fault detector (AFD) is developed in this study. First, an experimental arc fault platform is built to study electrical fires. A high-frequency transducer and a current transducer are used to measure typical load signals of arc faults and normal states. After the common features of these signals are studied, high-frequency energy and current variations are extracted as an input eigenvector for use by an arc fault detection algorithm. Then, the detection algorithm based on a weighted least squares support vector machine is designed and successfully applied in a microprocessor. Finally, an AFD is developed. The test results show that the AFD can detect arc faults in a timely manner and interrupt the circuit power supply before electrical fires can occur. The AFD is not influenced by cross talk or transient processes, and the detection accuracy is very high. Hence, the AFD can be installed in low-voltage circuits to monitor circuit states in real-time to facilitate the early detection of electrical fires. PMID:27070618

  3. Dosimetric and delivery characterizations of full-arc and half-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy for maxillary cancer.

    PubMed

    Miura, Hideharu; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Tanooka, Masao; Doi, Hiroshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Takada, Yasuhiro; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Hirota, Shozo

    2012-09-01

    We compared the efficiency and accuracy of full-arc and half-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery for maxillary cancer. Plans for gantry rotation angles of 360° and 180° (full-arc and half-arc VMAT) were created for six maxillary cancer cases with the Monaco treatment planning system, and delivered using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Full-arc and half-arc VMAT were compared with regard to homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), mean dose to normal brain, total monitor units (MU), delivery times, root mean square (r.m.s.) gantry accelerations (°/s(2)), and r.m.s. gantry angle errors (°). The half-arc VMAT plans achieved comparable HI and CI to the full-arc plans. Mean doses to the normal brain and brainstem with the half-arc VMAT plans were on average 16% and 17% lower than those with the full-arc VMAT plans. For other organs at risk (OARs), no significant DVH differences were observed between plans. Half-arc VMAT resulted in 11% less total MU and 20% shorter delivery time than the full-arc VMAT, while r.m.s. gantry acceleration and r.m.s. gantry angle error during half-arc VMAT delivery were 30% and 23% less than those during full-arc VMAT delivery, respectively. Furthermore, the half-arc VMAT plans were comparable with the full-arc plans regarding dose homogeneity and conformity in maxillary cancer, and provided a statistical decrease in mean dose to OAR, total MU, delivery time and gantry angle error. Half-arc VMAT plans may be a suitable treatment option in radiotherapy for maxillary cancer. PMID:22843367

  4. Scintillation Arcs: Probing Turbulence and Structure in the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinebring, Daniel R.

    2006-12-01

    Multi-path scattering through inhomogeneities in the interstellar medium causes many related effects. In this review, I concentrate on the phenomenon of scintillation arcs, which are parabolic patterns in the secondary spectrum caused by interference between different angular components of the scatter-broadened image of a pulsar. Scintillation arcs are now fairly well understood. The measured curvature of the arc, together with proper motion and distance information about the pulsar, can be used to determine the location of thin scattering screens along the line of sight to the object. Some recent work of this type is presented. The puzzle of substructure in the power distribution of scintillation arcs is poorly understood, however, and is commented on as an open puzzle. In particular, some inferred physical structures in the ISM are small scale (˜ 1 AU) and over-dense with respect to the background medium. Finally, an application of scintillation arc studies to the correction of high-precision pulsar timing is presented.

  5. Vacuum arcing behavior between transverse magnetic field contacts subjected to variable axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhiyuan; Geng, Yingsan; Wang, Zhenxing; Yan, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to reveal the effects of an axial magnetic field (AMF) on the vacuum arc characteristics between transverse magnetic field (TMF) contacts. These vacuum arc characteristics include the vacuum arcing behavior and the arc voltage waveform. In the experiments, an external AMF was applied to a pair of TMF contacts. The external AMF flux density BAMF can be adjusted from 0 to 110 mT. The arc current in the tests varied over a range from 0 to 20 kA rms at 45 Hz. The contact material was CuCr25 (25% Cr). A high-speed charge-coupled device video camera was used to record the vacuum arc evolution. The experimental results show that the application of the AMF effectively reduces the TMF arc voltage noise component and reduces the formation of liquid metal drops between the contacts. The diffuse arc duration increases linearly with increasing AMF flux density, but it also decreases linearly with increasing arc current under application of the external AMF. The results also indicate that the diffuse arc duration before the current zero is usually more than 1 ms under the condition that the value of the AMF per kiloampere is more than 2.0 mT/kA. Finally, under application of the AMF, the arc column of the TMF contacts may constrict and remain in the center region without transverse rotation. Therefore, the combined TMF-AMF contacts should be designed such that they guarantee that the AMF is not so strong as to oppose transverse rotation of the arc column.

  6. Commissioning of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, James L. Warrington, Alan P.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) involves the simultaneous use of dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) techniques and gantry arcing; appropriate quality assurance is therefore required. This article describes the development and implementation of procedures for commissioning VMAT on a commercial linear accelerator (Elekta PreciseBeam VMAT with MLCi and Beam Modulator heads). Materials and Methods: Tests for beam flatness and symmetry at the variable dose rates required for VMAT were performed. Multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration was investigated using dynamic prescriptions. The cumulative dose delivered by a sliding window aperture was measured and compared with calculated values. Rotational accuracy was evaluated using dynamic prescriptions which required accurate correlated motion of both gantry and MLC leaves. Finally, measured and calculated dose distributions for complete VMAT treatment plans were compared and evaluated. Results: Beam symmetry was found to be better than 3% down to dose rates of 75 MU/min. MLC calibration provided continuity of dose at match planes of better than 4%, which was comparable to interleaf leakage effects. Integrated sliding window doses were within 3% of those calculated. Tests for rotational accuracy showed uniformity of peripheral dose mostly within {+-}4% of local control point dose, or approximately {+-}0.2% of total central dose. A two-arc prostate case showed an absolute dose difference between calculations and measurements of less than 3%, with gamma (3% and 3 mm) of better than 95%. Conclusions: VMAT has been successfully commissioned and has been introduced into clinical use. The Elekta DMLC has also been shown to be suitable for sliding window delivery.

  7. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  8. Arc-cathode interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, X.; Heberlein, J.

    1992-01-01

    Insufficient electrode life and uncertainties in that life are major problems hampering the development in many plasma application areas which make use of plasma torches, arc heaters, and arc jet thrusters. In spite of a considerable amount of work published dealing with arc-cathode phenomena, our present understanding is still incomplete because different physical phenomena dominate for different combinations of experimental parameters. The objective of our present research project is to gain a better understanding of the behavior of arc-cathode surface interaction over a wide range of parameters, and furthermore to develop guidelines for better thermal design of the electrode and the selection of materials. This report will present the research results and progress obtained on the arc-cathode interaction studies at the University of Minnesota. It includes results which have been obtained under programs other than the NASA funded program. Some of the results have been submitted in an informal interim progress report, and all of the results have been presented in a seminar during a visit to the NASA Lewis Research Center on October 16, 1992.

  9. Welding arc length control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a welding arc length control system. The system includes, in its broadest aspects, a power source for providing welding current, a power amplification system, a motorized welding torch assembly connected to the power amplification system, a computer, and current pick up means. The computer is connected to the power amplification system for storing and processing arc weld current parameters and non-linear voltage-ampere characteristics. The current pick up means is connected to the power source and to the welding torch assembly for providing weld current data to the computer. Thus, the desired arc length is maintained as the welding current is varied during operation, maintaining consistent weld penetration.

  10. Subduction initiation at relic arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Wei; Gurnis, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Although plate tectonics is well established, how a new subduction zone initiates remains controversial. Based on plate reconstruction and recent ocean drilling within the Izu-Bonin-Mariana, we advance a new geodynamic model of subduction initiation (SI). We argue that the close juxtaposition of the nascent plate boundary with relic oceanic arcs is a key factor localizing initiation of this new subduction zone. The combination of thermal and compositional density contrasts between the overriding relic arc, and the adjacent old Pacific oceanic plate promoted spontaneous SI. We suggest that thermal rejuvenation of the overriding plate just before 50 Ma caused a reduction in overriding plate strength and an increase in the age contrast (hence buoyancy) between the two plates, leading to SI. The computational models map out a framework in which rejuvenated relic arcs are a favorable tectonic environment for promoting subduction initiation, while transform faults and passive margins are not.

  11. Flow Dynamics in Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Lowke, John J.; Tanaka, Manabu

    2008-02-21

    The state of the art for numerical computations has now advanced so that the capability is within sight of calculating weld shapes for any arc current, welding gas, welding material or configuration. Inherent in these calculations is 'flow dynamics' applied to plasma flow in the arc and liquid metal flow in the weld pool. Examples of predictions which are consistent with experiment, are discussed for (1) conventional tungsten inert gas welding, (2) the effect of a fraction of a percent of sulfur in steel, which can increase weld depth by more than a factor of two through changes in the surface tension, (3) the effect of a flux, which can produce increased weld depth due to arc constriction, (4) use of aluminium instead of steel, when the much larger thermal conductivity of aluminium greatly reduces the weld depth and (5) addition of a few percent of hydrogen to argon, which markedly increases weld depth.

  12. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    PubMed Central

    Massiczek, O.; Friedreich, S.; Juhász, B.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2011-01-01

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser–microwave–laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium – an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland – are described. Similar experiments for 4He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised 3He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the 3He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD. PMID:22267883

  13. A variable conductance gas switch for intermediate temperature operation of liquid He/liquid N2 cryostats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayner, J. T.; Chuter, T. C.; Mclean, I. S.; Radostitz, J. V.; Nolt, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    A technique for establishing a stable intermediate temperature stage in liquid He/liquid N2 double vessel cryostats is described. The tertiary cold stage, which can be tuned to any temperature between 10 and 60 K, is ideal for cooling IR sensors for use in astronomy and physics applications. The device is called a variable-conductance gas switch. It is essentially a small chamber, located between the cold stage and liquid helium cold-face, whose thermal conductance may be controlled by varying the pressure of helium gas within the chamber. A key feature of this device is the large range of temperature control achieved with a very small (less than 10 mW) heat input from the cryogenic temperature control switch.

  14. Dating the India-Eurasia collision through arc magmatic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouilhol, Pierre; Jagoutz, Oliver; Hanchar, John M.; Dudas, Francis O.

    2013-03-01

    The Himalayan orogeny, a result of the collision of India and Eurasia, provides direct evidence of strain accommodation and large-scale rheological behavior of the continental lithosphere. Knowledge of the timing of the India-Eurasia collision is essential to understand the physical processes involved in collisional systems. Here we present a geochronological and multi-isotopic study on rocks from the upper crust of the Kohistan Paleo-Island Arc that formed in the equatorial part of the Neo-Tethys Ocean. In situ U-Pb geochronology and Hf isotopes in zircon, and whole-rock Nd and Sr isotopic data of plutonic rocks from the Kohistan-Ladakh Batholith, are used to construct a continuous record of the isotopic evolution of the source region of these granitoids that are related to both the subduction of the oceanic lithosphere and subsequent arc-continent collisions. We demonstrate that profound changes in the source region of these rocks correspond to collisional events. Our dataset constrains that the Kohistan-Ladakh Island Arc initially collided along the Indus suture zone with India at 50.2±1.5 Ma, an age generally attributed to the final India-Eurasia collision for the entire Himalayan belt. In the western Himalaya, the final collision between the assembled India/Arc and Eurasia however, occurred ∼10 Ma later at 40.4±1.3 Ma along the so-called Shyok suture zone. We present evidence indicating that a similar dual collision scenario can be extended to the east and conclude that a final India/Arc-Eurasia collision at ∼40 Ma integrates crucial aspects of the magmatic, tectonic, and sedimentary record of the whole Himalayan mountain belt.

  15. Auroral arcs and ion outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiolo, Romain

    2016-04-01

    This presentation provides an overwiew of the chapter "Auroral Arcs and Ion Outflow" from the AGU book "Auroral Dynamics and Space Weather" (eds Y. Zhang and L. J. Paxton). This topic covers a wide range of domains, from auroral acceleration processes, auroral arc morphology and dynamics to global magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and atmospheric erosion. This presentation mainly focuses on the observational properties of auroral ion outflow. Recent observations about their large-scale spatial distribution and link with auroral forms will be presented. Auroral ion outflow statistical dependence on solar and geomagnetic activity and its modulation by auroral dynamics at the timescale of substorms will also be discussed.

  16. Ionization effect on arc plasma's optical diagnosis by the measurement of the refractive index.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-yun; Zhang, Cheng-yi; Gu, Fang; Wang, Qing-hua; Li, Zhen-hua

    2012-06-01

    The effect of arc plasma ionization on its temperature diagnosis by the measurement of the refractive index is discussed. The refractive index of arc plasma in two conditions is compared: 1) only the first ionization is considered and 2) both the first and second ionizations are considered. In order to facilitate plasma temperature reconstruction, two corresponding refractive index models are deduced. For the sake of making this study universal, both the monatomic and dual-atomic molecule arc plasmas are chosen as typical examples for theoretical deduction and analysis. A condition, which can be adopted to estimate whether the second ionization should be considered in temperature reconstruction, is proposed. Finally, an argon arc plasma is chosen as an example for experiment, and the experimental results match well with the theoretical analysis. This study is crucial to arc plasma's optical diagnosis, which is based on the measurement of the refractive index. PMID:22695575

  17. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This welding curriculum guide treats two topics in detail: the care of tungsten electrodes and the entire concept of contamination control and the hafnium electrode and its importance in dual-air cutting systems that use compressed shop air for plasma arc cutting activities. The guide contains three units of instruction that cover the following…

  18. Unzipping of the volcano arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, R. J.; Smoot, N. C.; Rubin, M.

    1984-02-01

    A working hypothesis for the recent evolution of the southern Volcano Arc, Japan, is presented which calls upon a northward-progressing sundering of the arc in response to a northward-propagating back-arc basin extensional regime. This model appears to explain several localized and recent changes in the tectonic and magrnatic evolution of the Volcano Arc. Most important among these changes is the unusual composition of Iwo Jima volcanic rocks. This contrasts with normal arc tholeiites typical of the rest of the Izu-Volcano-Mariana and other primitive arcs in having alkaline tendencies, high concentrations of light REE and other incompatible elements, and relatively high silica contents. In spite of such fractionated characteristics, these lavas appear to be very early manifestations of a new volcanic and tectonic cycle in the southern Volcano Arc. These alkaline characteristics and indications of strong regional uplift are consistent with the recent development of an early stage of inter-arc basin rifting in the southern Volcano Arc. New bathymetric data are presented in support of this model which indicate: (1) structural elements of the Mariana Trough extend north to the southern Volcano Arc. (2) both the Mariana Trough and frontal arc shoal rapidly northwards as the Volcano Arc is approached. (3) rugged bathymetry associated with the rifted Mariana Trough is replaced just south of Iwo Jima by the development of a huge dome (50-75 km diameter) centered around Iwo Jima. Such uplifted domes are the immediate precursors of rifts in other environments, and it appears that a similar situation may now exist in the southern Volcano Arc. The present distribution of unrifted Volcano Arc to the north and rifted Mariana Arc to the south is interpreted not as a stable tectonic configuration but as representing a tectonic "snapshot" of an arc in the process of being rifted to form a back-arc basin.

  19. Unzipping of the volcano arc, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, R.J.; Smoot, N.C.; Rubin, M.

    1984-01-01

    A working hypothesis for the recent evolution of the southern Volcano Arc, Japan, is presented which calls upon a northward-progressing sundering of the arc in response to a northward-propagating back-arc basin extensional regime. This model appears to explain several localized and recent changes in the tectonic and magrnatic evolution of the Volcano Arc. Most important among these changes is the unusual composition of Iwo Jima volcanic rocks. This contrasts with normal arc tholeiites typical of the rest of the Izu-Volcano-Mariana and other primitive arcs in having alkaline tendencies, high concentrations of light REE and other incompatible elements, and relatively high silica contents. In spite of such fractionated characteristics, these lavas appear to be very early manifestations of a new volcanic and tectonic cycle in the southern Volcano Arc. These alkaline characteristics and indications of strong regional uplift are consistent with the recent development of an early stage of inter-arc basin rifting in the southern Volcano Arc. New bathymetric data are presented in support of this model which indicate: 1. (1) structural elements of the Mariana Trough extend north to the southern Volcano Arc. 2. (2) both the Mariana Trough and frontal arc shoal rapidly northwards as the Volcano Arc is approached. 3. (3) rugged bathymetry associated with the rifted Mariana Trough is replaced just south of Iwo Jima by the development of a huge dome (50-75 km diameter) centered around Iwo Jima. Such uplifted domes are the immediate precursors of rifts in other environments, and it appears that a similar situation may now exist in the southern Volcano Arc. The present distribution of unrifted Volcano Arc to the north and rifted Mariana Arc to the south is interpreted not as a stable tectonic configuration but as representing a tectonic "snapshot" of an arc in the process of being rifted to form a back-arc basin. ?? 1984.

  20. Total Marrow Irradiation With RapidArc Volumetric Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aydogan, Bulent; Yeginer, Mete; Kavak, Gulbin O.; Fan, John; Radosevich, James A.; Gwe-Ya, Kim

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To develop a volumetric arc therapy (VMAT)-total marrow irradiation (TMI) technique for patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: VMAT planning was performed for 6 patients using RapidArc technology. The planning target volume consisted of all the bones in the body from the head to the mid-femur, excluding the extremities, except for the humerus, plus a 3.0-mm margin. The organs at risk included the lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, bowels, brain, eyes, and oral cavity. The VMAT-TMI technique consisted of three plans: the head and neck, the chest, and the pelvis, each with three 330{sup o} arcs. The plans were prescribed to ensure, at a minimum, 95% planning target volume dose coverage with the prescription dose (percentage of volume receiving dose of {>=}12 Gy was 95%). The treatments were delivered and verified using MapCheck and ion chamber measurements. Results: The VMAT-TMI technique reported in the present study provided comparable dose distributions with respect to the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. RapidArc planning was less subjective and easier, and, most importantly, the delivery was more efficient. RapidArc reduced the treatment delivery time to approximately 18 min from 45 min with the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. When the prescription dose coverage was reduced to 85% from 95% and the mandible and maxillary structures were not included in the planning target volume as reported in a tomotherapy study, a considerable organ at risk dose reduction of 4.2-51% was observed. The average median dose for the lungs and lenses was reduced to 5.6 Gy from 7.2 Gy and 2.4 Gy from 4.5 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The RapidArc VMAT technique improved the treatment planning, dose conformality, and, most importantly, treatment delivery efficiency. The results from our study suggest that the RapidArc VMAT technology can be expected to facilitate the clinical transition of TMI.

  1. Arc track resistant polymers for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haghighat, Ross

    1995-01-01

    The properties and test methods of aorimide polymers, kapton, and fep teflon are given in table format. Graphic depiction of an atomic oxygen resistance comparison, arc track resistance set-up and arc incident vs. propagation are given.

  2. Arc restrike in the rail accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Pradosh K.

    1989-01-01

    One of the causes of the degradation in rail accelerator performance is the formation of a secondary arc. Experimental evidence of arc restrike and the subsequent growth of this secondary arc is presented. A simple analytical treatment of arc restrike is developed in terms of breakdown of residual vapor atoms. It is found that after the passage of the primary arc, the bore volume contains a large number of residual neutral vapor atoms. If the density of these atoms is in excess of the critical density, then for a certain length of time the condition exists in the bore for the formation of a secondary arc. Evaporation of atoms from the bore surfaces cannot provide a sufficient number of atoms for an arc restrike. A likely source of the high residual atom density is the leakage of a portion of the ablated material that is added to the trailing edge of the primary arc.

  3. 3D cartography of the Alpine Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vouillamoz, N.; Sue, C.; Champagnac, J. D.; Calcagno, P.

    2012-04-01

    We present a 3D cartography of the alpine arc, a highly non-cylindrical mountain belt, built using the 3D GeoModeller of the BRGM (French geological survey). The model allows to handle the large-scale 3D structure of seventeen major crustal units of the belt (from the lower crust to the sedimentary cover nappes), and two main discontinuities (the Insubric line and the Crustal Penninic Front). It provides a unique document to better understand their structural relationships and to produce new sections. The study area comprises the western alpine arc, from the Jura to the Northwest, up to the Bergell granite intrusion and the Lepontine Dome to the East, and is limited to the South by the Ligurian basin. The model is limited vertically 10 km above sea level at the top, and the moho interface at the bottom. We discarded the structural relationships between the Alps sensus stricto and the surrounding geodynamic systems such as the Rhine graben or the connection with the Apennines. The 3D-model is based on the global integration of various data such as the DEM of the Alps, the moho isobaths, the simplified geological and tectonic maps of the belt, the crustal cross-sections ECORS-CROP and NFP-20, and complementary cross-sections specifically built to precise local complexities. The database has first been integrated in a GIS-project to prepare their implementation in the GeoModeller, by homogenizing the different spatial referencing systems. The global model is finally interpolated from all these data, using the potential field method. The final document is a new tri-dimentional cartography that would be used as input for further alpine studies.

  4. Rotating Drive for Electrical-Arc Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fransen, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    Rotating drive improves quality of holes made by electrical-arc machining. Mechanism (Uni-tek, rotary head, or equivalent) attached to electrical-arc system. Drive rotates electrode as though it were mechanical drill, while an arc disintegrates metal in workpiece, thereby creating hole. Rotating electrode method often used in electric-discharge machining. NASA innovation is application of technique to electrical-arc machining.

  5. Laboratory experiments on arc deflection and instability

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.; Karasik, M.

    2000-03-21

    This article describes experiments on arc deflection instability carried out during the past few years at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The approach has been that of plasma physicists interested in arcs, but they believe these results may be useful to engineers who are responsible for controlling arc behavior in large electric steel furnaces.

  6. Arc-starting aid for GTA welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    Three-in-one handtool combining arc-gap gage, electrode tip sander, and electrode projection gate, effectively improves initiation on gas tungsten arc (GTA), automatic skate-welding machines. Device effects ease in polishing electrode tips and setting exactly initial arc gap before each weld pass.

  7. Making Conductive Polymers By Arc Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daech, Alfred F.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental technique for fabrication of electrically conductive polymeric filaments based on arc tracking, in which electrical arc creates conductive carbon track in material that initially was insulator. Electrically conductive polymeric structures made by arc tracking aligned along wire on which formed. Alignment particularly suited to high conductivity and desirable in materials intended for testing as candidate superconductors.

  8. Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of

  9. Parametric Study on Arc Behavior of Magnetically Diffused Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tang; Li, Hui; Bai, Bing; Liao, Mengran; Xia, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    A model coupling the plasma with a cathode body is applied in the simulation of the diffuse state of a magnetically rotating arc. Four parametric studies are performed: on the external axial magnetic field (AMF), on the cathode shape, on the total current and on the inlet gas velocity. The numerical results show that: the cathode attachment focuses in the center of the cathode tip with zero AMF and gradually shifts off the axis with the increase of AMF; a larger cathode conical angle corresponds to a cathode arc attachment farther away off axis; the maximum values of plasma temperature increase with the total current; the plasma column in front of the cathode tip expands more severely in the axial direction, with a higher inlet speed; the cathode arc attachment shrinks towards the tip as the inlet speed increases. The various results are supposed to be explained by the joint effect of coupled cathode surface heating and plasma rotating flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475174, 11035005 and 50876101)

  10. A mechanism that triggers double arcing during plasma arc cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemchinsky, Valerian

    2009-10-01

    Double arcing (DA) is a phenomenon when a transferred arc, flowing inside an electrically insulated nozzle, breaks into two separate arcs: one that connects the cathode and the nozzle and another that connects the nozzle and a work-piece. It is a commonly accepted opinion that the reason for DA is high voltage drop in the plasma inside the nozzle. However, the specific mechanism that triggers the DA development is not clear. In this paper, we propose such a mechanism. Dielectric films deposited inside the nozzle's orifice play the key role in this mechanism. These films are charged by ion current from plasma. A strong electric field is created inside the film and at the boundary of the film and clean metal of the nozzle. This gives rise to a thermo-field electron emission from the clean metal that borders the film. Emitted electrons are accelerated at the voltage drop between the nozzle and plasma. These electrons produce extra ions, which in turn move back to the film and additionally charge it. This sequence of events leads to explosive instability if the voltage drop inside the nozzle is high enough. Experiments to check the proposed mechanism are suggested.

