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Sample records for area columbus day

  1. 33 CFR 165.779 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. 165.779 Section 165.779 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District 165.779 Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. (a) Regulated area. The regulated navigation area encompasses all waters in Biscayne Bay...

  2. 33 CFR 165.779 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...′01″ W; thence back to origin. All coordinates are North American Datum 1983. (b) Definition. The term... the Saturday before Columbus Day, through 2:00 a.m. on Monday (the Columbus Day holiday). Columbus Day is the federally recognized holiday occurring annually on the second Monday in October. Eighth...

  3. 33 CFR 165.779 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...′01″ W; thence back to origin. All coordinates are North American Datum 1983. (b) Definition. The term... the Saturday before Columbus Day, through 2:00 a.m. on Monday (the Columbus Day holiday). Columbus Day is the federally recognized holiday occurring annually on the second Monday in October. Eighth...

  4. 75 FR 63693 - Columbus Day, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-26219 Filed 10-14-10; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8584 of October 8, 2010 Columbus Day, 2010 By the President of the United... ``Columbus Day.'' NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do...

  5. 78 FR 62337 - Columbus Day, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-18

    ... hundred and thirty- eighth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-24525 Filed 10-17-13; 8:45 am] Billing code... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9041 of October 11, 2013 Columbus Day, 2013 By the President of the United... requested the President proclaim the second Monday of October of each year as ``Columbus Day.''...

  6. 77 FR 62135 - Columbus Day, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-25229 Filed 10-11-12; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8882 of October 5, 2012 Columbus Day, 2012 By the President of the United... fateful October day in 1492, countless pioneering Americans have summoned the same spirit of...

  7. 76 FR 63809 - Columbus Day, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... thirty-sixth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-26727 Filed 10-12-11; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8735 of October 7, 2011 Columbus Day, 2011 By the President of the United... in the Western hemisphere for tens of thousands of years. On this day, we also remember the...

  8. 77 FR 43554 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public Participation and Request for... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... complying with all other Federal, state, and local laws in the area, including manatee slow speed zones....

  9. 76 FR 24837 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... Guard proposes to establish a permanent regulated navigation area (RNA) on Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida. The RNA would be enforced annually on the Saturday and Sunday of the second week in...

  10. 76 FR 49301 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... (NPRM) entitled USCG-2011-0044 in the Federal Register (76 FR 24837). We received no comments on the... establishing a permanent regulated navigation area (RNA) on Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida. The RNA will be... Bank and the Rickenbacker Causeway Bridge. All vessels within the RNA are: required to transit the...

  11. 33 CFR 100.729 - Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. (a) Regulated area. A regulated area is established for the Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, Florida. The regulated area encompasses all waters within the following... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Columbus Day Regatta,...

  12. 33 CFR 100.729 - Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. (a) Regulated area. A regulated area is established for the Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, Florida. The regulated area encompasses all waters within the following... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Columbus Day Regatta,...

  13. 33 CFR 100.729 - Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. 100.729 Section 100.729 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.729 Columbus...

  14. 33 CFR 100.729 - Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. 100.729 Section 100.729 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.729 Columbus...

  15. Electrical-analog-model study of water resources of the Columbus area, Bartholomew County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watkins, Frank A.; Heisel, J.E.

    1970-01-01

    The Columbus study area is in part of a glacial outwash sand and gravel aquifer that was deposited in a preglacial bedrock valley. The study area extends from the north line of Bartholomew County to the south county line and includes a small part of Jackson County south of Sand Creek and east of the East Fork White River. This report area includes about 100 square miles of the aquifer. In the Columbus area, ground water in the outwash aquifer is unconfined. Results of pumping tests and estimates derived from specific-capacity data indicate that the average horizontal permeability for this aquifer is about 3,500 gallons per day per square foot. An average coefficient of storage of about 0.2 was determined from pumping tests. Transmissibilities range from near zero in some places along the boundary to about 500,000 gallons per day per foot in the thicker parts of the aquifer. About 800,000 acre-feet of water is in storage in the aquifer. This storage is equivalent to an average yield of 34 million gallons per day for about 21 years without recharge. An electrical-analog model was built to analyze the aquifer system and determine the effects of development. Analysis of the model indicates that there is more than enough water to meet the estimated needs of the city of Columbus without seriously depleting the aquifer. Additional withdrawals will affect the flow in the Flatrock River, but if the withdrawals are made south of the city, they will not affect the river any more than present pumping. Future pumping should be confined to the deepest part of the outwash aquifer and (or) to the area adjacent to the streams. On the basis of an hypothesized amount and distribution of pumping, the decline in water levels in the Columbus area as predicted by the model for the period 1970-2015 ranged from about 20 feet in the center of the areas of pumping to 3 feet or less in the areas upstream and downstream from these areas of pumping.

  16. 3 CFR 8735 - Proclamation 8735 of October 7, 2011. Columbus Day, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12, 1492, Christopher Columbus and his crewmembers sighted land after an ambitious voyage across the... our Nation’s earliest settlers and Founders. Born in Genoa, Italy, Christopher Columbus was the first... American experience. The excitement Christopher Columbus and his crewmembers experienced that...

  17. 76 FR 318 - Designation for the Columbus, OH; Dallas, TX; and Decatur, IN Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ...)). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the May 25, 2010, Federal Register (75 FR 29310), GIPSA requested applications for... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Designation for the Columbus, OH; Dallas, TX; and Decatur, IN Areas AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration, USDA....

  18. 75 FR 29722 - Foreign-Trade Zone 138-Columbus, OH Area; Site Renumbering Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 138--Columbus, OH Area; Site Renumbering Notice Foreign-Trade Zone 138 was approved by the Foreign-Trade Zones Board on March 13, 1987 (Board Order 351), expanded on..., contact Claudia Hausler at Claudia.Hausler@trade.gov or (202) 482-1379. Dated: May 18, 2010. Andrew...

  19. Structural Data for the Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    SciTech Connect

    Faulds, James E.

    2011-12-31

    Shapefiles and spreadsheets of structural data, including attitudes of faults and strata and slip orientations of faults. - Detailed geologic mapping of ~30 km2 was completed in the vicinity of the Columbus Marsh geothermal field to obtain critical structural data that would elucidate the structural controls of this field. - Documenting E‐ to ENE‐striking left lateral faults and N‐ to NNE‐striking normal faults. - Some faults cut Quaternary basalts. - This field appears to occupy a displacement transfer zone near the eastern end of a system of left‐lateral faults. ENE‐striking sinistral faults diffuse into a system of N‐ to NNE‐striking normal faults within the displacement transfer zone. - Columbus Marsh therefore corresponds to an area of enhanced extension and contains a nexus of fault intersections, both conducive for geothermal activity.

  20. 3 CFR 8882 - Proclamation 8882 of October 5, 2012. Columbus Day, 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., let us commemorate the many contributions they have made to the American experience, and let us..., countless pioneering Americans have summoned the same spirit of discovery that drove Christopher Columbus... contributions that generations of Italian Americans have made to our country. Throughout 2013, Italy will...

  1. 3 CFR 8584 - Proclamation 8584 of October 8, 2010. Columbus Day, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... centuries ago, Christopher Columbus set sail across the Atlantic Ocean in search of a new trade route to... continent. His epic quest into the unknown may not have revealed the new trade route he sought, but it exposed the boundless potential of a new frontier. It is this intrepid character and spirit of...

  2. Estimation of the recharge areas contributing water to the south well field, Columbus, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, C.W.; Schalk

    1996-01-01

    The city of Columbus, Ohio, operates four radial collector wells, designed to yield 42 Mgal/d (million gallons per day), in southern Franklin County, Ohio, as part of their municipal supply of water. The collector wells are adjacent to, and designed to induce infiltration from, Big Walnut Creek and Scioto River. A previously constructed, three-dimensional, steady-state and transient ground-water-flow model of this river-aquifer system was used to estimate contributing recharge areas (CRA's) and calculate particle flowpaths in southern Franklin County. The simulations were of two steady-state periods (October 1979 and March 1986) and one 5-year transient period (March 1986---June 1991). The first simulation (1979) was of conditions before construction of the collector wells. The second simulation (1986) was of conditions when the collector wells were producing 8 Mgal/d. During the 5 years covered in the transient simulation, production at the well field averaged 18.5 Mgal/d. Under the 1979 conditions, the largest ground-water contributing areas were of the quarries and Scioto River (41 and 47 percent of the study area, respectively). During 1986, when 8 Mgal/d was withdrawn, the primary contributing areas were of the quarries (40 percent), collector wells (34 percent), and rivers (8 percent). Travel times associated with simulated particles of water tracked from cells along Big Walnut Creek to their discharge points in cells along Scioto River were about 5 to 60 years in the 1979 simulation and about 7 to 41 years in the 1986 simulation. The endpoints of these particles varied as simulated pumping rates were increased to 22 Mgal/d. The 1986, 10-year CRA's of the collector wells under 8 Mgal/d-conditions totalled about 4.5 mi2. As the pumping rate was increased to 22 Mgal/d in a predictive simulation, 10-year CRA's of the collector wells increased to 6.7mi2. Because the transient simulation encompassed only 5 years, the 10-year CRA's could not be estimated from the transient simulation. However, the size of the 1- to 5-year CRA's for the transient simulation was similar to the size of the 1- to 5-year CRA's for a steady-state predictive simulation if well-field production were 16 Mgal/d. The transient simulations predicted discontinuous CRA's, especially adjacent to the rivers, due to changes in hydrologic stresses. Analyses of the steady-state and transient models showed that sizes of CRA's were most sensitive to changes in porosity, pumping rate, riverbed conductance, and horizontal hydraulic conductivity.

  3. 75 FR 29310 - Opportunity for Designation in the Columbus, OH; Dallas, TX; and Decatur, IN Areas; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Opportunity for Designation in the Columbus, OH... AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration, USDA. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... services provided by the following designated agencies: Columbus Grain Inspection, Inc. (Columbus);...

  4. Columbus Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Karen D.

    1992-01-01

    Offers a list of books for teachers and children about Christopher Columbus and the consequences of 1492. Suggests that teachers need to relearn the Columbus story to avoid the myths and biased texts of the past. Includes the American Indian perspective of the discoveries, original materials, and biological and cultural consequences. (DK)

  5. ISS: Columbus.

    PubMed

    Thirkettle, A; Patti, B; Mitschdoerfer, P; Kledzik, R; Gargioli, E; Brondolo, D

    2002-02-01

    In 2001, a total of 13 assembly and logistic flights to the ISS were made, using both Russian launchers and the Space Shuttle, including flights of the first European astronauts, payloads and Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs). Several US, Russian and Canadian elements have already been assembled in orbit and the fourth Expedition Crew is currently onboard. The cornerstone of ESA's contribution to this enormous international undertaking in space is the Columbus laboratory. On 27 September 2001, the Columbus flight unit arrived at the premises of ESA's industrial prime contractor Astrium in Bremen, Germany. Final integration of the module is now nearly complete and functional qualification and acceptance testing is about to start. This article summarises the characteristics and functional architecture of Columbus, its development, integration and test approach, as well as today's qualification status. PMID:14513818

  6. Columbus pressurized module verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messidoro, Piero; Comandatore, Emanuele

    1986-01-01

    The baseline verification approach of the COLUMBUS Pressurized Module was defined during the A and B1 project phases. Peculiarities of the verification program are the testing requirements derived from the permanent manned presence in space. The model philosophy and the test program have been developed in line with the overall verification concept. Such critical areas as meteoroid protections, heat pipe radiators and module seals are identified and tested. Verification problem areas are identified and recommendations for the next development are proposed.

  7. Discovering Columbus: Classroom Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulden, Rick

    1992-01-01

    Presents learning activities concerning Christopher Columbus and his voyages. Includes lessons requiring students to (1) write a pledge of allegiance to the world; (2) examine the Americas before Columbus; (3) prepare a newscast on Columbus' arrival in the Americas; (4) imagine being a Native American encountering Columbus; and (5) explore what…

  8. 68. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS MAP OF COLUMBUS ca. 1875 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS MAP OF COLUMBUS ca. 1875 BIRD'S EYE VIEW OF COLUMBUS MISSISSIPPI by Camille Drie ca. 1875. Copy of snapshot in Lowndes Co. Public Library, Columbus, Ms. Snow status in early 1870s: includes M&O RR bridge, but no highway bridge. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms., Sept 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  9. From Columbus to Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morain, Stanley A.

    On the eve of Christopher Columbus's historic voyage to the New World, the international community of remote sensing and mapping sciences is poised to lead a new, environmentally conscious world into the 21st century. Developments in remote sensing and GIS technology during the past 25 years have paved the way for a modern round of earth exploration that could well equal in lasting importance the geographic achievement of Columbus, 500 years ago. Human experience has evolved from land-lubbing to sea-faring, air-faring and now space-faring so that in future all four modes will be used to enhacce our understanding of earth systems. Columbus "dead reckoned" his place into history by sailing the southern arm of the Atlantic Gyre westward to the Bahamas. For reasons beyond his knowledge, he was "lost" almost from the moment he departed; and to this day, his landfall is placed at several islands between Grand Turk at latitude 21.5°N and San Salvador at 24°N. His headings, nautical speeds, and drift are all subjects of controversy. Today, with global positioning systems, scientists and entrepreneurs can triangulate with considerable accuracy almost any point on the earth's surface, day or night; and, with a fourth satellite, can determine elevation. The same satellite constellation can monitor the speeds and headings of land, sea, and air transportation carriers for the benefit of all international commerce - a knowledge that would have been the envy of Spain's Admiral of the Ocean Seas throughout his search for spices, souls, and gold. We can only imagine what he and his captains might have given for a nightly satellite weather report, let alone images by which to navigate.

  10. 77 FR 62437 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) entitled USCG-2012-0191 in the Federal Register (73 FR 2012... had a significant concentration of persons and vessels on the waters of Biscayne Bay. To ensure...

  11. Distribution and variability of fecal-indicator bacteria in Scioto and Olentangy rivers in the Columbus, Ohio, area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, D.N.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Columbus, Ohio, to determine the distribution and variability of fecal-indicator bacteria in Scioto and Olentangy Rivers. Fecal-indicator bacteria are among the contaminants of concern to recreational users of these rivers in the Columbus area. Samples were collected to be analyzed for fecal-coliform and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria and selected water-quality constituents and physical properties at 10 sites-- 4 on the Olentangy River and 6 on the Scioto River during the recreational seasons in 1987, 1988, and 1989. Measurements of streamflow also were made at these sites at various frequencies during base flow and runoff. The concentrations of fecal-coliform and E. coli bacteria in the Scioto and Olentangy Rivers spanned a range of five orders of magnitude, from less than 20 to greater than 2,000,000 col/100 mL (colonies per 100 milliliters). In addition, the concentrations of fecal coliform and E. coli bacteria are well correlated (r=0.97) in the study area. At times, relatively high concentrations, for fecal-indicator bacteria (concentrations greater than 51,000 col/100 mL for fecal-coliform and E. coli ) were found in Olentangy River at Woody Hayes Drive and at Goodale Street, and in Scioto River at Greenlawn Avenue and at Columbus. Intermediate concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria (from 5,100 to 50,000 col/100 mL for fecal coliform and (from 510 to 50,000 col/100 mL for E. coli ) were found in Scioto River at Town Street and below O'Shaughnessy Dam near Dublin, Ohio, and in Olentangy River at Henderson Road. The lowest (median) concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria (from 20 to 5,000 col/100 mL for fecal coliform and from 20 to 500 col/100 mL for E. coli ) were found at Olentangy River near Worthington, Ohio, Scioto River at Dublin Road Water Treatment Plant and below Griggs Reservoir. Fecal-coliform concentrations exceeded the geometric mean and single-sample Ohio Water Quality Standards for recreation less frequently than E. coli concentrations. The E. coli numerical water-quality standards are more difficult to meet than the fecal coliform standards because they are as much as an order of magnitude lower in some instances. The geometric mean bathing-water and primary-contact standards for fecal-coliform and E. coli bacteria were exceeded in more samples for Olentangy River at Goodale Street than for any other site. The single-sample bathing-water standard for fecal-coliform bacteria was exceeded in 83 percent of all samples and for E. coli in 91 percent of samples for Olentangy River at Goodale Street. Compared to Olentangy River at Goodale Street, geometric means and single-samples exceeded the bathing-water standards somewhat less frequently for Scioto River at Town Street and far less frequently for Scioto River at Dublin Road Water Treatment Plant. In contrast to results for fecal-indicator bacteria, the differences between sites for pH and for concentrations for total alkalinity, total chloride, total nonfilterable residue, total nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen, total phosphorus, and total organic carbon were small. The large contribution of streamflow and discharge of fecal-indicator bacteria from Olentangy River to Scioto River has a major effect on the Scioto River downstream from the confluence of Olentangy River during periods of rainfall and runoff. Fecal-indicator discharges were calculated for times before, during, and at 24-hour intervals for 48 to 72 hours after two runoff-producing storms. Fecal-coliform and E. coli concentrations were lower in samples collected before runoff and during receding streamflows at 24- to 48-hours after the storms than in samples collected during runoff. The fecal-indicator discharges entering Scioto River from Olentangy River ranged from 22.6 to nearly 100 percent of the total for two storms studied. Controlling nonpoint, unregulated,

  12. How Columbus Encountered America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickey, V. Frederick

    1992-01-01

    Discusses aspects of Christopher Columbus' decision to sail west in order to reach Asia. Includes discussions concerning the shape and size of the earth as determined up to Columbus' time and conclusions he made during the journey based on his calculations. (MDH)

  13. Meteorological Implications of the First Voyage of Christopher Columbus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerveny, Randall S.; Hobgood, Jay S.

    1992-02-01

    The log of the first voyage of Christopher Columbus to the New World provides valuable information on the meteorological conditions of September 1492. Comparison and analysis of the descriptive accounts of weather made by Columbus and his pilots to other available Columbian and modern data leads to two distinct perspectives on the Columbian voyage: an examination of the frequency of "calm" events, and an analysis of the lack of tropical storm activity. The major conclusions of the first portion of the study include: 1) The Columbian pilots' descriptions of "cairns" related to travel slower than travel occurring during other portions of the voyage. That rate of travel compares favorably to calm winds and an oceanic current of 0.4 knots, a value close to modern-day values; 2) The frequency of "calm" events experienced by Christopher Columbus in 1492 is significantly higher than the most liberal estimates of calms in the North Atlantic over the last 100 years; and 3) The locations of the Columbian calms are generally in the same region currently experiencing the highest frequency of calms. The main finding of the second portion of the study is that, based on historical hurricane records from 1886 to 1989, the center of a hurricane would have passed within 100 km of Columbus only once in the past 104 years. Inclusion of tropical storms increases this number to four out of 104 years. Therefore, while Columbus may indeed have been fortunate to have avoided severe weather during his voyage, the odds decidedly were in his favor. This Columbian "weather luck" was due to a combination of 1) encountering abnormally strong anticyclonic flow over the eastern North Atlantic, 2) starting late enough in the hurricane season to significantly decrease the probability of experiencing a hurricane, and 3) taking a north and easterly voyage, thereby avoiding the area of maximum hurricane occurrence.

  14. Columbus ships at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    On the 500th arniversary of Christopher Columbus' discovery of the New World, replicas of his three ships sailed past the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) while the space shuttle Columbia sat poised for lift off.

  15. Searching for Columbus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of books on Christopher Columbus for elementary school students. The list of 49 books includes grade level information and a brief description of the contents. Out-of-print material is included. (SLD)

  16. Columbus, Ohio's RDF experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, H.A. )

    1988-01-01

    This is a presentation on the Columbus, Ohio Trash Burning Power Plant from its original design assumptions and considerations to its start-up and operation. Problems associated with an infant technology and subsequent modifications to make it one of the most successful operations are today discussed in non-technical detail. By the end of 1987, the Columbus plant successfully disposed of its 1,600,00th ton of trash following its start-up in December 1983.

  17. Trash will fuel new Columbus plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Columbus, Ohio is building a refuse- and coal-fired 90-MW municipal electric plant that will burn 3000 tons of refuse a day. The plant will burn 80% trash and 20% low-sulfur coal (with the option of burning either all coal or all trash) because the 80-20 ratio offers the best balance between boiler corrosion and efficiency. A general obligation bond sale rather than federal or state financing is possible because of the city's good bond rating. The plant will include a fine-shredder, waste treatment facility, and a coal storage area. Pollution control will be handled by six oversized electrostatic precipitators, six mechanical dust collectors, and three 275-foot stacks. (DCK)

  18. Area Conceptions Sprout on Earth Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickstrom, Megan H.; Nelson, Julie; Chumbley, Jean

    2015-01-01

    With the adoption of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) (CCSSI 2010), many concepts related to area are covered in third grade: (1) Recognizing area as an attribute of a plane figure; (2) Understanding that a square with a side length of one is a unit square; (3) Measuring area by tiling figures and counting the squares it

  19. Area Conceptions Sprout on Earth Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickstrom, Megan H.; Nelson, Julie; Chumbley, Jean

    2015-01-01

    With the adoption of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) (CCSSI 2010), many concepts related to area are covered in third grade: (1) Recognizing area as an attribute of a plane figure; (2) Understanding that a square with a side length of one is a unit square; (3) Measuring area by tiling figures and counting the squares it…

  20. Activity Book. Columbus: 500 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This activity book for teachers and students presents ideas for lessons on Christopher Columbus. Three sections offer teaching ideas and student activities focusing on Columbus's inspiration and preparation for departure, the science of navigation and the voyage, and the pros and cons of changes brought about by Columbus's voyage. (SM)

  1. Columbus and Ecological Imperialism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Alfred W.

    Christopher Columbus crossed the Atlantic in 1492 and opened a period of extensive exchange between the Old and New Worlds. His greatest impact on the New World has been the one to which the least attention has been paid: his biological impact. For millions of years the biotas of the Old and New Worlds developed independently, divergently. The…

  2. Columbus and Ecological Imperialism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Alfred W.

    1992-01-01

    Observes that Native Americans have been replaced almost entirely in North America by the descendants of European immigrants. Discusses the differing ecological histories of Europe and the Americas. Identifies some of the plants, animals, and pathogens that were exchanged between Europe and the Americas as a result of Columbus' and other…

  3. Columbus and Ecological Imperialism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Alfred W.

    Christopher Columbus crossed the Atlantic in 1492 and opened a period of extensive exchange between the Old and New Worlds. His greatest impact on the New World has been the one to which the least attention has been paid: his biological impact. For millions of years the biotas of the Old and New Worlds developed independently, divergently. The

  4. How Columbus Did It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saveland, Robert N.; DeVorsey, Louis, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson in which history, science, and mathematics combine to contribute to an understanding of one of the five fundamental themes of geography: location. Discusses the maps and navigational equipment available at the time of Christopher Columbus. Describes timekeeping, recording speed, and determining latitude and longitude during a…

  5. Columbus safety and reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhurst, F.; Wessels, H.

    1988-10-01

    Analyses carried out to ensure Columbus reliability, availability, and maintainability, and operational and design safety are summarized. Failure modes/effects/criticality is the main qualitative tool used. The main aspects studied are fault tolerance, hazard consequence control, risk minimization, human error effects, restorability, and safe-life design.

  6. Columbus Closure Project Released without Radiological Restrictions

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, G.

    2007-07-01

    The Columbus Closure Project (CCP), a historic radiological research complex, was cleaned up for future use without radiological restriction in 2006. The CCP research and development site contributed to national defense, nuclear fuel fabrication, and the development of safe nuclear reactors in the United States until 1988 when research activities were concluded for site decommissioning. In November of 2003, the Ohio Field Office of the U.S. Department of Energy contracted ECC/E2 Closure Services, LLC (Closure Services) to complete the removal of radioactive contamination from of a 1955 era nuclear sciences area consisting of a large hot cell facility, research reactor building and underground piping. The project known as the Columbus Closure Project (CCP) was completed in 27 months and brought to a close 16 years of D and D in Columbus, Ohio. This paper examines the project innovations and challenges presented during the Columbus Closure Project. The examination of the CCP includes the project regulatory environment, the CS safety program, accelerated clean up innovation, project execution strategies and management of project waste issues and the regulatory approach to site release 'without radiological restrictions'. (authors)

  7. The Columbus Quincentennial: A Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bill, Willard, Comp.; And Others

    This document provides interpretive and bibliographical information concerning Christopher Columbus and his voyages to the New World. Following a preface, Part A of the sourcebook presents four authors'"Introductory Perspectives" on the meaning of Columbus' contacts with the Americas. Part B consists of resources on: (1) "Europe and the Americas…

  8. A Geologic Guide to the Cooper Furnace Day Use Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crews, Patty

    1991-01-01

    This article describes the day use area adjoining the Allatoona Dam on the Etowah River north of Atlanta and the geology of the three physiographic provinces which converge there. Included are a generalized geologic map of the area and maps of the visitor center, picnic areas, the abandoned pig iron furnace, the scenic overlooks, and the…

  9. Discovering Columbus: Rereading the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Bill

    1989-01-01

    Presents a series of lessons for a U.S. history class on Christopher Columbus's "discovery" of America. Notes that this approach teaches students to evaluate critically the historical information presented in their textbooks. (MM)

  10. Sun Heats, Cools Columbus Tech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Solar energy heats and cools the newest building on the campus of Columbus Technical Institute in Ohio. A solar demonstration project grant from the Department of Energy covered about 77 percent of the solar cost. (Author/MLF)

  11. 50. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of St. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of St. S., Columbus, Ms. Side view of fixed truss span, from S. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  12. 75 FR 64966 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Columbus, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ...This action proposes to amend Class E airspace in the Columbus, OH area. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) at Port Columbus International Airport. The FAA is taking this action to enhance the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) operations at the...

  13. 40. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS OLD ROAD BRIDGE End of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS OLD ROAD BRIDGE End of Main St., Columbus 'Aerial' view of 1878 bridge during flood. Taken from water tower in Columbus. Credit: Shenks Photography, Columbus, Ms, owner. O. Pruitt, photographer, Apr 1892. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  14. Columbus: To Mars with solar-electric propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James A.; Wallace, Ricky A.

    1994-03-01

    A design for a human trip to Mars using solar-electric propulsion is proposed. The Columbus vehicle features a solar array divided into three identical parts. Each part carries cargo to a rendezvous point. Because each part carries a different cargo mass, they can be launched from the low-Earth-orbit assembly point at different times and all arrive at the rendezvous point at the same time. The Columbus provides for a crew of six to travel to Mars on a 1000-day conjunction-class mission. Designing a 3-part solar array reduces the requirements of the node and the problems caused by the Earth spiral time.

  15. What Was Columbus Thinking? [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    Christopher Columbus remains one of the most studied yet the least known of major historical figures. In this lesson, students read excerpts from Columbus's letters and journals, as well as recent considerations of his achievements so that they can reflect on the motivations behind Columbus's explorations, his reactions to what he found, and the…

  16. The Textbook Columbus: Examining the Myth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Carla R.; Phillips, William D., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Surveys U.S. historiography dealing with Christopher Columbus from the eighteenth century to the present. Traces the changes in interpretation, treating Columbus as a hero, a victim, a visionary, a genius, and a mariner. Discusses past textbook treatments of Columbus and the portrayal of minorities in descriptions of his expeditions. (DK)

  17. Italian Students' Views of Christopher Columbus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aucoin, Linda; Cangemi, JoAnn

    1992-01-01

    Describes a project where students in an Italian elementary school wrote letters about Columbus and his contributions. Finds that these students have not lost their view of Columbus as a great hero. Includes a list of organizations and resources for teaching about Italy and Columbus. (CFR)

  18. Selective Forgetfulness: Christopher Columbus Reconsidered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meltzer, Milton

    1992-01-01

    Reconsiders myths about Christopher Columbus. Discusses the importance of presenting students history in all its complexity. Suggests that students must see that the people who have occupied center stage at crucial moments are not without weakness and fears. Urges students to raise critical questions concerning historical figures. (MG)

  19. Columbus 500: History's Other Voice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yolen, Jane

    1992-01-01

    A children's book author explains why she chose to write "Encounter," an accurate story of Christopher Columbus's first meeting with the gentle Taino tribe 500 years ago. The article presents suggestions for using "Encounter" as a springboard for activities to help elementary students interpret history. (SM)

  20. Columbus 500: Sail with Columbus. A Teacher's Guide to Columbus's Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laufer, Joseph M.

    1992-01-01

    This teaching guide provides across-the-curriculum hands-on activities, reproducibles, and resources for elementary teachers and students. The material teaches about Columbus's journey with sensitivity and respect for different points of view, offering opportunities to teach basic skills and lessons on how to interpret history. (SM)

  1. 37. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS BRIDGE, CONSTRUCTION End of Main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS BRIDGE, CONSTRUCTION End of Main St., Columbus Overhead view of round, swing pier, showing steel reinforcing rods, workmen. During construction, 1925-27. Credit: Shenks Photography, Columbus, Ms, owner. O. Pruitt, photographer, ca. 1926. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  2. 41. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS OLD ROAD BRIDGE End of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS OLD ROAD BRIDGE End of Main St., Columbus View of iron truss bridge, 1878-1928, from NW bank. Shows details of web members, and piers. Credit: Shenks Photography, Columbus, Ms, owner. O. Pruitt, photographer, early 1900s. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  3. 36. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS Tombigbee R. NEW & OLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS Tombigbee R. NEW & OLD HIGHWAY BRIDGES End of Main St., Columbus Photo, 1927-28, after new bridge (foreground) was completed. From SW bank. Credit: Shenks Photography, Columbus, Ms. owner. O. Pruitt, photographer, ca. 1928. Copied by Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  4. 33. BRIDGE, CONSTRUCTION MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS End of Main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BRIDGE, CONSTRUCTION MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS End of Main St., Columbus Center and east pier, with framing, makes panorama with preceding photo. Date: 1925-27. Credit: Shenks Photographi, Columbus, Ms. owner. O. Pruitt, photographer, ca. 1926 Copied by Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  5. 32. BRIDGE, CONSTRUCTION Tombigbee R. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS End ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. BRIDGE, CONSTRUCTION Tombigbee R. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS End of Main St., Columbus Center and east pier, with framing, during construction, 1925-27. Makes panorama with next photo. Note steam crane on framing. Credit: Shenks Photography, Columbus, MS, owner. O. Pruitt, photographer. Copied by Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  6. 34. BRIDGE, CONSTRUCTION MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS End of Main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. BRIDGE, CONSTRUCTION MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS End of Main St., Columbus Date: 1925-27. Old bridge in background. Photo taken from such (probably east) bank. Credit: Shenks Photography, Columbus, Ms, owner. O. Pruitt, photographer, ca. 1927. Copied by Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  7. 39. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS OLD ROAD BRIDGE End of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS OLD ROAD BRIDGE End of Main St., Columbus Both spans of 1878 bridge during flood. Taken from top of the E approach. Credit: Shenks Photography, Columbus, Ms, owner. O. Pruitt, photographer, Apr. 8 1882. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  8. 35. BRIDGE, CONSTRUCTION MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS End of Main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. BRIDGE, CONSTRUCTION MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS End of Main St., Columbus Bridge under construction, 1925-27. Photo from S side of W approach. Credit: Shenks Photography, Columbus, Ms, owner. O. Pruitt, photographer, ca. 1927. Copied by Sarcone Photography, columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  9. Once upon a Genocide: Christopher Columbus in Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, William

    1992-01-01

    Reviews several children's biographies of Columbus and challenges the image of Columbus portrayed in these books. Calls upon educators to be more critical when having elementary school students read about Columbus. (MG)

  10. The Columbus Myth: Power and Ideology in Picturebooks about Christopher Columbus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desai, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    In 1992, the 500th anniversary of Columbus's landing in the Bahamas was simultaneously celebrated and denounced in the US. Damaging facts about Columbus and the impact of his voyages were aired along with demands for truth and change. This study analyzes the power relationships and political ideology of picturebooks about Columbus published…

  11. The Two Authors of Columbus' Diary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irizarry, Estelle

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that computer analysis makes it possible to assess the intervention of a second "author" in Christopher Columbus's famous "Diary." Concludes that computer analysis makes it possible to examine Columbus's verbatim testimony and identify ways that Bartoleme de Las Casas intervened. (CFR)

  12. History on Trial: The Case of Columbus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Como, Robert M.; O' Connor, John S.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the experiences of one high school class as they attempted to sort out the conflicting representations of Christopher Columbus. The students examined several textbooks and other histories. They then conducted a mock trial to determine if Columbus should be considered a criminal, a hero, or both. (MJP)

  13. Introduction: Teaching about the Voyages of Columbus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, John J.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the historical and ecological significance of Christopher Columbus' contacts with the Americas. Suggests that 1992's Columbian quincentennial can be an occasion for improving teaching about Columbus. Underscores teachers' responsibility to provide a multidimensional view of the explorer's times. Cites the need to balance teaching about…

  14. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Teaching Christopher Columbus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enedy, Joseph D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Contends that instruction in schools from elementary through university levels is a seamless web in which numerous elements of subjects converge with elements from other subjects. Asserts that a variety of disciplines can be taught through a study of Christopher Columbus and the Columbus voyages. (CFR)

  15. Columbus in History and High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewen, James W.

    1992-01-01

    Criticizes accounts of Christopher Columbus and the Age of Exploration in 12 high school textbooks of U.S. history, citing their Eurocentrism, presentation of textbook history as absolute truth, lack of unpleasant details, and presentation of Columbus's voyage as origin myth. Lists 14 possible earlier expeditions to America. (SV)

  16. Piri Reis and the Columbus Map.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunde, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the origins and impact of the Piri Reis map, an early world map based on the voyages of Columbus and 20 other source maps. Maintains that evidence exists that Christopher Columbus may have drawn part of the map. Includes lengthy quotes from the map's legend written by Reis. (CFR)

  17. Columbus Saves: Saving Money in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shockey, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The "Columbus Saves" educational program is a broad-based community coalition made up of more than 40 local organizations from the education, nonprofit, government, faith-based, and private sectors. Common goals of partners in reaching Columbus, Ohio's 1.5 million residents are to: (a) promote increased savings through education and social service…

  18. Columbus and the Flat Earth Myth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singham, Mano

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the resilient myth that it was Columbus' journey to the New World that proved that the world was round. It is widely known that it was Columbus' journey to the New World that proved that the world was round. However, Thomas Kuhn in "The Copernican Revolution" showed clearly in 1957 that the idea of a flat…

  19. 500 years after Columbus.

    PubMed

    Imbach, A

    1992-01-01

    The astonishing range of plants and animals of Central America's 7 countries (Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama) is disappearing, as 60% of its forests have been cut for lumber and firewood as well as for cotton, cattle, or subsistence crops. Up to 5 million Mayans lived sustainably for thousands of years in an area now being destroyed by a few hundred thousand inhabitants. The Spanish colonization that started 500 years ago was concentrated in Panama, Nicaragua, and Guatemala. The majority of the English-speaking country of Belize are descended from the black slave population whose culture spread down the coast to Central America. Panama's service economy is based on the Panama Canal and trade and finance. Costa Rica benefits from a tourist industry based on its natural beauty, however, it also has the highest rate of deforestation and its fast population growth could jeopardize earlier social and economic progress. In El Salvador and Guatemala long periods of civil conflict have taken their toll on the economy and the environment. El Salvador has a mountainous territory and limited natural resources and industrialization, while the best land is in the hands of a few families. Honduras and Nicaragua retain the highest proportion of forest cover of the countries in the region, despite Nicaragua's years of tyranny, then revolution and the Contra war, and Honduras's own turmoils. Belize has achieved some stability, and is now strengthening its Central American links. Its coral reefs and coastal areas offer potential for sustainable development through fishing and tourism. Central American countries face the challenges of their fragile environments and major social problems. PMID:12317700

  20. Adrift in a Sargasso Sea: Recent Books on Christopher Columbus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunenfeld, Marvin

    1992-01-01

    Reviews more than 24 books recently published on the topic of Christopher Columbus and the voyages of discovery. Classifies the books as those designed for student use, for teachers and scholars, biographies, and "Columbus-Bashers." Maintains that the different viewpoints of Columbus the hero and Columbus the villain are barriers for serious…

  1. 64. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS BLEWETT'S BRIDGE On Pickensville Rd., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS BLEWETT'S BRIDGE On Pickensville Rd., S of Columbus 4.5 miles S on McLeod-Shuqualak road. Copy of snapshot in Lowndes Co. Public Library. Date Aug 1926, when bridge was completed. View of underside. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, MS. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  2. 63. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS BLEWETT'S BRIDGE On Pickensville Rd., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS BLEWETT'S BRIDGE On Pickensville Rd., S of Columbus 4.5 miles S on McLeod-Shuqualak road. Copy of snapshot in Lowndes Co. Public Library. Dated Aug 1926, when bridge was completed. View is lengthwise, through the truss. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  3. Have a Chemistry Field Day in Your Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes a full day of chemistry fun and competition for high school chemistry students. Notes teams have five students from each high school. Lists five competitive events for each team: titration, qualitative analysis, balancing equations, general chemistry quiz, and quantitative analysis with atomic absorption spectroscopy. (MVL)

  4. 38. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS OLD ROAD BRIDGE End of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS OLD ROAD BRIDGE End of Main St., Columbus Show/fabrication details of patented arch truss of Wrought Iron Bridge Co., Canton, Ohio. Taken from middle of swing span looking W toward arch span. Credit: Shenks Photography, Columbus, Ms, owner. O. Pruitt, photographer, ca. 1927-28. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  5. Columbus: ready for the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Patti, Bernardo; Chesson, Robert; Zell, Martin; Thirkettle, Alan

    2005-02-01

    One of the key contributions to the development and operation of the International Space Station (ISS) is ESA's Columbus Laboratory Module. It will be transported to the ISS, together with its payload complement, on Space Shuttle Assembly Flight 1E in 2006. Columbus's readiness for launch requires the availability not only of the Module itself, but also three other major elements being provided by ESA, namely: the Ground Segment, consisting of the Columbus Control Centre and the User Support and Operations Centres (USOCs), the Operations products, and the Crew Training. PMID:16134284

  6. The ultraviolet astronomy mission: Columbus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R.

    1984-01-01

    An ultraviolet astronomy mission (Columbus) is described. It exploits the spectral region between 900 and 1200A, which is extremely rich in containing the Lyman lines of hydrogen and deuterium and the Lyman band of their molecules, together with the resonance lines of many important ions. High resolving power and high sensitivity provide a unique capability for studying the brightest members of neighboring galaxies, the HeI and HeII absorption systems in quasars out to a red shift of 2, and the halos of intervening galaxies. Complementary focal plane instruments are planned in order to allow observations to longer (2000A) and shorter (100A) wavelengths. This wide coverage embraces the resonance lines of all the cosmically abundant elements and a wide range of temperature zones up to 100 million K.

  7. Astronomy in the Age of Columbus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingerich, Owen

    1992-01-01

    Presents an historical perspective of astronomy. Discusses how Columbus' discovery of America demonstrated the incompleteness of the ancient knowledge of the world and paved the way for unorthodox astronomical ideas, including the sun-centered cosmology of Copernicus. (MCO)

  8. 46. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Overall view, from S. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  9. 45. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Turn span from SE. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  10. Rethinking Columbus: Teaching about the 500th Anniversary of Columbus's Arrival in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Bill, Ed.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This periodical critiques the traditional views of Christopher Columbus and his voyages to America and looks at current issues that affect Native Americans. More than 50 essays, poems, historical documents, and articles are featured, including: "Columbus and Native Issues in the Elementary Classroom" (Bob Peterson); "Bones of Contention" (Tony…

  11. The Columbus-CC—Operating the European laboratory at ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuch, T.; Sabath, D.

    2008-07-01

    The European ISS Columbus Control Center (Col-CC) joined the club of ISS mission control centers in Moscow, Houston and Huntsville. It took some time to reach that goal. In 1998 the European Space Agency (ESA) awarded the German Aerospace Center DLR to design, develop and implement the Col-CC at its premises in Oberpfaffenhofen, near Munich, Germany. In 2002 a core mission operations team was built up. An integrated team of ESA, industry and control center started to define processes and implemented first operations products and tools. This was accompanied by regular meetings with the international partners in the US and Russia. With intensive training and numerous simulations the team was able to gain experience and is now eagerly waiting for the launch of Columbus. However, thanks to the involvement in some operational activities the Col-CC staff has already been able to gain operational ISS experience. After the inauguration in October 2004 Col-CC supported the Eneide mission in April 2005 when the Italian ESA-Astronaut Roberto Vittori flew onboard a Soyuz to the ISS where he spent 10 days. Another very important milestone was the operations support for ESA's Astrolab mission. The Astrolab mission was of major importance for Europe and particularly for Germany because it implied the first long duration flight of ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter, an astronaut of German nationality. The tasks of Col-CC are described and also the experiences made with the first operational long-term mission which took place from July to December 2006. Meanwhile the Col-CC was able to reach the operational readiness status for the Columbus mission which is set for a launch date later in 2007. Despite the concentration on the challenging Columbus Assembly and Checkout phase emphasis is already laid on the following increments for the European ISS operations. Early 2006 ESA transferred the operational tasks and responsibilities to the hands of the industrial operator. This approach creates beneficial synergies between the Columbus manufacturer and the experts at the control center. The cooperation will be further intensified with ESA, as the leading agency, the scientific users and the payload providers. The integrated operations team consists of technical and management experts from all involved parties, with key functions distributed among the partners according to the expertise available.

  12. Columbus Payloads Flow Rate Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quaranta, Albino; Bufano, Gaetana; DePalo, Savino; Holt, James M.; Szigetvari, Zoltan; Palumberi, Sergio; Hinderer, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) is the main thermal bus for the pressurized racks working inside the European laboratory. One of the ATCS goals is to provide proper water flow rate to each payload (P/L) by controlling actively the pressure drop across the common plenum distribution piping. Overall flow measurement performed by the Water Pump Assembly (WPA) is the only flow rate monitor available at system level and is not part of the feedback control system. At rack activation the flow rate provided by the system is derived on ground by computing the WPA flow increase. With this approach, several anomalies were raised during these 3 years on-orbit, with the indication of low flow rate conditions on the European racks FSL, BioLab, EDR and EPM. This paper reviews the system and P/Ls calibration approach, the anomalies occurred, the engineering evaluation on the measurement approach and the accuracy improvements proposed, the on-orbit test under evaluation with NASA and finally discusses possible short and long term solutions in case of anomaly confirmation.

  13. Lithium in the brines of Fish Lake Valley and Columbus Salt Marsh, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, C.L.; Meier, Allen L.; Downey, H.D.

    1977-01-01

    Analyses of waters-from springs in Nevada have led to the identification of an area containing anomalous amounts of lithium northwest of the Clayton Valley-area. Fish Lake Valley and Columbus Salt Marsh contain waters having, relatively high lithium and potassium concentrations. At least a part of these waters is probably derived from the leaching of Tertiary rocks containing saline minerals. The high-lithium waters at Columbus Salt Marsh could be derived not only by the leaching of rocks with a high soluble lithium ands, potassium content but also by subsurface outflow from Fish Lake Valley.

