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Sample records for arctic polar vortex

  1. Weakening of the Stratospheric Polar Vortex by Arctic Sea-Ice Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Baek-Min; Son, Seok-Woo; Min, Seung-Ki; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Joong; Zhang, Xiangdong; Shim, Taehyoun; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-09-02

    Successive cold winters of severely low temperatures in recent years have had critical social and economic impacts on the mid-latitude continents in the Northern Hemisphere. Although these cold winters are thought to be partly driven by dramatic losses of Arctic sea ice, the mechanism that links sea ice loss to cold winters remains a subject of debate. Here, by conducting observational analyses and model experiments, we show how Arctic sea ice loss and cold winters in extra-polar regions are dynamically connected through the polar stratosphere. We find that decreased sea ice cover during early winter months (November-December), especially over the Barents-Kara seas, enhance the upward propagation of planetary-scale waves with wavenumbers of 1 and 2, subsequently weakening the stratospheric polar vortex in mid-winter (January- February). The weakened polar vortex preferentially induces a negative phase of Arctic Oscillation at the surface, resulting in low temperatures in mid-latitudes.

  2. Dehydration and Denitrification in the Arctic Polar Vortex During the 1995-1996 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintsa, E. J.; Newman, P. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Herman, R. L.; Lait, L. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Wamsley, P. R.; Dutton, G. S.; Bui, T. P.; Kohn, D. W.; Anderson, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Dehydration of more than 0.5 ppmv water was observed between 18 and 19 km (0-450-465 K) at the edge of the Arctic polar vortex on February 1, 1996. More than half the reactive nitrogen (NO(y)) had also been removed, with layers of enhanced NO(y) at lower altitudes. Back trajectory calculations show that air parcels sampled inside the vortex had experienced temperatures as low as 188 K within the previous 12 days, consistent with a small amount of dehydration. The depth of the dehydrated layer (approximately 1 km) and the fact that trajectories passed through the region of ice saturation in one day imply selective growth of a small fraction of particles to sizes large enough (>10 microns) to be irreversibly removed on this timescale. Over 25% of the Arctic vortex in a 20-30 K range of 0 is estimated to have been dehydrated in this event.

  3. Dehydration and Denitrification in the Arctic Polar Vortex During the 1995-1996 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintsa, E. J.; Newman, P. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Herman, R. L.; Lait, L. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Wamsley, P. R.; Dutton, G. S.; Bui, T. P.; Kohn, D. W.; Anderson, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Dehydration of more than 0.5 ppmv water was observed between 18 and 19 km (theta about 450-465 K) at the edge of the Arctic polar vortex on February 1, 1996. More than half the reactive nitrogen (NO(sub y)) had also been removed, with layers of enhanced (sub y) at lower altitudes. Back trajectory calculations show that air parcels sampled inside the vortex had experienced temperatures as low as 188 K within the previous 12 days, consistent with a small amount of dehydration. The depth of the dehydrated layer (about 1 km) and the fact that trajectories passed through the region of ice saturation in one day imply selective growth of a small fraction of particles to sizes large enough (>10 micron) to be irreversibly removed on this timescale. Over 25% of the Arctic vortex in a 20-30 K range of theta is estimated to have been dehydrated in this event.

  4. Dehydration and Denitrification in the Arctic Polar Vortex During the 1995-1996 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintsa, E. J.; Newman, P. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Herman, R. L.; Lait, L. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Wamsley, P. R.; Dutton, G. S.; Bui, T. P.; Kohn, D. W.; Anderson, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Dehydration of more than 0.5 ppmv water was observed between 18 and 19 km (theta approximately 450-465 K) at the edge of the Arctic polar vortex on February 1, 1996. More than half the reactive nitrogen (NO(y)) had also been removed, with layers of enhanced NO(y) at lower altitudes. Back trajectory calculations show that air parcels sampled inside the vortex had experienced temperatures as low as 188 K within the previous 12 days, consistent with a small amount of dehydration. The depth of the dehydrated layer (approximately 1 km) and the fact that trajectories passed through the region of ice saturation in one day imply selective growth of a small fraction of particles to sizes large enough (>10 micrometers) to be irreversibly removed on this timescale. Over 25% of the Arctic vortex in a 20-30 K range Transport of theta is estimated to have been dehydrated in this event.

  5. Dehydration and Denitrification in the Arctic Polar Vortex During the 1995-1996 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintsa, E. J.; Newman, P. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Herman, R. L.; Lait, L. R.; Schoerberl, M. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Wamsley, P. R.

    1998-01-01

    Dehydration of more than 0.5 ppmv water was observed between 18 and 19 km (theta = 450-465 K) at the edge of the Arctic polar vortex on February 1, 1996. More than half the reactive nitrogen (NOy) had also been removed, with layers of enhanced NOy at lower altitudes. Back trajectory calculations show that air parcels sampled inside the vortex had experienced temperatures as low as 188 K within the previous 12 days, consistent with a small amount of dehydration. The depth of the dehydrated layer (approx. 1 km) and the fact that trajectories passed through the region of ice saturation in one day imply selective growth of a small fraction of particles to sizes large enough (>10 micrometers) to be irreversibly removed on this timescale. Over 25% of the Arctic vortex in a 20-30 K range of theta is estimated to have been dehydrated in this event.

  6. Baroclinic Instability in High Latitudes Induced by Polar Vortex: A Connection to the Arctic Oscillation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H. L.; Tokinaga, Hiroki

    2002-01-01

    In this study, baroclinic instability of the northern winter atmosphere is investigated in the context of the dynamical interpretation of the Arctic oscillation. The unstable solutions, obtained by a method of 3D normal mode expansion, are compared for observed zonal basic states with strong and weak polar vortices in reference to the Arctic oscillation index.As a result of the eigenvalue problem of the linear stability analysis, a characteristic unstable solution is obtained that dominates in high latitudes when the polar vortex is strong. The mode is called a monopole Charney mode M1, which is similar to an ordinary Charney mode MC in midlatitudes. In order to understand the origin of the M1 mode, a hypothetical zonal basic state that has only the polar jet with no subtropical jet is analyzed. It is found that the M1 mode in high latitudes is excited by the baroclinicity associated with the polar vortex. The M1 mode in high latitudes is dynamically the same Charney mode as MC but is excited by the baroclinicity of the polar jet instead of the subtropical jet.As the MC mode intensifies the subtropical jet by the eddy momentum transfer, the M1 mode transfers eddy momentum to high latitudes to intensify the polar jet. Since M1 mode appears during the strong polar jet and feeds the westerly momentum to the polar jet, there is a positive feedback between the M1 mode and the polar vortex. This positive feedback would produce a persistent strong polar jet, which may in tern result in the occurrence of the annular mode of the Arctic oscillation.


  7. Aircraft Emissions Deposited in the Stratosphere and Within the Arctic Polar Vortex. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baughcum, S.L.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes an analysis of the quantity of emissions (water vapor, NO(x)) projected to be deposited directly within the Arctic polar vortex by projected fleets of Mach 2.4 high speed civil transports (HSCT`s). It also evaluates the amount of emissions from subsonic aircraft which are emitted into the lower stratosphere using aircraft emission inventories developed earlier for May 1990 as representative of the annual average.

  8. Weakening of the stratospheric polar vortex by Arctic sea-ice loss.

    PubMed

    Kim, Baek-Min; Son, Seok-Woo; Min, Seung-Ki; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Joong; Zhang, Xiangdong; Shim, Taehyoun; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Successive cold winters of severely low temperatures in recent years have had critical social and economic impacts on the mid-latitude continents in the Northern Hemisphere. Although these cold winters are thought to be partly driven by dramatic losses of Arctic sea-ice, the mechanism that links sea-ice loss to cold winters remains a subject of debate. Here, by conducting observational analyses and model experiments, we show how Arctic sea-ice loss and cold winters in extra-polar regions are dynamically connected through the polar stratosphere. We find that decreased sea-ice cover during early winter months (November-December), especially over the Barents-Kara seas, enhances the upward propagation of planetary-scale waves with wavenumbers of 1 and 2, subsequently weakening the stratospheric polar vortex in mid-winter (January-February). The weakened polar vortex preferentially induces a negative phase of Arctic Oscillation at the surface, resulting in low temperatures in mid-latitudes. PMID:25181390

  9. Polar processing in a split vortex: Arctic ozone loss in early winter 2012/2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, G. L.; Lawrence, Z. D.; Santee, M. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Lambert, A.; Pitts, M. C.

    2015-05-01

    A sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) in early January 2013 caused the Arctic polar vortex to split and temperatures to rapidly rise above the threshold for chlorine activation. However, ozone in the lower stratospheric polar vortex from late December 2012 through early February 2013 reached the lowest values on record for that time of year. Analysis of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) trace gas measurements and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) data shows that exceptional chemical ozone loss early in the 2012/13 Arctic winter resulted from a unique combination of meteorological conditions associated with the early-January 2013 SSW: unusually low temperatures in December 2012, offspring vortices within which air remained well isolated for nearly 1 month after the vortex split, and greater-than-usual vortex sunlight exposure throughout December 2012 and January 2013. Conditions in the two offspring vortices differed substantially, with the one overlying Canada having lower temperatures, lower nitric acid (HNO3), lower hydrogen chloride, more sunlight exposure/higher ClO in late January, and a later onset of chlorine deactivation than the one overlying Siberia. MLS HNO3 and CALIPSO data indicate that PSC activity in December 2012 was more extensive and persistent than at that time in any other Arctic winter in the past decade. Chlorine monoxide (ClO, measured by MLS) rose earlier than previously observed and was the largest on record through mid-January 2013. Enhanced vortex ClO persisted until mid-February despite the cessation of PSC activity when the SSW started. Vortex HNO3 remained depressed after PSCs had disappeared; passive transport calculations indicate vortex-averaged denitrification of about 4 parts per billion by volume. The estimated vortex-averaged chemical ozone loss, ~ 0.7-0.8 parts per million by volume near 500 K (~21 km), was the largest December/January loss in the MLS

  10. Arctic Vortex

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-06-26

    ... within the cloud layer downwind of the obstacle. These turbulence patterns are known as von Karman vortex streets. In these images ... was the first to derive the conditions under which these turbulence patterns occur. von Karman was a professor of aeronautics at the ...

  11. Polar processing in a split vortex: early winter Arctic ozone loss in 2012/13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, G. L.; Lawrence, Z. D.; Santee, M. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Lambert, A.; Pitts, M. C.

    2015-02-01

    -averaged chemical ozone loss by late January near 500 K (~ 21 km), with substantial loss occurring from ~ 450 to 550 K. The surface area of PSCs in December 2012 was larger than that in any other December observed by CALIPSO. As a result of denitrification, HNO3 abundances in 2012/13 were among the lowest in the MLS record for the Arctic. ClO enhancement was much greater in December 2012 through mid-January 2013 than that at the corresponding time in any other Arctic winter observed by MLS. Furthermore, reformation of HCl appeared to play a greater role in chlorine deactivation than in more typical Arctic winters. Ozone loss in December 2012 and January 2013 was larger than any previously observed in those months. This pattern of exceptional early winter polar processing and ozone loss resulted from the unique combination of dynamical conditions associated with the early January 2013 SSW, namely unusually low temperatures in December 2012 and offspring vortices that remained well-confined and largely in sunlit regions for about a month after the vortex split.

  12. The anomalous Arctic lower stratospheric polar vortex of 1992-1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Zurek, R. W.; Gelman, M. E.; Miller, A. J.; Nagatani, R.

    1994-01-01

    Potential vorticity (PV) gradients defining the lower stratospheric vortex during the 1992-1993 winter were anomalously strong and persistent compared to those during the last 16 Arctic winters. For approximately equal to 3 months PV gradients were closer to typical Antarctic values than to most Arctic values. Air motion diagnostics computed for 3-dimensional air parcels confirm that the 1992-1993 Arctic lower stratospheric vortex was substantially more isolated than is typical. Such isolation will delay and reduce the export of the higher ozone typical of the winter lower stratospheric vortex to mid-latitudes. This may have contributed to the record-low total ozone amounts observed in northern mid-latitudes in 1993.

  13. Polar Vortex Conditions During the 1995-96 Arctic Winter: MLS CL0 and HNO(sub 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of lower stratospheric CLO and HNO(sub 3) during the 1995-96 Arctic winter are presented. The 1995-96 Arctic winter was both colder and more persistently cold than usual, leading to an enhancement in lower stratospheric CLO of greater magnitude, vertical extent, and duration than has been previously observed in the Arctic. Vortex concentrations of HNO(sub 3) in mid-December were large due to diabetic decent. Trajectory calculations indicate that localized severe depletions of gas-phase HNO(sub 3) in mid-February and early March did not arise from intrainment of midlatitude air into the vortex and were therefore probably related to polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation.

  14. Measurements of condensation nuclei in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition - Observations of particle production in the polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Stolzenburg, M. R.; Clark, W. E.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.

    1990-01-01

    The ER-2 Condensation Nucleus Counter (ER-2 CNC) was operated in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in January and February 1989. The ER-2 CNC measures the mixing ratio of particles, CN, with diameters from approximately 0.02 to approximately 1 micron. The spatial distribution of CN in the Arctic polar vortex was found to resemble that measured in the Antarctic in the Spring of 1987. The vertical profile of CN in the vortex was lowered by subsidence. At altitudes above the minimum in the CN mixing ratio profile, CN mixing ratios correlated negatively with that of N2O, demonstrating new particle production. CN serve as nuclei in the formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) and the concentration of CN can affect PSC properties.

  15. Measurements of condensation nuclei in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition: Observations of particle production in the polar vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.C.; Stolzenburg, M.R. ); Clark, W.E. ); Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G.V.; Chan, K.R. )

    1990-03-01

    The ER-2 Condensation Nucleus Counter (ER-2 CNC) was operated in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in January and February 1989. The ER-2 CNC measures the mixing ratio of particles, CN, with diameters from approximately 0.02 {mu}m to approximately 1 {mu}m. The spatial distribution of CN in the Arctic polar vortex was found to resemble that measured in the Antarctic in the Spring of 1987. The vertical profile of CN in the vortex was lowered by subsidence. At altitudes above the minimum in the CN mixing ratio profile, CN mixing ratios correlated negatively with that of N{sub 2}O, demonstrating new particle production. CN serve as nuclei in the formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC's) and the concentration of CN can affect PSC properties.

  16. Arctic sea ice melt, the Polar vortex, and mid-latitude weather: Are they connected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vihma, Timo; Overland, James; Francis, Jennifer; Hall, Richard; Hanna, Edward; Kim, Seong-Joong

    2015-04-01

    The potential of recent Arctic changes to influence broader hemispheric weather is a difficult and controversial topic with considerable skepticism, as time series of potential linkages are short (<10 years) and the signal-to-noise ratio relative to chaotic weather events is small. A way forward is through further understanding of potential atmospheric dynamic mechanisms. Although not definitive of change in a statistical or in a causality sense, the exceptionally warm Arctic winters since 2007 do contain increased variability according to some climate indices, with six negative (and two positive) Arctic Oscillation atmospheric circulation index events that created meridional flow reaching unusually far north and south. High pressure anomalies developed east of the Ural Mountains in Russia in response to sea-ice loss in the Barents/Kara Seas, which initiated eastward-propagating wave trains of high and low pressure that advected cold air over central and eastern Asia. Increased Greenland blocking and greater geopotential thickness related to low-level temperatures increases led to northerly meridional flow into eastern North America, inducing persistent cold periods. Arctic connections in Europe and western North America are less clear. The quantitative impact of potential Arctic change on mid-latitude weather will not be resolved within the foreseeable future, yet new approaches to high-latitude atmospheric dynamics can contribute to improved extended range forecasts as outlined by the WMO/Polar Prediction Program and other international activities.

  17. 2009/10 Arctic polar vortex observed by ISS/JEM/SMILES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Imai, Koji; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Sano, Takuki; Manago, Naohiro; Naito, Yoko; Akiyoshi, Hideharu

    2012-07-01

    Superocnducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) is a 4K cooled limb sounding instrument in the 625-650 GHz frequency region, onboard International Space Station (ISS). SMILES was jointly developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). SMILES operated from Oct. 12, 2009 to Apr. 23, 2010. SMILES measured O3, H35Cl, H37Cl, ClO, HOCl, HO2, BrO, HNO3, CH3CN and O3 isotopes. Precision (random error) of SMILES ClO product is about 0.01 ppb. SMILES measured latitudinal region 38°S-65°N. On Jan. 23, 2010, HCl is about 1.6 ppbt at outside polar vortex and it is almost entirely converted to the ClO (1.6 to 2.0 ppbt). O3 destruction has occurred as much as 20% (from 4 ppmv to 3.2 ppmv) after 3 weeks of heterogeneous chemical process. We compared temperature, O3, HCl, ClO, of SMILES with those calculated from SD-WACCM (specified dynamics-WACCM, reproduction run using GEOS-5 meteoroogical data, ±15 mintes at the nearest spatial grid). It has been already known that the agreement between SMILES and SD-WACCM are quite excellent at outside polar vortex at all altitude region. We found that agreements inside polar vortex, in genral, are also good.

  18. Chemical analysis of refractory stratospheric aerosol particles collected within the arctic vortex and inside polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Martin; Weigel, Ralf; Kandler, Konrad; Günther, Gebhard; Molleker, Sergej; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Vogel, Bärbel; Weinbruch, Stephan; Borrmann, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric aerosol particles with diameters larger than about 10 nm were collected within the arctic vortex during two polar flight campaigns: RECONCILE in winter 2010 and ESSenCe in winter 2011. Impactors were installed on board the aircraft M-55 Geophysica, which was operated from Kiruna, Sweden. Flights were performed at a height of up to 21 km and some of the particle samples were taken within distinct polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). The chemical composition, size and morphology of refractory particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. During ESSenCe no refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were sampled. In total 116 small silicate, Fe-rich, Pb-rich and aluminum oxide spheres were found. In contrast to ESSenCe in early winter, during the late-winter RECONCILE mission the air masses were subsiding inside the Arctic winter vortex from the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, thus initializing a transport of refractory aerosol particles into the lower stratosphere. During RECONCILE, 759 refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were found consisting of silicates, silicate / carbon mixtures, Fe-rich particles, Ca-rich particles and complex metal mixtures. In the size range below 500 nm the presence of soot was also proven. While the data base is still sparse, the general tendency of a lower abundance of refractory particles during PSC events compared to non-PSC situations was observed. The detection of large refractory particles in the stratosphere, as well as the experimental finding that these particles were not observed in the particle samples (upper size limit ˜ 5 µm) taken during PSC events, strengthens the hypothesis that such particles are present in the lower polar stratosphere in late winter and have provided a surface for heterogeneous nucleation during PSC formation.

  19. Chemical loss of ozone in the Arctic polar vortex in the winter of 1991- 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Wofsy, S. C.; Gottlieb, E. W.; Lait, L. R.; Newman, P. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Proffitt, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    In situ measurements of chlorine monoxide, bromine monoxide, and ozone are extrapolated globally, with the use of meteorological tracers, to infer the loss rates for ozone in the Arctic lower stratosphere during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition II (AASE II) in the winter of 1991-1992. The analysis indicates removal of 15 to 20 percent of ambient ozone because of elevated concentrations of chlorine monoxide and bromine monoxide. Observations during AASE II define rates of removal of chlorine monoxide attributable to reaction with nitrogen dioxide (produced by photolysis of nitric acid) and to production of hydrochloric acid. Ozone loss ceased in March as concentrations of chlorine monoxide declined. Ozone losses could approach 50 percent if regeneration of nitrogen dioxide were inhibited by irreversible removal of nitrogen oxides (denitrification), as presently observed in the Antarctic, or without denitrification if inorganic chlorine concentrations were to double.

  20. Chemical Loss of Ozone in the Arctic Polar Vortex in the Winter of 1991-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Wofsy, S. C.; Gottlieb, E. W.; Lait, L. R.; Newman, P. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Chan, K. R.; Proffitt, M. H.; Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Baumgardner, D.; Dye, J. E.; Wilson, J. C.; Elkins, J. W.; Anderson, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    In situ measurements of chlorine monoxide, bromine monoxide, and ozone are extrapolated globally, with the use of meteorological tracers, to infer the loss rates for ozone in the Arctic lower stratosphere during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition II (AASE II) in the winter of 1991-1992. The analysis indicates removal of 15 to 20 percent of ambient ozone because of elevated concentrations of chlorine monoxide and bromine monoxide. Observations during AASE II define rates of removal of chlorine monoxide attributable to reaction with nitrogen dioxide (produced by photolysis of nitric acid) and to production of hydrochloric acid. Ozone loss ceased in March as concentrations of chlorine monoxide declined. Ozone losses could approach 50 percent if regeneration of nitrogen dioxide were inhibited by irreversible removal of nitrogen oxides (denitrification), as presently observed in the Antarctic, or without denitrification if inorganic chlorine concentrations were to double.

  1. Titan's Winter Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F.M.; Achterberg, R.K.; Schinder, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere has provided an interesting study in contrasts and similarities with Earth's. While both have N$_2$ as the dominant constituent and comparable surface pressures $\\sim1$ bar, Titan's next most abundant molecule is CH$_4$, not O$_2$, and the dissociative breakup of CH$_4$ and N$_2$ by sunlight and electron impact leads to a suite of hydrocarbons and nitriles, and ultimately the photochemical smog that enshrouds the moon. In addition, with a 15.95-day period, Titan is a slow rotator compared to Earth. While the mean zonal terrestrial winds are geostrophic, Titan's are mostly cyclostrophic, whipping around the moon in as little as 1 day. Despite the different dynamical regime, Titan's winter stratosphere exhibits several characteristics that should be familiar to terrestrial meteorologists. The cold winter pole near the 1 -mbar level is circumscribed by strong winds (up to 190 m/s) that act as a barrier to mixing with airmasses at lower latitudes. There is evidence of enhancement of several organic species over the winter pole, indicating subsidence. The adiabatic heating associated with this subsidence gives rise to a warm anomaly at the 0.01-mbar level, raising the stratopause two scale heights above its location at equatorial latitudes. Condensate ices have been detected in Titan's lower stratosphere within the winter polar vortex from infrared spectra. Although not always unambiguously identified, their spatial distribution exhibits a sharp gradient, decreasing precipitously across the vortex away from the winter pole. The interesting question of whether there is important heterogeneous chemistry occurring within the polar vortex, analogous to that occurring in the terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds in the ozone holes, has not been addressed. The breakup of Titan's winter polar vortex has not yet been observed. On Earth, the polar vortex is nonlinearly disrupted by interaction with large-amplitude planetary waves. Large-scale waves have not

  2. Polar vortex dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Recent work with high resolution, one-layer numerical models of fluid flows resembling those in the real stratosphere has suggested that: (1) the interiors of strong cyclonic vortices like the Antarctic polar vortex may be almost completely isolated laterally from their surroundings - perhaps even completely isolated, under some circumstances; (2) by contrast, material near the edge of such and isolated region can easily be eroded (or mixed one-sidedly) into the surrounding region; and (3) the erosion characteristically produces extremely steep gradients in isentropic distributions of potential vorticity (PV) and of other tracers, possibly down to horizontal length scales of a few kilometers only. Such length scales may occur both at the edge of the main polar vortex and in smaller features outside it, such as thin filamentary structures, produced by the erosion process.

  3. Observation of O3, HCl, ClO, and HOCl by ISS/JEM/SMILES inside and outside Arctic Polar Vortex during 2009-2010 Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, M.; Mitsuda, C.; Manago, N.; Imai, K.; Naito, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Shiotani, M.

    2011-12-01

    JEM/SMILES instrument has been in operation from Oct. 12, 2009 to Apr. 21, 2010 on the International Space Station. SMILES observed limb emission in the frequency region 625 and 650 GHz with 0.8 MHz sampling, and it can provide vertical profiles of O3, HCl, ClO, HOCl, HO2, BrO, HNO3, CH3CN and O3 isotopes. SMILES use 4K cooled SIS mixer which has very low noise (Tsys ~ 340 K), and SMILES L2 products should have significantly smaller random error for species such as ClO and HOCl compared to the previous measurements. This paper reports interpretation of chemistry at inside and outside Arctic polar vortex during 2009-2010 winter season based upon O3, HCl, ClO, and HOCl observation by SMILES.

  4. The Arctic Vortex in March 2011: A Dynamical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Newman, Paul A.; Garfinkel,Chaim I.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the record ozone loss observed in March 2011, dynamical conditions in the Arctic stratosphere were unusual but not unprecedented. Weak planetary wave driving in February preceded cold anomalies in t he polar lower stratosphere in March and a relatively late breakup of the Arctic vortex in April. La Nina conditions and the westerly phas e of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) were observed in March 201 1. Though these conditions are generally associated with a stronger vortex in mid-winter, the respective cold anomalies do not persist t hrough March. Therefore, the La Nina and QBO-westerly conditions cannot explain the observed cold anomalies in March 2011. In contrast, po sitive sea surface temperature anomalies in the North Pacific may ha ve contributed to the unusually weak tropospheric wave driving and s trong Arctic vortex in late winter 2011.

  5. Match observations in the Arctic winter 1996/97: High stratospheric ozone loss rates correlate with low temperatures deep inside the polar vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, A.; Rex, M.; Steger, J.; Harris, N. R. P.; Braathen, G. O.; Reimer, E.; Alfier, R.; Beck, A.; Alpers, M.; Cisneros, J.; Claude, H.; De Backer, H.; Dier, H.; Dorokhov, V.; Fast, H.; Godin, S.; Hansen, G.; Kanzawa, H.; Kois, B.; Kondo, Y.; Kosmidis, E.; Kyrö, E.; Litynska, Z.; Molyneux, M. J.; Murphy, G.; Nakane, H.; Parrondo, C.; Ravegnani, F.; Varotsos, C.; Vialle, C.; Viatte, P.; Yushkov, V.; Zerefos, C.; von der Gathen, P.

    2000-01-01

    With the Match technique, which is based on the coordinated release of ozonesondes, chemical ozone loss rates in the Arctic stratospheric vortex in early 1997 have been quantified in a vertical region between 400 K and 550 K. Ozone destruction was observed from mid February to mid March in most of these levels, with maximum loss rates between 25 and 45ppbv/day. The vortex averaged loss rates and the accumulated vertically integrated ozone loss have been smaller than in the previous two winters, indicating that the record low ozone columns observed in spring 1997 were partly caused by dynamical effects. The observed ozone loss is inhomogeneous through the vortex with the highest loss rates located in the vortex centre, coinciding with the lowest temperatures. Here the loss rates per sunlit hour reached 6 ppbv/h, while the corresponding vortex averaged rates did not exceed 3.9 ppbv/h.

  6. Four Fourier transform spectrometers and the Arctic polar vortex: instrument intercomparison and ACE-FTS validation at Eureka during the IPY springs of 2007 and 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, R. L.; Kolonjari, F.; Lindenmaier, R.; Mittermeier, R. L.; Daffer, W.; Fast, H.; Manney, G.; Strong, K.; Walker, K. A.

    2009-11-01

    The Canadian Arctic Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Validation Campaigns have been carried out at Eureka, Nunavut (80.05° N, 86.42° W) during the polar sunrise period since 2004. During the International Polar Year (IPY) springs of 2007 and 2008, three ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers were operated simultaneously. This paper presents a comparison of trace gas measurements of stratospherically important species involved in ozone depletion, namely O3, HCl, ClONO2, HNO3 and HF, recorded with these three spectrometers. Total column densities of the gases measured with the new Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) Bruker 125HR are shown to agree to within 3.5% with the existing Environment Canada Bomem DA8 measurements. After smoothing both of these sets of measurements to account for the lower spectral resolution of the University of Waterloo Portable Atmospheric Research Interferometric Spectrometer for the Infrared (PARIS-IR), the measurements were likewise shown to agree with PARIS-IR to within 7%. Concurrent measurements of these gases were also made with the satellite-based Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) during overpasses of Eureka during these time periods. While one of the mandates of the ACE satellite mission is to study ozone depletion in the polar spring, previous validation exercises have identified the highly variable polar vortex conditions of the spring period to be a challenge for validation efforts. In this work, comparisons between the CANDAC Bruker 125HR and ACE-FTS have been used to develop strict criteria that allow the ground- and satellite-based instruments to be confidently compared. When these criteria are taken into consideration, there is shown to be no significant bias between the ACE-FTS and ground-based FTIR spectrometer for any of these gases.

  7. Chemical Observations of a Polar Vortex Intrusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Douglass, A. R.; McGee, T. J.; Browell, E.; Waters, J.; Livesey, N.; Read, W.; Froidevaux, L.

    2006-01-01

    An intrusion of vortex edge air in D the interior of the Arctic polar vortex was observed on the January 31,2005 flight of the NASA DC-8 aircraft. This intrusion was identified as anomalously high values of ozone by the AROTAL and DIAL lidars. Our analysis shows that this intrusion formed when a blocking feature near Iceland collapsed, allowing edge air to sweep into the vortex interior. along the DC-8 flight track also shows the intrusion in both ozone and HNO3. Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) were observed by the DIAL lidar on the DC-8. The spatial variability of the PSCs can be explained using MLS HNO3 and H2O observations and meteorological analysis temperatures. We also estimate vortex denitrification using the relationship between N2O and HNO3. Reverse domain fill back trajectory calculations are used to focus on the features in the MLS data. The trajectory results improve the agreement between lidar measured ozone and MLS ozone and also improve the agreement between the HNO3 measurements PSC locations. The back trajectory calculations allow us to compute the local denitrification rate and reduction of HCl within the filament. We estimate a denitrification rate of about lO%/day after exposure to below PSC formation temperature. Analysis of Aura MLS observations made

  8. Four Fourier transform spectrometers and the Arctic polar vortex: instrument intercomparison and ACE-FTS validation at Eureka during the IPY springs of 2007 and 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, R. L.; Kolonjari, F.; Lindenmaier, R.; Mittermeier, R. L.; Daffer, W.; Fast, H.; Manney, G.; Strong, K.; Walker, K. A.

    2010-01-01

    The Canadian Arctic Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Validation Campaigns have been carried out at Eureka, Nunavut (80.05° N, 86.42° W) during the polar sunrise period since 2004. During the International Polar Year (IPY) springs of 2007 and 2008, three ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers were operated simultaneously. This paper presents a comparison of trace gas measurements of stratospherically important species involved in ozone depletion, namely O3, HCl, ClONO2, HNO3 and HF, recorded with these three spectrometers. Total column densities of the gases measured with the new Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) Bruker 125HR are shown to agree to within 3.5% with the existing Environment Canada Bomem DA8 measurements. After smoothing both of these sets of measurements to account for the lower spectral resolution of the University of Waterloo Portable Atmospheric Research Interferometric Spectrometer for the Infrared (PARIS-IR), the measurements were likewise shown to agree with PARIS-IR to within 7%. Concurrent measurements of these gases were also made with the satellite-based Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) during overpasses of Eureka during these time periods. While one of the mandates of the ACE satellite mission is to study ozone depletion in the polar spring, previous validation exercises have identified the highly variable polar vortex conditions of the spring period to be a challenge for validation efforts. In this work, comparisons between the CANDAC Bruker 125HR and ACE-FTS have been used to develop strict criteria that allow the ground- and satellite-based instruments to be confidently compared. When these criteria are taken into consideration, the observed biases between the ACE-FTS and ground-based FTIR spectrometer are not persistent for both years and are generally insignificant, though small positive biases of ~5%, comparable in magnitude to those seen

  9. The potential for ozone depletion in the Arctic polar stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. ); Anderson, J.G.; Toohey, D.W. ); Fahey, D.W.; Kawa, S.R. ); Jones, R.L. ); McKenna, D.S. ); Poole, L.R. )

    1991-05-31

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. most of the available chlorine (HCl and ClONO{sub 2}) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl{sub 2}O{sub 2} throughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO{sub 3}, and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15% at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8% losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50% over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  10. The potential for ozone depletion in the Arctic polar stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, W. H.; Anderson, J. G.; Toohey, D. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Poole, L. R.

    1991-01-01

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. Most of the available chlorine (CHl and ClONO2) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl2O2 thoroughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO3, and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15 percent at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8 percent losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50 percent over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  11. In situ observations of HO2 and OH obtained on the NASA ER-2 in the high-ClO conditions of the 1999/2000 Arctic polar vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisco, T. F.; Smith, J. B.; Stimpfle, R. M.; Wilmouth, D. M.; Anderson, J. G.; Richard, E. C.; Bui, T. P.

    2002-10-01

    Extensive observations of OH and HO2 obtained aboard the NASA ER-2 inside the Arctic polar vortex during the SAGE III Ozone loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) provide the opportunity to identify and test interferences during the measurement of HO2 in the presence of high concentrations of ClO. In-flight calibrations are consistent with small interferences from CH3O2 (8%) and from ClO (3%) to the total signal on average inside the vortex. Measurements of HO2, OH, ClO, and O3 are used with rate constants derived from laboratory measurements to test the consistency of the reactions that control HO2/OH. Inside the vortex the calculated HO2/OH under predicts the observed HO2/OH by 7% with the JPL-00 rate constants and over-predicts the observations by 23% when recent laboratory rates are used. Measurements of HO2 and ClO are used to calculate ozone loss rates and concentrations of HOCl with uncertainties determined from the analysis of HO2/OH. The calculated concentration of HOCl is 52-28+50 pptv, or 0.07 × ClO on average in the vortex. The ozone loss rate from the two cycles controlled by HO2 + ClO is ˜1.5-0.5+1.2 ppbv d-1 in early March.

  12. Trace Gas Transport in the Arctic Vortex Inferred from ATMOS ATLAS-2 Observations During April 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. C.; Manney, G. L.; Gunson, M. R.; Abbas, M. M.; Chang, A. Y.; Goldman, A.; Irion, F. W.; Michelsen, H. A.; Newchurch, M. J.; Rinsland, C, P,; Salawitch, R. J.; Stiller, G. P.; Zander, R.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the long-lived tracers CH4, N2O, and HF from the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument during the Atmospheric Laboratory for Science and Applications-2 (ATLAS-2) Space Shuttle mission in April 1993 are used to infer average winter descent rates ranging from 0.8 km/month at 20 km to 3.2 km/month at 40 km in the Arctic polar vortex during the 1992-93 winter. Descent rates in the mid-stratosphere are similar to those deduced for the Antarctic vortex using ATMOS/ATLAS-3 measurements in November 1994, but the shorter time period of descent in the Arctic leads to smaller total distances of descent. Strong horizontal gradients observed along the vortex edge indicate that the Arctic vortex remains a significant barrier to transport at least until mid-April in the lower to middle stratosphere.

  13. Transport out of the lower stratospheric Arctic vortex by Rossby wave breaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, D. W.; Plumb, R. A.; Atkinson, R. J.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Lait, L. R.; Newman, P. A.; Loewenstein, M.; Toohey, D. W.; Avallone, L. M.; Webster, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The fine-scale structure in lower stratospheric tracer transport during the period of the two Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expeditions (January and February 1989; December 1991 to March 1992) is investigated using contour advection with surgery calculations. These calculations show that Rossby wave breaking is an ongoing occurrence during these periods and that air is ejected from the polar vortex in the form of long filamentary structures. There is good qualitative agreement between these filaments and measurements of chemical tracers taken aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. The ejected air generally remains filamentary and is stretched and mixed with midlatitude air as it is wrapped around the vortex. This process transfers vortex air into midlatitudes and also produces a narrow region of fine-scale filaments surrounding the polar vortex. Among other things, this makes it difficult to define a vortex edge. The calculations also show that strong stirring can occur inside as well as outside the vortex.

  14. Microphysical properties of synoptic-scale polar stratospheric clouds: in situ measurements of unexpectedly large HNO3-containing particles in the Arctic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molleker, S.; Borrmann, S.; Schlager, H.; Luo, B.; Frey, W.; Klingebiel, M.; Weigel, R.; Ebert, M.; Mitev, V.; Matthey, R.; Woiwode, W.; Oelhaf, H.; Dörnbrack, A.; Stratmann, G.; Grooß, J.-U.; Günther, G.; Vogel, B.; Müller, R.; Krämer, M.; Meyer, J.; Cairo, F.

    2014-10-01

    In January 2010 and December 2011, synoptic-scale polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) fields were probed during seven flights of the high-altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysica within the RECONCILE (Reconciliation of essential process parameters for an enhanced predictability of Arctic stratospheric ozone loss and its climate interaction) and the ESSenCe (ESSenCe: ESA Sounder Campaign) projects. Particle size distributions in a diameter range between 0.46 and 40μm were recorded by four different optical in situ instruments. Three of these particle instruments are based on the detection of forward-scattered light by single particles. The fourth instrument is a grayscale optical array imaging probe. Optical particle diameters of up to 35μm were detected with particle number densities and total particle volumes exceeding previous Arctic measurements. Also, gas-phase and particle-bound NOy was measured, as well as water vapor concentrations. The optical characteristics of the clouds were measured by the remote sensing lidar MAL (Miniature Aerosol Lidar) and by the in situ backscatter sonde MAS (Multiwavelength Aerosol Scatterometer), showing the synoptic scale of the encountered PSCs. The particle mode below 2μm in size diameter has been identified as supercooled ternary solution (STS) droplets. The PSC particles in the size range above 2μm in diameter are considered to consist of nitric acid hydrates, and the particles' high HNO3 content was confirmed by the NOy instrument. Assuming a particle composition of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), the optically measured size distributions result in particle-phase HNO3 mixing ratios exceeding available stratospheric values. Therefore the measurement uncertainties concerning probable overestimations of measured particle sizes and volumes are discussed in detail. We hypothesize that either a strong asphericity or an alternate particle composition (e.g., water ice coated with NAT) could explain our observations. In particular

  15. Titan's South Polar Vortex in Motion

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie captured by NASA'S Cassini spacecraft shows a south polar vortex, or a swirling mass of gas around the pole in the atmosphere, at Saturn’s moon Titan. The swirling mass appears to exec...