  11. Petrology and tectonics of Phanerozoic continent formation: From island arcs to accretion and continental arc magmatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, C.-T.A.; Morton, D.M.; Kistler, R.W.; Baird, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    continental margin. The mafic cumulates and restites, owing to their high densities, eventually foundered into the mantle, leaving behind a more felsic crust. Our grid-based sampling allows us to estimate an unbiased average upper crustal composition for the Peninsular Ranges Batholith. Major and trace-element compositions are very similar to global continental crust averaged over space and time, but in detail, the Peninsular Ranges are slightly lower in compatible to mildly incompatible elements, MgO, Mg#, V, Sc, Co, and Cr. The compositional similarities suggest a strong arc component in global continental crust, but the slight discrepancies suggest that additional crust formation processes are also important in continent formation as a whole. Finally, the delaminated Sierran garnet pyroxenites have some of the lowest U/Pb ratios ever measured for silicate rocks. Such material, if recycled and stored in the deep mantle, would generate a reservoir with very unradiogenic Pb, providing one solution to the global Pb isotope paradox. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Brown, Ian G.

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  13. The refractory painful arc syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watson, M

    1978-11-01

    Twenty-three patients with a severe refractory painful arc syndrome have been treated by excision of the outer end of the clavicle and division of the coracoacromial ligament through a deltoid-splitting approach. After a follow-up of more than six months all patients have been relieved of night pain. Six still have slight pain on movement, but the rest are symptom-free. PMID:711806

  14. The modelling of an SF6 arc in a supersonic nozzle: I. Cold flow features and dc arc characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Yan, J. D.; Fang, M. T. C.

    2014-05-01

    The cold flow and the arc, under direct currents burning in the nozzle of the arcing device used in Benenson (1980 Final Report General Electric Co. (Schenectady, NY) Project 246-2) with fixed stagnation pressure, have been investigated computationally using five flow models; the laminar flow model, the Prandtl mixing length model, the standard k-epsilon model and its two variants, the Chen-Kim model and the renormalization group model. For the cold flow, the computational results are almost the same for the different flow models apart from in the regions close to the two electrodes. There is a bow shock in front of the downstream hollow electrode and a wake near the tip of the upstream electrode. The size of the wake and the strength and the structure of the shock differ greatly amongst the flow models. With a dc arc in the nozzle, derived voltage-current characteristics are negative for currents of less than 600 A but for higher currents the arc voltage is nearly constant.

  15. Continent-arc collision in the Banda Arc imaged by ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, Robert W.; Miller, Meghan S.; O'Driscoll, Leland J.; Harris, Cooper W.; Roosmawati, Nova; Teofilo da Costa, Luis

    2016-09-01

    The tectonic configuration of the Banda region in southeast Asia captures the spatial transition from subduction of Indian Ocean lithosphere to subduction and collision of the Australian continental lithosphere beneath the Banda Arc. An ongoing broadband seismic deployment funded by NSF is aimed at better understanding the mantle and lithospheric structure in the region and the relationship of the arc-continent collision to orogenesis. Here, we present results from ambient noise tomography in the region utilizing this temporary deployment of 30 broadband instruments and 39 permanent stations in Indonesia, Timor Leste, and Australia. We measure dispersion curves for over 21,000 inter-station paths resulting in good recovery of the velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Savu Sea, Timor Leste, and the Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT) region of Indonesia. The resulting three dimensional model indicates up to ∼25% variation in shear velocity throughout the plate boundary region; first-order velocity anomalies are associated with the subducting oceanic lithosphere, subducted Australian continental lithosphere, obducted oceanic sediments forming the core of the island of Timor, and high velocity anomalies in the Savu Sea and Sumba. The structure in Sumba and the Savu Sea is consistent with an uplifting forearc sliver. Beneath the island of Timor, we confirm earlier inferences of pervasive crustal duplexing from surface mapping, and establish a link to underlying structural features in the lowermost crust and uppermost mantle that drive upper crustal shortening. Finally, our images of the volcanic arc under Flores, Wetar, and Alor show high velocity structures of the Banda Terrane, but also a clear low velocity anomaly at the transition between subduction of oceanic and continental lithosphere. Given that the footprint of the Banda Terrane has previously been poorly defined, this model provides important constraints on tectonic reconstructions that

  16. Liquid helium cryostat with internal fluorescence detection for x-ray absorption studies in the 2-6 keV energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane Holman, Karen L.; Latimer, Matthew J.; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2004-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in the intermediate x-ray region (2-6 keV) for dilute biological samples has been limited because of detector/flux limitations and inadequate cryogenic instrumentation. We have designed and constructed a new tailpiece/sample chamber for a commercially available liquid helium cooled cryostat which overcomes difficulties related to low fluorescence signals by using thin window materials and incorporating an internal photodiode detector. With the apparatus, XAS data at the Cl, S, and Ca K edges have been collected on frozen solutions and biological samples at temperatures down to 60 K. A separate chamber has been incorporated for collecting room-temperature spectra of standard compounds (for energy calibration purposes) which prevents contamination of the cryostat chamber and allows the sample to remain undisturbed, both important concerns for studying dilute and radiation-sensitive samples.

  17. Evanescent straight tapered-fiber coupling of ultra-high Q optomechanical micro-resonators in a low-vibration helium-4 exchange-gas cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, R.; Arcizet, O.; Schliesser, A.; Kippenberg, T. J.

    2013-04-01

    We developed an apparatus to couple a 50-μm diameter whispering-gallery silica microtoroidal resonator in a helium-4 cryostat using a straight optical tapered-fiber at 1550 nm wavelength. On a top-loading probe specifically adapted for increased mechanical stability, we use a specifically-developed "cryotaper" to optically probe the cavity, allowing thus to record the calibrated mechanical spectrum of the optomechanical system at low temperatures. We then demonstrate excellent thermalization of a 63-MHz mechanical mode of a toroidal resonator down to the cryostat's base temperature of 1.65 K, thereby proving the viability of the cryogenic refrigeration via heat conduction through static low-pressure exchange gas. In the context of optomechanics, we therefore provide a versatile and powerful tool with state-of-the-art performances in optical coupling efficiency, mechanical stability, and cryogenic cooling.

  18. Expression of blood group antigens in urinary tract tumours: prospective fluorescence study using cryostat sections of fresh frozen tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, S J; Abel, P; Henderson, D; Jones, N; Feizi, T

    1986-01-01

    Cryostat sections of fresh frozen tissues were used in a prospective study of blood group H and A antigen fluorescence in 73 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. The aim was to evaluate antigen expression without subjecting the tumour tissues to organic solvents that extract blood group active glycolipids. Deletion of the genetically predicted antigen was twice as common in tumours of pT1 or greater stage than those of pTa stage and also twice as common in poorly differentiated than in moderately well differentiated tumours. The considerable heterogeneity and overlap, however, in patterns of reactivity in tumours of various histopathological stages and grades and the effect of secretor status on antigenicity meant that there was no obvious antigenic feature that correlated precisely with invasive stage or differentiation grade. It remains to be determined whether the antigen positive and antigen negative tumours represent different disease entities with differing clinical courses. Our results indicate, however, that studies of the blood group antigens in urinary tract tumours are more likely to be of value in research into biochemical disorders in the neoplastic process than in routine clinical assessment as a guide to treatment. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:3540013

  19. Physical characteristics of welding arc ignition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Linan; Song, Yonglun; Xiao, Tianjiao; Ran, Guowei

    2012-07-01

    The existing research of welding arc mainly focuses on the stable combustion state and the research on the mechanism of welding arc ignition process is quite lack. The tungsten inert gas(TIG) touch arc ignition process is observed via a high speed camera and the high time resolution spectral diagnosis system. The changing phenomenon of main ionized element provided the electrons in the arc ignition is found. The metallic element is the main contributor to provide the electrons at the beginning of the discharging, and then the excitated shielding gas element replaces the function of the metallic element. The electron density during the period of the arc ignition is calculated by the Stark-broadened lines of Hα. Through the discussion with the repeatability in relaxation phenomenon, the statistical regularity in the arc ignition process is analyzed. The similar rules as above are observed through the comparison with the laser-assisted arc ignition experiments and the metal inert gas(MIG) arc ignition experiments. This research is helpful to further understanding on the generation mechanism of welding arc ignition and also has a certain academic and practical significance on enriching the welding physical theoretical foundation and improving the precise monitoring on automatic arc welding process.

  20. Parsing Aleutian Arc Magma Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    The first-order subdivision of Aleutian arc magma compositions is based on SiO2, and the second-order subdivision is usually based on the change of FeOt/MgO as a function of SiO2, resulting in the additional twofold subdivision into (TH) and calcalkaline (CA) magmas. However, additional robust compositional variations exist. The two most important of these are (1) variation of the calcium number [Ca#; Ca/(Na+Ca)] as a function of SiO2, and (2) the Rate of Incompatible Trace-element Enrichment (RITE) at individual volcanic centers. Additionally, the data show that the low FeOt/MgO of CA andesite and dacite is more controlled by MgO excess than FeOt depletion. The Ca# of andesites and dacites is strongly bimodal. The low-Ca# group is "calc-alkalic", while the high-Ca# group is "calcic", using Peacock (1931) criteria. A continuum of Ca#s exists, but lavas intermediate between high-Ca# and low-Ca# are much less abundant. Ca#s merge below about 55% SiO2, and have a simple normal distribution. RITE, with rare but important exceptions, is generally constant at the temporal and spatial scale of a single volcano. Among high-RITE magmas LILE, LREE, HFSE, and Th increase ~3.5-fold, and HREE increase ~2.5-fold from basalt or basaltic-andesite through andesite to dacite. There is no strong indication that RITE is silica-dependant. High-RITE magmas develop a strong negative Eu anomaly, and are qualitatively compatible with an origin primarily involving fractionation of plagioclase-dominated mineral assemblages. Low-RITE magmas, in contrast, have nearly invariant REE and HFSE, and LILE and Th increase merely 1.5-fold over the same silica range. Low-RITE magmas are not compatible with fractionation of a plagioclase-dominant mineral assemblage. Alternative qualitatively plausible explanations (needing rigorous evaluation) include fractionation of an ultramafic mineral assemblage (Alaskan-type mafic-ultramafic bodies may be a model; see USGS Prof Paper 1564); that low-RITE basaltic

  1. Does one need a 4.5 K screen in cryostats of superconducting accelerator devices operating in superfluid helium? lessons from the LHL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, Philippe; Parma, Vittorio; Tavian, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large projects confronted with this issue, i.e. CEBAF, SPL, ESS, LHC, TESLA, European X-FEL, ILC.

  2. Does one need a 4.5 K screen in cryostats of superconducting accelerator devices operating in superfluid helium? lessons from the LHL

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Philippe; Parma, Vittorio; Tavian, Laurent

    2014-01-29

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large projects confronted with this issue, i.e. CEBAF, SPL, ESS, LHC, TESLA, European X-FEL, ILC.

  3. Matched Optics of Muon RLA and Non-Scaling FFAG ARCS

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, S.A. Bogacz, Y. Roblin, K.B. Beard, D. Trbojevic

    2011-03-01

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are an efficient way of accelerating short-lived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. To reduce the number of required return arcs, we employ a Non-Scaling Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (NS-FFAG) arc lattice design. We present a complete linear optics design of a muon RLA with two-pass linear NS-FFAG droplet return arcs. The arcs are composed of symmetric cells with each cell designed using combined function magnets with dipole and quadrupole magnetic field components so that the cell is achromatic and has zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both passes’ energies. Matching to the linac is accomplished by adjusting linac quadrupole strengths so that the linac optics on each pass is matched to the arc optics. We adjust the difference of the path lengths and therefore of the times of flight of the two momenta in each arc to ensure proper synchronization with the linac. We investigate the dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance of the arcs.

  4. Arc Regulates Experience-Dependent Persistent Firing Patterns in Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ming; Cao, Vania; Ye, Yizhou; Manji, Husseini K.

    2014-01-01

    The brain encodes information about past experience in specific populations of neurons that communicate with one another by firing action potentials. Studies of experience-dependent neural plasticity have largely focused on individual synaptic changes in response to neuronal input. Indicative of the neuronal output transmitted to downstream neurons, persistent firing patterns are affected by prior experience in selective neuronal populations. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which experience-related persistent firing patterns are regulated in specific neuronal populations. Using frontal cortical slices prepared from transgenic mice carrying a fluorescent reporter of Arc gene expression, this study investigates how behavioral experience and the activity-regulated Arc gene affect patterns of neuronal firing. We found that motor training increases Arc expression in subsets of excitatory neurons. Those neurons exhibit persistent firing in contrast to Arc-negative neurons from the same mice or neurons from the untrained mice. Furthermore, in mice carrying genetic deletion of Arc, the frontal cortical circuitry is still in place to initiate experience-dependent gene expression, but the level of persistent firing thereafter is diminished. Finally, our results showed that the emergence of persistent activity is associated with Arc-dependent changes in the function of NMDA-type glutamate receptors, rather than changes in AMPA-type receptors or membrane excitability. Our findings therefore reveal an Arc-dependent molecular pathway by which gene–experience interaction regulates the emergence of persistent firing patterns in specific neuronal populations. PMID:24806683

  5. Analysis of Fault Arc in High-Speed Switch Applied in Hybrid Circuit Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yifei; Ren, Zhigang; Feng, Ying; Li, Mei; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-03-01

    The behavior of fault arc in a high-speed switch (HSS) has been studied theoretically and experimentally. A simplified HSS setup is designed to support this work. A two-dimensional arc model is developed to analyze the characteristics of fault arc based on magnetic-hydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The advantage of such a model is that the thermal transfer coefficient can be determined by depending on the numerical method alone. The influence of net emission coefficients (NEC) radiation model and P1 model on fault arc is analyzed in detail. Results show that NEC model predicts more radiation energy and less pressure rise without the re-absorption effect considered. As a consequence, P1 model is more suitable to calculate the pressure rise caused by fault arc. Finally, the pressure rise during longer arcing time for different arc currents is predicted. supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2015CB251001), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51221005, 51177124, 51377128, 51323012), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation SGSNKYOOKJJS1501564 and Shaanxi Province Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 2013JM-7010)

  6. Racialized masculinities and the new homonormativity in LOGO's Noah's Arc.

    PubMed

    Yep, Gust A; Elia, John P

    2012-01-01

    Examining the relationship between neoliberalism, race, and gender performance, this article provides an analysis of Noah's Arc, a popular LOGO television series in the United States. More specifically, it focuses on the intricate relationship between specific forms of racialized masculinities and the new homonormativity in this show. This article is divided into six sections. First, an overview of the LOGO series is provided. Next, gay, lesbian, and queer visibility in mainstream U.S. popular culture and the new homonormativity are examined. Third, the relationship between race and masculinity is discussed. Next, a close reading and analysis of the show is provided. Fifth, an exploration of how representations of Noah's Arc queers and "quares" Black masculinity in U.S. culture is undertaken. Finally, some concluding thoughts on representations of racialized masculinities and homonormativity in this popular television series are offered. PMID:22925051

  7. ARC length control for plasma welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A control system to be used with a plasma arc welding apparatus is disclosed. The plasma arc welding apparatus includes a plasma arc power supply, a contactor, and an electrode assembly for moving the electrode relative to a work piece. The electrode assembly is raised or lowered by a drive motor. The present apparatus includes a plasma arc adapter connected across the power supply to measure the voltage across the plasma arc. The plasma arc adapter forms a dc output signal input to a differential amplifier. A second input is defined by an adjustable resistor connected to a dc voltage supply to permit operator control. The differential amplifier forms an output difference signal provided to an adder circuit. The adder circuit then connects with a power amplifier which forms the driving signal for the motor. In addition, the motor connects to a tachometor which forms a feedback signal delivered to the adder to provide damping, therby avoiding servo loop overshoot.

  8. Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed

    DOEpatents

    Hooper, Frederick M

    2002-01-01

    A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

  9. One Arc PMSM for telescope tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Changzhi; Zhang, Zhenchao; Wang, Daxing; Hu, Wei; Zhu, Zhenlian

    2008-07-01

    This paper explores one Arc PMSM for Direct Drive Telescope tracking system. By the Arc PMSM, we can very easily manufacture one direct drive system for large telescope. Direct drive system has many advantages over more traditionally used friction and rack/pinion drive. The advantages include high stiffness, no friction, easy alignment and low maintenance. The paper discusses the design process of the Arc PMSM, especially the methods to reduce the torque ripple.

  10. Magnetic-cusp, cathodic-arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic-cusp for a cathodic-arc source wherein the arc is confined to the desired cathode surface, provides a current path for electrons from the cathode to the anode, and utilizes electric and magnetic fields to guide ions from the cathode to a point of use, such as substrates to be coated. The magnetic-cusp insures arc stability by an easy magnetic path from anode to cathode, while the straight-through arrangement leads to high ion transmission.

  11. ArcRegionalization: a GIS-based Toolkit to Predict Streamflow in Ungauged Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Y.; Cheng, Q.

    2005-12-01

    Regionalization, which aims to estimate the model parameters for the ungauged basins from the model parameters for the gauged basins within the same region, provides a method to predict the streamflow in the ungauged basins. However, most of regionalization researches have to calibrate model parameters and derive basin descriptors using two isolated software tools: hydrological modelling software and GIS. In order to facilitate model regionalization research, an ArcGIS extension: ArcRegionalization is developed with C# language to integrate basin descriptor derivation and hydrological models. ArcRegionalization not only provides basin descriptors derivation methods, widely used hydrological models, and regionalization methods, but also provides the interfaces to incorporate new basin descriptors, new hydrological models, and new regionalization methods. Finally, a case study of model regionalization in Oak Ridges Moraine area, southern Ontario, Canada is used to demonstrate the functions of ArcRegionalization.

  12. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  13. Specification of harmonic corrections (wirefix) for the SLC ARCS

    SciTech Connect

    Bambade, P.; Hutton, A.

    1989-02-01

    In the original SLC commissioning plans, it was thought that accumulated optical mismatch, generated by focusing errors in the whole machine, would be corrected at the very end, in the Final Focus. Dedicated correctors for optical matching and a special adjustment strategy were planned for this purpose, with a large tuning range of up to about a factor four in any dimension of the beam phase-space. With the present collimation and shielding arrangements, it is necessary to control the beam upstream of the Final Focus in order to inject a nearly matched phase-space there. We have developed and installed a new system of harmonic focusing corrections at the end of the SLC Arcs, to provide such control. The scheme consists of introducing small regular and skew focusing deviations at specific harmonics of the betatron frequency which the phase-space is specially sensitive to. The harmonics in question are the zeroeth harmonic and the second harmonic of the betatron frequency. The focusing deviations are introduced in the Arc lattice by perturbing the strengths of the combined function magnets with a set of appropriately rewired trim windings at their backleg. The corrections provide an efficient way for adjusting both for errors in the Arc lattice and for mismatch at the injection to the Arc, generated by the upstream systems. In this note, we describe the specification of this correction procedure as well as the present installation. Initial operational experience with this new method for adjusting beam-lines is presented elsewhere. 20 refs., 18 figs.

  14. The arcs of the Western Alps and the Northern Apennines: an updated view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubscher, Hans P.

    1988-01-01

    The arcs of the Western Alps and the Northern Apennines and the link between them are in the process of being investigated using the European Geotraverse and they have historically been interpreted in many different ways. New information, particularly geophysical, further constrains possible models. Both arcs have evolved in several stages. sometimes complexly interrelated and sometimes independent of each other. Compressional belts produced in these stages have either been of the "push-arc" type (indentation into a deformable mass) or the "pull-arc" type (backward migration of hinge of a subduction zone, leading to small extensional basins known as back-arc basins and "pores", with an arcuate mountain range on the subduction side). Extensional periods with the possible formation of pull-arcs in the Alps comprise the Gosau period between the Eo- and Meso-Alpine push-arc phases and the "Oligocene lull" period between the Meso- and the Neo-Alpine push-arc phases. In the Northern Apennines, remainders of the Meso-Alpine nappes were involved in Oligocene-Early Miocene pull-arc formation associated with spreading in the Balearic Sea, followed by push-arc formation particularly in the Middle Miocene and by renewed pull-arc formation from the latest Late Miocene to the present. During all of these developments, the Moho was modified by such processes as lithospheric stretching, asthenospheric intrusions, subhorizontal shearing and isostatic uplift. The present Moho configuration is consequently a collage of Moho patches formed at different intervals. Both push- and pull-arcs are laterally bounded by complementary strike-slip or transform zones. These too were modified in the course of history and their final geometry is consequently of a very complex nature. In the Alps for instance, the Insubric fault zone appears to have been the main dextral transform fault of the Neogene push-arc, until it was sinistrally kinked by the Giudicarie fault zone and probably deactivated

  15. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  16. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  17. Metals purification by improved vacuum arc remelting

    DOEpatents

    Zanner, Frank J.; Williamson, Rodney L.; Smith, Mark F.

    1994-12-13

    The invention relates to improved apparatuses and methods for remelting metal alloys in furnaces, particularly consumable electrode vacuum arc furnaces. Excited reactive gas is injected into a stationary furnace arc zone, thus accelerating the reduction reactions which purify the metal being melted. Additionally, a cooled condensation surface is disposed within the furnace to reduce the partial pressure of water in the furnace, which also fosters the reduction reactions which result in a purer produced ingot. Methods and means are provided for maintaining the stationary arc zone, thereby reducing the opportunity for contaminants evaporated from the arc zone to be reintroduced into the produced ingot.

  18. Electrode Evaporation Effects on Air Arc Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingwen; Chen, Degui; Li, Rui; Wu, Yi; Niu, Chunping

    2008-06-01

    A numerical study of the effects of copper and silver vapours on the air arc behavior is performed. The commercial software FLUENT is adapted and modified to develop a two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) models of arc with the thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients, net emission coefficient for the radiation model of 99% ai-1% Cu, 99% air-1% Ag, and pure air, respectively. The simulation result demonstrates that vaporization of the electrode material may cool the arc center region and reduce the arc velocity. The effects of Ag vapour are stronger compared to those of Cu vapour.

  19. Unstable behavior of anodic arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-09-01

    A short carbon arc operating with a high ablation rate of the graphite anode exhibits a combined motion of the arc and the arc attachment to the anode. A characteristic time scale of this motion is in a 10‑3 s range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. It is also hypothesized that the arc motion could potentially cause mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime.

  20. Cosmology through arc statistics I: sensitivity to Ωm and σ8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrin, Michele; Giocoli, Carlo; Meneghetti, Massimo; Moscardini, Lauro; Tormen, Giuseppe; Biviano, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The next generation of large sky photometric surveys will finally be able to use arc statistics as a cosmological probe. Here, we present the first of a series of papers on this topic. In particular, we study how arc counts are sensitive to the variation of two cosmological parameters: the (total) matter density parameter, Ωm, and the normalization of the primordial power spectrum, expressed in terms of σ8. Both these parameters influence the abundances of collapsed structures and their internal structure. We compute the expected number of gravitational arcs with various length-to-width ratios in mock light cones, by varying these cosmological parameters in the ranges 0.1 ≤ Ωm ≤ 0.5 and 0.6 ≤ σ8 ≤ 1. We find that the arc counts dependence on Ωm and σ8 is similar, but not identical, to that of the halo counts. We investigate how the precision of the constraints on the cosmological parameters based on arc counts depend on the survey area. We find that the constraining power of arc statistics degrades critically only for surveys covering an area smaller than 10 per cent of the whole sky. Finally, we consider the case in which the search for arcs is done only in frames where galaxy clusters have been previously identified. Adopting the selection function for galaxy clusters expected to be detected from photometric data in future wide surveys, we find that less than 10 per cent of the arcs will be missed, with only a small degradation of the corresponding cosmological constraints.

  1. Interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liming; Chen, Minghua

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation on the interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding on magnesium alloy AZ31B using the spectral diagnose technique. By comparably analyzing the variation in plasma information (the shape, the electron temperature and density) of single tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding with the laser-arc hybrid welding, it is found that the laser affects the arc plasma through the keyhole forming on the workpiece. Depending on the welding parameters there are three kinds of interactions taking place between laser and arc plasma.