  14. COLUMBUS as Engineering Testbed for Communications and Multimedia Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, C.; Anspach von Broecker, G. O.; Kolloge, H.-G.; Richters, M.; Rauer, D.; Urban, G.; Canovai, G.; Oesterle, E.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents ongoing activities to prepare COLUMBUS for communications and multimedia technology experiments. For this purpose, Astrium SI, Bremen, has studied several options how to best combine the given system architecture with flexible and state-of-the-art interface avionics and software. These activities have been conducted in coordination with, and partially under contract of, DLR and ESA/ESTEC. Moreover, Astrium SI has realized three testbeds for multimedia software and hardware testing under own funding. The experimental core avionics unit - about a half double rack - establishes the core of a new multi-user experiment facility for this type of investigation onboard COLUMBUS, which shall be available to all users of COLUMBUS. It allows for the connection of 2nd generation payload, that is payload requiring broadband data transfer and near-real-time access by the Principal Investigator on ground, to test highly interactive and near-realtime payload operation. The facility is also foreseen to test new equipment to provide the astronauts onboard the ISS/COLUMBUS with bi- directional hi-fi voice and video connectivity to ground, private voice coms and e-mail, and a multimedia workstation for ops training and recreation. Connection to an appropriate Wide Area Network (WAN) on Earth is possible. The facility will include a broadband data transmission front-end terminal, which is mounted externally on the COLUMBUS module. This Equipment provides high flexibility due to the complete transparent transmit and receive chains, the steerable multi-frequency antenna system and its own thermal and power control and distribution. The Equipment is monitored and controlled via the COLUMBUS internal facility. It combines several new hardware items, which are newly developed for the next generation of broadband communication satellites and operates in Ka -Band with the experimental ESA data relay satellite ARTEMIS. The equipment is also TDRSS compatible; the open loop antenna tracking system employing star sensors enables usability with any other GEO data relay satellite system. In order to be prepared for the upcoming telecom standards for ground distribution of spacecraft generated data, the interface avionics allows for testing ATM-based data formatting and routing. Three testbeds accompany these studies and designs: i)a cable-and-connector testbed measures the signal characteristics for data transfer of up to 200 Mbps through the ii)an avionics &embedded software testbed prepares for data formatting, routing, and storage in CCSDS and ATM; iii)a software testbed tests newly developed S/W man-machine interfaces and simulates bandwidth limitations, on- This makes COLUMBUS a true technology testbed for a variety of engineering topics: - application of terrestrial standard data formats for broadband, near-real-time applications in space - qualification &test of off-the-shelf multimedia equipment in manned spacecraft - secure data transmission in flexible VPNs - in-orbit demonstration of advanced data transmission technology - elaboration of efficient crew and ground operations and training procedures - evaluation of personalized displays (S/W HFI) for long-duration space missions

  15. Offgassing Characterization of the Columbus Laboratory Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampini, riccardo; Lobascio, Cesare; Perry, Jay L.; Hinderer, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    Trace gaseous contamination in the cabin environment is a major concern for manned spacecraft, especially those designed for long duration missions, such as the International Space Station (ISS). During the design phase, predicting the European-built Columbus laboratory module s contribution to the ISS s overall trace contaminant load relied on "trace gas budgeting" based on material level and assembled article tests data. In support of the Qualification Review, a final offgassing test has been performed on the complete Columbus module to gain cumulative system offgassing data. Comparison between the results of the predicted offgassing load based on the budgeted material/assembled article-level offgassing rates and the module-level offgassing test is presented. The Columbus module offgassing test results are also compared to results from similar tests conducted for Node 1, U.S. Laboratory, and Airlock modules.

  16. Study on communications costs for Columbus utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Svend Moller; Sorensen, Nicolaj

    1988-09-01

    On the basis of a hypothetical communications scenario established for cost calculations, the expected communications costs for Columbus utilization in the year 1995 and onwards to the year 2025, are estimated to provide initial considerations for a charging policy in relation to potential Columbus users. A hypothetical sample of five European countries is established, and current telecommunications tariffs for the data, voice, and video communications required for the Columbus utilization in and between these five countries and the USA are identified. Technological, political, and commercial development trends are analyzed as to their likely influences on future telecommunications tariff development. Communications costs for the study period are estimated, assuming telecommunications administrations to be providers of service and considering estimated equipment and operations costs. Alternative communications solutions are indicated.

  17. Columbus Outdoor Pursuits: A Model Structure for Volunteer Based Outdoor Pursuits Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerckens, Ann E.

    Columbus Outdoor Pursuits (COP) is a volunteer-based nonprofit organization in Ohio that has offered outdoor educational and recreational opportunities to its members for 63 years. COP day and trip programs focus on outdoor activities such as bicycling, kayaking, hiking, and rock climbing. In addition, COP offers classes in the skills required for…

  18. How to reduce day-to-day variation of leaf area index derived from digital cover photography?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Y. R.; Ryu, Y.; Kimm, H.; Macfarlane, C.; Lang, M.; Sonnentag, O.

    2014-12-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is essential for computing canopy level carbon and water fluxes. Nowadays, it is possible to automatically monitor daily LAI using low-cost sensors, such as digital cameras and LED-sensors. Recent studies have shown that RAW camera format images can improve the estimation of gap fractions and LAI compared to JPEG format. However, whether RAW-based methods can effectively reduce day-to-day variation of LAI time series has not been investigated. In this study, we used two methods to compute gap fraction. The first method separates sky and vegetation pixels using a single threshold in the blue band histogram. The second method interpolates the background sky image from pure sky pixels, and computes the transmittance from original and reconstructed images. In order to investigate which method is more accurate in reducing day-to-day variation of LAI, we first conducted a controlled experiment with punched panels which included different hole size and gap fractions on the rooftop. Then, we applied both methods to photos collected daily over a year at deciduous forest and evergreen forest in South Korea.

  19. Christopher Columbus and Early Americans Booklist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misheff, Sue

    1992-01-01

    Presents brief descriptions of 31 books (published between 1962 and 1991) concerning the commemoration of the discovery of the Americas. Divides the books into those about Christopher Columbus, those that shed light on the world in which he lived, and those that look at the Americas before he landed. (RS)

  20. NEW TECHNOLOGY AND PEC PROCESS - COLUMBUS, GA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation will discuss Columbus, Georgia’s Biosolids Flow-through Thermophilic Treatment (BFT3) Process. Site-specific equivalency requires proof. Laboratory-scale pathogen testing must exceed Class A performance criteria while simulating full scale as closely as pos...

  1. Microscopy & microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michael, Joseph R.

    2016-01-08

    The article provides information about an upcoming conference from the program chair. The Microscopy Society of America (MSA), the Microanalysis Society (MAS), and the International Metallographic Society (IMS) invite participation in Microscopy & Microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio, July 24 through July 28, 2016.

  2. Cyberspace Explorer: Getting To Know Christopher Columbus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Jill

    This lesson supports third- through fifth-grade students' exploration of multiple online sources to gather information about the life of a well-known explorer, Christopher Columbus. During the two 50- to 60-minute sessions, students will: use prewriting (a K-W-L chart) to prepare for research; use prior knowledge to extend the depth of inquiry;…

  3. Immigrants from the Appalachian Region to the City of Columbus, Ohio: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rico-Velasco, Jesus Antonio

    The major purpose of the study was to provide information and test specific hypotheses about the causes and nature of the process of migration and the adjustment of Appalachian migrants to the city of Columbus, Ohio. In the study, the Appalachian region was approached not only as a geographic area but also as an ecological structure, a cultural…

  4. Hiring Decisions: An Analysis of Columbus Employer Assessments of Youthful Job Applicants. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Kevin

    This study was conducted to describe and to analyze how employers respond to information presented to them on application forms and in interviews when they make hiring decisions for entry-level jobs. The approach of the study was to observe the responses of 56 employers in the Columbus, Ohio, area to simulated hiring settings concerning youthful

  5. 42. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Copy of postcard ca. 1900. Copy owned and made by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. Shows two-span steel truss, built by Phoenix Bridge Co. in 1878. Negative copied by: Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  6. The Economic Impact of Six Cultural Institutions on the Economy of the Columbus SMSA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwi, David

    The impact of six cultural institutions on the Columbus, Ohio, economy was determined by measuring their 1978 direct and indirect financial effects. The six institutions are Ballet Metropolitan, Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus Symphony Orchestra, Center of Science and Industry, Players Theatre of Columbus, and Columbus Association for the…

  7. 69. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS MAP OF LOWNDES COUNTY, 1931 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS MAP OF LOWNDES COUNTY, 1931 ROAD MAP OF LOWNDES COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, 1931 by C.L. Wood, the county engineer. Updated through the mid-1930s to show new federal aid-state roads. Compares modern system with older county system. Original scale: 1 in. to 1 mi. Property of Helen (Mrs. Sam L.) Crawford, Hamilton, Ms. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms., Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  8. Osler, cardiac disease, and students of medicine--Columbus, OH: December 1899.

    PubMed

    Wooley, Charles F

    2006-01-01

    "Our Distinguished Visitor" was the headline describing the day William Osler honored the Ohio Medical University (OMU) with a visit and clinical lecture. OMU, founded in 1892 and located in downtown Columbus, was the fourth in a series of 5 19th-century Columbus medical schools that were predecessors to The Ohio State University College of Medicine established in 1914. OMU occupied a new 5-story building adjacent to the Protestant Hospital established in 1891. Osler was the guest of Dr Edwin Frazer Wilson, Professor of Therapeutics and Clinical Medicine at OMU, a student of Osler's at the University of Pennsylvania, and an 1885 graduate of that institution. Osler was in Columbus for consultation with one of Dr Wilson's patients. While Osler was in Columbus, a teaching clinic and lecture was arranged at OMU. Murray B. McGonigle, OMU Class of 1900, reported the visit in The Phagocyte, the OMU student publication, and in the Columbus Medical Journal. There was an assemblage of hundreds of students in the amphitheater at clinic hour when OMU Chancellor, Dr David N. Kinsman, introduced Osler. The patient, a 16-year-old young man, was brought to the amphitheater with a history of kidney trouble. Osler's clinical evaluation, physical examination, diagnosis, and discussion of prognosis and treatment provided an object lesson that was impressed on the minds of the students. Following the clinic, Osler addressed the students in his familiar style, demonstrating his easy rapport with students. His comments to the students are classic statements combining personal encouragement with professional attitudes. McGonigle concluded, "these remarks by so eminent an authority are certainly encouraging for the future of the medical student if he will but heed the excellent advice." PMID:17086008

  9. What Shall We Tell the Children? The Press Encounters Columbus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunenfeld, Marvin

    1992-01-01

    Discusses scholarly criticism and media coverage of the controversy surrounding the effects of Christopher Columbus' voyages upon the Americas. Examines the reactions of some writers to some scholars' negative portrayals of Columbus. Argues that schools should continue to be the place for respectful study of the explorer. (SG)

  10. Selected Resources to Explore Columbus and His Legacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Barbara

    1992-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of materials dealing with Christopher Columbus. Includes articles, ERIC documents, children's magazines and books, discovery kits, films and videos, and other items. Concludes that educators are only now discovering the innumerable connections between Columbus' era and the present. (SG)

  11. Christopher Columbus in United States Historiography: Biography as Projection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Carla Rahn; Phillips, William D.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an analysis of the portrayal of Christopher Columbus in writings about U.S. history. Suggests that most scholars would agree with Justin Winsor's 1892 portrayal of Columbus. Criticizes the controversy surrounding the explorer's first North American voyage. Concludes that current scholarship may give future generations a more accurate view…

  12. You Are There: The Mock Trial of Christopher Columbus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latman, Joel; Walter, Cathy

    The 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus's voyage to the Americas has raised a debate over how historians and teachers should portray this moment in history. Some view Columbus as a hero whose courage helped to provide a foundation for modern civilization in the Americas, while others see him as a villain who exploited indigenous people and…

  13. Columbus 1492 -- Rediscovery -- 1992. Instructional Media Advisory List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Media Evaluation Service.

    This annotated bibliography covers resources pertaining to Christopher Columbus, the European Age of Exploration, native civilizations in the Americas, and changing views of Columbus' role in history. The materials are organized by intended audience into the following sections: grades preK-3, grades 4-8, grade 9-12, and professional. Most of these…

  14. Columbus and the Age of Discovery. Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WGBH-TV, Boston, MA.

    This seven part teacher's guide is designed to accompany the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) television series, "Columbus and the Age of Discovery," and also may be used without viewing the programs. The guide features seven units that reflect the themes of the television series. The units are: (1) "Columbus's World"; (2) "An Idea Takes Shape";…

  15. The Christopher Columbus Quincentennial: Beware the Ides of October.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruff, Thomas P.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the Columbus Quincentenary and its impact on the K-12 history and social studies curriculum. Reviews the differences of opinion about Christopher Columbus and the results of the voyages of discovery. Warns that teachers must be wary of instructional materials that are based on political and social ideologies. (CFR)

  16. The Voyages of Columbus: A Turning Point in World History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Alfred W.; Nader, Helen

    The far-reaching and transforming interactions of the Old World and the New are known today as "the Columbian Exchange." Part 1 of this booklet is an introduction by John J. Patrick dealing with teaching about the voyages of Christopher Columbus. Part 2, "Columbus and Ecological Imperialism," by Alfred W. Crosby, provides an ecological perspective…

  17. Hello Columbus. America Was No Paradise in 1492.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Argues that, in the current portrayal of Columbus' arrival in America, American Indians have become the new heroes and models to be imitated. Discusses the native peoples and their societies at the time of Columbus including diversity among peoples, development of civilizations, view of the cosmos, and political development. (JB)

  18. A History of Labor in Columbus, Ohio 1812-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Tine, Warren R.

    While the building and printing industries flourished in pre-Civil War Columbus, manufacturing languished. The manufacturing base grew and diversified from 1820 to 1850. Few unions emerged, and those that did seldom lasted long. During the Civil War business and manufacturing increased to serve the camps and prisons established in Columbus. When…

  19. Structural vulnerability and problem drinking among Latino migrant day laborers in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    PubMed

    Worby, Paula A; Organista, Kurt C; Kral, Alex H; Quesada, James; Arreola, Sonya; Khoury, Sahar

    2014-08-01

    Latino migrant day laborers (LMDLs) live under challenging conditions in the San Francisco Bay Area. This study explored day laborer alcohol use guided by a structural vulnerability framework, specifically problem vs. non-problem drinking as perceived by LMDLs and how they cope with or try to avoid problem drinking given their broader environment. The study utilized ethnographic methods including in-depth semi-structured qualitative interviews with 51 LMDLs. Findings revealed the considerable challenge of avoiding problem drinking given socio-environmental factors that influence drinking: impoverished living and working conditions, prolonged separation from home and family, lack of work authorization, consequent distress and negative mood states, and peer pressure to drink. While participants shared strategies to avoid problem drinking, the success of individual-level efforts is limited given the harsh structural environmental factors that define day laborers' daily lives. Discussed are implications for prevention and intervention strategies at the individual, community, national and international levels. PMID:25130240

  20. Columbus proto-planetesimal dust aggregation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, H. U.; Blum, J.; Donn, B.; Elgoresy, A.; Fechtig, H.; Feuerbacher, Berndt; Gruen, E.; Ip, W.-H.; Kochan, H.; Mann, I.

    1992-01-01

    A microgravity experiment to study the growth of dust particles which has been proposed to be flown on one of the Columbus precursor flights is described. The microgravity environment will allow for low collision velocities (of order of mm/s) of the dust grains and for a large Knudsen number of the embedding gas; conditions expected in the early solar nebula. The outcome of the experiment will yield estimates of the sticking efficiency and the critical velocity for agglomeration. The values of these two parameters will provide substantial improvements in the constraints for models of the formation of planetesimals. In particular, the questions related to growth rate and mode of the aggregation process will be answered. The range of material type, collision velocities, properties of the environment in which growth takes place, and other factors permit a natural extension of this experiment to take advantage of the capabilities of the Space Station Columbus. Other astrophysical applications, such as processes in Saturnian rings, with somewhat different regimes could also be investigated.

  1. Columbus State University Global Observation and Outreach for the 2012 Transit of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Matthew; McCarty, C.; Bartow, M.; Hood, J. C.; Lodder, K.; Johnson, M.; Cruzen, S. T.; Williams, R. N.

    2013-01-01

    Faculty, staff and students from Columbus State University’s (CSU’s) Coca-Cola Space Science Center presented a webcast of the 2012 Transit of Venus from three continents to a global audience of 1.4 million unique viewers. Team members imaged the transit with telescopes using white-light, hydrogen-alpha, and calcium filters, from Alice Springs, Australia; the Gobi Desert, Mongolia; Bryce Canyon, UT; and Columbus, GA. Images were webcast live during the transit in partnership with NASA’s Sun-Earth Day program, and Science Center staff members were featured on NASA TV. Local members of the public were brought in for a series of outreach initiatives, in both Georgia and Australia, before and during the transit. The data recorded from the various locations have been archived for use in demonstrating principles such as the historical measurement of the astronomical unit.

  2. 48. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms Latching mechanism, E end of turn span, view from N. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, MS. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  3. 47. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Latching mechanism, E end of turn span, viewed from W. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  4. 49. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Top of pier and underside of w end of turn span. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  5. 44. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Detail from Camille Drie's map: A Bird's Eye View of Columbus, Mississippi ca. 1875-76. Shows M&O RR bridge before the Phoenix Bridge Co. erected iron truss spans in 1878. Credit: Photostat of map in Lowndes Co. Public Library Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  6. Who still eats three meals a day? Findings from a quantitative survey in the Paris area.

    PubMed

    Lhuissier, Anne; Tichit, Christine; Caillavet, France; Cardon, Philippe; Masullo, Ana; Martin-Fernandez, Judith; Parizot, Isabelle; Chauvin, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    In France, mealtimes constitute a strong cultural trait, especially the three-meal pattern. The aim of our study was to test whether this pattern is still prevailing and to what extent familial structure, gender, poverty and migration have an effect on meal frequency. This study is based on a cross-sectional analysis of data collected in 2010 in the SIRS cohort study among a representative sample of 3006 adults in the Paris metropolitan area. We developed simple logistic models and multinomial logistic models. Results confirmed that the three-meal pattern remains strongly rooted in food habits in the Paris area. For three meals a day, the presence of a partner was more significant than the presence of children in the household. However, the study highlighted that one out of four inhabitants declared eating two meals a day only. The results emphasized gender differences in eating two meals a day, as being less frequent but more distinctive for women than for men. For women indeed, it was mainly linked to economic and social vulnerability (women below the poverty line, foreigners, in single parent families). In this respect, the paper provides new insights into the social differentiation of meal patterns, and calls for further analysis. PMID:23274963

  7. Latino immigrants, discrimination and reception in Columbus, Ohio

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J. H.; Chavez, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Columbus, Ohio has witnessed rapid growth in its Latino population as immigrants settle in the city to access jobs and a generally low cost of living. Immigrants also face discrimination as they settle in Columbus and interact with the city’s citizens. In this paper, we note how discrimination plays out in social and economic isolation; a lack of programs to support the incorporation of Latinos in the city; and state laws that target immigrants. We present results of ongoing ethnographic work with the Latino community in Columbus. PMID:25097268

  8. The Columbus APM centre flexible and efficient engineering support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battocchio, Luciano; Harris, David R.; Sarlo, Lorenzo

    1990-10-01

    Columbus Attached Pressurized Module (APM) operations, beginning with final testing before loading into the Shuttle, are integrated into the overall Space Station Freedom and Columbus scenarios. These operations, both ground and flight, are supported by an engineering support center, the APMC (APM Center), connected to both Columbus and NASA in orbit infrastructures (IOI). The APMC must fulfill several different roles. The requirements for some roles are reasonably well defined, at least in outline. The requirements for others are still to be defined. Creation of a system for the center which allows all of these roles to be played efficiently and effectively, and when required concurrently is discussed.

  9. Causes of the elevated nitrate aerosol levels during episodic days in Taichung urban area, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu Chi; Cheng, Man Ting; Lin, Wei Hsiang; Lan, Yung-Yao; Tsuang, Ben-Jei

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the possible reasons accounting for elevated nitrate aerosol levels during high particulate days (HPD) in Taichung urban area of central Taiwan. To achieve this goal, simultaneous measurements of particulate and gaseous pollutants were carried out from September 2004 to April 2005 using an annular denuder system (ADS). The formation rate of NO 2 to nitrate aerosol, calculated using the relevant chemical reactions, was employed to interpret enhanced nitrate aerosol concentrations during HPD. The observations showed that nitrate concentration during HPD was 14 times higher than that during low particulate days (LPD). The average formation rate during HPD was 4.0% h -1, which was 3.1 times higher than that during LPD. The quantitative analysis showed that the formation rate was mainly influenced by temperature and relative humidity. Lower temperature and higher relative humidity led much nitrate aerosol formation in HPD. Moreover, the residence time analysis of air masses staying over the studied area showed that the slow-motion air retained high nitrate concentrations due to more nitrate aerosol converted from the precursors in NOx-rich areas.

  10. Downlight Demonstration Program: Hilton Columbus Downtown

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Robert G.; Perrin, Tess E.

    2014-05-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that there were about 700 million downlight luminaires installed in residential and commercial buildings in the U.S. as of 2012, with light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires representing less than 1% of this installed base. Downlight luminaires using conventional incandescent, halogen, and compact fluorescent lamps have lower efficacies and shorter expected lifetimes than comparable LED systems, but the lower initial cost of the conventional technology and the uncertainties associated with the newer LED technology have restricted widespread adoption of LED downlight luminaires. About 278 tBtu of energy could be saved annually if LED luminaires were to saturate the downlight market, equating to an annual energy cost savings of $2.6 billion. This report summarizes an evaluation of LED recessed downlight luminaires in the guest rooms at the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Columbus, OH. The facility opened in October of 2012, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a post-occupancy assessment of the facility in January–March of 2014. Each of the 484 guest rooms uses seven 15 W LED downlights: four downlights in the entry and bedroom and three downlights in the bathroom. The 48 suites use the seven 15 W LED downlights and additional fixtures depending on the space requirements, so that in total the facility has more than 3,700 LED downlights. The downlights are controlled through wall-mounted switches and dimmers. A ceiling-mounted vacancy sensor ensures that the bathroom luminaires are turned off when the room is not occupied.

  11. Teaching Astronomy at Columbus State University using Small Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Zodiac T.

    2006-12-01

    Astronomy is inherently fascinating to students but dark skies and good weather are not often scheduled during the school day. Radio telescopes provide an all-weather, all-day opportunity for astronomical observations. Columbus State University (CSU) has installed two Small Radio Telescopes for use by undergraduate students to pursue extra-curricular research in introductory astronomy. These telescopes are relatively affordable and are designed to be remotely operated through a Windows, Linux, or Macintosh environment. They are capable of diffraction-limited observations of the Sun and galactic Hydrogen in the L-band. A comprehensive website of projects suitable for high-school students and undergraduates is maintained by a group at MIT. This website ensures users are not left to explore the telescopes abilities blindly. Students with varied interests learn about the nature of science by using an instrument that doesnt lend itself to pretty pictures. Radio telescopes also provide a slight engineering flavor drawing in students who might not otherwise be interested in astronomy. This poster will provide a summary of installation, calibration, and future plans, and will share some observations by undergraduates at CSU.

  12. Columbus and the Quincentennial Myths: Another Side of the Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Phyllis

    1992-01-01

    Discusses how early childhood educators can address the issues surrounding Christopher Columbus and the Quincentenary of his voyage to America to serve as an opportunity to enlighten and challenge young children's perspectives on this historical event. (BB)

  13. Christopher Columbus: Bridge between the Old and New World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a partial bibliography of ERIC database entries concerning Christopher Columbus and the effects of his discoveries upon the world. Includes works on historiography, the ecological impact of the meeting of the two worlds, and history lesson plans. (DK)

  14. Columbus's Method of Determining Longitude: An Analytical View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Keith

    On 14 September 1494, Christopher Columbus observed a lunar eclipse while at the island of Saona near the eastern tip of Hispaniola. He later recorded in his Libro de las Profecias that, from his timing of the eclipse, he determined his longitude to be west of Cape San Vicente. His actual longitude was three hours and 59 minutes west of Cape San Vicente, so Columbus was off by over an hour and a half, some 23 degrees of longitude.

  15. An introduction to GUGA in the COLUMBUS Program System

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.

    1992-12-31

    The COLUMBUS Program System is a collection of Fortran programs for performing general multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) and multireference single- and doubele-exicitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) wave function optimization based on the graphical unitary group approach (GUGA). This paper describes at an introductory level how wave functions are specified and characterized in the COLUMBUS Program System in terms of the unitary group, and in particular, using the graphical representation proposed by Shavitt.

  16. Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Brian

    2004-02-01

    In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Oxbow Ranch, now know as the Oxbow Conservation Area (OCA). Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. The project during 2003 was crippled due to the aftermath of the BPA budget crisis. Some objectives were not completed during the first half of this contract because of limited funds in the 2003 fiscal year. The success of this property purchase can be seen on a daily basis. Water rights were utilized only in the early, high water season and only from diversion points with functional fish screens. After July 1, all of the OCA water rights were put instream. Riparian fences on the river, Ruby and Granite Boulder creeks continued to promote important vegetation to provide shade and bank stabilization. Hundreds of willow, dogwood, Douglas-fir, and cottonwood were planted along the Middle Fork John Day River. Livestock grazing on the property was carefully managed to ensure the protection of fish and wildlife habitat, while promoting meadow vigor and producing revenue for property taxes. Monitoring of property populations, resources, and management activities continued in 2003 to build a database for future management of this and other properties in the region.

  17. Christopher Columbus--Bridge between the Old and New Worlds: An ERIC/ChESS Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a sampling of items from the ERIC database about Christopher Columbus. Includes items on Columbus' voyages, his contacts with the New World, ecological imperialism, and the explorer's experiences in Jamaica. Explains how to obtain ERIC documents. (SG)

  18. Modeling of wastewater quality in an urban area during festival and rainy days.

    PubMed

    Obaid, H A; Shahid, S; Basim, K N; Chelliapan, S

    2015-01-01

    Water pollution during festival periods is a major problem in all festival cities across the world. Reliable prediction of water pollution is essential in festival cities for sewer and wastewater management in order to ensure public health and a clean environment. This article aims to model the biological oxygen demand (BOD(5)), and total suspended solids (TSS) parameters in wastewater in the sewer networks of Karbala city center during festival and rainy days using structural equation modeling and multiple linear regression analysis methods. For this purpose, 34 years (1980-2014) of rainfall, temperature and sewer flow data during festival periods in the study area were collected, processed, and employed. The results show that the TSS concentration increases by 26-46 mg/l while BOD(5) concentration rises by 9-19 mg/l for an increase of rainfall by 1 mm during festival periods. It was also found that BOD(5) concentration rises by 4-17 mg/l for each increase of 10,000 population. PMID:26360765

  19. An alternative look at new particle formation: Undefined days and the effect of source area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buenrostro Mazon, Stephany; Manninen, Hanna E.; Lampilahti, Janne; Nieminen, Tuomo; Aalto, Pasi; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-05-01

    The presence of the EU project PEGASOS in the SMEAR II field station, Hyytiälä, Southern Finland, during the months of May and June 2013 was aimed at elucidating the synergetic processes between atmospheric chemistry, boundary layer micrometeorology and aerosol particle formation. However, it must be noted that during the two spring months, the Hyytiälä ground station while we recognize 22 'event days' (days with new particle formation occurring, NPF), 30 days where left as 'undefined', that is, a day which was not successfully classified as either presenting NPF or not (nonevent day). The ratio of unclassified days to event and nonevent days leaves a great portion of the data untouched. A previous study specifically investigated the undefined days using an 11-year time series (1996 to 2006) from Hyytiälä station. The results showed that undefined days could highlight intermediate or incomplete conditions when compared to a day presenting NPF: relative humidity, condensation sink and radiation values lay precisely in between event and nonevent values. A sub-classification of undefined days into a 'failed events' class allows for the possibility of days that are to a degree truncated or advected event days, and which show parameters closer in value to event than to nonevent days. By including undefined days in the analysis of the spring 2013 data, we look for the micrometeorology process that could help explain the 'failed events' day conditions, and thus shed more light on NPF dynamics. Furthermore we propose that NPF need not be at a regional scale as previously thought, but rather, specific local sources could bring about NPF, captured at the ground station with the right wind conditions. To analyze for possible local versus regional sources for NPF, we aim to correlate micrometeorological parameters, including boundary layer stability, wind vectors and air chemistry, in order to capture what is happening when one variable changes, scanning each day as opposed to averaging the day as a whole. Preliminary results have divided nucleation mode particles (3-25 nm) to westerly winds during event days, easterly winds for nonevent days, and intermediate winds (east, west) for the undefined days. Coupling ground measurements to airborne data including the PEGASOS campaign aboard a Zeppelin will allow for a wider view of NPF dynamics across the boundary layer, help identify possible local sources of NPF, and shed more light on the 'failed events' subclass.

  20. 43. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS RAILROAD BRIDGE End of 1st St. S., Columbus, Ms. Copy of photo 1900. Shows 1878 M&O RR bridge. The steamboat, 'Gopher,' in foreground, was an archeological survey vessel from the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia. Published in Art in Mississippi (1901). Credit: Copied from print in Lowndes Co. Public Library by Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  1. Columbus, the European Physiology Modules Facility and CADMOS.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Alain; Couloumies, Damien; Ben Aim, Hélène

    2007-07-01

    Columbus, the European Space Agency (ESA) orbital facility laboratory will be launched in December 2007 and attached to the International Space Station (ISS). In its launch configuration, Columbus includes 4 multi-user facilities: one of them is the European Physiology Modules Facility, also called EPM. The EPM will be devoted to Human Physiology; it will be collocated in the Columbus module with two other physiology racks, i.e. the HRF-1 and HRF-2 American racks (Human Research Facility). CADMOS is part of the French Space Agency, located in Toulouse; it has been designated by the European Space Agency as the Facility Responsible Centre (FRC) for the EPM. As a User Support and Operations Centre, CADMOS main tasks are to help the scientists to prepare and perform their experiments in Space and to monitor operations on the ISS. PMID:18372739

  2. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama)...

  3. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama)...

  4. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama)...

  5. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama)...

  6. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama)...

  7. The Columbus Controversy: A Historian Walks through the Battlefield of Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thernstrom, Stephan

    1992-01-01

    Reviews controversies concerning celebrating the 500th anniversary of Columbus' landing in America. Summarizes historians' perspectives concerning that event, including the following: (1) who was first; (2) discovery or invasion; (3) native population numbers; (4) how so few conquered so many; (5) Columbus and slavery; and (6) Columbus and

  8. A Study of School Without Schools: The Columbus, Ohio Public Schools During the Natural Gas Shortage, Winter, 1977. Volume I and Volume II, Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, James R.; Stufflebeam, Daniel L.

    The energy crisis, specifically a shortage of natural gas, caused by the unusually cold winter of 1977, resulted in the Columbus, Ohio, schools being closed for a month. Schools heated with gas were closed, but students met one day a week in school buildings that used coal, oil, or electricity. The educational program continued with school…

  9. Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Brian; Smith, Brent

    2003-07-01

    In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Oxbow Ranch, now know as the Oxbow Conservation Area (OCA). Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. The 2002 contract period was well funded and the second year of the project. A new manager started in April, allowing the previous manager to focus his efforts on the Forrest Ranch acquisition. However, the Oxbow Habitat manager's position was vacant from October through mid February of 2003. During this time, much progress, mainly O&M, was at a minimum level. Many of the objectives were not completed during this contract due to both the size and duration needed to complete such activities (example: dredge mine tailings restoration project) or because budget crisis issues with BPA ending accrual carryover on the fiscal calendar. Although the property had been acquired a year earlier, there were numerous repairs and discoveries, which on a daily basis could pull personnel from making progress on objectives for the SOW, aside from O&M objectives. A lack of fencing on a portion of the property's boundary and deteriorating fences in other areas are some reasons much time was spent chasing trespassing cattle off of the property. The success of this property purchase can be seen on a daily basis. Water rights were used seldom in the summer of 2002, with minor irrigation water diverted from only Granite Boulder Creek. Riparian fences on the river, Ruby and Granite Boulder creeks help promote important vegetation to provide shade and bank stabilization. Trees planted in this and past years are growing and will someday provide cover fish and wildlife. Even grazing on the property was carefully managed to ensure the protection of fish and wildlife habitat. Monitoring of property populations, resources, and management activities continued in 2002 to build a database for future management of this and other properties in the region.

  10. International Space Station Columbus Payload SoLACES Degradation Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, William A.; Schmidl, William D.; Mikatarian, Ron; Soares, Carlos; Schmidtke, Gerhard; Erhardt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    SOLAR is a European Space Agency (ESA) payload deployed on the International Space Station (ISS) and located on the Columbus Laboratory. It is located on the Columbus External Payload Facility in a zenith location. The objective of the SOLAR payload is to study the Sun. The SOLAR payload consists of three instruments that allow for measurement of virtually the entire electromagnetic spectrum (17 nm to 2900 nm). The three payload instruments are SOVIM (SOlar Variable and Irradiance Monitor), SOLSPEC (SOLar SPECctral Irradiance measurements), and SolACES (SOLar Auto-Calibrating Extreme UV/UV Spectrophotometers).

  11. Aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms in tubercles of the Columbus, Ohio, water distribution system.

    PubMed Central

    Tuovinen, O H; Hsu, J C

    1982-01-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms were enumerated in tubercles collected from sections of the water distribution pipeline in the Columbus, Ohio, metropolitan area. Coliform bacteria were not detected in the tubercles examined. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were detected in 80% of the samples. Nitrate-reducing heterotrophs were present in all samples. The results, including plate counts of aerobic heterotrophs, indicated variation in bacterial densities depending on the tubercle sample and fraction examined. The associations among the viable counts obtained by the different culture methods were analyzed statistically, using three methods (Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall). PMID:7138010

  12. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow at the South Well Field, Columbus, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, W.L.; Bair, E.S.; Yost, W.P.

    1996-01-01

    The City of Columbus, Ohio, operates four radial collector wells in southern Franklin County. The 'South Well Field' is completed in permeable outwash and ice-contact deposits, upon which flow the Scioto River and Big Walnut Creek. The wells are designed to yield approximately 42 million gallons per day; part of that yield results from induced infiltration of surface water from the Scioto River and Big Walnut Creek. The well field supplied up to 30 percent of the water supply of southern Columbus and its suburbs in 1991. This report describes the hydrogeology of southern Franklin County and a tran sient three-dimensional, numerical ground-water- flow model of the South Well Field. The primary source of ground water in the study area is the glacial drift aquifer. The glacial drift is composed of sand, gravel, and clay depos ited during the Illinoian and Wisconsinan glaciations. In general, thick deposits of till containing lenses of sand and gravel dominate the drift in the area west of the Scioto River. The thickest and most productive parts of the glacial drift aquifer are in the buried valleys in the central and eastern parts of the study area underlying the Scioto River and Big Walnut Creek. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the glacial drift aquifer differs spa tially and ranges from 30 to 375 feet per day. The specific yield ranges from 0.12 to 0.30. The secondary source of ground water within the study area is the underlying carbonate bedrock aquifer, which consists of Silurian and Devonian limestones, dolomites, and shales. The horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the carbonate bedrock aquifer ranges from 10 to 15 feet per day. The storage coefficient is about 0.0002. The ground-water-flow system in the South Well Field area is recharged by precipitation, regional ground-water flow, and induced stream infiltration. Yearly recharge rates varied spatially and ranged from 4.0 to 12.0 inches. The three-dimensional, ground-water-flow model was constructed by use of the U.S. Geological Survey three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water-flow code. Recharge, boundary flux, and river leakage are the principal sources of water to the flow system. The study area is bounded on the north and south by streamlines, with flow entering the area from the east and west. Areal recharge is contributed throughout the study area, although a comparatively high percentage of precipitation reaches the water table in the area east of the Scioto River where little surface drain age exists. Ground-water flow is downward in the uplands of the Scioto River, and upward near the river in the glacial drift and carbonate bedrock aquifers. The numerical model contains 53 rows, 45 columns, and 3 layers. The uppermost two layers represent the glacial drift. The bottom layer represents the carbonate bedrock. The horizontal model grid is variably spaced to account for differences in available data and to simulate heads accurately in specific areas of interest. The length and width of grid cells range from 200 to 2,000 feet; the finer spacings are designed to increase detail in the areas near the collector wells. The model uses 7,155 active nodes. Measurements of water levels from October 1979 were used to represent steady-state conditions before municipal pumping at the well field began. Measurements made during March 1986 were used to represent steady-state conditions after commencement of pumping at the well field. Water levels measured during March 1986 - June 1991 were used for calibration targets in the transient simulations. The transient model was discretized into eight stress periods of 93 to 487 days on the basis of recharge, well-field pumpage, and available water-level data. Transient model calibration was based on seven sets of hydraulic-head measure ments made during March 1986 - June 1991. This time period includes large-scale increases in well- field production associated with a drought in the summer of 1988, an

  13. Listening to Children Think Critically about Christopher Columbus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Mary Beth; Snow-Gerono, Jennifer L.; Reed, Diane; Warner, Amy

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a story of two fourth-grade teachers' journey to create lessons that would be developmentally appropriate, culturally sensitive, and historically accurate in teaching children about Columbus's encounter with Native Americans. The aim of this four-week unit of study was to have fourth-grade students look at multiple…

  14. Meeting the Needs of Urban Youths in Columbus City Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deglau, Dena A.; Barnes, Diane

    2009-01-01

    With 55 percent of the 53,400 students on free and reduced lunch programs, a 78 percent mobility rate, and a diverse population, Columbus City Schools (CCS) in Ohio faces the challenges common to other urban districts. In spite of the challenges, CCS has made a long-term commitment to engage students in high-quality physical education and physical…

  15. 2010 Library of the Year: Columbus Metropolitan Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2010-01-01

    This article features Columbus Metropolitan Library (CML), winner of the Gale/"Library Journal" Library of the Year Award 2010. CML, comprised of an operations center and 21 branches, serves the 847,376 people who inhabit a large portion of Franklin County in central Ohio. It is an independent library with its own taxing district. CML operates…

  16. 75 FR 81438 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Columbus, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... additional controlled airspace at Port Columbus International Airport (75 FR 64966) Docket No. FAA-2010-0770... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR,...

  17. Impact of Cotton Production Systems on Management of Hoplolaimus columbus

    PubMed Central

    Koenning, S. R.; Edmisten, K. L.; Barker, K. R.; Morrison, D. E.

    2003-01-01

    The effectiveness of selected cultural practices in managing the Columbia lance nematode, Hoplolaimus columbus, on cotton was evaluated in experiments in growers' infested fields. The effects of planting date, cotton cultivar, treatment with the growth regulator mepiquat chloride, and destruction of cotton-root systems after harvest on cotton-lint yield and population densities of H. columbus were studied. The yield of cotton cultivar Deltapine 50 was negatively related (P = 0.054) to initial population density of H. columbus whereas the yield of Deltapine 90 was not affected by preplant density of this nematode, indicating tolerance in Deltapine 90. Reproduction of this nematode did not differ on the two cultivars. Planting date and treatment with the growth regulator mepiquat chloride did not influence cotton yield in a consistent manner. Application of mepiquat chloride suppressed (P ? 0.05) numbers of Columbia lance nematode, although there was an interaction (P ? 0.05) with cultivar and year. Early vs. late destruction of cotton-root systems did not impact population densities of this nematode either year, and had no impact on the subsequent cotton crop. The nematicide fenamiphos increased (P ? 0.03) cotton yield when H. columbus numbers exceeded the damage threshold. PMID:19265977

  18. Impact of Cotton Production Systems on Management of Hoplolaimus columbus.

    PubMed

    Koenning, S R; Edmisten, K L; Barker, K R; Morrison, D E

    2003-03-01

    The effectiveness of selected cultural practices in managing the Columbia lance nematode, Hoplolaimus columbus, on cotton was evaluated in experiments in growers' infested fields. The effects of planting date, cotton cultivar, treatment with the growth regulator mepiquat chloride, and destruction of cotton-root systems after harvest on cotton-lint yield and population densities of H. columbus were studied. The yield of cotton cultivar Deltapine 50 was negatively related (P = 0.054) to initial population density of H. columbus whereas the yield of Deltapine 90 was not affected by preplant density of this nematode, indicating tolerance in Deltapine 90. Reproduction of this nematode did not differ on the two cultivars. Planting date and treatment with the growth regulator mepiquat chloride did not influence cotton yield in a consistent manner. Application of mepiquat chloride suppressed (P columbus numbers exceeded the damage threshold. PMID:19265977

  19. Columbus moves to develop low-head hydro potential

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Jerry L.

    1980-05-01

    A study, conducted to determine the feasibility of hydropower generation at two water storage dams owned by the city of Columbus, Ohio, is discussed. The study concluded that power development at these sites is technically, environmentally, and economically feasible. Construction plans are being developed for one site with project completion scheduled for mid 1983. (LCL)

  20. The Native American Response to the Columbus Quincentenary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce de Leon, Juana

    1992-01-01

    In response to the Columbus Quincentenary, indigenous peoples of the Americas are gathering forces to publicize their own perspectives and experiences, which are vastly different than those of European Americans. There is a general intent to use the celebration as a forum to provide fuller descriptions of Indian cultures. (SLD)

  1. Columbus Unified High School: Every Adult Advocates, Every Student Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article features Columbus Unified High School, a school that takes pride in knowing that each student will graduate prepared for his or her future. Although poverty (45%) and unemployment (25%) are widespread in this rural Kansas community, the community members are fierce in their loyalty to the school. Last year, 97.8% of the four-year…

  2. 2010 Library of the Year: Columbus Metropolitan Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2010-01-01

    This article features Columbus Metropolitan Library (CML), winner of the Gale/"Library Journal" Library of the Year Award 2010. CML, comprised of an operations center and 21 branches, serves the 847,376 people who inhabit a large portion of Franklin County in central Ohio. It is an independent library with its own taxing district. CML operates

  3. Columbus Free Flyer Center - Tasks and manpower profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmann, H. J. C.

    The role of element centers within the Columbus ground infrastructure is considered. They will provide system expertise for mission/increment planning, execution and assessment and they will give support to strategical, tactical and executional levels of operations. Center tasks and tasks execution approach are defined together with the implementation approach. Manpower requirements and profiles are given.

  4. Cable TV in Columbus. What's Happening/What Can Happen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Contemporary Problems, Columbus, OH. Design Center for Community Communications.

    This report is divided into two parts. It is an effort by individuals in Columbus, Ohio to inform and aid citizens interested in knowing more about cable television and how to use it. The first half offers factual information, the experience of other communities using cable, the laws governing cable and comments on issues facing the community. The

  5. Columbus Verification Control Approach Versus Micro-gravity Requirement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marucchi-Chierro, P.; Martini, M.

    2004-08-01

    The European project manned module Columbus, as part of the International Space Station has been conceived to allow scientific experiments on micro- gravity environment. In order to face against this challenging Design goal, Alenia Spazio developed a dedicated control approach, based on budget allocation of the mechanical power, covering the design, the Analysis and the Verification aspects from system level down to the equipment one. This Control method covers both the evaluations by analysis and/or by testing of the Columbus Structural and Vibro-acoustic transmission paths and the characterization of the disturbers (as Environment Control Life System fans, Thermal Control System pumps and valves, etc.) in terms of force at the equipment interfaces and Sound power Level emitted by the disturbers in the surrounding volume. A dedicated methodology on how to derive the induced disturber's interface forcing functions has been developed in the frame of this project.This paper reports the most significant outcomes during the whole verification and test process at equipment and system level for the derivation of the disturber forcing function. The originality of the method is based on the fact that in the frame of the Columbus Design/Verification cycle, testing has been done at equipment and at system level for the : a) derivation of the equipment Forcing Function when installed on a reference base-plate b) derivation of the disturbers Forcing function when installed o Columbus in the frame of the complete Micro-gravity System Test that allowed both the characterization of : - the structural and the vibro-acoustic system transmissibility by the use of artificial exciters (as shakers and sound source) - the micro-gravity Environment by the Columbus disturbers activation c) Definition of a combination method of forcing function in order to get similar results coming function in order to get similar results coming from both the equipment characterization standing- alone and from the equipment characterization when installed on Columbus. Samples of the comparison between the forcing functions derived from the equipment tests and from system test will confirm the robustness and the correctness of the combination method and control approach from system level down to equipment one.By this industrial experience developed on ESA-Columbus project, Alenia Spazio got the needed skill and sound database for the Design of the next generation of Space laboratories and Payloads for scientific research on Micro-gravity field.