  16. Dynamics of a polarized vortex ring

    SciTech Connect

    Virk, D.; Melander, M.V.; Hussain, F.

    1994-02-01

    This paper builds on our claim that most vortical structures in transitional and turbulent flows are partially polarized. Polarization is inferred by the application of helical wave decomposition. We analyse initially polarized isolated viscous vortex rings through direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations using divergence-free axisymmetric eigenfunctions of the curl operator. Integral measures of the degree of polarization, such as the fractions of energy, enstrophy, and helicity associated with right-handed (or left-handed) eigenfunctions, remain nearly constant during evolution, thereby suggesting that polarization is a persistent feature. However, for polarized rings an axial vortex (tail) develops near the axis, where the local ratio of right- to left-handed vorticities develops significant non-uniformities due to spatial separation of peaks of polarized components. Reconnection can occur in rings when polarized and is clearly discerned from the evolution of axisymmetric vortex surfaces; but interestingly, the location of reconnection cannot be inferred from the vorticity magnitude. The ring propagation velocity U(p) decreases monotonically as the degree of initial polarization increases. Unlike force-balance arguments, two explanations based on vortex dynamics provided here are not restricted to thin rings and predict reduction in U(p) correctly. These results reveal surprising differences among the evolutionary dynamics of polarized, partially polarized, and unpolarized rings. 29 refs.

  17. On the Origin of Polar Vortex Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, J. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The existence of the multi-year HALOE CH4 data set, together with some comparisons of forward with back trajectory calculations which we have carried out, has motivated us to reexamine the question of polar vortex descent. Three-dimensional diabatic trajectory calculations have been carried out for the seven month fall to spring period in both the northern hemisphere (NH) and southern hemisphere (SH) polar stratosphere for the years 1992-1999. These computations are compared to fixed descent computations where the parcels were fixed at their latitude-longitude locations and allowed to descend without circulating. The forward trajectory computed descent is always less than the fixed descent due to horizontal parcel motions and variations in heating rates with latitude and longitude. Although the forward calculations estimate the maximum amount of descent that can occur, they do not necessarily indicate the actual origin of springtime vortex air. This is because more equator-ward air can be entrained within the vortex during its formation. To examine the origin of the springtime vortex air, the trajectory model was run backward for seven months from spring to fall. The back trajectories show a complex distribution of parcels in which one population originates in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere and experiences considerable descent in the polar regions, while the remaining parcels originate at lower altitudes of the middle and lower stratosphere and are mixed into the polar regions during vortex formation without experiencing as much vertical transport. The amount of descent experienced by the first population shows little variability from year to year, while the computed descent and mixing of the remaining parcels show considerable interannual variability due to the varying polar meteorology. Because of this complex parcel distribution it is not meaningful to speak of a net amount of descent experienced over the entire winter period. Since the back trajectories

  18. Microphysical properties of synoptic scale polar stratospheric clouds: in situ measurements of unexpectedly large HNO3 containing particles in the Arctic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molleker, S.; Borrmann, S.; Schlager, H.; Luo, B.; Frey, W.; Klingebiel, M.; Weigel, R.; Ebert, M.; Mitev, V.; Matthey, R.; Woiwode, W.; Oelhaf, H.; Dörnbrack, A.; Stratmann, G.; Grooß, J.-U.; Günther, G.; Vogel, B.; Müller, R.; Krämer, M.; Meyer, J.; Cairo, F.

    2014-05-01

    In January 2010 and December 2011 synoptic scale PSC fields were probed during seven flights of the high altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysica within the RECONCILE (Reconciliation of essential process parameters for an enhanced predictability of Arctic stratospheric ozone loss and its climate interaction.) and the ESSenCe (ESSenCe: ESA Sounder Campaign) projects. Particle size distributions in a diameter range between 0.46 μm and 40 μm were recorded simultaneously by up to four different optical in situ instruments. Three of these particle instruments are based on the detection of forward scattered light by single particles. The fourth instrument is a grey scale optical array imaging probe. Optical particle diameters of up to 35 μm were detected with particle number densities and total particle volumes exceeding previous Arctic measurements. Also, gas phase and particle bound NOy were measured, as well as water vapor concentrations, and other variables. Two remote sensing particle instruments, the Miniature Aerosol Lidar (MAL) and the backscatter sonde (MAS, Multiwavelenght Aerosol Scatterometer) showed the synoptic scale of the encountered PSCs. The particle mode below 2 μm in size diameter has been identified as supercooled ternary solution droplets (STS). The PSC particles in the size range above 2 μm in diameter are considered to consist of nitric acid hydrates or ice, and the particles' high HNO3 content was confirmed by the NOy instrument. Assuming a particle composition of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), the optically measured size distributions result in particle-phase HNO3 mixing ratios exceeding available stratospheric values. In particular, with respect to the denitrification by sedimentation of large HNO3-contaning particles, generally considered as NAT, our new measurements raise questions concerning composition, shape and nucleation pathways. Measurement uncertainties are discussed concerning probable overestimations of measured particle sizes

  19. Diabatic Descent In The Stratospheric Polar Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, J.; Schoeberl, M.

    Polar regions experience diabatic cooling during the fall and winter months, resulting in a downward mass flux. An accurate measure of this fall and winter diabatic descent, as well as an understanding of the transport of air into and out of the winter polar vor- tices, is required for estimates of polar ozone depletion. We have calculated diabatic cooling rates using a radiative transfer code and U.K. Met Office (UKMO) tempera- tures for the years 1992-2000. These cooling rates, together with UKMO horizontal winds, have been used to compute three-dimensional forward and backward diabatic trajectories for the seven month fall to spring period in both the NH and the SH. The forward calculations estimate the maximum amount of descent that can occur. How- ever, they are not necessarily a good indicator of the origin of the springtime vortex air because more equatorward air from lower altitudes can be entrained within the vortex during its formation. The back trajectories, starting in the springtime lower middle stratosphere, show a complex final distribution of parcels. One population originates in the fall in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere and experiences considerable de- scent, while the remaining parcels originate at lower altitudes in the midlatitudes and are mixed into the polar regions during vortex formation. The amount of descent ex- perienced by the first population shows little variability from year to year, while the computed descent and mixing of the remaining parcels show considerable interannual variability due to the varying polar meteorology. Because of this complex parcel dis- tribution it is not meaningful to speak of a net amount of descent experienced over the entire winter period. We have also compared diabatic trajectories with kinematic tra- jectories, in which the vertical motion is given by the UKMO analysed omega fields. These show that the kinematic trajectory descent is much less than the diabatic tra- jectory descent and exhibits

  20. Chemical change in the arctic vortex during AASE 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, Wesley A.; Jucks, Kenneth W.; Johnson, David G.; Chance, Kelly V.

    1994-01-01

    We measured column abundances of HF, HCl, O3, HNO3, and H2O on the NASA DC-8 during the AASE II campaign, using thermal emission spectroscopy. We made multiple traversals of the Arctic vortex and surroundings. Using HF as a tracer, we remove the effects of subsidence from the measured column abundances; perturbations in the resulting column abundances are attributed to chemical processing. We find that by January 1992 the stratospheric column in the vortex had been chemically depleted by about (55+/-10)% in HCl and (35+/-10)% in O3, and enhanced by about (15+/-10)% in HNO3 and (0+/-10)% in H2O.

  1. STED microscopy based on axially symmetric polarized vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhehai, Zhou; Lianqing, Zhu

    2016-03-01

    A stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy scheme using axially symmetric polarized vortex beams is proposed based on unique focusing properties of such kinds of beams. The concept of axially symmetric polarized vortex beams is first introduced, and the basic principle about the scheme is described. Simulation results for several typical beams are then shown, including radially polarized vortex beams, azimuthally polarized vortex beams, and high-order axially symmetric polarized vortex beams. The results indicate that sharper doughnut spots and thus higher resolutions can be achieved, showing more flexibility than previous schemes based on flexible modulation of both phase and polarization for incident beams. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61108047 and 61475021), the Natural Science Foundation of Beijing, China (Grant No. 4152015), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in Universities of China (Grant No. NCET-13-0667), and the Top Young Talents Support Program of Beijing, China (Grant No. CIT&TCD201404113).

  2. Volcanoes, Polar Clouds and Arctic Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite observations and model calculations show 5 to 10% local column ozone loss in some tropical and mid latitude locations, following El Chichon and Mount Pinatubo eruptions. The rapid deepening of the Antarctic ozone hole in the early 1980s has also been partially attributed to chemistry on volcanic aerosols from a number of large eruptions. Here the effects of volcanoes on Arctic polar processes are explored. Large polar stratospheric cloud particles that cause denitrification cannot form in a volcanically perturbed environment. Denitrification can increase Arctic ozone loss by up to 30% in a future colder climate. However, we show that enhanced chemical processing on volcanic aerosols can increase Arctic ozone loss in a cold year by about 60% independent of denitrification. A coupled chemistry-microphysics model is used to show that widespread distribution of volcanic aerosols in 2000 could have caused severe springtime ozone depletion in the Arctic stratosphere. While, volcanic aerosols can strongly affect the current Arctic column ozone abundance in a cold year, denitrification effects on ozone can only become important in a much colder lower stratosphere.

  3. Polar Stratospheric Descent of NO(y) and CO and Arctic Denitrification During Winter 1992-1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Salawitch, R. J.; Gunson, M. R.; Solomon, S.; Zander, R.; Mahieu, E.; Goldman, A.; Newchurch, M. J.; Irion, F. W.; Chang, A. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Observations inside the November 1994 Antarctic stratospheric vortex and inside the April 1993 remnant Arctic stratospheric vortex by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer are reported. In both instances, elevated volume mixing ratios (VMRS) of carbon monoxide (CO) were measured. A peak Antarctic CO VMR of 60 ppbv (where 1 ppbv = 10(exp -9) per unit Volume) was measured at a potential temperature of 710 K (about 27 km), about 1 km below the altitude of a pocket of elevated NO(y) (total reactive nitrogen) at a deep minimum in N2O (<5 ppbv). The Arctic observations also show a region of elevated vortex CO with a peak VMR of 90 ppbv it 630-670 K (-25 km) but no corresponding enhancement in NO(sub y) perhaps because of stronger dynamical activity in the northern hemisphere polar winter and/or interannual variability in the production of mesospheric or lower thermospheric NO. By comparing vortex and extravortex observations of NO(y) obtained at the same N2O VMR, Arctic vortex denitrification of 5 +/- 2 ppbv at 470 K (at approximately 18 km) is inferred. We show that our conclusion of substantial Arctic winter 1992-1993 denitrification is robust by comparing our extravortex observations with previous polar measurements obtained over a wide range of winter conditions. Correlations of NO(y) with N2O measured at the same potential temperature by ATMOS in the Arctic vortex and at midlatitudes on board the ER-2 aircraft several weeks later lie along the same mixing line. The result demonstrates the consistency of the two data sets and confirms that the ER-2 sampled fragments of the denitrified Arctic vortex following its breakup. An analysis of the ATMOS Arctic measurements of total hydrogen shows no evidence for significant dehydration inside the vortex.

  4. Effect of Recent Sea Surface Temperature Trends on the Arctic Stratospheric Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkel, Chaim I.; Oman, Luke; Hurwitz, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The springtime Arctic polar vortex has cooled significantly over the satellite era, with consequences for ozone concentrations in the springtime transition season. The causes of this cooling trend are deduced by using comprehensive chemistry-climate model experiments. Approximately half of the satellite era early springtime cooling trend in the Arctic lower stratosphere was caused by changing sea surface temperatures (SSTs). An ensemble of experiments forced only by changing SSTs is compared to an ensemble of experiments in which both the observed SSTs and chemically- and radiatively-active trace species are changing. By comparing the two ensembles, it is shown that warming of Indian Ocean, North Pacific, and North Atlantic SSTs, and cooling of the tropical Pacific, have strongly contributed to recent polar stratospheric cooling in late winter and early spring, and to a weak polar stratospheric warming in early winter. When concentrations of ozone-depleting substances and greenhouse gases are fixed, polar ozone concentrations show a small but robust decline due to changing SSTs. Ozone changes are magnified in the presence of changing gas concentrations. The stratospheric changes can be understood by examining the tropospheric height and heat flux anomalies generated by the anomalous SSTs. Finally, recent SST changes have contributed to a decrease in the frequency of late winter stratospheric sudden warmings.

  5. Middle-high latitude N2O distributions related to the arctic vortex breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. B.; Zou, H.; Gao, Y. Q.

    2006-03-01

    The relationship of N2O distributions with the Arctic vortex breakup is first analyzed with a probability distribution function (PDF) analysis. The N2O concentration shows different distributions between the early and late vortex breakup years. In the early breakup years, the N2O concentration shows low values and large dispersions after the vortex breakup, which is related to the inhomogeneity in the vertical advection in the middle and high latitude lower stratosphere. The horizontal diffusion coefficient (K,,) shows a larger value accordingly. In the late breakup years, the N2O concentration shows high values and more uniform distributions than in the early years after the vortex breakup, with a smaller vertical advection and K,, after the vortex breakup. It is found that the N2O distributions are largely affected by the Arctic vortex breakup time but the dynamically defined vortex breakup time is not the only factor.

  6. The Yearly Variation in Fall-Winter Arctic Winter Vortex Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Newman, Paul A.

    1999-01-01

    Using the change in HALOE methane profiles from early September to late March, we have estimated the minimum amount of diabatic descent within the polar which takes place during Arctic winter. The year to year variations are a result in the year to year variations in stratospheric wave activity which (1) modify the temperature of the vortex and thus the cooling rate; (2) reduce the apparent descent by mixing high amounts of methane into the vortex. The peak descent amounts from HALOE methane vary from l0km -14km near the arrival altitude of 25 km. Using a diabatic trajectory calculation, we compare forward and backward trajectories over the course of the winter using UKMO assimilated stratospheric data. The forward calculation agrees fairly well with the observed descent. The backward calculation appears to be unable to produce the observed amount of descent, but this is only an apparent effect due to the density decrease in parcels with altitude. Finally we show the results for unmixed descent experiments - where the parcels are fixed in latitude and longitude and allowed to descend based on the local cooling rate. Unmixed descent is found to always exceed mixed descent, because when normal parcel motion is included, the path average cooling is always less than the cooling at a fixed polar point.

  7. Defining the Polar Vortex Edge Using an N2O: Potential Temperature Correlation Versus the Nash Criterion: A Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James R.; Bui, T. Paul; Hurst, Dale F.; Elkins, James W.; Herman, Robert L.; Webster, Christopher R.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A prerequisite to study phenomena in the winter stratospheric polar vortex is the separation of measurements inside and outside the dynamical barrier of the vortex edge. We describe a technique to accurately determine the inner edge of the vortex boundary region from measurements of potential temperature and a trace gas, such as N2O, and apply it to in situ aircraft and balloon measurements from the SOLVE/THESE02000 Arctic campaign. The method may be used to refine the Nash algorithm, which, due to the inherently coarser resolution of potential vorticity on which it is dependent, may misidentify the inner edge by up to 466 km, and omit the identification of small, extra-vortex filaments within the vortex.

  8. Indirect switching of vortex polarity through magnetic dynamic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fior, G. B. M.; Novais, E. R. P.; Sinnecker, J. P.; Guimarães, A. P.; Garcia, F.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic vortex cores exhibit a gyrotropic motion and may reach a critical velocity, at which point they invert their z-component of the magnetization. We performed micromagnetic simulations to describe this vortex core polarity reversal in magnetic nanodisks with a perpendicular anisotropy. We found that the critical velocity decreases with the increase in perpendicular anisotropy, therefore departing from a universal criterion that relates this velocity only to the exchange stiffness of the material. This leads to a critical velocity inversely proportional to the vortex core radius. We have also shown that in a pair of interacting disks, it is possible to switch the core vortex polarity through a non-local excitation; exciting one disk by applying a rotating magnetic field, one is able to switch the polarity of a neighbor disk, with a larger perpendicular anisotropy.

  9. Potential Vorticity as a Diagnostic for the Mars Polar Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnochie, T. H.; Conrath, B. J.; Gierasch, P. J.; Banfield, D.; Smith, M. D.

    2009-05-01

    Polar vortices dominate the dynamics of the winter mid- and polar latitudes in the martian atmosphere as well as in the terrestrial stratosphere. Polar vortices have also been observed on Venus (Taylor, 2002), Jupiter (Orton, 2002), Saturn (Fletcher, 2008), and Titan (Teanby, 2008). Potential vorticity is the analysis quantity of choice for the terrestrial polar vortices because its vertical component distills the most important features of the wind and temperature fields into a single scalar variable; because it is a conserved tracer under adiabatic conditions; because it serves as the medium for Rossby waves; and because steep potential vorticity gradients are observed to be correlated with steep gradients in the concentrations of chemical species. Using potential vorticity derived from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) temperature soundings, we compare the structure of the martian polar vortices to those of the earth. We find that the northern martian winter polar vortex, just like its terrestrial conterpart, is bounded by a region of very steep potential vorticity gradients and is surrounded by a "surf zone", a region of low potential vorticity and very low potential vorticity gradients. The surf zone concept, as first described for the terrestrial stratosphere by McIntyre and Palmer (1983), implies persistent Rossby wave breaking. In the vicinity of the northern polar vortex, the TES data set provides some examples of local gradient reversals that are suggestive of wave breaking. There is also one case of possible large-scale wave breaking accompanied by an abrupt polar warming. The martian southern polar vortex, unlike its terrestrial counterpart and unlike the northern martian polar vortex, lacks a distinct boundary between the polar vortex and a surf zone. Instead, the potential vorticity field is highly disorganized with local gradient reversals throughout the middle and polar latitudes. In the zonal mean, the southern winter

  10. Balloon-borne In-Situ Measurements of ClO and ClONO2 in the late 2010/2011 Arctic Polar Vortex: Instrument Calibration and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroh, F.; Heinecke, F.; Afchine, A.; Barthel, J.; Engel, A.; Grooß, J.; von Hobe, M.; Richter, A.; Schönfeld, A.; Suminska, O.; Tan, V.

    2011-12-01

    Since 1995 we have carried out balloon-borne in-situ measurements of ClO and BrO. Lately we have designed an upgraded balloon instrument to additionally measure the ClO dimer and the reservoir species ClONO2. The halogen oxide measurements are carried out employing the chemical conversion resonance fluorescence technique (Brune et al., 1989) in a fast flow through two parallel ducts generated by modified roots blowers. The inlet of one duct is equipped with a dedicated heating element enabling controlled air temperatures in excess of 550K at pressures lower than 50 hPa. This causes the ClO dimer to thermolyze forming two ClO molecules at around 380K as well as additional thermolysis of ClONO2 to ClO and NO2 at around 540K. The ClO generated within the thermolysis is then detected on top of the ambient ClO. Temperature cycling and intercomparisons with the first unheated duct allow the differentiation of the chlorine species. Details of the instrumental setup, instrument calibration, and performance will be discussed. Profiles for ClO and ClONO2 from a flight carried out from ESRANGE near Kiruna, Sweden, on April-01-2011 in the edge region of the degrading arctic vortex will be presented marking the first ClONO2 in-situ measurements above research aircraft altitudes (20km). Brune, W. H., et al., Insitu Observations Of ClO In The Antarctic - Er-2 Aircraft Results From 54-Degrees-S To 72-Degrees-S Latitude, Journal Of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 94, 16649-16663, 1989.

  11. Occurrence of ozone laminae near the boundary of the stratospheric polar vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, S.J.; Vaughan, G. ); Kyro, E. )

    1993-05-20

    The authors report on observations of laminae in ozone distributions observed at high northern latitudes near the polar vortex. Regions of enhanced and depleted ozone density are observed. Data from ozonesonde collections and lidar measurements during the Airborne Arctic Stratosphere Expedition (AASE) are analyzed, and compared with earlier work. The ozonesonde archives of the World Meteorological Organization are also examined in this analysis. The laminae are observed to distribute differently as a function of season, and with the potential temperature. Transport of ozone equatorward is also found with a class of these laminae.

  12. Arctic polar stratospheric cloud measurements by means of a four wavelength depolarization lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanutti, L.; Castagnoli, F.; Delguasta, M.; Flesia, C.; Godin, S.; Kolenda, J.; Kneipp, H.; Kyro, Esko; Matthey, R.; Morandi, M.

    1994-01-01

    A four wavelength depolarization backscattering lidar has been operated during the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) in Sodankyl, in the Finnish Arctic. The lidar performed measurements during the months of December 1991, January, February and March 1992. The Finnish Meteorological Institute during the same period launched regularly three Radiosondes per day, and three Ozone sondes per week. Both Mt. Pinatubo aerosols and Polar Stratospheric Clouds were measured. The use of four wavelengths, respectively at 355 nm, 532 nm , 750 nm, and 850 nm permits an inversion of the lidar data to determine aerosol particle size. The depolarization technique permits the identification of Polar Stratospheric Clouds. Frequent correlation between Ozone minima and peaks in the Mt. Pinatubo aerosol maxima were detected. Measurements were carried out both within and outside the Polar Vortex.

  13. Precursors of weak stratospheric polar vortex events: intra-seasonal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Durán, Adelaida; Ayarzagüena, Blanca; Serrano, Encarna; Ábalos, Marta; de la Camara, Álvaro

    2016-04-01

    It is known that changes in the strength of stratospheric polar vortex are related to forcings that can affect the tropospheric upward wave propagation. In particular, an anomalous weak polar vortex (WPV) is preceded by a strong wave activity from the troposphere into the stratosphere causing a warming over the polar region and a consequent weakening of the polar cyclonic circulation. El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) or certain tropospheric anomalous circulation structure, among others, have been identified in many studies as potential precursors of WPV events. However, although the timing of the most effective impact of those precursors on the stratospheric polar vortex is already known, the generation of WPV events at any given time of winter is still unknown in detail. The aim of this work is to explore the WPV occurred in different boreal winter sub-seasons and their possible precursors. Namely, we consider early winter (from October to December), mid-winter (January and February) and late winter (March and April) separately. For this purpose, we use daily-mean data from ERA-Interim for the period 1979-2011. Preliminary results by the authors give evidence of intra-winter variability in the state of the polar stratosphere prior to WPV events, in the characteristics of the anomalous wave activity triggering them and in the tropospheric circulation structures related to this enhancement of wave activity. In this work we show that mid- and late winter WPV events are preceded by an anomalously strong vortex and a peak of high wave activity with relevant contribution of wavenumber-1 and wavenumber-2 components. In contrast, a preconditioning in the stratosphere is observed for early winter WPVs, which are preceded by a weak enhancement of wavenumber-1 wave activity. The contribution of precursors of WVP events, such as QBO, Arctic sea ice anomalies or ENSO, presents differences among the three winter sub-seasons.

  14. On the motion of air through the stratospheric polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Zurek, R. W.; O'Neill, A.; Swinbank, R.

    1994-01-01

    Trajectory calculations using horizontal winds from the U.K. Meteorological Office data assimilation system and vertical velocities from a radiation calculation are used to simulate the three-dimensional motion of air through the stratospheric polar vortex for Northern Hemisphere (NH) and Southern Hemisphere (SH) winters since the launch of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Throughout the winter, air from the upper stratosphere moves poleward and descends into the middle stratosphere. In the SH lower to middle stratosphere, strongest descent occurs near the edge of the polar vortex, with that edge defined by mixing characteristics. The NH shows a similar pattern in late winter, but in early winter strongest descent is near the center of the vortex, except when wave activity is particularly strong. Strong barriers to latitudinal mixing exist above about 420 K throughout the winter. Below this, the polar night jet is weak in early winter, so air descending below that level mixes between polar and middle latitudes. In late winter, parcels descend less and the polar night jet moves downward, so there is less latitudinal mixing. The degree of mixing in the lower stratosphere thus depends strongly on the position and evolution of the polar night jet and on the amount of descent experienced by the air parcels; these characteristics show considerable interannual variability in both hemispheres. The computed trajectories provide a three-dimensional picture of air motion during the final warming. Large tongues of air are drawn off the vortex and stretched into increasingly long and narrow tongues extending into low latitudes. This vortex erosion process proceeds more rapidly in the NH than in he SH. In the lower stratosphere, the majority of air parcels remain confined within a lingering region of strong potential vorticity gradients into December in the SH and April in the NH, well after the vortex breaks up in the midstratosphere.

  15. Interannual Variability of the North Polar Vortex in the Lower Stratosphere During the UARS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurek, R. W.; Manney, G. L.; Miller, A. J.; Gelman, M. E.; Nagatani, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    Northern winters since the 1991 launch of UARS are compared to earlier years (1978 -1991) with respect to the potential for formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds and for isolation of the north polar vortex. Daily NMC temperature minima at 465 K late in the winter of 1993-94 and again in December 1994 were the lowest values experienced during these times of the year (since 1978). Northern PV gradients were unusually strong in 1991-92 prior to late January and throughout the winter in both 1992-93 and 1994-95. Of all northern winters since 1978, 1994-95 with its early extended cold spell and persistently strong PV gradients most resembled the Antarctic winter lower stratosphere. Even so, temperatures was never as low, nor was the polar vortex as large, as during a typical southern winter. Judged by daily temperature minima and PV gradients at 465 K, meteorological conditions in the Arctic winter lower stratosphere during the UARS period were more conducive to vortex ozone loss by heterogeneous chemistry than in most previous winters since 1978-79.

  16. Long-term trends of the Polar and Arctic cells influencing the Arctic climate since 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Weihong; Wu, Kaijun; Leung, Jeremy Cheuk-Hin; Shi, Jian

    2016-03-01

    The strengthening and broadening trends of the Hadley cell have been revealed, while the existence of the Arctic cell has also been confirmed in previous studies. This study extends previous strengthening trend analyses of the Hadley cell to the Polar and Arctic cells in the Northern Hemisphere and explores their climate influences. Results show that the Polar cell experienced an abrupt change from a slow to a rapid strengthening trend in 1989, while the Arctic cell showed an insignificant strengthening trend and a significant weakening trend successively. The strengthening subsidence flow associated with the Polar and Arctic cells can partly explain the warming surface air temperature and declining sea ice concentration through the increasing tropospheric height and temperature trends. These results provide new insights for understanding the interdecadal relationship between atmospheric circulation and climate change in the Arctic region.

  17. Effect of Recent Sea Surface Temperature Trends on the Springtime Cooling Trend of the Arctic Stratospheric Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkel, Chaim; Oman, Luke; Hurwitz, Margaret

    2015-04-01

    The springtime Arctic polar vortex has cooled significantly over the satellite era, with consequences for ozone concentrations in the springtime transition season. The causes of this cooling trend are deduced by using comprehensive chemistry-climate model experiments. Approximately half of the satellite era early springtime cooling trend in the Arctic lower stratosphere was caused by changing sea surface temperatures (SSTs). An ensemble of experiments forced only by changing SSTs is compared to an ensemble of experiments in which both the observed SSTs and chemically- and radiatively-active trace species are changing. By comparing the two ensembles, it is shown that warming of Indian Ocean, North Pacific, and North Atlantic SSTs, and cooling of the tropical Pacific, have strongly contributed to recent polar stratospheric cooling in late winter and early spring, and to a weak polar stratospheric warming in early winter. When concentrations of ozone-depleting substances and greenhouse gases are fixed, polar ozone concentrations show a small but robust decline due to changing SSTs. Ozone changes are magnified in the presence of changing gas concentrations. The stratospheric changes can be understood by examining the tropospheric height and heat flux anomalies generated by the anomalous SSTs. Finally, recent SST changes have contributed to a decrease in the frequency of late winter stratospheric sudden warmings.

  18. Determination of the polarization states of an arbitrary polarized terahertz beam: Vectorial vortex analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wakayama, Toshitaka; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Oikawa, Hiroki; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Washio, Masakazu; Yonemura, Motoki; Yoshizawa, Toru; Tyo, J. Scott; Otani, Yukitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Vectorial vortex analysis is used to determine the polarization states of an arbitrarily polarized terahertz (0.1–1.6 THz) beam using THz achromatic axially symmetric wave (TAS) plates, which have a phase retardance of Δ = 163° and are made of polytetrafluorethylene. Polarized THz beams are converted into THz vectorial vortex beams with no spatial or wavelength dispersion, and the unknown polarization states of the incident THz beams are reconstructed. The polarization determination is also demonstrated at frequencies of 0.16 and 0.36 THz. The results obtained by solving the inverse source problem agree with the values used in the experiments. This vectorial vortex analysis enables a determination of the polarization states of the incident THz beam from the THz image. The polarization states of the beams are estimated after they pass through the TAS plates. The results validate this new approach to polarization detection for intense THz sources. It could find application in such cutting edge areas of physics as nonlinear THz photonics and plasmon excitation, because TAS plates not only instantaneously elucidate the polarization of an enclosed THz beam but can also passively control THz vectorial vortex beams. PMID:25799965

  19. Vortex-wide chlorine activation by a mesoscale PSC event in the Arctic winter of 2009/10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Tobias; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Tritscher, Ines; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic polar vortex of the 2009/10 winter temperatures were low enough to allow widespread formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). These clouds occurred during the initial chlorine activation phase which provided the opportunity to investigate the impact of PSCs on chlorine activation. Satellite observations of gas-phase species and PSCs are used in combination with trajectory modeling to assess this initial activation. The initial activation occurred in association with the formation of PSCs over the east coast of Greenland at the beginning of January 2010. Although this area of PSCs covered only a small portion of the vortex, it was responsible for almost the entire initial activation of chlorine vortex wide. Observations show HCl (hydrochloric acid) mixing ratios decreased rapidly in and downstream of this region. Trajectory calculations and simplified heterogeneous chemistry modeling confirmed that the initial chlorine activation continued until ClONO2 (chlorine nitrate) was completely depleted and the activated air masses were advected throughout the polar vortex. For the calculation of heterogeneous reaction rates, surface area density is estimated from backscatter observations. Modeled heterogeneous reaction rates along trajectories intersecting with the PSCs indicate that the initial phase of chlorine activation occurred in just a few hours. These calculations also indicate that chlorine activation on the binary background aerosol is significantly slower than on the PSC particles and the observed chlorine activation can only be explained by an increase in surface area density due to PSC formation. Furthermore, there is a strong correlation between the magnitude of the observed HCl depletion and PSC surface area density.

  20. Dynamics of polarized vortex solitons in nonlocal media with Bessel optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingzhi; Chen, Zhifeng

    2015-09-21

    We investigate the formation of polarized vortex solitons in nonlocal media with Bessel optical lattices and show the various dynamics of these solitons. Particularly, the stable high-order polarized vortex solitons, which are not found in local media with Bessel optical lattices, are found in nonlocal media. It is found that the nonlocal nonlinearity plays an important role in the stability of these solitons which is similar to that of phase vortex solitons. However, we show that the dynamics of these polarized vortex solitons are quite different from the phase vortex solitons. PMID:26406632

  1. Venusian Polar Vortex reproduced in an Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Hiroki; Imamura, Takeshi; Takagi, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Kashimura, Hiroki

    The Venus atmosphere has a polar vortex rotating in the retrograde direction with a period of about three days. The vortex has a warm feature surrounded by a cold collar (e.g., Taylor et al. 1980; Piccioni et al. 2006). Although the Venusian polar vortex has been reported by many observations, its mechanism is still unknown. Elson (1982, 1989) examined the structure of the polar vortex by linear calculations. However, the background zonal wind assumed in the calculations was much stronger or weaker than those retrieved in the previous measurements (e.g., Peralta et al. 2008; Kouyama et al. 2012). Lee et al. (2010) and Yamamoto and Takahashi (2012) performed numerical simulations with general circulation models (GCMs) of the Venus atmosphere and obtained vertical structure in the polar region. However, the models included artificial forcing of Kelvin and/or Rossby waves. We have developed a new Venusian GCM by modifying the Atmospheric GCM For the Earth Simulator (Sugimoto et al. 2012; 2013). The basic equations of the GCM are primitive ones in the sigma coordinate on a sphere without topography. The model resolution is T42 (i.e., about 2.8 deg x 2.8 deg grids) and L60 (Deltaz is about 2 km). Rayleigh friction (sponge layer) in the upper layer (>80 km) is applied to prevent the reflection of waves, whose effect increases gradually with height. In the model, the atmosphere is dry and forced by the solar heating and Newtonian cooling. The vertical profile of the solar heating is based on Crisp (1986), and zonally averaged distribution is used. In addition diurnal component of the solar heating, which excites the diurnal and semi-diurnal tides, is also included. Newtonian cooling relaxes the temperature to the zonally uniform basic temperature which has a virtual static stability of Venus with almost neutral layers, and its coefficient is based on Crisp (1986). To prevent numerical instability, the biharmonic hyper-diffusion is included with 0.8 days of e-folding time

  2. Wintertime Polar Ozone Evolution during Stratospheric Vortex Break-Down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tweedy, O.; Limpasuvan, V.; Smith, A. K.; Richter, J. H.; Orsolini, Y.; Stordal, F.; Kvissel, O.

    2011-12-01

    Stratospheric Sudden Warming (SSW) is characterized by the rapid warming of the winter polar stratosphere and the weakening of the circumpolar flow. During the onset of a major SSW (when the circumpolar flow reverses direction), the warm stratopause layer (SL) descends from its climatological position to the mid-stratosphere level. As the vortex recovers from SSW, a "new" SL forms in the mid-mesosphere region before returning to its typical level. This SL discontinuity appears in conjunction with enhanced downward intrusion of chemical species from the lower thermosphere/upper mesosphere to the stratosphere. The descended species can potentially impact polar ozone. In this study, the NCAR's Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) is used to investigate the behavior of polar ozone related to major SSWs. Specifically, dynamical evolution and chemistry of NOx, CO, and O3 are examined during three realistic major SSWs and compared with a non-SSW winter season. The simulated (zonal-mean) polar ozone distribution exhibits a "primary" maximum near 40 km, a "secondary" maximum between 90-105 km, and a "tertiary" maximum near 70 km. The concentration of the secondary maximum reduces by ~1.5 parts per million by volume (ppmv) as the vortex recovers and the upper mesospheric polar easterlies return. Enhanced downwelling above the newly formed SL extends up to just above this secondary maximum (~110 km). With an averaged concentration of 2 ppmv, the tertiary ozone maximum layer displaces upward with enhanced upwelling during SSW in conjunction with the lower mesospheric cooling. The downward propagation of the stratospheric wind reversal is accompanied by CO intrusion toward the lowermost stratosphere and anomalous behavior in the primary ozone maximum. Overall, the major SSW, SL, and polar ozone evolution mimic recently reported satellite observations.

  3. Ozone laminae near the edge of the stratospheric polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, S. J.; Vaughan, Geraint

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of ozonesonde data collected at high northern latitudes in winter and spring shows that laminae of enhanced and depleted ozone are associated with the polar vortex. In January and February, they are most common at all latitudes in the potential temperature range 370-430 K, but are abundant up to 500 K between 60 and 70 deg N. In March and April they occur most frequently northward of 75 deg N, and are abundant up to 520 K, whereas they are largely confined to the range 320-440 K at lower latitudes. Analysis of ozone lidar data obtained during AASE-1 depicts clearly the extrusion of laminae of enhanced ozone concentration from the polar regions in the altitude range 13-15 km. These extrusions form a class of laminae which transport ozone equatorward in the lowest levels of the stratosphere.

  4. Pipeline under the arctic ice: the Polar Gas Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kaustinen, O.M.

    1982-06-01

    The Polar Gas Project was established in 1972 to determine the best means of moving frontier natural gas from Canada's high arctic to southern markets. Pipeline was found to be most feasible. Several pipeline routings from two major supply areas--the MacKenzie Delta/Beaufort Sea region, and the Sverdrup Basin of the Arctic Islands--have been considered. Field programs to determine the type and ice content of soils along the route have been undertaken. The most challenging engineering aspect will be two marine crossings in arctic waters at either end of Victoria Island, at Dolphin and Union Strait, and at McClure's strait. The ''Ice Hole Bottom Pull'' technique has been recommended, and is illustrated in detail. The planned pipeline demonstration would significantly enhance the current state-of-the-art for deepwater pipelining worldwide.

  5. Nanoscale switch for vortex polarization mediated by Bloch core formation in magnetic hybrid systems

    PubMed Central

    Wohlhüter, Phillip; Bryan, Matthew Thomas; Warnicke, Peter; Gliga, Sebastian; Stevenson, Stephanie Elizabeth; Heldt, Georg; Saharan, Lalita; Suszka, Anna Kinga; Moutafis, Christoforos; Chopdekar, Rajesh Vilas; Raabe, Jörg; Thomson, Thomas; Hrkac, Gino; Heyderman, Laura Jane

    2015-01-01

    Vortices are fundamental magnetic topological structures characterized by a curling magnetization around a highly stable nanometric core. The control of the polarization of this core and its gyration is key to the utilization of vortices in technological applications. So far polarization control has been achieved in single-material structures using magnetic fields, spin-polarized currents or spin waves. Here we demonstrate local control of the vortex core orientation in hybrid structures where the vortex in an in-plane Permalloy film coexists with out-of-plane maze domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. The vortex core reverses its polarization on crossing a maze domain boundary. This reversal is mediated by a pair of magnetic singularities, known as Bloch points, and leads to the transient formation of a three-dimensional magnetization structure: a Bloch core. The interaction between vortex and domain wall thus acts as a nanoscale switch for the vortex core polarization. PMID:26238042

  6. Nanoscale switch for vortex polarization mediated by Bloch core formation in magnetic hybrid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlhüter, Phillip; Bryan, Matthew Thomas; Warnicke, Peter; Gliga, Sebastian; Stevenson, Stephanie Elizabeth; Heldt, Georg; Saharan, Lalita; Suszka, Anna Kinga; Moutafis, Christoforos; Chopdekar, Rajesh Vilas; Raabe, Jörg; Thomson, Thomas; Hrkac, Gino; Heyderman, Laura Jane

    2015-08-01

    Vortices are fundamental magnetic topological structures characterized by a curling magnetization around a highly stable nanometric core. The control of the polarization of this core and its gyration is key to the utilization of vortices in technological applications. So far polarization control has been achieved in single-material structures using magnetic fields, spin-polarized currents or spin waves. Here we demonstrate local control of the vortex core orientation in hybrid structures where the vortex in an in-plane Permalloy film coexists with out-of-plane maze domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. The vortex core reverses its polarization on crossing a maze domain boundary. This reversal is mediated by a pair of magnetic singularities, known as Bloch points, and leads to the transient formation of a three-dimensional magnetization structure: a Bloch core. The interaction between vortex and domain wall thus acts as a nanoscale switch for the vortex core polarization.