  2. Risk assessment of metal vapor arcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Monika C. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing metal vapor arcing risk for a component is provided. The method comprises acquiring a current variable value associated with an operation of the component; comparing the current variable value with a threshold value for the variable; evaluating compared variable data to determine the metal vapor arcing risk in the component; and generating a risk assessment status for the component.

  3. Spinarc gas tungsten arc torch holder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, D. F.; Crockett, J. L.

    1970-01-01

    Semiautomatic welding torch enables operator to control arc length, torch angle, and spring tension when welding small diameter aluminum tubing. Tungsten is preset for the weld to make arc initiation easier and to eliminate searching for the joint through a dark welding lens.

  4. Copper coating specification for the RHIC arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2010-12-01

    Copper coating specifications for the RHIC arcs are given. Various upgrade scenarios are considered and calculations of resistive wall losses in the arcs are used to constrain the necessary quality and surface thickness of a copper coating. We find that 10 {mu}m of high purity copper will suffice.

  5. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.

    1999-01-01

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  6. Preventing Arc Welding From Damaging Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Noel; Mareen, D.

    1988-01-01

    Shielding technique developed to protect sensitive electronic equipment from damage due to electromagnetic disturbances produced by arc welding. Established acceptable alternative in instances in which electronic equipment cannot be removed prior to arc welding. Guidelines established for open, unshielded welds. Procedure applicable to robotics or computer-aided manufacturing.

  7. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, P.S.; Korzekwa, D.R.

    1999-10-26

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting is disclosed. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  8. Steady rotation of the Cascade arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Ray E.; McCaffrey, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Displacement of the Miocene Cascade volcanic arc (northwestern North America) from the active arc is in the same sense and at nearly the same rate as the present clockwise block motions calculated from GPS velocities in a North American reference frame. Migration of the ancestral arc over the past 16 m.y. can be explained by clockwise rotation of upper-plate blocks at 1.0°/m.y. over a linear melting source moving westward 1–4.5 km/m.y. due to slab rollback. Block motion and slab rollback are in opposite directions in the northern arc, but both are westerly in the southern extensional arc, where rollback may be enhanced by proximity to the edge of the Juan de Fuca slab. Similarities between post–16 Ma arc migration, paleomagnetic rotation, and modern GPS block motions indicate that the secular block motions from decadal GPS can be used to calculate long-term strain rates and earthquake hazards. Northwest-directed Basin and Range extension of 140 km is predicted behind the southern arc since 16 Ma, and 70 km of shortening is predicted in the northern arc. The GPS rotation poles overlie a high-velocity slab of the Siletzia terrane dangling into the mantle beneath Idaho (United States), which may provide an anchor for the rotations.

  9. Crustal thickening drives arc front migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Lee, Cin-Ty; Manga, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The location of volcanic arcs, relative to the trench evolves over time. Arc front migration has been observed in relic (Sierra Nevada, Andes) as well as active (Cascades) arcs, sometimes with cycles of retreat and return of the front towards the trench over millions of years. Other arcs, particularly where back-arc extension dominates, migrate more slowly, if at all. Coupled with arc migration there are systematic changes in the geochemistry of magmas such as the ratio of trace elements La/Yb and 87Sr/86Sr isotopes (e.g., Haschke et al., 2002). The position of active volcanic arcs relative to the trench is controlled by the location where melt is generated in the mantle wedge, in turn controlled by the geometry of subduction, and the processes that focus rising melt. Arc front migration is commonly attributed to variation in dip angle of the downgoing slab, delamination of overthickened crust, or to subduction erosion. Here we present an alternative hypothesis. Assuming mantle wedge melting is a largely temperature-dependant process, the maximum isotherm in the wedge sets arc front location. Isotherm location depends on slab angle, subduction velocity and wedge thermal diffusivity (England and Katz, 2010). It also depends on crustal thickness, which evolves as melt is transferred from the wedge to the crust. Arc front migration can thus occur purely through magmatic thickening of crust and lithosphere. Thickening rate is determined by the mantle melt flux into the crust, modulated by tectonics and surface erosion. It is not steady in time, as crustal thickening progressively truncates the mantle melt column and eventually shuts it off. Thus slab angle need not change, and in the absence of other contribution processes front location and crustal thickness have long-time steady state values. We develop a quantitative model for arc front migration that is consistent with published arc front data, and explains why arc fronts do not move when there is extension, such

  10. Numerical Study on Arc Plasma Behavior During Arc Commutation Process in Direct Current Circuit Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fei; Ma, Ruiguang; Wu, Yi; Sun, Hao; Niu, Chunping; Rong, Mingzhe

    2012-02-01

    This paper focuses on the numerical investigation of arc plasma behavior during arc commutation process in a medium-voltage direct current circuit breaker (DCCB) contact system. A three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model of air arc plasma in the contact system of a DCCB is developed, based on commercial software FLUENT. Coupled electromagnetic and gas dynamic interactions are considered as usual, and a thin layer of nonlinear electrical resistance elements is used to represent the voltage drop of plasma sheath and the formation of new arc root. The distributions of pressure, temperature, gas flow and current density of arc plasma in arc region are calculated. The simulation results indicate that the pressure distribution related to the contact system has a strong effect on the arc commutation process, arising from the change of electrical conductivity in the arc root region. In DCCB contact system, the pressure of arc root region will be concentrated and higher if the space above the moving contact is enclosed, which is not good for arc root commutation. However, when the region is opened, the pressure distribution would be lower and more evenly, which is favorable for the arc root commutation.

  11. Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

  12. Thermoacoustic energy effects in electrical arcs.

    PubMed

    Capelli-Schellpfeffer, M; Miller, G H; Humilier, M

    1999-10-30

    Electrical arcs commonly occur in electrical injury incidents. Historically, safe work distances from an energized surface along with personal barrier protection have been employee safety strategies used to minimize electrical arc hazard exposures. Here, the two-dimensional computational simulation of an electrical arc explosion is reported using color graphics to depict the temperature and acoustic force propagation across the geometry of a hypothetical workroom during a time from 0 to 50 ms after the arc initiation. The theoretical results are compared to the experimental findings of staged tests involving a mannequin worker monitored for electrical current flow, temperature, and pressure, and reported data regarding neurologic injury thresholds. This report demonstrates a credible link between electrical explosions and the risk for pressure (acoustic) wave trauma. Our ultimate goal is to protect workers through the design and implementation of preventive strategies that properly account for all electrical arc-induced hazards, including electrical, thermal, and acoustic effects. PMID:10842616

  13. Sensor Control of Robot Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sias, F. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The potential for using computer vision as sensory feedback for robot gas-tungsten arc welding is investigated. The basic parameters that must be controlled while directing the movement of an arc welding torch are defined. The actions of a human welder are examined to aid in determining the sensory information that would permit a robot to make reproducible high strength welds. Special constraints imposed by both robot hardware and software are considered. Several sensory modalities that would potentially improve weld quality are examined. Special emphasis is directed to the use of computer vision for controlling gas-tungsten arc welding. Vendors of available automated seam tracking arc welding systems and of computer vision systems are surveyed. An assessment is made of the state of the art and the problems that must be solved in order to apply computer vision to robot controlled arc welding on the Space Shuttle Main Engine.

  14. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1985-08-05

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  15. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1987-01-01

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  16. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1987-11-17

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

  17. Laser assisted arc welding for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerschbach, P.W.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effector to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (<1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  18. Diode Laser Sensors for Arc-Jet Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Ronald K.

    2005-01-01

    established that the number density of these excited species is much lower than estimated using frozen-chemistry approximations. This key finding suggests that in the post-expansion region there is not a significant energy sequestration in electronically excited species. Finally, TDL measurements of atomic potassium seeded into the test cabin flow were used to directly measure the static temperature of the test gas. The results of this study illustrate the high potential of time-resolved TDL measurements for routine and economical sensing of arc-heater health (gas temperature and electrode erosion) as well as the time-resolved test-cabin-flow conditions in front of the model.

  19. Slab melting and magma formation beneath the southern Cascade arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walowski, K. J.; Wallace, P. J.; Clynne, M. A.; Rasmussen, D. J.; Weis, D.

    2016-07-01

    The processes that drive magma formation beneath the Cascade arc and other warm-slab subduction zones have been debated because young oceanic crust is predicted to largely dehydrate beneath the forearc during subduction. In addition, geochemical variability along strike in the Cascades has led to contrasting interpretations about the role of volatiles in magma generation. Here, we focus on the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc, where previous work has demonstrated across-arc geochemical variations related to subduction enrichment, and H-isotope data suggest that H2O in basaltic magmas is derived from the final breakdown of chlorite in the mantle portion of the slab. We use naturally glassy, olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) from the tephra deposits of eight primitive (MgO > 7 wt%) basaltic cinder cones to quantify the pre-eruptive volatile contents of mantle-derived melts in this region. The melt inclusions have B concentrations and isotope ratios that are similar to mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), suggesting extensive dehydration of the downgoing plate prior to reaching sub-arc depths and little input of slab-derived B into the mantle wedge. However, correlations of volatile and trace element ratios (H2O/Ce, Cl/Nb, Sr/Nd) in the melt inclusions demonstrate that geochemical variability is the result of variable addition of a hydrous subduction component to the mantle wedge. Furthermore, correlations between subduction component tracers and radiogenic isotope ratios show that the subduction component has less radiogenic Sr and Pb than the Lassen sub-arc mantle, which can be explained by melting of subducted Gorda MORB beneath the arc. Agreement between pMELTS melting models and melt inclusion volatile, major, and trace element data suggests that hydrous slab melt addition to the mantle wedge can produce the range in primitive compositions erupted in the Lassen region. Our results provide further evidence that chlorite-derived fluids from the mantle portion of the

  20. Three-dimensional modeling of the plasma arc in arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.; Tsai, H. L.; Hu, J.

    2008-11-15

    Most previous three-dimensional modeling on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) focuses on the weld pool dynamics and assumes the two-dimensional axisymmetric Gaussian distributions for plasma arc pressure and heat flux. In this article, a three-dimensional plasma arc model is developed, and the distributions of velocity, pressure, temperature, current density, and magnetic field of the plasma arc are calculated by solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, as well as part of the Maxwell's equations. This three-dimensional model can be used to study the nonaxisymmetric plasma arc caused by external perturbations such as an external magnetic field. It also provides more accurate boundary conditions when modeling the weld pool dynamics. The present work lays a foundation for true three-dimensional comprehensive modeling of GTAW and GMAW including the plasma arc, weld pool, and/or electrode.

  1. Three-dimensional modeling of the plasma arc in arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Hu, J.; Tsai, H. L.

    2008-11-01

    Most previous three-dimensional modeling on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) focuses on the weld pool dynamics and assumes the two-dimensional axisymmetric Gaussian distributions for plasma arc pressure and heat flux. In this article, a three-dimensional plasma arc model is developed, and the distributions of velocity, pressure, temperature, current density, and magnetic field of the plasma arc are calculated by solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, as well as part of the Maxwell's equations. This three-dimensional model can be used to study the nonaxisymmetric plasma arc caused by external perturbations such as an external magnetic field. It also provides more accurate boundary conditions when modeling the weld pool dynamics. The present work lays a foundation for true three-dimensional comprehensive modeling of GTAW and GMAW including the plasma arc, weld pool, and/or electrode.

  2. Alignment of the Stanford Linear Collider Arcs: Concepts and results

    SciTech Connect

    Pitthan, R.; Bell, B.; Friedsam, H.; Pietryka, M.; Oren, W.; Ruland, R.

    1987-02-01

    The alignment of the Arcs for the Stanford Linear Collider at SLAC has posed problems in accelerator survey and alignment not encountered before. These problems come less from the tight tolerances of 0.1 mm, although reaching such a tight statistically defined accuracy in a controlled manner is difficult enough, but from the absence of a common reference plane for the Arcs. Traditional circular accelerators, including HERA and LEP, have been designed in one plane referenced to local gravity. For the SLC Arcs no such single plane exists. Methods and concepts developed to solve these and other problems, connected with the unique design of SLC, range from the first use of satellites for accelerator alignment, use of electronic laser theodolites for placement of components, computer control of the manual adjustment process, complete automation of the data flow incorporating the most advanced concepts of geodesy, strict separation of survey and alignment, to linear principal component analysis for the final statistical smoothing of the mechanical components.

  3. The Ophiolite - Oceanic Fore-Arc Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. K.; Pearce, J. A.; Stern, R. J.; Ishizuka, O.; Petronotis, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Miyashiro (1973, EPSL) put forward the hypothesis that many ophiolites are generated in subduction zone settings. More recently, ophiolitic sequences including MORB-like basalts underlying boninites or other subduction-related rock types have been linked to near-trench spreading during subduction infancy (e.g., Stern and Bloomer, 1992, GSA Bull.; Shervais, 2001, G-cubed; Stern et al., 2012, Lithos.). These contentions were given strong support by the results of Shinkai 6500 diving in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) fore-arc (e.g., Reagan et al., 2010, G-cubed; Ishizuka et al., 2011, EPSL; Reagan et al., 2013, EPSL). Based on widely spaced dives and grab sampling at disbursed dive stops, these studies concluded that the most abundant and most submerged volcanic rocks in the IBM fore-arc are MORB-like basalts (fore-arc basalts or FAB), and that these basalts appear to be part of a crustal sequence of gabbro, dolerite, FAB, boninite, and normal arc lavas overlying depleted peridotite. This ophiolitic sequence was further postulated to make up most or all of the IBM fore-arc from Guam to Japan, with similar magmatic ages (52 Ma FAB to 45 Ma arc) north to south, reflecting a western-Pacific wide subduction initiation event. At the time of this writing, IODP Expedition 352 is about to set sail, with a principal goal of drilling the entire volcanic sequence in the Bonin fore-arc. This drilling will define the compositional gradients through the volcanic sequence associated with subduction initiation and arc infancy, and test the hypothesized oceanic fore-arc - ophiolite genetic relationship. A primary goal of this expedition is to illustrate how mantle compositions and melting processes evolved during decompression melting of asthenosphere during subduction initiation to later flux melting of depleted mantle. These insights will provide important empirical constraints for geodynamic models of subduction initiation and early arc development.

  4. Ionospheric flow shear associated with the preexisting auroral arc: A statistical study from the FAST spacecraft data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Feifei; Kivelson, Margaret G.; Strangeway, Robert J.; Khurana, Krishan K.; Walker, Raymond

    2015-06-01

    An auroral substorm is a disturbance in the magnetosphere that releases energy stored in the magnetotail into the high-latitude ionosphere. By definition, an auroral substorm commences when a discrete auroral arc brightens and subsequently expands poleward and azimuthally. The arc that brightens is usually the most equatorward of several auroral arcs that remain quiescent for ~5 to ~60 min before the breakup commences. This arc is often referred to as the "preexisting auroral arc (PAA)" or the "growth-phase arc." In this study, we use FAST measurements to establish the statistics of flow patterns near PAAs in the ionosphere. We find that flow shear is present in the vicinity of a preexisting arc. When a PAA appears in the evening sector, enhanced westward flow develops equatorward of the arc, whereas when a PAA appears in the morning sector, enhanced eastward flow develops poleward of the arc. We benchmark locations of the PAAs relative to large-scale field-aligned currents (FACs) and convective flows in the ionosphere, finding that the arc forms in the upward current region within ~1° of the Region 1/Region 2 boundary in all local time sectors from 20 MLT to 03 MLT. We also find that near midnight in the Harang region, most of the PAAs lie within 0.5° poleward of the low-latitude Region 1/Region 2 currents boundary and sit between the westward and eastward flow peak but equatorward of the flow reversal point. Finally, we examine arc-associated electrodynamics and find that the FAC of the PAA is mainly closed by the north-south Pedersen current in the ionosphere.

  5. Incorporation of crust at the Lesser Antilles arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J. P.; Bezard, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Most convergent margin magmas exhibit geochemical characteristics of continental crust, incorporated via subduction of continental sediment into the arc source (mantle wedge) or via assimilation of continental crust by arc magmas en route to surface. Resolving which of these processes dominate at a given arc is important in avoiding the circularity of the question of the origin of the continental crust. The Lesser Antilles is built on oceanic lithosphere so in principle any crustal signature has been introduced via sediment subduction. Geochemical variations in magmas along the arc have been matched with the variations displayed in sediments outboard of the trench 1 . At about the same time, similarly comprehensive data sets were produced from along the Lesser Antilles, arguing that much of the geochemical diversity reflected crustal contamination rather than source contamination 2. These claims were based on; 1) correlations between isotopic ratios and indices of differentiation, 2) high delta18O, which argues for extensive interaction with material that has interacted with water at low T and finally the observation that the highest Pb isotope ratios in the lavas actually exceed the highest seen in the sediments. The latter problem has now been solved since a wider range of sediments have now been examined, with a section of black shales exhibiting remarkably radiogenic Pb isotopes 3 . We have re-examined the origin of geochemical variations by comparing two specific volcanoes, Mt Pelee in the centre of the arc and The Quill in the north 4. The idea is to explore differentiation trends at a given volcano, and back project them to reasonable primitive magma compositions. In that way we can account for geochemical effects resulting from differentiation, and focus on source variations (contributions from slab to wedge along the Antilles). From this we conclude that 1) both suites differentiate largely by amphibole-plag fractionation, along with contamination by the

  6. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  7. Zircon Recycling in Arc Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Barth, A.; Matzel, J.; Wooden, J.; Burgess, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recycling of zircon has been well established in arc intrusions and arc volcanoes, but a better understanding of where and how zircons are recycled can help illuminate how arc magma systems are constructed. To that end, we are conducting age, trace element (including Ti-in-zircon temperatures; TzrnTi) and isotopic studies of zircons from the Late Cretaceous (95-85 Ma) Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS) in the Sierra Nevada Batholith (CA). Within the TIS zircons inherited from ancient basement sources and/or distinctly older host rocks are uncommon, but recycled zircon antecrysts from earlier periods of TIS-related magmatism are common and conspicuous in the inner and two most voluminous units of the TIS, the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak Granodiorites. All TIS units have low bulk Zr ([Zr]<150 ppm) and thus low calculated zircon saturation temperatures (Tzrnsat). Within the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak, TzrnTi values are predominantly at or below average Tzrnsat, and there is no apparent correlation between age and TzrnTi. At temperatures appropriate for granodiorite/tonalite melt generation (at or above biotite dehydration; >825°C), [Zr] in the TIS is a factor of 2 to 3 lower than saturation values. Low [Zr] in TIS rocks might be attributed to a very limited supply of zircon in the source, by disequilibrium melting and rapid melt extraction [1], by melting reactions involving formation of other phases that can incorporate appreciable Zr [2], or by removal of zircon at an earlier stage of magma evolution. Based on a preliminary compilation of literature data, low [Zr] is common to Late Cretaceous N.A. Cordilleran granodioritic/tonalitic intrusions (typically <200 ppm and frequently 100-150 ppm for individual large intrusions or intrusive suites). We infer from this that [Zr] in anatectic melts is probably not limited by zircon supply and is primarily controlled by melting parameters. Comparison of the data from TIS with one of these intrusions, the smaller but otherwise

  8. Annular arc accelerator shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An annular arc accelerator shock tube employs a cold gas driver to flow a stream of gas from an expansion section through a high voltage electrode section to a test section, thus driving a shock wave in front of it. A glow discharge detects the shock wave and actuates a trigger generator which in turn fires spark-gap switches to discharge a bank of capacitors across a centered cathode and an annular anode in tandem electrode sections. The initial shock wave passes through the anode section from the cathode section thereby depositing energy into the flow gas without the necessity of any diaphragm opening in the gas flow from the expansion section through the electrode sections.

  9. Theoretical analysis of ARC constriction

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, M.L.; Brooks, A.W.; Smith, T.M.

    1980-12-01

    The physics of the thermionic converter is governed by strong electrode-plasma interactions (emissions surface scattering, charge exchange) and weak interactions (diffusion, radiation) at the maximum interelectrode plasma radius. The physical processes are thus mostly convective in thin sheaths in front of the electrodes and mostly diffusive and radiative in the plasma bulk. The physical boundaries are open boundaries to particle transfer (electrons emitted or absorbed by the electrodes, all particles diffusing through some maximum plasma radius) and to convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer. In a first approximation the thermionic converter may be described by a one-dimensional classical transport theory. The two-dimensional effects may be significant as a result of the sheath sensitivity to radial plasma variations and of the strong sheath-plasma coupling. The current-voltage characteristic of the converter is thus the result of an integrated current density over the collector area for which the boundary conditions at each r determine the regime (ignited/unignited) of the local current density. A current redistribution strongly weighted at small radii (arc constriction) limits the converter performance and opens questions on constriction reduction possibilities. The questions addressed are the followng: (1) what are the main contributors to the loss of current at high voltage in the thermionic converter; and (2) is arc constriction observable theoretically and what are the conditions of its occurrence. The resulting theoretical problem is formulated and results are given. The converter electrical current is estimated directly from the electron and ion particle fluxes based on the spatial distribution of the electron/ion density n, temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/, electrical voltage V and on the knowledge of the transport coefficients. (WHK)

  10. Analysis of arc emission spectra of stainless steel electric arc furnace slag affected by fluctuating arc voltage.

    PubMed

    Aula, Matti; Mäkinen, Ari; Fabritius, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Control of chromium oxidation in the electric arc furnace (EAF) is a significant problem in stainless steel production due to variations of the chemical compositions in the EAF charge. One potential method to control chromium oxidation is to analyze the emission spectrum of the electric arc in order to find indicators of rising chromium content in slag. The purpose of this study was to determine if slag composition can be gained by utilizing electric arc emission spectra in the laboratory environment, despite electric arc voltage fluctuations and varying slag composition. The purpose of inducing voltage fluctuation was to simulate changes in the industrial EAF process. The slag samples were obtained from Outokumpu Stainless Oy Tornio Works, and three different arc currents were used. The correlation analysis showed that the emission spectra offer numerous peak ratios with high correlations to the X-ray fluorescence-measured slag CrO(x)/FeO(x) and MnO/SiO2 ratios. These ratios are useful in determining if the reduction agents have been depleted in the EAF. The results suggest that analysis of laboratory-scale electric arc emission spectra is suitable for indicating the high CrO(x) or MnO content of the slag despite the arc fluctuations. Reliable analysis of other slag components was not successful. PMID:24405950

  11. Some experiences from the commissioning program of the SLC arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.; Brown, K.L.; Bulos, F.; Fieguth, T.; Hutton, A.; Murray, J.J.; Toge, N.; Weng, W.T.; Wiedemann, H.

    1987-02-01

    The SLC Arc System is designed to transport beams of electrons and positrons from the end of the SLAC Linac to the beginning of the Final Focus System where they are made to collide head on. To minimize phase space dilution caused by quantum processes in the synchrotron radiation energy loss mechanism, the bending radii are large (279 m) and very high gradient (n = 32824) AG cells are arranged in trains of low dispersion, terrain following achromats. First experiences in operating a system of over 900 magnets, each with beam position monitors and corrector magnet movers, spanning 9000 feet, are described.

  12. Appeals court upholds electric arc furnace dust disposal restrictions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    On July 8, 1994, the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia upheld EPA`s 1991 final rule governing the land disposal of electric arc furnace dust, listed as K061 in the RCRA regulations. The Steel Manufacturers Association (SMA), believing that EPA had acted {open_quotes}arbitrarily and capriciously,{close_quotes} had petitioned for review of this rule. SMA members argued that K061 is reclaimed-not discarded-to recover metals as part of the steel production process; therefore, the petitioners contended that the agency has no right to regulate slag resulting from treatment of K061.

  13. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-01

    By manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, it is possible to arrange for a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy ("heavy-ion fusion"). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly "wobbling" each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. It is found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  14. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-20

    Manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, makes it possible to arrange a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy (“heavy-ion fusion”). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly “wobbling” each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. We also found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  15. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-15

    By manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, it is possible to arrange for a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy ('heavy-ion fusion'). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly 'wobbling' each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. It is found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  16. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-20

    Manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, makes it possible to arrange a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy (“heavy-ion fusion”). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly “wobbling” each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this ismore » sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. We also found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.« less

  17. Propagation of back-arc extension into the arc lithosphere in the southern New Hebrides volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriat, M.; Collot, J.; Danyushevsky, L.; Fabre, M.; Meffre, S.; Falloon, T.; Rouillard, P.; Pelletier, B.; Roach, M.; Fournier, M.

