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Sample records for area luquillo experimental

  1. Annotated list of the flora of the Bisley Area, luquillo experimental forest, Puerto Rico 1987 to 1992. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chinea, J.D.; Beymer, R.J.; Sastre de Jesus, I.; Scatena, F.N.

    1993-08-01

    The plant species of the Bisley area were surveyed for several years, mostly as a result of studies conducted under the Long-Term Ecological Research Program of the National Science Foundation. A list was prepared that contains a total of 336 plant species in 255 genera and 102 families of bryophytes and vascular plants. Within these species there are 107 tree species, 20 shrub species, 28 dicotyledonous vines, 86 herbs, 52 bryophytes, and 43 ferns. There are 22 introduced and 314 native species (of the later, 30 are endemic to Puerto Rico). Nine families account for 39 percent of all species found in the Bisley area. Forests of the Bisley area have been classified as subtropical wet forests, lower montane rain forests, and single-dominant forests. The Bisley watersheds are covered by a secondary forest of the tabonuco type (Dacryodes excelsa). This forest type is part of the Dacryodes-Sloanea association of Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, and higher elevation islands of the Lesser Antilles.

  2. Temporal and spatial stability of red-tailed hawk territories in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boal, C.W.; Snyder, H.A.; Bibles, B.D.; Estabrook, T.S.

    2003-01-01

    We mapped Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) territories in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) of Puerto Rico in 1998. We combined our 1998 data with that collected during previous studies of Red-tailed Hawks in the LEF to examine population numbers and spatial stability of territorial boundaries over a 26-yr period. We also investigated potential relationships between Red-tailed Hawk territory sizes and topographic and climatic factors. Mean size of 16 defended territories during 1998 was 124.3 ?? 12.0 ha, which was not significantly different from our calculations of mean territory sizes derived from data collected in 1974 and 1984. Aspect and slope influenced territory size with the smallest territories having high slope and easterly aspects. Territory size was small compared to that reported for other parts of the species' range. In addition, there was remarkably little temporal change in the spatial distribution, area, and boundaries of Red-tailed Hawk territories among the study periods. Further, there was substantial boundary overlap (21-27%) between defended territories among the different study periods. The temporal stability of the spatial distribution of Red-tailed Hawk territories in the study area leads us to believe the area might be at or near saturation.

  3. Strontium isotopes evolution of groundwater in a floodplain, Rio Icacos, Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Sharma, M.; Landis, J. D.; Gazis, C.; Posmentier, E.; McDowell, W. H.

    2005-12-01

    Major element and Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr ratios were measured in groundwater, rainwater and stream samples collected in2004 from Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF), Puerto Rico. The groundwater was obtained from wells augured across a ~20 m wide floodplain, which lies between a tributary of Rio Iacos and upslope forest (McDowell et al., Biogeochem 18:53, 1992). The Sr isotope data were also obtained on archived samples collected from the same sites in 1989-1991. The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) controls on the evolution of Sr2+ and their variation between 1989-91 and 2004 and (b) the extent to which floodplain weathering governs the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of the stream. The subsurface water at this site flows through a deep layer of coarse sand and the water table has a gradient of ~0.25. A subset of the data is given below; 1989-91 data are weighted averages of the analyzed samples. % Table generated by Excel2LaTeX from sheet 'Sheet1' \\begin{tabular}{lllll} \\hline Sample & 2004 & 2004 & 1989-91 & 1989-92 & [Sr], ppb & 87Sr/86Sr & [Sr], ppb & 87Sr/86Sr \\hline Rainwater & 4.6 & 0.7101 & & Well (I-9, =4.3 m) & 10.1 & 0.71351 & 1.2 & 0.70875 Well (I-2,d =3.0m) & 18.8 & 0.71035 & & Well (I-4, d= 3.0 m) & 18.1 & 0.70879 & 9.4 & 0.70523 Stream (I-0) & 16.8 & 0.7063 & 15.5 & 0.70512 Downstream of I-0 & 21.5 & 0.70536 & & \\hline The rainwater sample is highly enriched in Sr and has an 87Sr/86Sr ratio higher than seawater; the latter possibly reflects a contribution from Saharan dust. Extreme gradients in 87Sr/86Sr are present in waters from both 2004 and 1989-91 with the samples becoming less radiogenic towards the stream. This is accompanied by a 2 to 5 fold increase in the Sr content. It is evident that most of the stream water Sr is derived from subsurface water, which is significantly modified within the floodplain. The floodplain soil is derived from alteration of quartz diorite bedrock containing biotite, hornblende, plagioclase and quartz