  7. Bioluminescence in the high Arctic during the polar night.

    PubMed

    Berge, J; Båtnes, A S; Johnsen, G; Blackwell, S M; Moline, M A

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the composition and activity of the planktonic community during the polar night in the high Arctic Kongsfjord, Svalbard. Our results are the first published evidence of bioluminescence among zooplankton during the Arctic polar night. The observations were collected by a bathyphotometer detecting bioluminescence, integrated into an autonomous underwater vehicle, to determine the concentration and intensity of bioluminescent flashes as a function of time of day and depth. To further understand community dynamics and composition, plankton nets were used to collect organisms passing through the bathyphotometer along with traditional vertical net tows. Additionally, using a moored bathyphotometer closed to the sampling site, the bioluminescence potential itself was shown not to have a diurnal or circadian rhythm. Rather, our results provide evidence for a diel vertical migration of bioluminescent zooplankton that does not correspond to any externally detectable changes in illumination. PMID:24489409

  8. Chlorine chemistry on polar stratospheric cloud particles in the Arctic winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Toohey, D. W.; Avallone, L. M.; Anderson, J. G.; Newman, P.; Lait, L.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Chan, K. R.

    1993-01-01

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and chlorine monoxide (ClO) in the Arctic winter vortex showed large HCl losses of up to 1 ppbv, which were correlated with high ClO levels of up to 1.4 ppbv. Air parcel trajectory analysis identified that this conversion of inorganic chlorine occurred at air temperatures of less than 196 -/+ 4 kelvin. High ClO was always accompanied by loss of HCl mixing ratios equal to 1/2(ClO+ 2Cl2O2). These data indicate that the heterogeneous reaction HCl + ClONO2 - Cl2 + HNO3 on particles of polar stratospheric clouds establishes the chlorine partitioning, which, contrary to earlier notions, begins with an excess of ClONO2, not HCl.

  9. Visualization of stratospheric ozone depletion and the polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treinish, Lloyd A.

    1995-01-01

    Direct analysis of spacecraft observations of stratospheric ozone yields information about the morphology of annual austral depletion. Visual correlation of ozone with other atmospheric data illustrates the diurnal dynamics of the polar vortex and contributions from the upper troposphere, including the formation and breakup of the depletion region each spring. These data require care in their presentation to minimize the introduction of visualization artifacts that are erroneously interpreted as data features. Non geographically registered data of differing mesh structures can be visually correlated via cartographic warping of base geometries without interpolation. Because this approach is independent of the realization technique, it provides a framework for experimenting with many visualization strategies. This methodology preserves the fidelity of the original data sets in a coordinate system suitable for three-dimensional, dynamic examination of atmospheric phenomena.

  10. Potential vorticity of the south polar vortex of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garate-Lopez, I.; Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; García Muñoz, A.

    2016-04-01

    Venus' atmosphere shows highly variable warm vortices over both of the planet's poles. The nature of the mechanism behind their formation and properties is still unknown. Potential vorticity is a conserved quantity when advective processes dominate over friction and diabatic heating and is a quantity frequently used to model balanced flows. As a step toward understanding the vortices' dynamics, we present maps of Ertel's potential vorticity (EPV) at Venus' south polar region. We analyze three configurations of the south polar vortex at the upper cloud level (P ~ 240 mbar; z ~ 58 km), based on our previous analyses of cloud motions and thermal structure from data acquired by the Visual and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer instrument on board Venus Express. Additionally, we tentatively estimate EPV at the lower cloud level (P ~ 2200 mbar; z ~ 43 km), based on our previous wind measurements and on static stability data from Pioneer Venus and the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) model. Values of EPV are on the order of 10-6 and 10-8 K m2 kg-1 s-1 at the upper and lower cloud levels, respectively, being 3 times larger than the estimated errors. The morphology observed in EPV maps is mainly determined by the structures of the vertical component of the relative vorticity. This is in contrast to the vortex's morphology observed in 3.8 or 5 µm images which are related to the thermal structure of the atmosphere at the cloud top. Some of the EPV maps point to a weak ringed structure in the upper cloud, while a more homogenous EPV field is found in the lower cloud.

  11. On the depletion of HCl in the Antarctic polar vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Tobias; Kinnison, Douglas; Garcia, Rolando; Madronich, Sasha; Solomon, Susan; von Hobe, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Satellite observations and numerical modeling are used to constrain the mechanisms that deplete gas-phase HCl in the Antarctic vortex. Our analysis shows that current formulations of heterogeneous chlorine activation cannot explain the observed loss of gas-phase HCl in SD-WACCM. Uncertainties in photochemistry, transport and initial conditions are investigated, and it is shown that ClONO2 formed after photolysis of condensed-phase nitrate increases the loss of HCl through heterogeneous chemistry, especially in the sunlit edge of the vortex. This process eventually produces sufficient NOx to completely deplete gas-phase HCl but this occurs too late compared to observations. Our results suggest that the more likely primary mechanism for decreases in gas-phase HCl from the beginning of the polar night until about the middle of July is active partitioning between the gas and condensed phase. Since the HCl taken up into particles is quickly released upon warming, it does not represent irreversible loss of chlorine, only temporary removal from the gas-phase. With HCl dissolved in STS particles, the associated decrease in gas-phase HCl is not an indicator of chlorine activation. The solubility of HCl in STS is highly sensitive to water vapor and temperature, such that accurate simulation of both is necessary to reproduce the observed depletion of gas-phase HCl. With the reference setup of SD-WACCM hardly any HCl is simulated to be sequestered in STS. A negative offset has to be applied to model temperatures to achieve significant partitioning of HCl into the condensed phase. While our results imply substantial changes in chlorine partitioning during the polar night, the ozone loss is insensitive to them.

  12. Numerical analysis of inductive detection of magnetic vortex motion excited with circularly polarized field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya, Xiaorui; Tanaka, Terumitsu; Matsuyama, Kimihide

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the rotation and switching of a vortex core in submicron-size square dots were numerically analyzed by micromagnetic simulation. This study clarified that the eigenfrequency of the vortex core is strongly dependent on the magnetostatic energy and that rapid switching can be realized by circularly polarized fields with practical amplitudes at the corresponding eigenfrequency. The inductive detection of vortex core rotation, which can distinguish vortex core polarity, was successfully demonstrated and the structural design of the detector was optimized.

  13. Diel vertical migration of Arctic zooplankton during the polar night

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Jørgen; Cottier, Finlo; Last, Kim S.; Varpe, Øystein; Leu, Eva; Søreide, Janne; Eiane, Ketil; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Willis, Kate; Nygård, Henrik; Vogedes, Daniel; Griffiths, Colin; Johnsen, Geir; Lorentzen, Dag; Brierley, Andrew S.

    2008-01-01

    High-latitude environments show extreme seasonal variation in physical and biological variables. The classic paradigm of Arctic marine ecosystems holds that most biological processes slow down or cease during the polar night. One key process that is generally assumed to cease during winter is diel vertical migration (DVM) of zooplankton. DVM constitutes the largest synchronized movement of biomass on the planet, and is of paramount importance for marine ecosystem function and carbon cycling. Here we present acoustic data that demonstrate a synchronized DVM behaviour of zooplankton that continues throughout the Arctic winter, in both open and ice-covered waters. We argue that even during the polar night, DVM is regulated by diel variations in solar and lunar illumination, which are at intensities far below the threshold of human perception. We also demonstrate that winter DVM is stronger in open waters compared with ice-covered waters. This suggests that the biologically mediated vertical flux of carbon will increase if there is a continued retreat of the Arctic winter sea ice cover. PMID:18948249

  14. Diurnal variations of reactive chlorine and nitrogen oxides observed by MIPAS-B inside the January 2010 Arctic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, G.; Oelhaf, H.; Kirner, O.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Ruhnke, R.; Ebersoldt, A.; Kleinert, A.; Maucher, G.; Nordmeyer, H.; Orphal, J.

    2012-07-01

    The winter 2009/2010 was characterized by a strong Arctic vortex with extremely cold mid-winter temperatures in the lower stratosphere associated with an intense activation of reactive chlorine compounds (ClOx) from reservoir species. Stratospheric limb emission spectra were recorded during a flight of the balloon version of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-B) from Kiruna (Sweden) on 24 January 2010 inside the Arctic vortex. Several fast limb sequences of spectra (in time steps of about 10 min) were measured from nighttime photochemical equilibrium to local noon allowing the retrieval of chlorine- and nitrogen-containing species which change rapidly their concentration around the terminator between night and day. Mixing ratios of species like ClO, NO2, and N2O5 show significant changes around sunrise, which are temporally delayed due to polar stratospheric clouds reducing the direct radiative flux from the sun. ClO variations were derived for the first time from MIPAS-B spectra. Daytime ClO values of up to 1.6 ppbv are visible in a broad chlorine activated layer below 26 km correlated with low values (below 0.1 ppbv) of the chlorine reservoir species ClONO2. Observations are compared and discussed with calculations performed with the 3-dimensional Chemistry Climate Model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry). Mixing ratios of the species ClO, NO2, and N2O5 are well reproduced by the model during night and noon. However, the onset of ClO production and NO2 loss around the terminator in the model is not consistent with the measurements. The MIPAS-B observations along with Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) radiation model calculations suggest that polar stratospheric clouds lead to a delayed start followed by a faster increase of the photodissoziation of ClOOCl and NO2 near the morning terminator since stratospheric clouds alter the direct and the diffuse flux of solar radiation. These effects are not considered in the EMAC

  15. Polar vortex dynamics during spring and fall diagnosed using trace gas observations from the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, G. L.; Michelsen, H. A.; Santee, M. L.; Gunson, M. R.; Irion, F. W.; Roche, A. E.; Livesey, N. J.

    1999-08-01

    Trace gases measured by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument during three Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) space-shuttle missions, in March/April 1992 (AT-1), April 1993 (AT-2), and November 1994 (AT-3) have been mapped into equivalent latitude/potential temperature (EqL/θ) coordinates. The asymmetry of the spring vortices results in coverage of subtropical to polar EqLs. EqL/θ fields of long-lived tracers in spring in both hemispheres show the net effects of descent at high EqL throughout the winter, reflecting strong descent in the upper stratosphere, decreasing descent at lower altitudes, and evidence of greater descent at the edge of the lower stratospheric vortex than in the vortex center; these results are consistent with trajectory calculations examining the history of the air measured by ATMOS in the month prior to each mission. EqL/θ tracer fields, the derived fields CH4-CH4* (CH4* is the expected CH4 calculated from a prescribed relationship with N2O for fall) and NOy-NOy* (analogous to CH4*), and parcel histories all indicate regions of strong mixing in the 1994 Southern Hemisphere (SH) spring vortex above 500 K, with the strongest mixing confined to the vortex edge region between 500 and 700 K, and mixing throughout the Northern Hemisphere (NH) spring vortex in 1993 below about 850 K. Parcel histories indicate mixing of extravortex air with air near the vortex edge below 500 K in the SH but not with air in the vortex core; they show extravortex air mixing well into the vortex above ˜450 K in the NH and into the vortex edge region below. The effects of severe denitrification are apparent in EqL/θ HNO3 in the SH lower stratospheric spring vortex. The morphology of HNO3 in the Arctic spring lower stratospheric vortex is consistent with the effects of descent. EqL/θ fields of ATMOS NOy-NOy* show decreases consistent with the effects of mixing throughout the NH lower stratospheric vortex. The Eq

  16. Tracer-Based Determination of Vortex Descent in the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James R.; Hurst, Dale F.; Elkins, James W.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Herman, Robert L.; Webster, Christopher R.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed analysis of available in situ and remotely sensed N2O and CH4 data measured in the 1999-2000 winter Arctic vortex has been performed in order to quantify the temporal evolution of vortex descent. Differences in potential temperature (theta) among balloon and aircraft vertical profiles (an average of 19-23 K on a given N2O or CH4 isopleth) indicated significant vortex inhomogeneity in late fall as compared with late winter profiles. A composite fall vortex profile was constructed for November 26, 1999, whose error bars encompassed the observed variability. High-latitude, extravortex profiles measured in different years and seasons revealed substantial variability in N2O and CH4 on theta surfaces, but all were clearly distinguishable from the first vortex profiles measured in late fall 1999. From these extravortex-vortex differences, we inferred descent prior to November 26: 397+/-15 K (1sigma) at 30 ppbv N2O and 640 ppbv CH4, and 28+/-13 K above 200 ppbv N2O and 1280 ppbv CH4. Changes in theta were determined on five N2O and CH4 isopleths from November 26 through March 12, and descent rates were calculated on each N2O isopleth for several time intervals. The maximum descent rates were seen between November 26 and January 27: 0.82+/-0.20 K/day averaged over 50-250 ppbv N2O. By late winter (February 26-March 12), the average rate had decreased to 0.10+/-0.25 K/day. Descent rates also decreased with increasing N2O; the winter average (November 26-March 5) descent rate varied from 0.75+/-0.10 K/day at 50 ppbv to 0.40+/-0.11 K/day at 250 ppbv. Comparison of these results with observations and models of descent in prior years showed very good overall agreement. Two models of the 1999-2000 vortex descent, SLIMCAT and REPROBUS, despite theta offsets with respect to observed profiles of up to 20 K on most tracer isopleths, produced descent rates that agreed very favorably with the inferred rates from observation.

  17. The 2015-2016 Arctic winter: Perspectives on extremes in polar processing and meteorological variability from the 12-year record of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santee, Michelle; Manney, Gloria; Lambert, Alyn; Livesey, Nathaniel; Lawrence, Zachary

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, the Arctic lower stratosphere has seen some of the most dynamically disturbed winters, with stratospheric sudden warmings that curtailed polar processing early in the season and limited chemical ozone loss, as well as several winters marked by exceptionally cold conditions and severe chemical ozone loss. The occurrence in recent winters of different combinations of extreme meteorological conditions, and their impact on polar chemical processes, has underscored the Arctic stratosphere's sensitivity to a spectrum of dynamical variability. Launched as part of NASA's Aura satellite in July 2004, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) provides an extensive suite of measurements enabling quantification of polar processing and chemical ozone loss. Here we use MLS observations in conjunction with meteorological analyses in a comprehensive analysis of the Arctic winter of 2015-2016. An unusually large volume of low temperatures in the early winter led to strong depletion in gas-phase HNO3 and H2O associated with polar stratospheric cloud formation. As a consequence of this early-winter processing and an elongated vortex with significant portions exposed to sunlight, substantial chlorine activation (enhanced abundances of ClO, depressed abundances of HCl) was evident far earlier than is typical in Arctic winter. The degree of polar processing and chemical ozone loss in this winter will be placed in the context of the previous 11 Arctic winters observed by Aura MLS.

  18. Microbial Communities in a High Arctic Polar Desert Landscape.

    PubMed

    McCann, Clare M; Wade, Matthew J; Gray, Neil D; Roberts, Jennifer A; Hubert, Casey R J; Graham, David W

    2016-01-01

    The High Arctic is dominated by polar desert habitats whose microbial communities are poorly understood. In this study, we used next generation sequencing to describe the α- and β-diversity of microbial communities in polar desert soils from the Kongsfjorden region of Svalbard. Ten phyla dominated the soils and accounted for 95% of all sequences, with the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Chloroflexi being the major lineages. In contrast to previous investigations of Arctic soils, relative Acidobacterial abundances were found to be very low as were the Archaea throughout the Kongsfjorden polar desert landscape. Lower Acidobacterial abundances were attributed to characteristic circumneutral soil pHs in this region, which has resulted from the weathering of underlying carbonate bedrock. In addition, we compared previously measured geochemical conditions as possible controls on soil microbial communities. Phosphorus, pH, nitrogen, and calcium levels all significantly correlated with β-diversity, indicating landscape-scale lithological control of available nutrients, which in turn, significantly influenced soil community composition. In addition, soil phosphorus and pH significantly correlated with α-diversity, particularly with the Shannon diversity and Chao 1 richness indices. PMID:27065980

  19. Microbial Communities in a High Arctic Polar Desert Landscape

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Clare M.; Wade, Matthew J.; Gray, Neil D.; Roberts, Jennifer A.; Hubert, Casey R. J.; Graham, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The High Arctic is dominated by polar desert habitats whose microbial communities are poorly understood. In this study, we used next generation sequencing to describe the α- and β-diversity of microbial communities in polar desert soils from the Kongsfjorden region of Svalbard. Ten phyla dominated the soils and accounted for 95% of all sequences, with the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Chloroflexi being the major lineages. In contrast to previous investigations of Arctic soils, relative Acidobacterial abundances were found to be very low as were the Archaea throughout the Kongsfjorden polar desert landscape. Lower Acidobacterial abundances were attributed to characteristic circumneutral soil pHs in this region, which has resulted from the weathering of underlying carbonate bedrock. In addition, we compared previously measured geochemical conditions as possible controls on soil microbial communities. Phosphorus, pH, nitrogen, and calcium levels all significantly correlated with β-diversity, indicating landscape-scale lithological control of available nutrients, which in turn, significantly influenced soil community composition. In addition, soil phosphorus and pH significantly correlated with α-diversity, particularly with the Shannon diversity and Chao 1 richness indices. PMID:27065980

  20. The Distribution of Ozone in the Early Stages of Polar Vortex Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Newman, P. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Bevilacqua, R.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Previous analysis has shown that the distribution of O3 at high northern latitudes in the lower-to-middle stratosphere at the beginning of the winter season, 1999-2000 has a characteristic distribution, which is consistent between in situ and satellite measurements [Kawa et al., The Interaction Between Dynamics and Chemistry of Ozone in the Set-up Phase of the Northern Hemisphere Polar Vortex, submitted manuscript, 2001 ]. Initial O3 profiles in the vortex are similar to each other and are quite different from outside the vortex at the same latitude and also from a zonal mean climatology. In the vortex, O3 is nearly constant from 500 to above 800 K with a value at 3 ppmv +/- approx.10%. Values outside the vortex are up to a factor of 2 higher and increase significantly with potential temperature. The seasonal time series of POAM data shows that relatively low O3 mixing ratios, which characterize the vortex in late fall, are already present at high latitudes at the end of summer in September before the vortex circulation sets up. This suggests a possible feedback role between O3 chemistry and the formation of the vortex, which is dominated by the seasonal radiation balance. Here we show that these characteristic O3 distributions are consistent from year to year and between the hemispheres. We will attempt to determine whether variations in fall vortex O3 are related in any way to O3 abundances and vortex structure later during winter and into spring.

  1. Generation of cylindrically polarized vector vortex beams with digital micromirror device

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Weiwei; Wang, Meng; Zhong, Mincheng; Wang, Ziqiang; Li, Yinmei; Ren, Yuxuan

    2014-11-14

    We propose a novel technique to directly transform a linearly polarized Gaussian beam into vector-vortex beams with various spatial patterns. Full high-quality control of amplitude and phase is implemented via a Digital Micro-mirror Device (DMD) binary holography for generating Laguerre-Gaussian, Bessel-Gaussian, and helical Mathieu–Gaussian modes, while a radial polarization converter (S-waveplate) is employed to effectively convert the optical vortices into cylindrically polarized vortex beams. Additionally, the generated vector-vortex beams maintain their polarization symmetry after arbitrary polarization manipulation. Due to the high frame rates of DMD, rapid switching among a series of vector modes carrying different orbital angular momenta paves the way for optical microscopy, trapping, and communication.

  2. Barotropic simulation of large-scale mixing in the Antarctic Polar Vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.P. )

    1993-09-01

    Theory and observations suggest that the Antarctic polar vortex is relatively isolated from midlatitudes, although others have interpreted the observations to indicate that there is substantial mixing from the interior of the vortex into middle latitudes. The equivalent barotropic model of Salby et al. is used to study quasi-horizontal mixing by the large-scale flow in the lower stratosphere during Southern Hemisphere spring, which is when the Antarctic ozone hole appears and disappears. The model is forced by relaxation to observed climatological monthly mean zonal-mean winds and by an idealized wave 1 or 2 forcing at the lower boundary. Mixing and transport and diagnosed primarily through Lagrangian tracer trajectories. For September, October, and November basic states, there is little or no mixing in the interior of the vortex. Mixing occurs near the critical lines for the waves: in the tropics and subtropics for a stationary wave 1, and in midlatitudes on the equatorward flank of the jet for an eastward-moving wave 2. For the December basic state, the wave 2 forcing rapidly mixes the interior of the vortex. Mixing of Lagrangian tracer particles can be significant even when the waves do not [open quotes]break,[close quotes] as evidenced by the potential vorticity field. In the model there does not appear to be any significant transport of air out of the interior of the polar vortex prior to the vortex breakdown. The principal factor that leads to the vortex breakdown and mixing of the vortex interior is the deceleration of the jet to the factor that leads to the vortex breakdown and mixing of the vortex interior is the deceleration of the get to the point where winds in the interior of the vortex are close to phase velocity of the wavenumber 2 forcing. The tracer transport is very similar to many aspects of the behavior of the total ozone field during the spring season. 37 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  3. OMAE 1996 -- Proceedings of the 15. international conference on offshore mechanics and arctic engineering. Volume 4: Arctic/polar technology

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, W.A.; Sodhi, D.S.; Kennedy, K.P.; Bugno, W.

    1996-12-01

    Volume 4 contains papers on the following topics: arctic/polar technology and development; ice properties; ice engineering; applied ice mechanics; ice-structure interaction; arctic structures and operations; frozen soil properties; and Russian Arctic development. In addition to the regular topics covered in OMAE conferences, there has been a special workshop as part of this year`s conference. In keeping with issues of current interest, there is a workshop on development of oil resources in the Russian Arctic. Over two days, papers dealing with development of oil and gas resources in the Russian Arctic are presented. Volume 4 contains papers from this workshop. Some of the papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  4. Large-scale isentropic mixing properties of the Antarctic polar vortex from analyzed winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.

    1993-01-01

    Winds derived from analyzed geopotential height fields are used to study quasi-horizontal mixing by the large-scale flow in the lower stratosphere during austral spring. This is the period when the Antarctic ozone hole appears and disappears. Trajectories are computed for large ensembles of particles initially inside and outside the main polar vortex. Mixing and transport are diagnosed through estimates of finite time Lyapunov exponents and Lagrangian dispersion statistics of the tracer trajectories. At 450 K and above prior to the vortex breakdown: Lyapunov exponents are a factor of 2 smaller inside the vortex than outside; diffusion coefficients are an order of magnitude smaller inside than outside the vortex; and the trajectories reveal little exchange of air across the vortex boundary. At lower levels (425 and 400 K) mixing is greater, and there is substantial exchange of air across the vortex boundary. In some years there are large wave events that expel small amounts of vortex air into the mid-latitudes. At the end of the spring season during the vortex breakdown there is rapid mixing of air across the vortex boundary, which is evident in the mixing diagnostics and the tracer trajectories.

  5. The evolution of ozone observed by UARS MLS in the 1992 late winter southern polar vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Manney, G.L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W.; Elson, L.S.; Fishbein, E.F.; Zurek, R.W. ); Harwood, R.S.; Lahoz, W.A. )

    1993-06-18

    This paper presents initial data analysis of ozone distributions in the southern polar vortex region during the winter of 1992. The data comes from the microwave limb sounder on the upper atmosphere research satellite. The data provides never before available coverage of the polar stratosphere, and reveals the development of an ozone hole from column ozone data, changes in ozone mixing ratios in the lower stratosphere consistent with ozone destruction processes in the stratosphere, and evidence to support the transport of ozone toward the pole by tidal wave activity in the stratosphere. The ozone measurements are compared with the development of the polar vortex derived from national meteorological center data.

  6. Structured caustic vector vortex optical field: manipulating optical angular momentum flux and polarization rotation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Chen, Zhaozhong; Chew, Khian-Hooi; Li, Pei-Gang; Yu, Zhongliang; Ding, Jianping; He, Sailing

    2015-01-01

    A caustic vector vortex optical field is experimentally generated and demonstrated by a caustic-based approach. The desired caustic with arbitrary acceleration trajectories, as well as the structured states of polarization (SoP) and vortex orders located in different positions in the field cross-section, is generated by imposing the corresponding spatial phase function in a vector vortex optical field. Our study reveals that different spin and orbital angular momentum flux distributions (including opposite directions) in different positions in the cross-section of a caustic vector vortex optical field can be dynamically managed during propagation by intentionally choosing the initial polarization and vortex topological charges, as a result of the modulation of the caustic phase. We find that the SoP in the field cross-section rotates during propagation due to the existence of the vortex. The unique structured feature of the caustic vector vortex optical field opens the possibility of multi-manipulation of optical angular momentum fluxes and SoP, leading to more complex manipulation of the optical field scenarios. Thus this approach further expands the functionality of an optical system. PMID:26024434

  7. The dynamics of the stratospheric polar vortex and its relation to springtime ozone depletions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    1991-01-01

    Recent aircraft observations have determined the structure of polar vortices during winter and their relationship to polar ozone depletions, based on high dynamical isolation and the extremely low temperatures required for stratospheric cloud formation. The aircraft data reveal large gradients of potential vorticity and concentrations of conservative trace species at the transition from high-latitude to polar air, implying that the inward mixing of heat and constituents is strongly inhibited, and that the perturbed polar stratospheric chemistry associated with the ozone hole is isolated from the rest of the stratosphere until the vortex breaks up in late spring. It is therefore the overall polar vortex which limits the annual polar ozone depletions' maximum area-coverage.

  8. Assessment of the Breakup of the Antarctic Polar Vortex in Two New Chemistry-Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Newman, P. A.; Oman, L. D.; Li, F.; Morgenstern, O.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Successful simulation of the breakup of the Antarctic polar vortex depends on the representation of tropospheric stationary waves at Southern Hemisphere middle latitudes. This paper assesses the vortex breakup in two new chemistry-climate models (CCMs). The stratospheric version of the UK Chemistry and Aerosols model is able to reproduce the observed timing of the vortex breakup. Version 2 of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS V2) model is typical of CCMs in that the Antarctic polar vortex breaks up too late; at 10 hPa, the mean transition to easterlies at 60 S is delayed by 12-13 days as compared with the ERA-40 and National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalyses. The two models' skill in simulating planetary wave driving during the October-November period accounts for differences in their simulation of the vortex breakup, with GEOS V2 unable to simulate the magnitude and tilt of geopotential height anomalies in the troposphere and thus underestimating the wave driving. In the GEOS V2 CCM the delayed breakup of the Antarctic vortex biases polar temperatures and trace gas distributions in the upper stratosphere in November and December.

  9. The Sensitivity of Arctic Ozone Loss to Polar Stratospheric Cloud Volume and Chlorine and Bromine Loading in a Chemistry and Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A. R.; Stolarski, R. S.; Strahan, S. E.; Polansky, B. C.

    2006-01-01

    The sensitivity of Arctic ozone loss to polar stratospheric cloud volume (V(sub PSC)) and chlorine and bromine loading is explored using chemistry and transport models (CTMs). A simulation using multi-decadal output from a general circulation model (GCM) in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) CTM complements one recycling a single year s GCM output in the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) CTM. Winter polar ozone loss in the GSFC CTM depends on equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC) and polar vortex characteristics (temperatures, descent, isolation, polar stratospheric cloud amount). Polar ozone loss in the GMI CTM depends only on changes in EESC as the dynamics repeat annually. The GSFC CTM simulation reproduces a linear relationship between ozone loss and Vpsc derived from observations for 1992 - 2003 which holds for EESC within approx.85% of its maximum (approx.1990 - 2020). The GMI simulation shows that ozone loss varies linearly with EESC for constant, high V(sub PSC).

  10. The January 30, 1989 Arctic polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) event - Evidence for a mechanism of dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandrud, B. W.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Ferry, G. V.; Loewenstein, M.; Chan, K. R.; Sanford, L.; Gary, B.

    1990-01-01

    In-situ particle measurements made aboard the NASA ER-2 in the Arctic on 890130 (YYMMDD) show Type 1 PSC particles over much of the flight, with instances of embedded Type 2 PSCs. The Type 2 particles were observed at temperatures warmer than the local frost-point temperature of water; extended up to the upper size cutoff of the instrument (about 24-micron diameter); and are shown to contain too large a volume to be primarily NAT. Based on measured vertical temperature profiles, it is concluded that the Type 2 particles observed on this day were formed above the aircraft in a region where saturation with respect to ice was achieved and were sufficiently large to have fallen into the path of the ER-2. Although the amount of material in the particles, expressed as water, is small by comparison to the total (vapor + aerosol) water concentration, the flux of water from the falling particles is of sufficient magnitude, if sustained, to lead to dehydration of the source region. These observations verify the mechanism for dehydration of polar vortex air masses by precipitation of ice particles.

  11. Nonorographic generation of Arctic polar stratospheric clouds during December 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchman, Matthew H.; Buker, Marcus L.; Tripoli, Gregory J.; Browell, Edward V.; Grant, William B.; McGee, Thomas J.; Burris, John F.

    2003-03-01

    During December 1999, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were observed in the absence of conditions conducive to generation by topographic gravity waves. The possibility is explored that PSCs can be generated by inertia gravity waves (IGW) radiating from breaking synoptic-scale Rossby waves on the polar front jet. The aerosol features on 7 and 12 December are selected for comparison with theory and with simulations using the University of Wisconsin Nonhydrostatic Modeling System (UWNMS). Consistent with Rossby adjustment theory, a common feature in the UWNMS simulations is radiation of IGW from the tropopause polar front jet, especially from sectors which are evolving rapidly in the Rossby wave breaking process. Packets of gravity wave energy radiate upward and poleward into the cold pool, while individual wave crests propagate poleward and downward, causing mesoscale variations in vertical motion and temperature. On 12 December the eastbound DC-8 lidar observations exhibited a fairly uniform field of six waves in aerosol enhancement in the 14-20 km layer, consistent with vertical displacement by a field of IGW propagating antiparallel to the flow, with characteristic horizontal and vertical wavelengths of ˜300 and ˜10 km. UWNMS simulations show emanation of a field of IGW upward and southwestward from a northward incursion of the polar front jet. The orientation and evolution of the aerosol features on 7 December are consistent with a single PSC induced by an IGW packet propagating from a breaking Rossby wave over western Russia toward the northeast into the coldest part of the base of the polar vortex, with characteristic period ˜9 hours, vertical wavelength ˜12 km, and horizontal wavelength ˜1000 km. Linear theory shows that for both of these cases, IGW energy propagates upward at ˜1 km/hour and horizontally at ˜100 km/hour, with characteristic trace speed ˜30 m/s. The spatial orientation of the PSC along IGW phase lines is contrasted with the nearly

  12. Primary aberrations in focused radially polarized vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, David P.; Brown, T. G.

    2004-02-01

    We study the effect of primary aberrations on the 3-D polarization of the electric field in a focused lowest order radially polarized beam. A full vector diffraction treatment of the focused beams is used. Attention is given to the effects of primary spherical, astigmatic, and comatic aberrations on the local polarization, Strehl ratio, and aberration induced degradation of the longitudinal field at focus

  13. Arctic Vortex changes alter the sources and isotopic values of precipitation in northeastern US.

    PubMed

    Puntsag, Tamir; Mitchell, Myron J; Campbell, John L; Klein, Eric S; Likens, Gene E; Welker, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    Altered atmospheric circulation, reductions in Arctic sea ice, ocean warming, and changes in evaporation and transpiration are driving changes in the global hydrologic cycle. Precipitation isotopic (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) measurements can help provide a mechanistic understanding of hydrologic change at global and regional scales. To study the changing water cycle in the northeastern US, we examined the longest (1968-2010) record of precipitation isotope values, collected at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, US (43(°)56'N, 71(°)45'W). We found a significant reduction in δ(18)O and δ(2)H values over the 43-year record, coupled with a significant increase in d-excess values. This gradual reduction in δ(18)O and δ(2)H values unexpectedly occurred during a period of regional warming. We provide evidence that these changes are governed by the interactions among the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, loss of Arctic sea ice, the fluctuating jet stream, and regular incursions of polar air into the northeastern US. PMID:26971874

  14. Arctic Vortex changes alter the sources and isotopic values of precipitation in northeastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puntsag, Tamir; Mitchell, Myron J.; Campbell, John L.; Klein, Eric S.; Likens, Gene E.; Welker, Jeffrey M.

    2016-03-01

    Altered atmospheric circulation, reductions in Arctic sea ice, ocean warming, and changes in evaporation and transpiration are driving changes in the global hydrologic cycle. Precipitation isotopic (δ18O and δ2H) measurements can help provide a mechanistic understanding of hydrologic change at global and regional scales. To study the changing water cycle in the northeastern US, we examined the longest (1968–2010) record of precipitation isotope values, collected at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, US (43o56‧N, 71o45‧W). We found a significant reduction in δ18O and δ2H values over the 43-year record, coupled with a significant increase in d-excess values. This gradual reduction in δ18O and δ2H values unexpectedly occurred during a period of regional warming. We provide evidence that these changes are governed by the interactions among the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, loss of Arctic sea ice, the fluctuating jet stream, and regular incursions of polar air into the northeastern US.

  15. Arctic Vortex changes alter the sources and isotopic values of precipitation in northeastern US

    PubMed Central

    Puntsag, Tamir; Mitchell, Myron J.; Campbell, John L.; Klein, Eric S.; Likens, Gene E.; Welker, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Altered atmospheric circulation, reductions in Arctic sea ice, ocean warming, and changes in evaporation and transpiration are driving changes in the global hydrologic cycle. Precipitation isotopic (δ18O and δ2H) measurements can help provide a mechanistic understanding of hydrologic change at global and regional scales. To study the changing water cycle in the northeastern US, we examined the longest (1968–2010) record of precipitation isotope values, collected at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, US (43o56′N, 71o45′W). We found a significant reduction in δ18O and δ2H values over the 43-year record, coupled with a significant increase in d-excess values. This gradual reduction in δ18O and δ2H values unexpectedly occurred during a period of regional warming. We provide evidence that these changes are governed by the interactions among the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, loss of Arctic sea ice, the fluctuating jet stream, and regular incursions of polar air into the northeastern US. PMID:26971874

  16. Femto-vortex sheets and hyperon polarization in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baznat, Mircea; Gudima, Konstantin; Sorin, Alexander; Teryaev, Oleg

    2016-03-01

    We study the structure of vorticity and hydrodynamic helicity fields in peripheral heavy-ion collisions using the kinetic quark-gluon string model. The angular momentum conservation within this model holds with a good accuracy. We observe the formation of specific toroidal structures of vorticity field (vortex sheets). Their existence is mirrored in the polarization of hyperons of the percent order.

  17. Polar vortex evolution during the 2002 Antarctic major warming as observed by the Odin satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricaud, P.; LefèVre, F.; Berthet, G.; Murtagh, D.; Llewellyn, E. J.; MéGie, G.; KyröLä, E.; Leppelmeier, G. W.; Auvinen, H.; Boonne, C.; Brohede, S.; Degenstein, D. A.; de La Noë, J.; Dupuy, E.; El Amraoui, L.; Eriksson, P.; Evans, W. F. J.; Frisk, U.; Gattinger, R. L.; Girod, F.; Haley, C. S.; Hassinen, S.; Hauchecorne, A.; Jimenez, C.; Kyrö, E.; Lautié, N.; Le FlochmoëN, E.; Lloyd, N. D.; McConnell, J. C.; McDade, I. C.; Nordh, L.; Olberg, M.; Pazmino, A.; Petelina, S. V.; Sandqvist, A.; SeppäLä, A.; Sioris, C. E.; Solheim, B. H.; Stegman, J.; Strong, K.; Taalas, P.; Urban, J.; von Savigny, C.; von Scheele, F.; Witt, G.

    2005-03-01

    In September 2002 the Antarctic polar vortex split in two under the influence of a sudden warming. During this event, the Odin satellite was able to measure both ozone (O3) and chlorine monoxide (ClO), a key constituent responsible for the so-called "ozone hole", together with nitrous oxide (N2O), a dynamical tracer, and nitric acid (HNO3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), tracers of denitrification. The submillimeter radiometer (SMR) microwave instrument and the Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System (OSIRIS) UV-visible light spectrometer (VIS) and IR instrument on board Odin have sounded the polar vortex during three different periods: before (19-20 September), during (24-25 September), and after (1-2 and 4-5 October) the vortex split. Odin observations coupled with the Reactive Processes Ruling the Ozone Budget in the Stratosphere (REPROBUS) chemical transport model at and above 500 K isentropic surfaces (heights above 18 km) reveal that on 19-20 September the Antarctic vortex was dynamically stable and chemically nominal: denitrified, with a nearly complete chlorine activation, and a 70% O3 loss at 500 K. On 25-26 September the unusual morphology of the vortex is monitored by the N2O observations. The measured ClO decay is consistent with other observations performed in 2002 and in the past. The vortex split episode is followed by a nearly complete deactivation of the ClO radicals on 1-2 October, leading to the end of the chemical O3 loss, while HNO3 and NO2 fields start increasing. This acceleration of the chlorine deactivation results from the warming of the Antarctic vortex in 2002, putting an early end to the polar stratospheric cloud season. The model simulation suggests that the vortex elongation toward regions of strong solar irradiance also favored the rapid reformation of ClONO2. The observed dynamical and chemical evolution of the 2002 polar vortex is qualitatively well reproduced by REPROBUS. Quantitative differences are mainly attributable to the

  18. PolarPortal.org Communicates Real-Time Developments in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langen, P. L.; Andersen, S. B.; Andersen, K. K.; Andersen, M. L.; Ahlstrom, A. P.; van As, D.; Barletta, V. R.; Box, J. E.; Citterio, M.; Colgan, W. T.; Dybkjær, G.; Forsberg, R.; Høyer, J. L.; Jensen, M. B.; Kliem, N.; Mottram, R.; Nielsen, K. P.; Olesen, M.; Quaglia, F. C.; Rasmussen, T. A.; Rodehacke, C. B.; Stendel, M.; Sandberg Sørensen, L.; Tonboe, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    PolarPortal.org was launched in June 2013 by a consortium of Danish institutions, including the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) and the National Space Institute at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU-Space). Polar Portal is a single web portal presenting a wide range of near real-time information on both the Greenland ice sheet and Arctic sea-ice in a format geared for non-specialists. Polar Portal aims to meet widespread public interest in a diverse range of climate-cryosphere processes in the Arctic: What is the present Greenland ice sheet contribution to sea level rise? How quickly are outlet glaciers retreating or advancing right now? How extensive is Arctic sea-ice or how warm is the Arctic Ocean at this moment? Although public interest in such topics is widely acknowledged, an important primary task for the scientists behind Polar Portal was collaborating with media specialists to establish the knowledge range of the general public on these topics, in order for Polar Portal to appropriately present useful climate-cryosphere information. Consequently, Polar Portal is designed in a highly visual exploratory format, where individual data products are accompanied by plain written summaries, with hyperlinks to relevant journal papers for more scrutinizing users. Numerous satellite and in situ observations, together with model output, are channeled daily into the Greenland ice sheet and Arctic sea-ice divisions of Polar Portal.