    2015-09-01

    New geophysical data acquired during three expeditions of the R/V Southern Surveyor in the southern part of the North Fiji Basin allow us to characterize the deformation of the upper plate at the southern termination of the New Hebrides subduction zone, where it bends eastward along the Hunter Ridge. Unlike the northern end of the Tonga subduction zone, on the other side of the North Fiji Basin, the 90° bend does not correspond to the transition from a subduction zone to a transform fault, but it is due to the progressive retreat of the New Hebrides trench. The subduction trench retreat is accommodated in the upper plate by the migration toward the southwest of the New Hebrides arc and toward the south of the Hunter Ridge, so that the direction of convergence remains everywhere orthogonal to the trench. In the back-arc domain, the active deformation is characterized by propagation of the back-arc spreading ridge into the Hunter volcanic arc. The N-S spreading axis propagates southward and penetrates in the arc, where it connects to a sinistral strike-slip zone via an oblique rift. The collision of the Loyalty Ridge with the New Hebrides arc, less than two million years ago, likely initiated this deformation pattern and the fragmentation of the upper plate. In this particular geodynamic setting, with an oceanic lithosphere subducting beneath a highly sheared volcanic arc, a wide range of primitive subduction-related magmas has been produced including adakites, island arc tholeiites, back-arc basin basalts, and medium-K subduction-related lavas.

  18. High-temperature superconducting radiofrequency probe for magnetic resonance imaging applications operated below ambient pressure in a simple liquid-nitrogen cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Simon; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Darrasse, Luc

    2013-05-01

    The present work investigates the joined effects of temperature and static magnetic field on the electrical properties of a 64 MHz planar high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, in order to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications with a moderate decrease of the HTS coil temperature (THTS). Temperature control is provided with accuracy better than 0.1 K from 80 to 66 K by regulating the pressure of the liquid nitrogen bath of a dedicated cryostat. The actual temperature of the HTS coil is obtained using a straightforward wireless method that eliminates the risks of coupling electromagnetic interference to the HTS coil and of disturbing the static magnetic field by DC currents near the region of interest. The resonance frequency ( f0) and the quality factor (Q) of the HTS coil are measured as a function of temperature in the 0-4.7 T field range with parallel and orthogonal orientations relative to the coil plane. The intrinsic HTS coil sensitivity and the detuning effect are then analyzed from the Q and f0 data. In the presence of the static magnetic field, the initial value of f0 in Earth's field could be entirely recovered by decreasing THTS, except for the orthogonal orientation above 1 T. The improvement of Q by lowering THTS was substantial. From 80 to 66 K, Q was multiplied by a factor of 6 at 1.5 T in orthogonal orientation. In parallel orientation, the maximum measured improvement of Q from 80 K to 66 K was a factor of 2. From 80 to 66 K, the improvement of the RF sensitivity relative to the initial value at the Earth's field and ambient pressure was up to 4.4 dB in parallel orientation. It was even more important in orthogonal orientation and continued to increase, up to 8.4 dB, at the maximum explored field of 1.5 T. Assuming that the noise contributions from the RF receiver are negligible, the SNR improvement using enhanced HTS coil cooling in NMR experiments was extracted from Q measurements either

  19. Superconducting final focus for the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ash, W.W.; Barrera, F.; Burgess, W.; Cook, K.; Cutler, H.; Ferrie, J.; Petersen, H.; Sawyer, D.; Rinta, R.

    1992-05-01

    Triplets composed of superconducting quadrupoles have been built and installed as the final focusing element for the high-energy positron and electron beams of the SLAC Linear Collider. Special features include independent alignment to 100-micron tolerance inside a common cryostat; non-magnetic materials to allow operation inside the detector`s solenoid field; a continuous-flow helium-only system using 50-meter-long flexible transfer lines; and complete operation of the system before installation. The mechanical design and cryogenic operation experience are presented.

  20. Superconducting final focus for the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ash, W.W.; Barrera, F.; Burgess, W.; Cook, K.; Cutler, H.; Ferrie, J.; Petersen, H.; Sawyer, D.; Rinta, R.

    1992-05-01

    Triplets composed of superconducting quadrupoles have been built and installed as the final focusing element for the high-energy positron and electron beams of the SLAC Linear Collider. Special features include independent alignment to 100-micron tolerance inside a common cryostat; non-magnetic materials to allow operation inside the detector's solenoid field; a continuous-flow helium-only system using 50-meter-long flexible transfer lines; and complete operation of the system before installation. The mechanical design and cryogenic operation experience are presented.

  1. Final Acceptance Tests of Helium Refrigerator for Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhard, C. P.; Nagel, M.; Raatz, S.; Nuesslein, U.; Ressel, M.

    Following successful installation and commissioning, final acceptance tests were carried out on the helium refrigerator for Wendelstein 7-X.The tests were carried out for the normal operating modes i.e. peak power mode (3.4 K), standard mode(3.9 K), short standby mode (< 10 K) and long standby mode (< 100 K).Besides the normal modes, the transient modes including, cool-down and warm-up, auto interchanging between various modes and the purging modes were tested.In addition, the handling of quench, emergency signals such as cryostat vacuum break,utility failure, alarm and trip signals were checked.

  2. Oroclinal bending and evidence against the Pangea megashear: The Cantabria-Asturias arc (northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Arlo B.; van der Voo, Rob; van der Pluijm, Ben A.

    2001-11-01

    The Cantabria-Asturias arc of southwestern Europe is a highly curved Variscan belt that formed along the ancient plate boundary between Gondwana and Laurussia during the assembly of Pangea. New paleomagnetic data from 59 sites in the southern limb of the arc were combined with previously published data from 109 sites to determine the evolution of the arc. A previously unrecognized postrotation magnetization is found in the southern limb, refuting earlier models of arc formation that concluded secondary rotation of only 50% of present-day arc curvature. The new data show that the arc underwent true (100%) oroclinal bending of an originally linear belt in a two-stage tectonic history. This history represents two regional compression phases: (1) east-west in the late Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian) and (2) north-south in the Permian (both in present-day coordinates). The north-south compression phase coincides with the northward movement of Gondwana and its final collision with Laurussia. This tectonic scenario argues against an indentor scenario, and does not support a 3500 km dextral megashear proposed in earlier reconstructions.

  3. New Hydrogen Cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Tomohiro; Newman, Bonna; Johnson, Cort; Steinberger, Julia; vant, Kendra; Matos, Lia; Yi, Peng; Willmann, Lorenz; Kleppner, Daniel; Greytak, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    We are setting up a new dilution refrigerator for ultracold hydrogen experiments. The aims of the new fridge can be summerized as following: having more optical access, improving solid angle to a detector, having larger and colder condensate, and trapping Deuterium too. As the first step, we are implementing Anti-Helmholtz loading and ^3He buffer-gas cooling. To enhance H cooling, we are introducing other species such as Li, Na. After trapping atoms in the Anti-Helmholtz field, we transfer atoms to quadrupole field. We are planning to investigate the Li-H scattering lengths, H cooling process by Li, ultracold Li-H mixture, also trapped D and Li-D mixture in the quadrupole field. If time allows me to do, I would like to mention the sencond stage of the new fridge and H experiments.

  4. TU-C-17A-07: FusionARC Treatment with Adaptive Beam Selection Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H; Li, R; Xing, L; Lee, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recently, a new treatment scheme, FusionARC, has been introduced to compensate for the pitfalls in single-arc VMAT planning. It basically allows for the static field treatment in selected locations, while the remaining is treated by single-rotational arc delivery. The important issue is how to choose the directions for static field treatment. This study presents an adaptive beam selection method to formulate fusionARC treatment scheme. Methods: The optimal plan for single-rotational arc treatment is obtained from two-step approach based on the reweighted total-variation (TV) minimization. To choose the directions for static field treatment with extra segments, a value of our proposed cost function at each field is computed on the new fluence-map, which adds an extra segment to the designated field location only. The cost function is defined as a summation of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of all structures with the fluence-map, while assuming that the lower cost function value implies the enhancement of plan quality. Finally, the extra segments for static field treatment would be added to the selected directions with low cost function values. A prostate patient data was applied and evaluated with three different plans: conventional VMAT, fusionARC, and static IMRT. Results: The 7 field locations, corresponding to the lowest cost function values, are chosen to insert extra segment for step-and-shoot dose delivery. Our proposed fusionARC plan with the selected angles improves the dose sparing to the critical organs, relative to static IMRT and conventional VMAT plans. The dose conformity to the target is significantly enhanced at the small expense of treatment time, compared with VMAT plan. Its estimated treatment time, however, is still much faster than IMRT. Conclusion: The fusionARC treatment with adaptive beam selection method could improve the plan quality with insignificant damage in the treatment time, relative to the conventional VMAT.

  5. Corrigendum to 'The global relevance of the Scotia Arc: An introduction'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Andrés; Dalziel, Ian W. D.; Leat, Philip T.

    2015-10-01

    The authors and the journal regret that the printed version of the above article was not included in the special issue "SCOTIA ARC EVOLUTION: GLOBAL IMPLICATIONS". The correct and final version follows. The authors would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused.

  6. Towards a theory for Neptune's arc rings

    SciTech Connect

    Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.; Borderies, N.

    1986-08-01

    It is proposed that the incomplete rings of Neptune consist of a number of short arcs centered on the corotation resonances of a single satellite. The satellite must have a radius of the order of 100 km or more and move on an inclined orbit. Corotation resonances are located at potential maxima. Thus, mechanical energy dissipated by interparticle collisions must be continually replenished to prevent the arcs from spreading. It is shown that each corotation resonance is associated with a nearby Lindblad resonance, which excites the ring particles' orbital eccentricity, thus supplying the energy required to maintain the arc. The ultimate energy reservoir is the satellite's orbital energy. Therefore, interaction with the arcs damps the satellite's orbital inclination. The self-gravity of the arcs limits their contraction and enforces a relation between arc length and mass. The estimated arc masses are so small, of the order of 10 to the 16th g, that the satellite's orbital inclination suffers negligible decay over the age of the solar system. The inferred surface mass densities are comparable to those found in the major rings of Saturn and Uranus. 15 references.

  7. Initial development of the Banda Volcanic Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Hartono, H.M.S. )

    1990-06-01

    The initial development of the Banda Volcanic Arc can be determined by obtaining absolute ages of granites or volcanics, stratigraphy of the Eocene Metan Volcanics of Timor as the oldest formation containing Banda Volcanic Arc extrusives, and tectonic analysis. Banda Arc volcanism is the result of subduction of oceanic crust under the volcanic arc. The time of initial subduction is related to initial seafloor spreading between Australia and Antarctica, which is identical to geomagnetic polarity time 34 (82 mybp). Therefore, 82 mybp can be used as one of the criteria to determine the birth of the Banda Volcanic Arc. With present available time data for determining the birth of the Banda Volcanic Arc, the minimum age coincides with the age of the Metan Volcanics (Eocene, 39-56 mybp) and the maximum age coincides with initial seafloor spreading between Australia and Antarctica (82 mybp). This time span is too long. With the assumption that it needs some time to develop from transcurrent faulting to subduction and volcanism, it is proposed that the initial development of Banda Arc volcanism was during early Tertiary.

  8. Crustal recycling and the aleutian arc

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, R.W.; Kay, S.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Two types of crustal recycling transfer continental crust back into its mantle source. The first of these, upper crustal recycling, involves elements that have been fractionated by the hydrosphere-sediment system, and are subducted as a part of the oceanic crust. The subduction process (S-process) then fractionates these elements, and those not removed at shallow tectonic levels and as excess components of arc magmas are returned to the mantle. Newly determined trace element composition of Pacific oceanic sedimants are variable and mixing is necessary during the S-process, if sediment is to provide excess element in the ratios observed in Aleutian arc magmas. Only a small fraction of the total sediment subducted at the Aleutian trench is required to furnish the excess elements in Aleutian arc magmas. Ba and {sub 10}Be data indicate that this small fraction includes a contribution from the youngest subducted sediment. The second type of recycling, lower crustal recycling, involves crystal cumulates of both arc and oceanic crustal origin, and residues from crustal melting within arc crust. Unlike the silicic sediments, recycled lower crust is mafic to ultramafic in composition. Trace element analyses of xenoliths representing Aleutian arc lower crust are presented. Recycling by delamination of lower crust and attached mantle lithosphere may occur following basalt eclogite phase transformations that are facilitated by terrane suturing events that weld oceanic island arcs to the continents. The relative importance of upper and lower crustal recycling exerts a primary control on continental crustal composition.

  9. Contribution For Arc Temperature Affected By Current Increment Ratio At Peak Current In Pulsed Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Ryota; Mitubori, Hironori; Iwao, Toru

    2015-11-01

    Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding is one of the high quality welding. However, parameters of the pulsed arc welding are many and complicated. if the welding parameters are not appropriate, the welding pool shape becomes wide and shallow.the convection of driving force contributes to the welding pool shape. However, in the case of changing current waveform as the pulse high frequency TIG welding, the arc temperature does not follow the change of the current. Other result of the calculation, in particular, the arc temperature at the reaching time of peak current is based on these considerations. Thus, the accurate measurement of the temperature at the time is required. Therefore, the objective of this research is the elucidation of contribution for arc temperature affected by current increment ratio at peak current in pulsed arc. It should obtain a detail knowledge of the welding model in pulsed arc. The temperature in the case of increment of the peak current from the base current is measured by using spectroscopy. As a result, when the arc current increases from 100 A to 150 A at 120 ms, the transient response of the temperature didn't occur during increasing current. Thus, during the current rise, it has been verified by measuring. Therefore, the contribution for arc temperature affected by current increment ratio at peak current in pulsed arc was elucidated in order to obtain more knowledge of welding model of pulsed arc.

  10. Helical Tomotherapy Versus Single-Arc Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy: A Collaborative Dosimetric Comparison Between Two Institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Yi; Tang, Grace; Welsh, James S.; Mohiuddin, Majid M.; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Yu, Cedric X.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Both helical tomotherapy (HT) and single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) deliver radiation using rotational beams with multileaf collimators. We report a dual-institution study comparing dosimetric aspects of these two modalities. Methods and Materials: Eight patients each were selected from the University of Maryland (UMM) and the University of Wisconsin Cancer Center Riverview (UWR), for a total of 16 cases. Four cancer sites including brain, head and neck (HN), lung, and prostate were selected. Single-arc IMAT plans were generated at UMM using Varian RapidArc (RA), and HT plans were generated at UWR using Hi-Art II TomoTherapy. All 16 cases were planned based on the identical anatomic contours, prescriptions, and planning objectives. All plans were swapped for analysis at the same time after final approval. Dose indices for targets and critical organs were compared based on dose-volume histograms, the beam-on time, monitor units, and estimated leakage dose. After the disclosure of comparison results, replanning was done for both techniques to minimize diversity in optimization focus from different operators. Results: For the 16 cases compared, the average beam-on time was 1.4 minutes for RA and 4.8 minutes for HT plans. HT provided better target dose homogeneity (7.6% for RA and 4.2% for HT) with a lower maximum dose (110% for RA and 105% for HT). Dose conformation numbers were comparable, with RA being superior to HT (0.67 vs. 0.60). The doses to normal tissues using these two techniques were comparable, with HT showing lower doses for more critical structures. After planning comparison results were exchanged, both techniques demonstrated improvements in dose distributions or treatment delivery times. Conclusions: Both techniques created highly conformal plans that met or exceeded the planning goals. The delivery time and total monitor units were lower in RA than in HT plans, whereas HT provided higher target dose uniformity.

  11. Sensoring fusion data from the optic and acoustic emissions of electric arcs in the GMAW-S process for welding quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Sadek Crisóstomo Absi; Cayo, Eber Huanca

    2012-01-01

    The present study shows the relationship between welding quality and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arcs, during welding runs, in the GMAW-S process. Bead on plate welding tests was carried out with pre-set parameters chosen from manufacturing standards. During the welding runs interferences were induced on the welding path using paint, grease or gas faults. In each welding run arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emission values were acquired and parameters such as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate computed. Data fusion algorithms were developed by assessing known welding quality parameters from arc emissions. These algorithms have showed better responses when they are based on more than just one sensor. Finally, it was concluded that there is a close relation between arc emissions and quality in welding and it can be measured from arc emissions sensing and data fusion algorithms. PMID:22969330

  12. Sensoring Fusion Data from the Optic and Acoustic Emissions of Electric Arcs in the GMAW-S Process for Welding Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, Sadek Crisóstomo Absi; Cayo, Eber Huanca

    2012-01-01

    The present study shows the relationship between welding quality and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arcs, during welding runs, in the GMAW-S process. Bead on plate welding tests was carried out with pre-set parameters chosen from manufacturing standards. During the welding runs interferences were induced on the welding path using paint, grease or gas faults. In each welding run arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emission values were acquired and parameters such as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate computed. Data fusion algorithms were developed by assessing known welding quality parameters from arc emissions. These algorithms have showed better responses when they are based on more than just one sensor. Finally, it was concluded that there is a close relation between arc emissions and quality in welding and it can be measured from arc emissions sensing and data fusion algorithms. PMID:22969330

  13. Reconstruction of Late Cretaceous Magmatic Arcs in the Northern Andes: Single Versus Multiple Arc Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Leon, S.; Hincapie, S.; Mejia, D.; Patino, A. M.; Vanegas, J.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.; Jimenez, G.; Monsalve, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although magmatic rocks are major tracers of the geological evolution of convergent margins, pre-collisional events such as subduction erosion, collisional thrusting or late collisional strike slip segmentation may difficult the recognizing of multiple arc systems and therefore the existence of paleogeographic scenarios with multiple subduction systems. New field, U-Pb geochronology and whole rock geochemistry constraints from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera in the states of Antioquia and Caldas (Colombia) are used to understand the nature of the Late Cretaceous arc magmatism and evaluate the existence of single or multiple Pacific and Caribbean arc systems in the growth of the Northwestern Andes. The new results integrated with additional field and published information is used to suggest the existence of at least three different magmatic arcs. (1) An Eastern Continental arc built within a well defined Permian to Triassic continental crust that record a protracted 90-70 Ma magmatic evolution, (2) a 90-80 arc formed within attenuated continental crust and associated oceanic crust, (3) 90-88 Ma arc formed over a Late Cretaceous plateau crust. The eastern arcs were formed as part of double eastern vergent subduction system, where the most outboard arc represent a fringing arc formed over detached fragments of continental crust, whereas the easternmost continental arc growth by the closure an subduction of and older and broad Triassic to Early Jurassic back-arc ocean. Its closure also end up in ophiolite emplacement. The third allochtonous oceanic arc was formed over the Caribbean plateau crust and was accreted to the continental margin in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing paleomagnetic, deformational, gravimetric and basin analysis will be integrate to test this model and understand the complex Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes.

  14. Melting Efficiency During Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, J.C.; Evans, D. M.; Tang, W.; Nunes, A. C.

    1999-01-01

    A series of partial penetration Variable Polarity Plasma Arc welds were made at equal power but various combinations of current and voltage on 2219 aluminum. Arc Efficiency was measured calorimetrically and ranged between 48% and 66%. Melting efficiency depends on the weld pool shape. Increased current increases the melting efficiency as it increases the depth to width ratio of the weld pool. Higher currents are thought to raise arc pressure and depress the liquid at the bottom of the weld pool causing a more nearly two dimensional heat flow condition.

  15. Formation of the G-ring arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, N. C. S.; Vieira Neto, E.; Foryta, D. W.

    2016-05-01

    Since 2004, the images obtained by Cassini spacecraft's on-board cameras have revealed the existence of several small satellites in the Saturn system. Some of these small satellites are embedded in arcs of particles. While these satellites and their arcs are known to be in corotation resonances with Mimas, their origin remains unknown. This work investigates one possible process for capturing bodies into a corotation resonance, which involves raising the eccentricity of a perturbing body. Therefore, through numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show a scenario that the excitation of Mimas' eccentricity could capture particles in a corotation resonance and given a possible explanation for the origin for the arcs.

  16. Modeling Multi-Arc Spraying Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.

    2016-04-01

    The use of plasma as energy source in thermal spraying enables among others the processing of feed stock materials with very high melting temperatures as coating materials. New generation multi-arc plasma spraying systems are widely spread and promise several advantages in comparison to the conventional single-arc systems. Numerical modeling of multi-arc plasma spraying offers the possibility to increase the understanding about this process. This study focuses on the numerical modeling of three-cathode spraying systems, introducing the recent activities in this field and discussing the numerical aspects which influence the prediction power of the models.

  17. Modeling Multi-Arc Spraying Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.

    2016-06-01

    The use of plasma as energy source in thermal spraying enables among others the processing of feed stock materials with very high melting temperatures as coating materials. New generation multi-arc plasma spraying systems are widely spread and promise several advantages in comparison to the conventional single-arc systems. Numerical modeling of multi-arc plasma spraying offers the possibility to increase the understanding about this process. This study focuses on the numerical modeling of three-cathode spraying systems, introducing the recent activities in this field and discussing the numerical aspects which influence the prediction power of the models.

  18. Electrical Arc Ignition Testing for Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Kyle; Gallus, Timothy; Smith, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Materials and Processes Branch requested that NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) perform testing for the Constellation Program to evaluate the hazard of electrical arc ignition of materials that could be in close proximity to batteries. Specifically, WSTF was requested to perform wire-break electrical arc tests to determine the current threshold for ignition of generic cotton woven fabric samples with a fixed voltage of 3.7 V, a common voltage for hand-held electrical devices. The wire-break test was developed during a previous test program to evaluate the hazard of electrical arc ignition inside the Extravehicular Mobility Unit [1].

  19. The Global Array of Primitve Arc Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. W.; Jagoutz, O. E.

    2015-12-01

    A longstanding question concerns the nature of the melts forming in the subarc mantle and giving rise to arc magmatism. The global array of primitive arc melts (1180 volcanic rocks in 25 arcs extracted from the georoc database, calculated to be in equilibrium with mantle olivine) yields five principal melt types: calc-alkaline basalts and high-Mg andesites, tholeiitic basalts and high-Mg andesites, and shoshonitic or alkaline arc melts; many arcs have more than one type. Primitive calc-alkaline basalts occur in 11 arcs but most strikingly, 8 continental arcs (incl. Aleutians, Cascades, Japan, Mexico, Kamtschatka) have a continuous range of calc-alkaline basalts to high-Mg andesites with mostly 48-58 wt% SiO2. In each arc, these are spatially congruent, trace element patterns overlap, and major elements form a continuum. Their Ca-Mg-Si systematics suggests saturation in olivine+opx+cpx. We hence interpret the large majority of high-Mg andesites as derived from primitive calc-alkaline basalts through fractionation and reaction in the shallower mantle. Removal of anhydrous mantle phases at lower pressures increases SiO2 and H2O-contents while Mg# and Ni remain buffered to mantle values. Primitive tholeiitic basalts (Cascades, Kermadec, Marianas, Izu-Bonin, Japan, Palau, Sunda) have a much lesser subduction signal (e.g. in LILE) than the calc-alkaline suite. These tholeiites have been interpreted to form through decompression melting, but also characterize young intraoceanic arcs. In the two continental arcs with both tholeiitic and calc-alkaline primitive basalts (clearly distinct in trace patterns), there is no clear spatial segregation (Casacades, Japan). Three intraoceanic arcs (Marianas, Izu-Bonin, Tonga) have primitive tholeiitic, highly depleted high-Mg andesites (boninites) with HFSE and HREE slightly above primitive mantle values. These deviate in majors from the array formed by the basalts and calc-alkaline andesites suggesting that only these formed from a

  20. Metal vapor arc switch electromagnetic accelerator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mongeau, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A multielectrode device housed in an insulator vacuum vessel, the metal vapor vacuum switch has high power capability and can hold off voltages up to the 100 kilovolt level. Such switches can be electronically triggered and can interrupt or commutate at a zero current crossing. The physics of arc initiation, arc conduction, and interruption are examined, including material considerations; inefficiencies; arc modes; magnetic field effects; passive and forced extinction; and voltage recovery. Heating, electrode lifetime, device configuration, and external circuit configuration are discussed. The metal vapor vacuum switch is compared with SCRs, GTOs, spark gaps, ignitrons, and mechanical breakers.