  4. Denudation rates determined from the accumulation of in situ-produced 10Be in the luquillo experimental forest, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Erik Thorson; Stallard, Robert F.; Larsen, Matthew C.; Raisbeck, Grant M.; Yiou, Francoise

    1995-01-01

    We present a simple method for estimation of long-term mean denudation rates using in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be in fluvial sediments. Procedures are discussed to account for the effects of soil bioturbation, mass wasting and attenuation of cosmic rays by biomass and by local topography. Our analyses of 10Be in quartz from bedrock outcrops, soils, mass-wasting sites and riverine sediment from the Icacos River basin in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, are used to characterize denudation for major landform elements in that basin. The 10Be concentration of a discharge-weighted average of size classes of river sediment corresponds to a long-term average denudation of ≈ 43 m Ma −1, consistent with mass balance results. 

  5. Histories of Puerto Rican parrot nests in the Caribbean National Forest/Luquillo Experimental Forest, 1973-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wunderle, J.M., Jr.; Snyder, N.F.R.; Muiznieks, B.; Wiley, J.W.; Meyers, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    This publication summarizes the histories of all known Puerto Rican parrot nests in the Caribbean National Forest/Luquillo Experimental Forest from 1973 through 2000. Included for each nest, when known, are the identifies of the pair, clutch size, known fertile and infertile eggs, number of eggs that hatched, number of chicks that survived, sources of mortality, fostering (source, destination. or both), number of young fledged from the pair and from the nest, and percentage of days the nest was guarded. This information is useful for detecting and assessing potential changes in reproductive output and nest threats and is fundamental for understanding some of the demographic and genetic factors influencing the wild parrot population.

  6. Probing the deep critical zone beneath the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buss, Heather L.; Brantley, Susan L.; Scatena, Fred; Bazilevskaya, Katya; Blum, Alex E.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Jiménez, Rafael; White, Arthur F.; Rother, G.; Cole, D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has suggested that weathering processes occurring in the subsurface produce the majority of silicate weathering products discharged to the world's oceans, thereby exerting a primary control on global temperature via the well-known positive feedback between silicate weathering and CO2. In addition, chemical and physical weathering processes deep within the critical zone create aquifers and control groundwater chemistry, watershed geometry and regolith formation rates. Despite this, most weathering studies are restricted to the shallow critical zone (e.g. soils, outcrops). Here we investigate the chemical weathering, fracturing and geomorphology of the deep critical zone in the Bisley watershed in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico, from two boreholes drilled to 37.2 and 27.0 m depth, from which continuous core samples were taken. Corestones exposed aboveground were also sampled. Weathered rinds developed on exposed corestones and along fracture surfaces on subsurface rocks slough off of exposed corestones once rinds attain a thickness up to ~1 cm, preventing the corestones from rounding due to diffusion limitation. Such corestones at the land surface are assumed to be what remains after exhumation of similar, fractured bedrock pieces that were observed in the drilled cores between thick layers of regolith. Some of these subsurface corestones are massive and others are highly fractured, whereas aboveground corestones are generally massive with little to no apparent fracturing. Subsurface corestones are larger and less fractured in the borehole drilled on a road where it crosses a ridge compared with the borehole drilled where the road crosses the stream channel. Both borehole profiles indicate that the weathering zone extends to well below the stream channel in this upland catchment; hence weathering depth is not controlled by the stream level within the catchment and not all of the water in the watershed is discharged to the stream