  6. A time of day analysis of crashes involving large trucks in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Pahukula, Jasmine; Hernandez, Salvador; Unnikrishnan, Avinash

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have looked at different factors that contribute to large truck-involved crashes, however a detailed analysis considering the specific effects of time of day is lacking. Using the Crash Records Information System (CRIS) database in Texas, large truck-involved crashes occurring on urban freeways between 2006 and 2010 were separated into five time periods (i.e., early morning, morning, mid-day, afternoon and evening). A series of log likelihood ratio tests were conducted to validate that five separate random parameters logit models by time of day were warranted. The outcomes of each time of day model show major differences in both the combination of variables included in each model and the magnitude of impact of those variables. These differences show that the different time periods do in fact have different contributing factors to each injury severity further highlighting the importance of examining crashes based on time of day. Traffic flow, light conditions, surface conditions, time of year and percentage of trucks on the road were found as key differences between the time periods. PMID:25481540

  7. A SCREENING LEVEL RISK ASSESSMENT OF THE INDIRECT IMPACTS FROM THE COLUMBUS WASTE TO ENERGY FACILITY IN COLUMBUS, OHIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing for emissions of dioxins from the stack of the Columbus, Ohio Waste to Energy (WTE) municipal solid waste combustion facility in 1992 implied that dioxin concentrations in stack gas averaged 328 ng TEQ/m3. The incinerator had been in operation since the early 1980s. In ...

  8. Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Shaun; Smith, Brent; Cochran, Brian

    2003-04-01

    In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Middle Fork Oxbow Ranch. Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. This report is to be provided to the BPA by 30 April of each year. This is the first annual report filed for the Oxbow Ranch property.

  9. Late Holocene and present-day fluvial morphodynamics in small catchment areas of Central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englhard, Michael; Damm, Bodo; Frechen, Manfred; Terhorst, Birgit

    2010-05-01

    During the past decades strong runoff events repeatedly occurred in small drainage basins of the European low mountains. In numerous events runoff was connected with erosion and transport of extensive bed load. Runoff events were predominantly triggered by rainstorms, which were limited to the catchment areas. They partly caused severe economic loss. The present study focuses on fluvial morphodynamics in northern Hesse and Lower Saxony. In this area runoff and transport of bed load occurred in small tributary catchment areas of the Fulda, Werra and Oberweser rivers. In general, the small drainage basins are used by agriculture and forestry. Drainage channels are developed as gullies and are incised into solid bedrock, Quaternary hillslope sediments, alluvial fills, and anthropogenic deposits. Vertical incision into the bedrock may amount to 1 meter per event. Furthermore, in single cases sediment discharge amounted to 16.000 m³ in addition to the suspension load. On the base of historical analyses about 50 severe runoff events with a maximum frequency of 10 events during 1965 are recorded during the past 150 years in the study area. Field survey, sedimentological analyses and dating reveal intensive runoff processes since the Neolithic age in a comparable catchment area. In this context potsherds could be dated to the Linear Pottery culture, which were detected in an alluvial cone of the "Rehgraben gully", close to the city of.Kassel. Furthermore, findings of fossil wood were recovered in the same alluvial cone. Radiocarbon dating reveals calibrated ages which are for the most parts younger than AD. In younger sediments we suppose the severe runoff event of 1342. Current studies in the catchment area of the Rehgraben aim to distinguish different processes of the fluvial morphodynamics on a temporal scale and to estimate potential Holocene erosional rates. References Damm, B., 2004. Geschiebe führende und murfähige Wildbäche in Mittelgebirgsräumen. Interpraevent 10/3, Themenbereich VII Wildbach, 61-72. Dreibrodt, S., Lubos, C., Terhorst, B., Damm, B., Bork, H.-R., 2009. Historical Soil Erosion by Water in Germany. A Review. - Quaternary International, doi:10.1016/ j.quatint.2009.06.014. Kreikemeier, A., Damm, B., Böhner, J., Hagedorn, J., 2004. Wildbäche im Fulda- und Oberwesereinzugsgebiet (Nordhessen und Südniedersachsen) - Fallbeispiele und Ansätze zur Abfluss- und Abtragsmodellierung. Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie N.F., Suppl. Vol. 135, 69-94.

  10. Next Generation Luminaire (NGL) Downlight Demonstration Project, Hilton Columbus Downtown

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R. G.; Perrin, T. E.

    2014-09-30

    At the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Ohio, DOE's Better Buildings Alliance conducted a demonstration of Next Generation Luminaires-winning downlights installed in all guest rooms and suites prior to the hotel's 2012 opening. After a post-occupancy assessment, the LED downlights not only provided the aesthetic appearance and dimming functionality desired, but also provided 50% energy savings relative to a comparable CFL downlight and enabled the lighting power to be more than 20% below that allowed by code.

  11. Updates on HRF Payloads Operations in Columbus ATCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DePalo, Savino; Wright, Bruce D.; La,e Robert E.; Challis, Simon; Davenport, Robert; Pietrafesa, Donata

    2011-01-01

    The NASA developed Human Research Facility 1 (HRF1) and Human Research Facility (HRF2) experiment racks have been operating in the European Space Agency (ESA) Columbus module of the International Space Station (ISS) since Summer 2008. The two racks are of the same design. Since the start of operations, unexpected pressure spikes were observed in the Columbus module's thermal-hydraulic system during the racks activation sequence. The root cause of these spikes was identified in the activation command sequence in the Rack Interface Controller (RIC), which controls the flow of thermal-hydraulic system fluid through the rack. A new Common RIC Software (CRS) release fixed the bug and was uploaded on both racks in late 2009. This paper gives a short introduction to the topic, describes the Columbus module countermeasures to mitigate the spikes, describes the ground validation test of the new software, and describes the flight checks performed before and after the final upload. Finally, the new on-orbit test designed to further simplify the racks hydraulic management is presented.

  12. Effects of 2 or 5 consecutive exercise days on adipocyte area and lipid parameters in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Ricardo LF; Prado, Wagner L; Cheik, Nádia C; Viana, Fabiana P; Botero, João Paulo; Vendramini, Regina C; Carlos, Iracilda Z; Rossi, Elizeu A; Dâmaso, Ana R

    2007-01-01

    Background Exercise has been prescribed in the treatment and control of dyslipidemias and cholesterolemia, however, lipid responses to different training frequencies in hypercholesterolemic men have been inconsistent. We sought to verify if different frequencies of continuous moderate exercise (2 or 5 days/week, swimming) can, after 8 weeks, promote adaptations in adipocyte area and lipid parameters, as well as body weight and relative weight of tissues in normo and hypercholesterolemic adult male rats. Methods Normal cholesterol chow diet or cholesterol-rich diet (1% cholesterol plus 0.25% cholic acid) were freely given during 8 weeks to the rats divided in 6 experimentals groups: sedentary normal cholesterol chow diet (C); sedentary cholesterol-rich diet (H); 5× per week continuous training normal cholesterol chow diet (TC5) and cholesterol-rich diet (TH5); 2× per week continuos traning normal cholesterol chow diet (TC2) and cholesterol-rich diet (TH2). Results No changes were observed in lipid profile in normal cholesterol chow diet, but both 2 a 5 days/week exercise improved this profile in cholesterol-rich diet. Body weight gain was lower in exercised rats. Decrease in retroperitoneal and epididymal relative weights as well as reductions in adipocyte areas under all diets types were observed only in 5 days/week, while 2 days/week showed improvements mainly in cholesterol-rich diet rats. Conclusion Our results confirm the importance of exercise protocols to control dyslipidemias and obesity in rats. The effects of 5 days/week exercise were more pronounced compared with those of 2 consecutive days/week training. PMID:17605802

  13. Simulation of a Multi-day Ozone Episode in the Metropolitan Area of São Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, V.; Mazzoli, C.; Andrade, M.; Freitas, E.

    2009-05-01

    High concentration values of ozone are commonly observed over the metropolitan area of São Paulo (MASP). According to the state environmental agency (CETESB) violations to the National Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) were reported on 72 days during 2007. Over 19 million people live in the MASP and the vehicular fleet has more than 7 million vehicles responsible for almost 95% of CO, NOX and hydrocarbons emissions. In this study, a prolonged ozone episode observed in the area was simulated with the Simplified Photochemical Model coupled with the Brazilian version of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (SPM- BRAMS). The simulated photochemical episode started in October 3rd, 2002 and lasted for 14 days. During this period, hourly ozone concentration reached values over than 300 μ g.m-3. During 10 days of those 14, more than 60% of the air quality monitoring sites presented ozone levels above the NAAQS. Two nested grids with a horizontal resolution of 16 and 4 km were used in order to evaluate the meteorological conditions related with this extreme air pollution event. Several meteorological variables were extracted from the model simulation. Ozone concentration values simulated by the SPM were also used to support the analysis. During the simulation period, the MASP was under the influence of a high pressure system associated with clear sky conditions and calm winds. Meso-scale circulations were favored due to this synoptic pattern and the sea breeze influence, transporting the photochemical plume to northwest of the region, could be identified during all days of the simulation. During some days even the effect of the land breeze, transporting the plume to the seashore, located about 60 km southeast from the center of the grid, was verified. The planetary boundary layer (PBL) height simulated by the SPM-BRAMS model showed lower values during days when the worst air quality conditions were registered by the existent monitoring network. High temperatures and low relative humidity rates were also observed through the model results. During the entire period, precipitation was not produced by the model. All these factors contributed to the occurrence of the multi-day ozone episode considered in this work.

  14. Volt-VAR Optimization on American Electric Power Feeders in Northeast Columbus

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Weaver, T. F.

    2012-05-10

    In 2007 American Electric Power launched the gridSMART® initiative with the goals of increasing efficiency of the electricity delivery system and improving service to the end-use customers. As part of the initiative, a coordinated Volt-VAR system was deployed on eleven distribution feeders at five substations in the Northeast Columbus Ohio Area. The goal of the coordinated Volt-VAR system was to decrease the amount of energy necessary to provide end-use customers with the same quality of service. The evaluation of the Volt-VAR system performance was conducted in two stages. The first stage was composed of simulation, analysis, and estimation, while the second stage was composed of analyzing collected field data. This panel paper will examine the analysis conducted in both stages and present the estimated improvements in system efficiency.

  15. Health hazard evaluation report heta 94-0179-2516, Diamet Corporation, Columbus, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnes, G.M.; Martinez, K.F.; Lushniak, B.D.

    1995-07-01

    In response to a request from employees of DIAMET Corporation (SIC-3714), Columbus, Indiana, an investigation was begun into reported dermatitis and respiratory symptoms which were thought to be associated with the application of a rust preventive oil to finished metal parts. DIAMET manufactured sintered, metal machinery components using a powder metallurgy process. At the time of manual inspection, the parts were treated with the rust preventative oil just prior to packaging. At the time of the study the oil was applied using either an automatic spray table or a manual spray bottle. The time weighted average concentrations for all the personal breathing zone and area samples were below the NIOSH recommend exposure limits of 5 350mg/cubic meter, for oil mist and naphthas, respectively. The authors conclude that there was a potential for exposures to rust preventative oil during manual spraying. Design deficiencies were cited in the automatic spray tables which, when modified, will improve their effectiveness.

  16. 75 FR 8285 - Establishment of Class D Airspace, Modification of Class E Airspace; Columbus, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ...; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February..., 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 2. The incorporation by... airspace at Columbus Metropolitan Airport, Columbus, GA. A decrease in air traffic volume at the...

  17. 76 FR 47060 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Columbus Lawson AAF, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Columbus Lawson... modifies Class D and Class E airspace at Lawson Army Airfield (AAF), Columbus, GA, by removing the... in the Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to modify Class D and E airspace...

  18. 78 FR 48291 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Columbus, Rickenbacker International Airport, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D Airspace; Columbus.... SUMMARY: This action amends Class D airspace at Rickenbacker International Airport, Columbus, OH. Changes... Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend Class D airspace for Rickenbacker...

  19. 67. MISSISSIPPI, CLAY CO., TIBBEE ROAD BRIDGE On old ColumbusWest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. MISSISSIPPI, CLAY CO., TIBBEE ROAD BRIDGE On old Columbus-West Point rd., just N of Tibbee Aerial view from E side of truss bridge. David J. Kaminsky, Architectural Photography, Atlanta, Ga. Aug. 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  20. Turning Tricks: Sexuality and Trickster Language in Vizenor's "The Heirs of Columbus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lush, Rebecca M.

    2012-01-01

    First published in anticipation of the quincentennial of Christopher Columbus's "discovery" of the Americas, Gerald Vizenor's novel "The Heirs of Columbus" (1991) appropriates the European narrative of discovery to privilege a Native perspective that follows "trickster discourse," a mode that rejects the tragic narratives of the European…

  1. 76 FR 41855 - Columbus Geographic Systems (GIS) Ltd.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Columbus Geographic Systems (GIS) Ltd.; Order of Suspension of Trading July 13, 2011. It appears... concerning the securities of Columbus Geographic Systems (GIS) Ltd. because it has not filed any...

  2. DECOMMISSIONING OF HOT CELL FACILITIES AT THE BATTELLE COLUMBUS LABORATORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Patrick; Henderson, Glenn; Erickson, Peter; Garber, David

    2003-02-27

    Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL), located in Columbus, Ohio, must complete decontamination and decommissioning activities for nuclear research buildings and grounds at its West Jefferson Facilities by 2006, as mandated by Congress. This effort includes decommissioning several hot cells located in the Hot Cell Laboratory (Building JN-1). JN-1 was originally constructed in 1955, and a hot cell/high bay addition was built in the mid 1970s. For over 30 years, BCL used these hot cell facilities to conduct research for the nuclear power industry and several government agencies, including the U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, and the U.S. Department of Energy. As a result of this research, the JN-1 hot cells became highly contaminated with mixed fission and activation products, as well as fuel residues. In 1998, the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) began efforts to decommission JN-1 with the goal of remediating the site to levels of residual contamination allowing future use without radiological restrictions. This goal requires that each hot cell be decommissioned to a state where it can be safely demolished and transported to an off-site disposal facility. To achieve this, the BCLDP uses a four-step process for decommissioning each hot cell: (1) Source Term Removal; (2) Initial (i.e., remote) Decontamination; (3) Utility Removal; and (4) Final (i.e., manual) Decontamination/Stabilization. To date, this process has been successfully utilized on 13 hot cells within JN-1, with one hot cell remaining to be decommissioned. This paper will provide a case study of the hot cell decommissioning being conducted by the BCLDP. Discussed will be the methods used to achieve the goals of each of the hot cell decommissioning stages and the lessons learned that could be applied at other sites where hot cells need to be decommissioned.

  3. Neural activation in arousal and reward areas of the brain in day-active and night-active grass rats

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Ruiz, Alexandra; Nixon, Joshua P.; Smale, Laura; Nunez, Antonio A.

    2009-01-01

    In the diurnal unstriped Nile grass rat (Arvicanthis niloticus) access to a running wheel can trigger a shift in active phase preference, with some individuals becoming night-active (NA), while others continue to be day-active (DA). To investigate the contributions of different neural systems to the support of this shift in locomotor activity, we investigated the association between chronotype and Fos expression during the day and night in three major nuclei in the basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic (ACh) arousal system – medial septum (MS), vertical and horizontal diagonal band of Broca (VDB and HDB respectively) –, and whether neural activation in these areas was related to neural activity in the orexinergic system. We also measured Fos expression in dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic cells of two components of the reward system that also participate in arousal – the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and supramammillary nucleus (SUM). NAs and DAs were compared to animals with no wheels. NAs had elevated Fos expression at night in ACh cells, but only in the HDB. In the non-cholinergic cells of the BF of NAs, enhanced nocturnal Fos expression was almost universally seen, but only associated with activation of the orexinergic system for the MS/ VDB region. For some of the areas and cell types of the BF, the patterns of Fos expression of DAs appeared similar to those of NAs, but were never associated with activation of the orexinergic system. Also common to DAs and NAs was a general increase in Fos expression in non-dopaminergic cells of the SUM and anterior VTA. Thus, in this diurnal species, voluntary exercise and a shift to a nocturnal chronotype changes neural activity in arousal and reward areas of the brain known to regulate a broad range of neural functions and behaviors, which may be also affected in human shift workers. PMID:19837140

  4. Guest Room Lighting at the Hilton Columbus Downtown

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-30

    At the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Ohio, DOE's Better Buildings Alliance conducted a demonstration of Next Generation Luminaires-winning downlights installed in all guest rooms and suites prior to the hotel's 2012 opening. After a post-occupancy assessment, the LED downlights not only provided the aesthetic appearance and dimming functionality desired, but also provided 50% energy savings relative to a comparable CFL downlight and enabled the lighting power to be more than 20% below that allowed by code. This document is a summary case study of the report.

  5. EMC verification approach and facility on Columbus Attached Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccolella, A.; Comandatore, E.; Groll, P.; Roberto, V.

    1990-09-01

    The overall problems of Electro Magnetic Compatibility (EMC) verification, as part of the environmental test phase, to be conducted on very large and technically complex space systems, are studied. The Columbus Attached Laboratory (CAL) was taken as the referenced program, where all the related problems and constraints are present. Major requirements and constraints with regard to the Attached Pressurized Module (APM) are outlined: EMC design and test requirements; overall EMC verification methodology; EMC analytical software tools/models; and external interface simulators. The overall CAL verification approach is summarized.

  6. Portal vein cross-sectional area and flow and orthostatic tolerance: a 90-day bed rest study.

    PubMed

    Arbeille, Philippe P; Besnard, Stephane S; Kerbeci, Pascaline P; Mohty, Dania M

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the changes in the portal vein cross-sectional area (PV CSA) and flow during a stand test associated with orthostatic intolerance. Eighteen subjects underwent a 90-day head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest at 6 degrees: 9 controls (Con) and 9 with flywheel exercise countermeasures (CM). At post-HDT, nine subjects (5 CM, 4 Con) were tolerant, and nine were intolerant. The PV CSA was measured by echography. We found that at HDT day 85, the PV CSA at rest had increased less in the CM subjects than in the Con (+12 vs. +27% from pre-HDT supine; P < 0.05), whereas it increased similarly in tolerant and intolerant subjects (23 and 16%, respectively). Two days after the HDT, there was a decrease in the PV CSA supine compared with the pre-HDT PV CSA supine that was similar for all groups (Con: -11%, CM: -21%; tolerant: -10%, intolerant: -16%; P < 0.05). The PV CSA decreased significantly less from supine to standing in the Con than in the CM group (-2 vs. -10% compared with the pre-HDT stand test; P < 0.05). The PV CSA also decreased significantly from supine to standing compared with the pre-HDT stand test in the tolerant group but not in the intolerant group (-20 vs. +2%; P < 0.05). From these findings, we conclude the following. 1) Because the portal vein is the only output from the splanchnic vascular area, we suggest that the lower reduction in the PV CSA and flow associated with orthostatic intolerance was related to a lower splanchnic arterial vasoconstriction. 2) The flywheel exercise CM helped to reduce the distention of the splanchnic network at rest and to maintain partially the splanchnic vasoconstriction, but it did not reduce the orthostatic intolerance. PMID:16227458

  7. Columbus Zoological Gardens feasibility study for a solar greenhouse at the Columbus Zoo. [Includes set of drawings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-28

    A feasibility study is being conducted to determine if it is possible to design a 100% fossil fuel free greenhouse 1/3 acre in size. Three principle sources of renewable energy will be used: solar energy, methane digestion, and ground water for preheat. The steps taken to achieve a preliminary design are flow charted. An engineering analysis of the greenhouse design is presented. Dimensions for the greenhouse are given and a NOAA climatological data summary is included for Columbus, Ohio. Also included is a preliminary design layout, distribution of heat load, winter design heat loads, and monthly heating loads. A set of drawings is included. (LEW)

  8. Columbus stowage optimization by cast (cargo accommodation support tool)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, G.; Saia, D.; Piras, A.

    2010-08-01

    A challenging issue related to the International Space Station utilization concerns the on-board stowage, implying a strong impact on habitability, safety and crew productivity. This holds in particular for the European Columbus laboratory, nowadays also utilized to provide the station with logistic support. The volume exploitation has to be maximized, in compliance with the given accommodation rules. At each upload step, the stowage problem must be solved quickly and efficiently. This leads to the comparison of different scenarios to select the most suitable one. Last minute upgrades, due to possible re-planning, may, moreover arise, imposing the further capability to rapidly readapt the current solution to the updated status. In this context, looking into satisfactory solutions represents a very demanding job, even for experienced designers. Thales Alenia Space Italia has achieved a remarkable expertise in the field of cargo accommodation and stowage. The company has recently developed CAST, a dedicated in-house software tool, to support the cargo accommodation of the European automated transfer vehicle. An ad hoc version, tailored to the Columbus stowage, has been further implemented and is going to be used from now on. This paper surveys the on-board stowage issue, pointing out the advantages of the proposed approach.

  9. Tectonic influence on depositional sequence development, Columbus Basin, eastern offshore Trinidad and Tobago

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.J.

    1996-12-31

    The Columbus Basin is located off the eastern coast of Trinidad and the northeastern coast of Venezuela, along the margins of the converging Caribbean and Atlantic plates. Post-Miocene tectonics have resulted in transpressional structures oriented NE-SW and tensional faults oriented NW-SE. Sea level has undergone high frequency fluctuations throughout the Plio-Pleistocene. The Orinoco River, which drains the Andean Highlands, has fed enormous quantities of sediment into the basin since the late Miocene (>30,000{prime}). Several observations from an Integrated Depositional Sequence Analysis of the Columbus Basin are applicable to basins in similar settings, such as the Nile and Niger deltas. These include the following: (1) Limited shelf development, associated with limited shelf subsidence, may be an indicator of shelf bypass and slope Canyon development. (2) United basin-floor and slope fan development may be an indicator of shelf aggradation, associated with subsidence at the shelf-break. (3) Extensional and compressional structures focus feeder systems and localize accommodation space. (4) Drill deeper; the basal deepening of a regressive package may be in response to localized tectonics and indicate only temporary loss of good reservoir. (5) Limited transgressive systems tract development is associated with limited transgressive-time accommodation space, and creates better reservoir-seal relationships. (6) Interactively, integrating data sets provides the best chance for discerning: sequence relationships across the basin, local versus basinwide chronologic events, sediment bypass versus aggradation zones, reservoir trends and TRUE age of the section. (7) Interpreting the rock record in terms of accommodation space and sediment supply provides a much more practical methodology in tectonically active areas than traditional sequence stratigraphic techniques using the classic eustatic-driven model.

  10. Tectonic influence on depositional sequence development, Columbus Basin, eastern offshore Trinidad and Tobago

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.J. )

    1996-01-01

    The Columbus Basin is located off the eastern coast of Trinidad and the northeastern coast of Venezuela, along the margins of the converging Caribbean and Atlantic plates. Post-Miocene tectonics have resulted in transpressional structures oriented NE-SW and tensional faults oriented NW-SE. Sea level has undergone high frequency fluctuations throughout the Plio-Pleistocene. The Orinoco River, which drains the Andean Highlands, has fed enormous quantities of sediment into the basin since the late Miocene (>30,000[prime]). Several observations from an Integrated Depositional Sequence Analysis of the Columbus Basin are applicable to basins in similar settings, such as the Nile and Niger deltas. These include the following: (1) Limited shelf development, associated with limited shelf subsidence, may be an indicator of shelf bypass and slope Canyon development. (2) United basin-floor and slope fan development may be an indicator of shelf aggradation, associated with subsidence at the shelf-break. (3) Extensional and compressional structures focus feeder systems and localize accommodation space. (4) Drill deeper; the basal deepening of a regressive package may be in response to localized tectonics and indicate only temporary loss of good reservoir. (5) Limited transgressive systems tract development is associated with limited transgressive-time accommodation space, and creates better reservoir-seal relationships. (6) Interactively, integrating data sets provides the best chance for discerning: sequence relationships across the basin, local versus basinwide chronologic events, sediment bypass versus aggradation zones, reservoir trends and TRUE age of the section. (7) Interpreting the rock record in terms of accommodation space and sediment supply provides a much more practical methodology in tectonically active areas than traditional sequence stratigraphic techniques using the classic eustatic-driven model.

  11. A numerical model simulation of the regional air pollution meteorology of the greater Chesapeake Bay area - Summer day case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, M.; Pielke, R. A.; Mcnider, R. T.; Mcdougal, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    The mesoscale numerical model of the University of Virginia (UVMM), has been applied to the greater Chesapeake Bay area in order to provide a detailed description of the air pollution meteorology during a typical summer day. This model provides state of the art simulations for land-sea thermally induced circulations. The model-predicted results agree favorably with available observed data. The effects of synoptic flow and sea breeze coupling on air pollution meteorological characteristics in this region, are demonstrated by a spatial and temporal presentation of various model predicted fields. A transport analysis based on predicted wind velocities indicated possible recirculation of pollutants back onto the Atlantic coast due to the sea breeze circulation.

  12. Timing of cut-and-fill sequences in the John Day Formation (Eocene-Oligocene), Painted Hills area, central Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Bestland, E.A.; Retallack, G.J. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Swisher, C.C. III ); Fremd, T.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Large-scale cut-and-fill features in the Eocene-Oligocene part of the John Day Formation in the Pained Hills area of central Oregon can be interpreted as terrestrial depositional sequences, mapped as lithostratigraphic units, and correlated to North American Land Mammal Ages (NALMA). New laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar single-crystal ages from the John Day Formation provide evidence for the timing of these sequences and a revised placement of the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. The sequences are bound by erosional surfaces that have relief of up to 60 m, are marked in places by claystone breccias full of reworked soil clasts, and separate otherwise conformable strata. The lowermost depositional sequence in the John Day Formation contains very well developed, Fe- and Al-rich paleosols, laterite horizons, and the welded tuff of member A (39.7 my), and probably correlates to the Duchesean and Chadronian NALMA. These brick-rid claystones are sharply truncated by prominent detrital laterite horizon. Overlying this basal sequence is a second sequence of much less well developed paleosols, abundant tuffs and lacustrine tuffaceous claystones. This sequence contains a distinctive biotite tuff (33 my) and the type locality of the Bridge Creek fossil flora and probably correlates to the Orellan NALMA. Above this biotite tuff are alternating red, dark gray, and tan paleosols and a prominent crystal vitric tuff (32.7 my). The Eocene-Oligocene boundary lies between these two sequences, associated with the laterite horizon that truncates the basal red beds. A major truncation surface cuts this sequence and is overlain by a third sequence of thin red paleosols which probably correlates with the Whitneyan NALMA. Above this is a fourth sequence (Arikareean NALMA) consisting of greenish-tan paleosols, a crystal vitric tuff near its base (29.8 my) and the Picture Gorge Ignimbrite (28.7 my).

  13. The Microgravity Isolation Mount (MGIM): A Columbus facility for improving the microgravity quality of payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, R. G.; Jones, D. I.; Owens, A. R.; Roberts, G.; Hadfield, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Microgravity Isolation Mount (MGIM) is a facility for providing active vibration isolation for sensitive experiments on the Columbus Attached Laboratory and the Columbus Free-Flying Laboratory. The facility is designed to be accommodated in a standard Columbus rack, and it iterfaces with existing rack utility services. The design is based on a non-contact strategy, whereby the payload 'floats' inside the rack, and its position is controlled by a number of magnetic actuators. The main advantage of using this non-contact strategy is the improved microgravity quality available. The overall design of the facility and a description of its elements are given.

  14. [Christopher Columbus flu. A hypothesis for an ecological catastrophe].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Sanz, Agustín

    2006-05-01

    When Christopher Columbus and his men embarked on the second Colombian expedition to the New World (1493), the crew suffered from fever, respiratory symptoms and malaise. It is generally accepted that the disease was influenza. Pigs, horses and hens acquired in Gomera (Canary Islands) traveled in the same ship. The pigs may well have been the origin of the flu and the intermediary hosts for genetic recombination of other viral subtypes. The Caribbean archipelago had a large population of birds, the natural reservoir of the avian influenza virus. In this ecological scenario there was a concurrence of several biological elements that had never before coexisted in the New World: pigs, horses, the influenza virus and humans. We propose that birds are likely to have played an important role in the epidemiology of the flu occurring on the second Colombian trip, which caused a fatal demographic catastrophe, with an estimated mortality of 90% among the natives. PMID:16762260

  15. The "Egg of Columbus" for making the world's toughest fibres.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Nicola M

    2014-01-01

    In this letter we present the "Egg of Columbus" for making fibres with unprecedented toughness: a slider, in the simplest form just a knot, is introduced as frictional element to dissipate additional energy and thus demonstrating the existence of a previously "hidden" toughness. The proof of concept is experimentally realized making the world's toughest fibre, increasing the toughness modulus of a commercial Endumax macroscopic fibre from 44 J/g up to 1070 J/g (and of a zylon microfiber from 20 J/g up to 1400 J/g). The ideal upperbound toughness is expected for graphene, with a theoretical value of ∼10(5) J/g. This new concept, able of maximizing (one fold increment) the structural robustness, could explain the mysterious abundance of knot formations, in spite of their incremental energy cost and topological difficulty, in biological evolved structures, such as DNA strands and proteins. PMID:24695084

  16. International Space Station Columbus Payload SoLACES Degradation Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, William; Schmidl, William; Mikatarian, Ron; Soares, Carlos; Schmidtke, Gerhard; Erhardt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    SOLAR is a European Space Agency (ESA) payload deployed on the International Space Station (ISS) and located on the Columbus Laboratory. It is located on the Columbus External Payload Facility in a zenith location. The objective of the SOLAR payload is to study the Sun. The SOLAR payload consists of three instruments that allow for measurement of virtually the entire electromagnetic spectrum (17 nm to 100 um). The three payload instruments are SOVIM (SOlar Variable and Irradiance Monitor), SOLSPEC (SOLar SPECctral Irradiance measurements), and SolACES (SOLar Auto-Calibrating Extreme UV/UV Spectrophotometers). The SolACES payload includes a set of 4 spectrometers that measure the solar EUV flux from 17 nm to 220 nm. One of these 4 spectrometers failed early on (before deployment). EUV data is important in understanding the solar dynamo. Also, EUV flux is the source of most of the ionization that produces the ionosphere plasma. Plasma production is important in understanding the ionosphere environment. The ionosphere conditions affect many subjects including spacecraft charging, dynamo processes, instabilities, and communications. The 3 remaining spectrometers have collected valuable data during the historically low solar cycle 24. Some of this data will be presented. A significant trend in degradation of the remaining SolACES spectrometers was observed towards the end of CY2010 (GMT 310) through mid CY 2011 (GMT 132). The Principle Investigators of SolACES initiated a Mission Evaluation Room (MER) Chit to request an investigation of the degradation in CY 2011 (GMT 230). The Boeing Space Environments team was asked to respond to the ESA initiated MER Chit request to investigate the cause of the degradation. This paper will discuss the findings of that investigation.

  17. Exploring Habitability, Hydrology, and Climate Change on Mars at Columbus Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. L.; Wray, J. J.

    2015-10-01

    Columbus crater is groundwater fed paleolake basin located in the northwest region of Terra Sirenum and is known for hosting a large diversity of aqueous deposits and therefore hosts a variety of science ROIs and potential resource ROIs.

  18. Automation and robotics for COLUMBUS: An implementation concept for the free flying laboratory (MTFF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goelz, G.; Sommer, B.

    1992-01-01

    With nearly forty percent of the funding, Germany is the main contributor to the European COLUMBUS Programme, followed by Italy, France and further ESA member states. The COLUMBUS elements are the Attached Laboratory (APM) to be permanently attached to the Space Station FREEDOM, the polar platform (PPF) and the Man Tended Free Flyer (MTFF). The latter element is regarded to be of special interest for the German micro-g community. Until now the implementation of A&R Technologies has not been included as part of the system concept for the COLUMBUS laboratory modules. Yet especially for the Free Flyer, a high degree of A&R will be indispensible. An A&R system concept and implementation options for A&R are given to make the COLUMBUS labs 'intelligent' laboratories in orbit.

  19. Eco-Environmental Assessment and Analysis of Tonglvshan Mining Area in Daye City, Hubei Province Based on Spatiotemporal Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. M.; He, G. J.; Wang, M. M.; Zhang, Z. M.; Jiao, W. L.; Peng, Y.; Wang, G. Z.; Liu, H. C.; Long, T. F.

    2015-07-01

    Mine exploitation has a significant impact on the ecological environment status of the surroundings. To analyze the impact of Tonglvshan Mining area to its surroundings, this paper adopted the spatiotemporal methodology based on the extracted Eco-environmental Quality Index (EQI) to analysis the extent and degree of the effect. The spatiotemporal methodologies are based on two scales: buffers and administrative units. EQI includes Biological Abundance Index (BAI), Vegetation Index (VI), Water Network Density Index (WNDI), and Land Degradation Index (LDI). The weight of each Index was determined by the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and scores of the experts. The calculating of EQI was referenced to the standard "Technical criterion for Eco-environment Status Evaluation" HJ/T192-2006 and the "Standards for Classification and Gradation of Soil Erosion" SL 190-96. Considering ecological and environmental characteristics relevant to China, this method has been widely used to study the environment status of specific regions in China. The assessment based on buffers adopted the radius of 300m, 500m, 700m, 1000m, 1500m, 2000m, 2500m, 3000m, 3500m, and 4000m as the buffers in 3 typical miners respectively. The calculated result indicates that, the REI is increasing with the radius and the increasing rate becoming smaller until REI is stable. Which means the effect of miner is getting weaker with the distance to the miner is increasing and the effect is diminished when the distance is far enough. The analysis of the 3 typical miner shows that the extent and degree of the effect of miner relates not only with the area of the miner, but also with type of mineral resource, the status of mining and the ecological restoration. The assessment was also carried out by calculating the EQI in 14 administrative units in Daye city in 2000, 2005, and 2010. The study shows that the EQI is decreasing in 14 units from 2000 to 2010. The spatiotemporal analysis of the type and area of land cover in 14 units within ten years period ranging from 2000 to 2010 shows that the mainly factor to affect the eco-environment status is mine exploitation and urban expansion.

  20. 3 CFR 9041 - Proclamation 9041 of October 11, 2013. Columbus Day, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Americans have enriched our culture and our communities—as soldiers who defend our Nation in times of war... their arrival would leave on the Native American societies they encountered. So as we celebrate the bold... Americans, with whom the United States will always maintain strong nation-to-nation relationships. As...

  1. 3 CFR 8437 - Proclamation 8437 of October 9, 2009. Columbus Day, 2009

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Americans to pursue brave new frontiers in business, science, and technology. Today, we reflect on the... land for many European nations whose people would later flock to our shores in search of prosperity and... women to search out the farthest reaches of the world. From the coasts of Newfoundland to the Gulf...

  2. 33 CFR 100.729 - Columbus Day Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Coast Guard Patrol Commander may permit traffic to resume normal operations. (3) Between scheduled racing events, the Coast Guard Patrol Commander may permit traffic to resume normal operations for...

  3. A screening level risk assessment of the indirect impacts from the Columbus Waste to Energy facility in Columbus, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Lorber, M.; Cleverly, D.; Schaum, J.

    1996-12-31

    Testing for emissions of dioxins from the stack of the Columbus, Ohio Waste to Energy (WTE) municipal solid waste combustion facility in 1992 implied that dioxin emissions could approach 1,000 grams of dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) per year. The incinerator has been in operation since the early 1980s. Several varying activities to further evaluate or curtail emissions were conducted by local, state and federal agencies in 1994. Also in that year, US EPA`s Region 5 issued an emergency order under Section 7003 of RCRA requiring the facility to install maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT). As part of their justification for this emergency order, Region 5 used a screening level risk assessment of potential indirect impacts. This paper describes this assessment. The exposure setting is a hypothetical dairy farm where individuals on the farm obtain their beef, milk, and vegetables from home sources. A 70-year exposure scenario is considered, which includes 45 years of facility operation at the pre- and post-MACT emission rates, followed by 25 years of impact due to residual soil concentrations. Soil dermal contact, inhalation, and breast milk exposures were also considered for this assessment. The source term, or dioxin loadings to this setting, were derived from air dispersion modeling of emissions from the Columbus WTE. A key finding of the assessment was that exposures to dioxin in beef and milk dominated the estimated risks, with excess cancer risk form these two pathways estimated at 2.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. A second key finding was that over 90% of a lifetime of impact from these two pathways, and the inhalation and vegetable ingestion pathways, has already occurred due to pre-MACT emissions.

  4. Candidate functions for advanced technology implementation in the Columbus mission planning environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, Audrey; Kellner, Albrecht

    1988-01-01

    The Columbus Project is the European Space Agency's contribution to the International Space Station program. Columbus is planned to consist of three elements (a laboratory module attached to the Space Station base, a man-tended freeflyer orbiting with the Space Station base, and a platform in polar orbit). System definition and requirements analysis for Columbus are underway, scheduled for completion in mid-1990. An overview of the Columbus mission planning environment and operations concept as currently defined is given, and some of the challenges presented to software maintainers and ground segment personnel during mission operators are identified. The use of advanced technologies in system implementation is being explored. Both advantages of such solutions and potential problems they present are discussed, and the next steps to be taken by Columbus before targeting any functions for advanced technology implementation are summarized. Several functions in the mission planning process were identified as candidates for advanced technology implementation. These range from expert interaction with Columbus' data bases through activity scheduling and near-real-time response to departures from the planned timeline. Each function is described, and its potential for advanced technology implementation briefly assessed.

  5. 27 CFR 70.306 - Time for performance of acts other than payment of tax or filing of any return when the last day...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... October, Columbus Day, (ix) November 11, Veterans' Day, (x) Fourth Thursday in November, Thanksgiving Day... acts other than payment of tax or filing of any return when the last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or... performance of acts other than payment of tax or filing of any return when the last day falls on...

  6. 27 CFR 70.306 - Time for performance of acts other than payment of tax or filing of any return when the last day...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... October, Columbus Day, (ix) November 11, Veterans' Day, (x) Fourth Thursday in November, Thanksgiving Day... acts other than payment of tax or filing of any return when the last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or... performance of acts other than payment of tax or filing of any return when the last day falls on...

  7. 27 CFR 70.306 - Time for performance of acts other than payment of tax or filing of any return when the last day...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... October, Columbus Day, (ix) November 11, Veterans' Day, (x) Fourth Thursday in November, Thanksgiving Day... acts other than payment of tax or filing of any return when the last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or... performance of acts other than payment of tax or filing of any return when the last day falls on...

  8. 27 CFR 70.306 - Time for performance of acts other than payment of tax or filing of any return when the last day...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... October, Columbus Day, (ix) November 11, Veterans' Day, (x) Fourth Thursday in November, Thanksgiving Day... acts other than payment of tax or filing of any return when the last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or... performance of acts other than payment of tax or filing of any return when the last day falls on...

  9. Contributions of suspended sediment from highway construction and other land uses to the Olentangy River, Columbus, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helsel, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Highway construction within the Olentangy River flood plain in Columbus, Ohio, was projected to be a large source of suspended sediment to the river system. A monitoring program was begun by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1978 to quantify the implacts of construction process. Sediment information was collected daily at six gaging stations located above, below, and within the construction area. Yields of suspended sediment from the active construction area ranged from 9,580 to 15,700 tons per square mile per year. Surrounding suburban terrain yielded 428 to754 tons per square mile per year. However, the size of the construction project was small in comparison to the surrounding suburbs contributing sediment. No more than 4 percent of the yearly downstream suspended-sediment loads were produced by high-way construction during the monitoring periods.

  10. Generations: A Co-Located Intergenerational Day Care Program. Replication Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Christopher R.; And Others

    This manual describes the procedures for planning and implementing a co-located or shared-site intergenerational day care program, based on the experiences of the Generations program in Columbus, Ohio. Part 1 of the manual defines co-located or shared site programs, provides a rationale for providing co-located child day care and adult day…

  11. Rethinking Columbus: The Next 500 Years. Resources for Teaching about the Impact of the Arrival of Columbus in the Americas. 2nd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Bill, Ed.; Peterson, Bob, Ed.

    This revised edition offers an alternative narrative of the myth about the voyages of Christopher Columbus traditionally taught in schools. The hope is to encourage a deeper understanding of the European invasion's consequences, to honor the rich legacy of resistance to the injustices it created, to convey the appreciation for the diverse…

  12. Space-to-Ground Communication for Columbus: A Quantitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Thomas; Mannel, Thurid; Fortunato, Antonio; Illmer, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS) are only the most visible part of a much larger team engaged around the clock in the performance of science and technical activities in space. The bulk of such team is scattered around the globe in five major Mission Control Centers (MCCs), as well as in a number of smaller payload operations centres. Communication between the crew in space and the flight controllers at those locations is an essential element and one of the key drivers to efficient space operations. Such communication can be carried out in different forms, depending on available technical assets and the selected operational approach for the activity at hand. This paper focuses on operational voice communication and provides a quantitative overview of the balance achieved in the Columbus program between collaborative space/ground operations and autonomous on-board activity execution. An interpretation of the current situation is provided, together with a description of potential future approaches for deep space exploration missions. PMID:26290898

  13. Space-to-Ground Communication for Columbus: A Quantitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Uhlig, Thomas; Mannel, Thurid; Fortunato, Antonio; Illmer, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS) are only the most visible part of a much larger team engaged around the clock in the performance of science and technical activities in space. The bulk of such team is scattered around the globe in five major Mission Control Centers (MCCs), as well as in a number of smaller payload operations centres. Communication between the crew in space and the flight controllers at those locations is an essential element and one of the key drivers to efficient space operations. Such communication can be carried out in different forms, depending on available technical assets and the selected operational approach for the activity at hand. This paper focuses on operational voice communication and provides a quantitative overview of the balance achieved in the Columbus program between collaborative space/ground operations and autonomous on-board activity execution. An interpretation of the current situation is provided, together with a description of potential future approaches for deep space exploration missions. PMID:26290898

  14. Solar Education and Outreach at Columbus State University's Mead Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael; Hood, J.; Cruzen, S. T.

    2006-12-01

    Since Columbus State University’s Mead Observatory opened its doors in 1996, the primary goals have been public outreach and education using its main 16-inch telescope and an army of smaller 8and 10inch telescopes that travel to many locations giving adults and children a new view on the night sky. In 2001, Mead Observatory’s main instrument, the 16-inch Meade LX200, was converted to a full-time solar telescope with a generous grant from a private foundation. Since 2001, the Solar Observatory has grown to include an online accessibility that allows schools from around the world to log on and experience the Sun from their own classroom. At the beginning of 2006, the decision was made to upgrade some of the hardware and software used for online access. The upgrades were intended to make the online experience easier for teachers and allow for better imaging over the internet. This poster highlights how these changes enhance the online experience and allow the Mead Observatory to achieve is educational outreach goals.