  19. Climatic anomalous patterns associated with the Arctic and Polar cell strength variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Weihong; Wu, Kaijun; Leung, Jeremy Cheuk-Hin

    2016-03-01

    The Arctic cell as a reversed and closed loop next to the Polar cell has been recently revealed in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). In this paper, we study the interannual variability of the Arctic and Polar cell strengths during 1979-2012, and their influence on surface air temperature (SAT), precipitation, and sea-ice concentration (SIC) at mid- and high-latitudes of the NH. We show that there is a significant negative correlation between the Arctic and Polar cell strengths. Both the Arctic and Polar cell strengths can well indicate the recurring climatic anomalies of SAT, precipitation, and SIC in their extreme winters. The surface large-scale cold-warm and dry-wet anomalous patterns in these extreme winters are directly linked with the vertical structure of height and temperature anomalies in the troposphere. Results suggest that the past climatic anomalies are better indicated by the strength anomalies of the Polar and Arctic cells than the traditional indices of mid-high latitude pattern such as the Arctic Oscillation and North Atlantic Oscillation. This study illustrates a three-dimensional picture of atmospheric variable anomalies in the troposphere that result in surface climatic anomalies.

  20. Instantaneous three-dimensional thermal structure of the South Polar Vortex of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garate-Lopez, I.; García Muñoz, A.; Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Venus thermal radiation spectrum exhibits the signature of CO2 absorption bands. By means of inversion techniques, those bands enable the retrieval of atmospheric temperature profiles. We have analyzed VIRTIS-M-IR night-side data obtaining high-resolution thermal maps of the Venus south polar region between 55 and 85 km altitudes. This analysis is specific to three Venus Express orbits where the vortex presents different dynamical configurations. The cold collar is clearly distinguishable centered at ∼62 km (∼100 mbar) altitude level. On average, the cold collar is more than 15 K colder than the pole, but its specific temperature varies with time. In the three orbits under investigation the South Polar Vortex appears as a vertically extended hot region close to the pole and squeezed by the cold collar between altitudes 55 and 67 km but spreading equatorwards at about 74 km. Both the instantaneous temperature maps and their zonal averages show that the top altitude limit of the thermal signature from the vortex is at ∼80 km altitude, at least on the night-side of the planet. The upper part of the atmosphere (67-85 km) is more homogeneous and has long-scale horizontal temperature differences of about 25 K over horizontal distances of ∼2000 km. The lower part (55-67 km) shows more fine-scale structure, creating the vortex morphology, with thermal differences of up to about 50 K over the same altitude range and ∼500 km horizontal distances. This lower part of the atmosphere is highly affected by the upper cloud deck, leading to stronger local temperature variations and larger uncertainties in the retrieval. From the temperature maps, we also study the vertical stability of different atmospheric layers for the three vortex configurations. The static stability is always positive (ST > 0) in the considered altitude range (55-85 km) and in the whole polar vortex. The cold collar is the most vertically stable structure at polar latitudes, while the vortex and

  1. Laser microprocessing of steel with radially and azimuthally polarized femtosecond vortex pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegre, O. J.; Perrie, W.; Edwardson, S. P.; Dearden, G.; Watkins, K. G.

    2012-08-01

    The use of a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) device to convert a linearly polarized femtosecond laser beam into a radially or azimuthally polarized vortex beam is demonstrated. In order to verify the state of polarization at the focal plane, laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are produced on stainless steel, imprinting the complex vectorial polarization structures and confirming the efficacy of the SLM in producing the desired polarization modes. Stainless steel plates of various thicknesses are micromachined with the radially and azimuthally polarized vortex beams and the resulting cut-outs are analysed. The process efficiency and quality of each mode are compared with those of circular polarization. Radial polarization is confirmed to be the most efficient mode for machining high-aspect-ratio (depth/width > 3) channels thanks to its relatively higher absorptivity. Following our microprocessing tests, liquid-crystal SLMs emerged as a flexible off-the-shelf tool for producing radially and azimuthally polarized beams in existing ultrashort-pulse laser microprocessing systems.

  2. Numerical simulation study of polar lows in Russian Arctic: dynamical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verezemskaya, Polina; Baranyuk, Anastasia; Stepanenko, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Polar Lows (hereafter PL) are intensive mesoscale cyclones, appearing above the sea surface, usually behind the arctic front and characterized by severe weather conditions [1]. All in consequence of the global warming PLs started to emerge in the arctic water area as well - in summer and autumn. The research goal is to examine PLs by considering multisensory data and the resulting numerical mesoscale model. The main purpose was to realize which conditions induce PL development in such thermodynamically unusual season and region as Kara sea. In order to conduct the analysis we used visible and infrared images from MODIS (Aqua). Atmospheric water vapor V, cloud liquid water Q content and surface wind fields W were resampled by examining AMSR-E microwave radiometer data (Aqua)[2], the last one was additionally extracted from QuickSCAT scatterometer. We have selected some PL cases in Kara sea, appeared in autumn of 2007-2008. Life span of the PL was between 24 to 36 hours. Vortexes' characteristics were: W from 15m/s, Q and V values: 0.08-0.11 kg/m2 and 8-15 kg/m2 relatively. Numerical experiments were carried out with Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), which was installed on supercomputer "Lomonosov" of Research Computing Center of Moscow State University [3]. As initial conditions was used reanalysis data ERA-Interim from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Numerical experiments were made with 5 km spatial resolution, with Goddard center microphysical parameterization and explicit convection simulation. Modeling fields were compared with satellite observations and shown good accordance. Than dynamic characteristics were analyzed: evolution of potential and absolute vorticity [4], surface heat and momentum fluxes, and CAPE and WISHE mechanisms realization. 1. Polar lows, J. Turner, E.A. Rasmussen, 612, Cambridge University press, Cambridge, 2003. 2. Zabolotskikh, E. V., Mitnik, L. M., & Chapron, B. (2013). New approach for severe marine

  3. Effect of recent sea surface temperature trends on the Arctic stratospheric vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkel, C. I.; Hurwitz, M. M.; Oman, L. D.

    2015-06-01

    Comprehensive chemistry-climate model experiments and observational data are used to show that up to half of the satellite era early springtime cooling trend in the Arctic lower stratosphere was caused by changing sea surface temperatures (SSTs). An ensemble of experiments forced only by changing SSTs is compared to an ensemble of experiments in which both the observed SSTs and chemically and radiatively active trace species are changing. By comparing the two ensembles, it is shown that warming of Indian Ocean, North Pacific, and North Atlantic SSTs and cooling of the tropical Pacific have strongly contributed to recent polar stratospheric cooling in late winter and early spring. When concentrations of ozone-depleting substances and greenhouse gases are fixed, polar ozone concentrations show a small but robust decline due to changing SSTs. Ozone loss is larger in the presence of changing concentrations of ozone-depleting substances and greenhouse gases. The stratospheric changes can be understood by examining the tropospheric height and heat flux anomalies generated by the anomalous SSTs. Finally, recent SST changes have contributed to a decrease in the frequency of late winter stratospheric sudden warmings.

  4. Polar stratospheric clouds over Finland in the 2012/2013 Arctic winter measured by two Raman lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Anne; Giannakaki, Eleni; Kivi, Rigel; Schrems, Otto; Immler, Franz; Komppula, Mika

    2013-04-01

    Already in December 2012, the Arctic stratospheric vortex reached temperatures sufficiently low for polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation over wide areas of Northern Europe and whole Finland. Within Finland, stratospheric aerosol lidar measurements have been and are performed with two Raman lidar systems, the PollyXT, owned by the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) and situated well below the Arctic circle close to Kuopio (63 N, 27 E) and the MARL lidar owned by the Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), and situated at the FMI Arctic Research Centre in Sodankylä (67 N, 26 E). The PollyXT has been designed as an autonomous tropospheric lidar system, but it has proven to be able to detect aerosol backscatter and depolarization at least as high up as 25 km. Measurements are ongoing as far as low clouds allow for stratospheric analysis with both lidars until the end of PSC season in February. For the winter 2012/2013, PSC occurrence frequency, types and characteristics will be determined. Comparative analysis with Calipso lidar profiles covering Finland will be performed. Preliminary results from December 17-24 show PSCs detected in Kuopio during seven days with the PollyXT lidar. The altitude of the clouds varied in the range of 17-25 km. In Sodankylä the measurements were running on one day during the period and PSCs were observed between altitudes 17-25 km. For the same time period (December 17-24, 2012) CALIPSO has observed stratospheric layers at all overpasses over Finland (9 tracks on five days). The clouds were observed between 18.5 and 26 km, with varying geometric and optical thickness.

  5. Nonlinear magnetic vortex dynamics in a circular nanodot excited by spin-polarized current

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigate analytically and numerically nonlinear vortex spin torque oscillator dynamics in a circular magnetic nanodot induced by a spin-polarized current perpendicular to the dot plane. We use a generalized nonlinear Thiele equation including spin-torque term by Slonczewski for describing the nanosize vortex core transient and steady orbit motions and analyze nonlinear contributions to all forces in this equation. Blue shift of the nano-oscillator frequency increasing the current is explained by a combination of the exchange, magnetostatic, and Zeeman energy contributions to the frequency nonlinear coefficient. Applicability and limitations of the standard nonlinear nano-oscillator model are discussed. PMID:25147490

  6. Scattering to different vortex polarity in coupled long Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wustmann, Waltraut; Osborn, Kevin D.

    We theoretically study the motion of flux vortices (fluxons) in structures made from discrete long Josephson junctions (DLJJs) which may have applications in the fields of reversible and low-power computing. We investigate the scattering of fluxons at specially designed interfaces where multiple DLJJs meet. Once fluxons approach the interface, flux oscillations at the interface can be temporarily excited before the fluxons continue along to another DLJJ. Under some conditions the fluxons will change their polarity (to antifluxons) and in other cases the fluxon continues without a change in polarity. We explain the dynamics through the resonant interaction of the soliton with bound states at the interface. We also study a controlled polarity gate, where the polarity of the target fluxon depends on a control fluxon which enters and exits the interface through separate DLJJs.

  7. Observations of Hydration and Dehydration in the Winter 2000 Arctic Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, R.; Webster, C.; Ordla, K.; Bui, P.; Gandrud, B.

    2000-01-01

    During the January 2000 deployment of the SAGE III Ozone Loss Validation Experiment (SOLVE), the NASA ER-2 aircraft intercepted air parcels with unusual water mixing ratios within the the Arctic polar vortex.

  8. Shaping the focal field of radially/azimuthally polarized phase vortex with Zernike polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lei; Urbach, H. Paul

    2016-06-01

    The focal field properties of radially/azimuthally polarized Zernike polynomials are studied. A method to design the pupil field in order to shape the focal field of radially or azimuthally polarized phase vortex is introduced. With this method, we are able to obtain a pupil field to achieve a longitudinally polarized hollow spot with a depth of focus up to 12λ and 0.28λ lateral resolution (FWHM) for an optical system with numerical aperture 0.99; a pupil field to generate eight focal spots along the optical axis is also obtained with this method.

  9. An International Polar Year Adventure in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wartes, D.

    2008-12-01

    Native students in the UA system who participated in RAHI are nearly twice as likely to earn a bachelor's degree, than those who did not attend RAHI. The past two summers, in celebration of the International Polar Year, in collaboration with Ilisagvik College, at the completion of the traditional RAHI program, ten RAHI students flew to Barrow for an additional two weeks of study. Five students participated in an archaeological dig and five students performed research with the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium scientists studying climate change. And another student was the Alaskan delegate to the Students on Ice, a 2-week ship-based adventure in northern Canada. In addition, ten students from Greenland visited the program, with plans to more fully participate next summer. This added dimension to the program has proved successful, allowing the students to compare and contrast between their own countries and indigenous perspectives. Global warming was an issue that was hotly debated, as its effects are so evident in the Polar Regions. In the Arctic, one's life is directly tied to the ice and snow. As the ice disappears and/or changes, the Indigenous people have to adapt. RAHI would like to share with you some of the results of this past summer's IPY activities.

  10. Polarization-selective vortex-core switching by tailored orthogonal Gaussian-pulse currents

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Young-Sang; Lee, Ki-Suk; Jung, Hyunsung; Choi, Youn-Seok; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Han, Dong-Soo; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2011-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate low-power-consumption vortex-core switching in magnetic nanodisks using tailored rotating magnetic fields produced with orthogonal and unipolar Gaussian-pulse currents. The optimal width of the orthogonal pulses and their time delay are found, from analytical and micromagnetic numerical calculations, to be determined only by the angular eigenfrequency ωD for a given vortex-state disk of polarization p, such that σ=1/ωD and Δt=π/2p/ωD. The estimated optimal pulse parameters are in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, this work lays a foundation for energy-efficient information recording in vortex-core cross-point architecture.

  11. Polar bear and walrus response to the rapid decline in Arctic sea ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oakley, K.; Whalen, M.; Douglas, D.; Udevitz, M.; Atwood, T.; Jay, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic is warming faster than other regions of the world due to positive climate feedbacks associated with loss of snow and ice. One highly visible consequence has been a rapid decline in Arctic sea ice over the past 3 decades - a decline projected to continue and result in ice-free summers likely as soon as 2030. The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) and the Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) are dependent on sea ice over the continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean's marginal seas. The continental shelves are shallow regions with high biological productivity, supporting abundant marine life within the water column and on the sea floor. Polar bears use sea ice as a platform for hunting ice seals; walruses use sea ice as a resting platform between dives to forage for clams and other bottom-dwelling invertebrates. How have sea ice changes affected polar bears and walruses? How will anticipated changes affect them in the future?

  12. Large amplitude spin torque vortex oscillations at zero external field using a perpendicular spin polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Dussaux, A.; Rache Salles, B.; Jenkins, A. S.; Bortolotti, P.; Grollier, J.; Cros, V.; Fert, A.; Khvalkovskiy, A. V.; Kubota, H.; Fukushima, A.; Yakushiji, K.; Yuasa, S.

    2014-07-14

    We investigate the microwave response of a spin transfer vortex based oscillator in a magnetic tunnel junction with an in-plane reference layer combined with a spin valve with an out-of-plane magnetization spin polarizing layer. The main advantage of this perpendicular spin polarizer is to induce a large spin transfer force even at zero magnetic field, thus leading to a record emitted power (up to 0.6 μW) associated to a very narrow spectral linewidth of a few hundreds of kHz. The characteristics of this hybrid vortex based spin transfer nano-oscillator obtained at zero field and room temperature are of great importance for applications based on rf spintronic devices as integrated and tunable microwave source and/or microwave detector.

  13. Spatial variation of ozone depletion rates in the springtime Antarctic polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Yuk L.; Allen, Mark; Crisp, David; Zurek, Richard W.; Sander, Stanley P.

    1990-01-01

    An area-mapping technique, designed to filter out synoptic perturbations of the Antarctic polar vortex such as distortion or displacement away from the pole, was applied to the Nimbus-7 TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) data. This procedure reveals the detailed morphology of the temporal evolution of column O3. The results for the austral spring of 1987 suggest the existence of a relatively stable collar region enclosing an interior that is undergoing large variations. A simplified photochemical model of O3 loss and the temporal evolution of the area-mapped polar O3 are used to constrain the chlorine monoxide (ClO) concentrations in the springtime Antarctic vortex. The O3 loss rates could be larger than deduced here because of underestimates of total O3 by TOMS near the terminator.

  14. Antarctic ozone variability inside the polar vortex estimated from balloon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrondo, M. C.; Gil, M.; Yela, M.; Johnson, B. J.; Ochoa, H. A.

    2014-01-01

    Thirteen years of ozone soundings at the Antarctic Belgrano II station (78° S, 34.6° W) have been analysed to establish a climatology of stratospheric ozone and temperature over the area. The station is inside the polar vortex during the period of development of chemical ozone depletion. Weekly periodic profiles provide a suitable database for seasonal characterization of the evolution of stratospheric ozone, especially valuable during wintertime, when satellites and ground-based instruments based on solar radiation are not available. The work is focused on ozone loss rate variability (August-October) and its recovery (November-December) at different layers identified according to the severity of ozone loss. The time window selected for the calculations covers the phase of a quasi-linear ozone reduction, around day 220 (mid-August) to day 273 (end of September). Decrease of the total ozone column over Belgrano during spring is highly dependent on the meteorological conditions. Largest depletions (up to 59%) are reached in coldest years, while warm winters exhibit significantly lower ozone loss (20%). It has been found that about 11% of the total O3 loss, in the layer where maximum depletion occurs, takes place before sunlight has arrived, as a result of transport to Belgrano of air from a somewhat lower latitude, near the edge of the polar vortex, providing evidence of mixing inside the vortex. Spatial homogeneity of the vortex has been examined by comparing Belgrano results with those previously obtained for South Pole station (SPS) for the same altitude range and for 9 yr of overlapping data. Results show more than 25% higher ozone loss rate at SPS than at Belgrano. The behaviour can be explained taking into account (i) the transport to both stations of air from a somewhat lower latitude, near the edge of the polar vortex, where sunlight reappears sooner, resulting in earlier depletion of ozone, and (ii) the accumulated hours of sunlight, which become much

  15. Observations of deformation and mixing of the total ozone field in the Antaractic Polar Vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.P. ); Mangus, N.J. )

    1993-09-01

    Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) images of the springtime Southern Hemisphere commonly show concentric layers in the total ozone field outside the Antarctic polar vortex. The layering appears to result from horizontal folding and stretching of regions on the equatorward flank of the polar vortex near the midlatitude ozone maximum. This folding and stretching interleaves low and high ozone air from the subtropics and midlatitudes, respectively. Occasional large amplitude wave events can extract very low ozone air from the interior of the polar vortex (the Antarctic ozone hole), but the folding and stretching results in relatively rapid horizontal mixing of the atmosphere on the equatorward flank of the jet. This type of lagrangian behavior may be common in the atmosphere, but is only visible when local tracer gradients are large and observations with high spatial resolution are available. Also, experimentation has shown that gray-scale images of TOMS data show the details of the spatial distribution of ozone much more clearly than contour maps of false-color images. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Using FTIR measurements of stratospheric composition to identify midlatitude polar vortex intrusions over Toronto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaley, C.; Strong, K.; Adams, C.; Bourassa, A. E.; Daffer, W. H.; Degenstein, D. A.; Fast, H.; Fogal, P. F.; Manney, G. L.; Mittermeier, R. L.; Pavlovic, B.; Wiacek, A.

    2013-11-01

    Using 11 years of trace gas measurements made at the University of Toronto Atmospheric Observatory (43.66°N, 79.40°W) and Environment Canada's Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments (44.23°N, 79.78°W), along with derived meteorological products, we identify a number of polar intrusion events, which are excursions of the polar vortex or filaments from the polar vortex extending down to midlatitudes. These events are characterized by enhanced stratospheric columns (12-50 km) of hydrogen fluoride (HF), by diminished stratospheric columns of nitrous oxide (N2O), and by a scaled potential vorticity above 1.2 × 10-4s-1. The events comprise 16%of winter/spring (November to April inclusive) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements from January 2002 to March 2013, and we find at least two events per year. The events are corroborated by Modèle Isentrope du transport Méso-échelle de l'Ozone Stratosphérique par Advection, Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications potential vorticity maps, and Global Modeling Initiative N2O maps. During polar intrusion events, the stratospheric ozone (O3) columns over Toronto are usually greater than when there is no event. Our O3 measurements agree with the Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System satellite instrument and are further verified with the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer and Ozone Monitoring Instrument satellite observations. We find six cases out of 53 for which chemical O3depletion within the polar vortex led to a reduction in stratospheric O3 columns over Toronto. We have thus identified a dynamical cause for most of the winter/spring variability of stratospheric trace gas columns observed at our midlatitude site. While there have been a number of prior polar intrusion studies, this is the first study to report in the context of 11 years of ground-based FTIR column measurements, providing insight into the frequency of midlatitude polar vortex intrusions

  17. Effect of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction on the magnetic vortex oscillator driven by spin-polarized current

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shujun; Zhang, Senfu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Liu, Xianyin; Jin, Chendong; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2015-05-07

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the dynamic of magnetic vortex driven by spin-polarized current in Permalloy nanodisks in the presence of interfacial/superficial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMI). It is found that spin-polarized current can drive the vortex precession. In the presence of DMI, the oscillation frequency of the vortex is about 3 times higher than that of without DMI for the same nanodisk. Moreover, the linewidth is more narrow than that of without DMI when the radius of nanodisk is 50 nm. In addition, the vortex can support a higher current density than that of without DMI. Introduction of DMI in this system can provide a new way to design magnetic vortex oscillator.

  18. Dual-polarization and dual-mode orbital angular momentum radio vortex beam generated by using reflective metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shixing; Li, Long; Shi, Guangming

    2016-08-01

    A metasurface, which is composed of printed cross-dipole elements with different arm lengths, is designed, fabricated, and experimentally demonstrated to generate orbital angular momentum (OAM) vortex waves of dual polarizations and dual modes in the radio frequency domain simultaneously. The prototype of a practical metasurface is fabricated and measured to validate the results of theoretical analysis and design at 5.8 GHz. Numerical and experimental results verify that vortex waves with dual OAM modes and dual polarizations can be flexibly generated by using a reflective metasurface. The proposed method paves a way to generate diverse OAM vortex waves for radio frequency and microwave wireless communication applications.

  19. Polar bear maternal den habitat in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durner, G.M.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Ambrosius, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) give birth during mid-winter in dens of ice and snow. Denning polar bears subjected to human disturbances may abandon dens before their altricial young can survive the rigors of the Arctic winter. Because the Arctic coastal plain of Alaska is an area of high petroleum potential and contains existing and planned oil field developments, the distribution of polar bear dens on the plain is of interest to land managers. Therefore, as part of a study of denning habitats along the entire Arctic coast of Alaska, we examined high-resolution aerial photographs (n = 1655) of the 7994 km2 coastal plain included in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) and mapped 3621 km of bank habitat suitable for denning by polar bears. Such habitats were distributed uniformly and comprised 0.29% (23.2 km2) of the coastal plain between the Canning River and the Canadian border. Ground-truth sampling suggested that we had correctly identified 91.5% of bank denning habitats on the ANWR coastal plain. Knowledge of the distribution of these habitats will help facilitate informed management of human activities and minimize disruption of polar bears in maternal dens.

  20. The mechanism of polar vortex strengthening after large tropical volcanic eruptions as simulated in the MPI-ESM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Matthias; Timmreck, Claudia; Schmidt, Hauke; Toohey, Matthew; Krueger, Kirstin

    2016-04-01

    State-of-the-art climate models that have participated in the recent CMIP5 model intercomparison activity do, on average, not produce the strengthened northern hemispheric (NH) polar vortex after historical large tropical volcanic eruptions as suggested by observations. Here, we study the impact of volcanic eruptions of different strength on the NH winter stratosphere in the MPI-ESM Earth system model. We compare the dynamical impact in ensemble simulations of a very large Tambora eruption in 1815 with the response to the two largest eruptions of the CMIP5 historical simulations (Krakatau, 1883; and Mt. Pinatubo, 1991). The mechanism, of the strengthening of the vortex can clearly be identified in the simulations for the Tambora eruption. An increased meridional stratospheric temperature gradient is often assumed to be the cause of the vortex strengthening. The position of the maximum temperature anomaly gradient is located, however, at approximately 30°N, far away from the polar vortex . Hence, the vortex strengthening is caused only indirectly by the changed temperature gradient which first produces a subtropical wind anomaly in early winter. This leads planetary waves propagating more equatorward causing finally the vortex strengthening. The simulated response to the weaker eruptions of Krakatau and Pinatubo is also a slight average strengthening of the polar vortex, but individual ensemble members differ strongly indicating that internal variability can mask the impact on the polar vortex in the NH post-eruption winter under such moderate eruption strengths. The large forcing of the Tambora eruption does not only cause a mean vortex strengthening but also a reduction of the ensemble variability of the vortex.

  1. Three-dimensional thermal structure of the South Polar Vortex of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, Ricardo; Garate-Lopez, Itziar; Garcia-Muñoz, Antonio; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín

    2014-11-01

    We have analyzed thermal infrared images provided by the VIRTIS-M instrument aboard Venus Express (VEX) to obtain high resolution thermal maps of the Venus south polar region between 55 and 85 km altitudes. The maps investigate three different dynamical configurations of the polar vortex including its classical dipolar shape, a regularly oval shape and a transition shape between the different configurations of the vortex. We apply the atmospheric model described by García Muñoz et al. (2013) and a variant of the retrieval algorithm detailed in Grassi et al. (2008) to obtain maps of temperature over the Venus south polar region in the quoted altitude range. These maps are discussed in terms of cloud motions and relative vorticity distribution obtained previously (Garate-Lopez et al. 2013). Temperature maps retrieved at 55 - 63 km show the same structures that are observed in the ~5 µm radiance images. This altitude range coincides with the optimal expected values of the cloud top altitude at polar latitudes and magnitudes derived from the analysis of ~5 µm images are measured at this altitude range. We also study the imprint of the vortex on the thermal field above the cloud level which extends up to 80 km. From the temperature maps, we also study the vertical stability of different atmospheric layers. The cold collar is clearly the most statically stable structure at polar latitudes, while the vortex and subpolar latitudes show lower stability values. Furthermore, the hot filaments present within the vortex at 55-63 km exhibit lower values of static stability than their immediate surroundings.ReferencesGarate-Lopez et al. Nat. Geosci. 6, 254-257 (2013).García Muñoz et al. Planet. Space Sci. 81, 65-73 (2013).Grassi, D. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 113, 1-12 (2008).AcknowledgementsWe thank ESA for supporting Venus Express, ASI, CNES and the other national space agencies supporting VIRTIS on VEX and their principal investigators G. Piccioni and P. Drossart. This work

  2. The relationship between the polar vortex and ozone in the boreal stratosphere from ERA-40 reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Merino, Beatriz; Serrano, Encarna

    2010-05-01

    The relation between the ozone and the polar vortex in the stratosphere has an outstanding role in climate studios, and also a large repercussion in the improvement of the climate models. This importance is due to the combination of two reasons: the key role of the stratospheric ozone in the Earth climate due to its radiative properties, and that the most important dynamic activity in the high-latitude stratosphere is associated with the polar vortex (present during the whole winter and part of the spring). This work focuses on the spring months, a transitional period in the stratospheric circulation between the winter westerlies (the stratospheric polar vortex, SPV, is completely developed) and summer easterlies (SPV has already disappeared). This breakdown of the SPV is known as the Stratospheric Final Warming, SFW. Using ERA-40 data, currently the longest-period reanalysis (1979-2002) with a sufficiently realistic representation of the stratosphere circulation, we analyze different aspects about the relation between the ozone concentration and the intensity of polar vortex in the boreal stratosphere during the springtime. Among other results, we see that the 24-yr mean evolution of the stratospheric ozone, averaged over the polar region (60°N-80°N), exhibits a slow increase along March followed by a progressive decrease during April and May. The interannual variability of the monthly mean of zonal wind and ozone mixing ratio at 50 hPa in the analyzed polar region decreases gradually along the season as well. When analyzing the springtime stratospheric preconditioning, we found that almost all the warm Februaries are not associated with low ozone content and strong SPV at the beginning of March; and that none cold February was followed by a weak SPV in the first third of March. Also, the stratospheric conditions around the SFW occurrence have been studied. It is seen that the 50-hPa ozone over the polar region is nearly constant prior to the SFW, while it gets

  3. Design of an Autonomous Polarized Raman Lidar for Arctic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillwell, R. A.; Neely, R. R., III; O'Neill, M.; Thayer, J. P.; Hayman, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    A dearth of high-spatial and temporal resolution measurements of atmospheric state variables in the Arctic directly inhibits scientific understanding of radiative and precipitation impacts on the changing surface environment. More reliable and frequent measurements are needed to better understand Arctic weather processes and constrain model predictions. To partially address the lack of Artic observations, a new autonomous Raman lidar system, which will measure through the troposphere water vapor mixing ratio, temperature, extinction, and cloud phase profiles, is under development for deployment to Summit Camp, Greenland (72° 36'N, 38° 25'W, 3250m). This high-altitude Arctic field site has co-located ancillary equipment such as a Doppler millimeter cloud radar, microwave radiometers, depolarization lidars, ceiliometer, an infrared interferometer and twice-daily radiosondes which are part of the Integrated Characterization of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric State and Precipitation at Summit (ICECAPS) project and the Arctic Observing Network (AON). The current suite of instruments allows for a near comprehensive picture of the atmospheric state above Summit but increased spatial and temporal resolution of water vapor and temperature are needed to reveal detailed microphysical information. In this presentation, a system description will be provided with an emphasis on the features necessary for autonomous, full diurnal operation, and how the new system will help fill the observation gap within the already existing sensor suite.

  4. Chemical Depletion of Lower Stratospheric Ozone in the 1992-1993 Northern Winter Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.; Zurek, R. W.; Read, W. G.; Elson, L. S.; Kumer, J. B.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Roche, A. E.; O'Neill, A.; Harwood, R. S.; MacKenzie, I.; Swinbank, R.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite observations of ozone and chlorine monoxide in the Arctic lower stratosphere during winter 1992-1993 are compared with observations during other winters, observations of long-lived tracers and the evolution of the polar vortex. Chlorine in the lower stratospheric vortex during February 1993 was mostly in chemically reactive forms.

  5. Enhancing NASA's Contribution to Arctic Terrestrial Hydrology and the Study of Polar Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. E.; Elfring, C.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; McGuire, A. D.

    2001-12-01

    In a recent report by the National Academies, an interdisciplinary committee assessed NASA's polar geophysical datasets in the context of the science questions driving the Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) and other avenues of polar research. The report examines data sets in terms of the major ESE themes: ongoing changes in polar climate and the biosphere, forcings of the polar climate system, responses and feedbacks to the forcing, consequences of change in the polar regions, and prediction of such changes. It includes a matrix of science needs and available data sets and, from that, identifies high-priority measurement needs, many of which are directly relevant to Arctic hydrology. The greatest needs are improved measurements of polar precipitation, surface albedo, freshwater discharge from terrestrial regions, surface temperatures and turbulent fluxes, permafrost extent and dynamics, ocean salinity, ice sheet mass flux, land surface (especially vegetative) characteristics, and sea ice thickness. For Arctic hydrological studies, key needs include surface radiation parameters (albedo, roughness), especially with regard to the timing of ice-out in rivers and lakes, the associated pulse of freshwater discharge, biogeochemical fluxes, and aquatic biology. There is a particular need for pan-Arctic datasets of vegetative characteristics such as leaf area index, structural composition, canopy density, albedo, disturbance characteristics, wetland extent, and nitrogen deposition. Pan-Arctic information of this type will require novel efforts in the synthesis of different products, often from different sensors. Such information, as well as high-resolution surface elevation and topography, is needed for Arctic land system models that include hydrology and ecosystem dynamics. Key changes to be anticipated or predicted by these models include changes in water supplies from snow and snow-fed rivers, effects of physical environmental change on terrestrial productivity and

  6. Analysis of isentropic potential vorticities for the relationship between stratospheric polar vortex and the cooling process in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the relationships between stratospheric polar vortex anomalies and cooling events in eastern China using isentropic reanalysis data from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Daily mean data from 2000 to 2011 are used to explore the effective stratospheric signals. First, diagnoses of the 2009/2010 winter show that after the stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) of the Atlantic-East Asian (AEA) pattern, the stratospheric high isentropic potential vorticity(IPV) center derived from the split polar vortex will move to the northeast of the Eurasian continent. The air mass, accompanied by some southward and eastward movements and characterized by high IPV values, will be stretched vertically, leading to apparent reinforcements of the positive vorticity and the development of a cold vortex system in the troposphere. The northerly wind on the western side of the cold vortex can transport cold air southward and downward, resulting in this distinct cooling process in eastern China. Secondly, the Empirical Orthogonal Function analyses of IPV anomalies on the 430 K isentropic surface during 2000-2011 winters indicate that the IPV distribution and time series of the first mode are able to represent the polar vortex variation features, which significantly influence cold-air activity in eastern China, especially in the AEA-type SSW winter. When the time series increases significantly, the polar vortex will be split and the high-IPV center will move to the northeast of the Eurasian continent with downward and southward developments, inducing obvious cooling in eastern China. Moreover, all the four times SSW events of AEA pattern from 2000 to 2011 are reflected in the first time series, and after the strong polar vortex disturbances, cooling processes of different intensities are observed in eastern China. The cooling can sustain at least one week. For this reason the first time series can be used as an available index of polar vortex oscillation and has

  7. Direct Observation of Magnetic Vortex Cores using Scanning Electron Microscopy with Polarization Analysis (SEMPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Seok-Hwan; Pierce, Daniel; Unguris, John

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic singularities associated with magnetic vortex cores are a common feature in patterned magnetic nanostructures. Their small size, on the order of 10 nm, makes them technologically interesting, but also difficult to measure or image directly. We used Scanning Electron Microscopy with Polarization Analysis (SEMPA) to image magnetic vortices in a wide variety of patterned nanostructures. Since SEMPA can measure both the in-plane and the out-of-plane component of the surface magnetization, SEMPA can potentially determine both the chirality and the polarity of the vortex core, simultaneously. Samples consisted of NiFe (25nm) / Ta (3nm), and other soft magnetic films, patterned by electron beam lithography and lift-off into disks with various diameters. The films were grown on 85nm thick SiN membranes to reduce image degradation from backscattered electrons. The experimental results were compared to micromagnetic simulations and the vortex core profile showed a good correspondence with theoretical predictions, which considers only the exchange and magnetostatic energy. This work has been supported in part by the NIST-CNST/UMD-NanoCenter Cooperative Agreement.

  8. Spatial variation of ozone depletion rates in the springtime antarctic polar vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, Y.L.; Allen, M.; Crisp, D.; Zurek, R.W.; Sander, S.P. )

    1990-05-11

    An area-mapping technique, designed to filter out synoptic perturbations of the Antarctic polar vortex such as distortion or displacement away from the pole, was applied to the Nimbus-7 TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) data. This procedure reveals the detailed morphology of the temporal evolution of column O{sub 3}. The results for the austral spring of 1987 suggest the existence of a relatively stable collar region enclosing an interior that is undergoing large variations. There is tentative evidence for quasi-periodic O{sub 3} fluctuations in the collar and for upwelling of tropospheric air in late spring. A simplified photochemical model of O{sub 3} loss and the temporal evolution of the area-mapped polar O{sub 3} are used to constrain the chlorine monoxide (ClO) concentrations in the springtime Antarctic vortex. The concentrations required to account for the observed loss of O{sub 3} are higher than those previously reported by Anderson et al. but are comparable to their recently revised values. However, the O{sub 3} loss rates could be larger than deduced here because of underestimates of total O{sub 3} by TOMS near the terminator. This uncertainty, together with the uncertainties associated with measurements acquired during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment, suggests that in early spring, closer to the vortex center, there may be even larger ClO concentrations than have yet been detected.

  9. Stratospheric sulfate aerosol in and near the Northern Hemisphere polar vortex - The morphology of the sulfate layer, multimodal size distributions, and the effect of denitrification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. G.; Stolzenburg, M. R.; Clark, W. E.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.; Kelly, K. K.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements were made of stratospheric sulfate aerosols using a passive cavity aerosol spectrometer and a condensation nucleus counter on a NASA ER-2 aircraft in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment of 1989. The problems of representative and accurate sampling and particle evaporation were explicitly addressed in the design of the inlets and reduction of the data. The measurements suggest that the sulfate aerosol is bimodal in the polar vortex above the mass mixing ratio maximum in the sulfate layer. It appears that a nuclei mode of small, newly formed particles exists in this region. A stronger case is made for a nuclei mode in the upper few kilometers of the troposphere and in the lower few kilometers of the stratosphere. This mode is probably a global phenomenon occurring in all seasons. Comparison of denitrified and nondenitrified air suggests that denitrification removes some of the larger sulfate particles.