  7. Probing the deep critical zone beneath the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, Heather; Brantley, S. L.; Scatena, Fred; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina; Blum, Alex; Schulz, M; Jimenez, M; White, Art; Rother, Gernot; Cole, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has suggested that weathering processes occurring in the subsurface produce the majority of silicate weathering products discharged to the world s oceans, thereby exerting a primary control on global temperature via the well-known positive feedback between silicate weathering and CO2. In addition, chemical and physical weathering processes deep within the critical zone create aquifers and control groundwater chemistry, watershed geometry and regolith formation rates. Despite this, most weathering studies are restricted to the shallow critical zone (e.g., soils, outcrops). Here we investigate the chemical weathering, fracturing and geomorphology of the deep critical zone in the Bisley watershed in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico, from two boreholes drilled to 37.2 and 27.0 m depth, from which continuous core samples were taken. Corestones exposed aboveground were also sampled. Weathered rinds developed on exposed corestones and along fracture surfaces on subsurface rocks slough off of exposed corestones once rinds attain a thickness up to ~1 cm, preventing the corestones from rounding due to diffusion limitation. Such corestones at the land surface are assumed to be what remains after exhumation of similar, fractured bedrock pieces that were observed in the drilled cores between thick layers of regolith. Some of these subsurface corestones are massive and others are highly fractured, whereas aboveground corestones are generally massive with little to no apparent fracturing. Subsurface corestones are larger and less fractured in the borehole drilled on a road where it crosses a ridge compared to the borehole drilled where the road crosses the stream channel. Both borehole profiles indicate that the weathering zone extends to well below the stream channel in this upland catchment; hence weathering depth is not controlled by the stream level within the catchment and not all of the water in the watershed is discharged to the stream.

  8. Slopewash, surface runoff and fine-litter transport in forest and landslide scars in humid-tropical steeplands, Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, M.C.; Torres-Sanchez, A. J.; Concepcion, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    Rainfall, slopewash (the erosion of soil particles), surface runoff and fine-litter transport at humid-tropical steepland sites in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico (18??20' N, 65??45' W) were measured from 1991 to 1995. Hillslopes underlain by (1) Cretaceous tuffaceous sandstone and siltstone in subtropical rain (tabonuco) forest with vegetation recovering from Hurricane Hugo (1989), and (2) Tertiary quartz diorite in subtropical lower montane wet (colorado and dwarf) forest with undisturbed forest canopy were compared to recent landslide scars. Monthly surface runoff on these very steep hillslopes (24??to 43??) was only 0.2 to 0.5 per cent of monthly rainfall. Slopewash was higher in sandy loam soils whose parent material is quartz diorite (averaging 46 g m-2 a-1) than in silty clay loam soils derived from tuffaceous sandstone and siltstone where the average was 9 g m-2 a-1. Annual slopewash of 100 to 349 g m-2 on the surfaces of two recent, small landslide scars was measured initially but slopewash decreased to only 3 to 4 g m-2 a-1 by the end of the study. The mean annual mass of fine litter (mainly leaves and twigs) transported downslope at the forested sites ranged from 5 to 8 g m-2 and was lower at the tabonuco forest site, where post-Hurricane Hugo recovery is still in progress. Mean annual fine-litter transport was 2.5 g m-2 on the two landslide scars.

  9. Controls on spatial and temporal variability in nitrous oxide fluxes across a tropical rainforest ecosystem in the Luquillo experimental forest, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSwiney, Claire Patricia

    1999-10-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a trace gas that contributes to the greenhouse effect and participates in the reactions that destroy stratospheric ozone. Soil microbial processes are significant producers of this trace gas, particularly in tropical areas, which are considered major sources in the global N2O budget. Nitrous oxide fluxes to the atmosphere are variable in space and time. In this study, spatial and temporal variability in surface N2O fluxes were assessed as well as the major environmental controls on N2O production for a tropical rainforest watershed in northeastern Puerto Rico. A static chamber technique was used to assess surface fluxes and soil air probes were installed at different depths to determine soil concentrations of N2O, methane (CH4), and oxygen (O2). Suction lysimeters were installed to sample soil water for the concentrations of the major regulators of the production of N2O, specifically, nitrate (NO3-), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and ammonium (NH4+). Water table heights were monitored manually over the course of the study. Patterns in surface N2O flux across three topographic sequences were stable through time. The three sequences had similar flux rates in aerobic, slope environments and the streambank, however, they differed in anaerobic, riparian environments. The greatest fluxes in two of the sites and lowest fluxes in the third site occurred at the junction between the slope and the riparian zone. In one of the sites, the slope-riparian break was where soil water NO3- and DOC concentrations decreased precipitously. Soil N2O concentrations were greatest in probes that had intermediate O2 concentrations. Over the course of storm events, there were no drastic changes in N2 O fluxes or the concentrations of the controllers of its production in the break between the slope and the riparian zone. Redox status is helpful in predicting where N2O fluxes will occur on the landscape, with sites that are intermediate in O2 status having the highest

  10. Non-indigenous bamboo along headwater streams of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: Leaf fall, aquatic leaf decay and patterns of invasion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, P. J.; Covich, A.P.; Scatena, F.N.; Loope, L.L.