  1. Formation of the G-ring arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, N. C. S.; Vieira Neto, E.; Foryta, D. W.

    2016-09-01

    Since 2004, the images obtained by the Cassini spacecraft's on-board cameras have revealed the existence of several small satellites in the Saturn system. Some of these small satellites are embedded in arcs of particles. While these satellites and their arcs are known to be in corotation resonances with Mimas, their origin remains unknown. This work investigates one possible process for capturing bodies into a corotation resonance, which involves increasing the eccentricity of a perturbing body. Therefore, through numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show a scenario in which the excitation of Mimas's eccentricity could capture particles in a corotation resonance. This is a possible explanation for the origin of the arcs.

  2. The ring arcs of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    After the corotation resonance with an exterior satellite proved inapplicable to the Neptune ring arc confinement, a search for other mechanisms settled on the possible influence of Neptune's magnetic field. The areas of greater optical depth around the ring are much dustier than the low optical depth regions. These particles reside in a plasma; therefore, they must carry some charge. The components of Neptune's magnetic field on the equator at the radius of the ring arcs as a function of Neptunian longitude are shown. The components are those of an offset tilted dipole model. Although the dipole model is probably not a good approximation so close to the planet, the magnitude of the field that is given is probably close to the actual value. The possible importance of the magnetic field on the smallest particles in the ring is indicated by the ratio of the magnetic field on the smallest particles in the ring is indicated by the ratio of the magnetic force to the central gravitation attraction with the field strength of B = 0.01 gauss at the ring distance. A preferred position in the orbit for magnetically perturbed particles seems to require a commensurability between the rotation of the planet and the motion of the particle in the orbit. The period of rotation is assumed to be that of the radio bursts at 16.11 hours. However, without a model for the radio emission, one cannot be absolutely sure. Jupiter's decametric radiation depends on Io's orbital position as well as the rotation, so a synodic periodicity might be appropriate. But the latter radiation is highly directed, whereas Neptune's was seen all along the spacecraft trajectory on the 16.11 hour schedule, i.e., with no shifts in phase relative to a fixed longitude on the planet. The ring orbital period is 10.536 hours which is not commensurate with the rotation period. If the 16.11 hours is interpreted as a synodic period between the rotation and a satellite motion, the closest rotation periods to 16 hours

  3. Study on Seismic Zoning of Sino-Mongolia Arc Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.

    2015-12-01

    According to the agreement of Cooperation on seismic zoning between Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration and Research Center of Astronomy and Geophysics, Mongolian Academy of Science, the data of geotectonics, active faults, seismicity and geophysical field were collected and analyzed, then field investigation proceeded for Bolnay Faults, Ar Hutul Faults and Gobi Altay Faults, and a uniform earthquake catalogue of Mongolia and North China were established for the seismic hazard study in Sino-Mongolia arc areas. Furthermore the active faults and epicenters were mapped and 2 seismic belts and their 54 potential seismic sources are determined. Based on the data and results above mentioned the seismicity parameters for the two seismic belts and their potential sources were studied. Finally, the seismic zoning with different probability in Sino-Mongolia arc areas was carried out using China probabilistic hazard analysis method. By analyzing the data and results, we draw the following main conclusions. Firstly, the origin of tectonic stress field in the study areas is the collision and pressure of the India Plate to Eurasian Plate, passing from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. This is the reason why the seismicity is higher in the west than in the east, and all of earthquakes with magnitude 8 or greater occurred in the west. Secondly, the determination of the 2 arc seismic belts, Altay seismic belt and Bolnay-Baikal seismic belt, are reasonable in terms of their geotectonic location, geodynamic origin and seismicity characteristics. Finally, there are some differences between our results and the Mongolia Intensity Zoning map published in 1985 in terms of shape of seismic zoning map, especially in the areas near Ulaanbaatar. We argue that our relsults are reasonable if we take into account the data use of recent study of active faults and their parameters, so it can be used as a reference for seismic design.

  4. Vacuum arc plasma mass separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paperny, V. L.; Krasov, V. I.; Lebedev, N. V.; Astrakchantsev, N. V.; Chernikch, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    The propagation of a metal plasma flow in a transport system with a curvilinear magnetic field was studied experimentally. The flow was generated by a pulsed vacuum arc discharge with a composite (W+Fe) cathode. The ion energy measurements at the transport system output showed that all ion components were accelerated up to equal energies per charge unit, about 150 eV and 320 eV in the outer and inner areas of the curved plasma flow, respectively. The spatial separation of the atoms of the cathode material was measured at the system output by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The ions of the lighter element (Fe) were concentrated in the inner part of the cathodic plasma flow deflected by the magnetic field while the distribution of the heavy element (W) was substantially shifted toward the outer area of the flow. The maximum mass separation efficiency reached 45, the effective value being 7.7. Such a system is promising for use in plasma technology for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel, namely for the separation of the heavy radioactive fission product from nuclear waste.

  5. Lifespans of Cascade Arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Compiled argon ages reveal inception, eruptive episodes, ages, and durations of Cascade stratovolcanoes and their ancestral predecessors. Geologic mapping and geochronology show that most Cascade volcanoes grew episodically on multiple scales with periods of elevated behavior lasting hundreds of years to ca. 100 kyr. Notable examples include the paleomag-constrained, few-hundred-year-long building of the entire 15-20 km3 Shastina edifice at Mt. Shasta, the 100 kyr-long episode that produced half of Mt. Rainier's output, and the 30 kyr-long episode responsible for all of South and Middle Sister. Despite significant differences in timing and rates of construction, total durations of active and ancestral volcanoes at discrete central-vent locations are similar. Glacier Peak, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Adams, Mt. Hood, and Mt. Mazama all have inception ages of 400-600 ka. Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Jefferson, Newberry Volcano, Mt. Shasta and Lassen Domefield have more recent inception ages of 200-300 ka. Only the Sisters cluster and Mt. Baker have established eruptive histories spanning less than 50 kyr. Ancestral volcanoes centered 5-20 km from active stratocones appear to have similar total durations (200-600 kyr), but are less well exposed and dated. The underlying mechanisms governing volcano lifecycles are cryptic, presumably involving tectonic and plumbing changes and perhaps circulation cycles in the mantle wedge, but are remarkably consistent along the arc.

  6. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, G.; Cameron, D.; Ellert, M.; Kleist, J.; Taga, A.

    2008-07-01

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and managed by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed among heterogeneous resources in several countries and yet must present a single access point for all data stored within the centre. The middleware framework used in NDGF differs significantly from other Grids, specifically in the way that all data movement and registration is performed by services outside the worker node environment. Also, the service used for cataloging the location of data files is different from other Grids but must still be useable by DQ2 and ATLAS users to locate data within NDGF. This paper presents in detail how we solve these issues to allow seamless access worldwide to data within NDGF.

  7. Stretched arc discharge in produced water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y I; Wright, K C; Kim, H S; Cho, D J; Rabinovich, A; Fridman, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost. PMID:25638080

  8. Laboratory arc furnace features interchangeable hearths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. L.; Kruger, O. L.

    1967-01-01

    Laboratory arc furnace using rapidly interchangeable hearths gains considerable versatility in casting so that buttons or special shaped castings can be produced. It features a sight glass for observation.

  9. Magneto-plasma-dynamic arc thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, J. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The performance of a magnetoplasmadynamic arc thruster, in the 600 to 2,100 seconds specific impulse range, was improved by locating its cathode in the exhaust beam downstream of the anode and main propellant injection point.

  10. ARC syndrome: an expanding range of phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Eastham, K; McKiernan, P; Milford, D; Ramani, P; Wyllie, J; van't, H; Lynch, S; Morris, A

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To describe the clinical phenotype in infants with ARC syndrome, the association of arthrogryposis, renal tubular acidosis, and cholestasis.
METHODS—The medical records for six patients with ARC syndrome were reviewed, presenting over 10 years to three paediatric referral centres.
RESULTS—All patients had the typical pattern of arthrogryposis. Renal Fanconi syndrome was present in all but one patient, who presented with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Although all patients had severe cholestasis, serum γ glutamyltransferase values were normal. Many of our patients showed dysmorphic features or ichthyosis. All had recurrent febrile illnesses, diarrhoea, and failed to thrive. Blood films revealed abnormally large platelets.
CONCLUSIONS—ARC syndrome exhibits notable clinical variability and may not be as rare as previously thought. The association of Fanconi syndrome, ichthyosis, dysmorphism, jaundice, and diarrhoea has previously been reported as a separate syndrome: our observations indicate that it is part of the ARC spectrum.

 PMID:11668108

  11. Stretched arc discharge in produced water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Wright, K. C.; Kim, H. S.; Cho, D. J.; Rabinovich, A.; Fridman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost.

  12. Arc voltage measurements of the hyperbaric MIG process

    SciTech Connect

    Huismann, G.; Hoffmeister, H.

    1996-12-01

    As a vital part of the MIG process, the arc controls the stability of the process, the melting of the filler wire and the base material. In order to control and describe the arc behavior, it is necessary to know the voltage- current- arc length relations, or the arc characteristics. Knowledge of arc characteristics is necessary for control of the MIG process and further automation of welding systems, in particular, at hyperbaric welding. In literature, information on arc characteristics for hyperbaric open arc pulsed process is not available so far. Therefore, in the present work, arc characteristics were measured for a pressure range of 1 to 16 bar. In measuring arc voltages and arc lengths of MIG arcs, specific problems are encountered as compared to TIG arcs where the distance between the electrode and work piece can be taken as the arc length and the ohmic voltage drop in the tungsten electrode is low. The movement of the electrode in the MIG process and the deformation of the molten wire end together with weld pool fluctuations are providing a complex system. For determining the arc characteristics certain simplifications are thus required which have been applied in this work. This paper presents a new concept on measuring arc lengths and voltages in the open MIG arc.

  13. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  14. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  15. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  16. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  17. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  18. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  19. Arc distribution during the vacuum arc remelting of Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Woodside, Charles Rigel; King, Paul E.; Nordlund, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Currently, the temporal distribution of electric arcs across the ingot during vacuum arc remelting (VAR) is not a known or monitored process parameter. Previous studies indicate that the distribution of arcs can be neither diffuse nor axisymmetric about the center of the furnace. Correct accounting for the heat flux, electric current flux, and mass flux into the ingot is critical to achieving realistic solidification models of the VAR process. The National Energy Technology Laboratory has developed an arc position measurement system capable of locating arcs and determining the arc distribution within an industrial VAR furnace. The system is based on noninvasive magnetic field measurements and a VAR specific form of the Biot–Savart law. The system was installed on a coaxial industrial VAR furnace at ATI Albany Operations in Albany, OR. This article reports on the different arc distributions observed during production of Ti-6Al-4V. It is shown that several characteristic arc distribution modes can develop. This behavior is not apparent in the existing signals used to control the furnace, indicating the measurement system is providing new information. It is also shown that the different arc distribution modes observed may impact local solidification times, particularly at the side wall.

  20. Sensitivity of collapsed arc QA method for delivery errors in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Tony; Xing, Aitang; Vial, Philp; Thwaites, David; Holloway, Lois; Arumugam, Sankar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the sensitivity of an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to detecting introduced Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) treatment errors was studied using the Collapsed Arc method. Two clinical Head and Neck (H&N) and Prostate treatment plans had gantry dependent dose and MLC errors introduced to the plans. These plans were then delivered to an Elekta Synergy Linear Accelerator EPID and compared to the original treatment planning system Collapsed Arc dose matrix. With the Collapsed Arc technique the EPID was able to detect MLC errors down to 2mm and dose errors of down to 3% depending on the treatment plan complexity and gamma tolerance used.

  1. Arc Distribution During the Vacuum Arc Remelting of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodside, C. Rigel; King, Paul E.; Nordlund, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Currently, the temporal distribution of electric arcs across the ingot during vacuum arc remelting (VAR) is not a known or monitored process parameter. Previous studies indicate that the distribution of arcs can be neither diffuse nor axisymmetric about the center of the furnace. Correct accounting for the heat flux, electric current flux, and mass flux into the ingot is critical to achieving realistic solidification models of the VAR process. The National Energy Technology Laboratory has developed an arc position measurement system capable of locating arcs and determining the arc distribution within an industrial VAR furnace. The system is based on noninvasive magnetic field measurements and a VAR specific form of the Biot-Savart law. The system was installed on a coaxial industrial VAR furnace at ATI Albany Operations in Albany, OR. This article reports on the different arc distributions observed during production of Ti-6Al-4V. It is shown that several characteristic arc distribution modes can develop. This behavior is not apparent in the existing signals used to control the furnace, indicating the measurement system is providing new information. It is also shown that the different arc distribution modes observed may impact local solidification times, particularly at the side wall.

  2. Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Monika C.; Leidecker, Henning W.

    2010-01-01

    The Tin Whisker Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool has been designed to evaluate the risk of metal vapor arcing and to help facilitate a decision toward a researched risk disposition. Users can evaluate a system without having to open up the hardware. This process allows for investigating components at risk rather than spending time and money analyzing every component. The tool points to a risk level and provides direction for appropriate action and documentation.

  3. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding Tanks Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, G.; Tsibulskiy, I.; Kuznetsov, M.; Akhmetov, A.; Klimova-Korsmik, O.

    2016-04-01

    The results investigate hybrid laser-arc welding of high strength steels using design responsible metallic construction and the highest strength body of vehicles. Welds from modern high strength steels grade Hardox 400, Hardox 450, Armox 600T and AB were created. High power fiber laser LS-15 with output 15 kW and arc rectifier VDU - 1500 DC were used in the experiment. Results of the metallographic research and mechanical tests are presented.

  4. 1981N1 - A Neptune arc?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    An object in the vicinity of Neptune detected in 1981 by simultaneous stellar occultation measurements at observatories near Tucson, Arizona, was interpreted as a new Neptune satellite. A reinterpretation suggests that it may have instead been a Neptune arc similar to one observed in 1984. The 1981 object, however, did not occult the star during simultaneous observations at Flagstaff, Arizona. This result constrains possible arc geometries.

  5. Structure of an energetic narrow discrete arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, J. P.; Carlson, C. W.; Boehm, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    Particle distributions, waves, dc electric fields, and magnetic fields were measured by two sounding rockets at altitudes of 950 and 430 km through an energetic (greater than 5 keV) narrow (about 10 km) stable discrete arc. Although the payloads' magnetic footprints were separated by only 50 km, differences in the arc's structure were observed including the spatial width, peak energy, and characteristic spectra. The energetic electron precipitation included both slowly varying isotropic fluxes that formed an inverted-V energy-time signature and rapidly varying field-aligned fluxes at or below the isotropic spectral peak. The isotropic precipitation had a flux discontinuity inside the arc indicating the arc was present on a boundary between two different magnetospheric plasmas. Dispersive and nondispersive bursts of field-aligned electrons were measured throughout the arc, appearing over broad energy ranges or as monoenergetic beams. Dispersive bursts gave variable source distances less than 8000 km. Plateauing of some of the most intense bursts suggests that waves stabilized these electrons. During the lower altitude arc crossing, the field-aligned component formed a separate inverted-V energy-time signature whose peak energy was half the isotropic peak energy.

  6. Dynamics of a discrete auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruening, K.; Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Porcupine Flight 4 data were used to determine the field-aligned currents associated with a southward moving discrete auroral arc in the postmidnight sector. Three different methods were used for determining the field-aligned current which should give identical results if the arcs are quasi-stationary and no parallel electric field exists between the payload and the dynamo region of the ionosphere. As long as the rocket is above the arc, the three methods agree. The integral of precipitating electron flux, the local magnetic field perturbations, and the divergence of the horizontal Pedersen current all indicate an upward current of 5 + or - 3 microamperes/sq m. Immediately north of the arc a strong downward current of about 10-20 microamperes/sq m is detected. The magnitude, however, is not well known because the rocket's velocity relative to the arc cannot be clearly established. Further north of the southward moving arc, the two methods that can be applied (magnetic field perturbations and divergence of the horizontal Pedersen current) yield contradictory results not only about the magnitude of the current but also about the direction of the current. It is suggested that this discrepancy is due to time-dependent electric field.

  7. Klystron Gun Arcing and Modulator Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S

    2004-05-04

    The demand for 500 kV and 265 amperes peak to power an X-Band klystron brings up protection issues for klystron faults and the energy dumped into the arc from the modulator. This situation is made worse when more than one klystron will be driven from a single modulator, such as the existing schemes for running two and eight klystrons. High power pulsed klystrons have traditionally be powered by line type modulators which match the driving impedance with the load impedance and therefore current limit at twice the operating current. Multiple klystrons have the added problems of a lower modulator source impedance and added stray capacitance, which converts into appreciable energy at high voltages like 500kV. SLAC has measured the energy dumped into klystron arcs in a single and dual klystron configuration at the 400 to 450 kV level and found interesting characteristics in the arc formation. The author will present measured data from klystron arcs powered from line-type modulators in several configurations. The questions arise as to how the newly designed solid-state modulators, running multiple tubes, will react to a klystron arc and how much energy will be dumped into the arc.

  8. Dynamics of a discrete auroral arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruening, K.; Goertz, C. K.

    1986-06-01

    Porcupine Flight 4 data were used to determine the field-aligned currents associated with a southward moving discrete auroral arc in the postmidnight sector. Three different methods were used for determining the field-aligned current which should give identical results if the arcs are quasi-stationary and no parallel electric field exists between the payload and the dynamo region of the ionosphere. As long as the rocket is above the arc, the three methods agree. The integral of precipitating electron flux, the local magnetic field perturbations, and the divergence of the horizontal Pedersen current all indicate an upward current of 5 + or - 3 microamperes/sq m. Immediately north of the arc a strong downward current of about 10-20 microamperes/sq m is detected. The magnitude, however, is not well known because the rocket's velocity relative to the arc cannot be clearly established. Further north of the southward moving arc, the two methods that can be applied (magnetic field perturbations and divergence of the horizontal Pedersen current) yield contradictory results not only about the magnitude of the current but also about the direction of the current. It is suggested that this discrepancy is due to time-dependent electric field.

  9. Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspenion of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  10. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment wiht the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  11. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

    1990-11-13

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are disclosed. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig.

  12. Recent ARC developments: Through modularity to interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.; Cameron, D.; Dóbé, P.; Ellert, M.; Frågåt, T.; Grønager, M.; Johansson, D.; Jönemo, J.; Kleist, J.; Kočan, M.; Konstantinov, A.; Kónya, B.; Márton, I.; Möller, S.; Mohn, B.; Nagy, Zs; Nilsen, J. K.; Ould Saada, F.; Qiang, W.; Read, A.; Rosendahl, P.; Roczei, G.; Savko, M.; Skou Andersen, M.; Stefán, P.; Szalai, F.; Taga, A.; Toor, S. Z.; Wäänänen, A.

    2010-04-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) middleware introduced by NorduGrid is one of the basic Grid solutions used by scientists worldwide. While being well-proven in daily use by a wide variety of scientific applications at large-scale infrastructures like the Nordic DataGrid Facility (NDGF) and smaller scale projects, production ARC of today is still largely based on conventional Grid technologies and custom interfaces introduced a decade ago. In order to guarantee sustainability, true cross-system portability and standards-compliance based interoperability, the ARC community undertakes a massive effort of implementing modular Web Service (WS) approach into the middleware. With support from the EU KnowARC project, new components were introduced and the existing key ARC services got extended with WS technology based standard-compliant interfaces following a service-oriented architecture. Such components include the hosting environment framework, the resource-coupled execution service, the re-engineered client library, the self-healing storage solution and the peer-to-peer information system, to name a few. Gradual introduction of these new services and client tools into the production middleware releases is carried out together with NDGF and thus ensures a smooth transition to the next generation Grid middleware. Standard interfaces and modularity of the new component design are essential for ARC contributions to the planned Universal Middleware Distribution of the European Grid Initiative.

  13. Ion source with improved primary arc collimation

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1985-01-01

    An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power, thereby preventing the exposure of the anode to the full arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

  14. Direct probing of anode arc root dynamics and voltage instability in a dc non-transferred arc plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorui, S.; Tiwari, N.; Meher, K. C.; Jan, A.; Bhat, A.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    The transient dynamics of the anode arc root in a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch is captured through fast photography and directly correlated with the associated voltage instability for the first time. The coexistence of multiple arc roots, the transition to a single arc root, root formation and extinction are investigated for the steady, takeover and re-strike modes of the arc. Contrary to the usual concept, the emerging plasma jet of a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch is found to carry current. An unusually long self-propelled arc plasma jet, a consequence of the phenomenon, is demonstrated.

  15. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF GIANT ARCS IN THE SLOAN GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Matthew B.; Gladders, Michael D.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Sharon, Keren; Dahle, Haakon

    2011-01-20

    We measure the redshift distribution of a sample of 28 giant arcs discovered as a part of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey. Gemini/GMOS-North spectroscopy provides precise redshifts for 24 arcs, and 'redshift desert' constrains for the remaining 4 arcs. This is a direct measurement of the redshift distribution of a uniformly selected sample of bright giant arcs, which is an observable that can be used to inform efforts to predict giant arc statistics. Our primary giant arc sample has a median redshift z = 1.821 and nearly two-thirds of the arcs, 64%, are sources at z {approx}> 1.4, indicating that the population of background sources that are strongly lensed into bright giant arcs resides primarily at high redshift. We also analyze the distribution of redshifts for 19 secondary strongly lensed background sources that are not visually apparent in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging, but were identified in deeper follow-up imaging of the lensing cluster fields. Our redshift sample for the secondary sources is not spectroscopically complete, but combining it with our primary giant arc sample suggests that a large fraction of all background galaxies that are strongly lensed by foreground clusters reside at z {approx}> 1.4. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests indicate that our well-selected, spectroscopically complete primary giant arc redshift sample can be reproduced with a model distribution that is constructed from a combination of results from studies of strong-lensing clusters in numerical simulations and observational constraints on the galaxy luminosity function.

  16. Crustal thickening drives arc front migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, L.; Lee, C.; Manga, M.

    2012-12-01

    The position of active volcanism relative to the trench in arcs depends on melt focusing processes within the mantle wedge and the geometric parameters of subduction. Arc front migration has been observed in relic (Sierra Nevada, Andes) as well as active (Cascades) arcs, sometimes with cycles of retreat and return of the front towards the trench over millions of years. Other arcs, particularly where backarc extension dominates, exhibit a more stationary front in time relative to the trench. In addition, crustal indices of magmatism as measured by the ratio of trace elements La/Yb or isotopes 87}Sr/{86Sr covary with arc front migration (e.g., Haschke et al., 2002). Arc front migration is commonly attributed to variation in dip angle of the downgoing slab, delamination of overthickened crust, or to subduction erosion. Here we present an alternative hypothesis. Assuming mantle wedge melting is a largely temperature-dependant process, the maximum isotherm in the wedge sets arc front location. Isotherm location depends on slab angle, subduction velocity and wedge thermal diffusivity (England and Katz, 2010). It also depends on crustal thickness, which evolves as melt is transferred from the wedge to the crust. Arc front migration can thus occur purely through magmatic thickening of crust. Thickening proceeds through intrusive as well as extrusive volcanism, modulated by tectonics and surface erosion. Migration rate is set by the mantle melt flux into the crust, which decreases as thickening occurs. Thus slab angle need not change, and in the absence of other contribution processes front location and crustal thickness have long-time steady state values. We develop an analytic model of this process that produces migration rates consistent with published data and explains arc fronts that do not move (dominated by extension, such as in the case of intra-oceanic arcs). We present new geochemical and age data from the Peninsular Ranges Batholith that are also consistent with

  17. Cytochrome d but not cytochrome o rescues the toluidine blue growth sensitivity of arc mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Adrian F; Malpica, Roxana; Contreras, Martha; Escamilla, Edgardo; Georgellis, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    The Arc (anoxic redox control) two-component signal transduction system, consisting of the ArcB sensor kinase and the ArcA response regulator, allows adaptive responses of Escherichia coli to changes of O(2) availability. The arcA gene was previously known as the dye gene because null mutants were growth sensitive to the photosensitizer redox dyes toluidine blue and methylene blue, a phenotype whose molecular basis still remains elusive. In this study we report that the toluidine blue O (TBO) effect on the arc mutants is light independent and observed only during aerobic growth conditions. Moreover, 16 suppressor mutants with restored growth were generated and analyzed. Thirteen of those possessed insertion elements upstream of the cydAB operon, rendering its expression ArcA independent. Also, it was found that, in contrast to cythocrome d, cythocrome o was not able to confer toluidine blue resistance to arc mutants, thereby representing an intriguing difference between the two terminal oxidases. Finally, a mechanism for TBO sensitivity and resistance is discussed. PMID:19897650

  18. Dynamics of vaporization and dissociation during transient surface heating, with application to vacuum arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.A.