  10. NSF Antarctic and Arctic Data Consortium; Scientific Research Support & Data Services for the Polar Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, P. J.; Pundsack, J. W.; Carbotte, S. M.; Tweedie, C. E.; Grunow, A.; Lazzara, M. A.; Carpenter, P.; Sjunneskog, C. M.; Yarmey, L.; Bauer, R.; Adrian, B. M.; Pettit, J.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium (a2dc) is a collaboration of research centers and support organizations that provide polar scientists with data and tools to complete their research objectives. From searching historical weather observations to submitting geologic samples, polar researchers utilize the a2dc to search andcontribute to the wealth of polar scientific and geospatial data.The goals of the Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium are to increase visibility in the research community of the services provided by resource and support facilities. Closer integration of individual facilities into a "one stop shop" will make it easier for researchers to take advantage of services and products provided by consortium members. The a2dc provides a common web portal where investigators can go to access data and samples needed to build research projects, develop student projects, or to do virtual field reconnaissance without having to utilize expensive logistics to go into the field.Participation by the international community is crucial for the success of a2dc. There are 48 nations that are signatories of the Antarctic Treaty, and 8 sovereign nations in the Arctic. Many of these organizations have unique capabilities and data that would benefit US ­funded polar science and vice versa.We'll present an overview of the Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium, current participating organizations, challenges & opportunities, and plans to better coordinate data through a geospatial strategy and infrastructure.

  11. Optimally coherent sets in geophysical flows: a transfer-operator approach to delimiting the stratospheric polar vortex.

    PubMed

    Santitissadeekorn, Naratip; Froyland, Gary; Monahan, Adam

    2010-11-01

    The "edge" of the Antarctic polar vortex is known to behave as a barrier to the meridional (poleward) transport of ozone during the austral winter. This chemical isolation of the polar vortex from the middle and low latitudes produces an ozone minimum in the vortex region, intensifying the ozone hole relative to that which would be produced by photochemical processes alone. Observational determination of the vortex edge remains an active field of research. In this paper, we obtain objective estimates of the structure of the polar vortex by introducing a technique based on transfer operators that aims to find regions with minimal external transport. Applying this technique to European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-40 three-dimensional velocity data, we produce an improved three-dimensional estimate of the vortex location in the upper stratosphere where the vortex is most pronounced. This computational approach has wide potential application in detecting and analyzing mixing structures in a variety of atmospheric, oceanographic, and general fluid dynamical settings. PMID:21230580

  12. Polarity reversal of a magnetic vortex core by a unipolar, non-resonant in-plane pulsed magnetic field.

    SciTech Connect

    Keavney, D. J.; Cheng, X. M.; Buchanan, K. S.

    2009-06-24

    We report the polarity reversal of a magnetic vortex core using a nonresonant in-plane pulsed magnetic field of arbitrary waveform studied using time-resolved x-ray photoemission electron microscopy and micromagnetic simulations. The imaging and simulations show that a 5 mT pulse, higher than the critical field for nonlinear effects, effectively leads to the randomization of the vortex core polarity. The micromagnetic simulations further show that the onset of stochastic core polarity randomization does not necessarily coincide with the critical reversal field, leading to a field window for predictable core reversal.

  13. Potential Arctic sea ice refuge for sustaining a remnant polar bear population (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durner, G. M.; Amstrup, S. C.; Douglas, D. C.; Gautier, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    Polar bears depend on sea ice as a platform from which they capture seals. Sea ice availability must be spatially and temporally adequate for birth and weaning of seal pups, and to maximize seal hunting opportunities for polar bears. Projected declines in the spatial and temporal extent of summer and autumn sea ice could potentially limit the ability of polar bears to build up body stores sufficient to maintain reproductive fitness. General circulation models, however, suggest that summer and autumn sea ice may persist in the shelf waters of the Canadian Archipelago and northern Greenland adjacent to the Arctic basin. While winter-formed ice is important, a primary mechanism for sea ice accumulation in this region is by mechanical thickening of the sea ice facilitated by convergent forces from the Beaufort Gyre and the Transpolar Drift Stream. Collectively these areas could provide a polar bear refugium when other regions have lost the sea ice necessary to support viable populations. The potential for a polar bear refugium, however, must include other resource considerations. Projected declines of sea ice in the Northwest Passage may expose polar bears to hazards related to increase shipping and other commerce. Increasing global demands and limited opportunities elsewhere make the Arctic an increasingly attractive area for petroleum exploration. The Canadian Archipelago coincides with the Sverdrup basin, where petroleum accumulations have already been discovered but as yet are undeveloped. The Lincoln Sea Basin offshore of northern Greenland has the geological possibility of significant petroleum accumulations, and northeastern Greenland is one of the most prospective areas in the Arctic for undiscovered oil. Activities associated with commerce and petroleum development could reduce the potential viability of the region as a polar bear refugium. Hence, if the goal is a sustainable (albeit reduced) polar bear population, important considerations include commerce

  14. Troposphere-Stratosphere Dynamic Coupling Under Strong and Weak Polar Vortex Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, Judith; Graf, Hans-F.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropospheric and stratospheric wave-like anomalies of spherical zonal wave number (ZWN) 1 is studied by applying Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA). A lag-correlation technique is used with 10-day lowpass filtered daily time series of 50- and 500-hPa geopotential heights. Generally stratospheric circulation is determined by ultralong tropospheric planetary waves. During winter seasons characterized either by any anomalously strong or weak polar winter vortex different propagation characteristics for waves of ZWN 1 are observed. The non-linear perspective of the results have implications for medium range weather forecast and climate sensitivity experiments.

  15. Ozone profile measurements within, at the edge of, and outside the Antarctic polar vortex in the spring of 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Deshler, T.; Hofmann, D.J.; Hereford, J.V. )

    1990-06-20

    Ozone and temperature were measured during 38 balloon soundings at McMurdo Station, Antarctica (78{degree}S), in the spring of 1988. Because of the motion of the Antarctic polar vortex, measurements were obtained within, at the edge of, and outside the vortex. Although the polar vortex did not remain over McMurdo as it did in 1986 and 1987, it was overhead long enough to establish that ozone depletion was less extensive and ended earlier than in either 1986 or 1987. In the vortex the ozone mixing ratio at 18 km decayed with an exponential half-life of 29 days compared to 25 and 12 days in 1986 and 1987. While ozone partial pressure in the 16-18 km layer decayed to values as low as 10 nbar in 1986 and 3 nbar in 1987, ozone partial pressure dropped to only 60-70 nbar in 1988 in the depleted region, a reduction of 30 to 50%. Even with these differences in degree of ozone depletion there were similarities to previous measurements. Ozone depletion was caused by a sink between 12 and 20 km, and primary depletion was episodic, occurring in periods of <10 days. Measurements at the edge of the vortex displayed the ozone layering observed in 1986 and 1987 and suggest the exchange of ozone rich and poor air across the vortex wall in the 12-20 km layer. Outside the vortex, vertical profiles displayed a region of high ozone and constant temperature above 20 km.

  16. The Vector Vortex Coronagraph: Sensitivity to Low-Order Aberrations, Central Obscuration, Chromaticism, and Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawet, Dimitri; Pueyo, Laurent; Moody, Dwight; Krist, John; Serabyn, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The Vector Vortex Coronagraph is a phase-based coronagraph, one of the most efficient in terms of inner working angle, throughput, discovery space, contrast, and simplicity. Using liquid-crystal polymer technology, this new coronagraph has recently been the subject of lab demonstrations in the near-infrared, visible and was also used on sky at the Palomar observatory in the H and K bands (1.65 and 2.2 micrometers, respectively) to image the brown dwarf companion to HR 7672, and the three extasolar planets around HR 8799. However, despite these recent successes, the Vector Vortex Coronagraph is, as are most coronagraphs, sensitive to the central obscuration and secondary support structures, low-order aberrations (tip-tilt, focus, etc), bandwidth (chromaticism), and polarization when image-plane wavefront sensing is performed. Here, we consider in detail these sensitivities as a function of the topological charge of the vortex and design properties inherent to the manufacturing technology, and show that in practice all of them can be mitigated to meet specific needs.

  17. The Vector Vortex Coronagraph: sensitivity to central obscuration, low-order aberrations, chromaticism, and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawet, Dimitri; Pueyo, Laurent; Moody, Dwight; Krist, John; Serabyn, Eugene

    2010-07-01

    The Vector Vortex Coronagraph is a phase-based coronagraph, one of the most efficient in terms of inner working angle, throughput, discovery space, contrast, and simplicity. Using liquid-crystal polymer technology, this new coronagraph has recently been the subject of lab demonstrations in the near-infrared, visible and was also used on sky at the Palomar observatory in the H and K bands (1.65 and 2.2 μm, respectively) to image the brown dwarf companion to HR 7672, and the three extra-solar planets around HR 8799. However, despite these recent successes, the Vector Vortex Coronagraph is, as are most coronagraphs, sensitive to the central obscuration and secondary support structures, low-order aberrations (tip-tilt, focus, etc), bandwidth (chromaticism), and polarization when image-plane wavefront sensing is performed. Here, we consider in detail these sensitivities as a function of the topological charge of the vortex and design features inherent to the manufacturing technology, and show that in practice all of them can be mitigated to meet specific needs.

  18. The stratospheric pathway for Arctic impacts on midlatitude climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Koji; Iwamoto, Katsushi; Honda, Meiji; Miyoshi, Yasunobu; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Ukita, Jinro

    2016-04-01

    Recent evidence from both observations and model simulations suggests that an Arctic sea ice reduction tends to cause a negative Arctic Oscillation (AO) phase with severe winter weather in the Northern Hemisphere, which is often preceded by weakening of the stratospheric polar vortex. Although this evidence hints at a stratospheric involvement in the Arctic-midlatitude climate linkage, the exact role of the stratosphere remains elusive. Here we show that tropospheric AO response to the Arctic sea ice reduction largely disappears when suppressing the stratospheric wave mean flow interactions in numerical experiments. The results confirm a crucial role of the stratosphere in the sea ice impacts on the midlatitudes by coupling between the stratospheric polar vortex and planetary-scale waves. Those results and consistency with observation-based evidence suggest that a recent Arctic sea ice loss is linked to midlatitudes extreme weather events associated with the negative AO phase.

  19. Projected Polar Bear Sea Ice Habitat in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Stephen G.; Castro de la Guardia, Laura; Derocher, Andrew E.; Sahanatien, Vicki; Tremblay, Bruno; Huard, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Sea ice across the Arctic is declining and altering physical characteristics of marine ecosystems. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) have been identified as vulnerable to changes in sea ice conditions. We use sea ice projections for the Canadian Arctic Archipelago from 2006 – 2100 to gain insight into the conservation challenges for polar bears with respect to habitat loss using metrics developed from polar bear energetics modeling. Principal Findings Shifts away from multiyear ice to annual ice cover throughout the region, as well as lengthening ice-free periods, may become critical for polar bears before the end of the 21st century with projected warming. Each polar bear population in the Archipelago may undergo 2–5 months of ice-free conditions, where no such conditions exist presently. We identify spatially and temporally explicit ice-free periods that extend beyond what polar bears require for nutritional and reproductive demands. Conclusions/Significance Under business-as-usual climate projections, polar bears may face starvation and reproductive failure across the entire Archipelago by the year 2100. PMID:25426720

  20. Dielectric meta-reflectarray for broadband linear polarization conversion and optical vortex generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanmu; Wang, Wenyi; Moitra, Parikshit; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Briggs, Dayrl P; Valentine, Jason

    2014-03-12

    Plasmonic metasurfaces have recently attracted much attention due to their ability to abruptly change the phase of light, allowing subwavelength optical elements for polarization and wavefront control. However, most previously demonstrated metasurface designs suffer from low coupling efficiency and are based on metallic resonators, leading to ohmic loss. Here, we present an alternative approach to plasmonic metasurfaces by replacing the metallic resonators with high-refractive-index silicon cut-wires in combination with a silver ground plane. We experimentally demonstrate that this meta-reflectarray can be used to realize linear polarization conversion with more than 98% conversion efficiency over a 200 nm bandwidth in the short-wavelength infrared band. We also demonstrate optical vortex beam generation using a meta-reflectarray with an azimuthally varied phase profile. The vortex beam generation is shown to have high efficiency over a wavelength range from 1500 to 1600 nm. The use of dielectric resonators in place of their plasmonic counterparts could pave the way for ultraefficient metasurface-based devices at high frequencies. PMID:24547692

  1. Lower Stratospheric Temperature Differences Between Meteorological Analyses in two cold Arctic Winters and their Impact on Polar Processing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Sabutis, Joseph L.; Pawson, Steven; Santee, Michelle L.; Naujokat, Barbara; Swinbank, Richard; Gelman, Melvyn E.; Ebisuzaki, Wesley; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative intercomparison of six meteorological analyses is presented for the cold 1999-2000 and 1995-1996 Arctic winters. The impacts of using different analyzed temperatures in calculations of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation potential, and of different winds in idealized trajectory-based temperature histories, are substantial. The area with temperatures below a PSC formation threshold commonly varies by approximately 25% among the analyses, with differences of over 50% at some times/locations. Freie University at Berlin analyses are often colder than others at T is less than or approximately 205 K. Biases between analyses vary from year to year; in January 2000. U.K. Met Office analyses were coldest and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) analyses warmest. while NCEP analyses were usually coldest in 1995-1996 and Met Office or NCEP[National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis (REAN) warmest. European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) temperatures agreed better with other analyses in 1999-2000, after improvements in the assimilation model. than in 1995-1996. Case-studies of temperature histories show substantial differences using Met Office, NCEP, REAN and NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO) analyses. In January 2000 (when a large cold region was centered in the polar vortex), qualitatively similar results were obtained for all analyses. However, in February 2000 (a much warmer period) and in January and February 1996 (comparably cold to January 2000 but with large cold regions near the polar vortex edge), distributions of "potential PSC lifetimes" and total time spent below a PSC formation threshold varied significantly among the analyses. Largest peaks in "PSC lifetime" distributions in January 2000 were at 4-6 and 11-14 days. while in the 1996 periods, they were at 1-3 days. Thus different meteorological conditions in comparably cold winters had a large impact on expectations for PSC formation and on the

  2. Saturn's North Polar Vortex Revealed by Cassini/VIMS: Zonal Wind Structure and Constraints on Cloud Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Momary, T. W.; Fletcher, L. N.; Buratti, B. J.; Roos-Serote, M.; Showman, A. P.; Brown, R. H.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2008-09-01

    We present the first high-spatial resolution, near-nadir imagery and movies of Saturn's north polar region that reveal the wind structure of a north polar vortex. Obtained by Cassini/VIMS on June 15, 2008 from high over Saturn's polar region (sub-spacecraft latitude of 65 degrees N. lat) at an altitude of 0.42 million km during the long polar night, these 210-per-pixel images of the polar region north of 73 degrees N. latitude show several concentric cloud rings and hundreds of individual cloud features in silhouette against the 5-micron background thermal glow of Saturn's deep atmosphere. In contrast to the clear eye of the south polar vortex, the north polar vortex sports a central cloud feature about 650-km in diameter. Zonal winds reach a maximum of 150 m/s near 88 degrees N. latitude (planetocentric) - comparable to the south polar vortex maximum of 190 m/s near 88 degrees S. latitude - and fall off nearly monotonically to 10 m/s near 80 degrees N. latitude. At slightly greater distance from the pole, inside the north polar hexagon in the 75-77 degree N. latitude region, zonal winds increase dramatically to 130 m/s, as silhouetted clouds are seen speeding aroud the "race track” of the hexagonal feature. VIMS 5-micron thermal observations over a 1.6-year period from October 29, 2006 to June 15, 2008 are consistent with the polar hexagon structure itself remaining fixed in the Voyager-era radio rotation rate (Desch and Kaiser, Geophys. Res. Lett, 8, 253-256, 1981) to within an accuracy of 3 seconds per rotational period. This agrees with the stationary nature of the wave in this rotation system found by Godfrey (Icarus 76, 335-356, 1988), but is inconsistent with rotation rates found during the current Cassini era.

  3. Antarctic ozone variability inside the Polar Vortex estimated from balloon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrondo, M. C.; Gil, M.; Yela, M.; Johnson, B. J.; Ochoa, H. A.

    2013-06-01

    13 yr of ozonesoundings at the Antarctic Belgrano II station (78° S, 34.6° W) have been analyzed to establish a climatology of stratospheric ozone and temperature over the area. The station is inside the polar vortex during the period of development of chemical ozone depletion. Weekly periodic profiles provide a suitable database for seasonal characterization of the evolution of stratospheric ozone, especially valuable during winter time when satellites and ground-based instruments based on solar radiation are lacking. The work is focused on ozone loss rate variability (August-October) and its recovery (November-December) at different layers identified according to the severity of ozone loss. The time window selected for the calculations covers the phase of a quasi-linear ozone reduction, about day 220 (mid August) to day 273 (end of September). Decrease of the total ozone column over Belgrano during spring is highly dependent on the meteorological conditions. Largest depletions (up to 59%) are reached in coldest years while warms winters exhibit significantly lower ozone loss (20%). It has been found that about 11% of the total O3 loss in the layer where maximum depletion occurs takes place before the sun has arrived as a result of transport of lower latitude air masses, providing evidence of mixing inside the vortex. Spatial homogeneity of the vortex has been examined by comparing Belgrano results with those previously obtained for South Pole Station (SPS) for the same altitude range and for 9 yr of overlapping data. Unexpected results show more than 25% larger ozone loss rate at SPS than at Belgrano. It has been found that the accumulated hours of sunlight are the dominant factor driving the ozone loss rate. According to the variability of the ozone-hole recovery, a clear connection between the timing of the breakup of the vortex and the monthly ozone content was found. Minimum ozone concentration of 57 DU in the 12-24 km layer remained in November for the

  4. Interhemispheric Differences in Dentifrication and Related Processes Affecting Polar Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Froidevaux, L.; Manney, G. L.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Harwood, R. S.; Peckham, G. E.

    1994-01-01

    The severe depletion of stratospheric ozone over Antarctica in late winter and early spring is caused by enhanced CLO abundances arising from heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). CLO abundances comparable to those over Antarctica have also been observed throughout the Arctic Vortex, but the accompanying loss of Arctic ozone has been much less severe.

  5. Polar vortex formation in giant-planet atmospheres due to moist convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Morgan E.; Emanuel, Kerry A.; Flierl, Glenn R.

    2015-07-01

    A strong cyclonic vortex has been observed on each of Saturn’s poles, coincident with a local maximum in observed tropospheric temperature. Neptune also exhibits a relatively warm, although much more transient, region on its south pole. Whether similar features exist on Jupiter will be resolved by the 2016 Juno mission. Energetic, small-scale storm-like features that originate from the water-cloud level or lower have been observed on each of the giant planets and attributed to moist convection, suggesting that these storms play a significant role in global heat transfer from the hot interior to space. Nevertheless, the creation and maintenance of Saturn’s polar vortices, and their presence or absence on the other giant planets, are not understood. Here we use simulations with a shallow-water model to show that storm generation, driven by moist convection, can create a strong polar cyclone throughout the depth of a planet’s troposphere. We find that the type of shallow polar flow that occurs on a giant planet can be described by the size ratio of small eddies to the planetary radius and the energy density of its atmosphere due to latent heating from moist convection. We suggest that the observed difference in these parameters between Saturn and Jupiter may preclude a Jovian polar cyclone.

  6. Predictability of the stratospheric polar vortex breakdown: An ensemble reforecast experiment for the splitting event in January 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Shunsuke; Mukougawa, Hitoshi; Kuroda, Yuhji; Mizuta, Ryo; Yabu, Shoukichi; Yoshimura, Hiromasa

    2016-04-01

    A series of ensemble reforecast experiments is conducted to investigate the predictability and the occurrence mechanism of a stratospheric sudden warming occurred in late January 2009, which is a typical polar vortex splitting event. To fully examine the rapid vortex splitting evolution and predictability variation, ensemble forecasts are carried out every day during January 2009. The vortex splitting event is reliably predicted by forecasts initialized after 6 days prior to the vortex breakup. It is also found that the propagating property of planetary waves within the stratosphere is a key to the successful prediction for the vortex splitting event. Planetary waves incoming from the troposphere are reflected back into the troposphere for failed forecasts, whereas they are absorbed within the stratosphere for succeeded forecasts. Composite analysis reveals the following reflection process of planetary waves for the failed forecast: Upward propagation of planetary wave activity from a tropospheric blocking over Alaska is weaker during initial prediction periods; then, the deceleration of the zonal wind in the upper stratosphere becomes weaker over Europe, which produces a preferable condition for the wave reflection; hence, subsequently incoming wave activity from the troposphere over Europe is reflected back over the Siberia inducing the eastward phase tilt of planetary waves, which shuts down the further upward propagation of planetary waves leading to the vortex splitting. Thus, this study shows that the stratospheric condition would be another important control factor for the occurrence of the vortex splitting event, besides anomalous tropospheric circulations enforcing upward propagation of planetary waves.

  7. Arctic Forecasts Available from Polar Bear Exhibit as an Example of Formal/Informal Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, C. E.; Cervenec, J.

    2012-12-01

    A subset of the general population enjoys and frequents informal education venues, offering an opportunity for lifelong learning that also enhances and supports formal education efforts. The Byrd Polar Research Center (BPRC) at The Ohio State University collaborated with the Columbus Zoo & Aquarium (CZA) in the development of their Polar Frontier exhibit, from its initial planning to the Grand Opening of the exhibit, through the present. Of course, the addition to the Zoo of polar bears and Arctic fox in the Polar Frontier has been very popular, with almost a 7% increase in visitors in 2010 when the exhibit opened. The CZA and BPRC are now investigating ways to increase the climate literacy impact of the exhibit, and to increase engagement with the topics through follow-on activities. For example, individuals or classes anywhere in the world can check forecasts from the Polar Weather and Research Forecasting model and compare them to observed conditions-- allowing deep investigation into changes in the Arctic. In addition, opportunities exist to adapt the Zoo School experience (affecting several Central Ohio school districts) and/or to enable regular participation through social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and other forms of digital communication. BPRC's sustained engagement with the CZA is an example of a trusted and meaningful partnership where open dialogue exists about providing the best learning experience for visitors. This presentation will share some of the lessons learned from this unique partnership, and strategies that are adopted to move it forward.

  8. Different temperature adaptation in Arctic and Atlantic heterotrophic bacteria in the Barents Sea Polar Front region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Børsheim, Knut Yngve; Drinkwater, Kenneth F.

    2014-02-01

    In the northern Barents Sea, at and around the Polar Front, carbon cycle variables were investigated during 2 weeks in late summer of 2007. Arctic Water primary production in the experimental period averaged 50 mmol C m- 2 day- 1, as estimated from satellite sensed chlorophyll. In Atlantic waters, which appeared to just have passed the culmination of a late summer bloom, primary production was 125 mmol C m- 2 day- 1. Total organic carbon (TOC) averaged 82.4 μM C in the mixed layer, and the values showed a gradient with highest values to the southeast and lowest to the northwest. The distribution of TOC was not related to the distribution of Atlantic and Arctic waters, although the highest values were found in Atlantic Water. Integrated bacterial production in the mixed layer, as estimated from thymidine incorporation rates, averaged 6.3% of primary production. In Atlantic Water, over the depth of the mixed layer, bacterial production rate averaged 0.40 mmol C m- 3 day- 1, which was 6.6 times the average in Arctic Water and 2.3 times the average in the front regions. Below 30 m depth, bacterial production rates were generally higher in the Arctic Water than in the Atlantic Water. Moreover, when production rates of bacteria were compared according to temperature, the rates in Arctic Water were systematically higher than the rates in Atlantic Water. This difference implies that the heterotrophic bacteria from the Arctic have adapted towards higher growth efficiency than the bacteria in Atlantic Water.

  9. The Arctic Human Health Initiative: a legacy of the International Polar Year 2007–2009

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The International Polar Year (IPY) 2007–2008 represented a unique opportunity to further stimulate cooperation and coordination on Arctic health research and increase the awareness and visibility of Arctic regions. The Arctic Human Health Initiative (AHHI) was a US-led Arctic Council IPY coordinating project that aimed to build and expand on existing International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH) and Arctic Council human health interests. The project aimed to link researchers with potential international collaborators and to serve as a focal point for human health research, education, outreach and communication activities during the IPY. The progress of projects conducted as part of this initiative up until the end of the Arctic Council Swedish chairmanship in May 2013 is summarized in this report. Design The overall goals of the AHHI was to increase awareness and visibility of human health concerns of Arctic peoples, foster human health research, and promote health strategies that will improve health and well-being of all Arctic residents. Proposed activities to be recognized through the initiative included: expanding research networks that will enhance surveillance and monitoring of health issues of concern to Arctic peoples, and increase collaboration and coordination of human health research; fostering research that will examine the health impact of anthropogenic pollution, rapid modernization and economic development, climate variability, infectious and chronic diseases, intentional and unintentional injuries, promoting education, outreach and communication that will focus public and political attention on Arctic health issues, using a variety of publications, printed and electronic reports from scientific conferences, symposia and workshops targeting researchers, students, communities and policy makers; promoting the translation of research into health policy and community action including implementation of prevention strategies and health

  10. Increased Arctic Sea Ice Drift Alters Polar Bear Movements and Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, D. C.; Durner, G. M.; Albeke, S. E.; Whiteman, J. P.; Amstrup, S. C.; Richardson, E.; Wilson, R. R.; Ben-David, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent thinning of Arctic sea ice has increased its drift from currents and winds. Increased ice drift could affect movements and energy balance of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) which rely, almost exclusively, on this substrate for hunting seals. Foraging by polar bears is a relatively sedentary behavior, as they typically capture their main prey by waiting at breathing holes, where seals haul-out along leads, or by short-distance stalking. We examined the response of polar bears to ice drift in the Beaufort (BS) and Chukchi (CS) seas, and between two periods with different sea ice characteristics: 1987-1998 and 1999-2013. We used satellite-tracked adult female polar bear locations, standardized by a continuous-time correlated random walk, coupled with modeled ice drift, to estimate displacement and drift-corrected bear movements along east-west and north-south axes. Sea ice drift in both regions increased with greater westward and more extreme northward and southward rates from 1987-1998 to 1999-2013. Polar bears responded with greater eastward movements and, in the CS greater movements north and south. We show that efforts by polar bears to compensate for greater westward ice drift in recent years translated into a model-derived estimate of 5.7-7.2% increase in energy expenditure. We also estimated that polar bears increased their travel time 18-20% between the two time periods, suggesting time allocated to foraging was reduced. Increased energetic costs and travel time resulting from greater ice drift, in conjunction with ongoing habitat loss, suggest that recent changes to Arctic sea ice may affect movements and energy balance of polar bears.

  11. Imaging polarimetry of the fogbow: polarization characteristics of white rainbows measured in the high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Gábor; Hegedüs, Ramón; Barta, András; Farkas, Alexandra; Åkesson, Susanne

    2011-10-01

    The knowledge on the optics of fogbows is scarce, and their polarization characteristics have never been measured to our knowledge. To fill this gap we measured the polarization features of 16 fogbows during the Beringia 2005 Arctic polar research expedition by imaging polarimetry in the red, green and blue spectral ranges. We present here the first polarization patterns of the fogbow. In the patterns of the degree of linear polarization p, fogbows and their supernumerary bows are best visible in the red spectral range due to the least dilution of fogbow light by light scattered in air. In the patterns of the angle of polarization α fogbows are practically not discernible because their α-pattern is the same as that of the sky: the direction of polarization is perpendicular to the plane of scattering and is parallel to the arc of the bow, independently of the wavelength. Fogbows and their supernumeraries were best seen in the patterns of the polarized radiance. In these patterns the angular distance δ between the peaks of the primary and the first supernumerary and the angular width σ of the primary bow were determined along different radii from the center of the bow. δ ranged between 6.08° and 13.41°, while σ changed from 5.25° to 19.47°. Certain fogbows were relatively homogeneous, meaning small variations of δ and σ along their bows. Other fogbows were heterogeneous, possessing quite variable δ- and σ-values along their bows. This variability could be a consequence of the characteristics of the high Arctic with open waters within the ice shield resulting in the spatiotemporal change of the droplet size within the fog. PMID:22016248

  12. Polar Vortex Conditions during the 1995-96 Artic Winter: Meteorology and MLS Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Santee, M. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.; Zurek, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    The 1995-96 northern hemisphere (NH) 205 winter stratosphere was colder than in any of the previous 17 winters, with lower stratospheric temperatures continuously below the type 1 (primarily HN03) polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) threshold for over 2 1/2 months. Upper tropospheric ridges in late Feb and early Mar 1996 led to the lowest observed NH lower stratospheric temperatures, and the latest observed NH temperatures below the type 2 (water ice) PSC threshold. Consistent with the unusual cold and chemical processing on PSCS, Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) MLS observed a greater decrease in lower stratospheric ozone (03) in 1995-96 than in any of the previous 4 NH winters. 03 decreased throughout the vortex over an altitude range nearly as large as that typical of the southern hemisphere (SH). The decrease between late Dec 1995 and early Mar 1996 was about 2/3 of that over the equivalent SH period. As in other NH winters, temperatures in 1996 rose above the PSC threshold before the spring equinox, ending chemical processing in the NH vortex much earlier than is usual in the SH. A downward trend in column 03 above 100 hPa during Jan and Feb 1996 appears to be related to the lower stratospheric 03 depletion.

  13. Vulnerability of Polar Oceans to Anthropogenic Acidification: Comparison of Arctic and Antarctic Seasonal Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Shadwick, E. H.; Trull, T. W.; Thomas, H.; Gibson, J. A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Polar oceans are chemically sensitive to anthropogenic acidification due to their relatively low alkalinity and correspondingly weak carbonate buffering capacity. Here, we compare unique CO2 system observations covering complete annual cycles at an Arctic (Amundsen Gulf) and Antarctic site (Prydz Bay). The Arctic site experiences greater seasonal warming (10 vs 3°C), and freshening (3 vs 2), has lower alkalinity (2220 vs 2320 μmol/kg), and lower summer pH (8.15 vs 8.5), than the Antarctic site. Despite a larger uptake of inorganic carbon by summer photosynthesis, the Arctic carbon system exhibits smaller seasonal changes than the more alkaline Antarctic system. In addition, the excess surface nutrients in the Antarctic may allow mitigation of acidification, via CO2 removal by enhanced summer production driven by iron inputs from glacial and sea-ice melting. These differences suggest that the Arctic system is more vulnerable to anthropogenic change due to lower alkalinity, enhanced warming, and nutrient limitation. PMID:23903871

  14. Vulnerability of polar oceans to anthropogenic acidification: comparison of arctic and antarctic seasonal cycles.

    PubMed

    Shadwick, E H; Trull, T W; Thomas, H; Gibson, J A E

    2013-01-01

    Polar oceans are chemically sensitive to anthropogenic acidification due to their relatively low alkalinity and correspondingly weak carbonate buffering capacity. Here, we compare unique CO2 system observations covering complete annual cycles at an Arctic (Amundsen Gulf) and Antarctic site (Prydz Bay). The Arctic site experiences greater seasonal warming (10 vs 3°C), and freshening (3 vs 2), has lower alkalinity (2220 vs 2320 μmol/kg), and lower summer pH (8.15 vs 8.5), than the Antarctic site. Despite a larger uptake of inorganic carbon by summer photosynthesis, the Arctic carbon system exhibits smaller seasonal changes than the more alkaline Antarctic system. In addition, the excess surface nutrients in the Antarctic may allow mitigation of acidification, via CO2 removal by enhanced summer production driven by iron inputs from glacial and sea-ice melting. These differences suggest that the Arctic system is more vulnerable to anthropogenic change due to lower alkalinity, enhanced warming, and nutrient limitation. PMID:23903871

  15. Detrital zircons of deep-sea sediments of the Arctic ocean - key to the understanding of High Polar Arctic tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokalsky, S.; Morozov, A.; Petrov, O.; Belyatsky, B.; Rekant, P.; Shevchenko, S.; Sergeev, S.

    2012-04-01

    appreciably different for Polar sample (200-450 Ma) and Geophysicists Spur (200, 300, 400-600 Ma). It is known, that formation of modern deep-sea sediments takes place mainly due to fluvial discharge (ca 90%), erosion of oceanic bedrocks and coastal beaches. Wind-borne component and extraterraneous dust are not significant (<1%). Transportation of continental material by icebergs (ice-rafted debris) is added to these sources in polar areas. Well-known Permian-Triassic sandstones of Arctic coast (including polar islands) are defined by the presence of Grenvillian age zircons - Canadian Arctic, Alaska, Greenland (Miller et al., 2006), while Jurassic-Cretaceous sandstones of the South Anjui Zone, Chukotka and New Siberian Islands of Russian Arctic (Miller et al., 2008) have clastic zircon with ages very similar to the obtained by us for deep-sea sediments. We suppose that modern deep-sea sediments were formed either due to ablation of these sandstones with distal transportation of detritus (highly unlikely), or due to weathering of similar rock of oceanic highs of Lomonosov Ridge. The last is more realistic because the similarity of the Lomonosov Ridge and north-east continental Arctic is proved by geophysical data (Jokat et al., 1992).

  16. Accuracy of analyzed stratospheric temperatures in the winter Arctic vortex from infrared Montgolfier long-duration balloon flights 2. Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, B. M.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Garnier, A.; Nunes-Pinharanda, M.; Denis, L.; Newman, P.; Letrenne, G.; Durand, M.

    2002-08-01

    Five long-duration flights with the Mongolfier infrared (MIR) balloon lasting 15 days, on average, have been conducted in the Arctic winter stratospheric vortex in 1997, 1999, and 2000. Temperatures from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), Met Office (MO), National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), Data Assimilation Office (DAO), and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis (REA) have been compared to the observations from 4 to 146 hPa. Occasional large errors (>14 K) occur in each analysis, mainly above 30 hPa. In 2000 the standard deviations of ECMWF, MO, and DAO with respect to the measured temperatures range from 1.0 to 1.3 K, whereas NCEP and REA have substantially larger errors. In 1999 the flights took place during a major warming, and all operational models had large standard deviations and substantial biases. Preoperational versions of the new ECMWF model with increased stratospheric resolution and assimilation of the advanced microwave sounding unit, which none of the other models assimilated, show small biases and standard deviations.

  17. Spinning and orbiting motion of particles in vortex beams with circular or radial polarizations.

    PubMed

    Li, Manman; Yan, Shaohui; Yao, Baoli; Liang, Yansheng; Zhang, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Focusing fields of optical vortex (OV) beams with circular or radial polarizations carry both spin angular momentum (SAM) and orbital angular momentum (OAM), and can realize non-axial spinning and orbiting motion of absorptive particles. Using the T-matrix method, we evaluate the optical forces and torques exerted on micro-sized particles induced by the OV beams. Numerical results demonstrate that the particle is trapped on the circle of intensity maxima, and experiences a transverse spin torque along azimuthal direction, a longitudinal spin torque, and an orbital torque, respectively. The direction of spinning motion is not only related to the sign of topological charge of the OV beam, but also to the polarization state. However, the topological charge controls the direction of orbiting motion individually. Optically induced rotations of particles with varying sizes and absorptivity are investigated in OV beams with different topological charges and polarization states. These results may be exploited in practical optical manipulation, especially for optically induced rotations of micro-particles. PMID:27607664

  18. Atmospheric aspects of Arctic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overland, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Three important features of recent Arctic change are the rather uniform pattern of Arctic temperature amplification in response to greenhouse gas forcing, the modification of atmospheric temperature and wind patterns over newly sea-ice-free regions, and the possible increased linkage between Arctic climate and sub-arctic weather. An important argument for anthropogenic forcing of recent Arctic change is the model predicted rather uniform increases in Arctic temperatures, in contrast to more regional temperature maximums associated with intrinsic climate variability patterns such as those which occurred during the 1930s Arctic warming. Sea-ice-free areas at the end of summer are allowing: added heat and moisture transport into the troposphere as documented during the recent Japanese vessel Mirai cruises, decreased boundary layer stratification, and modification of wind flow through thermal wind processes. Winter 2009-2010 and December 2010 showed a unique connectivity between the Arctic and more southern weather when the typical polar vortex was replaced by high geopotential heights over the central Arctic and low heights over mid-latitudes that resulted in record snow and low temperatures, a Warm Arctic-Cold Continents pattern. A major challenge of Arctic meteorology is to understand the interaction of forced changes such as loss of sea ice and land impacts with intrinsic climate patterns such as the North Atlantic Oscillation and Pacific North American climate patterns. Could persistent shifts in Arctic climate be triggered by a combination of a gradual upward trend in temperature, an extreme event e.g. fortuitous timing in the natural variability of the atmospheric or ocean general circulation, and Arctic specific feedbacks? Scientific progress on both issues requires sustained decadal observations.

  19. Arctic Ozone Depletion from UARS MLS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of ozone during four Arctic winters are compared. The evolution of ozone in the lower stratosphere is related to temperature, chlorine monoxide (also measured by MLS), and the evolution of the polar vortex. Lagrangian transport calculations using winds from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office's Stratosphere-Troposphere Data Assimilation system are used to estimate to what extent the evolution of lower stratospheric ozone is controlled by dynamics. Observations, along with calculations of the expected dynamical behavior, show evidence for chemical ozone depletion throughout most of the Arctic lower stratospheric vortex during the 1992-93 middle and late winter, and during all of the 1994-95 winter that was observed by MLS. Both of these winters were unusually cold and had unusually cold and had unusually strong Arctic polar vortices compared to meteorological data over the past 17 years.