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of bamboo to montane rain forests of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico in the 1930s and 1940s has led to present-day bamboo monocultures in numerous riparian areas. When a non-native species invades a riparian ecosystem, in-stream detritivores can be affected. Bamboo dynamics expected to influence stream communities in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) were examined. Based on current distributions, bamboo has spread down-stream at a rate of 8 m y-1. Mean growth rate of bamboo culms was 15.3 cm d-1. Leaf fall from bamboo stands exceeded that of native mixed-species forest by c. 30% over a 10-mo study. Bamboo leaves (k = -0.021), and leaves from another abundant riparian exotic, Syzygium jambos (Myrtaceae) (k = -0.018), decayed at relatively slow rates when submerged in streams in fine-mesh bags which excluded macro-invertebrate leaf processors. In a second study, with leaf processors present, bamboo decay rates remained unchanged (k = -0.021), while decay rates of S. jambos increased (k = -0.037). Elemental losses from bamboo leaves in streams were rapid, further suggesting a change in riparian zone/stream dynamics following bamboo invasion. As non-indigenous bamboos spread along Puerto Rico streams, they are likely to alter aquatic communities dependent on leaf input.

  11. Insects of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J.A.

    1994-07-01

    In this review of the literature on forest entomology in Puerto Rico, emphasis is given to research conducted in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF). This review should serve as an introduction to the insects inhabiting the LEF for researchers and as a guide for the identification of possible insect pests. There are three sections to this review. The first deals with basic insect ecology; the second, forest insect pests; and the third, insect attacks on dry wood and during wood seasoning. The reference section and appendices contain information on the systematics and taxonomy of different insect orders found in Puerto Rico.

  12. Red-tailed Hawk movements and use of habitat in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vilella, Francisco; Nimitz, Wyatt F.

    2012-01-01

    The Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) is a top predator of upland ecosystems in the Greater Antilles. Little information exists on the ecology of the insular forms of this widely distributed species. We studied movements and resource use of the Red-tailed Hawk from 2000 to 2002 in the montane forests of northeastern Puerto Rico. We captured 32 and used 21 radio-marked Red-tailed Hawks to delineate home range, core area shifts, and macrohabitat use in the Luquillo Mountains. Red-tailed Hawks in the Luquillo Mountains frequently perched near the top of canopy emergent trees and were characterized by wide-ranging capabilities and extensive spatial overlap. Home range size averaged 5,022.6 6 832.1 ha (305–11,288 ha) and core areas averaged 564.8 6 90.7 ha (150–1,230 ha). This species had large mean weekly movements (3,286.2 6 348.5 m) and a preference for roadside habitats. Our findings suggest fragmentation of contiguous forest outside protected areas in Puerto Rico may benefit the Red-tailed Hawk

  13. Ecohydrology of the Luquillo Mountains of Northeast Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scatena, F. N.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal humid tropical mountains are major sources of sediment, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved fluxes to the ocean. They are also important sources of food, fiber, municipal and agricultural water. Unlike water-limited drylands their ecohydrology is influenced by excess water and a high frequency of natural and hydrologically induced disturbances. However, like water-limited drylands, the spatial distribution of water across the landscape can play a fundamental role on biogeochemical and ecological processes. This paper reviews the influence of water on the critical zones and ecohydrology of the Luquillo Mountains of Northeastern Puerto Rico. Over a horizontal distance of 10 to 20 km, Luquillo life zones change from subtropical dry conditions at the coast to cloud enshrouded mountain peaks where the vegetation is stunted, evapotranspiration is reduced, and cloud water interception adds to annual precipitation such that annual rainfall approaches annual runoff. Along this elevational gradient there are systematic changes in climate, vegetation structure and diversity, gross and net primary productivity, carbon storage, and hydrologic and biogeochemical cycles. At the scale of hillslopes within the elevational gradients, soil nutrients, soil moisture, and soil oxygen vary systematically from ridge tops to adjacent valleys and topographic position is correlated to landscape stability and vegetation composition and structure. At landscape scales, hurricanes are the major control on forest age and structure and their associated defoliation and biomass loss can have large influences on both hydrologic and biogeochemical cycles. Nevertheless, because of the rapid re-growth of hurricane disturbed forests, the fluxes of most hydrologic pathways return to pre-hurricane rates within a year. Biogeochemical can take years to decades to return to pre-hurricane conditions. This presentation reviews these relationships and the challenges and opportunities related to

  14. ISABELLE. Volume 3. Experimental areas, large detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This section presents the papers which resulted from work in the Experimental Areas portion of the Workshop. The immediate task of the group was to address three topics. The topics were dictated by the present state of ISABELLE experimental areas construction, the possibility of a phased ISABELLE and trends in physics and detectors.