    1981-02-01

    This report describes a model of vaporization and dissociation occurring as a result of intense heating over a localized area of a material surface. The balance of heat between the input power and losses due to vaporization, as well as radiation and conduction in the material, are considered. The model includes the effect of binary mass diffusion and changes of surface stoichiometry for multiple component materials. Effects of vapor recondensation are included. The model is then applied to the description of spot heating on a vacuum arc anode through the use of a simple power feedback model. Comparison of surface temperature measurements to model predictions are used to parametrically describe the arc behavior. Finally, extensive parametric analyses showing the effect of material property variations on the arc behavior are described.

  19. A modular approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy optimization with noncoplanar trajectories.

    PubMed

    Papp, Dávid; Bortfeld, Thomas; Unkelbach, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing noncoplanar beam angles in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to combine the benefits of arc therapy, such as short treatment times, with the benefits of noncoplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, such as improved organ sparing. Recently, vendors introduced treatment machines that allow for simultaneous couch and gantry motion during beam delivery to make noncoplanar VMAT treatments possible. Our aim is to provide a reliable optimization method for noncoplanar isocentric arc therapy plan optimization. The proposed solution is modular in the sense that it can incorporate different existing beam angle selection and coplanar arc therapy optimization methods. Treatment planning is performed in three steps. First, a number of promising noncoplanar beam directions are selected using an iterative beam selection heuristic; these beams serve as anchor points of the arc therapy trajectory. In the second step, continuous gantry/couch angle trajectories are optimized using a simple combinatorial optimization model to define a beam trajectory that efficiently visits each of the anchor points. Treatment time is controlled by limiting the time the beam needs to trace the prescribed trajectory. In the third and final step, an optimal arc therapy plan is found along the prescribed beam trajectory. In principle any existing arc therapy optimization method could be incorporated into this step; for this work we use a sliding window VMAT algorithm. The approach is demonstrated using two particularly challenging cases. The first one is a lung SBRT patient whose planning goals could not be satisfied with fewer than nine noncoplanar IMRT fields when the patient was treated in the clinic. The second one is a brain tumor patient, where the target volume overlaps with the optic nerves and the chiasm and it is directly adjacent to the brainstem. Both cases illustrate that the large number of angles utilized by isocentric noncoplanar VMAT plans

  20. A modular approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy optimization with noncoplanar trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Dávid; Bortfeld, Thomas; Unkelbach, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing noncoplanar beam angles in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to combine the benefits of arc therapy, such as short treatment times, with the benefits of noncoplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, such as improved organ sparing. Recently, vendors introduced treatment machines that allow for simultaneous couch and gantry motion during beam delivery to make noncoplanar VMAT treatments possible. Our aim is to provide a reliable optimization method for noncoplanar isocentric arc therapy plan optimization. The proposed solution is modular in the sense that it can incorporate different existing beam angle selection and coplanar arc therapy optimization methods. Treatment planning is performed in three steps. First, a number of promising noncoplanar beam directions are selected using an iterative beam selection heuristic; these beams serve as anchor points of the arc therapy trajectory. In the second step, continuous gantry/couch angle trajectories are optimized using a simple combinatorial optimization model to define a beam trajectory that efficiently visits each of the anchor points. Treatment time is controlled by limiting the time the beam needs to trace the prescribed trajectory. In the third and final step, an optimal arc therapy plan is found along the prescribed beam trajectory. In principle any existing arc therapy optimization method could be incorporated into this step; for this work we use a sliding window VMAT algorithm. The approach is demonstrated using two particularly challenging cases. The first one is a lung SBRT patient whose planning goals could not be satisfied with fewer than nine noncoplanar IMRT fields when the patient was treated in the clinic. The second one is a brain tumor patient, where the target volume overlaps with the optic nerves and the chiasm and it is directly adjacent to the brainstem. Both cases illustrate that the large number of angles utilized by isocentric noncoplanar VMAT plans

  1. Towards Understanding the Sunda and Banda Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R.

    2014-12-01

    The present change from oceanic subduction beneath the Sunda Arc to arc-continent collision east of Sumba is merely the latest stage in a complex collision history that began more than 20 million years ago. Understanding present-day tectonics requires restoring the pre-collisional margins and unravelling the history of the entire Sunda-Banda Arc, not just a segment centred on Sumba. Seismic tomography displays a single folded slab beneath the Banda Arc around which mantle has flowed. Above this is a wide actively deforming zone of complex geology. Australian crust was first added to the Sunda margin in the Cretaceous. Early Miocene closure of the oceanic gap north of Australia led to further additions of continental crust during collision of the Sula Spur. Few microcontinental fragments were sliced from New Guinea as commonly interpreted. Most are parts of the Sula Spur fragmented by extension and strike-slip faulting during development of subduction zones and rollback into the Banda embayment. Many metamorphic 'basement' rocks are significantly younger than expected. They were metamorphosed during multiple episodes of extension which also exhumed the sub-lithospheric mantle, melted the deep continental crust, created new ocean basins, and dispersed continental crust throughout the inner and outer arc, and forearc, so that in places Australian crust is colliding with Australian crust. Thus, many of the arc volcanoes are built on continental not oceanic crust, and sediment eroded from recently emergent islands is compositionally different to subducted sediment that contributed to arc magmas. The published literature is inadequate. New fieldwork and data are required, particularly in remote areas, with integration of information from a variety of sources (e.g. industry seismic and multibeam bathymetry, remotely acquired imagery) and sub-disciplines (e.g. geochronology, geochemistry, seismology, modelling). No single methodology can provide a complete solution.

  2. Gas Metal Arc Welding and Flux-Cored Arc Welding. Teacher Edition. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    These instructional materials are designed to improve instruction in Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) and Flux-Cored Arc Welding (FCAW). The following introductory information is included: use of this publication; competency profile; instructional/task analysis; related academic and workplace skills list; tools, materials, and equipment list; and…

  3. Thick, Cold and Dry Roots: the Key to Longevity of Continental Arc Lithosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, E. J.; Soustelle, V.; Hirth, G.; Saal, A. E.; Kruckenberg, S. C.; Eiler, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to the continuity of mid-ocean ridge magmatism, arc volcanism is episodic, characterized by flareups lasting 10 - 50 My which, for reasons that remain unclear, end abruptly in <10 My. Key to understanding the origins of episodic arc behavior lie in constraining the roles of subducting vs. overriding lithosphere. Here, we show that upper mantle xenoliths from the Sierra Nevada arc, CA, USA represent mantle wedge residues that were thickened and rapidly cooled at ~3 GPa and 750 C, presumably at the slab-mantle interface. Pervasive melt infiltration from wedge-derived basalts transformed the depleted residues into refertilized lherzolite. Olivine crystal-preferred orientations (CPO) are weak and show predominantly axial-(010) and one lherzolite with B-type CPO. Measured water contents by SIMS in olivine and pyroxene are low, 5 - 9 ppm and 30 - 500 ppm, respectively. Assuming olivine lost water during eruption, recalculated olivine water in equilibrium with pyroxene does not exceed 35 ppm, resulting in reconstructed bulk rock water content similar to the MORB source. Extrapolation of experimental olivine water solubility to the xenoliths' final PT conditions ranges from 30 to 270 ppm, indicating that the peridotites are water-undersaturated. Such low water contents are not sufficient to produce axial-(010) and B-type CPO. Instead, we propose that the observed CPO was inherited from the prior melt infiltration event, which deformed the peridotites via grain-size sensitive, diffusion creep (e.g., grain boundary sliding). Therefore, water played little role in deformation of arc mantle. Low water contents in thick, cold arc roots result in very high viscosities which preclude significant deformation at final PT. In the Sierran case, rapid cooling also helped to freeze in geochemical and microstructural evidence of earlier melt-assisted deformation, and allowed the preservation of arc mantle lithosphere for ~80 My after it was formed. Only when the Farallon

  4. Simulations of the magnet misalignments, field errors and orbit correction for the SLC north arc

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.; Chao, A.; Jaeger, J.; Shoaee, H.

    1983-11-01

    Given the intensity of linac bunches and their repetition rate the desired luminosity of SLC 1.0 x 10/sup 30/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ requires focusing the interaction bunches to a spot size in the micrometer (..mu..m) range. The lattice that achieves this goal is obtained by careful design of both the arcs and the final focus systems. For the micrometer range of the beam spot size both the second order geometric and chromatic aberrations may be completely destructive. The concept of second order achromat proved to be extremely important in this respect and the arcs are built essentially as a sequence of such achromats. Between the end of the linac and the interaction point (IP) there are three special sections in addition to the regular structure: matching section (MS) designed for matching the phase space from the linac to the arcs, reverse bend section (RB) which provides the matching when the sign of the curvature is reversed in the arc and the final focus system (FFS). The second order calculations are done by the program TURTLE. Using the TURTLE histogram in the x-y plane and assuming identical histogram for the south arc, corresponding 'luminosity' L is found. The simulation of the misalignments and error effects have to be done simultaneously with the design and simulation of the orbit correction scheme. Even after the orbit is corrected and the beam can be transmitted through the vacuum chamber, the focusing of the beam to the desired size at the IP remains a serious potential problem. It is found, as will be elaborated later, that even for the best achieved orbit correction, additional corrections of the dispersion function and possibly transfer matrix are needed. This report describes a few of the presently conceived correction schemes and summarizes some results of computer simulations done for the SLC north arc. 8 references, 12 figures, 6 tables.

  5. Influence of the arc plasma parameters on the weld pool profile in TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropchin, A.; Frolov, V.; Pipa, A. V.; Kozakov, R.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2014-11-01

    Magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of the arc and fluid simulations of the weld pool can be beneficial in the analysis and further development of arc welding processes and welding machines. However, the appropriate coupling of arc and weld pool simulations needs further improvement. The tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process is investigated by simulations including the weld pool. Experiments with optical diagnostics are used for the validation. A coupled computational model of the arc and the weld pool is developed using the software ANSYS CFX. The weld pool model considers the forces acting on the motion of the melt inside and on the surface of the pool, such as Marangoni, drag, electromagnetic forces and buoyancy. The experimental work includes analysis of cross-sections of the workpieces, highspeed video images and spectroscopic measurements. Experiments and calculations have been performed for various currents, distances between electrode and workpiece and nozzle diameters. The studies show the significant impact of material properties like surface tension dependence on temperature as well as of the arc structure on the weld pool behaviour and finally the weld seam depth. The experimental weld pool profiles and plasma temperatures are in good agreement with computational results.

  6. Linear Fixed-Field Multi-Pass Arcs for Recirculating Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, S.A. Bogacz, Y.R. Roblin, K.B. Beard

    2012-06-01

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA's) provide a compact and efficient way of accelerating particle beams to medium and high energies by reusing the same linac for multiple passes. In the conventional scheme, after each pass, the different energy beams coming out of the linac are separated and directed into appropriate arcs for recirculation, with each pass requiring a separate fixed-energy arc. In this paper we present a concept of an RLA return arc based on linear combined-function magnets, in which two and potentially more consecutive passes with very different energies are transported through the same string of magnets. By adjusting the dipole and quadrupole components of the constituting linear combined-function magnets, the arc is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final reference orbit offsets for all transported beam energies. We demonstrate the concept by developing a design for a droplet-shaped return arc for a dog-bone RLA capable of transporting two beam passes with momenta different by a factor of two. We present the results of tracking simulations of the two passes and lay out the path to end-to-end design and simulation of a complete dog-bone RLA.

  7. Arc_Mat: a Matlab-based spatial data analysis toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingjian; Lesage, James

    2010-03-01

    This article presents an overview of Arc_Mat, a Matlab-based spatial data analysis software package whose source code has been placed in the public domain. An earlier version of the Arc_Mat toolbox was developed to extract map polygon and database information from ESRI shapefiles and provide high quality mapping in the Matlab software environment. We discuss revisions to the toolbox that: utilize enhanced computing and graphing capabilities of more recent versions of Matlab, restructure the toolbox with object-oriented programming features, and provide more comprehensive functions for spatial data analysis. The Arc_Mat toolbox functionality includes basic choropleth mapping; exploratory spatial data analysis that provides exploratory views of spatial data through various graphs, for example, histogram, Moran scatterplot, three-dimensional scatterplot, density distribution plot, and parallel coordinate plots; and more formal spatial data modeling that draws on the extensive Spatial Econometrics Toolbox functions. A brief review of the design aspects of the revised Arc_Mat is described, and we provide some illustrative examples that highlight representative uses of the toolbox. Finally, we discuss programming with and customizing the Arc_Mat toolbox functionalities.

  8. Investigation on oblique shock wave control by arc discharge plasma in supersonic airflow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jian; Li Yinghong; Xing Fei

    2009-10-01

    Wedge oblique shock wave control by arc discharge plasma in supersonic airflow was investigated theoretically, experimentally, and numerically in this paper. Using thermal choking model, the change in oblique shock wave was deduced, which refer that the start point of shock wave shifts upstream, the shock wave angle decreases, and its intensity weakens. Then the theoretical results were validated experimentally in a Mach 2.2 wind tunnel. On the test conditions of arc discharge power of approx1 kW and arc plasma temperature of approx3000 K, schlieren photography and gas pressure measurements indicated that the start point of shock wave shifted upstream of approx4 mm, the shock wave angle decreased 8.6%, and its intensity weakened 8.8%. The deduced theoretical results match the test results qualitatively, so thermal mechanism and thermal choking model are rational to explain the problem of oblique shock wave control by arc discharge plasma. Finally, numerical simulation was developed. Based on thermal mechanism, the arc discharge plasma was simplified as a thermal source term that added to the Navier-Stokes equations. The simulation results of the change in oblique shock wave were consistent with the test results, so the thermal mechanism indeed dominates the oblique shock wave control process.

  9. Effects of shielding gas compositions on arc plasma and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Z. H.; Liao, S. M.; Tsai, H. L.

    2010-02-15

    This article presents the effects of shielding gas compositions on the transient transport phenomena, including the distributions of temperature, flow velocity, current density, and electromagnetic force in the arc and the metal, and arc pressure in gas metal arc welding of mild steel at a constant current input. The shielding gas considered includes pure argon, 75% Ar, 50% Ar, and 25% Ar with the balance of helium. It is found that the shielding gas composition has significant influences on the arc characteristics; droplet formation, detachment, transfer, and impingement onto the workpiece; and weld pool dynamics and weld bead profile. As helium increases in the shielding gas, the droplet size increases but the droplet detachment frequency decreases. For helium-rich gases, the current converges at the workpiece with a 'ring' shape which produces non-Gaussian-like distributions of arc pressure and temperature along the workpiece surface. Detailed explanations to the physics of the very complex but interesting transport phenomena are given.

  10. Research of Arc Chamber Optimization Techniques Based on Flow Field and Arc Joint Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianying; Guo, Yujing; Zhang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    The preliminary design of an arc chamber in the 550 kV SF6 circuit breaker was proposed in accordance with the technical requirements and design experience. The structural optimization was carried out according to the no-load flow field simulation results and verified by no-load pressure measurement. Based on load simulation results such as temperature field variation at the arc area and the tendency of post arc current under different recovery voltage, the second optimal design was completed and its correctness was certificated by a breaking test. Results demonstrate that the interrupting capacity of an arc chamber can be evaluated by the comparison of the gas medium recovery speed and post arc current growth rate.

  11. Yeast two-hybrid interactions between Arabidopsis lyrata S Receptor Kinase and the ARC1 E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Indriolo, Emily; Goring, Daphne R

    2016-06-01

    Here we describe protein-protein interactions between signaling components in the conserved self-incompatibility pathway from Brassica spp. and Arabidopsis lyrata. Previously, we had demonstrated that ARC1 is necessary in A. lyrata for the rejection of self-pollen by the self-incompatibility pathway. The results described here demonstrate that A. lyrata ARC1 interacts with A. lyrata S Receptor Kinase (SRK1) in the yeast 2-hybrid system. A. lyrata ARC1 also interacted with B. napus SRK910 illustrating that interactions in this pathway are conserved across species. Finally, we discuss how the more widely occurring interactions between SRK and ARC1-related family members may be modulated in vivo by expression and subcellular localization patterns resulting in a particular response. PMID:27175603

  12. Earthquake location in island arcs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engdahl, E.R.; Dewey, J.W.; Fujita, K.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive data set of selected teleseismic P-wave arrivals and local-network P- and S-wave arrivals from large earthquakes occurring at all depths within a small section of the central Aleutians is used to examine the general problem of earthquake location in island arcs. Reference hypocenters for this special data set are determined for shallow earthquakes from local-network data and for deep earthquakes from combined local and teleseismic data by joint inversion for structure and location. The high-velocity lithospheric slab beneath the central Aleutians may displace hypocenters that are located using spherically symmetric Earth models; the amount of displacement depends on the position of the earthquakes with respect to the slab and on whether local or teleseismic data are used to locate the earthquakes. Hypocenters for trench and intermediate-depth events appear to be minimally biased by the effects of slab structure on rays to teleseismic stations. However, locations of intermediate-depth events based on only local data are systematically displaced southwards, the magnitude of the displacement being proportional to depth. Shallow-focus events along the main thrust zone, although well located using only local-network data, are severely shifted northwards and deeper, with displacements as large as 50 km, by slab effects on teleseismic travel times. Hypocenters determined by a method that utilizes seismic ray tracing through a three-dimensional velocity model of the subduction zone, derived by thermal modeling, are compared to results obtained by the method of joint hypocenter determination (JHD) that formally assumes a laterally homogeneous velocity model over the source region and treats all raypath anomalies as constant station corrections to the travel-time curve. The ray-tracing method has the theoretical advantage that it accounts for variations in travel-time anomalies within a group of events distributed over a sizable region of a dipping, high

  13. Wet melting along the Tonga Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, L. B.; Plank, T.; Arculus, R. J.; Hauri, E. H.; Hall, P.

    2010-12-01

    Melting in the mantle at convergent margins is driven by water from the subducting slab. Previous work has found a strong role for water-fluxed melting from correlations between the concentration of water in the mantle source, (H2O)o, and the extent of melting beneath backarcs, Fba. Here we explore how wet melting beneath the Lau Backarc Basin relates to that beneath the Tonga Arc, Farc, by providing the first systematic study of water contents in Tonga arc magmas. We have measured volatiles and major and trace elements in melt inclusions, glasses, and whole rocks obtained from recently sampled submarine and subaerial Tonga arc volcanoes. The compositions are varied and range mostly between andesite and basalt/boninite, and least-degassed water contents range from 2 to 5 wt%. We estimate (H2O)o and Farc independently by combining pressure (P) and temperature (T) estimates from an olivine-orthopyroxene-melt thermobarometer with a wet melting productivity model. When P, T, and (H2O)o are known, Farc is uniquely constrained. Results for the volcanoes in the Tonga Arc are bimodal with respect to T: volcanoes located near active backarc spreading centers reflect cooler melting (~1275°C) than those located far from active spreading centers (~1365°C). The cooler primary T’s may result from removal of the heat of fusion during prior melting beneath the Lau backarc, Fba. In the northern portion of the arc, the warmest primary T’s may be due to proximity to the Samoan mantle plume. Farc varies non-systematically along-strike, indicating that Fba is the primary driver of along-arc variability in primary melt compositions. Farc can also be used to calculate the TiO2 concentration of the arc mantle source, (TiO2)o (a proxy for source depletion), which varies monotonically along the Tonga Arc. Arc volcanoes adjacent to the Southern Lau Rifts and Valu Fa Ridge melt mantle with a fertile N-MORB TiO2, while those adjacent to the northern extent of the Eastern Lau Spreading

  14. The geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Paleoproterozoic Green Mountain arc: A composite(?), bimodal, oceanic, fringing arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.S.; Barnes, C.G.; Premo, W.R.; Snoke, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    The inferred subduction affinity of the ~1780-Ma Green Mountain arc, a dominantly bimodal igneous terrane (together with immature marine and volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks) accreted to the southern margin of the Wyoming province, is integral to arc-accretion models of the Paleoproterozoic growth of southern Laurentia. Conversely, the dominantly bimodal nature of many putative arc-related igneous suites throughout southern Laurentia, including the Green Mountain arc, has also been used to support models of growth by extension of pre-existing crust. We report new geochemical and isotopic data from ~1780-Ma gabbroic and granodioritic to tonalitic rocks of the Big Creek Gneiss, interpreted as consanguineous with previously studied metavolcanic rocks of the Green Mountain Formation.The ~1780-Ma Big Creek Gneiss mafic rocks show clear geochemical signatures of a subduction origin and provide no supporting evidence for extensional tectonism. The ~1780-Ma Big Creek Gneiss felsic rocks are attributed to partial melting of mafic and/or mixed lower-crustal material. The bimodal nature of the suite results from the combination of arc basalts and felsic crustal melts. The lack of andesite is consistent with the observed tholeiitic differentiation trend of the mafic magmas. The lower e{open}Nd(1780Ma) values for the felsic rocks vs. the mafic rocks suggest that the unexposed lower crust of the arc may be older than the arc and that Trans-Hudson- or Penokean-aged rocks possibly form the substratum of the arc. Our results reinforce previous interpretations that arc-related magmatism played a key role in the Paleoproterozoic crustal growth of southern Laurentia, but also support the possibility of unexposed older crust as basement to the arcs. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  15. BROADBAND PHOTOMETRY OF 105 GIANT ARCS: REDSHIFT CONSTRAINTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR GIANT ARC STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Matthew B.

    2012-01-10

    We measure the photometric properties of 105 giant arcs that were identified in systematic searches for galaxy-cluster-scale strong lenses in the Second Red-Sequence Cluster Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The cluster lenses span 0.2 < z{sub l} < 1.2 in redshift, with a median z-bar{sub l}=0.58. Using broadband color criteria we sort the entire arc sample into redshift bins based on u-g and g-r colors, and also r-z colors for the {approx}90% of arcs that have z-band data. This analysis yields broad redshift constraints with 71{sup +5}{sub -4%} of the arcs at z {>=} 1.0, 64{sup +6}{sub -4%} at z {>=} 1.4, 56{sup +5}{sub -4%} at z {>=} 1.9, and 21{sup +4}{sub -2%} at z {>=} 2.7. The remaining 29{sup +03}{sub -5%} have z < 1. The inferred median redshift is z-bar{sub s}= 2.0{+-}0.1, in good agreement with a previous determination from a smaller sample of brighter arcs (g {approx}< 22.5). This agreement confirms that z{sub s} = 2.0 {+-} 0.1 is the typical redshift for giant arcs with g {approx}< 24 that are produced by cluster-scale strong lenses and that there is no evidence for strong evolution in the redshift distribution of arcs over a wide range of g-band magnitudes (20 {<=} g {<=}24). Establishing that half of all giant arcs are at z {approx}> 2 contributes significantly toward relieving the tension between the number of arcs observed and the number expected in a {Lambda}CDM cosmology, but there is considerable evidence to suggest that a discrepancy persists. Additionally, this work confirms that forthcoming large samples of giant arcs will supply the observational community with many magnified galaxies at z {approx}> 2.

  16. Gas Arcs in Comet Hyakutake: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combi, M. R.; Harris, W. M.; Kabin, K.