  15. Projecting Monthly Natural Gas Sales for Space Heating Using a Monthly Updated Model and Degree-days from Monthly Outlooks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Richard L.; Warren, Henry E.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of projecting monthly residential natural gas sales and evaluating interannual changes in demand is investigated using a linear regression model adjusted monthly. with lagged monthly heating degree-days as the independent variable. The relationship between sales and degree-day data for customers of Columbia Gas Company (serving the Columbus, Ohio, area) is studied for a 20-yr period ending in June 1990. Analysis of the phases of the monthly billed sales and the degree-day data indicated that monthly sales reports lagged degree-days and gas consumption by 15 days on average. Running 12-month regressions of Columbia Gas sales on 15-day-lagged degree-days show that lagged degree-days explain, on average, 97% of the variability in the monthly sales reports for the study years. Annualized trends in the regression coefficients indicate changes in consumption due to conservation and changes in price. Since 1974 75 the trends indicate declines of 50% in non-weather- sensitive sales per customer, and 35% in monthly sales per degree-day per customer, with most of the changes occurring prior to 1985. The mode is adapted by using a regression equation based on historical data through the prior 12 months with degree-days as the independent variable. Estimates for sales in the coming period are based on official National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) monthly temperature outlooks (outlooks) for the Columbus region. For comparison purposes, four lagged monthly degree-day sets are used in a model: 1) a set of degree-day normals, 2) a set of 100% projected degree-day values obtained by use of NOAA outlooks, 3) a set in which the first half of the degree-days in each monthly period are observations and the second half are projected, and 4) a set that is 100% observed (the perfect case). The skill of the degree-day sets for projecting monthly sales is evaluated by a statistical analysis of the projection errors (differences between projected and reported sales). Errors from the sales projection models using the four different degree-day sets are compared with errors from two sets of baseline sales. The first set of baseline sales is estimated with and the second set without foreknowledge of monthly sales norms and annual total sales. The models using partially and fully projected degree-days are found to have measurable skill over models using climatology in projecting monthly gas sales during the heating season.

  16. Christopher Columbus and His Voyages to America: A Guide to Selected Sources in the Kent State University Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent State Univ., OH. Univ. Libraries.

    This annotated list of reference sources features materials about Christopher Columbus's voyages to the Americas. While the sources featured are to be found specifically in Kent State University (Ohio) Libraries, this guide may provide helpful suggestions to persons interested in materials on Columbus in general. The guide covers the following…

  17. Supporting Student Teachers with Laptop Computers: A Project of the School of Education at Columbus State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggsby, Dutchie

    This paper describes a project at Columbus State University (Columbus, Georgia) to have students in the School of Education develop an electronic resume. A grant proposal was written which requested laptops for the development of electronic portfolios, and funding was received. Student participants were selected and were provided with Macintosh…

  18. Day to Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurecki, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A clean, healthy and safe school provides students, faculty and staff with an environment conducive to learning and working. However, budget and staff reductions can lead to substandard cleaning practices and unsanitary conditions. Some school facility managers have been making the switch to a day-schedule to reduce security and energy costs, and…

  19. Day to Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurecki, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A clean, healthy and safe school provides students, faculty and staff with an environment conducive to learning and working. However, budget and staff reductions can lead to substandard cleaning practices and unsanitary conditions. Some school facility managers have been making the switch to a day-schedule to reduce security and energy costs, and

  20. Future Studies of the Local Interstellar Medium with Space Telescope and Columbus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, B. D.

    1984-01-01

    The spectrographs aboard Space Telescope and Columbus which will provide important new information about the interstellar medium in the immediate vicinity of the sun are described. The space telescope's highest resolution is adequate to define the multicomponent nature of interstellar absorption lines and to measure thermal line widths exceeding 3 km/s. The Columbus spacecraft will contain spectrographs capable of resolutions of 3 x 10 to the 4th power between 912 and 1200 A and 500 between 100 and 900 A. In the short wavelength region, lines of He I and II, are observable. If the 3 x 10 to the 4th power resolution spectrograph provides extended wavelength coverage to 770 A, lines of Ne VIII which are expected from 8 x 10 to the 5th power K gas are accessible. The ST HRS and Columbus spectrographs enable the study of a wide range of problems relating to cold, warm, and hot gas in the local ISM.

  1. Tolerance to Hololaimus columbus in Glyphosate-Resistant, Transgenic Soybean Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Koenning, S R

    2002-12-01

    Transgenic soybean cultivars, resistant to glyphosate herbicide in maturity groups V and VI, were evaluated for tolerance to the Columbia lance nematode, Hoplolaimus columbus, in field experiments conducted in 1998 and 1999. Treatment with 43 liter/ha of 1,3-dichloropropene was effective in suppressing H. columbus population densities in a split-plot design. Fumigation increased soybean yield, but a significant cultivar x fumigation interaction indicated variation in cultivar response to H. columbus. A tolerance index (yield of nontreated / yield of treated x 100) was used to compare cultivar differences. Two cultivars in maturity group VI and one cultivar in maturity group V had a tolerance index greater than 90, indicating a high level of tolerance. PMID:19265958

  2. Tolerance to Hololaimus columbus in Glyphosate-Resistant, Transgenic Soybean Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Koenning, S. R.

    2002-01-01

    Transgenic soybean cultivars, resistant to glyphosate herbicide in maturity groups V and VI, were evaluated for tolerance to the Columbia lance nematode, Hoplolaimus columbus, in field experiments conducted in 1998 and 1999. Treatment with 43 liter/ha of 1,3-dichloropropene was effective in suppressing H. columbus population densities in a split-plot design. Fumigation increased soybean yield, but a significant cultivar fumigation interaction indicated variation in cultivar response to H. columbus. A tolerance index (yield of nontreated yield of treated 100) was used to compare cultivar differences. Two cultivars in maturity group VI and one cultivar in maturity group V had a tolerance index greater than 90, indicating a high level of tolerance. PMID:19265958

  3. Columbus crater and other possible groundwater-fed paleolakes of Terra Sirenum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wray, J.J.; Milliken, R.E.; Dundas, C.M.; Swayze, G.A.; Andrews-Hanna, J. C.; Baldridge, A.M.; Chojnacki, M.; Bishop, J.L.; Ehlmann, B.L.; Murchie, S.L.; Clark, R.N.; Seelos, F.P.; Tornabene, L.L.; Squyres, S. W.

    2011-01-01

    Columbus crater in the Terra Sirenum region of the Martian southern highlands contains light-toned layered deposits with interbedded sulfate and phyllosilicate minerals, a rare occurrence on Mars. Here we investigate in detail the morphology, thermophysical properties, mineralogy, and stratigraphy of these deposits; explore their regional context; and interpret the crater's aqueous history. Hydrated mineral-bearing deposits occupy a discrete ring around the walls of Columbus crater and are also exposed beneath younger materials, possibly lava flows, on its floor. Widespread minerals identified in the crater include gypsum, polyhydrated and monohydrated Mg/Fe-sulfates, and kaolinite; localized deposits consistent with montmorillonite, Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates, jarosite, alunite, and crystalline ferric oxide or hydroxide are also detected. Thermal emission spectra suggest abundances of these minerals in the tens of percent range. Other craters in northwest Terra Sirenum also contain layered deposits and Al/Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates, but sulfates have so far been found only in Columbus and Cross craters. The region's intercrater plains contain scattered exposures of Al-phyllosilicates and one isolated mound with opaline silica, in addition to more common Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates with chlorides. A Late Noachian age is estimated for the aqueous deposits in Columbus, coinciding with a period of inferred groundwater upwelling and evaporation, which (according to model results reported here) could have formed evaporites in Columbus and other craters in Terra Sirenum. Hypotheses for the origin of these deposits include groundwater cementation of crater-filling sediments and/or direct precipitation from subaerial springs or in a deep (???900 m) paleolake. Especially under the deep lake scenario, which we prefer, chemical gradients in Columbus crater may have created a habitable environment at this location on early Mars. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Columbus crater and other possible groundwater-fed paleolakes of Terra Sirenum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, J. J.; Milliken, R. E.; Dundas, C. M.; Swayze, G. A.; Andrews-Hanna, J. C.; Baldridge, A. M.; Chojnacki, M.; Bishop, J. L.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Murchie, S. L.; Clark, R. N.; Seelos, F. P.; Tornabene, L. L.; Squyres, S. W.

    2011-01-01

    Columbus crater in the Terra Sirenum region of the Martian southern highlands contains light-toned layered deposits with interbedded sulfate and phyllosilicate minerals, a rare occurrence on Mars. Here we investigate in detail the morphology, thermophysical properties, mineralogy, and stratigraphy of these deposits; explore their regional context; and interpret the crater's aqueous history. Hydrated mineral-bearing deposits occupy a discrete ring around the walls of Columbus crater and are also exposed beneath younger materials, possibly lava flows, on its floor. Widespread minerals identified in the crater include gypsum, polyhydrated and monohydrated Mg/Fe-sulfates, and kaolinite; localized deposits consistent with montmorillonite, Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates, jarosite, alunite, and crystalline ferric oxide or hydroxide are also detected. Thermal emission spectra suggest abundances of these minerals in the tens of percent range. Other craters in northwest Terra Sirenum also contain layered deposits and Al/Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates, but sulfates have so far been found only in Columbus and Cross craters. The region's intercrater plains contain scattered exposures of Al-phyllosilicates and one isolated mound with opaline silica, in addition to more common Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates with chlorides. A Late Noachian age is estimated for the aqueous deposits in Columbus, coinciding with a period of inferred groundwater upwelling and evaporation, which (according to model results reported here) could have formed evaporites in Columbus and other craters in Terra Sirenum. Hypotheses for the origin of these deposits include groundwater cementation of crater-filling sediments and/or direct precipitation from subaerial springs or in a deep (˜900 m) paleolake. Especially under the deep lake scenario, which we prefer, chemical gradients in Columbus crater may have created a habitable environment at this location on early Mars.

  5. Toward a permanent lunar settlement in the coming decade: the Columbus Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A.; Ishikawa, M.Y.; Wood, L.L.

    1985-11-19

    The motivation for creating a permanent lunar settlement is sketched, and reasons for doing so in the coming decade are put forward. A basic plan to accomplish this is outlined, along technical and programmatic axes. It is concluded that founding a lunar settlement on the five hundredth anniversary of the Columbus landing - a Columbus Project - could be executed as a volunteer-intensive American enterprise requiring roughly six thousand man-years of skilled endeavor and a total Governmental contribution of the order of a half-billion dollars. 8 figs.

  6. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Coy, R. G.; Braden, R. P.

    1980-09-01

    The Solar Energy System installed at Columbus Technical Institute, Columbus, Ohio was installed as a part of a new construction of a college building. The building will house classrooms and laboratories, administrative offices and three lecture halls. The Solar Energy System consists of 4096 square feet (128 panels) Owens/Illinois Evacuated Glass Tube Collector Subsystem, and a 5000 gallon steel tank below ground storage system, hot water is circulated between the collectors and storage tank, passing through a water/lithium bromide absorption chiller to cool the building. Extracts from the site files specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  7. Digital-model analysis to predict water levels in a well field near Columbus, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Planert, Michael

    1976-01-01

    Columbus, Indiana, obtains its water supply from six municipally owned wells southwest of the city. The wells are screened in an outwash sand and gravel aquifer that was deposited by glacial melt water in a preglacial bedrock valley. The well field is midway between the East Fork White River and the western edge of the valley. A digital model was used to determine the effects of two pumping plans on the outwash sand and gravel aquifer. In pumping plan 1, a continuous pumping rate of 1,400 gallons per minute (gpm) for 10 years in each of the city 's six existing wells was simulated with the model. Model results of plan 1 indicate that the water levels in the area of the well field would be lowered more than 20 ft and that drawdowns in the wells would approach 35 ft after 10 years ' pumping. Pumping plan 2 had two stages of pumping. In the first, a continuous pumping rate of 1,400 gpm for 5 years in each of the city 's six existing wells was simulated with the model; the second stage of pumping plan 2 differed from stage 1 only in that five planned wells were added to the six existing wells. Model results of plan 2 indicate that water levels in the area of the well field would be lowered as much as 40 feet. Drawdown at two of the well sites would approach 60 ft, leaving less than 15 ft of the initial 70 ft of saturated thickness at the two wells after 10 years ' pumping. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence Reported by Homeless Youth in Columbus, Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Natasha; Erdem, Gizem; Collins, Jennifer; Patton, Rikki; Buettner, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    No study to date has reported intimate partner violence (IPV) experiences among homeless youth. This study sought to uncover lifetime prevalence estimates of physical, sexual, and emotional IPV among a nonprobability sample of 180 homeless male and female youth in Columbus, Ohio. To that aim, self-reported IPV and the association between IPV and

  9. Christopher Columbus: Bridge between Two Worlds. An ERIC/ChESS Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1992-01-01

    Lists eight entries in the ERIC database that concern Christopher Columbus and the effects of his voyages on world history. Includes works on curriculum development, biological effects of the contact, and a bibliography of books for children. Explains how to find and obtain the materials. (DK)

  10. Nineteenth-Century American and British Poets on Columbus: A Twentieth-Century View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Anita G.

    In the 19th century alone, Christopher Columbus was the subject of hundreds of poems that rarely questioned his voyage, his methods, or his place in human history. However, the scholarly work and political realities of the 20th century have undermined the noble, heroic visions conveyed by the poets. Modern readers/students have a dual duty to…

  11. Readings for the Christopher Columbus Quincentenary: Kindergarten through Grade Twelve. An Annotated List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    The main purpose of this publication is to encourage educators in California to use this increasing interest in the quincentenary of the first voyage of Christopher Columbus to the New World to motivate students to read broadly and in depth in literature, history, and geography and to investigate controversial issues and think critically about…

  12. Painting and Christopher Columbus: A Story about Metaphors for School Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakofs, Mitch

    1998-01-01

    Uses metaphors of the preparation necessary for painting and for Columbus's journey into the unknown to suggest a model for planning and promoting school reform. Steps include definition of preexisting conditions, assessment of the situation, immersion (communication and trust building among stakeholders), and coordinated strategic and tactical…

  13. LONG-TERM CONTINUOUS MONITOR DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM: COLUMBUS AND SOUTHERN OHIO ELECTRIC COMPANY, CONESVILLE UNIT 6

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a continuous monitoring demonstration at the Columbus and Southern Ohio Electric Company's Conesville Generating Station. The purpose of the demonstration was to determine the feasibility of the requirements for monitoring and control of SO2 emissions ...

  14. Reviews: "The Crown of Columbus," [by] Michael Dorris and Louise Erdrich.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beidler, Peter G.; Hoy, Helen

    1991-01-01

    Beidler defends "The Crown of Columbus" against criticisms of its best-seller qualities and applauds its universality, playfulness, and thought-provoking qualities. Hoy views the novel as revisionist history contained within a seemingly frivolous narrative, a polyvocal protean voyage of discovery with humor and self-referentiality as its vehicles.…

  15. Ada (R) assessment: An important issue within European Columbus Support Technology Programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vielcanet, P.

    1986-01-01

    Software will be more important and more critical for Columbus than for any ESA previous project. As a simple comparison, overall software size has been in the range of 100 K source statements for EXOSAT, 500 K for Spacelab, and will probably reach several million lines of code for Columbus (all element together). Based on past experience, the total development cost of software can account for about 10 pct to 15 pct of the total space project development cost. The Ada technology may support the strong software engineering principles needed for Columbus, provided that technology is sufficiently mature and industry plans are meeting the Columbus project schedule. Over the past 3 years, Informatique Internationale has conducted a coherent program based on Ada technology assessment studies and experiments, for ESA and CNES. This specific research and development program benefits from 15 years experience in the field of space software development and is supported by the overall software engineering expertise of the company. The assessment and experiments of Ada software engineering by Informatique Internationale are detailed.

  16. Was Columbus a Hero? A Study of Students Who Have Been Confronted with Multiple Historical Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares two attempts by the author to teach two different grade 12 world history classes to think historically. Both classes were presented with a similar assignment that revolved around the conflicting historical accounts of Christopher Columbus. However, the second group of students was also provided with direct instruction about the…

  17. 75 FR 13698 - Establishment of Class D Airspace, Modification of Class E Airspace; Columbus, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... Register on March 11, 2010 (75 FR 11475), is hereby withdrawn. Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Issued in College Park, Georgia, on March... Airspace; Columbus, GA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of...

  18. 75 FR 11475 - Establishment of Class D Airspace, Modification of Class E Airspace; Columbus, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ..., 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 2. The incorporation by...; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February... Class E Airspace; Columbus, GA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice...

  19. "Are We Almost There, Captain?" The Geographical Errors of Christopher Columbus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Glenn M.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the scientific knowledge available to Christopher Columbus and how it influenced his geographically flawed, yet historically significant, decision to sail west in order to travel east. Factors discussed include Aristotle's conclusion that the earth was round, early measurements of latitude and longitude, and early map-making attempts.…

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: PAINT OVERSPRAY ARRESTOR, COLUMBUS INDUSTRIES, INC., SL-90B 8 POCKET BAG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of March 23-24, 1999, tests of Columbus Industries Inc's SL-90B 8 Pocket Bag paint overspray arrestor (POA) as part of an evaluation of POAs by EPA's Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The basic pe...

  1. Conservation program (EQIP) reduces atrazine in Columbus, OH drinking water supply reservoir

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation dollars applied in the Upper Big Walnut Creek Watershed have achieved a significant reduction in the atrazine levels in Hover Reservoir, a major drinking water source for Columbus, Ohio. During the 1990s, atrazine levels in this reservoir periodically exceeded the health advisory limit ...

  2. Integrated Lesson/Project Plans by and for Columbus Public School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bidwell, Sheri, Ed.

    This document contains 34 lesson or project plans written at inservice workshops focusing on integrating workplace skills (i.e. SCANS [Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills] and career awareness into the K-12 curriculum in Columbus (Ohio) Public Schools. The lesson and project plans are loosely organized by grade level. Each lesson…

  3. The Case of Columbus, New Mexico: Educational Life on the Border. Multicultural Videocase Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Joanne M., Ed.; McNergney, Robert F., Ed.

    This guide accompanies one of a pair of videocases depicting educational life in Columbus, New Mexico. The videocase includes 23 minutes of unstaged but edited videotape footage of teaching and learning in and around an elementary school. The first section of the guide, "Teaching Note" (Linda Warner), contains a transcript of the videotape and…

  4. Public Schools Energy Conservation Measures, Report Number 5: Fairmoor Elementary School, Columbus, Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    Presented is an engineering analysis of energy consumption at Fairmoor Elementary School, Columbus, Ohio. Based upon results of the building investigations, computer simulations and assessments of energy conservation opportunities, researchers estimate that minor changes in the existing building could yield a 50% reduction in energy use. The

  5. IVTC, BCSC, IUPUI-Columbus: Their Missions, Goals, Relationships, and Potential for Expanded Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyerdahl, Lawrence; And Others

    A study was conducted to identify and clarify the stated missions, goals, and relationships of three institutions (Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation [BCSC], Indiana Vocational Technical College [IVTC], and the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Campus [IUPUI]) to each other and the Columbus community to determine the

  6. Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence Reported by Homeless Youth in Columbus, Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Natasha; Erdem, Gizem; Collins, Jennifer; Patton, Rikki; Buettner, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    No study to date has reported intimate partner violence (IPV) experiences among homeless youth. This study sought to uncover lifetime prevalence estimates of physical, sexual, and emotional IPV among a nonprobability sample of 180 homeless male and female youth in Columbus, Ohio. To that aim, self-reported IPV and the association between IPV and…

  7. Achieving Effective Risk Management Reduction Throughout Decommissioning at the Columbus Closure Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.D.

    2006-07-01

    Nuclear facility decontamination, dismantlement, and demolition activities provide a myriad of challenges along the path to reaching a safe, effective, and compliant decommissioning. Among the challenges faced during decommissioning, is the constant management and technical effort to eliminate, mitigate, or minimize the potential of risks of radiation exposures and other hazards to the worker, the surrounding community, and the environment. Management strategies to eliminate, mitigate, or minimize risks include incorporating strong safety and As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principles into an integrated work planning process. Technical and operational strategies may include utilizing predictive risk analysis tools to establish contamination limits for demolition and using remote handling equipment to reduce occupational and radiation exposures to workers. ECC and E2 Closure Services, LLC (Closure Services) have effectively utilized these management and technical tools to eliminate, mitigate, and reduce radiation exposures under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the decontamination and decommissioning Columbus Closure Project (CCP). In particular, Closure Services achieved significant dose reduction during the dismantling, decontamination, and demolition activities for Building JN-1. Management strategies during the interior dismantlement, decontamination, and demolition of the facility demanded an integrated work planning processes that involved project disciplines. Integrated planning processes identified multiple opportunities to incorporate the use of remote handling equipment during the interior dismantling and demolition activities within areas of high radiation. Technical strategies employed predictive risk analysis tools to set upper bounding contamination limits, allowed for the radiological demolition of the building without exceeding administrative dose limits to the worker, general public, and the environment. Adhering to management and technical strategies during the dismantlement, decontamination, and demolition of Building JN-1 enabled Closure Services to achieve strong ALARA performance, maintain absolute compliance under the regulatory requirements and meeting licensing conditions for decommissioning. (authors)

  8. The relationship between aircraft noise exposure and day-use visitor survey responses in backcountry areas of national parks.

    PubMed

    Rapoza, Amanda; Sudderth, Erika; Lewis, Kristin

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the relationship between aircraft noise exposure and the quality of national park visitor experience, more than 4600 visitor surveys were collected at seven backcountry sites in four U.S. national parks simultaneously with calibrated sound level measurements. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate parameters describing the relationship among visitor responses, aircraft noise dose metrics, and mediator variables. For the regression models, survey responses were converted to three dichotomous variables, representing visitors who did or did not experience slightly or more, moderately or more, or very or more annoyance or interference with natural quiet from aircraft noise. Models with the most predictive power included noise dose metrics of sound exposure level, percent time aircraft were audible, and percentage energy due to helicopters and fixed-wing propeller aircraft. These models also included mediator variables: visitor ratings of the "importance of calmness, peace and tranquility," visitor group composition (adults or both adults and children), first visit to the site, previously taken an air tour, and participation in bird-watching or interpretive talks. The results complement and extend previous research conducted in frontcountry areas and will inform evaluations of air tour noise effects on visitors to national parks and remote wilderness sites. PMID:26520292

  9. Present-day tectonic stress regime in Egypt and surrounding area based on inversion of earthquake focal mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, H. M.; Abou Elenean, K. M.; Marzouk, I. A.; Korrat, I. M.; Abu El-Nader, I. F.; Ghazala, H.; ElGabry, M. N.

    2013-05-01

    Stress field inversion is performed in Egypt on the basis of 219 focal mechanism solutions in the period from 1955 to 2007. For this purpose Egypt is divided into six seismotectonic zones: the northern part of the Gulf of Suez, southern Gulf of Suez, and Gulf of Aqaba, Cairo-Suez district, Dahshour zone and the Aswan Zone. The entire Gulf of Suez is currently under extensional stress field, with NE-SW trending horizontal extension. In the Gulf of Aqaba, the strike-slip regime predominates with sub-horizontal σ1 and σ3 axes trending NNW and ENE, respectively. A normal dip slip with small strike-slip component due to a nearly sub-vertical σ1 and sub-horizontal NNE striking σ3 characterizes Cairo-Suez district and Dahshour zone. Aswan seismic zone shows mainly strike-slip stress regime with a slight extension component (horizontal NW σ1 and NNE σ3). The stress field derived in this study indicates a prevailing tension stress (σ3 horizontal) which agrees well with the general tectonic frame of northeastern African, which is subjected to tensional stresses. Generally, extensional and/or extensional-strike slips are dominating the Egyptian territory. These regimes are compatible with the kinematics of the Red Sea-Gulf of Suez rift and Gulf of Aqaba transform plate boundary. Furthermore, the inferred stress in the present study (SHmin directed NNE-SSW) for the Cairo-Suez, Dahshour, and Aswan areas is similar to the East African Rift stress fields "Congo and Sudan" especially (Bosworth et al., 1992; Delvaux and Barth, 2010), whose origin is attributed to the far field effects of ridge push in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans (Zoback, 1992).

  10. 77 FR 37953 - Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on Surplus Property Release at Columbus County Municipal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on Surplus Property Release at Columbus County Municipal Airport, Whiteville, NC AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  11. Results of the independent radiological verification survey at B and T Metals, 425 West Town Street, Columbus, Ohio (CO001V)

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, M.E.; Patania, V.P.; Johnson, C.A.

    1997-06-01

    In the mid-1940s, B and T Metals, 425 West Town Street, Columbus, Ohio became one of the first commercial firms to provide extrusion of uranium billets into rods in support of Manhattan Engineer District (MED) operations. The US Department of Energy conducted radiological surveys of these sites to evaluate current radiological conditions as part of the 1974 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In 1988 and 1989, a preliminary radiological survey was conducted by ORNL on the commercial property of B and T Metals. Results of the survey indicated that limited and localized residual radioactive material found in the main building and in one area outdoors exceeded current DOE guidelines, and the site was recommended for remediation. In the spring of 1996, a radiological verification survey of this property was conducted by ORNL, the independent verification contractor, in conjunction with decontamination operations conducted under the supervision of Bechtel National, Incorporated. The verification survey included gamma scans of the main building and parts of the grounds, limited beta-gamma scans of the building and roof, limited alpha scans of inside overhead structures, smear sampling, and the collection of samples for radionuclide analysis. This report describes the results of the radiological verification survey of the commercial property of B and T Metals, Columbus, Ohio.

  12. Day-night differences in neural activation in histaminergic and serotonergic areas with putative projections to the cerebrospinal fluid in a diurnal brain.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Ruiz, A; Gall, A J; Smale, L; Nunez, A A

    2013-10-10

    In nocturnal rodents, brain areas that promote wakefulness have a circadian pattern of neural activation that mirrors the sleep/wake cycle, with more neural activation during the active phase than during the rest phase. To investigate whether differences in temporal patterns of neural activity in wake-promoting regions contribute to differences in daily patterns of wakefulness between nocturnal and diurnal species, we assessed Fos expression patterns in the tuberomammillary (TMM), supramammillary (SUM), and raphe nuclei of male grass rats maintained in a 12:12 h light-dark cycle. Day-night profiles of Fos expression were observed in the ventral and dorsal TMM, in the SUM, and in specific subpopulations of the raphe, including serotonergic cells, with higher Fos expression during the day than during the night. Next, to explore whether the cerebrospinal fluid is an avenue used by the TMM and raphe in the regulation of target areas, we injected the retrograde tracer cholera toxin subunit beta (CTB) into the ventricular system of male grass rats. While CTB labeling was scarce in the TMM and other hypothalamic areas including the suprachiasmatic nucleus, which contains the main circadian pacemaker, a dense cluster of CTB-positive neurons was evident in the caudal dorsal raphe, and the majority of these neurons appeared to be serotonergic. Since these findings are in agreement with reports for nocturnal rodents, our results suggest that the evolution of diurnality did not involve a change in the overall distribution of neuronal connections between systems that support wakefulness and their target areas, but produced a complete temporal reversal in the functioning of those systems. PMID:23867764

  13. The requirements on data systems of Columbus logistics and engineering support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, G. F.; Masullo, S.; Randisi, S.

    1990-10-01

    The functions served by the Columbus Engineering Support Facilities (ESFs) are outlined. The support these can provide to the operations and control of flight elements during the overall life cycle is discussed. Starting from an analytical review of applicable set of requirements, the activities to be executed in the centers are derived. Subsequently the definition and analysis of the functional requirements of the centers are performed, mainly using the Structured Analysis and Design Technique (SADT) method. A sample operational scenario is taken out from the set of possible system configurations for analysis and discussions using the Petri nets method, in order to highlight the behavior of the ESF and its related transmission modes under contingency conditioning events. The requirements placed on the internal infrastructure concerning data handling aspects, are discussed and assessed providing a possible architecture. Programmatic recommendations are suggested for actual implementation, in compliance with the available and applicable constraints of the Columbus program.

  14. Cosmic radiation shielding properties of COLUMBUS and REMSIM multi-layer external shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Manti, Lorenzo; Rusek, Adam; Belluco, Maurizio; Lobascio, Cesare

    The European module COLUMBUS has been recently installed on the International Space Station. Future plans for exploration involve the use of inflatable modules, such as the REMSIM concept proposed in a previous ESA funded study. We studied the radiation shielding properties of COLUMBUS and REMSIM external shell using 1 GeV/n Feor H-ions accelerated at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Long Island, NY, USA). COLUMBUS has a 22 mm rigid multi-layer shell with Al, Nextel and Kevlar, as materials of the double bumper for meteoroids and debris protection, MLI for thermal reasons and again Al as pressure shell. Inside the module, astronauts are further protected by secondary structures, including racks, a number of electronic devices and payload equipment. This internal equipment has been simulated using Al and Kevlar, bringing the total thickness to about 15 g/cm2. REMSIM consists of a thermal multi-layer (MLI), four Nextel layers used to provide shock of the impacting micro-meteoroids, a ballistic restraint multi-layer of Kevlar used to absorb debris cloud's kinetic energy, a Kevlar structural restraint to support pressure loads incurred from inflating the module. To contain air inside the module, REMSIM adopts three layers of airtight material separated by two layers of Kevlar (air bladder). A final layer of Nomex provide protection against punctures and fire. In the flight configuration there are also spacer elements (foam) needed to guarantee correct spacing between consecutive bumper layers. These spacers were not included in the tests, making the total thickness about 1.1 cm. The internal equipment in REMSIM was not been defined, but due to its application for exploration missions it was decided to exploit water, valuable resource used for drinking, washing and technical usage, as a radiation shielding. In this test, we have included about 8 cm of water. Measured dose attenuation shows that the Columbus module reduces the heavy-ion dose approximately of 30

  15. Health-hazard evaluation report No. HETA 90-252-2167, Northland Terrace Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Columbus, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, K.W.; Deitchman, S.

    1991-12-01

    In response to a request from management at the Northland Terrace Nursing and Rehabilitation Center (SIC-8051), Columbus, Ohio, a study was undertaken of headaches in workers in the laundry facility and upper respiratory infections associated with delivering Attends diapers. The study included employee interviews, environmental monitoring, and an assessment of the adequacy of the design and performance of the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning system. Northland Terrace was a nursing and rehabilitation center. Employees who work in the laundry facility reported that they experience headache while present in this area which was renovated in 1989. Carbon-dioxide (124389) concentrations exceeded 1000 parts per million. Biologically significant carbon-monoxide (630080) concentrations were not observed. Temperatures in the laundry rooms ranged from 86 to 92 degrees-F. Relative humidities ranged from 48 to 56%. A possible reaction to the dust or the fragrance associated with Attends diapers was not followed to completion as the nursing facility stopped using this product during the study. The authors conclude that there was an inadequate supply of outside air in the laundry and basement areas. The authors recommend measures to improve the ventilation system and reduce the potential for heat stress in the laundry.

  16. Astronaut training for the European ISS contributions Columbus module and ATV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, Peter; Seine, Rüdiger; Khanina, Elena; Schön, Andreas

    2006-12-01

    An essential part of increment preparation for the ISS is the training of the flight crews. Each international partner is responsible for the basic training of its own astronauts, where a basic knowledge is taught on space science and engineering, ISS systems and operations and general astronaut skills like flying, diving, survival, language, etc. The main parts of the ISS crew training are the Advanced Training, e.g., generic ISS operations; nominal and malfunction systems operations and emergencies, and the Increment-Specific Training, i.e., operations and tasks specific to a particular increment. The Advanced and Increment-Specific Training is multilateral training, i.e., each partner is training all ISS astronauts on its contributions to the ISS program. Consequently, ESA is responsible for the Basic Training of its own astronauts and the Advanced and Increment-Specific Training of all ISS crews after Columbus activation on Columbus Systems Operations, Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), and ESA payloads. This paper gives an overview of the ESA ISS Training Program for Columbus Systems Operations and ATV, for which EADS Space Transportation GmbH is the prime contractor. The key training tasks, the training flow and the training facilities are presented.

  17. Geologic Reconnaissance of the Antelope-Ashwood Area, North-Central Oregon: With Emphasis on the John Day Formation of Late Oligocene and Early Miocene Age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, Dallas L.

    1964-01-01

    This report briefly describes the geology of an area of about 750 square miles in Jefferson, Wasco, Crook, and Wheeler Counties, Oregon. About 16,000 feet of strata that range in age from pre-Tertiary to Quaternary are exposed. These include the following units: pre-Tertiary slate, graywacke, conglomerate, and meta-andesite; Clarno Formation of Eocene age - lava flows, volcanic breccia, tuff, and tuffaceous mudstone, chiefly of andesitic composition; John Day Formation of late Oligocene and early Miocene age - pyroclastic rocks, flows, and domes, chiefly of rhyolitic composition; Columbia River Basalt of middle Miocene age - thick, columnar jointed flows of very fine grained dense dark-gray basalt; Dalles Formation of Pliocene age - bedded tuffaceous sandstone, siltstone, and conglomerate; basalt of Pliocene or Pleistocene age - lava flows of porous-textured olivine basalt; and Quaternary loess, landslide debris, and alluvium. Unconformities separate pre-Tertiary rocks and Clarno Formation, Clarno and John Day Formations, John Day Formation and Columbia River Basalt, and Columbia River Basalt and Dalles Formation. The John Day Formation, the only unit studied in detail, consists of about 4,000 feet of tuff, lapilli tuff, strongly to weakly welded rhyolite ash flows, and less abundant trachyandesite flows and rhyolite flows and domes. The formation was divided into nine mappable members in part of the area, primarily on the basis of distinctive ledge-forming welded ash-flow sheets. Most of the sheets are composed of stony rhyolite containing abundant lithophysae and sparse phenocrysts. One sheet contains 10 to 20 percent phenocrysts, mostly cryptoperthitic soda sanidine, but including less abundant quartz, myrmekitic intergrowths of quartz and sanidine, and oligoclase. The rhyolitic ash flows and lava flows were extruded from nearby vents, in contrast to some of the interbedded air-fall tuff and lapilli tuff of dacitic and andesitic composition that may have been derived from vents in an ancestral Cascade Range. The John Day is dated on the basis of a late Oligocene flora near the base of the formation and early Miocene faunas near the top of the formation. The middle Miocene and older rocks in the Antelope-Ashwood area are broadly folded and broken along northeast-trending faults. Over much of the area the rocks dip gently eastward from the crest of a major fold and are broken along a series of steeply dipping antithetic strike faults. Pliocene and Quaternary strata appear to be undeformed. At the Priday agate deposit, chalcedony-filled spherulites (thunder-eggs) occur in the lower part of a weakly welded rhyolitic ash flow. The so-called thunder-eggs are small spheroidal bodies, about 3 inches in average diameter; each consists of a chalcedonic core surrounded by a shell of welded tuff that is altered to radially oriented fibers of cristobalite and alkalic feldspar.

  18. Vectortine's Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, Frank

    1998-11-01

    Holidays at Lemon Bay High are days of unusual activities, as they well may be at other high schools. One of our special days is Valentine's Day. In order to maintain some academic focus in the physics department, while allowing my students to participate in the celebration, we've developed a physics version of the hearts-and-flowers February celebration. It's Vectortine's Day in physics class.

  19. 75 FR 45096 - Foreign-Trade Zone 138 - Columbus, Ohio Area, Application for Reorganization under Alternative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... to reorganize the zone under the alternative site framework (ASF) adopted by the Board (74 FR 1170, 1/ 12/09; correction 74 FR 3987, 1/22/09). The ASF is an option for grantees for the establishment or... March 13, 1987 (Board Order 351, 52 FR 9319, 3/24/87) and expanded on February 23, 1994 (Board Order...

  20. Christopher Columbus and the Great Voyage of Discovery. With a Message from President George Bush. Picture-book Biography Series, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, JoAnne B.; Deitch, Kenneth M.

    An illustrated story for young children features Christopher Columbus's first voyage to the Americas in 1492. The story begins with Columbus's youth in Genoa, Italy, follows him to Portugal and then to Spain, where he finally received backing for a voyage west to reach the East Indies. The preparations for the voyage and the trip itself are…

  1. "In Fourteen Hundred and Ninety-Two, Columbus Sailed the Ocean Blue": Effects of Multiple Document Readings on Student Attitudes and Misconceptions. Reading Research Report No. 82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahl, Steven A.; And Others

    To examine the effects of students reading multiple documents on their perceptions of a historical event, in this case the "discovery" of America by Christopher Columbus, 85 high school freshmen read 3 of 4 different texts (or sets of texts) dealing with Columbus. One text was an encyclopedia article, one a set of articles from "Newsweek" and…

  2. Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merro, John; And Others

    Interviews on the quality of day care in the United States are presented in this transcript of a program broadcast in the National Public Radio weekly series, "Options in Education." Writers, day care center personnel and others describe and evaluate the current situation. Federal legislation concerning children is examined, and researchers…

  3. Dinosaur Day!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient…

  4. CEMI Days

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    CEMI Days are an important channel of engagement between DOE and the manufacturing industry to identify challenges and opportunities for increasing U.S. manufacturing competitiveness. CEMI Days that are held at manufacturing companies’ facilities can include tours of R&D operations or other points of interest determined by the host company.

  5. The ESA payloads for Columbus--a bridge between the ISS and exploration.

    PubMed

    Reibaldi, Giuseppe; Nasca, Rosario; Mundorf, Horst; Manieri, Pierfilippo; Gianfiglio, Giacinto; Feltham, Stephen; Galeone, Piero; Dettmann, Jan

    2005-05-01

    As part of the European contribution to the International Space Station (ISS) Programme, ESA has developed a number of complex, pressurised and unpressurised payloads for conducting scientific investigations in a variety of disciplines, such as the life and physical sciences, technology and space science. The majority of these payloads will already be installed in ESA's Columbus Laboratory when it is launched in 2006. Many of them are ready for flight, whilst the others are approaching final acceptance. The development of these payloads and their utilisation on the ISS can be considered as a bridge to ESA's future Exploration activities. PMID:16134285

  6. The Columbus logistics support at the APMC: Requirements and implementation aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canu, C.; Battocchio, L.; Masullo, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper focuses on the logistics support to be provided by the APM Center (APMC). Among the Columbus ground infrastructures, this center is tasked to provide logistics, sustaining engineering and P/L integration support to the ongoing missions of the APM, i.e. the Columbus Laboratory attached to the Freedom Space Station. The following is illustrated: an analysis of the requirements that are levied on the logistics support of the APM; how such requirements are reflected in the corresponding support to be available on-ground and at APMC; the functional components of the APMC logistics support and how such components interact each other; how the logistics support function interfaces with the other functions of the ground support; and how the logistics support is being designed in terms of resources (such as hardware, data bases, etc.). Emphasis is given to the data handling aspects and to the related data bases that will constitute for the logistics activities the fundamental source of information during the APM planned lifetime. Functional and physical architectures, together with trades for possible implementation, are addressed. Commonalities with other centers are taken into account and recommendations are made for possible reuse of tools already developed in the C/D phase. Finally, programmatic considerations are discussed for the actual implementation of the center.

  7. Measurements with the TRITEL system in the Columbus Laboratory of the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirn, Attila; Reitz, Guenther; Zabori, Balazs; Palfalvi, Jozsef K.; Burmeister, Soenke; Pazmandi, Tamas; Apathy, Istvan; Szanto, Peter; Deme, Sandor; Csoke, Antal

    In cooperation with BL-Electronics Ltd. a three-dimensional silicon detector telescope (TRITEL) was developed at MTA Centre for Energy Research (MTA EK, the former MTA KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute) in the past years. The main objective of the instrument was to measure not only the absorbed dose in the cosmic radiation field, but also the linear energy (LET) spectrum of the charged particles and their average quality factor in three mutually orthogonal directions in order to give an estimation of the equivalent dose, too. In the frame of the EC project SURE the TRITEL system was delivered to the European Columbus Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) in October 31, 2012 and it was operated there between November 6, 2012 and May 10, 2013. Our presentation addresses the main characteristics of the TRITEL-SURE dosimetry system and the first measurement results obtained in the Columbus module. The TRITEL-SURE experiment is co-funded by the EC project SURE, contract number RITA-CT-2006-026069 and by the Government of Hungary through ESA Contracts 98057 and 4000108072/13/NL/KML under the PECS (Plan for European Cooperating States). The view expressed herein can in no way be taken to reflect the official opinion of the European Space Agency.

  8. Inspire Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohach, Barbara M.; Meade, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The authors collaborated on hosting a "Spring Inspire Day." planned and delivered by preservice elementary teachers as a social studies/science methods project. Projects that have authentic application opportunities can make learning meaningful for prospective teachers as well as elementary students. With the impetus for an integrated

  9. Inspire Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohach, Barbara M.; Meade, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The authors collaborated on hosting a "Spring Inspire Day." planned and delivered by preservice elementary teachers as a social studies/science methods project. Projects that have authentic application opportunities can make learning meaningful for prospective teachers as well as elementary students. With the impetus for an integrated…

  10. The DOSIS -Experiment onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the International Space Station -Overview and first mission results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Guenther; Berger, Thomas; Kürner, Christine; Burmeister, Sünke; Hajek, Michael; Bilski, Pawel; Horwacik, Tomasz; Vanhavere, Filip; Spurny, Frantisek; Jadrnickova, Iva; Pálfalvi, József K.; O'Sullivan, Denis; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Uchihori, Yukio; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kodaira, Satoshi; Yukihara, Eduardo; Benton, Eric; Zapp, Neal; Gaza, Ramona; Zhou, Dazhuang; Semones, Edward; Roed, Yvonne; Boehme, Matthias; Haumann, Lutz

    Besides the effects of the microgravity environment, and the psychological and psychosocial problems encountered in confined spaces, radiation is the main health detriment for long dura-tion human space missions. The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones encountered on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station ISS is therefore needed. The DOSIS (Dose Distribution inside the ISS) experiment, under the project and science lead of DLR, aims for the spatial and tempo-ral measurement of the radiation field parameters inside the European Columbus laboratory onboard the International Space Station. This goal is achieved by applying a combination of passive (Thermo-and Optical luminescence detectors and Nuclear track etch detectors) and active (silicon telescope) radiation detectors. The passive radiation detectors -so called pas-sive detector packages (PDP) are mounted at eleven positions within the Columbus laboratory -aiming for a spatial dose distribution measurement of the absorbed dose, the linear energy transfer spectra and the dose equivalent with an average exposure time of six months. Two active silicon telescopes -so called Dosimetry Telescopes (DOSTEL 1 and DOSTEL 2) together with a Data and Power Unit (DDPU) are mounted within the DOSIS Main Box at a fixed loca-tion beneath the European Physiology Module (EPM) rack. The DOSTEL 1 and DOSTEL 2 detectors are positioned at a 90 angle to each other for a precise measurement of the temporal and spatial variation of the radiation field, especially during crossing of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). The DOSIS hardware was launched with the Space Shuttle Endeavour to the International Space Station on 15 July 2009 and installed by European Astronaut Frank de Winne on 18 July 2009. The first PDP set was downloaded after an exposure time of 124 days in November 2009 and a second PDP set was installed in November 2009. The active part of the instrument suit is working since July 2009. The presentation will give an overview about the DOSIS experiment as well as first results from the passive and active radiation detector measurements. The Austrian activities within this experiment were supported by the Austrian Space Appli-cations Programme (ASAP) of the Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology under contract no. 819643. The Polish contribution to this work was supported by the Min-istry of Science and Higher Education, grant No. DWM/N118/ESA/2008. The Hungarian contribution was supported by the ESA PECS grant No. C98066.