  20. Unexpected Levels of Biological Activity during the Polar Night Offer New Perspectives on a Warming Arctic.

    PubMed

    Berge, Jørgen; Daase, Malin; Renaud, Paul E; Ambrose, William G; Darnis, Gerald; Last, Kim S; Leu, Eva; Cohen, Jonathan H; Johnsen, Geir; Moline, Mark A; Cottier, Finlo; Varpe, Øystein; Shunatova, Natalia; Bałazy, Piotr; Morata, Nathalie; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Kosobokova, Ksenia; Hoppe, Clara J M; Węsławski, Jan Marcin; Kukliński, Piotr; Legeżyńska, Joanna; Nikishina, Daria; Cusa, Marine; Kędra, Monika; Włodarska-Kowalczuk, Maria; Vogedes, Daniel; Camus, Lionel; Tran, Damien; Michaud, Emma; Gabrielsen, Tove M; Granovitch, Andrei; Gonchar, Anya; Krapp, Rupert; Callesen, Trine A

    2015-10-01

    The current understanding of Arctic ecosystems is deeply rooted in the classical view of a bottom-up controlled system with strong physical forcing and seasonality in primary-production regimes. Consequently, the Arctic polar night is commonly disregarded as a time of year when biological activities are reduced to a minimum due to a reduced food supply. Here, based upon a multidisciplinary ecosystem-scale study from the polar night at 79°N, we present an entirely different view. Instead of an ecosystem that has entered a resting state, we document a system with high activity levels and biological interactions across most trophic levels. In some habitats, biological diversity and presence of juvenile stages were elevated in winter months compared to the more productive and sunlit periods. Ultimately, our results suggest a different perspective regarding ecosystem function that will be of importance for future environmental management and decision making, especially at a time when Arctic regions are experiencing accelerated environmental change [1]. PMID:26412132

  1. Getting past the penguins and polar bears - comparing marine research in the Arctic and Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenoski, S.; Lawver, L.; van Avendonk, H.

    2006-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics is actively involved in marine geophysics research in the Arctic and Antarctic. Over the past 11 years teachers have participated in a number of research cruises as part of their effort to do outreach and involve K-12 teachers directly in the science. This presentation will focus on comparing the differences in weather, ice, seafloor, and biology, observed by one teacher/researcher who participated in seismic cruises in western Arctic and the Bransfield Straight and the Ross Sea in Antarctica. The presentation will focus on how these differences and similarities affect the process of conducting science in these extreme environments. Attention will be placed on describing how aspects of this polar research can be incorporated into a K-12 science curriculum. A discussion of the continuing outreach by the scientists and university will also be included.

  2. Making sense of Arctic maritime traffic using the Polar Operational Limits Assessment Risk Indexing System (POLARIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, M. A.; Etienne, L.; Fournier, M.; Pelot, R.; Beveridge, L.

    2016-04-01

    Maritime traffic volume in the Arctic is growing for several reasons: climate change is resulting in less ice in extent, duration, and thickness; economic drivers are inducing growth in resource extraction traffic, community size (affecting resupply) and adventure tourism. This dynamic situation, coupled with harsh weather, variable operating conditions, remoteness, and lack of straightforward emergency response options, demand robust risk management processes. The requirements for risk management for polar ship operations are specified in the new International Maritime Organization (IMO) International Code for Ships Operating in Polar Waters (Polar Code). The goal of the Polar Code is to provide for safe ship operations and protection of the polar environment by addressing the risk present in polar waters. Risk management is supported by evidence-based models, including threat identification (types and frequency of hazards), exposure levels, and receptor characterization. Most of the information used to perform risk management in polar waters is attained in-situ, but increasingly is being augmented with open-access remote sensing information. In this paper we focus on the use of open-access historical ice charts as an integral part of northern navigation, especially for route planning and evaluation.

  3. Arctic (and Antarctic) Observing Experiment - an Assessment of Methods to Measure Temperature over Polar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigor, I. G.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Woods, J. E.; Henderson, G. R.; Zook, J.; Marshall, C.; Gallage, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic environment has been undergoing profound changes; the most visible is the dramatic decrease in Arctic sea ice extent (SIE). These changes pose a challenge to our ability to measure surface temperature across the Polar Regions. Traditionally, the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP) and International Programme for Antarctic Buoys (IPAB) have measured surface air temperature (SAT) at 2-m height, which minimizes the ambiguity of measurements near of the surface. Specifically, is the temperature sensor measuring open water, snow, sea ice, or air? But now, with the dramatic decrease in Arctic SIE, increase in open water during summer, and the frailty of the younger sea ice pack, the IABP has had to deploy and develop new instruments to measure temperature. These instruments include Surface Velocity Program (SVP) buoys, which are commonly deployed on the world's ice-free oceans and typically measure sea surface temperature (SST), and the new robust Airborne eXpendable Ice Beacons (AXIB), which measure both SST and SAT. "Best Practice" requires that these instruments are inter-compared, and early results showing differences in collocated temperature measurements of over 2°C prompted the establishment of the IABP Arctic Observing Experiment (AOX) buoy test site at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Barrow, Alaska. Preliminary results showed that the color of the hull of SVP buoys introduces a bias due to solar heating of the buoy. Since then, we have recommended that buoys should be painted white to reduce biases in temperature measurements due to different colors of the buoys deployed in different regions of the Arctic or the Antarctic. Measurements of SAT are more robust, but some of the temperature shields are susceptible to frosting. During our presentation we will provide an intercomparison of the temperature measurements at the AOX test site (i.e. high quality DOE/ARM observations compared with

  4. Probing the spin polarization of current by soft x-ray imaging of current-induced magnetic vortex dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Shinya; Fischer, Peter; Im, Mi-Young; Yamada, Keisuke; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kohno, Hiroshi; Ono, Teruo

    2008-12-09

    Time-resolved soft X-ray transmission microscopy is applied to image the current-induced resonant dynamics of the magnetic vortex core realized in a micron-sized Permalloy disk. The high spatial resolution better than 25 nm enables us to observe the resonant motion of the vortex core. The result also provides the spin polarization of the current to be 0.67 {+-} 0.16 for Permalloy by fitting the experimental results with an analytical model in the framework of the spin-transfer torque.

  5. A comparison of polar vortex trend response to Pacific and Indian Ocean warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.

    2009-12-01

    During the past decades the tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean has become warmer than before. Meanwhile, both the northern and the southern hemispheric polar vortex (NPV and SPV) exhibit a deepening trend in boreal winter-half year. Although previous studies reveal that the tropical Indian Ocean Warming (IOW) favors intensifying the NPV and weakening the SPV, how the tropical Pacific Ocean Warming (POW) influences the NPV and the SPV is unclear. In this study, a comparative analysis is conducted through ensemble atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) experiments. The results show that, for the northern hemisphere, the two warming exert an opposite impact in boreal winter, in that the IOW intensifies the NPV while the POW weakens the NPV. For the southern hemisphere, both the IOW and POW warm the southern polar atmosphere and weaken the SPV. A diagnostic analysis based on vorticity budget reveals that such an interhemispheric different influence in boreal winter between the IOW and the POW is associated with the different roles of transient eddy momentum flux convergence. Furthermore, this difference may be linked to the different strength of stationary wave activity between the hemispheres in boreal winter.

  6. Arctic Observing Experiment - An Assessment of Instruments Used to Monitor the Polar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigor, I. G.; Johnson, J.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Woods, J. E.; Valentic, T. A.; Henderson, G. R.; Marshall, C.; Gallage, C.; Zook, J.; Davis, Z.

    2014-12-01

    To understand and predict weather and climate require an accurate observing network that measures the fundamental meteorological parameters: temperature, air pressure, and wind. Measuring these parameters autonomously in the polar regions is especially challenging. To assess the accuracy of polar measurement networks, we established the Arctic Observing Experiment (AOX) test site in March 2013 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation and Meteorology (ARM) site in Barrow, Alaska. We deployed a myriad of data loggers and autonomous buoys, which represent most of the instruments that are commonly deployed by the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP) to measure temperature, air pressure and wind. Estimates of temperature over this area have also been analyzed from satellites (e.g., using the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) ice-surface temperature (IST)) product, and can complement data from in-situ sensors and provide consistent measurements under clear-sky conditions. Preliminary results reveal that some of the buoys are susceptible to solar heating, icing can block barometers for short periods, and frosting may insulate air temperature sensors and freeze-lock anemometers. Some of these issues may be addressed by simply painting the buoys white to reduce solar heating of the buoys, and using better temperature shields and barometer ports. Nevertheless, frosting of ultrasonic and mechanical anemometers remains a significant challenge. These results will be useful to initiate a protocol to obtain accurate and consistent measurements from the IABP, the Arctic Observing Network (AON), the International Program for Antarctic Buoys, and the Southern Ocean Observing System to monitor polar environments.

  7. Identifying polar bear resource selection patterns to inform offshore development in a dynamic and changing Arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Ryan R.; Horne, Jon S.; Rode, Karyn D.; Regehr, Eric V.; Durner, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Although sea ice loss is the primary threat to polar bears (Ursus maritimus), little can be done to mitigate its effects without global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Other factors, however, could exacerbate the impacts of sea ice loss on polar bears, such as exposure to increased industrial activity. The Arctic Ocean has enormous oil and gas potential, and its development is expected to increase in the coming decades. Estimates of polar bear resource selection will inform managers how bears use areas slated for oil development and to help guide conservation planning. We estimated temporally-varying resource selection patterns for non-denning adult female polar bears in the Chukchi Sea population (2008–2012) at two scales (i.e., home range and weekly steps) to identify factors predictive of polar bear use throughout the year, before any offshore development. From the best models at each scale, we estimated scale-integrated resource selection functions to predict polar bear space use across the population's range and determined when bears were most likely to use the region where offshore oil and gas development in the United States is slated to occur. Polar bears exhibited significant intra-annual variation in selection patterns at both scales but the strength and annual patterns of selection differed between scales for most variables. Bears were most likely to use the offshore oil and gas planning area during ice retreat and growth with the highest predicted use occurring in the southern portion of the planning area. The average proportion of predicted high-value habitat in the planning area was >15% of the total high-value habitat for the population during sea ice retreat and growth and reached a high of 50% during November 2010. Our results provide a baseline on which to judge future changes to non-denning adult female polar bear resource selection in the Chukchi Sea and help guide offshore development in the region. Lastly, our study provides a

  8. The impact of volcanic aerosol on the Northern Hemisphere stratospheric polar vortex: mechanisms and sensitivity to forcing structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, M.; Krüger, K.; Bittner, M.; Timmreck, C.; Schmidt, H.

    2014-06-01

    Observations and simple theoretical arguments suggest that the Northern Hemisphere (NH) stratospheric polar vortex is stronger in winters following major volcanic eruptions. However, recent studies show that climate models forced by prescribed volcanic aerosol fields fail to reproduce this effect. We investigate the impact of volcanic aerosol forcing on stratospheric dynamics, including the strength of the NH polar vortex, in ensemble simulations with the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model. The model is forced by four different prescribed forcing sets representing the radiative properties of stratospheric aerosol following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo: two forcing sets are based on observations, and are commonly used in climate model simulations, and two forcing sets are constructed based on coupled aerosol-climate model simulations. For all forcings, we find that temperature and zonal wind anomalies in the NH high latitudes are not directly impacted by anomalous volcanic aerosol heating. Instead, high latitude effects result from robust enhancements in stratospheric residual circulation, which in turn result, at least in part, from enhanced stratospheric wave activity. High latitude effects are therefore much less robust than would be expected if they were the direct result of aerosol heating. While there is significant ensemble variability in the high latitude response to each aerosol forcing set, the mean response is sensitive to the forcing set used. Significant differences, for example, are found in the NH polar stratosphere temperature and zonal wind response to two different forcing data sets constructed from different versions of SAGE II aerosol observations. Significant strengthening of the polar vortex, in rough agreement with the expected response, is achieved only using aerosol forcing extracted from prior coupled aerosol-climate model simulations. Differences in the dynamical response to the different forcing sets used imply that reproducing

  9. Arctic and Antarctic exploration including the contributions of physicians and effects of disease in the polar regions.

    PubMed

    Fodstad, H; Kondziolka, D; Brophy, B P; Roberts, D W; Girvin, J P

    1999-05-01

    A history of Arctic and Antarctic exploration, whether to find a Northwest Passage, North Pole, or South Pole, is a story of triumph and tribulation. The hardship experienced by polar explorers in the last 1000 years permeates the tales of achievement. Physicians and surgeons have played prominent roles in all major polar explorations. No significant Arctic voyage, particularly in the last 300 years, was made without a member of the party trained in the management of medical emergencies and in basic surgery. During times of health, surgeons functioned as the voyage naturalists with expertise in biology, botany, zoology, and the writing of scientific catalogs. Spurred by our interest and fascination with the history of polar exploration, we reviewed the roles of physicians and natural scientists in Arctic and Antarctic adventures. PMID:10232525

  10. Geographical distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in the Norwegian and Russian Arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lie, E.; Bernhoft, A.; Riget, F.; Belikov, Stanislav; Boltunov, Andrei N.; Derocher, A.E.; Garner, G.W.; Wiig, O.; Skaare, J.U.

    2003-01-01

    Geographical variation of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) was studied in blood samples from 90 adult female polar bear (Ursus maritimus) from Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Kara Sea, East-Siberian Sea and Chukchi Sea. In all regions, oxychlordane was the dominant OCP. Regional differences in mean levels of HCB, oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor, ??-HCH, ??-HCH and p,p???-DDE were found. The highest levels of oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor and DDE were found in polar bears from Franz Josef Land and Kara Sea. HCB level was lowest in polar bears from Svalbard. Polar bears from Chukchi Sea had the highest level of ??- and ??-HCH. The lowest ??-HCH concentration was found in bears from Kara Sea. In all the bears, ???HCHs was dominated by ??-HCH. The geographical variation in OCP levels and pattern may suggest regional differences in pollution sources and different feeding habits in the different regions. Polar bears from the Western Russian Arctic were exposed to higher levels of chlordanes and p,p???-DDE than polar bears from locations westwards and eastwards from this region. This may imply the presence of a significant pollution source in the Russian Arctic area. The study suggests that the western Russian Arctic is the most contaminated region of the Arctic and warrants further research. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Interaction Between Dynamics and Chemistry of Ozone in the Set-Up Phase of the Northern Hemisphere Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S.R.; Douglass, A. R.; Bevilacqua, R.; Margitan, J. J.; Sen, B.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding stratospheric ozone loss to the point of accurately predicting ozone in the future requires correctly distinguishing chemical from transport-induced changes in ozone. For example, evaluating the impact of chlorine reduction in controlling stratospheric ozone loss requires estimating the amount of ozone lost in chemical reactions in the polar winter and spring. The Northern Hemisphere winter polar region is a particularly crucial and interesting area because it appears that the Northern vortex may currently be poised near the threshold of extreme ozone destruction such as that which now occurs annually in the Antarctic ozone "hole." In this presentation we explore the interaction of ozone transport and chemistry through the Northern late summer and fall seasons as the vortex circulation becomes established. This phase of the seasonal cycle determines the starting point for heterogeneous processes and chlorine-driven loss that take control in the winter vortex. Using a combination of profile data from POAM, HALOE, and in situ measurements, we show that relatively low ozone at high latitudes in the middle stratosphere is associated with vortex airmasses and that these ozone abundances evolve photochemically from characteristically higher values at the end of the summer. The zonal variance of ozone mixing ratio also increases greatly at this time consistent with increasing wave-driven transport. Comparison with a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model is used to generalize the findings from the limited set of observations and quantify the relative roles of transport and chemistry in determining the ozone mixing ratio distributions.

  12. Post-Equinox Evolution of Titan’s Detached Haze and South Polar Vortex Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Robert A.; Ovanessian, A.; Del Genio, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Perry, J.; NcEwen, A.; Ray, T.; Roy, M.

    2013-10-01

    Instruments on the Cassini spacecraft discovered new phenomena related to the (presumably) seasonal behavior of photochemical haze and formation of the winter polar vortex. West et al. 2011 (Geophys. Res. Lett. , 380 , L06204. doi: 10.1029/2011GL046843) described a ‘detached’ haze layer that dropped in altitude from about 500 km in 2005 to about 360 km by late 2010. New images from the Cassini ISS camera show that the appearance of a detached layer is produced by a gap in the haze vertical profile and it is the gap rather than a haze layer that drops in altitude. Intensity profiles from different epochs form an envelope when plotted on top of each other, and the downward movement of the gap can be most easily seen when plotted that way. The movement of a gap rather than movement of a layer of enhanced haze density was suspected in the earlier publication but now it is more apparent. In recent months the gap became very shallow and the limb intensity profiles at a pixel scale ~10 km/pixel evolved from one local maximum/minimum into two local minima/maxima of smaller amplitude and appear to be trending toward the disappearance of relative maxima and minima, leaving a smooth envelope. These observations will require new developments in coupled dynamical and haze microphysical models as none of the current models account for this behavior. Titan’s south polar vortex cloud was detected concurrently by the ISS, VIMS, and CIRS instruments on Cassini in May of 2012. It has an unusual color (more yellow than Titan’s main haze in ISS images), morphology and texture (suggestive of a condensate cloud experiencing open cell convection) and displays a spectral feature at 220 cm-1 (Jennings et al., 2012, Astrophys. J. Lett. 761, L15 DOI: 10.1088/2041-8205/761/1/L15). These attributes point to a condensate of unknown composition. The haze patch is seen in images up to the present (July, 2013), but the latest images suggest a ‘softening’ or more diffuse edge than the

  13. Mercury speciation in brain tissue of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Krey, Anke; Kwan, Michael; Chan, Hing Man

    2012-04-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxicant that has been found at elevated concentrations in the Arctic ecosystem. Little is known about its internal dose in wildlife such as polar bears. We measured concentrations of mercury (Hg) in three different brain regions (cerebellum, frontal lobe and brain stem) of 24 polar bears collected from the Nunavik, Canada between 2000 and 2003. Speciation of Hg was measured by High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (HPLC-ICP-MS). Concentrations of mean total Hg in brain tissue were up to 625 times lower (0.28 ± 0.07 mg kg(-1) dry weight (dw) in frontal lobe, 0.23 ± 0.07 mg kg(-1) dw in cerebellum and 0.12 ± 0.0 3mg kg(-1) dw in brain stem) than the mean total Hg concentration previously reported in polar bear liver collected from Eastern Baffin Island. Methylmercury (MeHg) accounted for 100% of the Hg found in all three brain regions analyzed. These results suggest that polar bear might reduce the toxic effects of Hg by limiting the uptake into the brain and/or decrease the rate of demethylation so that Hg can be excreted from the brain more easily. The toxicokinetics and the blood-brain-barrier mechanisms of polar bears are still unknown and further research is required. PMID:22406289

  14. Polar Gateways Arctic Circle Sunrise 2008 Conference at the Top of the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Kauristie, K.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Sheehan, G. W.; Smith, R. W.; Cline, T. D.; Lewis, E. M.; Haines-Stiles, G.

    2008-12-01

    The Polar Gateways conference was hosted during January 23-29, 2008, the first week of polar sunrise at Barrow, Alaska, at the new Barrow Arctic Research Center of the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium (BASC). The dawn week of polar day, the highly variable low temperatures, and the ice-covered shore tundra and adjacent sea ice conditions provided an appropriate locale for a conference dedicated in the spirit of the International Polar and Heliophysical Years 2007-2009 to the educational exploration of polar and icy world science of Earth and the solar system. The many scientific, educational, and cultural interactions with the local community of four thousand residents, sixty percent native Inupiat Eskimo, further provided an unforgettable experience of what life might be someday be like on other remote polar and icy worlds to be explored and eventually inhabited. Over one hundred active participants, more than half participating remotely, contributed science presentations and educational activities during this unique circumpolar and very "green" conference. Most remote contributions came via videoconference from the Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF) at Kiruna, Sweden, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar Facility at Spitzbergen, Norway, the University of Alaska at Fairbanks, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley, and the University of Arizona. A few contributors participated via teleconference, including one from the Polar Geophysical Institute at Apatity in Russia. These active contributions spanned up to thirteen time zones (Alaska to Russia) at various times during the conference. Primary videoconferencing support between Barrow and other sites was ably provided by the University of Alaska at Fairbanks, and local operators at each remote site collectively made this conference possible. Science presentations spanned the solar system from the polar Sun and heliospheric environment to Earth, Moon

  15. Polar Gateways Arctic Circle Sunrise 2008 Conference at the Top of the World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Kauristie, Kirsti; Weatherwax, Allan T.; Sandahl, Ingrid; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Sheehan, Glenn W.; Smith, Roger W.; Lewis, Elaine M.; Cline, Troy D.; Haines-Stiles, Geoff

    2008-01-01

    The Polar Gateways conference was hosted during January 23-29, 2008, the first week of polar sunrise at Barrow, Alaska, at the new Barrow Arctic Research Center of the Barrow Arctic Science consortium (BASC). The dawn week of polar day, the highly variable low temperatures, and the ice-covered shore tundra and adjacent sea ice conditions provided an appropriate locale for a conference dedicated in the spirit of the International Polar and Heliophysical Years 2007-2009 to the educational exploration of polar and icy world science of Earth and the solar system. The many scientific, educational, and cultural interactions with the local community of four thousand residents, sixty percent native Inupiat Eskimo, further provided an unforgettable experience of what life might be someday be like on other remote polar and icy worlds to be explored and eventually inhabited. Over one hundred active participants, more than half participating remotely, contributed science presentations and educational activities during this unique circumpolar and very "green" conference. Most remote contributions came via videoconference from the Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF) at Kisuna, Sweden, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar Facility at Spitzbergen, Norway, the University of Alaska at Fairbanks, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley, and the University of Arizona. A few contributors participated via teleconference, including one from the Polar Geophysical Institute at Apatity in Russia. These active contributions spanned up to thirteen time zones (Alaska to Russia) at various tirnes during the conference. Primary videoconferencing support between Barrow and other sites was ably provided by the University of Alaska at Fairbanks, and local operators at each remote site collectively made this conference possible. Science presentations spanned the solar system from the polar Sun and heliospheric environment to Earth, Moon

  16. The last polar dinosaurs: high diversity of latest Cretaceous arctic dinosaurs in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godefroit, Pascal; Golovneva, Lina; Shchepetov, Sergei; Garcia, Géraldine; Alekseev, Pavel

    2009-04-01

    A latest Cretaceous (68 to 65 million years ago) vertebrate microfossil assemblage discovered at Kakanaut in northeastern Russia reveals that dinosaurs were still highly diversified in Arctic regions just before the Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction event. Dinosaur eggshell fragments, belonging to hadrosaurids and non-avian theropods, indicate that at least several latest Cretaceous dinosaur taxa could reproduce in polar region and were probably year-round residents of high latitudes. Palaeobotanical data suggest that these polar dinosaurs lived in a temperate climate (mean annual temperature about 10°C), but the climate was apparently too cold for amphibians and ectothermic reptiles. The high diversity of Late Maastrichtian dinosaurs in high latitudes, where ectotherms are absent, strongly questions hypotheses according to which dinosaur extinction was a result of temperature decline, caused or not by the Chicxulub impact.

  17. Is Ambient Light during the High Arctic Polar Night Sufficient to Act as a Visual Cue for Zooplankton?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jonathan H.; Berge, Jørgen; Moline, Mark A.; Sørensen, Asgeir J.; Last, Kim; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Renaud, Paul E.; Leu, Eva S.; Grenvald, Julie; Cottier, Finlo; Cronin, Heather; Menze, Sebastian; Norgren, Petter; Varpe, Øystein; Daase, Malin; Darnis, Gerald; Johnsen, Geir

    2015-01-01

    The light regime is an ecologically important factor in pelagic habitats, influencing a range of biological processes. However, the availability and importance of light to these processes in high Arctic zooplankton communities during periods of 'complete' darkness (polar night) are poorly studied. Here we characterized the ambient light regime throughout the diel cycle during the high Arctic polar night, and ask whether visual systems of Arctic zooplankton can detect the low levels of irradiance available at this time. To this end, light measurements with a purpose-built irradiance sensor and coupled all-sky digital photographs were used to characterize diel skylight irradiance patterns over 24 hours at 79°N in January 2014 and 2015. Subsequent skylight spectral irradiance and in-water optical property measurements were used to model the underwater light field as a function of depth, which was then weighted by the electrophysiologically determined visual spectral sensitivity of a dominant high Arctic zooplankter, Thysanoessa inermis. Irradiance in air ranged between 1–1.5 x 10-5 μmol photons m-2 s-1 (400–700 nm) in clear weather conditions at noon and with the moon below the horizon, hence values reflect only solar illumination. Radiative transfer modelling generated underwater light fields with peak transmission at blue-green wavelengths, with a 465 nm transmission maximum in shallow water shifting to 485 nm with depth. To the eye of a zooplankter, light from the surface to 75 m exhibits a maximum at 485 nm, with longer wavelengths (>600 nm) being of little visual significance. Our data are the first quantitative characterisation, including absolute intensities, spectral composition and photoperiod of biologically relevant solar ambient light in the high Arctic during the polar night, and indicate that some species of Arctic zooplankton are able to detect and utilize ambient light down to 20–30m depth during the Arctic polar night. PMID:26039111

  18. Is Ambient Light during the High Arctic Polar Night Sufficient to Act as a Visual Cue for Zooplankton?

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan H; Berge, Jørgen; Moline, Mark A; Sørensen, Asgeir J; Last, Kim; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Renaud, Paul E; Leu, Eva S; Grenvald, Julie; Cottier, Finlo; Cronin, Heather; Menze, Sebastian; Norgren, Petter; Varpe, Øystein; Daase, Malin; Darnis, Gerald; Johnsen, Geir

    2015-01-01

    The light regime is an ecologically important factor in pelagic habitats, influencing a range of biological processes. However, the availability and importance of light to these processes in high Arctic zooplankton communities during periods of 'complete' darkness (polar night) are poorly studied. Here we characterized the ambient light regime throughout the diel cycle during the high Arctic polar night, and ask whether visual systems of Arctic zooplankton can detect the low levels of irradiance available at this time. To this end, light measurements with a purpose-built irradiance sensor and coupled all-sky digital photographs were used to characterize diel skylight irradiance patterns over 24 hours at 79°N in January 2014 and 2015. Subsequent skylight spectral irradiance and in-water optical property measurements were used to model the underwater light field as a function of depth, which was then weighted by the electrophysiologically determined visual spectral sensitivity of a dominant high Arctic zooplankter, Thysanoessa inermis. Irradiance in air ranged between 1-1.5 x 10-5 μmol photons m-2 s-1 (400-700 nm) in clear weather conditions at noon and with the moon below the horizon, hence values reflect only solar illumination. Radiative transfer modelling generated underwater light fields with peak transmission at blue-green wavelengths, with a 465 nm transmission maximum in shallow water shifting to 485 nm with depth. To the eye of a zooplankter, light from the surface to 75 m exhibits a maximum at 485 nm, with longer wavelengths (>600 nm) being of little visual significance. Our data are the first quantitative characterisation, including absolute intensities, spectral composition and photoperiod of biologically relevant solar ambient light in the high Arctic during the polar night, and indicate that some species of Arctic zooplankton are able to detect and utilize ambient light down to 20-30m depth during the Arctic polar night. PMID:26039111

  19. In the dark: A review of ecosystem processes during the Arctic polar night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Jørgen; Renaud, Paul E.; Darnis, Gerald; Cottier, Finlo; Last, Kim; Gabrielsen, Tove M.; Johnsen, Geir; Seuthe, Lena; Weslawski, Jan Marcin; Leu, Eva; Moline, Mark; Nahrgang, Jasmine; Søreide, Janne E.; Varpe, Øystein; Lønne, Ole Jørgen; Daase, Malin; Falk-Petersen, Stig

    2015-12-01

    Several recent lines of evidence indicate that the polar night is key to understanding Arctic marine ecosystems. First, the polar night is not a period void of biological activity even though primary production is close to zero, but is rather characterized by a number of processes and interactions yet to be fully understood, including unanticipated high levels of feeding and reproduction in a wide range of taxa and habitats. Second, as more knowledge emerges, it is evident that a coupled physical and biological perspective of the ecosystem will redefine seasonality beyond the "calendar perspective". Third, it appears that many organisms may exhibit endogenous rhythms that trigger fitness-maximizing activities in the absence of light-based cues. Indeed a common adaptation appears to be the ability to utilize the dark season for reproduction. This and other processes are most likely adaptations to current environmental conditions and community and trophic structures of the ecosystem, and may have implications for how Arctic ecosystems can change under continued climatic warming.

  20. Organochlorine contaminants in arctic marine food chains: identification, geographical distribution, and temporal trends in polar bears

    SciTech Connect

    Norstrom, R.J.; Simon, M.; Muir, D.C.G.; Schweinsburg, R.E.

    1988-09-01

    Contamination of Canadian arctic and subarctic marine ecosystems by organochlorine (OC) compounds was measured by analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) tissues collected from 12 zones between 1982 and 1984. PCB congeners (S-PCB), chlordanes, DDT and metabolites, chlorobenzenes (S-CBz), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (S-HC-H), and dieldrin were identified by high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Nonachlor-III, a nonachlor isomer in technical chlordane, was positively identified for the first time as an environmental contaminant. S-PCB and S-CHLOR accounted for >80% of the total organochlorines in adipose tissue. Six PCB congeners constituted approximately 93% of S-PCB in polar bears. Levels of most OCs were lowest in the high Arctic, intermediate in Baffin Bay, and highest in Hudson Bay. Levels of ..cap alpha..-HCH were evaluated in zones influenced by surface runoff. Levels of S-CHLOR were four times higher and levels of the other OCs were two times higher in adipose tissue of bears from Hudson Bay and Baffin Bay in 1984 than in adipose tissue archived since 1969 from these areas; levels of S-DDT did not change.

  1. Polar Bears from Space: Assessing Satellite Imagery as a Tool to Track Arctic Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Seth; LaRue, Michelle; Lecomte, Nicolas; Atkinson, Stephen; Garshelis, David; Porter, Claire; Atwood, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient techniques for monitoring wildlife is a priority in the Arctic, where the impacts of climate change are acute and remoteness and logistical constraints hinder access. We evaluated high resolution satellite imagery as a tool to track the distribution and abundance of polar bears. We examined satellite images of a small island in Foxe Basin, Canada, occupied by a high density of bears during the summer ice-free season. Bears were distinguished from other light-colored spots by comparing images collected on different dates. A sample of ground-truthed points demonstrated that we accurately classified bears. Independent observers reviewed images and a population estimate was obtained using mark–recapture models. This estimate (: 94; 95% Confidence Interval: 92–105) was remarkably similar to an abundance estimate derived from a line transect aerial survey conducted a few days earlier (: 102; 95% CI: 69–152). Our findings suggest that satellite imagery is a promising tool for monitoring polar bears on land, with implications for use with other Arctic wildlife. Large scale applications may require development of automated detection processes to expedite review and analysis. Future research should assess the utility of multi-spectral imagery and examine sites with different environmental characteristics. PMID:25006979

  2. Polar bears from space: assessing satellite imagery as a tool to track Arctic wildlife.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Seth; LaRue, Michelle; Lecomte, Nicolas; Atkinson, Stephen; Garshelis, David; Porter, Claire; Atwood, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient techniques for monitoring wildlife is a priority in the Arctic, where the impacts of climate change are acute and remoteness and logistical constraints hinder access. We evaluated high resolution satellite imagery as a tool to track the distribution and abundance of polar bears. We examined satellite images of a small island in Foxe Basin, Canada, occupied by a high density of bears during the summer ice-free season. Bears were distinguished from other light-colored spots by comparing images collected on different dates. A sample of ground-truthed points demonstrated that we accurately classified bears. Independent observers reviewed images and a population estimate was obtained using mark-recapture models. This estimate (N: 94; 95% Confidence Interval: 92-105) was remarkably similar to an abundance estimate derived from a line transect aerial survey conducted a few days earlier (N: 102; 95% CI: 69-152). Our findings suggest that satellite imagery is a promising tool for monitoring polar bears on land, with implications for use with other Arctic wildlife. Large scale applications may require development of automated detection processes to expedite review and analysis. Future research should assess the utility of multi-spectral imagery and examine sites with different environmental characteristics. PMID:25006979

  3. Polar bears from space: assessing satellite imagery as a tool to track Arctic wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapleton, Seth P.; LaRue, Michelle A.; Lecomte, Nicolas; Atkinson, Stephen N.; Garshelis, David L.; Porter, Claire; Atwood, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient techniques for monitoring wildlife is a priority in the Arctic, where the impacts of climate change are acute and remoteness and logistical constraints hinder access. We evaluated high resolution satellite imagery as a tool to track the distribution and abundance of polar bears. We examined satellite images of a small island in Foxe Basin, Canada, occupied by a high density of bears during the summer ice-free season. Bears were distinguished from other light-colored spots by comparing images collected on different dates. A sample of ground-truthed points demonstrated that we accurately classified bears. Independent observers reviewed images and a population estimate was obtained using mark- recapture models. This estimate (N: 94; 95% Confidence Interval: 92-105) was remarkably similar to an abundance estimate derived from a line transect aerial survey conducted a few days earlier (N: 102; 95% CI: 69-152). Our findings suggest that satellite imagery is a promising tool for monitoring polar bears on land, with implications for use with other Arctic wildlife. Large scale applications may require development of automated detection processes to expedite review and analysis. Future research should assess the utility of multi-spectral imagery and examine sites with different environmental characteristics.

  4. Reconstruction of the constituent distribution and trends in the Antarctic polar vortex from ER-2 flight observations

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeberl, M.R.; Lait, L.R. ); Newman, P.A.; Martin, R.L. ); Proffitt, M.H. ); Hartmann, D.L. ); Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J.; Strahan, S.E.; Chan, K.R. ); Anderson, J. ); Gary, B. )

    1989-11-30

    Ozone, chlorine monoxide, and nitrous oxide concentrations have been measured in the south polar region. These measurements have been analyzed using conservative coordinate transformations to potential temperature-N{sub 2}O and potential temperature-potential vorticity space. The latter transformation is equivalent to interpreting trace species observations within the modified Lagrangian mean (MLM) coordinate system. The analysis shows that the MLM transformed ozone concentration decreases at about 0.06 ppmv (parts per million by volume) per day between 20 and 16 km altitude inside the polar vortex during the mid-August to mid-September period. These ozone changes must be chemical in origin; they are also collocated with the region of high CIO. Outside the CPR (chemically perturbed region) at the highest aircraft altitudes, ozone systematically increases, suggesting a diabatic cooling of the order of 0.3-0.6 K/d. Within the CPR the cooling rate appears to be less than 0.2 K/d. The MLM analysis technique creates a picture of the general chemical structure of the Austral polar vortex which shows that air deep within the chemically perturbed region has subsided substantially in relation to the air outside. However, there is also a tongue of high ozone air which extends from mid-latitudes downward along the stratospheric jet at 65{degree}W and 60{degree}S. An examination of the last three flight days, September 20-22, 1987, shows that during this period the polar vortex shifts systematically equatorward along the Antarctic Peninsula. Apparent changes in the constituents measured over this period result from sampling air progressively further into the vortex.

  5. The impact of wave-mean flow interaction on the Northern Hemisphere polar vortex after tropical volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Matthias; Timmreck, Claudia; Schmidt, Hauke; Toohey, Matthew; Krüger, Kirstin

    2016-05-01

    The current generation of Earth system models that participate in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) does not, on average, produce a strengthened Northern Hemisphere (NH) polar vortex after large tropical volcanic eruptions as suggested by observational records. Here we investigate the impact of volcanic eruptions on the NH winter stratosphere with an ensemble of 20 model simulations of the Max Planck Institute Earth system model. We compare the dynamical impact in simulations of the very large 1815 Tambora eruption with the averaged dynamical response to the two largest eruptions of the CMIP5 historical simulations (the 1883 Krakatau and the 1991 Pinatubo eruptions). We find that for both the Tambora and the averaged Krakatau-Pinatubo eruptions the radiative perturbation only weakly affects the polar vortex directly. The position of the maximum temperature anomaly gradient is located at approximately 30°N, where we obtain significant westerly zonal wind anomalies between 10 hPa and 30 hPa. Under the very strong forcing of the Tambora eruption, the NH polar vortex is significantly strengthened because the subtropical westerly wind anomalies are sufficiently strong to robustly alter the propagation of planetary waves. The average response to the eruptions of Krakatau and Pinatubo reveals a slight strengthening of the polar vortex, but individual ensemble members differ substantially, indicating that internal variability plays a dominant role. For the Tambora eruption the ensemble variability of the zonal mean temperature and zonal wind anomalies during midwinter and late winter is significantly reduced compared to the volcanically unperturbed period.

  6. Influence of wave activity on the composition of the polar stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Pogoreltsev, A. I.; Galin, V. Ya.; Drobashevskaya, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The planetary wave impact on the polar vortex stability, polar stratosphere temperature, and content of ozone and other gases was simulated with the global chemical-climatic model of the lower and middle atmosphere. It was found that the planetary waves propagating from the troposphere into the stratosphere differently affect the gas content of the Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere. In the Arctic region, the degree of wave activity critically affects the polar vortex formation, the appearance of polar stratospheric clouds, the halogen activation on their surface, and ozone anomaly formation. Ozone anomalies in the Arctic region as a rule are not formed at high wave activity and can be registered at low activity. In the Antarctic Regions, wave activity affects the stability of polar vortex and the depth of ozone holes, which are formed at almost any wave activity, and the minimal ozone values depend on the strong or weak wave activity that is registered in specific years.

  7. Hematology of southern Beaufort Sea polar bears (2005-2007): Biomarker for an arctic ecosystem health sentinel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirk, Cassandra M.; Amstrup, S.; Swor, Rhonda; Holcomb, Darce; O'Hara, T. M.

    2010-01-01

    Declines in sea-ice habitats have resulted in declining stature, productivity, and survival of polar bears in some regions. With continuing sea-ice declines, negative population effects are projected to expand throughout the polar bear's range. Precise causes of diminished polar bear life history performance are unknown, however, climate and sea-ice condition change are expected to adversely impact polar bear (Ursus maritimus) health and population dynamics. As apex predators in the Arctic, polar bears integrate the status of lower trophic levels and are therefore sentinels of ecosystem health. Arctic residents feed at the apex of the ecosystem, thus polar bears can serve as indicators of human health in the Arctic. Despite their value as indicators of ecosystem welfare, population-level health data for U.S. polar bears are lacking. We present hematological reference ranges for southern Beaufort Sea polar bears. Hematological parameters in southern Beaufort Sea polar bears varied by age, geographic location, and reproductive status. Total leukocytes, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and serum immunoglobulin G were significantly greater in males than females. These measures were greater in nonlactating females ages ???5, than lactating adult females ages ???5, suggesting that females encumbered by young may be less resilient to new immune system challenges that may accompany ongoing climate change. Hematological values established here provide a necessary baseline for anticipated changes in health as arctic temperatures warm and sea-ice declines accelerate. Data suggest that females with dependent young may be most vulnerable to these changes and should therefore be a targeted cohort for monitoring in this sentinel. ?? 2010 International Association for Ecology and Health.