    2000-10-01

    The recent break-up of the nucleus of Comet LINEAR S4 demonstrates that fragmentation is an important cometary process and that it is not a rare phenomenon. Comet Hyakutake (1996 B2) underwent an outburst of gas production on March 21, 1996. Subsequent to the outburst, fragments, or condensations as they have been called, were observed moving tailward from the position of the nucleus. Arc-shaped structures were seen in images of gas species (OH, CN and C2) providing clear evidence of production of gas from cometary nucleus debris also tailward of the nucleus. We have already (Harris et al. 1997, Science 277, 676) described observations taken with the WIYN telescope consisting of a 6-hour time sequence of images on March 26, 1996 of CN and dust continuum and a single OH image showing that the arc, and by inference it's source, was generally moving tailward with the visible condensations. The entire OH arc was reproduced using a kinetic Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) calculation for water and all its photodissociation products. DSMC is suited to this physical environment that is in transition from fluid conditions in the inner coma to free-expansion in the outer coma. Our model asuming a string of fragments within the apex of the arc (i.e., the intersection of the arc and the tailward sun-comet line) reproduced the arc. Here we present a more extensive parameter study of the arc using DSMC and a solution of the standard perfect-fluid Euler equations. We find that a secondary source just behind the apex of the arc can reproduce the OH arc, but the location of the source must be much closer to the apex than indicated by solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) (Rodionov et al. 1998, Icarus 136, 232). We find that we must use unrealistically large collision cross sections to reproduce the NSE results, and that the NSE results are not substantially different from a simpler Euler equation approach. This work has been supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres

  17. Physics of arcing, and implications to sputter deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2005-03-15

    Arc and glow discharges are defined based on their cathode processes. Arcs are characterized by collective electron emission, which can be stationary with hot cathodes (thermionic arcs), or non-stationary with cold cathodes (cathodic arcs). A brief review on cathodic arc properties serves as the starting point to better understand arcing phenomena in sputtering. Although arcing occurs in both metal and reactive sputtering, it is more of an issue in the reactive case. Arcing occurs if sufficiently high field strength leads to thermal runaway of an electron emission site. The role of insulating layers and surface potential adjustment through current leakage is highlighted. In the situation of magnetron sputtering with ''racetrack'', the need for a model with two spatial dimensions is shown. In many cases, arcing is initiated by breakdown of dielectric layers and inclusions. It is most efficiently prevented if formation and excessive charge-up of dielectric layers and inclusions can be avoided.

  18. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    PubMed

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used. PMID:17355086

  19. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  20. Ion source with improved primary arc collimation

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1983-12-16

    An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

  1. 'LTE-diffusion approximation' for arc calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowke, J. J.; Tanaka, M.

    2006-08-01

    This paper proposes the use of the 'LTE-diffusion approximation' for predicting the properties of electric arcs. Under this approximation, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) is assumed, with a particular mesh size near the electrodes chosen to be equal to the 'diffusion length', based on De/W, where De is the electron diffusion coefficient and W is the electron drift velocity. This approximation overcomes the problem that the equilibrium electrical conductivity in the arc near the electrodes is almost zero, which makes accurate calculations using LTE impossible in the limit of small mesh size, as then voltages would tend towards infinity. Use of the LTE-diffusion approximation for a 200 A arc with a thermionic cathode gives predictions of total arc voltage, electrode temperatures, arc temperatures and radial profiles of heat flux density and current density at the anode that are in approximate agreement with more accurate calculations which include an account of the diffusion of electric charges to the electrodes, and also with experimental results. Calculations, which include diffusion of charges, agree with experimental results of current and heat flux density as a function of radius if the Milne boundary condition is used at the anode surface rather than imposing zero charge density at the anode.

  2. Electric Arc and Electrochemical Surface Texturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Snyder, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface texturing of conductive materials can readily be accomplished by means of a moving electric arc which produces a plasma from the environmental gases as well as from the vaporized substrate and arc electrode materials. As the arc is forced to move across the substrate surface, a condensate from the plasma re-deposits an extremely rough surface which is intimately mixed and attached to the substrate material. The arc textured surfaces produce greatly enhanced thermal emittance and hold potential for use as high temperature radiator surfaces in space, as well as in systems which use radiative heat dissipation such as computer assisted tomography (CAT) scan systems. Electrochemical texturing of titanium alloys can be accomplished by using sodium chloride solutions along with ultrasonic agitation to produce a random distribution of craters on the surface. The crater size and density can be controlled to produce surface craters appropriately sized for direct bone in-growth of orthopaedic implants. Electric arc texturing and electrochemical texturing techniques, surface properties and potential applications will be presented.

  3. Vertical Arc for ILC Low Emittance Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    The design and parameters of a vertical arc for the ILC Low Emittance Transport (LET) are reviewed. A 1 TeV CM ILC which relies upon 30 MV/m accelerating cavities with a packing fraction of 65% will require almost 48 km of main linac, which suggests that the total site length including BDS and bunch compressors will be on the order of 53 km. If built in a laser-straight tunnel with the low-energy ends near the surface, and assuming a perfectly spherical ''cue ball'' planetary surface with radius 6370 km, the collider halls will necessarily be 55 meters below grade, as shown in the top plot of Figure 1. Such depths would demand extensive use of deep tunneling, which would potentially drive up the cost and difficulty of ILC construction. An alternate solution is to use discrete vertical arcs at a few locations to allow a ''piecewise straight'' construction in which the depth of the tunnel below grade does not vary by more than a few meters. This approach is shown schematically in the bottom plot of Figure 1. In this Note we consider the issues for a design with one such vertical arc at the 250 GeV/c point (ie, midway down the linac for 1 TeV CM), and a second arc at the entrance to the BDS (ie, the entire BDS lies in one plane, with vertical arcs at each end).

  4. The IMF dependence of the local time of transpolar arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fear, R.; Milan, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    Transpolar arcs or polar cap arcs are auroral features which are observed within the polar cap. They occur predominantly during intervals of northward IMF (Berkey et al., 1976). There is mixed evidence for IMF BY control of the local time at which the arcs initially form; Gussenhoven (1982) found that polar cap arcs formed preferentially post-midnight when BY < 0 (evaluated over 1 or 2 hours preceding the start of the arc) and pre-midnight when BY > 0, whereas Valladares et al (1991) found no clear dependency. The only previous statistical study of globally-imaged transpolar arcs (Kullen et al., 2002) found differing results for moving and non-moving arcs, concluding that three different models were required to identify (i) moving arcs, (ii) stationary arcs near the dawn/dusk portion of the main oval, and (iii) stationary arcs in the midnight sector. In this presentation, we show the results of a statistical study of 131 transpolar arcs observed by the FUV cameras on the IMAGE satellite between June 2000 and September 2005. We find that arcs tend to form following the same dependency on BY as identified by Gussenhoven (1982), whether moving or not. We find that the correlation between the magnetic local time at which the arc forms and the IMF BY component is relatively weak if the IMF is only averaged over the hour preceding the arc formation, but becomes stronger if the IMF is evaluated between 1 and 4 hours before the arc first forms. This is consistent with the timescale that is expected for newly-opened magnetospheric flux to reach the magnetotail plasma sheet (Dungey, 1961; Milan et al., 2007), and is therefore consistent with the suggestion that transpolar arcs map to the plasma sheet. We suggest that the similar dependence of stationary and moving arcs on the IMF BY component might imply that it is possible to explain both types of arc in terms of a single mechanism.

  5. A 'Propagating' Active Across-Arc Normal Fault Shows Rupture Process of the Basement: the Case of the Southwestern Ryukyu Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Shinjo, R.; Nakamura, M.; Kubo, A.; Doi, A.; Tamanaha, S.

    2011-12-01

    scarp and on the footwall. These suggest that basically the both sides are composed of the same material, that the whole study area is characterised by Ryukyu limestone exposure and that the basement was split by the across-arc normal fault. Coarse-grained sand and gravels/rubbles were observed towards and on the trough of the fault. On the main scarp an outcrop of limestone basement was exposed and in some part it was broken into rubbles. These facts suggest that crash of the basement due to rupturing is taking place repeatedly on the scarp and the trough. The observed fine-grained sand on the hanging wall might be the final product by the process of the crash of the limestone basement.

  6. Along-arc and inter-arc variations in volcanic gas CO2/S signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiuppa, Alessandro; Robidoux, Philippe; Fischer, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Improving the current estimates of the global volcanic arc CO2 output requires a more accurate knowledge of the volcanic gas CO2/S ratio signature of each individual arc segment. This, when multiplied by sulphur (S) productivity of each arc segment (derived by either studies on melt inclusions or UV-based gas measurements), could in principle yield the individual arc CO2 output and, by summation, the global arc CO2 output. Unfortunately, the process is complicated, among others, by the limited volcanic gas dataset we have available, particularly for poorly explored, but potentially highly productive arc segments (Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, etc). We here review the currently available dataset of CO2/S ratios in the volcanic gas literature, and combine this with novel gas observations (partially obtained using the currently expanding DCO-DECADE Multi-GAS network) to provide experimental evidence for the existence of substantial variations in volcanic gas chemistry along individual arc segments, and from one arc segment to another. In Central America [1], for instance, we identify distinct volcanic gas CO2/S (molar) ratio signatures for magmatic volatiles in Nicaragua (~3), Costa Rica (~0.5-1.0) and El Salvador (~1.0), which we ascribe to variable extents of sedimentary carbon addition to a MORB-type (Costa Rica-like) mantle wedge. Globally, volcanic gas CO2/S ratios are typically found to be low (~1.0) in arc segments (e.g., Japan, Kuril-Kamchatka, Chile) where small amount of limestones enter the slab; whilst larger slab/crustal carbon contributions typically correspond to higher CO2/S ratio signatures for gases of other arcs, such as Indonesia (~4.0) or Italy (6 to 9). We find that CO2/S ratios of arc gases positively correlate with Ba/La and U/Th ratios in the corresponding magmas, these trace-element ratios being thought as petrological proxies for the addition slab-fluids to the magma generation zone. This relation implies a dominant slab-derivation of carbon

  7. The last stages of the Avalonian-Cadomian arc in NW Iberian Massif: isotopic and igneous record for a long-lived peri-Gondwanan magmatic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andonaegui, Pilar; Arenas, Ricardo; Albert, Richard; Sánchez Martínez, Sonia; Díez Fernández, Rubén; Gerdes, Axel

    2016-06-01

    The upper allochthonous units of NW Iberian Massif contain an extensive Cambrian magmatism (c. 500 Ma), covering felsic to mafic compositions. The magmatic activity generated large massifs of granitoids and gabbros, with calc-alkaline and tholeiitic compositions respectively. Petrological and geochemical features of these massifs are characteristic of volcanic arc. The plutons intruded siliciclastic sedimentary series deposited in the periphery of the West Africa Craton. U-Pb/Hf isotopic compositions of detrital zircon in the siliciclastic host series, indicate continental arc activity between c. 750 Ma and c. 500 Ma. It was characterized by a large variety of isotopic sources, including from very old continental input, even Archean, to the addition of a significant amount of juvenile mafic material. These isotopic sources experienced an extensive mixing that explains the composition and isotopic features (εHft from - 50 until + 15) of the represented Cambrian plutons. The Cambrian igneous rocks of the upper units of NW Iberia are related to the latest activity of the Avalonian-Cadomian arc. From the Middle Cambrian arc activity in the periphery of Gondwana was replaced by pronounced extension associated with the development of continental rifting, which finally led to separation of the microcontinent Avalonia. Subsequent drifting of Avalonia to the North caused progressive opening one of the main Paleozoic ocean, the Rheic Ocean.

  8. Study on Expansion Process of EDM Arc Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsu, Wataru; Shimoyamada, Mayumi; Kunieda, Masanori

    In order to understand the phenomena of electrical discharge machining (EDM), the characteristics of transition arc plasma in EDM were investigated. The arc plasma was directly observed with a high speed video camera. In addition, to learn more about arc plasma expansion, plasma temperature was measured by spectroscopy. The arc plasma temperature was obtained by measuring the radiant fluxes of two different wavelengths from the arc plasma and applying the line pair method. Furthermore, a new expansion model for EDM arc plasma was proposed based on the observations, and validated by comparing experimental and computed results of the discharge crater.

  9. The discharge mechanism of the high-temperature arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busz-Peuckert, G.; Finkelnburg, W.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of the high temperature Ar arc is interpreted considering those essential points in which it deviates from the known arcs based on earlier measurements and experiments. The following points are discussed individually: the charge carrier balance, the energy balance, the volt amp characteristics, and the difference between high temperature arcs in Ar and N. Besides the volt amp characteristic of a 10 mm long arc in Ar between 10 and 200 amp, the anode fall, cathode fall, and arc gradient were obtained with the aid of probes. The difference between Ar and N arcs are attributed to variations of the heat conditions and electrical conditions at different temperatures of the gas.

  10. Plasma arc heated secondary combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Haun, R.; Paulson, B.; Schlienger, M.; Goerz, D.; Kerns, J.; Vernazza, J.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes a secondary combustion chamber (SCC) for hazardous waste treatment systems that uses a plasma arc torch as the heat source. Developed under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Retech, Inc. and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the unit is intended primarily to handle the off-gas from a Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT) system. ft is designed to heat the effluent gas which may contain volatile organic compounds, and maintain the gas temperature above 1000 C for two seconds or more. The benefits of using a plasma arc gas heater are described in comparison to a conventional fossil fuel heated SCC. Thermal design considerations are discussed. Analysis and experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness in destroying hazardous compounds and reducing the total volume of gaseous emissions.

  11. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Stone, C.C.

    1960-05-10

    An apparatus and method are given for forming a welding arc which is rotated by a magnetic field very rapidly about an annular electrode so that a weld is produced simultaneously over all points of an annular or closed path. This invention inhibits outgassing from the jacket of a fuel slug which is being welded by adjusting the pressure throughout the welding cycle to establish a balance between the gas pressure within the jacket and that of the atmosphere surrounding the jacket. Furthermore, an improved control of the magnetic field producing rotation of the welding arc is disclosed whereby this rotation is prevented from splashing about the metal being welded as the welding arc makes it molten.

  12. Dynamic Discharge Arc Driver. [computerized simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, R. E.; Slapnicar, P. I.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program using nonlinear RLC circuit analysis was developed to accurately model the electrical discharge performance of the Ames 1-MJ energy storage and arc-driver system. Solutions of circuit parameters are compared with experimental circuit data and related to shock speed measurements. Computer analysis led to the concept of a Dynamic Discharge Arc Driver (DDAD) capable of increasing the range of operation of shock-driven facilities. Utilization of mass addition of the driver gas offers a unique means of improving driver performance. Mass addition acts to increase the arc resistance, which results in better electrical circuit damping with more efficient Joule heating, producing stronger shock waves. Preliminary tests resulted in an increase in shock Mach number from 34 to 39 in air at an initial pressure of 2.5 torr.

  13. Photoelectric detection electric arc in energetic arrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leks, Jan

    2001-08-01

    The evolution of photoelectric converter, fiber optics and integrated circuits, in particular optic detectors, increases area of applying of the industrial measuring and control systems that used IR detectors. One of the more important is optic detection of electric arc in industrial energetic arrangements. That kind of detection is sure, easy to apply in existing industrial apparatus a d it is cheaper than another way of detection. Additionally optic detection of electric arc is safety for attendance persons and may work on computer system. The article presents an example of circuit with semiconductor IR photoelectric detector to detection of electric arc and points at the most important questions which should be taken into consideration in designing instruments like described one.

  14. Singular-Arc Time-Optimal Trajectory of Aircraft in Two-Dimensional Wind Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a study of a minimum time-to-climb trajectory analysis for aircraft flying in a two-dimensional altitude dependent wind field. The time optimal control problem possesses a singular control structure when the lift coefficient is taken as a control variable. A singular arc analysis is performed to obtain an optimal control solution on the singular arc. Using a time-scale separation with the flight path angle treated as a fast state, the dimensionality of the optimal control solution is reduced by eliminating the lift coefficient control. A further singular arc analysis is used to decompose the original optimal control solution into the flight path angle solution and a trajectory solution as a function of the airspeed and altitude. The optimal control solutions for the initial and final climb segments are computed using a shooting method with known starting values on the singular arc The numerical results of the shooting method show that the optimal flight path angle on the initial and final climb segments are constant. The analytical approach provides a rapid means for analyzing a time optimal trajectory for aircraft performance.

  15. Boundary Layer Protuberance Simulations in Channel Nozzle Arc Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larin, M. E.; Campbell, C. H.; Pulsonetti, M. V.

    2009-01-01

    Various protuberance heights and shapes were modeled in the channel nozzle of the NASA Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Strictures Facility with the Data- Parallel Line Relaxation computational fluid dynamics code. The heating on the protuberance was compared to baseline (no protuberance) heating at a single fixed arc jet condition in order to obtain heating augmentation factors that will be used for flight traceability in the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment on Space Shuttle Orbiter flights STS-119 (completed) and STS-128 (future flight). The arc jet simulations were performed in conjunction with the actual ground tests performed on the flight version (selected height and shape) of the protuberance. Thearc jet simulations for the final (flight version) protuberance included non-uniform inflow conditions beginning at the channel nozzle throat. The 2D inflow condition was modeled based on the current best practices methodology and used variable enthalpy and mass flow rate across the throat. Channel walls were modeled as fully catalytic isothermal surfaces, while the test section (consisting of Reaction Cured Glass tiles) was modeled as a partially catalytic radiative equilibrium wall. The results of the protuberance and baseline simulations were compared to the applicable ground test results. In addition, the obtained heating augmentation factors were compared to the factors derived from the STS-119 flight data. The effects of the protuberance shock on the opposite channel wall were also investigated.

  16. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from −0.25 to −0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (−0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid−mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration. PMID:27303032

  17. Nonlinear identification of the total baroreflex arc.

    PubMed

    Moslehpour, Mohsen; Kawada, Toru; Sunagawa, Kenji; Sugimachi, Masaru; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2015-12-15

    The total baroreflex arc [the open-loop system relating carotid sinus pressure (CSP) to arterial pressure (AP)] is known to exhibit nonlinear behaviors. However, few studies have quantitatively characterized its nonlinear dynamics. The aim of this study was to develop a nonlinear model of the sympathetically mediated total arc without assuming any model form. Normal rats were studied under anesthesia. The vagal and aortic depressor nerves were sectioned, the carotid sinus regions were isolated and attached to a servo-controlled piston pump, and the AP and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) were measured. CSP was perturbed using a Gaussian white noise signal. A second-order Volterra model was developed by applying nonparametric identification to the measurements. The second-order kernel was mainly diagonal, but the diagonal differed in shape from the first-order kernel. Hence, a reduced second-order model was similarly developed comprising a linear dynamic system in parallel with a squaring system in cascade with a slower linear dynamic system. This "Uryson" model predicted AP changes 12% better (P < 0.01) than a linear model in response to new Gaussian white noise CSP. The model also predicted nonlinear behaviors, including thresholding and mean responses to CSP changes about the mean. Models of the neural arc (the system relating CSP to SNA) and peripheral arc (the system relating SNA to AP) were likewise developed and tested. However, these models of subsystems of the total arc showed approximately linear behaviors. In conclusion, the validated nonlinear model of the total arc revealed that the system takes on an Uryson structure. PMID:26354845

  18. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism.

    PubMed

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-28

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ(26)Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ(26)Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration. PMID:27303032

  19. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from ‑0.25 to ‑0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (‑0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid‑mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  20. Ion source based on the cathodic arc

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, D.M.; Falabella, S.

    1994-02-01

    A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated, is described. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles. 3 figures.

  1. Barriers to flashover discharge arcs on Teflon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gossland, M.; Balmain, K. G.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of various barriers (empty gap, copper, Mylar, and nickel mesh) on the probability of simultaneous arc discharging of two physically separated pieces of electron-beam-charged Teflon was studied. For the empty gap barrier, it was found that simultaneous discharges rarely occur when the separation between the samples is greater than approximately 0.4 times the length of their common edge when this length is of the order of 1 cm. Evidence suggests that electromagnetic fields play a larger role than electrons in influencing the occurrence of simultaneous arc discharges.

  2. Arc-driven rail accelerator research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Pradosh K.

    1987-01-01

    Arc-driven rail accelerator research is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time and rate of ablation. Locations of two simultaneously accelerating arcs were determined by optical and magnetic probes and fron streak camera photographs. All three measurements provide consistent results.

  3. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, R.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pollina, R.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Avco-Everett Research Lab., Everett, MA )

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this task is to study the corrosion and arc erosion of MHD materials in a cooperative effort with, and to support, the MHD topping cycle program. Materials tested in the Avco Research Laboratory/Textron facility, or materials which have significant MHD importance, will be analyzed to document their physical deterioration. Conclusions shall be drawn about their wear mechanisms and lifetime in the MHD environment with respect to the following issues; sulfur corrosion, electrochemical corrosion, and arc erosion. The impact of any materials or slag conditions on the level of power output and on the level of leakage current in the MHD channel will also be noted, where appropriate.

  4. Grain refinement control in TIG arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.; Whiffen, E. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A method for controlling grain size and weld puddle agitation in a tungsten electrode inert gas welding system to produce fine, even grain size and distribution is disclosed. In the method the frequency of dc welding voltage pulses supplied to the welding electrode is varied over a preselected frequency range and the arc gas voltage is monitored. At some frequency in the preselected range the arc gas voltage will pass through a maximum. By maintaining the operating frequency of the system at this value, maximum weld puddle agitation and fine grain structure are produced.

  5. Arc jet tests of metallic TPS materials.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centolanzi, F. J.; Zimmerman, N. B.; Probst, H. B.; Lowell, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    Seven thoria dispersed nickel base alloys and one cobalt base alloy, candidates for the Metallic Thermal Protection System for the Space Shuttle Vehicle, were tested simultaneously in an arc jet at a nominal test temperature of 1366 deg K (2000 deg F) and pressure of 0.01 atmospheres. The degradation of the materials after 50 one half-hour cycles in the arc jet simulating Space Shuttle entry conditions was determined utilizing techniques including X-ray diffraction, metallography, and electron beam microprobe.

  6. Ion source based on the cathodic arc

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Falabella, Steven

    1994-01-01

    A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles.

  7. Electric-arc steam plasma generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anshakov, A. S.; Urbakh, E. K.; Radko, S. I.; Urbakh, A. E.; Faleev, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigation results on the arc plasmatorch for water-steam heating are presented. The construction arrangement of steam plasma generator with copper electrodes of the stepped geometry was firstly implemented. The energy characteristics of plasmatorch and erosion of electrodes reflect the features of their behavior at arc glow in the plasma-forming environment of steam. The results of numerical study of the thermal state of the composite copper-steel electrodes had a significant influence on optimization of anode water-cooling aimed at improvement of its operation life.