  11. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day. (a) Day means calendar day unless otherwise indicated as business day or school day. (b) Business...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION, TEST REPORT OF CONTROL OF BIOAEROSOLS IN HVAC SYSTEMS, COLUMBUS INDUSTRIES SL-3 RING PANEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the High Efficiency Mini Pleat air filter for dust and bioaerosol filtration manufactured by Columbus Industries. The pressure drop across the filter was 142 Pa clean and 283 Pa dust load...

  13. Christopher Columbus, Hernando Cortes, and Francisco Pizzaro: A Qualitative Content Analysis Examining Cultural Bias in World History Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillejord, Jebadiah Serril

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate to what extent contemporary high school world history textbooks portray Christopher Columbus, Hernán Cortés, and Francisco Pizarro within the context of being "sacred," "profane," or someplace in between. To evaluate for existence of content bias this study employed qualitative…

  14. A Recap of the Fifth Nationwide Vocational Education Dissemination Conference (Columbus, Ohio, November 17-19, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Norman M., Comp.; Grieve, Shelley, Comp.

    Proceedings of a convention on dissemination held at the National Center for Research in Vocational Education in Columbus, Ohio are reviewed. The conference agenda includes brief summaries of small-group workshops and large-group sessions. Topics covered include acronyms and abbreviations in vocational education dissemination, microcomputers,…

  15. 78 FR 58995 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 138-Columbus, Ohio; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Rolls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ..., and Generator Sets); Mount Vernon, Ohio The Columbus Regional Airport Authority, grantee of FTZ 138... turbines, power generation turbines, and generator sets. Pursuant to 15 CFR 400.14(b), FTZ activity would... entry procedures that apply to industrial gas turbines, power generation turbines, generator sets,...

  16. A 2XCO2 climate change scenario over Europe generated using a limited area model nested in a general circulation model: 1. Present-day seasonal climate simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinucci, M. R.; Giorgi, F.

    1992-06-01

    In this and the companion paper by Giorgi et al. (this issue) we present a regional climate change scenario for Europe and the western Mediterranean basin induced by doubling of carbon dioxide concentration as produced with a limited area model (LAM) nested in a general circulation model (GCM). In this paper we analyze the seasonal climatology of the present-day climate simulation which is used as a control run in the generation of the scenario. The GCM and the LAM employed for this study are versions of the community climate model (CCM) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the NCAR/Pennsylvania State University mesoscale model (MM4). The CCM simulation generally reproduces the basic seasonal migration patterns of the storm tracks which affect the European region but also shows significant biases: (1) a general weakening and southward shift of the cold season North Atlantic jet; (2) cold sea surface temperature bias of up to 4°-6°C in the North Atlantic and the Mediterranean; (3) cold tropospheric temperature bias of several degrees; (4) low tropospheric relative humidity bias; and (5) underprediction of July precipitation, resulting in low soil moisture conditions and exceedingly high surface temperatures. Overall, the nested MM4 produces large-scale circulations similar to those of the driving CCM and, because of its finer representation of topography and coastlines, substantially improves the spatial distribution of precipitation and surface air temperature not only at high resolution but also at resolutions close to the CCM's. Among the main biases in the nested MM4 simulation are (1) cold bias over land of 1°-5°C in January, April, and October and warm bias in July; (2) underprediction of precipitation over most of continental Europe, maximum in July (simulated precipitation is 60-80% lower than observed) and less pronounced in January, April, and October (simulated precipitation is 10-40% lower than observed). A strong contribution to these biases is given by errors in the driving CCM tropospheric fields. Overall, temperature and precipitation are better simulated in the colder seasons than in summertime and the seasonal cycle is captured better over the Mediterranean regions than over the continental interior.

  17. Establishment and implementation of common product assurance and safety requirements for the contractors of the Columbus programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, H.; Stephan, H. J.

    1991-08-01

    When establishing the Columbus Product Assurance (PA)/safety requirements, the international environment of the Space Station Freedom program has to be taken into account. Considerations given to multiple ways of requirement definition and stages within the European Space Agency (ESA) Procedures, Specifications, and Standards (PSS-01) series of documents and the NASA Space Station requirements are discussed. A series of adaptations introduced by way of tailoring the basic ESA and NASA requirement sets to the Columbus program's needs are described. For the implementation of these tailored requirements, a scheme is developed, which recognizes the PA/safety approach within the European industries by way of various company handbooks and manuals. The changes introduced in the PSS-01 series and the applicable NASA Space Station requirements in recent years, has coincided with the establishment of Columbus PA/safety requirements. To achieve the necessary level of cooperation between ESA and the Columbus industries, a PA Working Group (PAWG) is established. The PAWG supervises the establishement of the Common PA/Safety Plan and the Standards to be used. Due to the high number of European industries participating in the Columbus program, a positive influence on the evolution of the industrial approaches in PA/safety can be expected. Cooperation in the PAWG has brought issues to light which are related to the ESA PSS-01 series and its requirements. Due to the rapid changes of recent years, basic company documentation has not followed the development, specifically as various recent ESA projects use different project specifc issues of the evolving PSS-01 documents.

  18. Hello, Columbus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thernstrom, Stephan

    1991-01-01

    The European invasion five centuries ago exposed a large portion of the globe to the influence of a dynamic civilization that did much to make the modern world what it is. A Harvard history professor considers seven questions for a multicultural exploration of the Columbian Quincentenary. (MLF)

  19. Professional Ethics, Day by Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roworth, Wendy Wassyng

    2002-01-01

    The chair of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) Committee on Professional Ethics explores faculty obligations to students, institutions, and colleagues. Discusses AAUP's guiding ethical principles and new areas of concern. (EV)

  20. Identification of groundwater parameters at Columbus, Mississippi, using a 3D inverse flow and transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlebo, H.C.; Rosbjerg, D.; Hill, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive amount of data including hydraulic heads, hydraulic conductivities and concentrations of several solutes from controlled injections have been collected during the MADE 1 and MADE 2 experiments at a heterogeneous site near Columbus, Mississippi. In this paper the use of three-dimensional inverse groundwater models including simultaneous estimation of flow and transport parameters is proposed to help identify the dominant characteristics at the site. Simulations show that using a hydraulic conductivity distribution obtained from 2187 borehole flowmeter tests directly in the model produces poor matches to the measured hydraulic heads and tritium concentrations. Alternatively, time averaged hydraulic head maps are used to define zones of constant hydraulic conductivity to be estimated. Preliminary simulations suggest that in the case of conservative transport many, but not all, of the major plume characteristics can be explained by large-scale heterogeneity in recharge and hydraulic conductivity.

  1. Valentine's Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02174 Valentine's Day

    This isolated mesa [lower left center of the image] has an almost heart-shaped margin. Happy Valentine's Day from Mars.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 29.4N, Longitude 79.1E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. COLUMBUS Orbital Facility and Automated Transfer Vehicle: a challenge for agency & industry.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, H; Luttmann, H

    1997-01-01

    Long term continuous operation of the COLUMBUS Orbital Facility (COF) flight- and ground segment requires continuous mission control and operations support capability to ensure proper operation and configuration of the COF systems in support of ongoing science and technology payloads. The ISS logistics scenario will be supported by the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). These operational needs require the built-up of a new ground infrastructure in Europe and USA, enabling an efficient operations for preparation, planning and mission execution. The challenge for the European space community consists in the development and operation of a user friendly operational environment but keeping costs within budgetary constraints. Results of detailed definition studies performed by both agency and industry for the ground infrastructure indicate solutions to those technical and programmatic requirements by using of existing centers and facilities, re-use of C/D phase products (Hardware, Software) and COTS equipment to avoid costly new developments, using engineering expertise of the industrial personnel from flight element phase C/D. The concept for operations execution defines the task sharing between Operations Control Facilities (OCF), Operations Support Facilities and User Operations Sites. Operations support consists of on-line engineering support, off-line engineering support, payload integration, logistics support and crew training support performed by industry. DASA RI has made internal investments in organizational concepts for mission operations as well as in mission technologies and tools based on the standard COLUMBUS Ground Software (CGS) toolset and on knowledge based systems to enable an efficient industrial operations support. These tools are available as prototypes being evaluated in a simulated operational environment. PMID:11541146

  3. Teacher Perceptions about the Importance of Parental Involvement for Included Students with Learning Disabilities in New York Metropolitan Area Orthodox Yeshivas and Day Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Goldie Eichorn

    2010-01-01

    The population of students attending Jewish day schools includes an increasing number of students with exceptional needs. How Jewish schools meet the needs of these students is an important question. Inclusive education is a service model predicated on legal and philosophical mores as well as pedagogical and psychological findings. The quality of…

  4. Teacher Perceptions about the Importance of Parental Involvement for Included Students with Learning Disabilities in New York Metropolitan Area Orthodox Yeshivas and Day Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Goldie Eichorn

    2010-01-01

    The population of students attending Jewish day schools includes an increasing number of students with exceptional needs. How Jewish schools meet the needs of these students is an important question. Inclusive education is a service model predicated on legal and philosophical mores as well as pedagogical and psychological findings. The quality of

  5. Hydrology day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel-Seytoux, H. J.

    Registration for the Hydrology Day sponsored by the Front Range Branch of AGU on April 23 at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado, totaled 121 participants, of whom 61 were students.Thirty-one individuals joined the Front Range Branch. Three students from Colorado State University won the awards for best paper in their category: Thomas W. Anzia (Sr.), ‘A Comprehensive Table of Standard Deviates for Confidence Limits on Extreme Events’ Victor Nazareth (M.S.), ‘Aquifer Properties from Single-Hole Aquifer Tests’ and Roy W. Koch (Ph.D.), ‘A Physically Based Derivation of the Distribution of Excess Precipitation.’ Judges for the awards were Dr. Bittinger, Resource Consultants, Fort Collins; George Leavesley and Daniel Bauer, USGS, Water Resources Division, Denver; Scott Tucker, Executive Director, Denver Urban Drainage and Flood Control District; Charles Brendecke, Department of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder.

  6. Differences in Math Achievement between Boys and Girls in 4th and 8th Grade in Coeducational Orthodox Jewish Day Schools in the New York Metropolitan Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witty, Emily Amie

    2012-01-01

    Gender differences in mathematics have been of particular interest over the past decades. Research has shown a disparity in mathematical proficiency between boys and girls depending on the area of mathematics tested, the age and grade of the student, and the structure of the test question (i.e., how the question is posed). Although, much of the…

  7. An overview of Dutch participation in the Spacelab D1 mission and the Columbus Space Station Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Articles and a few short descriptions of recent developments in the field of space travel are discussed. Information on research and technology in space to facilitate contact between these two fields is provided. A description is given of the successful Spacelab D-1 flight and the standard instrument package. The Netherlands experiments in the D-1 mission, the next Spacelab flights, and the Columbus program are discussed.

  8. Rapid prototyping, astronaut training, and experiment control and supervision: distributed virtual worlds for COLUMBUS, the European Space Laboratory module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Eckhard; Rossmann, Juergen

    2002-02-01

    In 2004, the European COLUMBUS Module is to be attached to the International Space Station. On the way to the successful planning, deployment and operation of the module, computer generated and animated models are being used to optimize performance. Under contract of the German Space Agency DLR, it has become IRF's task to provide a Projective Virtual Reality System to provide a virtual world built after the planned layout of the COLUMBUS module let astronauts and experimentators practice operational procedures and the handling of experiments. The key features of the system currently being realized comprise the possibility for distributed multi-user access to the virtual lab and the visualization of real-world experiment data. Through the capabilities to share the virtual world, cooperative operations can be practiced easily, but also trainers and trainees can work together more effectively sharing the virtual environment. The capability to visualize real-world data will be used to introduce measured data of experiments into the virtual world online in order to realistically interact with the science-reference model hardware: The user's actions in the virtual world are translated into corresponding changes of the inputs of the science reference model hardware; the measured data is than in turn fed back into the virtual world. During the operation of COLUMBUS, the capabilities for distributed access and the capabilities to visualize measured data through the use of metaphors and augmentations of the virtual world may be used to provide virtual access to the COLUMBUS module, e.g. via Internet. Currently, finishing touches are being put to the system. In November 2001 the virtual world shall be operational, so that besides the design and the key ideas, first experimental results can be presented.

  9. The DOSIS -Experiment onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the International Space Station -First Mission Results from the Active DOSTEL Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Soenke; Berger, Thomas; Beaujean, Rudolf; Boehme, Matthias; Haumann, Lutz; Kortmann, Onno; Labrenz, Johannes; Reitz, Guenther

    Besides the effects of the microgravity environment, and the psychological and psychosocial problems encountered in confined spaces, radiation is the main health detriment for long dura-tion human space missions. The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones encountered on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station ISS is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European COLUMBUS module the DLR experiment DOSIS (Dose Distribution Inside the ISS) was launched on July 15th 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The experimental package was transferred from the Space Shuttle into COLUMBUS on July 18th. It consists in a first part of a combination of passive detector packages (PDP) distributed at 11 locations inside the European Columbus Laboratory. The second part are two active radiation detectors (DOSTELs) with a DDPU (DOSIS Data and Power Unit) in a nomex pouch (DOSIS MAIN BOX) mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module (EPM) inside COLUMBUS. After the successful installation the active part has been activated on the 18th July 2009. Each of the DOSTEL units consists of two 6.93 cm PIPS silicon detectors forming a telescope with an opening angle of 120. The two DOSTELs are mounted with their telescope axis perpendicular to each other to investigate anisotropies of the radiation field inside the COLUMBUS module especially during the passes through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and during Solar Particle Events (SPEs). The data from the DOSTEL units are transferred to ground via the EPM rack which is activated approximately every four weeks for this action. The first data downlink was performed on July 31st 2009. First Results for the DOSTEL measurements such as count rate profiles, dose rates and LET spectra will be presented in comparison to the data obtained by other experiments.

  10. Assessment of crew operations during internal servicing of the Columbus Free-Flyer by Hermes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winisdoerffer, F.; Lamothe, A.; Bourdeau'hui, J. C.

    The Hermes system has been adopted as a European programme at the Hague ministerial level meeting. The primary mission of the Hermes spaceplane will be the servicing of the Columbus Free-Flyer (CFF) in order to bring new experiments in orbit, recover the results of old ones, and refurbish/maintain the various subsystems. This mission will be based on the extensive use of the 3 crewmembers on-board Hermes in order to perform either the Intra-Vehicular (IVA) and/or the Extra-Vehicular (EVA) activities. This paper focuses on the internal operations and the dimensions of the various payload of the basic reference cargo set are presented. The main constraints associated with their manipulation are also assessed independently of the configuration. During the spaceplane definition process, various configurations were developed. The operations were simulated using the CAD CATIA software with representative anthropometric models of the potential Hermes users population. These simulations helped to assess the various configurations and to refine the general concept of the spaceplane. The geometrical feasibility is demonstrated through those simulations. However full-scale tests are required to confirm data and assess the duration of the operations.

  11. Advanced Software Maintenance Approach for the Complex Columbus Flight Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatova, Temenushka; Westerholt, Uwe; Brandt, Matthias

    2010-08-01

    Many products in the space industry are unique systems which are utilized for a short period of time to fulfil a specific mission. Therefore, the importance of software maintenance has been often underestimated. However, if the utilization phase is meant to be longer, a well established software maintenance process has to be applied to meet the high requirements of complex space flight systems. In this paper, the adaptation of the software maintenance approach for the COLUMBUS laboratory, established during the development phase, to the evolving requirements of the utilization phase is described. The new approach is based on the Generation Environment , comprising different data storage repositories and software components for automatic performance of generation and integration tasks. The storage repositories are used for managing the integrated flight software, as well as for tracking the maintenance process, and for generation of reports and documentation. The automation components help to improve the efficiency and accuracy of the process by providing well defined user interfaces and a single point of access to various generation and integration tools. Current experience with the new Generation Environment, show that the new approach provides a much better understanding of the process. Furthermore, it becomes more transparent and easier to adapt to new requirements. One further pursued aim is to be able to apply this concept for the integration of other systems and other projects by developing it as open and generic as possible.

  12. Distribution and composition of Illinoian tills of the glaciated Appalachian Plateau east of Columbus, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, J.P. . Geology Dept.); Totten, S.M. . Geology Dept.)

    1994-04-01

    Many Illinoian tills which crop out in north-central Ohio can be traced into Licking County on the Appalachian Plateau east of columbus. Low carbonate till, BI at Mt. Gilead and correlative of the Millbrook Till at its type section, crops out throughout the county. High carbonate tills, BII at Mt. Gilead, correlates with the Gahanna till of the Rocky Fork drift. Multiple beds of diamict representing different facies of the Gahanna Till are exposed in stream cuts near alexandria and suggest an oscillating ice front. An older till of intermediate carbonate content crops out east of the Gahanna Till boundary but is not as extensive as the Millbrook till. Late wisconsinan Navarre till overlies Illinoian tills in many outcrops in western Licking County. Average clay contents of Illinoian tills decrease with increasing age. Millbrook Till contains about 6% dolomite and a small amount of calcite. Gahanna Till averages 16% total carbonate, contains as much as 23% carbonate, and has an average calcite-dolomite ratio equal to 0.3. The oldest Illinoian till contains 11% total carbonate and has calcite/dolomite equal to 0.2. The diffraction intensity ratio of all tills averages 1.2. Local clastic rocks dominate the 1--2 mm sand fractions of all tills which also contain extra-local carbonates eroded from outcrops in Delaware and Franklin counties.

  13. Capitalization of energy efficiency in housing prices. [Sample of 615 single-family dwellings, Columbus, OH

    SciTech Connect

    Longstreth, M.

    1981-01-01

    The capitalized values of energy-conserving structural characteristics of overall thermal efficiency as measured by the quantity of natural gas used for heating were imputed. Homes were described in terms of their features contributing to energy efficiency. Hedonic price theory was used to determine the implicit market prices of the energy-conserving structural characteristics and overall thermal efficiency. The implicit, or hedonic, prices were estimated with two-stage least-squares regression analysis. It was found that sample homes lacked thermal efficiency, indicating that the potential for fuel savings from conservation was substantial and that information about benefits needs improvement. The energy-conserving structural characteristics of ceiling and wall insulation and wood/vinyl window frames had statistically significant, positive effects on sale price between 1971 and 1980. Sale price declined with marginal increments in natural gas consumed for heating. When the 1971 to 1980 period was divided into two time segments it was found that storm windows and window frames had a statistically significant influence on sale price after 1975. Natural gas consumption had no effect on sale price prior to 1977 but had a sizeable, statistically significant effect after 1976. The sample was composed of 615 single-family dwellings located in Columbus, Ohio and sold between 1971 and 1980. All sample homes were heated with natural gas. Data sources included a mailed questionnaire, Multiple Listing Service, and property-tax records.

  14. National Trails Day. Project SEED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Mark

    This paper describes how a school district in Maine implemented an outdoor education program centered around National Trails Day (a day of awareness of outdoor recreational areas in the United States). The program combined classroom learning with an all-day hike on the Appalachian Trail by 240 seventh-grade students. Numerous teachers, school…

  15. Present-day long-term deformation from GPS survey in an intraplate area (Ploemeur aquifer, French Brittany): influence of hydrological and hydrogeological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biessy, G.; Moreau, F.; Dauteuil, O.; Bour, O.

    2009-12-01

    Four years of continuous GPS measurements were performed in an intraplate area located above the crystalline aquifer of Ploemeur (French Brittany) in order to quantify the three-dimensional surface deformation and to evaluate the relationship between the ground deformation and hydrological surface and hydrogeological processes. Several processes as tide effects, ocean tide loading and tectonics were removed thanks to a differential GPS setup, short baselines and appropriated processing parameters. Time series were calculated with the GAMIT/GLOBK software and indicate a seasonal deformation on both vertical direction (up to 16 mm of total displacement) and horizontal plane (3 to 12 mm of total displacement). This sub-annual deformation is principally related to the piezometric level of the aquifer and is used to estimate some hydrogeological parameters of the aquifer and better know the behaviour of this aquifer along the time. However, some additional data of the hydrous state of the ground allows us to associate a part of the deformation to this surface process. This GPS study highlights that these two phenomena act significantly on ground motion as well on vertical direction as in horizontal plane and should be integrated in any Earth deformation survey.

  16. Education and Public Outreach Programs at Columbus State University's Mead Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzen, S.; Rutland, C.; Carr, D.; Seckinger, M.

    2003-12-01

    Columbus State University (CSU) has made a substantial commitment to community education in astronomy and space science. Through the programs of the Mead Observatory at CSU's Coca-Cola Space Science Center, students, staff and faculty have been providing public outreach programs in astronomy for more than seven years. Recently, a generous grant from a private foundation has facilitated an astounding growth in the observatory's astronomy outreach activities. The grant made possible the purchase of a van, a portable planetarium, and additional telescope and computer equipment. It also funded a two-year scholarship that has supported a pair of CSU's science education majors who have staffed the program and made it a success. NASA, through the Georgia Space Grant Consortium, has provided additional funding for scholarships for 2003-2004. Prior to receiving these funds, the observatory program consisted of monthly open houses, occasional public observing nights at remote locations and approximately 6 to 8 school visits per year. Annually, these programs served approximately 3500 people. Since beginning the new phase of this program in October of 2001, the number of people served has soared to more than 23,000 in only 24 months. Over 60 schools have been visited, increasing our previous annual rate by nearly five times. Additional groups served include boys and girls scouting groups, state parks and other community organizations. School presentations have been designed to assist K-12 teachers in meeting science education standards. More than 200 teachers were asked to assess the program, and their responses were quite positive. More information about the program is available at our website (http://www.ccssc.org).

  17. Supreme Court of the United States, Syllabus. Columbus Board of Education Et Al. v. Penick Et Al. Certiorari to the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. No. 78-610.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supreme Court of the U. S., Washington, DC.

    This syllabus records the opinion of the Supreme Court and the concurring and dissenting opinions expressed by Supreme Court justices in this case. The opinion recorded upholds the charges brought in 1973 by students in the Columbus, Ohio school system that the Columbus Board of Education was causing and perpetuating racial segregation in the

  18. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  19. RH-TRU Waste Shipments from Battelle Columbus Laboratories to the Hanford Nuclear Facility for Interim Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Eide, J.; Baillieul, T. A.; Biedscheid, J.; Forrester, T,; McMillan, B.; Shrader, T.; Richterich, L.

    2003-02-26

    Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL), located in Columbus, Ohio, must complete decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities for nuclear research buildings and grounds by 2006, as directed by Congress. Most of the resulting waste (approximately 27 cubic meters [m3]) is remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The BCL, under a contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Ohio Field Office, has initiated a plan to ship the TRU waste to the DOE Hanford Nuclear Facility (Hanford) for interim storage pending the authorization of WIPP for the permanent disposal of RH-TRU waste. The first of the BCL RH-TRU waste shipments was successfully completed on December 18, 2002. This BCL shipment of one fully loaded 10-160B Cask was the first shipment of RH-TRU waste in several years. Its successful completion required a complex effort entailing coordination between different contractors and federal agencies to establish necessary supporting agreements. This paper discusses the agreements and funding mechanisms used in support of the BCL shipments of TRU waste to Hanford for interim storage. In addition, this paper presents a summary of the efforts completed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the 10-160B Cask system. Lessons learned during this process are discussed and may be applicable to other TRU waste site shipment plans.

  20. Youth Field Day Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison.

    Youth field days expose children to outdoor activities, land use ethics, and habitat conservation and encourage adults to be mentors in these areas. A typical youth field day could have programs in archery, fishing, boating, shooting, or safety. The event requires a diverse steering committee that usually includes sporting clubs and state…

  1. Montessori All Day, All Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Connie; Davis, Liza

    2015-01-01

    Introducing real community into the Children's House goes back to the roots of Montessori education through all-day Montessori. The all-day environment is a house where children live with a "developmental room" of Montessori materials including a living room, kitchen, dining area, bedroom, bathroom, greeting rooms, and outdoor spaces.…

  2. Nutritional composition of school meals serving children from 7 to 36 months of age in municipal day-care centres in the metropolitan area of Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Retondario, Anabelle; Silva, Débora Letícia Frizzi; Salgado, Silvana Magalhães; Alves, Márcia Aurelina de Oliveira; Ferreira, Sila Mary Rodrigues

    2016-06-01

    The Brazilian National School Feeding Program (PNAE) seeks to meet student's nutritional needs during the period they remain in school. This study aimed to determine the nutritional composition of meals provided in municipal day-care centres serving children of 7-11 months (group A) and 12-36 months (group B) of age and to compare observed values with the PNAE's and dietary reference intakes' (DRI) recommendations. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 4 day-care centres in the metropolitan area of Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil, between June and November 2013. Food samples of six daily meals were collected during 20 non-consecutive days, totalling 120 samples. For each meal, average served and consumed portions were submitted for laboratory analysis of moisture, ash, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, dietary fibre, Na, Ca and Fe and compared with the PNAE's and DRI's values. No statistically significant difference was found between age groups (P=0·793) regarding portion sizes and nutritional composition. The same menu was offered to both groups in 95 % of the meals (n 114), although the groups' nutritional needs were different. For group A, served meals met PNAE's recommendations for energy, carbohydrates, proteins, Na and Ca content, and consumed portions provided 70 % of the nutritional needs for carbohydrates, proteins and Ca. For group B, served portions complied with the PNAE's values for proteins, Na and Ca. Proteins and Na reached 70 % of the nutritional needs when consumed food was evaluated. School feeding in day-care centres partially meet PNAE's guidelines and children's nutritional requirements, contradicting the primary objective established by the national programme. PMID:27122205

  3. 75 FR 75963 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 138 Under Alternative Site Framework, Columbus, OH, Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ..., the Board adopted the alternative site framework (ASF) in December 2008 (74 FR 1170, 01/12/09; correction 74 FR 3987, 01/22/09) as an option for the establishment or reorganization of general-purpose... Federal Register (75 FR 45096-45097, 8/2/2010) and the application has been processed pursuant to the...

  4. When Every Day Is Professional Development Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Stonaker, Lew

    2007-01-01

    In the Monroe Township (New Jersey) Public Schools, teachers' learning occurs daily, not just on one day in October and February. Central office and school-level administrators foster job-embedded teacher growth. Every day is a professional development day in the district, but that has not always been so. How did the district become a system with

  5. When Every Day Is Professional Development Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Stonaker, Lew

    2007-01-01

    In the Monroe Township (New Jersey) Public Schools, teachers' learning occurs daily, not just on one day in October and February. Central office and school-level administrators foster job-embedded teacher growth. Every day is a professional development day in the district, but that has not always been so. How did the district become a system with…

  6. 500 Years after the Quest (A Directory of Organizations, Resources, and Activities Pertaining to the Quincentenary of the Historical Voyage of Christopher Columbus).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Jeanette

    This year, 1992, marks the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus's first voyage to the Americas. Much discussion, debate, and celebration of the historical significance of the quincentenary will occur. This directory of events, contacts, and activities pertaining to the quincentenary seeks to foster these various endeavors. Among the subjects…

  7. The Economic Impact of Six Cultural Institutions on the Economy of the Columbus SMSA. Technical Supplement. Volume I [and] Volume II--Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwi, David; Smith, D. Alden

    The research methods, procedures, and data for determining the impact of six fine arts institutions on the Columbus, Ohio, economy (1978) are outlined. A 30-equation model was used to identify a variety of effects on local businesses, government, and individuals. Researchers examined internal records of the six institutions as well as local,…

  8. Measurements on radiation shielding efficacy of Polyethylene and Kevlar in the ISS (Columbus)

    PubMed Central

    Di Fino, L.; Larosa, M.; Zaconte, V.; Casolino, M.; Picozza, P.; Narici, L.

    2014-01-01

    The study and optimization of material effectiveness as radiation shield is a mandatory step toward human space exploration. Passive radiation shielding is one of the most important element in the entire radiation countermeasures package. Crewmembers will never experience direct exposure to space radiation; they will be either inside some shelter (the spacecraft, a ‘base’) or in an EVA (Extra Vehicular Activity) suit. Understanding the radiation shielding features of materials is therefore an important step toward an optimization of shelters and suits construction in the quest for an integrated solution for radiation countermeasures. Materials are usually tested for their radiation shielding effectiveness first with Monte Carlo simulations, then on ground, using particle accelerators and a number of specific ions known to be abundant in space, and finally in space. Highly hydrogenated materials perform best as radiation shields. Polyethylene is right now seen as the material that merges a high level of hydrogenation, an easiness of handling and machining as well as an affordable cost, and it is often referred as a sort of ‘standard’ to which compare other materials' effectiveness. Kevlar has recently shown very interesting radiation shielding properties, and it is also known to have important characteristics toward debris shielding, and can be used, for example, in space suits. We have measured in the ISS the effectiveness of polyethylene and kevlar using three detectors of the ALTEA system [ 1– 3] from 8 June 2012 to 13 November 2012, in Express Rack 3 in Columbus. These active detectors are able to provide the radiation quality parameters in any orbital region; being identical, they are also suitable to be used in parallel (one for the unshielded baseline, two measuring radiation with two different amounts of the same material: 5 and 10 g/cm2). A strong similarity of the shielding behavior between polyethylene and kevlar is documented. We measured shielding providing as much as ∼40% reduction for high Z ions. In Fig. 1, the integrated behavior (3 ≤LET ≤ 350 keV/µm) is shown (ratios with the baseline measurements with no shield) both for polyethylene and kevlar, in flux, dose and dose equivalent. The measured reductions in dose for the 10 g/cm2 shields for high LET (>50 keV/µm, not shown in the figure) are in agreement with what found in accelerator measurements (Fe, 1 GeV) [4]. The thinner shielding (5 g/cm2) in our measurements performs ∼2% better (in unit areal density). Fig. 1.Integrated behavior (3 ≤ LET ≤ 350 keV/μm) of Flux, Dose and Equivalent Dose. The ratios with the baseline measurements with no shield are shown, both for Kevlar and Polyethylene as measured with the two different material thicknesses.

  9. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-041-1709, City of Columbus Refuse-derived Fuel Power Plant, Columbus, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenholz, S.H.

    1986-07-01

    Potential for heat stress along with exposure to chemical contaminants and airborne microbial pollutants was investigated at the City refuse-derived-fuel powerplant. Health hazards existed to lead and silica exposures for workers involved in handling ash. Low levels of exposure to chromium, chromium-VI, cadmium, and nickel were noted. Excessive heat stress occurred during the maintenance activities in hot areas of the facility. Airborne microbial contamination levels in the refuse-handling areas indicate that exposure hazards exist by both the inhalation and ingestion routes. Human pathogens may be present in the microbial pollutants. The author recommends that employee exposure to lead be reduced through the use of engineering controls. Eating, drinking, and carrying or use of tobacco products or cosmetics in the power plant and refuse handling areas should be prohibited. Recommended methods for controlling heat stress were given.

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA region 5): Tri-State Plating, Columbus, IN. (First remedial action), March 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-30

    The 3,900-square foot Tri-State Plating site is an abandoned metal plating facility in Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana. Land use in the vicinity of the site is residential and industrial. Metal plating operations at the site began during the 1940s. In 1983, the State identified soil contaminated with chromium, lead, and other metals, which was thought to be a result of an onsite waste spill. In 1984, following additional onsite waste disposal violations, onsite spills, and the failure of Tri-State plating to install an onsite waste treatment system, the State blocked sewers from the site and cut off the water supply. From 1987 to 1989, in two separate actions, EPA removed 27 drums of inorganic material from the storage building, excavated contaminated onsite soil, decontaminated and demolished all onsite structures. This ROD addresses the contaminated onsite ground water. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are metals including chromium.

  11. Industrywide studies report: a walk through survey of Ross Laboratories (Division of Abbott Laboratories), Columbus, Ohio. [Ethylene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Greife, A.; Steenland, K.

    1985-10-02

    A walk-through survey was conducted at Ross Laboratories, a Division of Abbott Laboratories, Columbus, Ohio in August, 1985. The purpose of the survey was to determine the feasibility of including the facility in a NIOSH industry wide mortality/industrial hygiene survey of ethylene oxide. The facility produced infant formula and infant related products, including nipples. The company had a full time nurse on the first and second shifts. A physician was available on a contract basis. New employees were given preemployment physicals. Employees received annual physicals until 1982 after which they became optional. The physicals did not include any components relating to ethylene-oxide exposure. The authors conclude that the personnel records are not adequate to identify a cohort of exposed individuals at the facility. The facility will not be included in the NIOSH study.

  12. Schoolwide Literacy Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polder, Darlene D.

    2000-01-01

    Describes 10 "literacy day" activities that one California elementary school has used successfully schoolwide, typically one such day per month, to make reading fun and purposeful, while developing a sense of community. Includes: spread-a-quilt day; teacher exchange day; turn off the TV; Dr. Seuss day; community readers; schoolwide poets; original…

  13. First Day of Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Child All About Food Allergies The First Day of Life KidsHealth > For Parents > The First Day ... continue What Your Baby Does on the First Day Many parents are surprised to see how alert ...

  14. World HABITAT Day message.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, A

    1990-01-01

    The Executive Director of the UN Centre for Human Settlements (HABITAT) discusses the 1989 World HABITAT Day message--Shelter, Health, and the Family. Women and children spend most of their time in their homes and neighborhoods. The environment and the way they live in that environment determine their health status and well being. Healthy housing encompasses protection against rain, heat, cold, and disease. Yet more than 25% of the world's population have inadequate housing which is responsible for various communicable and chronic diseases, injuries, and psychological stresses. For example, overcrowding leads to respiratory infection. Inferior building materials and designs foster the harboring and breeding of disease vectors and destruction by natural disasters. Limited access to potable water and sanitation facilities and poor personal hygiene cause death, disabilities, and blemishes to millions of people as well as fosters food contamination. 10,000 people die each day from injuries or conditions directly related to inadequate shelter and related services. The urban poor tend to be at the point where industrialization meets underdevelopment because they live in marginal areas often near refuse dumps, swamps, and areas subject to landslides, earthquake, or flooding. Social and psychological problems also emerge from such an environment which further undermine the underpinnings of a secure and pleasant family life. Few activities designed to improve shelter consider the health of the occupants, however. Education about the link between housing and health among the poor at the household and community levels may empower them to alleviate the health hazards. The Executive Director requests the international community, governments, their agencies, nongovernmental organizations, builders, planners, and policymakers to consider the link between housing and health when making policy and decisions. PMID:2326215

  15. Family Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seefeldt, Carol, Ed.; Dittmann, Laura L., Ed.

    This handbook is intended to provide information for the family seeking day care for its children, the family wishing to begin a family day care service, and an agency considering implementing a network of family day care homes. The first section of the handbook is especially intended for parents who are trying to decide which type of day care…

  16. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  17. Field-Scale Hydraulic Conductivity (K) and Mass Transfer at the MADE Site in Columbus, Mississippi: A Review and Continuing Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molz, F. J.; Guan, J.; Liu, H.; Zheng, C.

    2005-12-01

    During the late eighties and early nineties, several natural gradient tracer tests were conducted in a shallow unconfined fluvial aquifer at Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi. The aquifer matrix was highly heterogeneous (natural log(K) variance of about 4.5) and consisted of poorly-sorted to well-sorted layered sandy gravel to gravely sand, with variable silt and clay content (Boggs et al., 1993). Prior to performing the tracer tests, the aquifer was characterized extensively using a borehole flow-meter. The resulting tracer plumes were highly elongated with dilute leading edges in the down-gradient direction, and transport appeared to be advection-dominated. Although there is still some controversy, reasonably successful simulations of the MADE tracer data have settled on an approximate dual porosity conceptualization of the aquifer matrix. Throughout the aquifer, high K zones (mobile porosity) are visualized as being in contact with low K zones (immobile porosity), with mass transfer between the zones governed by an effective mass transfer coefficient B. Such a transfer coefficient is analogous to the matrix diffusion coefficient Dm used to simulate transport in fractured rock with diffusion into the rock matrix (Foster, 1975). Recently, experiments and geometrically-based reasoning have been presented, implying that the effective Dm, like dispersivity, increases with travel distance (Liu et al., 2004; Zhou et al., 2005). Conversely, other studies based on multiple rate mass transfer between mobile and immobile porosities in granular media (Haggerty et al., 2004) have indicated that B will decrease with travel distance. Thus in geometrically complex granular media, like those at the MADE site, two opposing effects may be present. To further study this question, new 3-D simulations of tritium transport are being performed using flow-meter K data and the measured tritium concentrations at selected times. Results to date indicate that B generally decreases with scale, but changes will depend on the details of how the flow and mass transfer process at the MADE site is conceptualized. For example, did the tritium tracer injected initially all enter the mobile porosity, as commonly assumed, or was a significant portion of it forced into the immobile porosity? Was fluid in the immobile porosity essentially non-moving relative to mobile fluid, or did both fluid classes move significantly down-gradient. Alternatively, was tracer simply injected into an overall low K region, from which it slowly leaked out during the course of the 328 day experiment? Simulation results from different scenarios will be presented and implications discussed concerning the detailed scale-dependence of B at the MADE Site.

  18. Starting a Day Care Center: The Day Care Center Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Checkett, Donald

    Designed to be of help to individuals and groups seeking to establish a day care center in the metropolitan St. Louis area, this manual calls attention to important and basic information which must be taken into account if planning is to produce tangible results. Following a brief section defining commonly used terms referring to organized…

  19. Genetic variation of Hoplolaimus columbus populations in the United States using PCR-RFLP analysis of nuclear rDNA ITS regions1

    PubMed Central

    Bae, C. H.; Szalanski, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    Hoplolaimus columbus is an important nematode pest which causes economic loss of crops including corn, cotton, and soybean in the Southeastern United States. DNA sequences of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of ribosomal DNA from H. columbus were aligned and analyzed to characterize intraspecific genetic variation between eleven populations collected from Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, and South Carolina. In comparative sequence analysis with clones from either one or two individuals obtained from the eleven populations, we found variability existed among clones from an individual and that clonal diversity observed from within individuals was verified by PCR-RFLP. PCR-RFLP analysis with Rsa I and Msp I restriction enzymes yielded several fragments on 3.0% agarose gel that corresponded to different haplotypes in all populations and the sum of digested products exceeded the length of undigested PCR products, which revealed that ITS heterogeneity existed in a genome of H. columbus. This indicates that heterogeneity may play a role in the evolution of this parthenogenetic species. PMID:22736813

  20. Every Day Is National Lab Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen

    2010-01-01

    President Barack Obama recently issued a call for increased hands-on learning in U.S. schools in an address at the National Academy of Sciences. Obama concluded that the future of the United States depends on one's ability to encourage young people to "create, and build, and invent." In this article, the author discusses National Lab Day (NLD)…

  1. Riley-Day syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Riley-Day syndrome is an inherited disorder that affects nerves throughout the body. ... Riley-Day syndrome is passed down through families (inherited). A person must inherit a copy of the defective gene ...

  2. Growing degree day calculator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Degree-day benchmarks indicate discrete biological events in the development of insect pests. For the Sparganothis fruitworm, we have isolated all key development events and linked them to degree-day accumulations. These degree-day accumulations can greatly improve treatment timings for cranberry IP...

  3. Every Day Is Mathematical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Rita H.; Jarrah, Adeeb M.

    2012-01-01

    March 14 is special because it is Pi Day. Mathematics is celebrated on that day because the date, 3-14, replicates the first three digits of pi. Pi-related songs, websites, trivia facts, and more are at the fingertips of interested teachers and students. Less celebrated, but still fairly well known, is National Metric Day, which falls on October…

  4. Every Day Is Mathematical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Rita H.; Jarrah, Adeeb M.

    2012-01-01

    March 14 is special because it is Pi Day. Mathematics is celebrated on that day because the date, 3-14, replicates the first three digits of pi. Pi-related songs, websites, trivia facts, and more are at the fingertips of interested teachers and students. Less celebrated, but still fairly well known, is National Metric Day, which falls on October

  5. Family Day Care Provider Support Services Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galblum, Trudi W.; Boyer-Shesol, Cathy

    This directory profiles numerous organizational support services for family day care providers in the Kansas City metropolitan area. The first chapter, on operating a family day care home, concerns licensing and registration, the processes of starting and marketing a day care business, zoning and municipal regulation, and substitute providers. The…

  6. Four-Day Week Schedule. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    What does research say about the four-day week as an alternative school schedule? More than 100 districts in at least 12 states currently use a four-day week alternative schedule. Most are located in rural areas, serve less than 1000 students, and made the move to a shorter school week with longer instructional days for financial reasons. Although…

  7. Results of the preliminary radiological survey at B and T Metals, 425 West Town Street, Columbus, Ohio (CO001)

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, W.D.; Quillen, J.L.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1990-10-01

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a radiological survey program to determine the radiological conditions at sites that were formerly used by the department's predecessor agencies. The preliminary radiological survey discussed in this report for the B T Metals site in Columbus, Ohio, is part of the FUSRAP effort and was conducted at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1988 and 1989. In the 1940s the B T Metals site was used to provide extrusion of uranium billets into rods in support of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) operations. The preliminary radiological survey included a surface gamma scan, collection of dust, debris, and soil samples, measurement of direct and transferable alpha and beta-gamma activity, and air sampling. Results of this radiological assessment indicate that the property contains residual radioactivity from MED activities in concentrations that exceed remedial action guidelines. 8 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Telescience with MARCO/HOLOP on board the spacelab D2-mission as a preparation for Columbus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, E.; Geist, W.; Heimann, K.; Heyland, D.; Hibsch, G.; Schmidt, K. D.

    The implementation of the telescience concept and its test in precursor missions is mandatory for experiment operations in the Columbus era with respect to enhancements in science quality and quantity. During the German D2 Spacelab mission, scheduled for spring 1993, a fluid physics experiment (MARCO, MARangoni COnvection in an open boat) will be performed in the telescience mode, using the HOLOP-D2 (HOLographic OPtics laboratory) experiment facility. MARCO will be remotely operated by the experimenter from a USOC (User Support and Operations Center). DLR/MUSC (Microgravity User Support Center, located at Cologne, Germany) will play the role of this USOC, being connected to DLR/GSOC (German Space Operations Center, located in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany) via remote data, voice and video lines. Telescience with MARCO/HOLOP is a joint effort between DARA GmbH (Deutsche Agentur für Raumfahrt-Angelegenheiten), DLR (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.) and ESA (European Space Agency).

  9. Open Day at SHMI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosova, M.

    2010-09-01

    During the World Meteorological Day there has been preparing "Open Day" at Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute. This event has more than 10 years traditions. "Open Day" is one of a lot of possibilities to give more information about meteorology, climatology, hydrology too to public. This "Day" is executed in whole Slovakia. People can visit the laboratories, the forecasting room....and meteo and clima measuring points. The most popular is visiting forecasting room. Visitors are interested in e.g. climatologic change in Slovakia territory, preparing weather forecasting, dangerous phenomena.... Every year we have more than 500 visitors.

  10. Popular Chat Day Q & A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Day / Popular Chat Day Q & A Popular Chat Day Q & A Read students most popular questions about ... New Order Free Materials National Drugs & Alcohol Chat Day Chat Day Participant FAQs Popular Chat Day Q & ...

  11. Popular Chat Day Q & A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Day / Popular Chat Day Q & A Popular Chat Day Q & A Read students’ most popular questions about ... New Order Free Materials National Drugs & Alcohol Chat Day Chat Day Participant FAQs Popular Chat Day Q & ...