  15. Sediment distribution on a storm-dominated insular shelf, Luquillo, Puerto Rico, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwab, W.C.; Rodriguez, R.W.; Danforthf, W.W.; Gowen, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    A sea-floor mapping investigation designed to assess the sediment distribution, the movement of the nearshore sand supply, and the fate of sediment eroded from the shoreline was conducted using high-resolution sidescan-sonar, seismic reflection, and sediment sampling techniques on the northern insular shelf of Puerto Rico, off the town of Luquillo. Sea-floor structures and the distribution of sediment texture and composition suggest that regional oceanographic processes result in a net offshore direction for cross-shelf sediment transport on the middle and outer shelf during storms. If these same processes are active on the inner shelf, mapping results indicate that this sediment is not transported seaward of a series of east-west trending Pleistocene-age eolianite ridges that outcrop on the middle shelf. The eolianite ridges may act as natural dams, preventing the removal of sediment from the nearshore area. Sand deposits behind the "dams" are up to 20 m thick on the shoreward flank of the ridges.

  16. Experimental area power monitoring during shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Pathiyil, J.

    1989-03-01

    The power consumption at the site is increasing every year and the power consumption in the fixed target beam lines is constantly changing for each run. Since we do not have an energy monitoring program in effect in the experimental areas; we are not in a position to tell whether we are using the electrical energy efficiently. The purpose of this study is to find the summer and winter base load of the three experimental areas while the beamlines are off and also to identify what kind loads are on. The most important purpose was to find the base loads in each of the big experimental halls during the shutdown.

  17. Chemical weathering in a tropical watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: II. Rate and mechanism of biotite weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, S.F.; Brantley, S.L.; Blum, A.E.; White, A.F.; Dong, H.

    1998-01-01

    Samples of soil, saprolite, bedrock, and porewater from a lower montane wet forest, the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) in Puerto Rico, were studied to investigate the rates and mechanisms of biotite weathering. The soil profile, at the top of a ridge in the Rio Icacos watershed, consists of a 50-100-cm thick layer of unstructured soil above a 600-800 cm thick saprolite developed on quartz diorite. The only minerals present in significant concentration within the soil and saprolite are biotite, quartz, kaolinite, and iron oxides. Biotite is the only primary silicate releasing significant K and Mg to porewaters. Although biotite in samples of the quartz diorite bedrock is extensively chloritized, chlorite is almost entirely absent in the saprolite phyllosilicates. Phyllosilicate grains are present as 200-1000 ??m wide books below about 50 cm depth. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron microprobe analyses indicate that the phyllosilicate grains contain a core of biotite surrounded by variable amounts of kaolinite. Lattice fringe images under transmission electron microscope (TEM) show single layers of biotite altering to two layers of kaolinite, suggesting dissolution of biotite and precipitation of kaolinite at discrete boundaries. Some single 14-A?? layers are also observed in the biotite under TEM. The degree of kaolinitization of individual phyllosilicate grains as observed by TEM decreases with depth in the saprolite. This TEM work is the first such microstructural evidence of epitaxial growth of kaolinite onto biotite during alteration in low-temperature environments. The rate of release of Mg in the profile, calculated as a flux through the soil normalized per watershed land area, is approximately 500 mol hectare-1 yr-1 (1.6 ?? 10-9 molMg m-2soil s-1). This rate is similar to the flux estimated from Mg discharge out the Rio Icacos (1000 mol hectare-1 yr-1, or 3.5 ?? 10-9 molMg m-2soil s-1), indicating that scaling up from the soil to the watershed is

  18. The Relative Importance of Convective and Trade-wind Orographic Precipitation to Streamflow in the Luquillo Mountains, Eastern Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, M. A.; Shanley, J. B.; Occhi, M.; Scatena, F. N.