  8. Dynamics of Venus' Southern hemisphere and South Polar Vortex from VIRTIS data obtained during the Venus Expres Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Garate-Lopez, I.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.

    2011-12-01

    The VIRTIS instrument onboard Venus Express observes Venus in two channels (visible and infrared) obtaining spectra and multi-wavelength images of the planet. The images have been used to trace the motions of the atmosphere at different layers of clouds [1-3]. We review the VIRTIS cloud image data and wind results obtained by different groups [1-3] and we present new results concerning the morphology and evolution of the South Polar Vortex at the upper and lower cloud levels with data covering the first 900 days of the mission. We present wind measurements of the South hemisphere obtained by cloud tracking individual cloud features and higher-resolution wind results of the polar region covering the evolution of the South polar vortex. The later were obtained by an image correlation algorithm run under human supervision to validate the data. We present day-side data of the upper clouds obtained at 380 and 980 nm sensitive to altitudes of 66-70 km, night-side data in the near infrared at 1.74 microns of the lower cloud (45-50 km) and day and night-side data obtained in the thermal infrared (wavelengths of 3.8 and 5.1 microns) which covers the dynamical evolution of Venus South Polar vortex at the cloud tops (66-70 km). We explore the different dynamics associated to the varying morphology of the vortex, its dynamical structure at different altitudes, the variability of the global wind data of the southern hemisphere and the interrelation of the polar vortex dynamics with the wind dynamics at subpolar and mid-latitudes. Acknowledgements: Work funded by Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07. References [1] A. Sánchez-Lavega et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L13204, (2008). [2] D. Luz et al., Science, 332, 577-580 (2011). [3] R. Hueso, et al., Icarus doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.04.020 (2011)

  9. Accuracy of Modelled Stratospheric Temperatures in the Winter Arctic Vortex from Infra Red Montgolfier Long Duration Balloon Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pommereau, J.-P.; Garnier, A.; Knudson, B. M.; Letrenne, G.; Durand, M.; Cseresnjes, M.; Nunes-Pinharanda, M.; Denis, L.; Newman, P. A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The temperature of the stratosphere has been measured in the Arctic vortex every 9-10 minutes along the trajectory of four Infra Red Montgolfier long duration balloons flown for 7 to 22 days during the winters of 1997 and 1999. From a number of comparisons to independent sensors, the accuracy of the measurements is demonstrated to be plus or minus 0.5 K during nighttime and at altitude below 28 km (10 hPa). The performances of the analyses of global meteorological models, European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 31 and 50 levels, United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO), Data Assimilation Office (DAO), National Climatic Prediction Center (NCEP) and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, used in photochemical simulations of ozone destruction and interpretation of satellite data, are evaluated by comparison to this large (3500 data points) and homogeneous experimental data set. Most of models, except ECMWF31 in 1999, do show a smal1 average warm bias of between 0 and 1.6 K, with deviations particularly large, up to 20 K at high altitude (5hPa) in stratospheric warming conditions in 1999. Particularly wrong was ECMWF 31 levels near its top level at 10 hPa in 1999 where temperature 25 K colder than the real atmosphere were reported. The average dispersion between models and measurements varies from plus or minus 1.0 to plus or minus 3.0 K depending on the model and the year. It is shown to be the result of three contributions. The largest is a long wave modulation likely caused by the displacement of the temperature field in the analyses compared to real atmosphere. The second is the overestimation of the vertical gradient of temperature particularly in warming conditions, which explains the increase of dispersion from 1997 to 1999. Unexpectedly, the third and smallest (plus or minus 0.6-0.7 K) is the contribution of meso and subgrid scale vertical and horizontal features associated to the vertical propagation of orographic or gravity waves. Compared to other

  10. Sailing the Open Polar Sea...Again: What Are You Teaching Your Children about the Arctic Ocean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockard, James W. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Relates how a blunder about the Arctic Ocean and the polar ice cap made by the author in his first year of teaching led to a successful learning experience. Lists five important discussion topics that social studies teachers should use to teach about this remote, but strategic, part of the world. (LS)

  11. Long Term Changes in the Polar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2016-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented. The unusual meteorological conditions of the 2015 south polar vortex and the 2010/11 and 2015/16 north polar vortices will be compared to other recent years.

  12. Autocatalytic release of bromine from Arctic snow pack during polar sunrise

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, T.; McConnell, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    Measurements and modeling studies strongly suggest that spring time depletion of ozone in the Arctic planetary boundary layer (PBL) is due to catalytic destruction by bromine atoms. However, the source of the bromine is uncertain. In this note, we propose that the source of the bromine at polar sunrise is the snow pack on the ice covering Arctic ocean and that it is released auto-catalytically, stimulated by a bromine seed from one of the brominated organic compounds, such as CHBr{sub 3}, by photolysis. In this manner {approximately}100 pptv of bromine can be transferred to the atmosphere where it can reside in the gas phase or, by scavenging, be partitioned in the aerosol or ice crystal phase. Moreover, it appears that heterogeneous recycling of bromine may be a process that self-terminates as ozone depletes to low levels. We also have included chlorine chemistry in the model in order to simulate inferred levels of chlorine atoms. This is important as it results in the production of HCHO which acts to convert post ozone depletion active bromine into HBr which is then returned to the snow pack or scavenged by aerosols or ice crystals. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1996

  13. Cosmogenic 35S: A unique tracer to Antarctic atmospheric chemistry and the polar vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshi, Antra; Dominguez, Gerardo; Savarino, Joel; Thiemens, Mark

    2011-07-01

    The cosmogenic radionuclide 35S (half life ˜87 d) exists in both 35SO2 gas and 35SO42- aerosol phase in the atmosphere. Cosmogenic 35S fulfils a unique niche in that it has an ideal half-life for use as a tracer of atmospheric processes, possesses a gas phase precursor and undergoes gas to particle conversion, providing a chronometer that complements other measurements of radiogenic isotopes of different half lives and chemical properties. Based on radiogenic 35S measurements and concomitant model calculations, we demonstrate that 35S is a unique tracer to understand stratospheric-tropospheric air mass transport dynamics and the atmospheric oxidation capacity on a short time scale. Reported are the first measurements of 35S contained in SO42- aerosols (bulk and size aggregated) at Antarctica. 35SO42- concentrations at Dome C and Dumont D'Urville exhibit summer maxima and winter minima with a secondary winter peak. Higher oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and long range transport of mid latitude air increases 35SO42- activity in summer whereas a lack of air mass mixing coupled with low oxidant concentration in winter significantly decreases 35SO42- activity. A 3% contribution from stratospheric 35SO42- into the free troposphere during stratosphere-troposphere air mass mixing accounts for the secondary winter 35SO42- peak. In the future, this work will be extended to 35S activity measurements of both gas and aerosol phases to further understand gas to particle conversion, vortex dynamics and trace polar stratospheric cloud sedimentation frequency.

  14. Leveraging scientific credibility about Arctic sea ice trends in a polarized political environment.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Kathleen Hall; Hardy, Bruce W

    2014-09-16

    This work argues that, in a polarized environment, scientists can minimize the likelihood that the audience's biased processing will lead to rejection of their message if they not only eschew advocacy but also, convey that they are sharers of knowledge faithful to science's way of knowing and respectful of the audience's intelligence; the sources on which they rely are well-regarded by both conservatives and liberals; and the message explains how the scientist arrived at the offered conclusion, is conveyed in a visual form that involves the audience in drawing its own conclusions, and capsulizes key inferences in an illustrative analogy. A pilot experiment raises the possibility that such a leveraging-involving-visualizing-analogizing message structure can increase acceptance of the scientific claims about the downward cross-decade trend in Arctic sea ice extent and elicit inferences consistent with the scientific consensus on climate change among conservatives exposed to misleadingly selective data in a partisan news source. PMID:25225380

  15. Evolution of the Antarctic polar vortex in spring: Response of a GCM to a prescribed Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boville, B. A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Briegleb, B. P.

    1988-01-01

    The possible effect of the Antartic ozone hole on the evolution of the polar vortex during late winter and spring using a general circulation model (GCM) is examined. The GCM is a version of the NCAR Community Climate Model whose domain extends from the surface to the mesosphere and is similar to that described on Boville and Randel (1986). Ozone is not a predicted variable in the model. A zonally averaged ozone distribution is specified as a function of latitude, pressure and month for the radiation parameterization. Rather that explicitly address reasons for the formation of the ozone hole, researchers postulate its existence and ask what effect it has on the subsequent evolution of the vortex. The evolution of the model when an ozone hole is imposed is then discussed.

  16. Changing Arctic Ecosystems: Updated forecast: Reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions required to improve polar bear outlook

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oakley, Karen L.; Atwood, Todd C.; Mugel, Douglas N.; Rode, Karyn D.; Whalen, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The Arctic is warming faster than other regions of the world due to the loss of snow and ice, which increases the amount of solar energy absorbed by the region. The most visible consequence has been the rapid decline in sea ice over the last 3 decades-a decline projected to bring long ice-free summers if greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are not significantly reduced. The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) depends on sea ice over the biologically productive continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean as a platform for hunting seals. In 2008, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the polar bear as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) due to the threat posed by sea ice loss. The polar bear was the first species to be listed due to forecasted population declines from climate change.

  17. Arctic Expedition of the Frozen Five: an Alternative way of Education and Outreach During the International Polar Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senger, K.; Björkman, M.; Garny, H.; Girard, L.; Lichteneger, J.

    2006-12-01

    In March 2007, a group of international students of the geosciences will embark on a two month expedition across the wilderness of Svalbard. The journey will involve traversing up to 1000 km of high Arctic glaciers between 76° an 80°N, reaching both the southernmost and northernmost capes of Spitsbergen, Svalbard's largest island. We expect to be frequently camping at -30°C, as well as having a high probability of encountering polar bears, crevasses and arctic storms during the expedition. Through this expedition, we wish to promote the multi-disciplinary approach required in successful Arctic science. Our team, young and energetic, has already demonstrated a strong research interest in the Arctic and is ready to share their passion with the general public. Presentations by the various team members focus on the enhanced climate change and related processes witnessed at high latitudes. The concept of alternative energy, including solar power and kites used while en route, is given a high priority throughout. Here we present the education and outreach framework of the project, as well as introducing the research background of the team. We highlight current progress on the integration of this expedition in high schools around the world. The Frozen Five expedition runs in close collaboration with New Zealand's Youth Steering Committee, a major IPY project, aiming to network young polar researchers and promote the study of the polar regions to potential scientists.

  18. Influence of Arctic Sea Ice Extent on Polar Cloud Fraction and Vertical Structure and Implications for Regional Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Strey, Sara T.; Spinhirne, James; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Recent satellite lidar measurements of cloud properties spanning a period of 5 years are used to examine a possible connection between Arctic sea ice amount and polar cloud fraction and vertical distribution. We find an anticorrelation between sea ice extent and cloud fraction with maximum cloudiness occurring over areas with little or no sea ice. We also find that over ice!free regions, there is greater low cloud frequency and average optical depth. Most of the optical depth increase is due to the presence of geometrically thicker clouds over water. In addition, our analysis indicates that over the last 5 years, October and March average polar cloud fraction has increased by about 7% and 10%, respectively, as year average sea ice extent has decreased by 5% 7%. The observed cloud changes are likely due to a number of effects including, but not limited to, the observed decrease in sea ice extent and thickness. Increasing cloud amount and changes in vertical distribution and optical properties have the potential to affect the radiative balance of the Arctic region by decreasing both the upwelling terrestrial longwave radiation and the downward shortwave solar radiation. Because longwave radiation dominates in the long polar winter, the overall effect of increasing low cloud cover is likely a warming of the Arctic and thus a positive climate feedback, possibly accelerating the melting of Arctic sea ice.

  19. The Influence of Arctic Sea Ice Extent on Polar Cloud Fraction and Vertical Structure and Implications for Regional Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Strey, Sara T.; Spinhirne, James; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Recent satellite lidar measurements of cloud properties spanning a period of five years are used to examine a possible connection between Arctic sea ice amount and polar cloud fraction and vertical distribution. We find an anti-correlation between sea ice extent and cloud fraction with maximum cloudiness occurring over areas with little or no sea ice. We also find that over ice free regions, there is greater low cloud frequency and average optical depth. Most of the optical depth increase is due to the presence of geometrically thicker clouds over water. In addition, our analysis indicates that over the last 5 years, October and March average polar cloud fraction has increased by about 7 and 10 percent, respectively, as year average sea ice extent has decreased by 5 to 7 percent. The observed cloud changes are likely due to a number of effects including, but not limited to, the observed decrease in sea ice extent and thickness. Increasing cloud amount and changes in vertical distribution and optical properties have the potential to affect the radiative balance of the Arctic region by decreasing both the upwelling terrestrial longwave radiation and the downward shortwave solar radiation. Since longwave radiation dominates in the long polar winter, the overall effect of increasing low cloud cover is likely a warming of the Arctic and thus a positive climate feedback, possibly accelerating the melting of Arctic sea ice.

  20. Particle size distributions in Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, growth and freezing of sulfuric acid droplets, and implications for cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.; Gary, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper uses particle size and volume measurements obtained with the forward scattering spectrometer probe model 300 during January and February 1989 in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment to investigate processes important in the formation and growth of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. It is suggested on the basis of comparisons of the observations with expected sulfuric acid droplet deliquescence that in the Arctic a major fraction of the sulfuric acid droplets remain liquid until temperatures at least as low as 193 K. It is proposed that homogeneous freezing of the sulfuric acid droplets might occur near 190 K and might play a role in the formation of PSCs.

  1. The Interaction Between Dynamics and Chemistry of Ozone in the Set-up Phase of the Northern Hemisphere Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Bevilacqua, R.; Margitan, J. J.; Douglass, A. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Hoppel, K.; Sen, B.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The morphology and evolution of the stratospheric ozone (O3) distribution at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) are examined for the late summer and fall seasons of 1999. This time period sets the O3 initial condition for the SOLVE/THESEO field mission performed during winter 1999-2000. In situ and satellite data are used along with a three-dimensional model of chemistry and transport (CTM) to determine the key processes that control the distribution of O3 in the lower-to-middle stratosphere. O3 in the vortex at the beginning of the winter season is found to be nearly constant from 500 to above 800 K with a value at 3 ppmv +/- approx. 10%. Values outside the vortex are up to a factor of 2 higher and increase significantly with potential temperature. The seasonal time series of data from POAM shows that relatively low O3 mixing ratios, which characterize the vortex in late fall, are already present at high latitudes at the end of summer before the vortex circulation sets up. Analysis of the CTM output shows that the minimum O3 and increase in variance in late summer are the result of: 1) stirring of polar concentric O3 gradients by nascent wave-driven transport, and 2) an acceleration of net photochemical loss with decreasing solar illumination. The segregation of low O3 mixing ratios into the vortex as the circulation strengthens through the fall suggests a possible feedback role between O3 chemistry and the vortex formation dynamics. Trajectory calculations from O3 sample points early in the fall, however, show only a weak correlation between initial O3 mixing ratio and potential vorticity later in the season consistent with order-of-magnitude calculations for the relative importance of O3 in the fall radiative balance at high latitudes. The possible connection between O3 chemistry and the dynamics of vortex formation does suggest that these feedbacks and sensitivities need to be better understood in order to make confident predictions of the recovery

  2. Generation of radially polarized high energy mid-infrared optical vortex by use of a passive axially symmetric ZnSe waveplate

    SciTech Connect

    Wakayama, Toshitaka Yonemura, Motoki; Oikawa, Hiroki; Sasanuma, Atsushi; Arai, Goki; Fujii, Yusuke; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Otani, Yukitoshi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Washio, Masakazu; Miura, Taisuke; Takahashi, Akihiko; Nakamura, Daisuke; Okada, Tatsuo

    2015-08-24

    We demonstrated the generation of the intense radially polarized mid-infrared optical vortex at a wavelength of 10.6 μm by use of a passive axially symmetric zinc selenide (ZnSe) waveplate with high energy pulse throughput. The phase of the radially polarized optical vortex with the degree of polarization of 0.95 was spirally distributed in regard to the angle. The converted laser beam energy of about 2.6 mJ per pulse was obtained at the input pulse energy of 4.9 mJ, corresponding to the energy conversion efficiency of 56%.

  3. Interannual Variability of Ozone in the Polar Vortex during the Fall Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor); Kawa, S. R.; Newman, P. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Stolarski, R. S.; Bevilacqua, R.

    2002-01-01

    Previous analysis has shown that the distribution of O3 at high northern latitudes in the lower-to-middle stratosphere at the beginning of the winter season has a characteristic distribution, which is consistent between in situ and satellite measurements. Initial O3 profiles in the vortex are similar to each other and are quite different from outside the vortex at the same latitude and also from a zonal mean climatology. In the vortex, O3 is nearly constant from 500 to above 800 K with a value near 3 ppmv. Values outside the vortex are up to a factor of 2 higher and increase significantly with potential temperature. Model analysis indicates that the characteristic vortex O3 profiles arise from a combination of seasonally accelerated photochemical loss at high latitudes and minimal transport of air from lower latitudes. Analysis of the relatively high-resolution POAM data shows that these characteristic O3 distributions are consistent from year to year and between the hemispheres. Here we emphasize analysis of the 24-year time series of O3 data from SBUV in the lower-to-middle stratosphere at high latitudes in the fall vortex. We find that the variability of O3 from SBUV is relatively small in this regime and no significant trend is detectable. The implications of the findings for stratospheric O3 chemistry and transport will be explored.

  4. Bacterial diversity in faeces from polar bear (Ursus maritimus) in Arctic Svalbard

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are major predators in the Arctic marine ecosystem, feeding mainly on seals, and living closely associated with sea ice. Little is known of their gut microbial ecology and the main purpose of this study was to investigate the microbial diversity in faeces of polar bears in Svalbard, Norway (74-81°N, 10-33°E). In addition the level of blaTEM alleles, encoding ampicillin resistance (ampr) were determined. In total, ten samples were collected from ten individual bears, rectum swabs from five individuals in 2004 and faeces samples from five individuals in 2006. Results A 16S rRNA gene clone library was constructed, and all sequences obtained from 161 clones showed affiliation with the phylum Firmicutes, with 160 sequences identified as Clostridiales and one sequence identified as unclassified Firmicutes. The majority of the sequences (70%) were affiliated with the genus Clostridium. Aerobic heterotrophic cell counts on chocolate agar ranged between 5.0 × 104 to 1.6 × 106 colony forming units (cfu)/ml for the rectum swabs and 4.0 × 103 to 1.0 × 105 cfu/g for the faeces samples. The proportion of ampr bacteria ranged from 0% to 44%. All of 144 randomly selected ampr isolates tested positive for enzymatic β-lactamase activity. Three % of the ampr isolates from the rectal samples yielded positive results when screened for the presence of blaTEM genes by PCR. BlaTEM alleles were also detected by PCR in two out of three total faecal DNA samples from polar bears. Conclusion The bacterial diversity in faeces from polar bears in their natural environment in Svalbard is low compared to other animal species, with all obtained clones affiliating to Firmicutes. Furthermore, only low levels of blaTEM alleles were detected in contrast to their increasing prevalence in some clinical and commensal bacterial populations. PMID:20074323

  5. The radiation belt slot region: A source of energetic electron precipitation in the southern hemisphere polar vortex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, Andrew J.

    2015-04-01

    Energetic electron precipitation at mid-magnetic latitudes in the southern winter hemisphere has the potential to influence regional climate variability. The offset of the magnetic pole in the southern hemisphere means that the footprint of the radiation belt slot region crosses the polar vortex; during large geomagnetic storms the slot region can be filled by electrons, some of which precipitate into the atmosphere. Energetic electron precipitation changes the ion chemistry, generating species that impact the heat balance of the middle atmosphere and potentially influencing regional climate variability when transported in the polar vortex. Energetic precipitation also leads to increased ionization in the mesosphere, which in turn attenuates high frequency radio waves that pass through the region. We present observations of the attenuation of a transmitted signal at 1.98 MHz under the footprint of the radiation belt slot-region during large geomagnetic storms. Measurements from the polar orbiting NOAA POES satellites indicate that the slot-region is being filled by electrons at these times. These observations indicate that the slot region is a source of precipitation that has the potential to impact on the heat balance of the middle atmosphere and below.

  6. First results of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols measurements during the Iceland Polar Vortex 2016 (IPV2016) campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ólafsson, Haraldur; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenaël; Duverger, Vincent; Vignelles, Damien

    2016-04-01

    The Iceland Polar Vortex 2016 (IPV2016) campaign was carried out during the passage of the stratospheric polar vortex over Iceland in early January 2016. During the period 9-13 January, a total of four meteorological balloon sondes were sent into the stratosphere, carrying the Light Optical Aerosol Counter (LOAC) up to altitude of 26 km. LOAC provides concentrations, size distribution and typology of the aerosols in the 0.2 - 100 micrometer size range. The measurements show background liquid and solid aerosol concentrations greater than conventional values in the mid-latitude stratosphere. LOAC has detected layers of cirrus around the tropopause and has provided their size distribution in the 5 - 40 micrometre range. Liquid polar stratospheric cloud particles, greater than a few micrometre, were detected in the 12 - 24 km altitude range. Finally, abornmal high concentrations of submicronic carbonaceus particles were observed from the middle tropopshere to the middle stratosphere. The origin of all these particles will be tentatively interpreted using modelling calculation and backward trajectories

  7. Connections Between the Spring Breakup of the Southern Hemisphere Polar Vortex, Stationary Waves, and Air-sea Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkel, Chaim I.; Oman, Luke David; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Hurwitz, Margaret H.; Molod, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    A robust connection between the drag on surface-layer winds and the stratospheric circulation is demonstrated in NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM). Specifically, an updated parameterization of roughness at the air-sea interface, in which surface roughness is increased for moderate wind speeds (4ms to 20ms), leads to a decrease in model biases in Southern Hemispheric ozone, polar cap temperature, stationary wave heat flux, and springtime vortex breakup. A dynamical mechanism is proposed whereby increased surface roughness leads to improved stationary waves. Increased surface roughness leads to anomalous eddy momentum flux convergence primarily in the Indian Ocean sector (where eddies are strongest climatologically) in September and October. The localization of the eddy momentum flux convergence anomaly in the Indian Ocean sector leads to a zonally asymmetric reduction in zonal wind and, by geostrophy, to a wavenumber-1 stationary wave pattern. This tropospheric stationary wave pattern leads to enhanced upwards wave activity entering the stratosphere. The net effect is an improved Southern Hemisphere vortex: the vortex breaks up earlier in spring (i.e., the spring late-breakup bias is partially ameliorated) yet is no weaker in mid-winter. More than half of the stratospheric biases appear to be related to the surface wind speed biases. As many other chemistry climate models use a similar scheme for their surface layer momentum exchange and have similar biases in the stratosphere, we expect that results from GEOSCCM may be relevant for other climate models.

  8. Polar cloud observatory at Ny-Ålesund in GRENE Arctic Climate Change Research Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanouchi, Takashi; Takano, Toshiaki; Shiobara, Masataka; Okamoto, Hajime; Koike, Makoto; Ukita, Jinro

    2016-04-01

    Cloud is one of the main processes in the climate system and especially a large feed back agent for Arctic warming amplification (Yoshimori et al., 2014). From this reason, observation of polar cloud has been emphasized and 95 GHz cloud profiling radar in high precision was established at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in 2013 as one of the basic infrastructure in the GRENE (Green Network of Excellence Program) Arctic Climate Change Research Project. The radar, "FALCON-A", is a FM-CW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar, developed for Arctic use by Chiba University (PI: T. Takano) in 2012, following its prototype, "FALCON-1" which was developed in 2006 (Takano et al., 2010). The specifications of the radar are, central frequency: 94.84 GHz; antenna power: 1 W; observation height: up to 15 km; range resolution: 48 m; beam width: 0.2 degree (15 m at 5 km); Doppler width: 3.2 m/s; time interval: 10 sec, and capable of archiving high sensitivity and high spatial and time resolution. An FM-CW type radar realizes similar sensitivity with much smaller parabolic antennas separated 1.4 m from each other used for transmitting and receiving the wave. Polarized Micro-Pulse Lidar (PMPL, Sigma Space MPL-4B-IDS), which is capable to measure the backscatter and depolarization ratio, has also been deployed to Ny-Ålesund in March 2012, and now operated to perform collocated measurements with FALCON-A. Simultaneous measurement data from collocated PMPL and FALCON-A are available for synergetic analyses of cloud microphysics. Cloud mycrophysics, such as effective radius of ice particles and ice water content, are obtained from the analysis based on algorithm, which is modified for ground-based measurements from Okamoto's retrieval algorithm for satellite based cloud profiling radar and lidar (CloudSat and CALIPSO; Okamoto et al., 2010). Results of two years will be shown in the presentation. Calibration is a point to derive radar reflectivity (dBZ) from original intensity data

  9. Denitrification in the Arctic mid-winter 2004/2005 observed by airborne submillimeter radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinbohl, Armin; Bremer, Holger; Kullmann, Harry; Kuttippurath, Jayanarayanan; Browell, Edward V.; Canty, Timothy; Salawitch, Ross J.; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Nothol, Justus

    2005-01-01

    We present measurements of unusually low mixing ratios of HNO3 in the exceptionally cold Arctic vortex of late-January and early-February 2005. The measurements were obtained by the airborne submillimeter radiometer ASUR during the polar aura validation experiment (PAVE). The distribution of HNO3 inside the vortex reaches minima below 4 ppbv around 22 km altitude and maxima above 13 ppbv around 16 km altitude, with a considerable spatial variability.

  10. A case study of high Arctic anthropogenic disturbance to polar desert permafrost and ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M. S.; Pollard, W. H.

    2013-12-01

    One of the indirect impacts of climate change on Arctic ecosystems is the expected increase of industrial development in high latitudes. The scale of terrestrial impacts cannot be known ahead of time, particularly due to a lack of long-term impact studies in this region. With one of the slowest community recovery rates of any ecosystem, the high Artic biome will be under a considerable threat that is exacerbated by a high susceptibility to change in the permafrost thermal balance. One such area that provides a suitable location for study is an old airstrip near Eureka, Ellesmere Island, Nunavut (80.0175°N, 85.7340°W). While primarily used as an ice-runway for winter transport, the airstrip endured a yearly summer removal of vegetation that continued from 1947 until its abandonment in 1951. Since then, significant vegetative and geomorphic differences between disturbed and undisturbed areas have been noted in the literature throughout the decades (Bruggemann, 1953; Beschel, 1963; Couture and Pollard, 2007), but no system wide assessment of both the ecosystem and near-surface permafrost has been conducted. Key to our study is that the greatest apparent geomorphic and vegetative changes have occurred and persisted in areas where underlying ice-wedges have been disturbed. This suggests that the colonizing communities rapidly filled new available thermokarst niches and have produced an alternative ice-wedge stable state than the surrounding polar desert. We hypothesize that disturbed areas will currently have greater depths of thaw (deeper active layers) and degraded ice-wedges, with decreased vegetation diversity but higher abundance due to a changed hydrological balance. To test this a comprehensive set of near-surface active layer and ecosystem measurements were conducted. Permafrost dynamics were characterized using probing and high-frequency Ground Penetrating Radar (500 MHz) to map the near-surface details of ice-wedges and active layer. Vegetation was measured

  11. New areas of polar lows over the Arctic as a result of the decrease in sea ice extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabolotskikh, E. V.; Gurvich, I. A.; Chapron, B.

    2015-12-01

    Three mesocyclones (MCs) over the Russian (Eastern) Arctic are investigated using multispectral satellite remote sensing data, surface analysis maps, and reanalysis data. Advanced retrieval algorithms are used for estimating the geophysical parameter from satellite passive microwave measurements. These methods allow reconstructing in full the geophysical parameter fields characterizing polar lows. Synoptic analysis along with cloud image, atmospheric water vapor content, cloud liquid water content, and sea surface wind speed field analysis show that, while the Arctic sea ice retreats, new areas of open water appear where MCs can arise. A detailed study of several polar low cases reveals the typical conditions of their formation and development. Further studies are in demand due to the danger of MC extreme events for navigation, transport, and fishery operations in these unexplored regions.

  12. The Polar Crust Project- BSC Diversity and Variability in the Arctic and Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Laura; Borchhardt, Nadine; Komisc-Buchmann, Karin; Becker, Burkhard; Karsten, Ulf; Büdel, Burkhard

    2015-04-01

    The Polar Crust Project is a newly funded DFG initiative that aims to provide a precise evaluation of the biodiversity of eukaryotic green microalgae and cyanobacteria in Biological Soil Crusts (BSC) isolated from the Antarctic Peninsula and Arctic Svalbard. This project will include a thorough investigation into the composition of BSC in the Polar regions, this especially is important for Svalbard due to the severe lack of any previous research on such communities in this area. During our expedition to Spitsbergen, Svalbard in August 2014 we were particularly surprised to find that the coverage of BSC is extremely high and is certainly the dominant vegetation type around Ny Ålesund. Due to this discovery the project has now been extended to include long term measurements of CO2 gas exchange in order to gain exact seasonal carbon fixation rates and therefore discovering how the BSC contributes to the ecosystems carbon balance. The research areas of Spitsbergen were centred around 2 localities: Ny-Ålesund is a research town, home to the AWIPEV station, on the Brøgger peninsula. Longyearbyen, which is the largest settlement on the island, is found in the valley Longyeardalen on the shore of Adventfjorden. Areas where BSC is the prevalent vegetation type were identified, 6 around Ny-Ålesund and 4 for Longyearbyen, and vegetation surveys were conducted. This entailed 625 single point measurements at each site and identifying the crust/or other cover type. For example, green algal lichen, cyanobacterial crust, higher plant, open soil. Samples were also taken at every location in order to study the green algal and cyanobacterial diversity. The vegetation survey will allow us to get a good overview of the BSC composition at the different sites. In January 2015 an expedition to the Antarctic Peninsular took place, here the sampling method was repeated and therefore both Polar Regions BSC composition can be described and compared. Here, we wish to introduce the Polar

  13. Radially polarized optical vortex converter created by femtosecond laser nanostructuring of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresna, Martynas; Gecevičius, Mindaugas; Kazansky, Peter G.; Gertus, Titas

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate the generation of optical vortices with radial or azimuthal polarization using a space variant polarization converter, fabricated by femtosecond laser writing of self-assembled nanostructures in silica glass. Manipulation of the induced form birefringence is achieved by controlling writing parameters, in particular, the polarization azimuth of the writing beam. The fabricated converter allows switching from radial to azimuthal polarization by controlling the handedness of incident circular polarization.

  14. Integrating Access to Arctic Environmental Change and Human Health Research for the International Polar Year and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, C. L.

    2006-12-01

    hosting the Arctic Human Health Initiative (AHHI), the human health focus of the International Polar Year activities. AHHI will coordinate research in the areas of infectious disease; the effects of anthropogenic pollution, UV radiation, and climate variability on human health; and telehealth innovations. A major goal of AHHI is the better integration of the findings of Arctic health research through outreach programs and public education.

  15. Subsidence, Mixing and Denitrification of Polar Vortex Air Measured During Polaris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rex, M.; Salawitch, R.; Toon, G.; Sen, B.; Margitan, J.; Osterman, G.; Blavier, J.; Gao, R.; Del Negro, L.; Donnelly, S.; Keim, E.; Neuman, J.; Fahey, D.; Webster, C.; Scott, D.; Herman, B.; May, R.; Moyer, L.; Gunson, M.; Irion, F.; Chang, A.; Rinsland, R.; Bui, P.; Loewenstein, M.

    1998-01-01

    We use the correlation between CH(sub 4) and N(sub 2)O as measured during the POLARIS campaign in spring 1997 to estimate the degree of mixing between descended air masses from the vortex and air masses from mid-latitudes.

  16. Synchronous polar winter starphotometry and lidar measurements at a High Arctic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baibakov, K.; O'Neill, N. T.; Ivanescu, L.; Duck, T. J.; Perro, C.; Herber, A.; Schulz, K.-H.; Schrems, O.

    2015-09-01

    We present recent progress on nighttime retrievals of aerosol and cloud optical properties over the PEARL (Polar Environmental Atmospheric Research Laboratory) station at Eureka (Nunavut, Canada) in the High Arctic (80° N, 86° W). In the spring of 2011 and 2012, a star photometer was employed to acquire aerosol optical depth (AOD) data, while vertical aerosol and cloud backscatter profiles were measured using the CANDAC Raman Lidar (CRL). We used a simple backscatter coefficient threshold (βthr) to distinguish aerosols from clouds and, assuming that aerosols were largely fine mode (FM)/sub-micron, to distinguish FM aerosols from coarse mode (CM)/super-micron cloud or crystal particles. Using prescribed lidar ratios, we computed FM and CM AODs that were compared with analogous AODs estimated from spectral star photometry. We found (βthr dependent) coherences between the lidar and star photometer for both FM events and CM cloud and crystal events with averaged, FM absolute differences being <∼0.03 when associated R2 values were between 0.2 and 0.8. A βthr sensitivity study demonstrated that zero crossing absolute differences and R2 peaks were in comparable regions of the βthr range (or physical reasons were given for their disparity). The utility of spectral vs. temporal cloud screening of star photometer AODs was also illustrated. In general our results are critical to building confidence in the physical fidelity of derived, weak amplitude, star photometry AODs and, in turn, towards the development of AOD climatologies and validation databases for polar winter models and satellite sensors.

  17. Analysis of the physical state of one Arctic polar stratospheric cloud based on observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, K.; Tabazadeh, A.; Turco, R. P.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Dye, J. E.; Twohy, C.; Baumgardner, D.

    1994-01-01

    During the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) simultaneous measurements of aerosol size distribution and NO(y)(HN03 + NO + NO2 + 2(N205)) were made along ER-2 flight paths. The flow characteristics of the NO(y) instrument allow us to derive the condensed NO(y) amount (assumed to be HN03) present during polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) events. Analysis of the January 24th flight indicates that this condensed HN03 amount does not agree well with the aerosol volume if the observed PSCs are composed of solid nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), as is generally assumed. However, the composition agrees well with that predicted for liquid H2S04/HN03/H20 solution droplets using a new Aerosol Physical Chemistry Model (APCM). The agreement corresponds in detail to variations in temperature and humidity. The weight percentages of H2SO4, HN03, and H2O derived from the measurements all correspond to those predicted for ternary, liquid solutions.

  18. Polar front associated variation in prokaryotic community structure in Arctic shelf seafloor

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tan T.; Landfald, Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    Spatial variations in composition of marine microbial communities and its causes have largely been disclosed in studies comprising rather large environmental and spatial differences. In the present study, we explored if a moderate but temporally permanent climatic division within a contiguous arctic shelf seafloor was traceable in the diversity patterns of its bacterial and archaeal communities. Soft bottom sediment samples were collected at 10 geographical locations, spanning spatial distances of up to 640 km, transecting the oceanic polar front in the Barents Sea. The northern sampling sites were generally colder, less saline, shallower, and showed higher concentrations of freshly sedimented phytopigments compared to the southern study locations. Sampling sites depicted low variation in relative abundances of taxa at class level, with persistent numerical dominance by lineages of Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria (57–66% of bacterial sequence reads). The Archaea, which constituted 0.7–1.8% of 16S rRNA gene copy numbers in the sediment, were overwhelmingly (85.8%) affiliated with the Thaumarchaeota. Beta-diversity analyses showed the environmental variations throughout the sampling range to have a stronger impact on the structuring of both the bacterial and archaeal communities than spatial effects. While bacterial communities were significantly influenced by the combined effect of several weakly selective environmental differences, including temperature, archaeal communities appeared to be more uniquely structured by the level of freshly sedimented phytopigments. PMID:25667586

  19. Leveraging scientific credibility about Arctic sea ice trends in a polarized political environment

    PubMed Central

    Hall Jamieson, Kathleen; Hardy, Bruce W.

    2014-01-01

    This work argues that, in a polarized environment, scientists can minimize the likelihood that the audience’s biased processing will lead to rejection of their message if they not only eschew advocacy but also, convey that they are sharers of knowledge faithful to science’s way of knowing and respectful of the audience’s intelligence; the sources on which they rely are well-regarded by both conservatives and liberals; and the message explains how the scientist arrived at the offered conclusion, is conveyed in a visual form that involves the audience in drawing its own conclusions, and capsulizes key inferences in an illustrative analogy. A pilot experiment raises the possibility that such a leveraging–involving–visualizing–analogizing message structure can increase acceptance of the scientific claims about the downward cross-decade trend in Arctic sea ice extent and elicit inferences consistent with the scientific consensus on climate change among conservatives exposed to misleadingly selective data in a partisan news source. PMID:25225380

  20. Relationship between the lunar tidal amplification in the equatorial electrojet and weakening of the northern polar vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan Siddiqui, Tarique; Luehr, Hermann; Stolle, Claudia; Matzka, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    Enhanced lunar tidal effects in the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) during boreal winters have been reported in the form of so-called "big L days" for a long time. Recent studies have suggested a relation between these enhanced lunar tidal observations and stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) events in the northern hemisphere through changes in tidal propagation conditions due to increased planetary wave activity. In this study we have used the horizontal component of the magnetic field recorded at Huancayo, Peru from 1997-2013 to study the relation between the timing and magnitude of the semimonthly lunar tide in the EEJ and the stratospheric polar vortex weakening (PVW). The definition of PVW is used to characterize the individual SSW events, and the intensity of PVW during each winter is estimated by taking into account the stratospheric temperature and wind conditions at polar latitudes. Our results indicate that the semimonthly lunar tide in the EEJ gets enhanced during boreal winters when a significant weakening in the polar vortex occurs and its timing and magnitude is correlated with the timing and intensity of the PVW. Our results suggest that the initiation of the lunar tidal enhancement in most of the cases is closely related to a PVW event. Further, we also discuss the longitudinal differences in lunar tidal enhancements of the EEJ during the SSW years. Finally, we extend the lunar tidal time series by utilizing the recently digitized magnetic recordings from Huancayo. The additional data of Huancayo recordings between 1962-1984 will open new perspectives in investigating long term trends of equatorial electrodynamics.