  12. For Just One Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, S.

    2004-01-01

    This essay explores the fantasy of a mother who wonders what her son would have been like if he were not severely disabled. For just one day, she confesses, she would like to know the anticipated son who disappeared from her life the day her disabled son was born, 21 years ago. The essay provides vivid examples of challenging experiences she has

  13. Science Challenge Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Science fairs can be good motivators, but as extracurricular activities, they leave some students behind. However, by staging a Science Challenge Day at school, educators can involve all students in doing everything from choosing activities to judging projects. This article presents a model for running a successful Science Challenge Day. The…

  14. RED-LETTER DAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The word "red-letter" is an adjective meaning "of special significance." It's origin is from the practice of marking Christian holy days in red letters on calendars. The "red-letter days" to which I refer occurred while I was a graduate student of ...

  15. Day Nurseries in Senegal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gueye, Khady

    1977-01-01

    Describes a village day nursery organized by peasant women in 1962 to provide care for preschool children whose mothers must work in the rice fields. Outlines the aims of the day nursery and the prerequisites for its establishment. Community and parent participation is stressed. (JK)

  16. The Presidents' Day Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2008-01-01

    The history behind the holiday commonly called "Presidents' Day" is a bit confusing. It started as a federal holiday called Washington's Birthday. It was a day set aside to honor George Washington for his accomplishments as a founding father of the country. Later, many northern states began to recognize Abraham Lincoln's Birthday as well for his…

  17. Science Challenge Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Science fairs can be good motivators, but as extracurricular activities, they leave some students behind. However, by staging a Science Challenge Day at school, educators can involve all students in doing everything from choosing activities to judging projects. This article presents a model for running a successful Science Challenge Day. The

  18. Family Science Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCubbins, Sara; Thomas, Bethany; Vetere, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a family-friendly science day event that encourages scientific discovery through hands-on activities, while also providing an opportunity to learn about scientific careers from actual research scientists and science educators, thereby raising awareness of the importance of STEM in our society. The one-day event bought

  19. Family Science Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCubbins, Sara; Thomas, Bethany; Vetere, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a family-friendly science day event that encourages scientific discovery through hands-on activities, while also providing an opportunity to learn about scientific careers from actual research scientists and science educators, thereby raising awareness of the importance of STEM in our society. The one-day event bought…

  20. Who Cares? Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Dept. of Children and Family Services, Springfield.

    The purpose of this report prepared by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services is to describe the growth of day care services in Illinois during 1972 and to present information which will aid state agencies and citizens in planning for and coordinating day care services. The report is divided into discussions of past, present, and

  1. My Lucky Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olvey, Maura

    2010-01-01

    Teaching based on problem solving brings challenges for the teacher, primarily that of finding problems with multiple access points that accommodate all students. This article narrates the author's lucky day as she discovers the Four fours problem which impacted her passion for teaching math. The day she presented the Four fours problem to her

  2. The Presidents' Day Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2008-01-01

    The history behind the holiday commonly called "Presidents' Day" is a bit confusing. It started as a federal holiday called Washington's Birthday. It was a day set aside to honor George Washington for his accomplishments as a founding father of the country. Later, many northern states began to recognize Abraham Lincoln's Birthday as well for his

  3. My Lucky Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olvey, Maura

    2010-01-01

    Teaching based on problem solving brings challenges for the teacher, primarily that of finding problems with multiple access points that accommodate all students. This article narrates the author's lucky day as she discovers the Four fours problem which impacted her passion for teaching math. The day she presented the Four fours problem to her…

  4. Rainy Day Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Experienced caregivers plan ahead for rainy days. This article describes specific rainy day activities for young children, such as books and crafts to learn about rain (rain in a jar, making a rainbow), simple cooking activities (taffy pull, cinnamon candy tea), and games (mummy wrap, hunt the thimble, rain lotto). (EV)

  5. Day of the Dead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dann, Tammy; Murphy, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language in Elementary School (FLES) teachers in the West Des Moines schools incorporate the Day of the Dead into the fourth grade curriculum each year. The teachers discuss the Day of the Dead celebration at the Art Center, and many ask for volunteers from fourth grade to participate in the event. Student presentations include a wide…

  6. The Early Black Diaspora in the Americas: The First Century after Columbus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Colin

    1991-01-01

    Assesses to present state of knowledge of African-American contributions to, and the role of slavery in the settlement of, the Americas. Suggests areas for future research and discusses research problems. Argues that the economics of capitalism had more effect on conditions of slavery than did the legal codes. (DK)

  7. Infections in day care.

    PubMed

    Ferson, M J

    1993-02-01

    The number of preschool-aged children who attend day care has increased dramatically in recent years. Factors promoting spread of infections in this setting include crowding, lack of hygiene, high prevalence of early exploratory behaviors, and the likelihood of many susceptible children being in close contact. As a result, children attending day care experience a great number of episodes of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness than do other children. Moreover, the risk of a number of specific infections, including Haemophilus influenzae type b and hepatitis A, is increased by attendance in day care. Day-care staff are at increased risk of a number of infections, some of which, including cytomegalovirus and parvovirus B19, may have adverse consequences to a fetus. The presence of children in day care increases the risk of illness among staff and family members and may promote the circulation of infections in the community as a whole. PMID:8374625

  8. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over many orbits has made it a powerhouse for learning about the temperatures, atmospheres, and orbits of exoplanets. The list of examples that Fazio provided included the first global temperature map of an exoplanet (HD 189733b), the detection of the closest transiting exoplanet (HD 219134b), and the measurement of thermal emission from a super-Earth (55 Cnc e). Spitzers large distance from the Earth (specifically, the ground-based telescopes on Earth) even allowed astronomers to observe an exoplanet via gravitational microlensing using a special technique called space-based parallax.Spitzer has also been extremely useful for observing everything from Solar System scales (such as the enormous infrared dust ring around Saturn) to galactic structures. Comparing images of galaxies observed at visible wavelengths with Spitzer images of the same galaxies at infrared wavelengths has allowed us to probe the structure and composition of galaxies at a new level.Astronomers have also used Spitzer to explore the evolution of stars. Thanks to its infrared detectors, Spitzer can look through large clouds of dust that are opaque at visible wavelengths, and observe young stellar objects in their birth environments. Cosmologists can use Spitzer to study the early universe and the formation of galaxies over twelve billion years ago. Fazio used all of these examples and more to demonstrate that Spitzer has truly changed our understanding of the universe.Climate Change for Astronomers (Meredith Rawls)Every astronomer at #aas227 wants to learn about climate change! WOW this room is ridiculously full. pic.twitter.com/ud9an0gLJG Meredith Rawls (@merrdiff) January 7, 2016The second half of the session was a presentation by Doug Duncan featuring an activity from his 101-level college course. He uses climate change as a way to teach critical thinking and scientific reasoning. Members of the audience were walked through an exercise that included interpreting plots of changing surface temperatures, think-pair-share style clicker questions, and comparing excerpts from scientific articles and the media. Eventually, students discover that the Earths overall temperature is going up, but observations can vary from year to year because heat is moving between the atmosphere and the oceans.Press Conference: Fermis Vision, First Stars, Massive Galaxy Cluster, and Dark Energy (by Susanna Kohler)Todays afternoon press conference was an exciting assortment of results, difficult to categorize under a single umbrella.First up was Marco Ajello (Clemson University), who spoke about 2FHL, the second Fermi-LAT catalog of high-energy sources. LAT stands for Large Area Telescope, an instrument on board the Fermi gamma-ray space observatory that scans the entire sky every three hours. Ajello described the contents of the 2FHL catalog: 360 gamma-ray sources, of which 75% are blazars (distant galactic nuclei with jets pointed toward us), 11% are sources within the galaxy, and the remaining 14% are unknown. With this catalog, Fermi has expanded into higher energies than ever before, providing the first map of the 50 GeV 2 TeV sky. Heres the press release.OMeara: Im a lowly spectroscopist so I dont have fun pictures to show you, just squiggly lines. #aas227 astrobites (@astrobites) January 7, 2016Next to speak, John OMeara (St. Michaels College) told us about the discovery of a gas cloud that may be a remnant from the first population of stars. OMeara showed us the emission spectrum from a distant quasar, which displays abrupt absorption by a cloud of gas located at a redshift of z~3.5. Absorption by gas clouds is not unusual but what is unusual is that this cloud is extremely metal-poor, with only 1/2500th solar metallicity. This is the lowest heavy-element content ever measured, and a sign that the cloud might have been enriched by Population III stars the theoretical first population of stars, which were born when gas in the universe was still pristine. Heres the press release.Cluster IDCS J1426.5+3508. [NASA, European Space Agency, University of Florida, University of Missouri, and University of California]Mark Brodwin (University of Missouri, Kansas City) was up next, discussing the most distant massive galaxy cluster that has ever been discovered. The cluster IDCS J1426.5+3508, weighing in at several trillion solar masses (as measured by three independent techniques!), is located at a redshift of z=1.75. Since clusters take several billion years to form, and its redshift corresponds to a time when the universe was only 3.8 billion years old, were probably seeing it at a very early age. This combination of mass and youth is unique! Brodwin also pointed out another interesting feature: the clusters core isnt centered, which means it probably underwent a major merger with another cluster within the last 500 million years. Heres the press release.The final speaker was Sukanya Chakrabarti (Rochester Institute of Technology), who gave a very interesting talk about a topic Id never heard of: galactoseismology. Galactoseismology involves observing waves in the disk of a galaxy to learn about the properties of dwarf galaxies that caused the perturbations. In this case, Chakrabarti evaluated ripples in the outer disk of our galaxy, and used these to predict the location of a dwarf galaxy that must have skimmed the outskirts of our galaxy a few hundred million years ago, causing the waves. This is a cool technique for learning about dwarf galaxies whether or not theyre visible, since theyll cause ripples even if theyre dominated by dark matter. Chakrabarti showed an awesome simulation of this dwarfs interaction with the Milky Way, which you can check out on her website. Heres the press release.

  9. Adult Day Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... care, to enhance self-esteem, and to encourage socialization. There are two types of adult day care: ... Meals Medical care Physical therapy Recreation Respite care Socialization Supervision Transportation Medication management Back to top Center ...

  10. Day care health risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus. It is spread by poor or no hand washing after going to the bathroom or changing a ... and then preparing food. In addition to good hand washing, day care staff and children should get the ...

  11. Pregnancy - identifying fertile days

    MedlinePlus

    ... between days 7 and 20 of a woman's menstrual cycle. In order to become pregnant, having sex every ... hours of ovulation. If you have an irregular menstrual cycle, an ovulation predictor kit can help you know ...

  12. Space Day 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winslow, Joyce

    2000-01-01

    Introduces three design challenges for fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students created by the Challenger Center for Space Science Education. Presents information on Space Day and the National Classroom and provides Internet site addresses. (YDS)

  13. Stennis Day Camper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Sara Beth Casey, 5, proudly displays her artwork, 'Planets.' Sara Beth created the art as a student of Stennis Day Camp, a free camp for Stennis Space Center employees' children whose schools have not resumed since Hurricane Katrina hit the region on Aug. 29. The camp has registered nearly 200 children and averages 100 children each day. The camp will continue until all schools are back in session.

  14. Long-term continuous monitor demonstration program: Columbus and Southern Ohio Electric Company, Conesville Unit 6. Final report Dec 79-Mar 83

    SciTech Connect

    Peduto, E.F. Jr.; Porter, T.J.; Midgley, D.P.

    1984-03-01

    The report gives results of a continuous monitoring demonstration at the Columbus and Southern Ohio Electric Company's Conesville Generating Station. The purpose of the demonstration was to determine the feasibility of the requirements for monitoring and control of SO2 emissions as specified in 40 CFR, Part 60, Subpart Da, which promulgates new source performance standards (NSPS) for new utility steam generators. A secondary objective was to adhere to the draft quality assurance requirements scheduled for promulgation as Appendix F. The report describes program activities and results of the field portion, during which data were collected for about 12 months of a 16-month period.

  15. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance US General Serices Administration - Project 193, John W. Bricker Federal Building, Columbus, OH

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-05-31

    This report documents the findings from an onsite audit of the John W. Bricker Federal building located in Columbus, Ohio. The Federal landlord for this building is the General Services Administration (GSA). The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost or low-cost energy efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would either reduce electrical and gas consumption or increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the future to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

  16. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt mean its not typical. While we wait for more and better observations of exoplanet systems, theory can help us understand why the Solar System formed the way it did, and where to look for systems that formed the same way. For example, some of Murray-Clays previous work has shown that metal-rich stars tend to host more hot Jupiters and eccentric giant planets (very different from Solar System architecture). So if we want to find more systems like our own, we need to search around stars with low-to-moderate metallicity.Extrasolar Planets: Hosts, Interactions, Formation, and Interiors (by Caroline Morley)This session was a mashup of a variety of planetary topics ranging from solar flares to interiors to habitability.Leslie Rogers kicked off the session by presenting work done in collaboration with her student Ellen Price to constrain the composition of the ultra-short period (4 hours!?!) planet candidate KOI 1843.03 using models of the objects interior. Since its so close to the star, it can only exist without being torn apart if its very dense, which allows them to calculate that it must be iron-rich like Mercury!Next Kevin Thielen, an undergrad at Eckerd College, presented results from a summer project to apply a variable polytrope index to planet models. Tom Barclay then showed models that demonstrate the huge effect that having giant planets in the outer solar system has on the formation of terrestrial planets. He finds that without Jupiter and Saturn, more planets would form (8 instead of 3-4!) and giant impacts (like the moon-forming impact) would be more frequent but less energetic.Aomawa Shields shifted to discuss her 3D GCM models to determine the orbital configurations that would lead to liquid water on the surface of the planet Kepler-62f. She determines the effect of eccentricity, axis tilt (obliquity), and rotation rate on habitability. Edward Guinan brought us closer to home discussing the potential for superflares solar flares up to hundreds of times more energetic than normalin our solar system. Analyses of Kepler data suggest that these flares likely happen every 300-500 years in Sunlike stars (way more often than previously thought!), and would devastate communications systems on Earth (and hurt astronauts in space).Peter Buhler and Taisiya Kopytova finished up the session. Peter showed how he used Spitzer secondary eclipses and MESA models to determine the tidal love number and core mass of HAT-P-13b. Taisiya presented her thesis work on observations of brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. She shows that in many cases, particularly for young objects and cold objects, the models for these objects do not fit the data very well!Press Conference: Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) IV (by Susanna Kohler)The final press conference of the meeting was all about the fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.In the opening talk, Michael Blanton (New York University) presented some early results from SDSS-IV, which is slated to run from 2014 to 2020. The major components to SDSS-IV are extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS), a cosmological survey of quasars and galaxies; APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-2), a stellar survey of the Milky Way; and Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA), a survey that will map the detailed internal structure of nearly 10,000 nearby galaxies.Next up was Melissa Ness (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy), speaking about APOGEEs creation of the first global age map of the Milky Way. APOGEE obtained the spectra for 70,000 red giant stars. These spectra, combined with the stars light curves, allowed the team to infer the ages of these stars distributed across the Milky Way galaxy. The resulting map is shown in the video below. From this map, Ness says its pretty clear: the Milky Way started as a small disk, and its expanded out from there, since. Our galaxy grew, and it grew up by growing out. Heres the press release. This is a big 3D map showing the age of stars in the Milky Way the latest from #aas227: https://t.co/HiPbm9eW6J pic.twitter.com/DqG6NNsPTU jonathan jb webb (@jjbw) January 8, 2016Francesco Belfiore (University of Cambridge) gave the next talk, cleverly titled Proof That Some Galaxies Are LIERs. The title is a play on the astrophysical source known as a LINER, or Low-Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region an area within a galactic center that displays line emission from weakly ionized or neutral atoms. These have commonly been interpreted as being a wimpy active galactic nucleus (AGN). But a closer look with MaNGA, which is able to take spectroscopic data for the whole galaxy at once, has revealed that these sources are actually distributed throughout the galaxy, rather than being nuclear hence, no N: these galaxies are LIERs. Instead of AGN, the sources may be newly born white dwarfs. Heres the press release.Artists conception of the changing look quasar as it appeared in early 2015. [Dana Berry / SkyWorks Digital, Inc.; SDSS collaboration]The final speaker was Jessie Runnoe (Pennsylvania State University), who captured everyones attention with the topic of changing look quasars. We know that quasars can transition from a bright state, where active accretion onto the galaxys central supermassive black hole is visible in their emission spectrum, to a dim state, where they look like a normal galaxy. But SDSS has just observed the quasar SDSS J1011+5442 turn off within the span of just 10 years. Based on the data, the team concludes that this quasar exhausted the supply of gas in its immediate vicinity, turning off when there was no longer anything available to accrete. Runnoe showed an awesome animation of this process, which you can check out here. Heres the press release.Coffee, Black Holes, Editors and Beer: The Science-Writing Life (by Susanna Kohler)This talk was a part of the series Beyond the Academy: Showcasing Astronomy Alumni in Non-Academic Careers. Matthew Francis is a former academic scientist (with a PhD in physics and astronomy) who transitioned to being a freelance science writer. Wearing a distinctive bowler hat, Francis talked to a room full of students (and some non-students!) about what its like to be a science writer. Here are some highlights from among his recommendations and comments.A day in the life of a science writer.About the mechanics of freelancing:Some sample numbers: he wrote 73 articles in 2015, for 12 different publications. These vary in length and time invested. He supports himself fully by freelancing.The time between pitching a story and getting it published can vary between a few hours for online news stories to months for feature articles.The answer to the question, What do science writers do all day? (see photo)About transitioning into science writing:If youre interested in a science writing career, start blogging now to build up a portfolio.Use your training! As a researcher, you can read plots, understand scientific articles, and talk to scientists as colleagues. These are great strengths.About writing for the public:Theres a difference in writing for academics and the public: when writing for academics, youre trying to bring them up to your level. When writing for the public, thats probably not the goal.That said, on the subject of dumbing down: If you think your audience is somehow deficient, youve already failed.writing for the web: youll make fundamental spelling/grammar errors, youll find them only when you read the published post. Truth! #aas227 astrobites (@astrobites) January 8, 2016At the end of the session, Francis told us what he considers to be the best part of being a science writer: getting to tell people something that theyve never heard before. Getting it right is communicating a mundane fact to you that is an astounding surprise to your audience.Plenary Talk: News on the Search for Milky Way Satellite Galaxies (by Susanna Kohler)The second-to-last plenary talk of the meeting was given by Keith Bechtol, John Bahcall fellow at University of Wisconsin-Madison. Bechtol spoke about the recent discovery of new satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. Dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way are often hard to spot because they are so faint while globular clusters have mass-to-light ratios of around 1, the ultra-faint satellites around the Milky Way can have mass-to-light ratios of hundreds or thousands! A combination of better facilities and improved analysis techniques has been lengthening the list of known Milky Way satellites, however: SDSS took us from ~10 to ~30 in the last ten years, and facilities like the Dark Energy Survey Camera (DES), Pan-STARRS 1, SkyMapper, and Hyper Suprime-Cam pushed that number to ~50 in 2015.Bechtol plenary on the discovery of new MW satellites #aas227 pic.twitter.com/3GH0Sd2J8c Matthias Steinmetz (@GalacticRAVE) January 8, 2016The new candidates discovered with DES are all less luminous and more distant than previous satellites found. One interesting aspect of this sample is that 15/17 of the candidates fall in the southern half of the DES footprint, and are located near the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. This anisotropy is not thought to be a selection effect so is it coincidence, or could they possibly be satellites of satellites? Were not sure yet!Why do we care about finding Milky Way satellites? There are lots of reasons, but one of the biggest is that they may help us to unravel some of the mysteries of dark matter. These faint-but-massive galaxies were probably born in the Milky Ways dark-matter halo, and they could be great places to indirectly detect dark matter. In addition, theres the missing satellite problem the phenomenon wherein the cold-dark-matter model predicts there should be hundreds of satellites around the Milky Way, yet weve only found a few dozen. Finding more of these galaxies would help clear up whether its the theory or the observations that are wrong.One more time, it shouldnt be called the Missing Satellite Problem. The theorists have a Satellite Overabundance Problem. #aas227 Peter Yoachim (@PeterYoachim) January 8, 2016Overall, Bechtol declares, its been an exciting year for the discovery of new Milky Way satellites, and with new surveys and facilities still in development, the future looks promising as well!Hack Day (by Meredith Rawls)A large contingent of astronomers spent our Friday working on small projects or chunks of larger projects that could be accomplished in a day. Astrobites has written about hack days before. Look for a dedicated recap post with all the great projects later in January!

  17. Rural Folklife Days: Resources for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Jon, Ed.; Beasley, Holly, Ed.; Hollingsworth, Teresa, Ed.; Smith, KC, Ed.

    Rural Folklife Days is an annual celebration of customs and crafts that have been practiced every fall by generations of people in rural areas of north Florida. This packet is designed to help teachers prepare elementary students for Rural Folklife Days and to introduce them to traditional crafts and arts that are still practiced in parts of north…

  18. Genetic Footprints of Iberian Cattle in America 500 Years after the Arrival of Columbus

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Amparo M.; Gama, Luis T.; Cañón, Javier; Ginja, Catarina; Delgado, Juan V.; Dunner, Susana; Landi, Vincenzo; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Rodellar, Clementina; Vega-Pla, Jose Luis; Acosta, Atzel; Álvarez, Luz A.; Camacho, Esperanza; Cortés, Oscar; Marques, Jose R.; Martínez, Roberto; Martínez, Ruben D.; Melucci, Lilia; Martínez-Velázquez, Guillermo; Muñoz, Jaime E.; Postiglioni, Alicia; Quiroz, Jorge; Sponenberg, Philip; Uffo, Odalys; Villalobos, Axel; Zambrano, Delsito; Zaragoza, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Background American Creole cattle presumably descend from animals imported from the Iberian Peninsula during the period of colonization and settlement, through different migration routes, and may have also suffered the influence of cattle directly imported from Africa. The introduction of European cattle, which began in the 18th century, and later of Zebu from India, has threatened the survival of Creole populations, some of which have nearly disappeared or were admixed with exotic breeds. Assessment of the genetic status of Creole cattle is essential for the establishment of conservation programs of these historical resources. Methodology/Principal Findings We sampled 27 Creole populations, 39 Iberian, 9 European and 6 Zebu breeds. We used microsatellite markers to assess the origins of Creole cattle, and to investigate the influence of different breeds on their genetic make-up. The major ancestral contributions are from breeds of southern Spain and Portugal, in agreement with the historical ports of departure of ships sailing towards the Western Hemisphere. This Iberian contribution to Creoles may also include some African influence, given the influential role that African cattle have had in the development of Iberian breeds, but the possibility of a direct influence on Creoles of African cattle imported to America can not be discarded. In addition to the Iberian influence, the admixture with other European breeds was minor. The Creoles from tropical areas, especially those from the Caribbean, show clear signs of admixture with Zebu. Conclusions/Significance Nearly five centuries since cattle were first brought to the Americas, Creoles still show a strong and predominant signature of their Iberian ancestors. Creole breeds differ widely from each other, both in genetic structure and influences from other breeds. Efforts are needed to avoid their extinction or further genetic erosion, which would compromise centuries of selective adaptation to a wide range of environmental conditions. PMID:23155451

  19. Day Care: Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Florence P.; And Others

    This collection of 12 short, bilingual papers on nutrition and preschool children is part of a series of papers on various aspects of day care published by the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare. Each paper is presented in both English and French. Topics dealt with include an overview of children's nutritional needs; development of

  20. One Play a Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate theater students rarely get the chance to work on a major world premiere, but this year hundreds of them will. Currently, more than 70 colleges and universities are participating in "365 Days/365 Plays," an ambitious project from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks. Every week, as they mount their portion of this epic…

  1. Make a Splash Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coverdale, Greg; Rust, April; Jensen, Belinda

    2004-01-01

    At the annual, all-day events-sponsored by Project WET (Water Education for Teachers) and held in nearly every state across the country each September--students participate in interactive activities and exhibits to learn about water resources and explore how human behaviors, such as development and recreation, can affect the quality of the…

  2. Seize the Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkey, Tim

    2008-01-01

    In order to improve what happens in classrooms, a considerable amount of work needs to take place between teachers and principals. This can only happen if campus leaders make dramatic shifts in how and where they spend their daily time. Principals can have a greater impact on teaching and learning by transforming their work one day at a time. The…

  3. International School Library Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clyde, Laurel A.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of an International School Library Day and discusses activities in Australian school libraries. Highlights include the development of Web pages; sponsorship by national, state, or provincial associations; publicity materials; joint activities with other countries; student involvement; and activities with public libraries.…

  4. Every Child, Every Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allington, Richard L.; Gabriel, Rachael E.

    2012-01-01

    We know more now than we ever did before about how to make every child a successful reader, write Allington and Gabriel in this research review. Yet, few students regularly receive the best reading instruction we know how to give. The authors present research supporting their recommendation that every child, every day, should (1) read something he…

  5. An Earth Day Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Don, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presents what the author believes to be some of the most important environmental books published since Earth Day 1970. Discusses each selection and how it provides the historical background, basic information, and appreciation necessary to understand the character of our environmental dilemma and our need to address it. (MCO)

  6. Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  7. No Treatment Day School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJong, Judith A.; Holder, Stanley R.

    2006-01-01

    At the No Treatment Day School, less than 15% of students used the dormitory during the school week. Located in the heart of a reservation and serving local students, the K-12 school enrolled over 1,000 students. The site received Therapeutic Residential Model funding for the 2001-2002 school year. Initial evaluation of this site found an array of…

  8. Family Day Care Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Coordinated Child Care (4-C) in Dane County, Inc., Madison, WI.

    This handbook provides both general and specific information on child development and child care to help adults who are providing child care in their homes. Information is presented in six sections which describe: (1) the family day care system, the occupation of caregiver, and the development of relationships; (2) development of a health program,

  9. Marketing Your Day Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, George

    1997-01-01

    Marketing strategies for day camps include encouraging camp staff to get involved in organizations involving children, families, and communities; holding camp fairs; offering the use of camp facilities to outside groups; hosting sport leagues and local youth outings; planning community fairs; and otherwise involving the camp in the community. (LP)

  10. Dog Day Afternoon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipczak, Bob

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the problem faced by trainers who are "on stage" for eight hours a day. Offers tips to relieve the stress caused by continuous training, including maintaining personal space, taking a lunch break, keeping physically energized, and avoiding burnout when teaching the same thing over and over. (JOW)

  11. First Day of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bort, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    In this brief article, the author, a science teacher at F. C. Hammond Middle School in Alexandria, Virginia, describes how the setting up of a simple science experiment on the first day of school can get students excited about learning science. The experiment involves heating a small amount of water in a flask, then covering the opening of the…

  12. Fabulous Weather Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Candice; Mogil, H. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Each year, first graders at Kensington Parkwood Elementary School in Kensington, Maryland, look forward to Fabulous Weather Day. Students learn how meteorologists collect data about the weather, how they study wind, temperature, precipitation, basic types/characteristics of clouds, and how they forecast. The project helps the students grow in

  13. Fabulous Weather Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Candice; Mogil, H. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Each year, first graders at Kensington Parkwood Elementary School in Kensington, Maryland, look forward to Fabulous Weather Day. Students learn how meteorologists collect data about the weather, how they study wind, temperature, precipitation, basic types/characteristics of clouds, and how they forecast. The project helps the students grow in…

  14. Scheduling: Seven Period Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Driven by stable or declining financial resources many school districts are considering the costs and benefits of a seven-period day. While there is limited evidence that any particular scheduling model has a greater impact on student learning than any other, it is clear that the school schedule is a tool that can significantly impact teacher…

  15. Day Care: Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Florence P.; And Others

    This collection of 12 short, bilingual papers on nutrition and preschool children is part of a series of papers on various aspects of day care published by the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare. Each paper is presented in both English and French. Topics dealt with include an overview of children's nutritional needs; development of…

  16. Multigenerational Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerschner, Paul A.

    This study explores the potential benefits of multigenerational day care programs. Two small preschool programs serving predominantly low income black families were chosen for comparison. The programs were matched for child/staff ratio, level of staff professionalism, and characteristics of families served. The programs differed, however, in their

  17. We Love Science Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1986-01-01

    Describes the goals and outcomes of the "We Love Science Day" programs that resulted from the inservice course, "Creative Integration of Science in Elementary Education" for Pennsylvania teachers. Provides samples of the hands-on activities that were offered to students, parents, and teachers. Includes a calendar of extracurricular science…

  18. 90-Day Cycle Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sandra; Takahashi, Sola

    2013-01-01

    90-Day Cycles are a disciplined and structured form of inquiry designed to produce and test knowledge syntheses, prototyped processes, or products in support of improvement work. With any type of activity, organizations inevitably encounter roadblocks to improving performance and outcomes. These barriers might include intractable problems at…

  19. Gravity-induced differentiations and deficiency in flower formation observed on Columbus experiment WAICO1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Günther; Pietrzyk, Peter

    The Arabidopsis Atpla-I-3 knockout mutant (gene nr. At1g61859) is deficient in gravitropism and phototropism indicating a defect in the auxin transport system. The mutant roots form higher numbers of root coils on 45° angle tilted agar. Root tip coils exhibit right-handed spiral pattern of the rhizodermis cells suggesting that torsion of rhizodermis cells could provide a driving force for asymmetrical growth and coiling. WAICO1 was designed to test whether the tendency to for coils by asymmetric tip growth may be provided by torsion of external rhizodermis cells or, alternatively, the asymmetric growth is driven by intrinsic forces in the root. Coil formation is often increased in root agravitropic mutants so that an increase of coils by lack of gravity -and thus absence of gravisensing -was the favoured working hypothesis. Two agar boxes each of wild type and mutant seedlings were grown inside of an outer growth container at 22.5° C in constant light and at a 45° angle tilted, in the 1G rotor and in the microgravity rotor. At first, the samples grown in microgravity could be retrieved from orbit as cooled (4° -8° C) material. They were investigated by microscopy and compared to photographs made in orbit of 1G and µG plants by astronaut. Plants first grown in 1G were retrieved much later (see below). Mutant and wt formed high numbers of coils in microgravity, whereas in 1G none were observed which is comparable to growth experiments on the ground. However, the mutant developed a lower percentage of spiral pattern in the rhizodermal cells despite an even higher number of coils as observed in the wt. The results show that asymmetrical growth of root tips is an intrinsic property and independent of forces that may be exerted by the rhizodermal pattern. Surprisingly, in both wild type and mutant a much higher number of lateral roots were found in µG-grown plants than in plants grown in the 1G-centrifuge after 12 d, suggesting that gravity suppresses lateral root formation. When mutants and wt only grown in the 1G centrifuge were compared the mutant leaves and cotyledons were smaller than in wt and hypocotyls were longer, but when the plants in µG for 12d were compared this difference was not found. Hence, gravity had an influence on leaf expansion and hypocotyl length in the mutant. The samples grown for 12d in 1G were kept in µG after 12d on due to a technical failure of the 1G centrifuge. They were retrieved about a year later. They had grown to full senescence and were preserved in a beautiful state as "straw". The observations on the root patterns by the astronaut photos at day 12 could be confirmed but plants had grown on and newer roots made coils just as the plants grown µG. Leaf sizes were different for wt and mutant. The most striking observation was that the mutants had developed small flower stems with a few flower buds but many flowers were incomplete, without the proper sepal or petal number or without gynaecium. The wild type plants had not developed any clear flower stem but only several malformed cell clumps shortly above the rosette. In ground laboratory experiments the mutants flower earlier which might explain why they developed flowers to some extent whereas the wt not at all. Microgravity might be a "stress" for flower formation. Taken together, several gravity-induced (or microgravity-induced) changes in differentiation occurred.

  20. STS-95 Day 02 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this second day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, are seen preparing a glovebox device in the middeck area of Discovery, an enclosed research facility that will support numerous science investigations throughout the mission. Payload Specialist John Glenn, activates the Microgravity Encapsulation Process experiment (MEPS). This experiment will study the formation of capsules containing two kinds of anti-tumor drugs that could be delivered directly to solid tumors with applications for future chemotherapy treatments and the pharmaceutical industry.

  1. STS-74 flight day 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    On this sixth day of the STS-74 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Kenneth Cameron, Pilot James Halsell, and Mission Specialists William McArthur, Jerry Ross, and Chris Hatfield and the Mir 20 cosmonauts, Cmdr. Yuri Gidzenko, Flight Engineer Sergei Avdeyev, and Cosmonaut-Researcher (ESA) Thomas Reiter, were greeted and briefly interviewed by the Secretary General of the United Nations, Boutros Boutros-Ghali, on the 50th anniversary of the United Nations via a radio satellite hookup. An additional interview with other journalists from different areas of the United States and Canada was also presented.

  2. Derivation of guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil at the B&T Metals Company site, Columbus, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboj, S.; Nimmagadda, Mm.; Yu, C

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil were derived for the B&T Metals Company site in Columbus, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Single-nuclide and total-uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that following remedial action, the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual living or working in the immediate vicinity of the site should not exceed a dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose limit of 100 n-mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, was used in this evaluation. RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines. Three scenarios were considered; each assumed that for a period of 1,000 years following remedial action, the site would be used without radiological restrictions. The three scenarios varied with regard to the type of site use, time spent at the site by the exposed individual, and sources of food and water consumed. The evaluations indicate that the dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for uranium (including uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) within 1,000 years, provided that the soil concentration of total uranium (uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) at the B&T Metals site did not exceed 1, I 00 pCi/g for Scenario A (industrial worker, current use) or 300 pCi/g for Scenario B (resident with municipal water supply, a likely future use). The dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded at the site if the total uranium concentration of the soil did not exceed 880 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident with an on-site water well, a plausible but unlikely future use).

  3. Flight Day 2 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The STS-107 second flight day begins with a shot of the Spacehab Research Double Module. Live presentations of experiments underway inside of the Spacehab Module are presented. Six experiments are shown. As part of the Space Technology and Research Student Payload, students from Australia, China, Israel, Japan, New York, and Liechtenstein are studying the effect that microgravity has on ants, spiders, silkworms, fish, bees, granular materials, and crystals. Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla is seen working with the zeolite crystal growth experiment.

  4. 2010 Day of Remembrance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Patrick Scheuermann (left), deputy director at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, and Richard Gilbrech, associate director, place a wreath in memory of the 17 astronauts lost in service of the space program since 1967. The wreath was placed during NASA's 2010 Day of Remembrance, observed each year in January. The annual observance memorializes the three astronauts lost in the Apollo 1 launch pad fire in 1967, the seven astronauts lost in the Challenger tragedy in 1986 and the seven astronauts lost in the Columbia accident in 2003. During the Stennis observance, Scheuermann praised the fallen astronauts as 'brave space pioneers who gave their lives in the cause of exploration and discovery.'

  5. One Cold Autumn Day

    PubMed Central

    de Schweinitz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral change is at the heart of effective primary care, but when patients don’t change, how do we account for our days? In this personal essay, I relate an encounter with a patient who wants to quit smoking, lose weight, and control her diabetes. I am discouraged when she deflects my recommendations, but a colleague’s comment encourages a deeper inquiry. Knowing the patient’s story and deepening the conversation, however, do not guarantee change. The experience reminds me why patience, humility, and faith are core values of the primary care physician. PMID:25964410

  6. Martian Valentine's Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 February 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a heart-shaped hill surrounded by cracked terrain within a depression in far northwestern Arabia Terra, near the Cydonia region of Mars. Happy St. Valentine's Day from the MGS MOC team!

    Location near: 39.1oN, 358.1oW Image width: 3.0 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  7. Every Day in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegri, Michael Delores

    1998-01-01

    Describes the various programs and goals of St. Monica School, Kansas City, Missouri, and provides individual accounts of student success despite great adversity. Discusses different ways of combating the violence and poverty of urban areas to provide emotional, spiritual, and educational support and guidance. (YKH)

  8. Three-day fever.

    PubMed

    Akakpo, A J

    2015-08-01

    Three-day fever is a viral disease caused by an Ephemerovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae, transmitted by arthropod vectors. It is common in tropical and sub-tropical regions, where it affects mainly domestic cattle and buffaloes, especially in intensive dairy or fattening production systems. It is of economic importance because it reduces milk production and fertility and causes abortion. The disease is generally benign. It manifests in several susceptible subjects simultaneously, with a sudden episode of fever accompanied by muscle involvement with arthritis, stiffness of the limbs, and lameness, followed by rapid recovery. The presence of a serofibrinous exudate in the joints is indicative of the disease. Clinical diagnosis is often difficult in the absence of pathognomonic signs. Epidemiological factors (proliferation of arthropod vectors), associated with a short-lived fever and the presence of many immature neutrophils, point strongly to three-day fever. In the absence of any specific treatment, the symptoms are treated with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. Medical prophylaxis currently uses live attenuated vaccines, pending the development of recombinant vaccines, which are giving promising results. PMID:26601454

  9. Of Camelot, Columbus, & Eclipses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenning, Carl J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an activity that involves determining local solar time of the various parts of a total lunar eclipse--beginning of the dark umbral phase of eclipse, onset of totality, end of totality, and end of dark umbral phase of eclipse--and comparing to the solar time of the events at Greenwich to calculate the longitude at the place of…

  10. Proceedings, Dean's Day 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Zanner, M.A.

    1999-03-01

    On January 14--15, 1999, Sandia National Laboratories sponsored Deans Day, a conference for the Deans of Engineering and other executive-level representatives from 29 invited universities. Through breakout sessions and a wrap-up discussion, university and Sandia participants identified activities to further develop their strategic relationships. The four primary activities are: (A) concentrate joint efforts on current and future research strengths and needs; (B) attract the best students (at all grade levels) to science and engineering; (C) promote awareness of the need for and work together to influence a national science and technology R and D policy; and (D) enable the universities and Sandia to be true allies, jointly pursuing research opportunities and funding from government agencies and industry.

  11. [World Population Day editorial].

    PubMed

    1995-07-01

    Despite demographic progress in many regions, world population is growing by more than 90 million persons each year. This massive growth is relatively new in human history. 80 years were required to add 1 billion inhabitants after 1850, but at current rates only 11 years will be required. The course of world demographic evolution will be decided by the actions or inaction of each man and woman on the planet. Questions of population are at the center of sustainable development and should be an essential feature of any vision of the future. Correctly conducted population programs provide essential services for the health and well-being of individuals and families and facilitate the task of creating structures for sustainable economic growth. In honor of World Population Day on July 11, the Salvadoran Demographic Association has presented a series of informative articles on the relationship between population and health, environment, education, food and nutrition, reproductive health, and family planning. PMID:12179417

  12. The day of women.

    PubMed

    Jimenez David, R

    1994-09-01

    March, 1994, was celebrated as Women's Month in the Philippines, with a focus on women's health. The theme chosen was Me, Too, a response to the ideal of feminine martyrdom. The intended message was that it is acceptable for women to look after themselves first, because only this way could they look after the other people in their lives. The Woman Who is Okey is defined as the woman who looks after her health and who practices self-care. The major health problems of women include cancer of the breast and cervix; reproductive tract infections; HIV/AIDS; poor nutrition, exacerbated by pregnancy and lactation; and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease linked to an increase in women smokers. The Woman Who is Okey is a woman who: carries out breast self examination each month, submits to a pap smear examination every year, does not smoke, spaces her pregnancies by 2-3 year intervals, knows how to protect herself from HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, visits a health center regularly for prenatal check-ups and other health services, and meets her hygienic and fitness needs. The campaign was broadened to include rape, violence, sexual harassment, and discrimination and exploitation of women. The activities of the Department of Health (DOH) during March 8, International Women's Day, were coordinated with those planned by women's groups spearheaded by the National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women (NCRFW). The DOH set up a permanent Women's Center in government hospitals throughout the country and began to institutionalize assistance to women who are victims of violence, including rape. The national celebration held in Manila was a day-long program organized by the NCRFW, in which close to 18,000 women participated from all political organizations. President Fidel V. Ramos was the keynote speaker. PMID:12288259

  13. Super Safety and Health Day at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Vendor tents and displays filled the grounds in the Industrial Area as well as LC 39 Area during Super Safety and Health Day at KSC. Safety Day is a full day of NASA-sponsored, KSC and 45th Space Wing events involving a number of health and safety related activities: Displays, vendors, technical paper sessions, panel discussions, a keynote speaker, etc. The entire Center and Wing stand down to participate in the planned events. Safety Day is held annually to proactively increase awareness in safety and health among the government and contractor workforce population. The first guiding principle at KSC is '''Safety and Health First.''' KSC's number one goal is to '''Assure sound, safe and efficient practices and processes are in place for privatized/commercialized launch site processing.'''

  14. Earth Day 25 years later

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, G.

    1995-08-01

    The idea of Earth Day 1970 was to have a national demonstration of environmental concern big enough to shake up the political establishment--get its attention, get some action, force environmental issues onto the political agenda of national priorities. The idea worked, thanks to the spontaneous response of millions of concerned Americans, and the event served as a wake-up call to the political establishment. Suddenly, the environment became a national political priority. Since Earth Day 1970, Congress has enacted nearly 40 major federal environmental laws addressing a wide range of issues, including clean air, clean water, energy conservation, hazardous wastes, and herbicides and other pesticides. Dozens of individual public land bills have been enacted since 1970 to designate or expand wilderness areas, wild and scenic rivers, national parks, and wildlife refuges. Perhaps most important, more than 80 percent of Americans now regard themselves as environmentalists. Since 1970 man has come a long way. After 25 years of researching, debating, and learning, increasing numbers of people recognize that the state of the environment is the key factor in determining this way of life and the quality of it.

  15. Barriers and Facilitators to Learning and Performing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in Neighborhoods with Low Bystander CPR Prevalence and High Rates of Cardiac Arrest in Columbus, Ohio

    PubMed Central

    Sasson, Comilla; Haukoos, Jason S.; Bond, Cindy; Rabe, Marilyn; Colbert, Susan H.; King, Renee; Sayre, Michael; Heisler, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Background Residents who live in neighborhoods that are primarily African-American, Latino, or poor are more likely to have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), less likely to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and less likely to survive. No prior studies have been conducted to understand the contributing factors that may decrease the likelihood of residents learning and performing CPR in these neighborhoods. The goal of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to learning and performing CPR in three low-income, “high-risk” predominantly African American, neighborhoods in Columbus, Ohio. Methods and Results Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approaches were used to develop and conduct six focus groups in conjunction with community partners in three target high-risk neighborhoods in Columbus, Ohio in January-February 2011. Snowball and purposeful sampling, done by community liaisons, was used to recruit participants. Three reviewers analyzed the data in an iterative process to identify recurrent and unifying themes. Three major barriers to learning CPR were identified and included financial, informational, and motivational factors. Four major barriers were identified for performing CPR and included fear of legal consequences, emotional issues, knowledge, and situational concerns. Participants suggested that family/self-preservation, emotional, and economic factors may serve as potential facilitators in increasing the provision of bystander CPR. Conclusion The financial cost of CPR training, lack of information, and the fear of risking one's own life must be addressed when designing a community-based CPR educational program. Using data from the community can facilitate improved design and implementation of CPR programs. PMID:24021699

  16. Day-1 chick development.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Guojun

    2014-03-01

    The first day of chick development takes place inside the mother hen (in utero), during which the embryo progresses from fertilization to late blastula/early gastrula formation. The salient features of developmental anatomy in this period are conserved among the sauropsids (birds and reptiles). Many of these features are also shared in prototherian (monotreme) embryos, whereas metatherian (marsupial) and eutherian (placental) embryos display significant variations. Important for understanding the evolution of early development in amniotes, the knowledge of cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating in utero chick development may also offer valuable insight into early lineage specification in prototherians and conserved features in mammalian early development. This commentary provides a snapshot of what is currently known about intrauterine chick development and identifies key issues that await further clarification, including the process of cellularization, allocation of maternal determinants, zygotic gene activation, mid-blastula transition, cell layer increase and reduction, radial symmetry breaking, early lineage segregation, and role of yolk syncytium in early patterning. PMID:24550174

  17. Stennis Space Center observes Disability Awareness Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Members of STARC, a non-profit organization in Slidell, La., that seeks to help people with disabilities lead meaningful, productive lives, pose with their appreciation awards during Disability Awareness Day at Stennis Space Center on Oct. 15. The group members received appreciation awards for their dedicated service to the rocket engine testing facility. Disability Awareness Day was hosted by the Stennis Diversity Council and included guest speakers from several area agencies.