  8. Modeling of the anode surface deformation in high-current vacuum arcs with AMF contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaolong; Wang, Lijun; Deng, Jie; Jia, Shenli; Qin, Kang; Shi, Zongqian

    2016-02-01

    A high-current vacuum arc subjected to an axial magnetic field is maintained in a diffuse status. With an increase in arc current, the energy carried by the arc column to the anode becomes larger and finally leads to the anode temperature exceeding the melting point of the anode material. When the anode melting pool is formed, and the rotational plasma of the arc column delivers its momentum to the melting pool, the anode melting pool starts to rotate and also flow outwards along the radial direction, which has been photographed by some researchers using high-speed cameras. In this paper, the anode temperature and melting status is calculated using the melting and solidification model. The swirl flow of the anode melting pool and deformation of the anode is calculated using the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model with the volume of fraction (VOF) method. All the models are transient 2D axial-rotational symmetric models. The influence of the impaction force of the arc plasma, electromagnetic force, viscosity force, and surface tension of the liquid metal are all considered in the model. The heat flux density injected into the anode and the arc pressure are obtained from the 3D numerical simulation of the high-current vacuum arc using the MHD model, which gives more realistic parameters for the anode simulation. Simulation results show that the depth of the anode melting pool increases with an increase in the arc current. Some droplets sputter out from the anode surface, which is caused by the inertial centrifugal force of the rotational melting pool and strong plasma pressure. Compared with the previous anode melting model without consideration of anode deformation, when the deformation and swirl flow of the anode melting pool are considered, the anode temperature is relatively lower, and just a little more than the melting point of Cu. This is because of liquid droplets sputtering out of the anode surface taking much of the energy away from the anode surface. The

  9. Geochemical differences between along-arc and across-arc volcanics in west-central Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilert, Sonja; Freundt, Armin; Wörner, Gerhard; Kutterolf, Steffen

    2012-04-01

    The La Paz Centro - Malpaisillo Lineament (LPML) in west-central Nicaragua is a north-south striking, 20 km long chain of maars and cinder cones, which intersects the northwest-southeast striking main volcanic front. A tectonic control of LPML volcanism is likely but only evident for the Malpaisillo fissure at the northern end of the LPML. Previous work demonstrated geochemical variations implying changes in mantle-source composition (i.e., added slab components) along the Central American Volcanic Arc at spatial scales of some 10's of kilometers. Our study of the LPML shows that minor but systematic changes also occur across the arc within 20 km distance. Variations in trace element ratios such as Zr/Nb, Ba/Th, Ba/La, Th/Zr, U/La and La/Yb along the LPML, i.e. across the volcanic front indicate little change in the degree of partial melting but an increase particularly in the hemipelagic sediment component in the mantle source from the fore arc towards the arc front, followed by a decrease behind the arc. Interestingly, the slab component is most prominent just in front of the arc. About 60 km southeast of the LPML, the Nejapa-Miraflores volcanic and tectonic lineament, which marks a 20 km north-south offset in the arc, differs substantially from the LPML. There is a wide scatter in incompatible trace element ratios indicating a heterogeneous mantle source at small spatial scales (c. 1 km). This mantle heterogeneity may represent vertical rather than across-arc variations and is probably related to the arc offset, because in the absence of such offset at the LPML mantle source conditions vary much less but more systematically.

  10. Physical volcanology of the submarine Mariana and Volcano Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomer, Sherman H.; Stern, Robert J.; Smoot, N. Christian

    1989-05-01

    Narrow-beam maps, selected dredge samplings, and surveys of the Mariana and Volcano Arcs identify 42 submarine volcanos. Observed activity and sample characteristics indicate 22 of these to be active or dormant. Edifices in the Volcano Arc are larger than most of the Mariana Arc edifices, more irregularly shaped with numerous subsidiary cones, and regularly spaced at 50 70 km. Volcanos in the Mariana Arc tend to be simple cones. Sets of individual cones and volcanic ridges are elongate parallel to the trend of the arc or at 110° counterclockwise from that trend, suggesting a strong fault control on the distribution of arc magmas. Volcanos in the Mariana Arc are generally developed west of the frontal arc ridge, on rifted frontal arc crust or new back-arc basin crust. Volcanos in the central Mariana Arc are usually subaerial, large (> 500 km3), and spaced about 50 70 km apart. Those in the northern and southern Marianas are largely submarine, closer together, and generally less than 500 km3 in volume. There is a shoaling of the arc basement around Iwo Jima, accompanied by the appearance of incompatible-element enriched lavas with alkalic affinities. The larger volcanic edifices must reflect either a higher magma supply rate or a greater age for the larger volcanos. If the magma supply (estimated at 10 20 km3/km of arc per million years at 18° N) has been relatively constant along the Mariana Arc, we can infer a possible evolutionary sequence for arc volcanos from small, irregularly spaced edifices to large (over 1000 km3) edifices spaced at 50 70 km. The volcano distribution and basal depths are consistent with the hypothesis of back-arc propagation into the Volcano Arc.

  11. Arcing Model of a Disconnector and its Effect on VFTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xin; Wang, Na; Xu, Jianyuan

    2013-07-01

    In the computational process of very fast transient over-voltage (VFTO), it is essential to find an accurate model for a gas insulated substation. The arcing model of the disconnector is particularly important. The general arcing model is not able to give a good description of the arc development process. In this paper, based on the physical process of arcing and existing arc models (the exponential time-varying resistance model and the segmental arcing models), a dynamic arcing model is proposed, which is divided into two stages before and after the zero crossing. The dynamic arcing model combines hyperbola time-varying resistance and the Mayr model to describe the dynamic process of arcing. The present paper creates an arc model blockset upon the Matlab/Simulink software platform. Moreover for a specific 1100 kV station, VFTO is simulated in detail based on different arcing models. It is demonstrated that the dynamic arcing model can describe the physical arc process precisely and is useful for improving the accuracy of VFTO simulations.

  12. Mandibular Reconstruction Based on the Concept of Double Arc Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sarukawa, Shunji; Noguchi, Tadahide; Kamochi, Hideaki; Sunaga, Ataru; Uda, Hirokazu; Nishino, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Yasushi

    2015-09-01

    The natural mandible has 2 arcs, the marginal arc and the occlusal arc. The marginal arc is situated along the lower margin of the mandible and affects the contour of the lower third of the face. The occlusal arc is situated along the dental arc and affects the stability of prosthodontics. The gap between these 2 arcs widens in the molar area. Our developed concept of "double arc reconstruction" involves making these 2 arcs for the reconstructed mandible. For the double-barrel fibula reconstruction, 2 bone segments are used to make both arcs. For reconstructions using the iliac crest, the double arc is made by inclination of the top of the bone graft toward the lingual side. Ten patients underwent double arc reconstruction: 2 underwent reconstruction with the double-barrel fibula, and 8 underwent reconstruction with the iliac crest. Four patients had a removable denture prosthesis, 1 had an osseointegrated dental implant, and 5 did not require further prosthodontic treatment. The shape of the reconstructed mandible after double arc reconstruction resembles the native mandible, and masticatory function is good with the use of a dental implant or removable denture prosthesis, or even without prosthodontics. PMID:26335321

  13. The effect of plasma on solar cell array arc characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Tyree, E.

    1984-01-01

    The influence from the ambient plasma on the arc characteristics of a negatively biased solar cell array was investigated. The arc characteristics examined were the peak current during an arc, the decay time as the arc terminates, and the charge lost during the arc. These arc characteristics were examined in a nitrogen plasma with charge densities ranging from 15,000 to 45,000 cu cm. Background gas pressures ranged from 8x1,000,000 to 6x100,000 torr. Over these ranges of parameters no significant effect on the arc characteristics were seen. Arc characteristics were also examined for three gas species: helium, nitrogen and argon. The helium arcs have higher peak currents and shorter decay times than nitrogen and argon arcs. There are slight differences in the arc characteristics between nitrogen and argon. These differences may be caused by the differences in mass of the respective species. Also, evidence is presented for an electron emission mechanism appearing as a precursor to solar array arcs. Occassionally the plasma generator could be turned off, and currents could still be detected in the vacuum system. When these currents are presented, arcs may occur.

  14. Influence of a transverse magnetic field on arc root movements in a dc plasma torch: Diamagnetic effect of arc column

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Keun Su

    2009-03-23

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field on the anodic arc root movement inside a dc plasma torch has been investigated. The arc voltage fluctuation, which represents the degree of the arc instability, was reduced to 28.6% of the original value and the high frequency components in the voltage signal also decreased in their magnitudes. The inherent arc instability in a dc thermal plasma torch seems to be suppressed by a diamagnetic effect of the arc column. Furthermore, the measured voltage wave forms indicated that the arc root attachment mode would be controllable by a transverse magnetic field.

  15. Automated Variable-Polarity Plasma-Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Jones, S. C., III; Munafo, P.; Munafo, A.; Biddle, A.; Wilson, W.

    1984-01-01

    Variable-polarity plasma-arc methods produces better welds at lower cost than gas-shielded tungsten-arc welding in assemblies. Weld porosity very low and costs of joint preparation, depeaking, inspection, and weld repair minimized.

  16. Arc-shock interaction inside a supersonic nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, M.T.C.; Kwan, S.; Hall, W.

    1996-02-01

    Arcs burning in supersonic nozzles have wide technical applications. They are commonly used in high-voltage circuit breakers, arc heaters, and arc plasma processing systems. The present investigation is aimed at an understanding of the arc behavior inside a modern high-voltage puffer circuit breaker where a high pressure necessary for the generation of a gas blast is produced by the compression of a piston inside the puffer chamber. Flow separation in the thermal layer between the high-temperature arc core and cold flow generates large vortices which deform the shape of the arc core. For the current range investigated, the center of the shock is not sensitive to the current, but is moved upstream relative to that without the arc. The computed features of the interaction are in agreement with the experimental observations of [2] and [3]. The arcing gas is SF{sub 6}.

  17. Optical Arc-Length Sensor For TIG Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew A.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed subsystem of tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding system measures length of welding arc optically. Viewed by video camera, in one of three alternative optical configurations. Length of arc measured instead of inferred from voltage.

  18. DEVICE AND METHOD FOR PRODUCING A HIGH INTENSITY ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-01-01

    A device is described for producing an energetic d-c carbon arc discharge between widely spaced electrodes with arc currents in excess of 100 amperes in a magnetic field of about 3000 gauss and witnin an evacuated enclo sure at a pressure of about 10/sup -5/ mm Hg. No defining electrodes are used in the device, thus essentially eliminating the problems of shorting which heretofore limited the amount of current that could be produced in an arc discharge. The energetic carbon arc discharge is sustained by the potential across the electrodes and by carbon ions and electrons released from the electrodes during arc operation. A large part of the potential drop of the arc occurs along the arc and many energetic electrons reach the anode because the arc pressure is relatively low, and few collisions occur. The carbon discharge is also an efficient ion pump.

  19. Three-dimensional seismic attenuation structure beneath Kyusyu, Japan: Implications for arc magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saita, H.; Nakajima, J.; Shiina, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Philippine Sea (PHS) plate is subducting beneath Kyusyu and a clear volcanic front is formed through the middle of the arc. However, there is a volcanic gap in the central part of Kyushu, between Aso and Kirishima volcanoes. Many studies have discussed arc magmatism in Kyushu in terms of 3D seismic velocity structure, but little is known on seismic attenuation structure. Seismic attenuation structure provides additional insights into subduction-zone dynamics, because higher-temperature environments or the existence of fluids may have different effects on seismic attenuation from on seismic velocity. Therefore the estimate of seismic attenuation is very important to understand arc magmatism and mantle dynamics in subduction zone. This study estimates seismic attenuation structure beneath Kyushu using a large number of high-quality waveform data. We applied the method of Nakajima et al. (2013, JGR) to waveform data derived from 3052 earthquakes that occurred from April 2003 to May 2014. We determined the corner frequency of earthquakes by the spectral ratio method of S-coda waves. Then, we determined a whole-path attenuation term (t*), site-amplification factors and spectrum level simultaneously by a joint inversion. Finally, the t* values (N= 62290) were inverted to obtain three-dimensional attenuation structure. The obtained results show several interesting features. First, the subducting PHS slab is imaged as a low attenuation zone. Second, high-attenuation zone exists in the fore-arc mantle. This high-attenuation zone corresponds spatially to a high Poisson's ratio area, suggesting that the mantle is serpentinized as a result of fluids released by dehydration in the subducting crust. Third, an inclined high-attenuation zone that is interpreted as a mantle upwelling flow is observed in the back-arc mantle. However, the inclined high-attenuation zone is less developed in the volcanic gap between Aso and Kirishima volcanoes. This observation suggests the

  20. Cheaper Custom Shielding Cups For Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.

    1992-01-01

    New way of making special-purpose shielding cups for gas/tungsten arc welding from hobby ceramic greatly reduces cost. Pattern machined in plastic. Plaster-of-paris mold made, and liquid ceramic poured into mold. Cost 90 percent less than cup machined from lava rock.

  1. Position Statements of the Arc. 1992 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arc, Arlington, TX.

    This monograph presents 15 position statements of The Arc, a national organization for persons with mental retardation. A preamble presents the organization's Mission Statement. Principles and assumptions stressing the uniqueness of all people and the importance of a sense of control over one's destiny are listed. The position statements are then…

  2. Arc spraying solderable tabs to glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindmayer, J.

    1981-01-01

    Tabs suitable for electrical or mechanical connections in solar cells and integrated circuits are made by spraying technique. Solder wets copper, copper bonds to aluminum, and aluminum adheres to glass. Arc spraying is automated and integrated with encapsulation, eliminating hand tabbing, improving reliability, and reducing cost.

  3. Clinical Applications of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matuszak, Martha M.; Yan Di; Grills, Inga; Martinez, Alvaro

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To present treatment planning case studies for several treatment sites for which volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) could have a positive impact; and to share an initial clinical experience with VMAT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Four case studies are presented to show the potential benefit of VMAT compared with conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in pediatric cancer, bone marrow-sparing whole-abdominopelvic irradiation (WAPI), and SBRT of the lung and spine. Details of clinical implementation of VMAT for SBRT are presented. The VMAT plans are compared with conventional techniques in terms of dosimetric quality and delivery efficiency. Results: Volumetric modulated arc therapy reduced the treatment time of spine SBRT by 37% and improved isodose conformality. Conformal and VMAT techniques for lung SBRT had similar dosimetric quality, but VMAT had improved target coverage and took 59% less time to deliver, although monitor units were increased by 5%. In a complex pediatric pelvic example, VMAT reduced treatment time by 78% and monitor units by 25% compared with IMRT. A double-isocenter VMAT technique for WAPI can spare bone marrow while maintaining good delivery efficiency. Conclusions: Volumetric modulated arc therapy is a new technology that may benefit different patient populations, including pediatric cancer patients and those undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and WAPI. Volumetric modulated arc therapy has been used and shown to be beneficial for significantly improving delivery efficiency of lung and spine SBRT.

  4. Signal Analysis of Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding is a process in which the input parameters such as current, voltage and travel speed, can be easily controlled and/or monitored. However, weld quality is not solely a function of these parameters. An adaptive method of observing weld quality is desired to improve weld quality assurance. The use of dynamic electrical properties of the welding arc as a weld quality monitor was studied. The electrical properties of the arc are characterized by the current voltage transfer function. The hardware and software necessary to collect the data at a maximum rate of 45 kHz and to allow the off-line processing of this data are tested. The optimum input current waveform is determined. Bead-on-plate welds to observe such characteristics of the weld as the fundamental frequency of the puddle are studied. Future work is planned to observe changes of the arc response with changes in joint geometry, base metal chemistry, and shielding gas composition are discussed.

  5. Neural-Network Modeling Of Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Kristinn; Barnett, Robert J.; Springfield, James F.; Cook, George E.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Bjorgvinsson, Jon B.

    1994-01-01

    Artificial neural networks considered for use in monitoring and controlling gas/tungsten arc-welding processes. Relatively simple network, using 4 welding equipment parameters as inputs, estimates 2 critical weld-bead paramaters within 5 percent. Advantage is computational efficiency.

  6. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  7. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scatteringmore » creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.« less

  8. Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Brown, William F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  9. CW arc-lamp-pumped alexandrite lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, H.; Walling, J.C.; Wernikowski, T.; Harter, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    The performance characteristics of arc-lamp- (Xe and Hg) pumped, CW alexandrite lasers are described in detail. The modes of operation considered are free running, tuned, and repetitively Q-switched. The experimental arrangement and apparatus are also outlined. The experimental results are discussed in terms of a steady-state model, and the areas of agreement and difficulty are pointed out.

  10. Arc tracking of cables for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D.; Frontzek, F. R.; Hanson, J.; Reher, H. J.; Judd, M. D.; Bryant, D.

    1995-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop a new test method that is suitable for the assessment of the resistance of aerospace cables to arc tracking for different specific environmental and network conditions of spacecrafts. This paper reports the purpose, test conditions, test specimen, test procedure, and test acceptance criteria of seven different (200-250 mm long) cables.

  11. First NIF ARC target shot results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; di Nicola, P.; Hermann, M.; Kalantar, D.; Martinez, D.; Tommasini, R.; NIF ARC Team

    2015-11-01

    The commissioning of the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser system in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is currently in progress. ARC laser is designed to ultimately provide eight beamlets with pulse duration adjustable from 1 to 50 ps, and energies up to 1.7 kJ per beamlet. ARC will add critical capability for the NIF facility for creating precision x-ray backlighters needed for many current NIF ICF and HED experiments. ARC can also produce MeV electrons and protons for new science experiment on NIF. In the initial set of experiments, 4 of the 8 beamlets are being commissioned up to 1 kJ per beam at 30 ps pulse length using foil and wire targets. X-ray energy distribution, spot size and pulse duration are measured using various diagnostics. This talk will describe the shot setup and results. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Arc Welding Dictionary 3. Project HIRE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David C.; And Others

    Designed as supplemental material to on-going instruction in the vocational program, this third of three picture dictionary booklets in the Arc Welding series is intended to assist the learning handicapped student to master the core vocabulary taught in the trade. Intended for individual or small group instruction with minimal supervision, this…

  13. Monochromatic imaging of cathodic arc plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kinrot, U.; Goldsmith, S.; Boxman, R.L.

    1996-02-01

    Vacuum arc deposition (VAD) is an increasingly studied and applied technology that offers potential advantages such as high deposition rates, low deposition temperatures, and good adhesion. In the cathodic vacuum arc, minute hot areas on the cathode surface (``cathode spots``) emit highly ionized metallic plasma jets. Deposition of the cathode material is formed by placing a substrate in the plasma stream. Ceramic thin films such as TiN, SnO{sub 2}, and TiO{sub 2} can be deposited using VAD in the presence of a reactive gas. Plasma parameters such as the density of the various ionic components, ionic kinetic energy, electron temperature, and ion-excited state population densities, all have an important role in the film growth mechanism in VAD and largely affect the film characteristics (structure, morphology, stoichiometry, adhesion, uniformity, thickness, etc.). In the case of ceramic films, the interaction between the expanding plasma and the ambient gas is very important, but poorly understood. Here, monochromatic imaging is presented as a powerful tool for plasma diagnostics, and specifically for the investigation of cathodic vacuum arc plasma. Two-dimensional (2-D) monochromatic images in the visible region of an aluminum cathodic arc burning in helium background gas are presented. Inversion of Abel`s integral enables a reconstruction of the spatial distribution of the plasma emission coefficient. The qualitative and sometimes quantitative nature of the interaction between the expanding plasma and the ambient gas can be visualized with this technique.

  14. Portable machine welding head automatically controls arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleksiak, C. E.; Robb, M. A.

    1967-01-01

    Portable weld tool makes weld repairs out-of-station and on the side opposite the original weld. It provides full automatic control of the arc voltage, current, wire feed, and electrode travel speed in all welding attitudes. The device is readily adaptable to commercially available straight polarity dc weld packs.

  15. Arc Welding Dictionary 1. Project HIRE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David C.; And Others

    Designed as supplemental material to on-going instruction in the vocational program, this first of three picture dictionary booklets in the Arc Welding series is intended to assist the learning handicapped student to master the core vocabulary taught in the trade. Intended for individual or small group instruction with minimal supervision, this…

  16. Arc Welding Dictionary 2. Project HIRE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David C.; And Others

    Designed as supplemental material to on-going instruction in the vocational program, this second of three picture dictionary booklets in the Arc Welding series is intended to assist the learning handicapped student to master the core vocabulary taught in the trade. Intended for individual or small group instruction with minimal supervision, this…

  17. Rejuvenating Allen's Arc with the Geometric Mean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, William A.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that, despite ongoing criticism, Allen's arc elasticity formula remains entrenched in the microeconomics principles curriculum. Reviews the evolution and continuing scrutiny of the formula. Argues that the use of the geometric mean offers pedagogical advantages over the traditional arithmetic mean approach. (CFR)

  18. 3D cartographic modeling of the Alpine arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vouillamoz, Naomi; Sue, Christian; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Calcagno, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    We built a 3D cartography of the Alpine arc, a highly non-cylindrical mountain belt, using the 3D GeoModeller of the BRGM (French geological survey). The model allows to handle the large-scale 3D structure of seventeen major crustal units of the belt (from the lower crust to the sedimentary cover nappes), and two main discontinuities (the Insubric Line and the Crustal Penninic Front). It provides a unique document to better understand their structural relationships and to produce new sections. The study area comprises the western Alpine arc, from the Jura to the Northwest, up to the Bergell granite intrusion and the Lepontine Dome to the East, and is limited to the South by the Ligurian basin. The model is limited vertically 10 km above sea level at the top, and the moho interface at the bottom. We discarded the structural relationships between the Alps sensus stricto and the surrounding geodynamic systems such as the Rhine graben or the connection with the Apennines. The 3D-model is based on the global integration of various data such as the DEM of the Alps, the moho isobaths, the simplified geological and tectonic maps of the belt, the crustal cross-sections ECORS-CROP and NFP-20, and complementary cross-sections specifically built to precise local complexities. The database has first been integrated in a GIS-project to prepare their implementation in the GeoModeller, by homogenizing the different spatial referencing systems. The global model is finally interpolated from all these data, using the potential field method. The final document is a new tri-dimensional cartography that would be used as input for further alpine studies.

  19. Diffuse degassing through magmatic arc crust (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. E.; Ingebritsen, S.

    2013-12-01

    The crust of magmatic arcs plays an important role in the volatile cycle at convergent margins. The fluxes of subduction- and arc-related volatiles such as H2O, C, Cl, S are poorly known. It is commonly believed that gases emitted from volcanoes account nearly quantitatively for the volatiles that cross the Moho beneath the volcanic front. This volcanic degassing may occur during eruption, emission from summit fumaroles and hot springs, or more 'diffuse' delivery to volcano flanks. However, several observations suggest that volatiles also transit arc crust by even more diffuse pathways, which could account for significant volatile loss on long time and length scales. Active metamorphism of arc crust produces crustal-scale permeability that is sufficient to transport a large volume of subducted volatiles (Ingebritsen and Manning, 2002, PNAS, 99, 9113). Arc magmas may reach volatile saturation deeper than the maximum depths recorded by melt inclusions (e.g., Blundy et al., 2010, EPSL, 290, 289), and exhumed sections of magmatic arc crust typically record voluminous plutons reflecting magma crystallization and volatile loss at depths well below the volcanic edifice. At shallower depths, topographically driven meteoric groundwater systems can absorb magmatic volatiles and transport them laterally by tens of km (e.g., James et al., 1999, Geology, 27, 823; Evans et al., 2002, JVGR, 114, 291). Hydrothermal ore deposits formed at subvolcanic depths sequester vast amounts of volatiles, especially sulfur, that are only returned to the surface on the time scale of exhumation and/or erosion. Water-rich metamorphic fluids throughout the crust can readily carry exsolved volcanic gases because the solubilities of volatile bearing minerals such as calcite, anhydrite, and fluorite are quite high at elevated pressure and temperature (e.g., Newton and Manning, 2002, Am Min, 87, 1401; 2005, J Pet, 46, 701; Tropper and Manning, 2007, Chem Geol, 242, 299). Taken together, these

  20. Bulk arc strain, crustal thickening, magma emplacement, and mass balances in the Mesozoic Sierra Nevada arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenrong; Paterson, Scott; Saleeby, Jason; Zalunardo, Sean

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying crustal deformation is important for evaluating mass balance, material transfer, and the interplay between tectonism and magmatism in continental arcs. We present a dataset of >650 finite strain analyses compiled from published works and our own studies with associated structural, geochronologic, and geobarometric information in central and southern Sierra Nevada, California, to quantify the arc crust deformation. Our results show that Mesozoic tectonism results in 65% arc-perpendicular bulk crust shortening under a more or less plane strain condition. Mesozoic arc magmatism replaced ∼80% of this actively deforming arc crust with plutons requiring significantly greater crustal thickening. We suggest that by ∼85 Ma, the arc crust thickness was ∼80 km with a 30-km-thick arc root, resulting in a ∼5 km elevation. Most tectonic shortening and magma emplacement must be accommodated by downward displacements of crustal materials into growing crustal roots at the estimated downward transfer rate of 2-13 km/Myr. The downward transfer of crustal materials must occur in active magma channels, or in "escape channels" in between solidified plutons that decrease in size with time and depth resulting in an increase in the intensity of constrictional strain with depth. We argue that both tectonism and magmatism control the thickness of the crust and surface elevation with slight modification by surface erosion. The downward transported crustal materials initially fertilize the MASH zone thus enhancing to the generation of additional magmas. As the crustal root grows it may potentially pinch out and cool the mantle wedge and thus cause reduction of arc magmatism.