  1. Space weather monitoring by ground-based means carried out in Polar Geophysical Center at Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzhura, Alexander

    A real-time information on geophysical processes in polar regions is very important for goals of Space Weather monitoring by the ground-based means. The modern communication systems and computer technology makes it possible to collect and process the data from remote sites without significant delays. A new acquisition equipment based on microprocessor modules and reliable in hush climatic conditions was deployed at the Roshydromet networks of geophysical observations in Arctic and is deployed at observatories in Antarctic. A contemporary system for on-line collecting and transmitting the geophysical data from the Arctic and Antarctic stations to AARI has been realized and the Polar Geophysical Center (PGC) arranged at AARI ensures the near-real time processing and analyzing the geophysical information from 11 stations in Arctic and 5 stations in Antarctic. The space weather monitoring by the ground based means is one of the main tasks standing before the Polar Geophysical Center. As studies by Troshichev and Janzhura, [2012] showed, the PC index characterizing the polar cap magnetic activity appeared to be an adequate indicator of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere and the energy that is accumulating in the magnetosphere. A great advantage of the PC index application over other methods based on satellite data is a permanent on-line availability of information about magnetic activity in both northern and southern polar caps. A special procedure agreed between Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) and Space Institute of the Danish Technical University (DTUSpace) ensures calculation of the unified PC index in quasi-real time by magnetic data from the Thule and Vostok stations (see public site: http://pc-index.org). The method for estimation of AL and Dst indices (as indicators of state of the disturbed magnetosphere) based on data on foregoing PC indices has been elaborated and testified in the Polar Geophysical Center. It is

  2. Nitric oxide measurements in the Arctic winter stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, D.W. ); Kawa, S.R. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder ); Chan, K.R. )

    1990-03-01

    Measurements of nitric oxide (NO) from five flights of the NASA ER-2 aircraft during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) are presented. The NO values and vertical gradient near 60{degree}N latitude are similar to previous measurements near 50{degree}N in winter (Ridley et al., 1984; 1987). The NO latitudinal gradient is distinctly negative outside of the polar vortex, approaching zero at the boundary of the vortex, and remaining below the 20 pptv detection limit inside the vortex. The low NO values in the vortex occur at solar zenith angles as low as 82{degree} indicating that NO{sub 2} values in the vortex are also low. Steady state NO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} (NO+NO{sub 2}) are calculated from measured NO, O{sub 3}, and ClO, and modeled photodissociation rates. NO{sub x} outside the vortex shows a negative dependence on latitude and solar zenith angle. The average ratio of NO{sub x} to NO{sub y} (at the same relative latitudes from different flight days) shows a strong latitude gradient with values near 0.08 at 12{degree} equatorward of the vortex edge, decreasing to less than 0.02 at the vortex boundary. Low NO{sub x} and NO{sub x}/NO{sub y} inside and near the vortex boundary may be indications of heterogeneous removal of ClONO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O{sub 5}.

  3. What Controls the Arctic Lower Stratosphere Temperature?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The temperature of the Arctic lower stratosphere is critical for understanding polar ozone levels. As temperatures drop below about 195 K, polar stratospheric clouds form, which then convert HCl and ClONO2 into reactive forms that are catalysts for ozone loss reactions. Hence, the lower stratospheric temperature during the March period is a key parameter for understanding polar ozone losses. The temperature is basically understood to be a result of planetary waves which drive the polar temperature away from a cold "radiative equilibrium" state. This is demonstrated using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis calculations of the heat flux and the mean polar temperature. The temperature during the March period is fundamentally driven by the integrated impact of large scale waves moving from the troposphere to the stratosphere during the January through February period. We will further show that the recent cold years in the northern polar vortex are a result of this weakened wave driving of the stratosphere.

  4. On the influence of polar stratospheric cloud formation on chemical composition during the 1988/89 Arctic winter

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.L.; McKenna, D.S. ); Poole, L.R. ); Solomon, S. )

    1990-03-01

    The northern winter polar vortex is more disturbed dynamically and warmer than the Antarctic equivalent, and correspondingly fewer polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are observed to form. However, the rapid flow of stratospheric air through slow moving synoptically forced PSC regions can result in exposure of both vortical and extra vortical air to PSCs intermittently throughout the winter months. This periodic exposure to PSCs may be sufficient to perturb the chemical composition of large volumes of northern hemisphere air. The synoptic forcing also leads to marked meridional flow which has a profound effect on chemical composition, having major impacts on both short term ozone depletion and the longer term recovery to lower ClOx abundances. Accurate simulation of the air flow is thus essential for the reliable calculation of ozone loss in polar regions.

  5. Long term changes in the polar vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2015-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented.

  6. ArtArctic Science: a polarTREC effort to educate about Antarctica through art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botella, J.; Racette, B.

    2013-12-01

    Formal scientific education is as important as ever for raising awarness about Antarctic issues, but some people resistance to learning about scienctific issues demands novel approaches for reaching people who are not in the classroom. ArtArctic Science is an interactive exhibit of photography and paintings presented at the Overture Center for the Arts, in Madison, WI by Monona Grove High School students and a science teacher that attempts to educate the general audience about Antarctic science. The exhibit explores art as a form of perceiving and understanding the world around us, and as a way of igniting the spark of curiosity that can lead to scientific inquiries. Antarctica has inspired explorers and scientists for over 100 years, and we add our work to efforts that share scientific results with common people. Antarctica offers stunning views of amazing geometric ice structures complemented and contrasted by the organisms that inhabit it that fascinate most everyone. We probe these scenes through photography and paintings knowing that there is more in each image than what the eye can 'see'. We invite the viewer to discover these secrets by engaging the observer in a mimicking of the scientific method (observation, questioning, finding an explanation, revising the explanation). Each art piece has a question and a scientific explanation hidden under a wooden lid. The observer is invited to explore the scene, involve itself with the scientific query, come up with an answer, and compare his or her idea with the hidden explanation. The exhibit is inspired by an Antarctic PolarTREC expedition in which our science teacher participated as a member of a scientific research team. In this presentation we share the knowledge acquired through this experience in hopes that it will help others attempting a similar Project.

  7. Closing the loop - Approaches to monitoring the state of the Arctic Mediterranean during the International Polar Year 2007-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauritzen, C.; Hansen, E.; Andersson, M.; Berx, B.; Beszczynska-Möller, A.; Burud, I.; Christensen, K. H.; Debernard, J.; de Steur, L.; Dodd, P.; Gerland, S.; Godøy, Ø.; Hansen, B.; Hudson, S.; Høydalsvik, F.; Ingvaldsen, R.; Isachsen, P. E.; Kasajima, Y.; Koszalka, I.; Kovacs, K. M.; Køltzow, M.; LaCasce, J.; Lee, C. M.; Lavergne, T.; Lydersen, C.; Nicolaus, M.; Nilsen, F.; Nøst, O. A.; Orvik, K. A.; Reigstad, M.; Schyberg, H.; Seuthe, L.; Skagseth, Ø.; Skarðhamar, J.; Skogseth, R.; Sperrevik, A.; Svensen, C.; Søiland, H.; Teigen, S. H.; Tverberg, V.; Wexels Riser, C.

    2011-07-01

    During the 4th International Polar Year 2007-2009 (IPY), it has become increasingly obvious that we need to prepare for a new era in the Arctic. IPY occurred during the time of the largest retreat of Arctic sea ice since satellite observations started in 1979. This minimum in September sea ice coverage was accompanied by other signs of a changing Arctic, including the unexpectedly rapid transpolar drift of the Tara schooner, a general thinning of Arctic sea ice and a double-dip minimum of the Arctic Oscillation at the end of 2009. Thanks to the lucky timing of the IPY, those recent phenomena are well documented as they have been scrutinized by the international research community, taking advantage of the dedicated observing systems that were deployed during IPY. However, understanding changes in the Arctic System likely requires monitoring over decades, not years. Many IPY projects have contributed to the pilot phase of a future, sustained, observing system for the Arctic. We now know that many of the technical challenges can be overcome. The Norwegian projects iAOOS-Norway, POLEWARD and MEOP were significant ocean monitoring/research contributions during the IPY. A large variety of techniques were used in these programs, ranging from oceanographic cruises to animal-borne platforms, autonomous gliders, helicopter surveys, surface drifters and current meter arrays. Our research approach was interdisciplinary from the outset, merging ocean dynamics, hydrography, biology, sea ice studies, as well as forecasting. The datasets are tremendously rich, and they will surely yield numerous findings in the years to come. Here, we present a status report at the end of the official period for IPY. Highlights of the research include: a quantification of the Meridional Overturning Circulation in the Nordic Seas (“ the loop”) in thermal space, based on a set of up to 15-year-long series of current measurements; a detailed map of the surface circulation as well as

  8. The Temperature of the Arctic and Antarctic Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The temperature of the polar lower stratosphere during spring is the key factor in changing the magnitude of ozone loss in the polar vortices. In this talk, we will review the results of Newman et al. [2000] that quantitatively demonstrate that the polar lower stratospheric temperature is primarily controlled by planetary-scale waves. In particular, the tropospheric eddy heat flux in middle to late winter (January--February) is highly correlated with the mean polar stratospheric temperature during March. Strong midwinter planetary wave forcing leads to a warmer spring Arctic lower stratosphere in early spring, while weak midwinter forcing leads to cooler spring Arctic temperatures. In addition, this planetary wave driving also has a strong impact on the strength of the polar vortex. These results from the Northern Hemisphere will be contrasted with the Southern Hemisphere.

  9. Polar Gateways Arctic Circle Sunrise Conference 2008, Barrow, Alaska: IHY-IPY Outreach on Exploration of Polar and Icy Worlds in The Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, John F.; Kauristie, K.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Sheehan, G. W.; Smith, R. W.; Sandahl, I.; Østgaard, N.; Chernouss, S.; Moore, M. H.; Peticolas, L. M.; Senske, D. A.; Thompson, B. J.; Tamppari, L. K.; Lewis, E. M.

    2008-09-01

    Polar, heliophysical, and planetary science topics related to the International Heliophysical and Polar Years 2007-2009 were addressed during this circumpolar video conference hosted January 23-29, 2008 at the new Barrow Arctic Research Center of the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium in Barrow, Alaska. This conference was planned as an IHY-IPY event science outreach event bringing together scientists and educational specialists for the first week of sunrise at subzero Arctic temperatures in Barrow. Science presentations spanned the solar system from the polar Sun to Earth, Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and the Kuiper Belt. On-site participants experienced look and feel of icy worlds like Europa and Titan by being in the Barrow tundra and sea ice environment and by going "on the ice" during snowmobile expeditions to the near-shore sea ice environment and to Point Barrow, closest geographic point in the U.S. to the North Pole. Many science presentations were made remotely via video conference or teleconference from Sweden, Norway, Russia, Canada, Antarctica, and the United States, spanning up to thirteen time zones (Alaska to Russia) at various times. Extensive educational outreach activities were conducted with the local Barrow and Alaska North Slope communities and through the NASA Digital Learning Network live from the "top of the world" at Barrow. The Sun-Earth Day team from Goddard, and a videographer from the Passport to Knowledge project, carried out extensive educational interviews with many participants and native Inupiaq Eskimo residents of Barrow. Video and podcast recordings of selected interviews are available at http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2008/multimedia/podcasts.php. Excerpts from these and other interviews will be included in a new high definition video documentary called "From the Sun to the Stars: The New Science of Heliophysics" from Passport to Knowledge that will later broadcast on NASA TV and other educational networks. Full conference

  10. Polar Gateways Arctic Circle Sunrise Conference 2008, Barrow, Alaska: IHY-IPY Outreach on Exploration of Polar and Icy Worlds in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Kauristie, Kirsti; Weatherwax, Allan T.; Sheehan, Glenn W.; Smith, Roger W.; Sandahl, Ingrid; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Chernouss, Sergey; Thompson, Barbara J.; Peticolas, Laura; Moore, Marla H.; Senske, David A.; Tamppari, Leslie K.; Lewis, Elaine M.

    2008-01-01

    Polar, heliophysical, and planetary science topics related to the International Heliophysical and Polar Years 2007-2009 were addressed during this circumpolar video conference hosted January 23-29, 2808 at the new Barrow Arctic Research Center of the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium in Barrow, Alaska. This conference was planned as an IHY-IPY event science outreach event bringing together scientists and educational specialists for the first week of sunrise at subzero Arctic temperatures in Barrow. Science presentations spanned the solar system from the polar Sun to Earth, Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and the Kuiper Belt. On-site participants experienced look and feel of icy worlds like Europa and Titan by being in the Barrow tundra and sea ice environment and by going "on the ice" during snowmobile expeditions to the near-shore sea ice environment and to Point Barrow, closest geographic point in the U.S. to the North Pole. Many science presentations were made remotely via video conference or teleconference from Sweden, Norway, Russia, Canada, Antarctica, and the United States, spanning up to thirteen time zones (Alaska to Russia) at various times. Extensive educational outreach activities were conducted with the local Barrow and Alaska North Slope communities and through the NASA Digital Learning Network live from the "top of the world" at Barrow. The Sun- Earth Day team from Goddard, and a videographer from the Passport to Knowledge project, carried out extensive educational interviews with many participants and native Inupiaq Eskimo residents of Barrow. Video and podcast recordings of selected interviews are available at http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2008/multimedidpodcasts.php. Excerpts from these and other interviews will be included in a new high definition video documentary called "From the Sun to the Stars: The New Science of Heliophysics" from Passport to Knowledge that will later broadcast on NASA TV and other educational networks. Full conference

  11. United States Naval Academy Polar Science Program's Visual Arctic Observing Platforms; IceGoat and IceKids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, J. E.; Rigor, I. G.; Valentic, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Naval Academy Oceanography Department currently has a curriculum based Polar Science Program (USNA PSP). Within the PSP there is an Arctic Buoy Program (ABP) student research component that will include the design, build, testing and deployment of Arctic Observing Platforms. Establishing an active, field-research program in Polar Science will greatly enhance Midshipman education and research, as well as introduce future Naval Officers to the Arctic environment. The Oceanography Department has engaged the USNA Engineering Departments, and in close collaboration with SRI International, developed the USNA Visual Arctic Observing Platforms. The experience gained through Polar field studies and data derived from these platforms will be used to enhance course materials and laboratories and will also be used directly in Midshipman independent research projects. The USNA PSP successfully deployed IceGoat1 (IG1) off the USCGC HEALY in September, 2012. IG1 suffered a malfunction to its solar powered webcam system upon deployment, but is still reporting via ARGOS SATCOM systems basic weather parameters of air temperature, pressure, and position. USNA PSP attempted to build a less robust, but more economical system integrating similar low power observing platforms housed in heavy duty coolers. This allowed for a streamlined process to get a complete system completed in one academic year. IceKids (IK) are similar observing platforms, just not designed to float once the sea ice melts. IK1 was deployed to Antarctica from October 2012 through January 2013 and captured over 11,000 web cam images in near real time of two remote environmental monitoring stations. IK2A and IK3T were built to be deployed at the Naval Academy Ice Experiment in Barrow, AK in March 2013. IK2A was unique in trying to collect and transmit underwater acoustic signals in near real time. The system integrated a passive hydrophone into the already developed low power data transport system

  12. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölix, L.; Backman, L.; Kivi, R.; Karpechko, A.

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry climate model simulation covering years 1990-2013 is compared to observations (satellite and frostpoint hygrometer soundings) and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. According to observations and the simulations the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere started to increase after year 2006, but around 2011 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that the increase in water vapour during 2006-2011 (at 56 hPa) is mostly explained by transport related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The water vapour trend in the stratosphere may have contributed to increased ICE PSC occurrence. The increase of water vapour in the precense of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ICE PSCs in the Arctic vortex. The polar vortex was unusually cold in early 2010 and allowed large scale formation of the polar stratospheric clouds. The cold pool in the stratosphere over the Northern polar latitudes was large and stable and a large scale persistent dehydration was observed. Polar stratospheric ice clouds and dehydration were observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT atmospheric sounding campaign. The observed changes in water vapour were reproduced by the model. Both the observed and simulated decrease of the water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  13. Resolution and contrast enhancement of subtractive second harmonic generation microscopy with a circularly polarized vortex beam

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Nian; Fu, Ling; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    We extend the subtractive imaging method to label-free second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to enhance the spatial resolution and contrast. This method is based on the intensity difference between two images obtained with circularly polarized Gaussian and doughnut-shaped beams, respectively. By characterizing the intensity and polarization distributions of the two focused beams, we verify the feasibility of the subtractive imaging method in polarization dependent SHG microscopy. The resolution and contrast enhancement in different biological samples is demonstrated. This work will open a new avenue for the applications of SHG microscopy in biomedical research. PMID:26364733

  14. Chlorine Partitioning in the Arctic Vortex During Winter 1995 Derived From Submillimeterwave Remote Sensing and in Situ Constituent Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stachnik, R. A.; Hardy, J. C.; Engel, A.; Schmidt, U.

    1995-01-01

    High altitude balloon flights of a combined payload of the Submillimeterwave Limb Sounder and the whole air sampler instruments were performed on 27 January 1995 and 08 March 1995. Both flights were launched from sweden as part of the Second European Stratospheric Arctic and Mid-latitude Experiment (SESAME). Results of the first flight suggest that most of the available chlorine had been converted to CLOx in the observed air parcel, while warmer air in the second flight had much more HCl than CLOx.

  15. Impact of Antarctic polar vortex occurrences on total ozone and UVB radiation at southern Argentinean and Antarctic stations during 1997-2003 period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PazmiñO, Andrea F.; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Ginzburg, MáXimo; Bekki, Slimane; Hauchecorne, Alain; Piacentini, RubéN. D.; Quel, Eduardo J.

    2005-02-01

    The evolution of total ozone and surface UV radiation over some stations in the southern region of South America and in Antarctica in relationship with polar vortex occurrences is analyzed using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer total ozone measurements and local surface UV data for the 1997-2003 period. The data are classified as a function of the position of the stations with respect to the polar vortex using equivalent latitude at 550 K isentropic level. The study of vortex occurrences showed that Ushuaia station (54.9°S) was located ˜40% of the cases in the edge of the vortex and 5% inside the vortex core during the winter-spring period. Concerning the Marambio (62.2°S) and Dumont d'Urville (66.4°S) stations, located on the shore of the Antarctic continent, the analysis shows a zonal asymmetry with respect to the center of the vortex. Marambio is located around 60% of the time inside the vortex, while Dumont d'Urville is predominantly at the edge of or outside the vortex. The evolution of the equivalent latitude of the stations in the anomalous 2002 winter presents a different behavior with respect to other years in the 1997-2003 period. The persistence of the vortex core above the stations is in average 1.8 days over Ushuaia and 7.1 days over Marambio in October during the 1997-2003 period with corresponding mean total ozone columns of 208.2 and 181.4 Dobson units, respectively. When the stations are inside the vortex, the total ozone columns are generally larger at Ushuaia than at Marambio in October during the 1997-2003 period. Finally, the impact of ozone-depleted air mass occurrences on ultraviolet radiation is evaluated by relating total ozone and UV erythemal dose measured at the stations. Twofold or threefold UV dose increases were reached in the 55°-65° southern latitude region during vortex overpasses, reaching maximum UV dose around 5 kJ/m2. The average increase of UV dose could be computed at the stations considered in the study when the

  16. The impacts of volcanic aerosol on stratospheric ozone and the Northern Hemisphere polar vortex: separating radiative-dynamical changes from direct effects due to enhanced aerosol heterogeneous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthers, S.; Arfeuille, F.; Raible, C. C.; Rozanov, E.

    2015-10-01

    After major volcanic eruptions the enhanced aerosol causes ozone changes due to greater heterogeneous chemistry on the particle surfaces (HET-AER) and from dynamical effects related to the radiative heating of the lower stratosphere (RAD-DYN). We carry out a series of experiments with an atmosphere-ocean-chemistry-climate model to assess how these two processes change stratospheric ozone and Northern Hemispheric (NH) polar vortex dynamics. Ensemble simulations are performed under present day and preindustrial conditions, and with aerosol forcings representative of different eruption strength, to investigate changes in the response behaviour. We show that the halogen component of the HET-AER effect dominates under present-day conditions with a global reduction of ozone (-21 DU for the strongest eruption) particularly at high latitudes, whereas the HET-AER effect increases stratospheric ozone due to N2O5 hydrolysis in a preindustrial atmosphere (maximum anomalies +4 DU). The halogen-induced ozone changes in the present-day atmosphere offset part of the strengthening of the NH polar vortex during mid-winter (reduction of up to -16 m s-1 in January) and slightly amplify the dynamical changes in the polar stratosphere in late winter (+11 m s-1 in March). The RAD-DYN mechanism leads to positive column ozone anomalies which are reduced in a present-day atmosphere by amplified polar ozone depletion (maximum anomalies +12 and +18 DU for present day and preindustrial, respectively). For preindustrial conditions, the ozone response is consequently dominated by RAD-DYN processes, while under present-day conditions, HET-AER effects dominate. The dynamical response of the stratosphere is dominated by the RAD-DYN mechanism showing an intensification of the NH polar vortex in winter (up to +10 m s-1 in January). Ozone changes due to the RAD-DYN mechanism slightly reduce the response of the polar vortex after the eruption under present-day conditions.

  17. Energetic particle induced intra-seasonal variability of ozone inside the Antarctic polar vortex observed in satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytterer, T.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Nieder, H.; Pérot, K.; Sinnhuber, M.; Stiller, G.; Urban, J.

    2015-03-01

    Measurements from 2002 to 2011 by three independent satellite instruments, namely MIPAS, SABER, and SMR on board the ENVISAT, TIMED, and Odin satellites are used to investigate the intra-seasonal variability of stratospheric and mesospheric O3 volume mixing ratio (vmr) inside the Antarctic polar vortex due to solar and geomagnetic activity. In this study, we individually analysed the relative O3 vmr variations between maximum and minimum conditions of a number of solar and geomagnetic indices (F10.7 cm solar radio flux, Ap index, ≥ 2 MeV electron flux). The indices are 26-day averages centred at 1 April, 1 May, and 1 June while O3 is based on 26-day running means from 1 April to 1 November at altitudes from 20 to 70 km. During solar quiet time from 2005 to 2010, the composite of all three instruments reveals an apparent negative O3 signal associated to the geomagnetic activity (Ap index) around 1 April, on average reaching amplitudes between -5 and -10% of the respective O3 background. The O3 response exceeds the significance level of 95% and propagates downwards throughout the polar winter from the stratopause down to ~ 25 km. These observed results are in good qualitative agreement with the O3 vmr pattern simulated with a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model, which includes particle impact ionisation.

  18. Polar stratospheric clouds in the 1998-2003 Antarctic vortex: Microphysical modeling and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, C. M.; Drdla, K.; Nedoluha, G. E.; Shettle, E. P.; Alfred, J.; Hoppel, K. W.

    2006-09-01

    The Integrated Microphysics and Aerosol Chemistry on Trajectories (IMPACT) model is used to study polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and evolution in the Antarctic vortex. The model is applied to individual air parcel trajectories driven by UK Met Office (UKMO) wind and temperature fields. The IMPACT model calculates the parcel microphysics, including the formation and sedimentation of ice, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT), and supercooled ternary solution (STS) aerosols. Model results are validated by comparison with data obtained by the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III solar occultation instrument and are examined for 6 years of POAM data (1998-2003). Comparisons of POAM water vapor and aerosol extinction measurements to the model results help to constrain three microphysical parameters influencing the formation and growth of both type I and type II PSCs. Principally, measurements of aerosol extinction prove to be valuable in differentiating model runs; the relationship of aerosol extinction to temperature is determined by the various particle types as they form and grow. Comparison of IMPACT calculations of this relationship to POAM measurements suggests that the initial fraction of nuclei available for heterogeneous NAT freezing is approximately 0.02% of all aerosols. Constraints are also placed on the accommodation coefficient of ice and the NAT-ice lattice compatibility. However, these two parameters have similar effects on the extinction-temperature relationship, and thus a range of values are permissible for each.

  19. Persistence of the Lower Stratospheric Polar Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, Darryn W.; Randel, William J.; Pawson, Steven; Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.

    1999-01-01

    The persistence of the Arctic and Antarctic lower stratospheric vortices is examined over the period 1958 to 1998. Three different vortex-following diagnostics (two using potential vorticity and one based solely on the zonal winds) are compared, and shown to give very similar results for the break up date. The variability in the timing of the breakup of each vortex is qualitatively the same: there are large interannual variations together with smaller decadal-scale variations and there is a significant increase in the persistence since the mid-1980s (all variations are larger for the Arctic vortex). Also, in both hemispheres there is a high correlation between the persistence and the strength and coldness of the spring vortex, with all quantities having the same interannual and decadal variability. However, there is no such correlation between the persistence and the characteristics of the mid-winter vortex. In the northern hemisphere there is also a high correlation between the vortex persistence and the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric eddy heat flux averaged over the two months prior to the breakup. This indicates that the variability in the wave activity entering the stratosphere over late-winter to early-spring plays a key role in the variability of the vortex persistence (and spring polar temperatures) on both interannual and decadal time scales. However, the decadal variation in the Arctic vortex coldness and persistence for the 1990's falls outside the range of natural variability, while this is not the case for the eddy heat flux. This suggests that the recent increase in vortex persistence is not due solely to changes in the wave activity entering the stratosphere.

  20. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölix, Laura; Backman, Leif; Kivi, Rigel; Karpechko, Alexey Yu.

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry transport model simulation covering the years 1990-2014 is compared to observations (satellite and frost point hygrometer soundings), and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. In the simulations, the Arctic water vapour shows decadal variability with a magnitude of 0.8 ppm. Both observations and the simulations show an increase in the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere after the year 2006, but around 2012 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that this increase in water vapour is mostly explained by transport-related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The increase in water vapour in the presence of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the Arctic vortex. We perform a case study of ice PSC formation focusing on January 2010 when the polar vortex was unusually cold and allowed large-scale formation of PSCs. At the same time a large-scale persistent dehydration was observed. Ice PSCs and dehydration observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT (Lapland Atmosphere-Biosphere facility) atmospheric measurement campaign were well reproduced by the model. In particular, both the observed and simulated decrease in water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  1. The Martian Dust Chronicle and the Impact on the Atmospheric Polar Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montabone, L.; Forget, F.; Millour, E.; Wilson, R. J.; Mitchell, D.; Thomson, S. I.; Lewis, S. R.; Read, P. L.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the chronicle of the dust distribution from martian year 24 to MY 31, and we analyze the impact of large-scale dust storms on the dynamics of the atmospheric polar vortices, as an example of effect at distance.

  2. Shifting El Niño inhibits summer Arctic warming and Arctic sea-ice melting over the Canada Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chundi; Yang, Song; Wu, Qigang; Li, Zhenning; Chen, Junwen; Deng, Kaiqiang; Zhang, Tuantuan; Zhang, Chengyang

    2016-06-01

    Arctic climate changes include not only changes in trends and mean states but also strong interannual variations in various fields. Although it is known that tropical-extratropical teleconnection is sensitive to changes in flavours of El Niño, whether Arctic climate variability is linked to El Niño, in particular on interannual timescale, remains unclear. Here we demonstrate for the first time a long-range linkage between central Pacific (CP) El Niño and summer Arctic climate. Observations show that the CP warming related to CP El Niño events deepens the tropospheric Arctic polar vortex and strengthens the circumpolar westerly wind, thereby contributing to inhibiting summer Arctic warming and sea-ice melting. Atmospheric model experiments can generally capture the observed responses of Arctic circulation and robust surface cooling to CP El Niño forcing. We suggest that identification of the equator-Arctic teleconnection, via the `atmospheric bridge', can potentially contribute to improving the skill of predicting Arctic climate.

  3. Shifting El Niño inhibits summer Arctic warming and Arctic sea-ice melting over the Canada Basin.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chundi; Yang, Song; Wu, Qigang; Li, Zhenning; Chen, Junwen; Deng, Kaiqiang; Zhang, Tuantuan; Zhang, Chengyang

    2016-01-01

    Arctic climate changes include not only changes in trends and mean states but also strong interannual variations in various fields. Although it is known that tropical-extratropical teleconnection is sensitive to changes in flavours of El Niño, whether Arctic climate variability is linked to El Niño, in particular on interannual timescale, remains unclear. Here we demonstrate for the first time a long-range linkage between central Pacific (CP) El Niño and summer Arctic climate. Observations show that the CP warming related to CP El Niño events deepens the tropospheric Arctic polar vortex and strengthens the circumpolar westerly wind, thereby contributing to inhibiting summer Arctic warming and sea-ice melting. Atmospheric model experiments can generally capture the observed responses of Arctic circulation and robust surface cooling to CP El Niño forcing. We suggest that identification of the equator-Arctic teleconnection, via the 'atmospheric bridge', can potentially contribute to improving the skill of predicting Arctic climate. PMID:27251873

  4. Shifting El Niño inhibits summer Arctic warming and Arctic sea-ice melting over the Canada Basin

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chundi; Yang, Song; Wu, Qigang; Li, Zhenning; Chen, Junwen; Deng, Kaiqiang; Zhang, Tuantuan; Zhang, Chengyang

    2016-01-01

    Arctic climate changes include not only changes in trends and mean states but also strong interannual variations in various fields. Although it is known that tropical-extratropical teleconnection is sensitive to changes in flavours of El Niño, whether Arctic climate variability is linked to El Niño, in particular on interannual timescale, remains unclear. Here we demonstrate for the first time a long-range linkage between central Pacific (CP) El Niño and summer Arctic climate. Observations show that the CP warming related to CP El Niño events deepens the tropospheric Arctic polar vortex and strengthens the circumpolar westerly wind, thereby contributing to inhibiting summer Arctic warming and sea-ice melting. Atmospheric model experiments can generally capture the observed responses of Arctic circulation and robust surface cooling to CP El Niño forcing. We suggest that identification of the equator-Arctic teleconnection, via the ‘atmospheric bridge', can potentially contribute to improving the skill of predicting Arctic climate. PMID:27251873

  5. Arctic Ocean circulation, processes and water masses: A description of observations and ideas with focus on the period prior to the International Polar Year 2007-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudels, Bert

    2015-03-01

    The evolving knowledge of the Arctic Ocean, its hydrography and its water masses and their transformations and circulation is reviewed starting with the observations made on Fram 1893-1896 and extending to the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2009. The expeditions and observations after Fram to the mid 20th century as well as the more extensive and systematic studies of water masses and circulation made from ice stations and airborne expeditions from the late 1940s to the late 1970s are briefly described. The early concepts of the connections and exchanges between the Arctic Ocean and the world ocean are also discussed. In the 1980s scientific icebreakers were beginning to enter the inner parts of the Arctic Ocean and large international programmes were launched, culminating in the IPY. The changes in the Arctic Ocean, first noted in the Atlantic layer in 1990 and shortly after in the upper layers, are described. The exchanges between the Arctic Ocean and the surrounding seas through the four main openings, Fram Strait, Barents Sea, Bering Strait and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago as well the volume and freshwater balances of the Arctic Ocean are examined.

  6. The International Polar Year, 2007-2008, an opportunity to focus on infectious diseases in Arctic regions.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Alan J

    2008-01-01

    On 3 occasions over the past 125 years, scientists from around the world have worked together to organize scientific and exploration activities in polar regions (www.ipy.org). The first International Polar Year (IPY) in 1881-1884 marked the first major coordinated international scientific initiative to collect standardized meteorological and geophysical data in polar regions. Fifteen expeditions led by 12 nations amassed a large amount of data, but the scientific value was diminished by disjointed publication efforts and lack of long-term institutional commitment; lessons were learned and corrected in subsequent polar years. The second IPY began in 1932. Forty-four nations led expeditions in the Arctic and Antarctic, resulting in greater understanding of the aurora, magnetism, and meteorology. Air and marine navigation, radio operations, and weather forecasting were greatly improved as a result. The third IPY, in 1957-58, was renamed the International Geophysical Year and capitalized on technologic advances developed during World War II. Technologic and scientific momentum was redirected toward research, particularly to studies of the upper atmosphere, a legacy that continues to the present day. Notable achievements included launching the first satellite, measurement of atmospheric greenhouse gases, delineating the system of mid-ocean ridges, and confirming the theory of plate tectonics. PMID:18258069

  7. The Earth Is Faster Now: Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change. Frontiers in Polar Social Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krupnik, Igor, Ed.; Jolly, Dyanna, Ed.

    This book focuses on documenting and understanding the nature of environmental changes observed by indigenous residents of the Arctic. Common themes include increasing variability and unpredictability of the weather and seasonal climatic patterns, as well as changes in the sea ice and the health of wildlife. Nine papers focus on these changes,…

  8. High bacterial diversity of biological soil crusts in water tracks over permafrost in the high arctic polar desert.

    PubMed

    Steven, Blaire; Lionard, Marie; Kuske, Cheryl R; Vincent, Warwick F

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report the bacterial diversity of biological soil crusts (biocrusts) inhabiting polar desert soils at the northern land limit of the Arctic polar region (83° 05 N). Employing pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes this study demonstrated that these biocrusts harbor diverse bacterial communities, often as diverse as temperate latitude communities. The effect of wetting pulses on the composition of communities was also determined by collecting samples from soils outside and inside of permafrost water tracks, hill slope flow paths that drain permafrost-affected soils. The intermittent flow regime in the water tracks was correlated with altered relative abundance of phylum level taxonomic bins in the bacterial communities, but the alterations varied between individual sampling sites. Bacteria related to the Cyanobacteria and Acidobacteria demonstrated shifts in relative abundance based on their location either inside or outside of the water tracks. Among cyanobacterial sequences, the proportion of sequences belonging to the family Oscillatoriales consistently increased in relative abundance in the samples from inside the water tracks compared to those outside. Acidobacteria showed responses to wetting pulses in the water tracks, increasing in abundance at one site and decreasing at the other two sites. Subdivision 4 acidobacterial sequences tended to follow the trends in the total Acidobacteria relative abundance, suggesting these organisms were largely responsible for the changes observed in the Acidobacteria. Taken together, these data suggest that the bacterial communities of these high latitude polar biocrusts are diverse but do not show a consensus response to intermittent flow in water tracks over high Arctic permafrost. PMID:23967218

  9. High Bacterial Diversity of Biological Soil Crusts in Water Tracks over Permafrost in the High Arctic Polar Desert

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Steven, Blaire; Lionard, Marie; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2013-08-13

    In this paper we report the bacterial diversity of biological soil crusts (biocrusts) inhabiting polar desert soils at the northern land limit of the Arctic polar region (83° 05 N). Employing pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes this study demonstrated that these biocrusts harbor diverse bacterial communities, often as diverse as temperate latitude communities. The effect of wetting pulses on the composition of communities was also determined by collecting samples from soils outside and inside of permafrost water tracks, hill slope flow paths that drain permafrost-affected soils. The intermittent flow regime in the water tracks was correlated with altered relativemore » abundance of phylum level taxonomic bins in the bacterial communities, but the alterations varied between individual sampling sites. Bacteria related to the Cyanobacteria and Acidobacteria demonstrated shifts in relative abundance based on their location either inside or outside of the water tracks. Among cyanobacterial sequences, the proportion of sequences belonging to the family Oscillatoriales consistently increased in relative abundance in the samples from inside the water tracks compared to those outside. Acidobacteria showed responses to wetting pulses in the water tracks, increasing in abundance at one site and decreasing at the other two sites. Subdivision 4 acidobacterial sequences tended to follow the trends in the total Acidobacteria relative abundance, suggesting these organisms were largely responsible for the changes observed in the Acidobacteria. Finally, taken together, these data suggest that the bacterial communities of these high latitude polar biocrusts are diverse but do not show a consensus response to intermittent flow in water tracks over high Arctic permafrost.« less

  10. High Bacterial Diversity of Biological Soil Crusts in Water Tracks over Permafrost in the High Arctic Polar Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Steven, Blaire; Lionard, Marie; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2013-08-13

    In this paper we report the bacterial diversity of biological soil crusts (biocrusts) inhabiting polar desert soils at the northern land limit of the Arctic polar region (83° 05 N). Employing pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes this study demonstrated that these biocrusts harbor diverse bacterial communities, often as diverse as temperate latitude communities. The effect of wetting pulses on the composition of communities was also determined by collecting samples from soils outside and inside of permafrost water tracks, hill slope flow paths that drain permafrost-affected soils. The intermittent flow regime in the water tracks was correlated with altered relative abundance of phylum level taxonomic bins in the bacterial communities, but the alterations varied between individual sampling sites. Bacteria related to the Cyanobacteria and Acidobacteria demonstrated shifts in relative abundance based on their location either inside or outside of the water tracks. Among cyanobacterial sequences, the proportion of sequences belonging to the family Oscillatoriales consistently increased in relative abundance in the samples from inside the water tracks compared to those outside. Acidobacteria showed responses to wetting pulses in the water tracks, increasing in abundance at one site and decreasing at the other two sites. Subdivision 4 acidobacterial sequences tended to follow the trends in the total Acidobacteria relative abundance, suggesting these organisms were largely responsible for the changes observed in the Acidobacteria. Finally, taken together, these data suggest that the bacterial communities of these high latitude polar biocrusts are diverse but do not show a consensus response to intermittent flow in water tracks over high Arctic permafrost.