  18. International Women's Day speech.

    PubMed

    Kazibwe, S W

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the International Women's Day are: 1) to celebrate the struggle for women's rights in the economic, social, political, and cultural domain; 2) to reaffirm women's solidarity in the struggle for peace; 3) and to show what women have achieved. In 1988, Uganda's government of the National Resistance Movement created the Ministry of Women in Development. The period 1988-1990 was one of consultations, needs assessment, planning, and recruiting staff for the Ministry. From 1990 to 1993, measurable results have been achieved. The Ministry's gender concerns pertained to the sector policies of the Ministries of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries, Education, Health, Water, Energy, Minerals, and Environment Protection. Under the Umbrella Project for Women in Development, gender sensitization has been achieved with policy makers in ministries, at district level, and in the media. Gender issues have also been incorporated in the National Political School Curriculum. The Ministry has also trained a corps of 73 women trainers from 38 districts. The Ministry, with funding from DANIDA, collected women's views on the constitution through meetings and seminars in all the districts in the country. Recommendations were submitted in a consolidated report to the Constitution Commission. A pilot para-legal scheme is successfully being implemented in Kamuli district. A community-based pool of legal advisors has been developed. Legal matters that affect both women and men are undertaken at the community level. The economic emancipation of women is a crucial part of the Ministry's mandate. In conjunction with NGOs, pilot credit programs are being run in Mukono, Jinja, Mbale, and Kapchorwa districts. Cross-sectoral programs are in close collaboration with the rural water and sanitation program, the Northern Uganda rehabilitation program, and the integrated Basic Education Pilot Project to be implemented in 8 districts. PMID:12345405

  19. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new tests of GR, and performing predictive GRMHD simulations hydrodynamics simulations that include magnetic fields and full GR treatment. Ozel pointed out that one of the recent theoretical advancements in GRMHD simulations is harnessing the power of GPUs to render images in simulations; check out the tweet below for the awesome video she showed us!Watch C. Chan manipulate black hole simulation with hand motions https://t.co/O5BgaltYAu (more on the code: https://t.co/9GC46ReMGs) #aas227 Sarah Scoles (@ScolesSarah) January 6, 2016Deployment of the full EHT array is planned for early 2017, and theyve already got 10 targets selected black holes that are near enough and large enough that the EHT should be able to image their shadows. I, for one, cant wait to see the first results!Grad School and Postdocs as a Means to a Job (by Meredith Rawls)This morning session was presented by Karen Kelsky of The Professor Is In. She presented a very practical overview of the advice in her book (which this job-searching Astrobiter highly recommends). Her target audience is postdocs and graduate students who are finishing their PhDs and applying for tenure-track jobs. Karens background is in the social sciences, but she has worked with many scientists and her expertise easily transferred. Much of her writing advice also applies for undergraduates who are writing research statements and proposals to apply to graduate school. For example:What not to do, with @ProfessorIsIn #aas227 pic.twitter.com/afGAsSuPwN Meredith Rawls (@merrdiff) January 6, 2016One of Karens main takeaways is that academia is not automatically good preparation for a job search. Writing documents like cover letters, resumes, and research statements will be harder and take more time than you think, and it is important to make them top-notch. Karen was also surprised that the majority of professional astronomers at the AAS meeting carry backpacks, because she typically advises against bringing a backpack to a job interview or campus visit. She conceded that astronomy is an exception to this rule!Brown Dwarfs and Exoplanets (by Caroline Morley)I started my morning in a session near and dear to my heart on brown dwarfs. The session had four dissertation talks, showcasing each students (impressive!) work over the last 4+ years.Astrobites alumnus Ben Montet kicked off the session to talk about his recent work to study the eclipsing brown dwarf LHS 6343, discovered in Kepler data. This brown dwarf is one of the best so-called benchmark brown dwarfs that we have discovered. Unlike almost every other object, we can measure LHS 6343s mass, radius, luminosity, and metallicity. Bens Spitzer observations reveal that its a ~1100 K T dwarf.Joe Filippazzo spoke next about his work to put together a large and impressive database of 300 brown dwarfs ranging in spectral type from M to Y, stitching together literature photometry, parallaxes, and both low and high resolution spectra. He studies the effect of age on the fundamental properties of these objects, empirically without needing models! You can download the database at BDNYC.org and use Joes open-source Python package astrokit which includes the SQL management tools to use the database.Jonathan Gagn presented results from his survey to find young free-floating objects in young moving groups. These objects are really interesting because they have the masses of planets but are easier to observe since they dont have nearby stars. He is currently extending his survey from his PhD thesis to be able to find even cooler objects (literally and figuratively) in these groups.Sebastian Pineda gave a very interesting talk about his thesis work to understand auroral emission from brown dwarfs. Brown dwarfs with a range of temperatures have been observed to have both radio activity and H-alpha emission, despite their neutral atmospheres. These properties are believed to be generated by auroral emission just like aurorae on Jupiter! One of many interesting results is that cooler objects have rare and weak aurorae. Sebastian postulates that these brown dwarfs may have aurorae that are modulated by the presence of satellites (brown dwarf moons?!). Very cool idea that needs more study!The last speaker of the session was the only non-dissertation talk of the session. Nolan Grieves presented results from his statistical survey of brown dwarf companions using the MARVELS radial velocity survey and finds a brown dwarf companion occurrence rate around 0.7%.Science to Action: Thoughts on Convincing a Skeptical Public (by Meredith Rawls)This years Public Policy plenary talk was delivered by William Press from UT Austin. Many scientific stories follow a familiar narrative, and too often, scientific consensus about a hazard has been accepted by the public only after some catalyzing event like a catastrophic fire or a spike in deaths linked to smoking. Press suggested that climate change may be at the tipping point of mainstream acceptance. He also discussed how a definition of science can encompass two distinct ideas: a series of fact-based conclusions and a value judgment based on rational thinking. To illustrate this dichotomy, he posed a question to the audience:Debate about science vs about values. Speaker forced a vote by raise of hand; split 50/50 in big room. Wow. #aas227 pic.twitter.com/rdvqUuuR95 Meredith Rawls (@merrdiff) January 6, 2016Press stated that he strongly supports the top view, but it was eye-opening to see a nearly even split of raised hands. His point was that GMO labeling ultimately boils down to a value judgement, not a scientific one, and we should be careful to understand the difference. Science communicators certainly have our work cut out for us! In the broadest sense, Press takeaway for effective science communication is a two-step approach: (1) communicate the value of a rationalist approach to decision making, and (2) communicate well-established scientific results.AAS Journals Workshop for Authors RefereesFirst half (by Susanna Kohler)Disclaimer: Im an employee of the AAS, as editor of AAS Nova.This 2-hour-long author referee workshop was intended partially as an overview of what it means to be an author or a referee (in any journal), and partly as a reveal of some of the new features that are now being implemented within the AAS publishing program. Many of the presentations have been uploaded here. A few highlights from the first half:Talks about authoring articles by Ethan Vishniac, and refereeing articles by Butler BurtonIntro to AAS Nova the AASs means of sharing its authors results with the broader community by me!Discussion of the AASs new policy for software citation by Chris LintottSecond half (by Becky Nevin)In between hopping between all the amazing science sessions today I made it to the last half of a very interesting Author Referee Workshop run by AAS journals. Even with missing the first half, I can still tell that theres a lot of changes coming to AAS journals (which include ApJ, AJ, ApJS, ApJL), in particular in the way that your research will be published. All good from what I saw in particular theyve addressed the long-standing problem of how to cite astronomical software (usually produced for free by a keen member of the community). Now they give guidelines for how to do this and have even appointed a new lead editor for instrumentation software.What got me most excited though was the demonstration by Greg Schwarz of AASTex v6.0 a markup package to assist authors in preparing manuscripts intended for submission to AAS-affiliated journals i.e. super cool amazing new LaTeX commands to satisfy even the most obsessive LaTeX-er! Check it out, because it will definitely ease the pain of writing and responding to referees. In the final talk (before free lunch, score!) Gus Muench showcased the new ways that authors will be able to include interactive JavaScript figures into articles in AAS journals. You can check out some of the amazing integrations in this nifty tutorial.A Report on the Inclusive Astronomy 2015 Meeting: Community Recommendations for Diversity and Inclusion in AstronomyThis very well-attended session recapped the Inclusive Astronomy 2015 meeting (see this link for a summary!)The IA2015 meeting results can be found here.A draft of the recommendations from IA2015 is here. Note that this document, termed the Nashville Recommendations, is a living document that isnt yet finalized, and feedback is welcome.Dannie Heineman Prize: From ~ to Precision Science: Cosmology from 1995 to 2025 (by Erika Nesvold)Marc Kamionkowski of Johns Hopkins University and David Spergel of Princeton University shared this years Heineman Prize for outstanding work in astronomy, and gave an impressive tag-team overview of the progress in the field of cosmology over the past 20 years.Spergel pointed out that in 1995, cosmologists were still debating over the value of the Hubble constant, and whether or not the universe is flat. Kamionkowski pointed out that back then, cosmology was an order of magnitude game where observations lagged far behind theory. He noted that in general, theorists tend to sit around predicting things, and not much progress is made in testing those predictions, at least not within the lifetime of an individual theorist. In cosmology, however, the measurements and observations made since 1995 have been more successful and precise than anyone could have anticipated.This is thanks in part to the WMAP mission and later the Planck satellite, which measured the cosmic microwave background and collected an amazing set of data. There is excellent agreement between the data from WMAP and Planck, a triumph for observational cosmologists. Much to the surprise of Spergel and other cosmologists, a simple model of only five fundamental parameters fits these data extremely well. Twenty years later, thanks to the hard work of cosmologists, we now know that the age of the universe is 13.8 billion years, and that it is composed of roughly 4% atoms, 23% dark matter, and 73% dark energy.Spergel and Kamionkowski then pointed towards the future, predicting even more spectacular results to come over the next decade or so. Our current model of the universe predicts gravitational waves, which we havent observed so far, but the search is heating up. Kamionkowski called this potentially the most important new physics result of this century! He also explained that we can now do neutrino physics using the cosmic microwave background, which already provides the strongest constraint on the sum of neutrinon masses. In the next decade, we should be able to further determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The coming years in cosmology could be even more exciting than the past twenty!HEAD Rossi Prize talk: A New View of the High Energy Universe with NuSTAR (by Susanna Kohler)This years Rossi Prize winner Fiona Harrison capped off the main part of the day with a plenary talk about some of the highlights from the first two years of the NuSTAR mission, NASAs space-based, high-energy X-ray telescope.Additional science results from the past two years with NuSTAR.Harrison began by telling us about NuSTARs launch in 2012, in which a Pegasus rocket with NuSTAR as its payload was launched from a L-1011 Stargazer aircraft. She claims to have been unconcerned about this part: The payload would go up or it would go down, there wasnt anything I could do about it. The real terror for the NuSTAR team came 9 days later when the telescope slowly unfolded itself over the span of 24 minutes, snapping components into place. All went well, however, and NuSTAR has since been forging exciting new territory in the high-energy X-ray regime!Harrison discussed science highlights from the last two years of NuSTAR, like the discovery of a population of dead stars in the inner parsecs of the galaxy, the identification of the mechanism that most likely re-energizes stalled shocks in supernovae and launches the explosion (in case youre keeping track, its because the star sloshes around. Seriously.), or the evidence that supernova 1987A exploded asymmetrically.NuSTAR is funded through the end of 2016 and is now in its extended mission, so we can expect to see more exciting science coming from it in the future!

  20. Family Day Care Training Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakatsu, Gail

    California's Family Day Care Training Program was designed to recruit and train in 7 weeks, Lao, Vietnamese, and Chinese refugees to establish their own state-licensed, family day care homes. Topics in the program's curriculum include an introduction to family day care, state licenses for family day care, state licensing requirements for family…

  1. An Analysis of the Nature and Difficulty of Reading Tasks Associated with Beginning Office Workers Jobs in the Columbus, Ohio Metropolitan Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Novella

    A study was undertaken to determine the operational reading levels and skills of beginning office employees and to compare the readability of classroom and on-the-job materials. Clerks and secretaries who had been employed for two years or less were observed and interviewed to collect the data. Statistical analysis revealed that secretaries read…

  2. AAS 227: Day 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or at astrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the @astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto have so many people tell us that they already know about and useastrobites, and we were excited to introduce a new cohort of students at AAS to astrobites for the first time.Tuesday morning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended today.Opening Address (by Becky Smethurst)The President of the AAS, aka our fearless leader Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at the purely coffee powered hour of 8am this morning. She spoke about the importance of young astronomers at the meeting (heres looking at you reader!) and also the importance of the new Working Group for Accessibility and Disabilities (aka WGAD pronounced like wicked) at the AAS. The Society has made extra effort this year to make the conference accessible to all,a message which was very well received by everyone in attendance.Kavli Lecture: New Horizons Alan Stern (by Becky Smethurst)We were definitely spoilt with the first Plenary lecture at this years conference Alan Stern gave us a a review of the New Horizons mission of the Pluto Fly By (astrobites covered the mission back in July with this post). We were treated to beautiful images, wonderful results and a foray into geology.Before (Hubble) and after #NewHorizons. #thatisall #science #astro alanstern #aas227 pic.twitter.com/kkMt6RsSIR Science News (@topsciencething) January 5, 2016Some awesome facts from the lecture that blew my mind:New Horizons is now 2AU (!) beyond PlutoThe mission was featured on the front pages of 450 newspapers worldwide on every single continent (including Antartica!)New Horizons reached the Moon in9 HOURSafter launch (compared to the ~3 days it took the Apollo missions)The mission controllers were aiming for a 100km window of space all the way from EarthThere was a window of ~400seconds which the probe had to arrive within the probe arrived90 seconds early! Putting tardy astronomers everywhere to shame.Charon was the only satellite of Pluto known at the time of the mission proposalThe canyon found on Charon is not only bigger than the Grand Canyon but bigger than Mariner Valley on Mars which is already4000 km (2500 mi) long and reaches depths of up to 7 km (4 mi)!Charons surface. Tectonic feature runs about 1500 km, around 10 km deep. Eat it, Mars. #aas227 pic.twitter.com/blewwJaXEn Danny Barringer (@HeavyFe_H) January 5, 2016The mountains ringing the Sputnik Planum (aka the heart of Pluto) are over 4km high and are snow capped with methane icePlutos mountain ranges. Means surface nitrogen layer is thin, probably water ice according to @AlanStern. #aas227 pic.twitter.com/0yyHZvpBOE Danny Barringer (@HeavyFe_H) January 5, 2016Plutos atmosphere has a dozendistincthaze layers but how they arecreated is a mystery#aas227 hazes on Pluto wow pic.twitter.com/VPx99ZhPj1 Lisa StorrieLombardi (@lisajsl) January 5, 2016Alan also spoke about the future of New Horizons there is a new mission proposal for a fly by of a Kuiper Belt object 2014MU69 in Jan 2019 which should give us a better understanding of this icy frontier at the edge ofthe Solar System. As a parting gift Alan playedthemost gorgeously detailed fly over video of Plutos surface that had all in the room melting into their flip flops. Its safe to say that the whole room is now Pluto-curious and wondering whether a change of discipline is in order!Press Conference: Black Holes and Exoplanets (by Susanna Kohler)This morning marked the first press conference of the meeting, covering some hot topics in black holes and exoplanets.Hubble (background) and Chandra (purple) image of SDSS J1126+2944. The arrow marks the second black hole. (From http://casa.colorado.edu/~comerford/press)The first speaker was Julie Comerford (University of Colorado Boulder), who told us about SDSS J1126+2944, a galaxy that was shown by Chandra X-ray detections to contain not just one, but two supermassive black holes. This is a sign of a recent merger between two galaxies, which can result in one new, larger galaxy with two nuclei for a while. The second black hole is surrounded by only a small sphere of stars. This may be because the rest have been stripped away in the process of the merger but its also possible that the second black hole is an elusive intermediate mass black hole of only 100-1,000,000 solar masses! Heres the press release.The second speaker was Eric Schlegel (University of Texas, San Antonio), who spoke about the galaxy NGC 5195. Eric discussed an interesting problem: we know that star formation ends in galaxies after a time, but the gas must be cleared out of the galaxy for the star formation to halt. What process does this? Schlegels collaboration found evidence in NGC 5195 for a burping supermassive black hole the shock from the black holes outflow sweeps up the hydrogen gas and blows it out of the galactic center. Heres the press release.NuSTAR image of Andromeda, inset on a UV image by NASAs Galaxy Evolution Explorer. Click for a better look! [NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC]Next up was Daniel Wik (NASA/Goddard SFC), who discussed recent high-energy X-ray observations of Andromeda galaxy with NASAs NuSTAR. As Wik described it, NuSTAR is like a CSI detective, working to identify what fraction of the compact remnants in X-ray binaries of Andromeda are neutron stars, and what fraction are black holes. Since X-ray binaries play a crucial role in heating gas in protogalaxies, shaping galaxy formation, its important that we learn more about this population and how it evolves over time. Heres the press release.The final speaker was grad studentSamuel Grunblatt (University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy), who spoke about measuring the mass of exoplanets around active stars. In radial velocity studies of exoplanets, a planet orbiting its star causes the star to wobble. This signal for an Earth-like planet is as tiny as 9 cm/s! Unfortunately, activity of the star can cause radial velocity noise of 1-10 m/s so to detect Earth-like planets, we need to find a way of subtracting off the noise. Grunblatt talked about an intriguing new method for determining planet masses that controls for the signature of their hosts activity. Heres his paper.Annie Jump Cannon Award Lecture: On the Dynamics of Planets, Stars and Black Holes (by Erika Nesvold)This year, the Annie Jump Cannon Award was given to Smadar Naoz, an assistant professor at UCLA. The Cannon Award is given every year to a young (less than 5 years since PhD), female astronomer for outstanding work in her field. Traditionally, the Cannon Award recipient delivers a lecture on her research, so this year we were lucky to see a dynamic and engaging talk by Smadar Naoz about her research in dynamical theory.You may have heard the common career advice that you should focus on becoming the expert on one particular facet of astronomy: a particular type of object, an observational technique, a type of instrument, etc. Naoz has managed to follow that advice while still managing to study a huge range of astronomical topics, from exoplanets to cosmology. She studies hierarchical triples, systems of three gravitational bodies in which two of the bodies orbit one another very closely, while the third orbits the other two from a much greater distance. For example, a planet in a tight orbit around a star, with a brown dwarf orbiting hundreds of AU away, make up a hierarchical triple system. So does a system in which two black holes orbit each other closely, with a third black hole orbiting farther away. The physics of these systems are all the same, so by studying the equations that govern a hierarchical triple system, Naoz can study a huge variety of astronomical objects.In particular, Naoz studies a mechanism called the Kozai-Lidov mechanism, named after the two researchers who discovered it independently. If the outer body in a hierarchical triple orbits at a high enough inclination to the inner body ( 40 degrees), the Kozai-Lidov mechanism will excite the inclination and eccentricity of the inner body. In fact, the inclination and eccentricity will oscillate opposite one another: as the inclination increases, the eccentricity will decrease, and vice versa. In the course of her research, Naoz discovered a flaw in Kozais original derivations of this mechanism, and derived a more accurate, general set of equations describing the Kozai-Lidov mechanism. These new equations indicate that the eccentricity of the inner object can become extremely high, and that the inclination can become so high that the objects orbit can flip from prograde to retrograde! In other words, the object can start orbiting in the opposite direction around the central body.Wondering how Naoz found the error in Kozai? I happen to know she rederives all the equations in every paper she reads. Wow. #aas227 Erika Nesvold (@erikanesvold) January 5, 2016This work has applications in many different types of systems. For example, over the past decade, observers have discovered a large number of retrograde hot Jupiters, gas giant planets orbiting very close to their star, in the opposite direction from the stars spin. Naoz showed that the new, correct Kozai-Lidov mechanism can explain the orbits of these exoplanets, because it increases the planets eccentricity until its orbit approaches very close to the star, and it flips the inclination into a retrograde orbit. Naoz: A puzzle: how to explain retrograde planets? Kozai mechanism can do that! #aas227 Peter Edmonds (@PeterDEdmonds) January 5, 2016Naoz also showed applications of the Kozai-Lidov mechanisms to dark matter halos around black holes, triple black hole systems, and so-called blue stragglers: main-sequence stars in clusters that are brighter and bluer than they should be. Her body of work is an excellent example of how theorists can adapt general physics theories to a wonderful variety of astronomical problems.holy styrofoam planets batman naoz just explained everything. #aas227 August Muench (@augustmuench) January 5, 2016Harassment in the Astronomical Sciences Town Hall(by Caroline Morley)The Town Hall on Harassment in the Astronomical Sciences involved a sobering panel discussion on the current state on workplace climate in astronomy and the current steps that the AAS and federal agencies are taking to improve it. Christina Richey kicked it off by presenting preliminary results from the CSWA Survey on workplace climate. This survey involved 426 participants, and reveals that many people, especially junior members of the field, experience harassment including both verbal and physical harassment. These results will be published this year. Next up, Dara Norman, a Councilor of the AAS and a member of the AAS Ethics Task Force, spoke about the proposed changes to the current AAS Ethics Statement. These changes will focus on corrective policies to improve the state of the field; they will solicit community feedback this Spring and vote on the changes at the Summer AAS meeting. Last, Jim Ulvestad, representing the federal agencies including NSF, NASA, and the DOE, spoke about the current policies for reporting to federal funding agencies. He reminds us that if an institution accepts money from the federal government, they are required by law to follow laws such as Title VI (covering racial harassment) and Title IX (covering sexual harassment), and that breaches can be reported to the funding agency.Tools and Tips for Better Software (aka Pain Reduction for Code Authors)(by Caroline Morley)This afternoon breakout session included a drinking-from-the-firehose set of short talks that covered everything from source-code management and software testing to building communities that create sustainable code. First, Kenza Arraki discussed software such as Git to do version control to keep track of code changes. (Version Control is my (science) New Years Resolution, so I was happy to learn that there is aCodeAcademy tutorial for Git!). Next up, AdrianPrice-Whelan described the merits of software testing and suggests that we actually do Test-driven development where we write tests for the code first, then write code, run tests and debug until tests all pass. Erik Tollerud spoke on Why Document code and how you might convince yourself to do so (documenting code is another good science New Years Resolution!) The most important rule is to always document as you code because you wont ever go back! Bruce Berriman described the best practices for code release, including, importantly, licensing it and describing it well (with tutorials, examples). Matthew Turk reminded us the importance of building community around code development. Robert Nemiroff ended the talks with a discussion of what to do withdeadcodes. The lowest bar? Put it in your Dropbox and share it with your collaborators and students!For more info on all of these topics and more, consider attending a Software Carpentry workshop.

  3. Full-Day or Half-Day Kindergarten? ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenberg, Dianne

    This ERIC Digest examines how changing family patterns have affected the full-day/half-day kindergarten issue, discussing why schools are currently considering alternative scheduling and describing the advantages and disadvantages of each type of program. The following changing family patterns affecting the choice of full-day kindergarten programs…

  4. Diabetes and Adult Day Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabelko, Holly I.; DeCoster, Vaughn A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a profile of individuals with diabetes who receive services in adult day centers. This exploratory study uses an administrative data set (N = 280) from five programs in central Ohio to examine four areas: demographics, health and mental health, financial and social resources, and disenrollment status. Older…

  5. Native Americans: A Seven Day Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Melissa L. Johns

    Developed for sixth-grade students, this curriculum incorporates Native American issues into such areas as art, social studies, language arts, and literature. Specifically, the curriculum examines the oppression of Native Americans in American society. The curriculum takes 7 days to complete, with the final assignment requiring an additional 1 or…

  6. STS-69 Flight Day 4 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    On the fourth day of the STS-69 mission, the astronauts, Cmdr. Dave Walker, Pilot Ken Cockrell, and Mission Specialists Jim Voss, Jim Newman, and Mike Gernhardt, were awakened by 5 year old Madeline Cockrell (Ken Cockrell's daughter) singing the song 'Bingo Was His Name.' The interception and retrieval of the SPARTAN-201 satellite was the first task of the day. The SPARTAN-201's mission was the study of the solar corona and the solar wind. The rest of the day was spent preparing for the deployment of the Wake Shield Facility (WSF), whose purpose during its two day orbit of the Earth, is to grow films for semiconductors in a vacuum-like environment. Earth views included some cloud cover and different areas of South America.

  7. Long term dose monitoring onboard the European Columbus module of the international space station (ISS) in the frame of DOSIS and DOSIS 3D project - results from the active instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Soenke; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther; Boehme, Matthias; Haumann, Lutz; Labrenz, Johannes

    Besides the effects of the microgravity environment, and the psychological and psychosocial problems encountered in confined spaces, radiation is the main health detriment for long duration human space missions. The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones encountered on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station ISS is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European COLUMBUS module the experiment DOSIS (Dose Distribution Inside the ISS) under the lead of DLR has been launched on July 15 (th) 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The experimental package was transferred from the Space Shuttle into COLUMBUS on July 18 (th) . It consists of a combination of passive detector packages (PDP) distributed at 11 locations inside the European Columbus Laboratory and two active radiation detectors (Dosimetry Telescopes = DOSTELs) with a DDPU (DOSTEL Data and Power Unit) in a Nomex pouch (DOSIS MAIN BOX) mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module rack (EPM) inside COLUMBUS. The active components of the DOSIS experiment were operational from July 18 (th) 2009 to June 16 (th) 2011. After refurbishment the hardware has been reactivated on May 15 (th) 2012 as active part of the DOSIS 3D experiment and provides continuous data since this activation. The presentation will focus on the latest results from the two DOSTEL instruments as absorbed dose, dose equivalent and the related LET spectra gathered within the DOSIS (2009 - 2011) and DOSIS 3D (2012 - 2014) experiment. The CAU contributions to DOSIS and DOSIS 3D are financially supported by BMWi under Grants 50WB0826, 50WB1026 and 50WB1232

  8. Myth or Truth: Independence Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Traci

    Most Americans think of the Fourth of July as Independence Day, but is it really the day the U.S. declared and celebrated independence? By exploring myths and truths surrounding Independence Day, this lesson asks students to think critically about commonly believed stories regarding the beginning of the Revolutionary War and the Independence Day…

  9. Perspectives on Infant Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elardo, Richard, E.; Pagan, Betty, Ed.

    These proceedings of the first annual SACUS workshop on infant day care contain the papers presented at the conference, plus an appendix--Developmental Objectives for Infants and Toddlers. The papers are: "Infant Day Care--Fads, Facts, and Fancies" by Bettye M. Caldwell; "Family Day Care""A Broad Perspective" by Malcolm S. Host; "Getting…

  10. Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Family day care providers are responsible for creating a high-quality program where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care…

  11. Long term dose monitoring onboard the European Columbus module of the International Space Station (ISS) in the frame of the DOSIS and DOSIS 3D project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones present on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station (ISS) is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European Columbus module the experiment “Dose Distribution Inside the ISS” (DOSIS), under the project and science lead of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), was launched on July 15th 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The DOSIS experiment consists of a combination of “Passive Detector Packages” (PDP) distributed at eleven locations inside Columbus for the measurement of the spatial variation of the radiation field and two active Dosimetry Telescopes (DOSTELs) with a Data and Power Unit (DDPU) in a dedicated nomex pouch mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module rack (EPM) for the measurement of the temporal variation of the radiation field parameters. The DOSIS experiment suite measured during the lowest solar minimum conditions in the space age from July 2009 to June 2011. In July 2011 the active hardware was transferred to ground for refurbishment and preparation for the follow up DOSIS 3D experiment. The hardware for DOSIS 3D was launched with Soyuz 30S to the ISS on May 15th 2012. The PDPs are replaced with each even number Soyuz flight starting with Soyuz 30S. Data from the active detectors is transferred to ground via the EPM rack which is activated once a month for this action. The presentation will give an overview of the DOSIS and DOSIS 3D experiment and focus on the results from the passive radiation detectors from the DOSIS 3D experiment (2012 - 2014) in comparison to the data of the DOSIS experiment (2009 - 2011). The Polish contribution was supported by the National Science Centre (No DEC-2012/06/M/ST9/00423). The CAU contributions to DOSIS and DOSIS 3D are financially supported by BMWi under Grants 50WB0826, 50WB1026 and 50WB1232.

  12. ISS COLUMBUS laboratory experiment `GeoFlow I and II' -fluid physics research in microgravity environment to study convection phenomena inside deep Earth and mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futterer, Birgit; Egbers, Christoph; Chossat, Pascal; Hollerbach, Rainer; Breuer, Doris; Feudel, Fred; Mutabazi, Innocent; Tuckerman, Laurette

    Overall driving mechanism of flow in inner Earth is convection in its gravitational buoyancy field. A lot of effort has been involved in theoretical prediction and numerical simulation of both the geodynamo, which is maintained by convection, and mantle convection, which is the main cause for plate tectonics. Especially resolution of convective patterns and heat transfer mechanisms has been in focus to reach the real, highly turbulent conditions inside Earth. To study specific phenomena experimentally different approaches has been observed, against the background of magneto-hydrodynamic but also on the pure hydrodynamic physics of fluids. With the experiment `GeoFlow' (Geophysical Flow Simulation) instability and transition of convection in spherical shells under the influence of central-symmetry buoyancy force field are traced for a wide range of rotation regimes within the limits between non-rotating and rapid rotating spheres. The special set-up of high voltage potential between inner and outer sphere and use of a dielectric fluid as working fluid induce an electro-hydrodynamic force, which is comparable to gravitational buoyancy force inside Earth. To reduce overall gravity in a laboratory this technique requires microgravity conditions. The `GeoFlow I' experiment was accomplished on International Space Station's module COLUM-BUS inside Fluid Science Laboratory FSL und supported by EADS Astrium, Friedrichshafen, User Support und Operations Centre E-USOC in Madrid, Microgravity Advanced Research and Support Centre MARS in Naples, as well as COLUMBUS Control Center COL-CC Munich. Running from August 2008 until January 2009 it delivered 100.000 images from FSL's optical diagnostics module; here more precisely the Wollaston shearing interferometry was used. Here we present the experimental alignment with numerical prediction for the non-rotating and rapid rotation case. The non-rotating case is characterized by a co-existence of several stationary supercritical modes, with a strong influence of initial conditions leading to axisymmetric, octahedral/cubic or pentagonal solutions. Transition to chaos is in form of a sudden onset. Experimental data supports the numerically validated influence of initial conditions in showing the octahedral mode as most preferred stable state. Well-known issue of rapid rotation is the alignment of convective cells at the tangent cylinder due to the domination of centrifugal forces against the self-gravitating buoyancy field. The system shows very clearly the centrifugal effects by patterns in form of columnar cells. For the planned second mission `GeoFlow II' (on orbit 2010) working fluid shall be an alcanole having a temperature dependent viscosity, i.e. nonanol. Herewith experimental modelling of mantle convection is going to spotlight.

  13. The Rural Bookmobile: Quality as a Basic Ingredient. Conference Proceedings (2nd, Columbus, Ohio, June 18-20, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavrek, Bernard, Ed.; Pratt, Mary Lou, Ed.

    Nine papers make up this proceedings on bookmobile services to rural areas. The primary theme of the conference was "programming," with emphasis on quality of services and how to market the bookmobile in communities. Although the primary focus is on rural library services, many of the ideas in these papers can be applied to metropolitan areas. The…

  14. Day Fire in Ventura County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    The Day fire has been burning in Ventura County in Southern California since Labor Day, and has consumed more than 160,000 acres. As of September 29, it was 63 percent contained. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer on NASA's Terra satellite flew over the fire at 10 p.m. Pacific Time on September 28, and imaged the fire with its infrared camera. The hottest areas of active burning appear as red spots on the image. The blue-green background is a daytime image acquired in June, used as a background to allow firefighters to localize the hot spots.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission directorate.

    Size: 22.5 by 31.0 kilometers (12.6 by 15.2 miles) Location: 34.6 degrees North latitude, 119.1 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER Bands 4, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: ASTER 15 meters (49.2 feet) and 30 meters (98.4 feet) Dates Acquired: September 28, 2006 and June 19 2006

  15. 77 FR 61047 - Public Notice for Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance: Bolton Field Airport; Columbus, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Public Notice for Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance: Bolton Field.... The above mentioned land is not needed for aeronautical use, as shown on the Airport Layout Plan... Register 30 days before modifying the land-use assurance that requires the property to be used for...

  16. Study of the Half-Day/Full-Day Kindergarten Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInroy, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    This case study and problem analysis was an in-depth investigation of the half-day/full-day kindergarten model by utilizing interviews and focus groups to provide insight from parents, teachers, and other district personnel as to how the model has impacted the social, emotional, and academic development of the participating students. This study…

  17. Rethinking the Day of Silence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Back in 2006, 7th and 8th graders at Green Acres, the K-8 independent school where the author taught in suburban Maryland, participated in the Day of Silence. The Day of Silence is a national event: Students across the country take a one-day pledge of silence to show that they want to make schools safe for all students, regardless of their sexual

  18. Rethinking the Day of Silence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Back in 2006, 7th and 8th graders at Green Acres, the K-8 independent school where the author taught in suburban Maryland, participated in the Day of Silence. The Day of Silence is a national event: Students across the country take a one-day pledge of silence to show that they want to make schools safe for all students, regardless of their sexual…

  19. Sun-Earth Day, 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Mortfield, P.; Hathaway, D. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To promote awareness of the Sun-Earth connection, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, in collaboration with the Stanford SOLAR Center, sponsored a one-day Sun-Earth Day event on April 27, 2001. Although "celebrated" on only one day, teachers and students from across the nation, prepared for over a month in advance. Workshops were held in March to train teachers. Students performed experiments, results of which were shared through video clips and an internet web cast. Our poster includes highlights from student experiments (grades 2 - 12), lessons learned from the teacher workshops and the event itself, and plans for Sun-Earth Day 2002.

  20. 2014 Maine Earth Science Day

    On October 15, 2014 Maine Earth Science Day was held at the Maine State Museum in Augusta. The USGS was represented by Charlie Culbertson, left, and Nick Waldron, right. This photo was taken as the two were packing up for the day, and shows a main feature of the table, a touch screen display with th...

  1. Celebrate International School Library Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braxton, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The Fourth Monday in October is International School Library Day (ISLD)--an opportunity for school libraries around the world to celebrate the contribution they make to the education of the children in their care. International School Library Day was proclaimed in 1999 by Dr Blanche Woolls, president of the International Association of School

  2. Day Care Infection Control Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health, Seattle, WA.

    This day care infection control manual was assembled to provide technical guidance for the prevention and control of communicable diseases to child day care facilities in Seattle and King County, Washington. For each disease, the manual provides background information, public health control recommendations, and letters that can be used to

  3. In Defense of Snow Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    In snowy climates, school superintendents must frequently decide whether an impending storm warrants closing schools for the day. Concerns about student and teacher safety must be weighed against the loss of student learning time, along with state requirements for days of instruction and the cost and inconvenience of extending the school year into…

  4. Day Care: Resources for Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotberg, Edith H., Ed.

    The question of federal day care programs on a mass scale oriented toward influencing family life is discussed, and a number of issues concerning the behavioral and social effects of such a system are raised. This document is divided into six parts. Part I discusses the following: day care settings--social, cultural, and anthropological…

  5. Dorothy Day's Vision of Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Nancy L.

    An examination of Dorothy Day's role as chief journalist, editor, and publisher of "The Catholic Worker," the ideological monthly she cofounded in 1933, reveals that she was the final authority within the organization of the newspaper. Deeply committed to proselytizing for her cause, the Catholic Worker Movement, Day still simultaneously…

  6. Day Care Infection Control Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health, Seattle, WA.

    This day care infection control manual was assembled to provide technical guidance for the prevention and control of communicable diseases to child day care facilities in Seattle and King County, Washington. For each disease, the manual provides background information, public health control recommendations, and letters that can be used to…

  7. Day Care Center Enrichment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Dept. of Welfare, Charleston.

    This guide to a West Virginia Department of Welfare project for upgrading the quality of day care centers throughout the state presents samples of the forms used in the program, accompanied by a brief description of the program's format, requirements and procedures. The Day Care Center Enrichment Program provides a monetary incentive for…

  8. In Defense of Snow Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    In snowy climates, school superintendents must frequently decide whether an impending storm warrants closing schools for the day. Concerns about student and teacher safety must be weighed against the loss of student learning time, along with state requirements for days of instruction and the cost and inconvenience of extending the school year into

  9. The ocean sampling day consortium.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Cariou, Thierry; O'Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion Mf; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C; Kandil, Mahrous M; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; Ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L'Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; Dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N; Gasol, Josep M; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M; Collins, R Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Gilbert, Jack A; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world's oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits. PMID:26097697

  10. The ocean sampling day consortium.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Kopf A; Bicak M; Kottmann R; Schnetzer J; Kostadinov I; Lehmann K; Fernandez-Guerra A; Jeanthon C; Rahav E; Ullrich M; Wichels A; Gerdts G; Polymenakou P; Kotoulas G; Siam R; Abdallah RZ; Sonnenschein EC; Cariou T; O'Gara F; Jackson S; Orlic S; Steinke M; Busch J; Duarte B; Caçador I; Canning-Clode J; Bobrova O; Marteinsson V; Reynisson E; Loureiro CM; Luna GM; Quero GM; Löscher CR; Kremp A; DeLorenzo ME; Øvreås L; Tolman J; LaRoche J; Penna A; Frischer M; Davis T; Katherine B; Meyer CP; Ramos S; Magalhães C; Jude-Lemeilleur F; Aguirre-Macedo ML; Wang S; Poulton N; Jones S; Collin R; Fuhrman JA; Conan P; Alonso C; Stambler N; Goodwin K; Yakimov MM; Baltar F; Bodrossy L; Van De Kamp J; Frampton DM; Ostrowski M; Van Ruth P; Malthouse P; Claus S; Deneudt K; Mortelmans J; Pitois S; Wallom D; Salter I; Costa R; Schroeder DC; Kandil MM; Amaral V; Biancalana F; Santana R; Pedrotti ML; Yoshida T; Ogata H; Ingleton T; Munnik K; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta N; Berteaux-Lecellier V; Wecker P; Cancio I; Vaulot D; Bienhold C; Ghazal H; Chaouni B; Essayeh S; Ettamimi S; Zaid el H; Boukhatem N; Bouali A; Chahboune R; Barrijal S; Timinouni M; El Otmani F; Bennani M; Mea M; Todorova N; Karamfilov V; Ten Hoopen P; Cochrane G; L'Haridon S; Bizsel KC; Vezzi A; Lauro FM; Martin P; Jensen RM; Hinks J; Gebbels S; Rosselli R; De Pascale F; Schiavon R; Dos Santos A; Villar E; Pesant S; Cataletto B; Malfatti F; Edirisinghe R; Silveira JA; Barbier M; Turk V; Tinta T; Fuller WJ; Salihoglu I; Serakinci N; Ergoren MC; Bresnan E; Iriberri J; Nyhus PA; Bente E; Karlsen HE; Golyshin PN; Gasol JM; Moncheva S; Dzhembekova N; Johnson Z; Sinigalliano CD; Gidley ML; Zingone A; Danovaro R; Tsiamis G; Clark MS; Costa AC; El Bour M; Martins AM; Collins RE; Ducluzeau AL; Martinez J; Costello MJ; Amaral-Zettler LA; Gilbert JA; Davies N; Field D; Glöckner FO

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world's oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  11. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Sonnenschein, Eva C.; Cariou, Thierry; O’Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R.; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E.; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P.; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M.; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion M. F.; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C.; Kandil, Mahrous M.; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L’Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M.; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M.; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A. Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J.; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N.; Gasol, Josep M.; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S.; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M.; Collins, R. Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  12. The day of the yam.

    PubMed

    Rosser, A

    Yam, the staple food in several tropical countries, is a good source of the steroid used in the manufacture of the pill and other sex hormone preparations -- saponin diosgenin. In the early days of production of oral contraceptives (OCs), most yams were gathered from the wild in Mexico. The type richest in steroids takes 3 years to mature and its cultivation has become something of an art. Yams grow best in light, well-drained soil, and for this reason are grown in mounds which have been heavily manured. Propagation is by planting the tops or heads or by small portions of the tuber which is a swollen shoot. Other varieties are planted before the onset of the rains and the crop harvested about 8 months later. In 1970 the Mexican government nationalized the yam industry as a safeguard. This pushed up prices and the drug companies looked elsewhere for a cheap source. Although Mexico still remains the principal grower, India, South Africa, and the Far East supply the industry with plant origin steroids. As more than 90% of the hefty yam tubers consist of water, well over 100,000 tons have to be harvested every year to provide the 600-700 tons of the saponin diosgenin used by the drug companies. In China, where Western corticosteroids are regarded as too expensive for the barefoot doctors, several species of yam are used. Research has been going on to find another source of diosgenin and the most promising seems to be fenugreek, Trigonella foenumgraecum. "Foenum graecum" is Latin for Greek hay and was used by the early Greeks as a culinary and medicinal herb throughout the Mediterranean area. The richness of fenugreek was used to improve the roundness of women's breasts and to stimulate the flow of milk. Bath University has spent 10 years researching the development of a species of fenugreek which will yield large amounts of diosgenin. A certain amount of steroids come from animal sources. Such steroids are given when there is an adverse reaction from the administeration of the synthetic variety. Placentae are a rich source of steroids and have been found to contain hormones, minerals, and enzymes. Placentae now are becoming big business throughout Europe. Although it is possible to make OCs from placental extract, it is not commercially viable. Over 600 varieties of yam exist and at this time there is no danger of the supply running out. PMID:3846954

  13. Self Reports of Day-to-Day Function in a Small Cohort of People with Prodromal and Early HD

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Janet; Downing, Nancy; Vaccarino, Anthony L; Guttman, Mark; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    Day-to-day functioning is a component of health-related quality of life and is an important end point for therapies to treat Huntington Disease (HD). Specific areas of day-to-day function changes have not been reported for prodromal or very early stages of HD. An exploratory self-report telephone interview was conducted with sixteen people with prodromal HD or early HD who met criteria designed to capture research participants most near to motor diagnosis. All completed semi-structured interviews on function in nine aspects of day-to-day life. Out of 16, 14 reported changes in at least one area. All day-to-day function areas were endorsed by at least one participant with driving being the most common area endorsed by 11/16. Changes in ability to perform some day-to-day tasks are experienced by people who are close to the time of clinical diagnosis for HD. Functional ability is likely to be an important component of outcome assessments of clinical trials and in ongoing clinical management. PMID:21901173

  14. Career Day - Duration: 62 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's 2013 Career Days was a joint collaboration between NASA Langley and the Newport News Shipbuilding where 600 high school students from Virginia took on two design challenges -- designing a ca...

  15. Earth Day Illustrated Haiku Contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-02-01

    As part of their 2007 Chemists Celebrate Earth Day Celebration, the American Chemical Society is sponsoring an illustrated haiku contest for students in grades K 12 around the theme, Recycling—Chemistry Can!

  16. STS-79 Flight Day 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    On this fifth day of the STS-79 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. William F. Readdy, Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt, Mission Specialists, Thomas D. Akers, Shannon Lucid, Jay Apt, and Carl E. Walz, in the first full day of joint Shuttle/Mir operations begin in with the transfer of a biotechnology investigation and logistical supplies from Atlantis to Mir. The Biotechnology System, an investigation that will study the long-term development of cartilage cells in microgravity, was transported to Mir early this morning. During his planned four-month stay on Mir, John Blaha will take weekly samples of the culture which may provide researchers with information on engineering cartilage cells for possible use in transplantation. They also took time out of their schedules to talk with Good Morning America's Elizabeth Vargas in a brief interview. Prior to beginning the day's transfer activities, all nine astronauts and cosmonauts participated in a joint planning session to outline the day's schedule.

  17. Antarctica Day: An International Celebration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, A.; Hambrook Berkman, J.; Berkman, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    For more than half a century, the 1959 Antarctic Treaty continues to shine as a rare beacon of international cooperation. To celebrate this milestone of peace in our civilization with hope and inspiration for future generations, Antarctica Day is celebrated each year on December 1st , the anniversary of the Antarctic Treaty signing. As an annual event - initiated by the Foundation for the Good Governance of International Spaces (www.internationalspaces.org/) in collaboration with the Association of Polar Early Carer Scientists (www.apecs.is) - Antarctica Day encourages participation from around the world. The Antarctic Treaty set aside 10% of the earth, 'forever to be used exclusively for peaceful purposes in the interest of mankind.' It was the first nuclear arms agreement and the first institution to govern all human activities in an international region beyond sovereign jurisdictions. In this spirit, Antarctica Day aims to: - Demonstrate how diverse nations can work together peacefully, using science as a global language of cooperation for decision making beyond national boundaries, - Provide strategies for students learning about Antarctica through art, science and history at all school levels, - Increase collaboration and communication between classrooms, communities, researchers and government officials around the world, and - Provide a focus for polar educators to build on each year. Through close collaboration with a number of partners. Antarctica Day activities have included: a Polar Film Festival convened by The Explorers Club; live sessions connecting classrooms with scientists in Antarctica thanks to PolarTREC and ARCUS; an international activity that involved children from 13 countries who created over 600 flags which exemplify Antarctica Day (these were actually flown in Antarctica with signed certificates then returned to the classes); a map where Antarctica Day participants all over the world could share what they were doing; an Antarctic bird count involving the International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators; and public lectures and online videos (including a notable submission from Polar Educators International). Antarctica Day was initiated as a legacy of the 2009 Antarctic Treaty Summit (www.atsumit50.aq), which was convened at the Smithsonian Institution with 40 sponsoring institutions from around the world as part of the International Polar Year. Antarctic Day involved participants from 14 nations in 2010. 28 nations in 2011, and 26 nations in 2012 with representatives from all 7 continents. Antarctica Day 2013 will have recently taken place before the AGU Fall Meeting 2013, and we will present updates at that time. Our aim is to continue expanding Antarctica Day as a globally-accessible platform to share, interpret and cherish the values associated with Antarctica for the benefit of present and future generations. We look forward to the discussion and sharing that this session will provide.

  18. English Day--A Whole Day of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Yehudit Od

    1997-01-01

    English Day is celebrated annually at one Israeli school through language- and culture-related activities. One year, the school implemented whole-language learning strategies and involved parents and students in related activities at a series of activity stations featuring movies, books, television, fashion, comics, games, technology, science,…

  19. Calculation of day and night emittance values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Anne B.

    1986-01-01

    In July 1983, the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) was flown over Death Valley, California on both a midday and predawn flight within a two-day period. The availability of calibrated digital data permitted the calculation of day and night surface temperature and surface spectral emittance. Image processing of the data included panorama correction and calibration to radiance using the on-board black bodies and the measured spectral response of each channel. Scene-dependent isolated-point noise due to bit drops, was located by its relatively discontinuous values and replaced by the average of the surrounding data values. A method was developed in order to separate the spectral and temperature information contained in the TIMS data. Night and day data sets were processed. The TIMS is unique in allowing collection of both spectral emittance and thermal information in digital format with the same airborne scanner. For the first time it was possible to produce day and night emittance images of the same area, coregistered. These data add to an understanding of the physical basis for the discrimination of difference in surface materials afforded by TIMS.

  20. Investigating the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Columbus, Mississippi, using a three-dimensional inverse flow and transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlebo, H.C.; Hill, M.C.; Rosbjerg, D.

    2004-01-01

    Flowmeter-measured hydraulic conductivities from the heterogeneous MADE site have been used predictively in advection-dispersion models. Resulting simulated concentrations failed to reproduce even major plume characteristics and some have concluded that other mechanisms, such as dual porosity, are important. Here an alternative possibility is investigated: that the small-scale flowmeter measurements are too noisy and possibly too biased to use so directly in site-scale models and that the hydraulic head and transport data are more suitable for site-scale characterization. Using a calibrated finite element model of the site and a new framework to evaluate random and systematic model and measurement errors, the following conclusions are derived. (1) If variations in subsurface fluid velocities like those simulated in this work (0.1 and 2.0 m per day along parallel and reasonably close flow paths) exist, it is likely that classical advection-dispersion processes can explain the measured plume characteristics. (2) The flowmeter measurements are possibly systematically lower than site-scale values when the measurements are considered individually and using common averaging methods and display variability that obscures abrupt changes in hydraulic conductivities that are well supported by changes in hydraulic gradients and are important to the simulation of transport.

  1. The moon-day project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, C.

    1982-07-01

    With the development of Astronautics very large projects become possible. The Moon-Day project comes from a simple idea: 2000 km 2 of mirrors on the Moon reflecting the solar light toward the Earth will make it possible to turn off street lighting during the Moon nights. With more mirrors it is even possible to produce a "moon-day" similar to the light at sunrise or sunset, that will be a great improvement on the quality of life, especially in tropical and equatorial countries where people, and above all farmers, will have the possibility to work during the cool night hours instead of the exhausting day hours. Comparison with mirrors on a geostationary orbit shows the many advantages of the mirrors on the Moon.

  2. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; et al

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore » embedded functional traits.« less

  3. STS-74 flight day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    On this fourth day of the STS-74 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Kenneth Cameron, Pilot James Halsell, and Mission Specialists William McArthur, Jerry Ross, and Chris Hatfield, perform a successful docking between the space shuttle and the Mir space station using the Russian-made docking module that had been previously installed on the third day of the mission. The astronauts and the Mir 20 cosmonauts, Cmdr. Yuri Gidzenko, Flight Engineer Gergei Avdeyev, and Cosmonaut-Researcher (ESA) Thomas Reiter, are shown greeting each other from inside the docking module and an in-orbit interview between the crews and NASA is conducted in both English and Russian.

  4. STS-91 Day 08 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this eighth day of the STS-91 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet L. Kavandi, and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin focus on science investigations and participate in several special interviews and phone calls. Following yesterday's undocking with the Russian Mir space station, crew members are given a couple of hours off duty during the day to provide a brief rest break from the hectic pace of their flight.

  5. [Diabetes and the day hospital].

    PubMed

    Zghal, A; el Fehik, N; Bousnina, O; Daoud, I; Zghal, I; Gaigi, S

    2000-04-01

    The day hospital is a relatively new way of hospitalization in Tunisia, the first experience beginning in 1985 to the National Institute of Nutrition. This hospitalization avoid the drawbacks of classic hospitalization (dependency, discomfort, separation) and boredom and present a lot of advantages of social command, humanitarian, psychological, medical and economical the cost of hospitalization is clearly reduced). This day hospitalization is beneficial in several pathologies notably the illness nutrition and metabolic diseases (diabetes, obesity, dyslipoproteinemia, hyperuricemia), where the patients continue to have a good physical activity and where the education médico sanitary and dietary hygiéno occupies a position of choice. PMID:11026830

  6. The Stride Rite Intergenerational Day Care Center: Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stride Rite Corp., Cambridge, MA.

    The Stride Rite Intergenerational Day Care Center is located in the Stride Rite Corporation's headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The facility is designed to provide day care to both children and elders, using two separate wings to afford privacy to each group and a large central area for informal interaction between children and elders. The

  7. Predictors of Condom Use in Latino Migrant Day Laborers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organista, Kurt C.; Ehrlich, Samantha F.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on predictors of condom use with casual female sex partners on the part of Latino migrant day laborers in the San Francisco Bay Area. Results come from a secondary analysis of data from a cross-sectional survey using convenience sampling to interview 290 sexually active adult, male, migrant Latino day laborers. Regression…

  8. Family Day Care Services: Our Great-Grandmothers' Quilt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arruda, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This article features Family Day Care Services, one of the largest nonprofit providers of licensed home and centre-based child care programs in the Greater Toronto Area with 400 staff serving more than 4,000 children and their families. Family Day Care Services is also the lead agency for five Ontario Early Years Centres which are family…

  9. Experiments for a Special Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Special events like science days, teacher's meetings and physics recruiting efforts require spectacular and, if possible, interactive experiments for the audience. Based on past experience with such events, we have gathered and present here a series of demonstration experiments in mechanics, optics, waves and electricity which are suitable, and…

  10. The Last Day of Civilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Willard J.

    1982-01-01

    A narrative account of what might occur the first day of a nuclear war is interspersed with facts about the nuclear arms race and about the destructive power of weapons already stockpiled in the United States and the Soviet Union. A plea is made for preserving civilization from such a catastrophe. (PP)

  11. From Five Days to Four

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarbrough, Rachel; Gilman, David Alan

    2006-01-01

    Facing financial difficulties, the Webster County Public School System in rural Kentucky implemented a four-day school week to save money on transportation and staffing. The district's research in the experience of other rural districts had indicated that such a calendar change could increase efficiency and also yield some unexpected benefits.…

  12. International Literacy Day Tool Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This tool kit suggests various International Literacy Day activities to raise awareness of the issues of adult literacy and language learning, to connect local literacy programs with national programs, and to help achieve the National Literacy Summit goal by 2010. The kit is intended for individuals, programs, and organizations that want to call…

  13. Day Care Management. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourque, Janet

    A curriculum was developed and a pilot project was conducted to train 20 day care center directors at Lake Washington Vocational Technical Institute. This document summarizes the curriculum development project and provides the curriculum that was developed. The report contains a summary and outline of the course, a skills assessment, pretests and…

  14. Festivals of the Darkest Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacha, Frances B.

    1980-01-01

    Presents historical background on various winter festivals around the world including Saturnalia, Christmas, winter solstice, Yule festivals, Hannukah, Divali, and New Year's Day. Suggests how teachers can help elementary school students understand their own culture by studying these and other festivals using maps, mobiles, discussion, and reading…

  15. Experiments for a Special Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Special events like science days, teacher's meetings and physics recruiting efforts require spectacular and, if possible, interactive experiments for the audience. Based on past experience with such events, we have gathered and present here a series of demonstration experiments in mechanics, optics, waves and electricity which are suitable, and

  16. Earth Day Changes in Attitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Betty; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes recycling related activities associated with the Earth Day celebration at the University School of East Tennessee State University. Activities involve tree planting, campus clean-up, student posters, assemblies, a schoolwide rally, and displays of recyclable items. A study examining attitude change revealed that hands-on activities…

  17. A New Day for Kids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farbman, David

    2007-01-01

    The Martin Luther King School in Boston and nine other Massachusetts public schools used a grant from the Massachusetts Department of Education to expand their school days by at least two hours. Each school lengthened the time students spent in reading and math instruction. Farbman focuses on the Martin Luther King School's foray into an extended…

  18. Bright Ideas for Dark Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easley, Dauna

    2005-01-01

    In this brief column, the author of "Teachers Touch Eternity," provides 20 tips that teachers can use to motivate themselves and others through the dark days of winter: (1) Fake it till you make it; (2) Allow for spontaneity; (3) Build an encouragement folder; (4) Lighten up! (5) Read motivational books or inspirational thoughts late at night or…

  19. Take Advantage of Constitution Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Bonnie F.

    2008-01-01

    The announcement of the mandate for Constitution and Citizenship Day shortly before September, 2005, probably led to groans of dismay. Not another "must-do" for teachers and schools already stressed by federal and state requirements for standardized tests, increasingly rigid curricula, and scrutiny from the public and officials. But the idea and…

  20. United Nations Day, 24 October.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Ken, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Serving as the journal of the Manitoba Social Science Teachers' Association, this issue commemorates United Nations Day with the editorial, "Teaching about the United Nations" (Ken Osborne). Another article devoted to the international organization is "The United Nations and International Peace and Security" (Ken Osborne). The article is intended…

  1. Bright Ideas for Dark Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easley, Dauna

    2005-01-01

    In this brief column, the author of "Teachers Touch Eternity," provides 20 tips that teachers can use to motivate themselves and others through the dark days of winter: (1) Fake it till you make it; (2) Allow for spontaneity; (3) Build an encouragement folder; (4) Lighten up! (5) Read motivational books or inspirational thoughts late at night or

  2. Make Your Own Snow Day!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robeck, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Children love snow days, even when they come during the warmest weather. In this lesson the snow isn't falling outside, it's in the classroom--thanks to "Snowflake Bentley" (Briggs Martin 1998) and several models of snowflakes. A lesson on snow demonstrates several principles of practice for using models in elementary science. Focusing on snow was…

  3. Infectious Diseases in Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleator, Esther K.

    Discussed in this publication are infectious illnesses for which children attending day care appear to be at special risk. Also covered are the common cold, some infectious disease problems receiving media attention, and some other annoying but not serious diseases, such as head lice, pinworms, and contagious skin conditions. Causes,…

  4. A New Day for Intellectuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delbanco, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Soon after election day, the columnist Nicholas D. Kristof wrote in "The New York Times" that the "second most remarkable thing" about the election was that "American voters have just picked a president who is an open, out-of-the-closet, practicing intellectual." Surely, one of the secrets of President Obama's rhetorical power is his ability to…

  5. Giving Students Their School Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watchorn, Vince; Willingham, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Opportunities, not obligations. That is how Providence Country Day School (Rhode Island) characterizes its daily one-hour "Community Time." The block, from 9:25 to 10:25 a.m., is used chiefly for students to partake in activities of their own making--as a daily lesson in the value of students taking charge of their own education. On any…

  6. Earth Day: All Species Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Marty

    1994-01-01

    Describes the All Species Project, an interdisciplinary program that attempts to build a sense of community and understanding of the natural world by integrating ideas from art, science, anthropology, counseling, theater, and any other area deemed applicable. (MDH)

  7. STS-79 Flight Day 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    On this eighth day of the STS-79 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. William F. Readdy, Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt, Mission Specialists, Thomas D. Akers, Shannon Lucid, Jay Apt, and Carl E. Walz, are seen bidding the crew of Mir farewell and then closing the hatches between their two spacecraft in preparation for undocking. The nine astronauts and cosmonauts gathered in the Core Module of the Russian space station for a formal goodbye. With the official ceremony complete, the crewmembers shared a final meal together and exchanged private farewells as Shannon Lucid prepared to return home in Atlantis and her replacement on Mir, John Blaha, began a four month stay on the station. Walz and Apt and Mir 22 Commander Valery Korzun with assistance from Flight Engineer 2 John Blaha, swung the hatches between their spacecraft closed concluding five days of joint operations. The vestibule between Atlantis and Mir was depressurized and leak checks were performed in readiness for undocking.

  8. STS-73 flight day 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    On this fifteenth day of the STS-73 sixteen day mission, the crew Cmdr. Kenneth Bowersox, Pilot Kent Rominger, Payload Specialists Albert Sacco and Fred Gregory, and Mission Specialists Kathryn Thornton, Catherine 'Cady' Collman, and Michael Lopez-Alegria are shown hosting an in-orbit interview with various newspaper reporters from Johnson Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center via satellite hookup. The astronauts were asked questions regarding the status of the United States Microgravity Lab-2 (USML-2) experiments, their personal goals regarding their involvement in the mission, their future in the space program, and general questions about living in space. Earth views included cloud cover and a tropical storm.

  9. STS-73 flight day 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    On this fourteenth day of the STS-73 sixteen day mission, the crew Cmdr. Kenneth Bowersox, Pilot Kent Rominger, Payload Specialists Albert Sacco and Fred Gregory, and Mission Specialists Kathryn Thornton, Catherine 'Cady' Collman, and Michael Lopez-Alegria are shown performing several of the spaceborne experiments onboard the United States Microgravity Lab-2 (USML-2). The experiments shown include the Drop Physics Module (DPM) experiment, the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE), the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) experiment, and an experiment on fuel combustion and combustion products. Bowersox, Sacco, Thornton, and Rominger (the red team) were interviewed by high school students from Worcester, Massachusetts, who asked questions regarding the mission's experiments and general questions about living in space. Earth views included a black and white image of the Earth's atmospheric boundary layers.

  10. Argonne's 2012 Earth Day Event

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Argonne's 2012 Earth Day event drew crowds from across the laboratory. Argonne and U.S. Department of Energy employees toured booths and interactive displays set up by Argonne programs and clubs. Several of Argonne's partners participated, including U.S. Department of Energy, University of Chicago, Abri Credit Union, DuPage County Forest Preserve, DuPage Water Commission, PACE and Morton Arboretum. Argonne scientists and engineers also participated in a poster session, discussing their clean energy research.

  11. The early days of incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1995-05-01

    Landfills reaching capacity, beaches fouled with trash, neighborhood residents protesting waste disposal sites in their backyards, and municipalities forced to recycle. Sound familiar? These issues might have been taken from today`s headlines, but they were also problems facing mechanical engineers a century ago. Conditions such as these were what led engineers to design the first incinerators for reducing the volume of municipal garbage, as well as for producing heat and electricity. The paper discusses these early days.

  12. Argonne's 2012 Earth Day Event

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-04-19

    Argonne's 2012 Earth Day event drew crowds from across the laboratory. Argonne and U.S. Department of Energy employees toured booths and interactive displays set up by Argonne programs and clubs. Several of Argonne's partners participated, including U.S. Department of Energy, University of Chicago, Abri Credit Union, DuPage County Forest Preserve, DuPage Water Commission, PACE and Morton Arboretum. Argonne scientists and engineers also participated in a poster session, discussing their clean energy research.

  13. STS-70 flight: Day 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-07-01

    The fifth day of the STS-70 Space Shuttle Discovery mission is contained on this video. The crew continues working on experiments, such as the Space Tissue Loss Analysis and the Bioreactor Development System. CNN reporter, John Holliman, interviewed the flight crew and the crew also answered questions posed by Internet users while on NASA's Shuttle Web. There are brief views of Earth's surface included.

  14. STS-79 Flight Day 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    On this ninth day of the STS-79 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. William F. Readdy, Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt, Mission Specialists, Thomas D. Akers, Shannon Lucid, Jay Apt, and Carl E. Walz having completed five days of joint operations between the American astronauts and the Russian cosmonauts are seen flying solo once again after undocking from the Mir Space Station. As Atlantis/Mir flew over the Ural Mountains of central Asia, the docking hooks and latches that joined the vehicles together were commanded open and Atlantis drifted slowly away from Mir. Wilcutt then initiated a tail-forward fly-around of the Russian space station. After one and one-half revolutions around Mir, Atlantis' jets were fired in a separation maneuver to enable Atlantis to break away from Mir. On board Atlantis, the six-member crew is settling back into its normal routine with a fairly light schedule for the remainder of the day. Early in the morning as Atlantis flew over the United States, the crew took time to talk with anchors for the CBS Up to the Minute' network news broadcast.

  15. Sun-Earth Day 2004: Venus Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J. R.; Odenwald, S.; Cline, T.; Lewis, E.; Mayo, L.; Ng, C.; Meyer, K.

    2003-12-01

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum annually promotes an event called Sun-Earth Day. For Sun-Earth Day 2004 SECEF has selected the transit of Venus as the theme. Opportunities are available to prepare for the viewing of this event. The event last occurred in 1882, so no one alive today has ever witnessed the transit of Venus. Through parallax measurements, it allowed astronomers to define, for the first time, a fairly accurate number for the A.U. and therefore, the distance to all the other known planets. The website http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/sunearthday has been developed to provide the necessary resources and opportunities for participation in Sun-Earth Day. This is the fourth year that we offer new and exciting space science. This year in particular the content area crosses all of space sciences offering activities and resources for every classroom and museum event. The goal is to involve as much of the student population and the public in this event as possible and to help them understand the immense importance and excitement surrounding this and previous transits. Through engaging activities focused on US and world history, technology, math, and astronomy, classrooms and museums can create their own event or participate in one of the opportunities we make available. Comparisons of Venus with the Earth and Mars, calculations of the distances to nearby stars, and the use of transits to identify extra-solar planets will all add to the excitement of this cosmic occurrence.

  16. Encapsulated radiophosphorescent standards for day-to-day photometer calibration.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, D J; Lee, J

    1990-10-01

    Solid, unquenched, radiophosphorescent standards for use in the day-to-day calibration of bottom viewing photometers (luminometers) were prepared by encapsulating commercially-available phosphor powders that are excited to phosphoresce by the beta- decay of 63Ni (t0.5 = 96 yr) or 14C (t0.5 = 5730 yr). The radionuclides are physically adsorbed on the phosphors by precipitation either as a "basic nickel carbonate" or as barium carbonate. The radioactive phosphors are then deposited by centrifugation as a thin layer at the bottom of the vials or tubes that are normally used in the photometer. The phosphor layer is infiltrated with a plastic resin and embedded. A light absorbing layer is subsequently cast over the phosphor layer to prevent stray light excitation of phosphorescence. The encapsulated photometer standards have remained mechanically and photometrically stable since their fabrication, which in some cases is 3 years ago. An equivalent level of visible luminescence emitted from the standards of up to 2.3 x 10(10) photons.s-1 was achieved by using an appropriate amount of radioactivity and the proper phosphor. The phosphor used in the standards could be chosen such that the radiophosphorescence emission spectrum corresponded approximately to the chemiluminescence or bioluminescence spectrum under investigation. PMID:2089419

  17. Macrocognition in Day-To-Day Police Incident Response

    PubMed Central

    Baber, Chris; McMaster, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Using examples of incidents that UK Police Forces deal with on a day-to-day basis, we explore the macrocognition of incident response. Central to our analysis is the idea that information relating to an incident is translated from negotiated to structured and actionable meaning, in terms of the Community of Practice of the personnel involved in incident response. Through participant observation of, and interviews with, police personnel, we explore the manner in which these different types of meaning shift over the course of incident. In this way, macrocognition relates to gathering, framing, and sharing information through the collaborative sensemaking practices of those involved. This involves two cycles of macrocognition, which we see as ‘informal’ (driven by information gathering as the Community of Practice negotiates and actions meaning) and ‘formal’ (driven by the need to assign resources to the response and the need to record incident details). The examples illustrate that these cycles are often intertwined, as are the different forms of meaning, in situation-specific ways that provide adaptive response to the demands of the incident. PMID:27014117

  18. Cassini Scientist for a Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Michael W.; Murray, C. D.; Piazza, E.; McConnell, S.

    2007-10-01

    The Cassini Mission's "Scientist for a Day" program allows students the opportunity to be in scientists' shoes, evaluate various options and learn how to make decisions based on scientific value. Students are given three or more possible imaging targets. They research these targets and decide which one will bring the best scientific results. They then defend their choice in a 500-word essay. The essay with the best scientific argument for a chosen target wins the contest. Cassini will take the images on Nov. 30, 2007. A few days later, winners (and as many other students as possible) are invited to discuss the results with Cassini scientists via videoconferences. Entries are judged by a committee composed of Cassini scientists, Cassini mission planners, Cassini Outreach and JPL Education Specialists. The contest has been held on a smaller scale three times. This edition is open to all U.S. schools. Students will be divided in two groups, grades 5 to 8 and grades 9 to 12. The contest will also be held in England, and possibly in other countries.

  19. STS-90 Day 14 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this fourteenth day of the STS-90 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Richard A. Searfoss, Pilot Scott D. Altman, and Mission Specialists Richard M. Linnehan, Dafydd Rhys Williams and Kathryn P. Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay C. Buckey and James A. Pawelczyk focus on the efforts of Neurolab's Neuronal Plasticity Team to better understand how the adult nervous system adapts to the new environment of space. Columbia's science crew -- Mission Specialists Rick Linnehan and Dave Williams and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey and Jim Pawelczyk -- perform the second and final in-flight dissections of the adult male rats on board. The crew euthanizes and dissects nine rats and remove the vestibular or balance organs of the inner ear; the cerebellum, the part of the brain critical for maintaining balance and for processing information from the limbs so they can be moved smoothly; and the cerebrum, one part of which controls automatic functions such as body temperature regulation and the body's internal clock, and the cortical region that controls cognitive functions such as thinking. The first dissection, which was performed on the second day of the flight, went extremely well, according to Neurolab scientists.

  20. [Day hospital treatment in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Eikelmann, B

    2010-03-01

    Day hospitals provide an organizational framework for complex psychiatric and psychotherapeutic treatments. They have been developed regarding treatment and in number, perhaps surprisingly, to fit existing standards in almost all domains of psychiatry. Similarities exist in the emphasis on acute treatment, in the orientation towards social inclusion, and particularly in the ability to connect with previous treatment settings. Day treatment guidelines exist only in basic form. In general the complex outpatient treatment is led by psychiatrists; the treatment is planned and pre-defined regarding time and goal orientation. It is directed exclusively at patients with severe mental health disorders and practiced by a multi-professional team. A structured treatment milieu is likely to be the main ingredient which includes all somatic-biological and many psychotherapeutic methods. Special options that for the most part have been empirically validated are available for the treatment of post-acute patients, prevention of social exclusion from families and work, detoxification of addicts and psychotherapy of personality disorders. The rapid increase of facilities is expected to persist for some time. Scientific evidence is relatively strong. Given proper indication, financial resources are used with a high degree of efficiency. PMID:20119657

  1. First Complete Day from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This spectacular, full-color image of the Earth is a composite of the first full day of data gathered by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. MODIS collected the data for each wavelength of red, green, and blue light as Terra passed over the daylit side of the Earth on April 19, 2000. Terra is orbiting close enough to the Earth so that it cannot quite see the entire surface in a day, resulting in the narrow gaps around the equator. Although the sensor's visible channels were combined to form this true-color picture, MODIS collects data in a total of 36 wavelengths, ranging from visible to thermal infrared energy. Scientists use these data to measure regional and global-scale changes in marine and land-based plant life, sea and land surface temperatures, cloud properties, aerosols, fires, and land surface properties. Notice how cloudy the Earth is, and the large differences in brightness between clouds, deserts, oceans, and forests. The Antarctic, surrounded by clockwise swirls of cloud, is shrouded in darkness because the sun is north of the equator at this time of year. The tropical forests of Africa, Southeast Asia, and South America are shrouded by clouds. The bright Sahara and Arabian deserts stand out clearly. Green vegetation is apparent in the southeast United States, the Yucatan Peninsula, and Madagascar. Image by Mark Gray, MODIS Atmosphere Team, NASA GSFC

  2. STS-74 flight day 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    On this fifth day of the STS-74 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Kenneth Cameron, Pilot James Halsell, and Mission Specialists William McArthur, Jerry Ross, and Chris Hatfield, were awakened to the theme from the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey'. The Mir 20 cosmonauts, Cmdr. Yuri Gidzenko, Flight Engineer Sergei Avdeyev, and Cosmonaut-Researcher (ESA) Thomas Reiter, and shuttle astronauts are shown giving each other plaques and presents to commemorate their historic docking event and the start towards the development of the International Space Station. There is a press conference from Moscow by a one of the officers of the Russian Space Agency with both flight crews and an additional separate press interview of the crews by Canadian reporters. There is video footage of the two docked spacecraft taken from various angles.

  3. STS-90 Day 15 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this fifteeth day of the STS-90 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Richard A. Searfoss, Pilot Scott D. Altman, and Mission Specialists Richard M. Linnehan, Dafydd Rhys Williams and Kathryn P. Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay C. Buckey and James A. Pawelczyk turns its attention to dexterity tests and dissections of rats neonates and the ball-catch experiment. Mission Specialists Rick Linnehan and Dave Williams and Payload Specialist Jim Pawelczyk will dissect the newborn rats. The dexterity test will test the response of young rats as they are tilted and turned while walking and climbing on a special apparatus with various surfaces. Later, all four payload crew members will repeat the ball-catch experiment. This experiment studies the ability of the central nervous system to accept and interpret new stimuli in space. The astronauts have performed this test at various points in the mission so scientists can compare their responses as their bodies adapt to weightlessness.

  4. Full-Day Kindergarten Programs. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenberg, Dianne

    Changes in American society and education over the last 20 years have contributed to the popularity of all-day, every-day kindergarten programs. Full-day kindergarten is popular for a number of reasons. Full-day programs eliminate the need to provide buses and crossing guards at mid-day. In high-poverty schools, state and federal funding for…

  5. Day Care: Old Think and New Think.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gwen G.

    In this paper, old and new ways of thinking about day care are described as "oldthink" and "newthink." Major points of oldthink are that: (1) day care is a social service; (2) day care users are recipients, or at best, clients; (3) day care must be limited to low-income families; (4) licensing should protect children in day care on the legal…

  6. Child Development: Day Care. Administration, Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Host, Malcolm S.; Heller, Pearl B.

    The organizing and administering of day care services are the focus of this handbook. The three parts of the handbook are: (1) Organizing Day Care Services (Starting a Day Care Program, The Board of Directors, and The Staff); (2) Components of Day Care Services (Purpose, Objectives and Evaluation of Day Care Programs; Health and Medical Program;…

  7. Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide Main Content Getting Started Three ... regularly. Back to Top Step 1. Brush Every Day Angle the brush at the gumline and brush ...

  8. [When you see the light of day at the hospital].

    PubMed

    Llimos, Susana; Pirovani, Carolina; Oszlak, Claudia; Cuini, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    Day Hospital delivers complex treatments to patients with psychiatric illness such as psychosis and severe neurosis. Interdisciplinary work is necessarily required by this device. Our Day Hospital is organized in three sections: community area, clinical area and education and research. Our practice isn't exempt of hindrances, which relate not only to the clinical specifics we deal with, but also with the social, cultural and legal contexts it develops in. Since the approval of the Mental Health National Law (no. 26657) we believe the Day Hospital, our old resource, is given the opportunity to keep fulfilling a space as a proposal both fresh and institutional. The mentioned law states that Day Hospitals are to be promoted as a means for social, labor and community inclusion of patients. We have no doubt on the legal advance this represents but, on daily practice, issues will persist until a strong change decision is shown, implemented as public health policies aligned with the law. PMID:23139922

  9. Galileo Teacher Training Program - GTTP Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenatigala, T.; Doran, R.

    2012-09-01

    Despite the vast availability of teaching resources on the internet, finding a quality and user-friendly materials is a challenge. Many teachers are not trained with proper computing skills to search for the right materials. With years of expertise training teachers globally, Galileo Teacher Training Program (GTTP) [1] recognize the need of having a go-to place for teachers to access resources. To fill this need GTTP developed - GTTP Days - a program creating resource guides for planetary, lunar and solar fields. Avoiding the imbalance in science resources between the developed and undeveloped world, GTTP Days is available both online and offline as a printable version. Each resource guide covers areas such as scientific knowledge, exploration, observation, photography, art & culture and web tools. The lesson plans of each guide include hands-on activities, web tools, software tools, and activities for people with disabilities [2]. Each activity indicate the concepts used, the skills required and age level which guides the teachers and educators to select the correct content suitable for local curriculum.

  10. The world surveyed in eighteen days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mott, P. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Earth Resources Technology Satellite 1 was launched on July 23, 1972, on a polar orbit at an altitude of approximately 900 kilometers. The satellite circles the earth fourteen times a day, and its multispectral scanners produce complete coverage of the world every 18 days. The scanning system of the satellite is designed to provide simultaneous images if the earth's surface, each in a different spectral band-green, orange/red, red, and infrared. This data is telemetered to stations on earth where it is processed from its digital form into corrected photographic images. A single photographic exposure covers an area of 185 square kilometers. Results of ERTS-1 have far exceeded all expectations and confirm the belief that the imagery obtained will be of wide-ranging value in the study and mapping of the earth's surface. The knowledge and experience gained from the ERTS-1 data will be applied to a further study based on the much more ambitious Skylab. The improvement in the material recovered from Skylab should mark a leap forward in technical quality and in the corresponding/potential of the imagery.

  11. STS-88 Day 11 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this eleventh day of the STS-88 mission, the flight crew, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman, Jerry L. Ross, and Sergei Krikalev are awakened with the song "Goodnight, Sweetheart, Goodnight". Pilot Rick Sturckow undocks Endeavour from the station and backs the shuttle away to a distance of 450 feet above the station before beginning a nose-forward fly-around. Later Cabana, Sturckow and Ross deploy the SAC-A satellite from Endeavour's payload bay. SAC-A is a small, self-contained, non-recoverable satellite built by the Argentinean National Commission of Space Activities. The cube-shaped, 590-pound satellite will test and characterize the performance of new equipment and technologies that may be used in future scientific or operational missions. The payload includes a differential global positioning system, a magnetometer, silicon solar cells, a charge-coupled device Earth camera and a whale tracker experiment.

  12. STS-90 Day 04 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this forth day of the STS-90 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Richard A. Searfoss, Pilot Scott D. Altman, and Mission Specialists Richard M. Linnehan, Dafydd Rhys Williams and Kathryn P. Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay C. Buckey and James A. Pawelczyk continue work with the Escher Staircase Behavior Testing of Adult Rats experiment. This is the first of two behavior testing sessions with the adult rats being used for this experiment. The rats will have a 'hyper drive' unit placed on their head which has recording electrodes made of microscopic wires that are positioned in the brain to record activity in the hippocampus. The hippocampus is that portion of the brain used to develop spatial maps to help us navigate from one place to the other. With the 'hyper drive' units in place, the rats will then be put through a maze or on a track. While the rat is maneuvering on the maze or track, the cell activity of the hippocampus will be measured and recorded.

  13. Hydrogeology and water quality of at the management systems evaluation area near Piketon, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jagucki, M.L.; Finton, C.D.; Springer, A.E.; Bair, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, The Ohio State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to describe the hydrology, water quality, and geochemical factors controlling water quality at the Ohio Management Systems Evaluation Area (MSEA). The Ohio MSEA is located on a 650-acre farm in the Scioto River Valley in Pike County, south-central Ohio. The farm is underlain by an incised bedrock valley filled with about 70 feet of sand and gravel outwash deposits that are covered by a veneer of silty clay alluvium and silty loam and sandy loam soils. Outwash sediment are composed predominantly of dolomite, quartz, and calcite, and have a median organic carbon concentration of 0.39 weight percent. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the sediment based on results of multiple-well aquifer tests ranges from 400 to 560 feet per day. Ground-water flow is from east to west-southwest at an average velocity of 1.5 to 2.5 feet per day. Ground water and surface water at the site are highly interconnected. Big Beaver Creek recharges the outwash aquifer along the eastern edge of the study area, and ground water discharges to the Scioto River at the western edge of the study area. High-stage events on the Scioto River cause frequent flow reversals in the aquifer that allow streamwater to travel a maximum observed distance of 190 feet inland. A zone of oxidizing waters (characterized by high dissolved oxygen concentration and Eh) is found in shallow ground water for several hundred feet adjacent to Big Beaver Creek and the Scioto River. This zone of oxidizing ground water is caused by the periodic inflow of surface waters to the aquifer. A ground-water budget for the study area indicates that the aquifer received 17.7 inches of recharge during water year 1992; of this amount, 72 percent originated as infiltrating precipitation, 28 percent as infiltration of surface water from Big Beaver Creek, and 0.2 percent as leakage from bedrock. Areal variation in water quality is caused by areal differences in the relative importance of these three recharge sources. The effects of bedrock leakage are evident only in the northeast corner of the study area. Here, deep outwash waters are transitional in composition between the calcium magnesium bicarbonate waters found elsewhere in the outwash aquifer and the calcium sodium chloride waters of the bedrock aquifer. Mixing calculations indicate that these deep outwash waters are composed of as much as 26 percent bedrock water. In the southern part of the MSEA, ground water is diluted by surface water from Big Beaver Creek as it recharges the aquifer through a sand and gravel streambed. At the northeast corner of the MSEA, however, Big Beaver Creek flows across a shale streambed through which no infiltration occurs. Redox reactions in the outwash aquifer control variations in aquifer chemistry with depth. From the water table to about 40 feet below land surface, oxidizing conditions are characterized by the presence of dissolved oxygen and nitrates in ground water, Eh greater than 200 millivolts, ferrihydrite coatings on sediment grains, and the absence of dissolved iron and manganese. From about 40 feet below land surface to the base of the aquifer, reducing conditions are characterized by dissolved oxygen concentrations less than 2 mg/L, Eh less than 200 millivolts, and the presence of dissolved iron and manganese. Denitrification in the reducing zone naturally remediates anthropogenic nitrate contamination of the aquifer while oxidizing pyrite in the aquifer sediment. ? The Ohio State University, Department of Geological Sciences, Columbus, Ohio.

  14. Regional variations of days of autonomy for solar energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grindle, E. II; Vliet, G.C.

    1999-07-01

    A problem faced by designers of stand-alone solar installations is the sizing of the collector area and storage capacity. From a curve of the minimum possible insolation over any period of days for a given site, a functional relationship between the collector-area and storage-capacity that provides a 0% probability of not meeting load (PNML) can be derived. This permits evaluating the regional variations in days-of-autonomy required to provide 100% reliability. Such variations are shown for Texas based on recent insolation data.

  15. A Hazy Day in Mexico City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mexico City has one of the world's most serious air pollution problems. The city is located atop a high plain at an altitude of 2200 meters, and is surrounded on three sides by mountains and snow-capped volcanoes. Since incident solar radiation does not vary significantly with season at tropical latitudes, photochemical smog is produced much of the year. In winter, air quality can worsen significantly when thermal inversions keep polluted air masses close to the surface.

    Atmospheric particulates (aerosols) are readily visible at oblique view angles, and differences in aerosol amount on two days are indicated by these images of central Mexico from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). The images at left and center are natural color views acquired by MISR's 70-degree forward-viewing camera on April 9 and December 5, 2001, respectively. Mexico City can be identified in the center panel by the large area of haze accumulation above image center. Two small brighter patches within the hazy area indicate low fog. In the left-hand panel, the city basin appears significantly clearer, but some haze remains apparent across the Sierra Madre mountains in the lower portion of the images. On the right is an elevation field corresponding to the December 5 view. Automated MISR stereoscopic retrievals reveal the clouds at lower right to be at very high altitudes, in contrast to the low-lying haze and fog near Mexico City. When the stereo retrieval determines that a location is not covered by clouds, digital terrain elevation data are displayed instead. High clouds appear as the orange and red areas, and mountainous areas appear light blue and green. The position of the clouds within the 70-degree image are slightly southward of their location in the elevation map as a consequence of geometric parallax.

    Major sources of air pollutants within the basin enclosing the Mexico City urban area include exhaust from 3.5 million vehicles, thousands of industries, and mineral dust. The ancient lakebed valley in which Mexico City is situated became a major source of dust when it was drained in the 16th century. The city basin stretches approximately 70 kilometers wide; it is reported that the local air quality causes the surrounding mountains to be rarely visible from the urban center.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer views almost the entire Earth every 9 days. These images were acquired during Terra orbits 6966 and 10461 and cover an area of 330 kilometers x 464 kilometers. They utilize data from blocks 75 to 77 within World Reference System-2 path 26.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  16. Family Day Care Networking Project. [Final Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Governor's Office of Human Development Commission for Children and Youth, Jackson.

    This report describes a project that established family day care homes in Mississippi and made use of senior citizens as day care providers. The goals of the project were to provide alternative day care arrangements for low income parents and to offer senior citizens extra income and strengthen their self-image. Advantages of home-based day care…

  17. Iowa Family Day Care Handbook. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinsky, Dorothy; And Others

    The Iowa Family Day Care Handbook is designed as an aid for persons entering the business of providing home day care as well as for those persons already in the field. Topics include advantages and disadvantages of family day care for children, parents and providers; getting started in family day care; and a list and description of records that…

  18. Family Day Care Training Curriculum (Lao).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakatsu, Gail

    California's Family Day Care Training Program was designed to recruit and train, in 7 weeks, Lao, Vietnamese, and Chinese refugees to establish their own state-licensed, family day care homes. Topics in the program's curriculum include an introduction to family day care, state licenses for family day care, state licensing requirements for family…

  19. Changing day services: do you agree?

    PubMed

    Campbell, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Models of day services for people with intellectual disabilities in Scotland are changing, with the purpose, content and availability being reviewed. There has been concern that a move to more flexible 'alternative day opportunities' is driven more by reduced budgets than a policy of modernising day services in response to individual needs. During a day services review, a questionnaire was used to rate and to collect views on existing services from 60 carers, service users and staff. This included evaluating day activities available, care plans, opening times, transport and the most valued aspects of existing day services. Respondents indicated general satisfaction with existing day services, although half believed that day services should be reviewed. The most valued parts of day services were forming and building friendships, and a safe place to go. Day services are highly valued by families and service users. Recommendations are made for a robust and transparent review process. PMID:22843810

  20. Present-day Crustal Deformation of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, K.; Rau, R.; Hu, J.; Lee, J.; Johnson, K. M.

    2009-12-01

    Taiwan, seated at the junction of the Manila and the Ryukyu subduction systems, is a classical case of the ongoing arc-continent collision due to convergence between the Eurasian and the Philippine Sea plates. We analyzed 601 GPS observations in Taiwan to understand the kinematics of present-day crustal deformation of the Taiwan mountain belt. Horizontal GPS velocities, relative to the Chinese continental margin station, S01R, represent a fan-shaped pattern and gradually decrease northwestward from ~82 mm/yr in SE Taiwan to nearly no deformation in NW coastal area. Directions of the horizontal velocities are dominantly toward NW in central Taiwan and the clockwise rotation and counterclockwise rotation are occurring in northern and southern Taiwan, respectively. For stations between the Chishan fault and the western flank of the southern Central Range in southern Taiwan, most station velocities are consistent (51.9 ± 6.6 mm/yr) and, from east to west, the azimuths change gradually from 277° to 247°. In northern Taiwan, magnitudes of northwestward velocities are 0.3-7.8 mm/yr in NW part of this area and vectors of 9.3-41.2 mm/yr from 53° to 146° occur in the Ilan area. Three significant features are characterized based on the analyses of velocities and 3-D block modeling results. First, tectonic block rotations are mostly concentrated on the northern Taiwan, which correspond to the transition from the Ryukyu subduction to the Taiwan collision zone. The roll-back of Ryukyu trench and the opening of Okinawa trough are probably superposed on the arc-continent collision-induced rotation in northern Taiwan mountain belt. Second, block translations are mainly occurred in southern Taiwan. The interaction between the Peikang basement high and the westward propagation of the accretionary wedge results in the material across southern Taiwan to move toward WSW, sub-parallel to the southern edge of the continental margin, via the strain partitioning along several major structures. Third, high slip rate deficits are mainly derived along the active faults in the Ilan area and along the northern Longitudinal Valley fault, which may correspond to the areas with high earthquake potential.