    2012-12-01

    Like many mountainous areas in the tropics, watersheds in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico (18.3° N) have abundant rainfall and stream discharge, but relatively little storage capacity. Therefore, the water supply is vulnerable to drought and water availability may be affected by projected changes in regional temperature and atmospheric dynamics due to global warming. To help determine the links between climate and water availability, precipitation patterns were analyzed, and stable-isotope signatures of precipitation from different seasonal weather systems were established to identify those that are most important in maintaining streamflow and groundwater recharge. Stable isotope data include cloud water, rainfall, throughfall, streamflow, and groundwater from the Rio Mameyes and Rio Icacos/ Rio Blanco watersheds. Precipitation inputs have a wide range of stable isotope values, from fog/cloud water with δ2H and δ18O averaging +3.2‰, -1.74‰ respectively, to tropical storm rain with values as low as -154‰, -20.4‰. Spatial and temporal patterns of water isotopic values on this Caribbean island are different than higher latitude, continental watersheds. The data exhibit a 'reverse seasonality', with higher isotopic values in winter and lower values in summer; and stable isotope values of stream water do not decrease as expected with increasing altitude, because of cloud water input. Rain isotopic values vary predictably with local and mesoscale weather patterns and correlate strongly with cloud altitude. This correlation allows us to assign isotopic signatures to different sources of precipitation, and to investigate which climate patterns contribute to streamflow and groundwater recharge. At a measurement site at 615 m in the Luquillo Mountains, the average length of time between rain events was 15 h, and 45% of the rain events were <2 mm, reflecting the frequent small rain events of the trade-wind orographic rainfall weather pattern. Long

  19. Chemical weathering in a tropical watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: I. Long-term versus short-term weathering fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Blum, A.E.; Schulz, M.S.; Vivit, D.V.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Larsen, M.; Murphy, S.F.; Eberl, D.

    1998-01-01

    The pristine Rio Icacos watershed in the Luquillo Mountains in eastern Puerto Rico has the fastest documented weathering rate of silicate rocks on the Earth's surface. A regolith propagation rate of 58 m Ma-1 calculated from iso-volumetric saprolite formation from quartz diorite, is comparable to the estimated denudation rate (25-50 Ma-1) but is an order of magnitude faster than the global average weathering rate (6 Ma-1). Weathering occurs in two distinct environments; plagioclase and hornblende react at the saprock interface and biotite and quartz weather in the overlying thick saprolitic regolith. These environments produce distinctly different water chemistries, with K, Mg, and Si increasing linearly with depth in saprolite porewaters and with stream waters dominated by Ca, Na, and Si. Such differences are atypical of less intense weathering in temperate watersheds. Porewater chemistry in the shallow regolith is controlled by closed-system recycling of inorganic nutrients such as K. Long-term elemental fluxes through the regolith (e.g., Si = 1.7 ?? 10-8 moles m-2 s-1) are calculated from mass losses based on changes in porosity and chemistry between the regolith and bedrock and from the age of the regolith surface (200 Ma). Mass losses attributed to solute fluxes are determined using a step-wise infiltration model which calculates mineral inputs to the shallow and deep saprolite porewaters and to stream water. Pressure heads decrease with depth in the shallow regolith (-2.03 m H2O m-1), indicating that both increasing capillary tension and graviometric potential control porewater infiltration. Interpolation of experimental hydraulic conductivities produces an infiltration rate of 1 m yr-1 at average field moisture saturation which is comparable with LiBr tracer tests and with base discharge from the watershed. Short term weathering fluxes calculated from solute chemistries and infiltration rates (e.g., Si = 1.4 ?? 10-8 moles m-2 s-1) are compared to watershed

  20. Particle mobility over flood and annual timescales in mountain streams of the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. B.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Linking the mechanics of fluvial and hillslope processes is critical for understanding how landscapes are sculpted. Over short timescales, the rate of bed load transport in mountain streams is determined by transport mechanics: channel hydraulics, bed configuration, and the intensity of flow events. At larger timescales, the rate of bed load transport represents the supply of coarse-grained sediment from hillslopes. Linking the mechanics of event-scale bed load transport to longer duration bed load transport rates is necessary for understanding mountain stream dynamics. We present a unique dataset using passive integrated transponder radio frequency identification (PIT RFID) tagged tracer particles in three streams in the humid tropical region of Northeast Puerto Rico. This region receives an average of four meters of precipitation per year. Importantly, precipitation occurs in short duration, high intensity events that are capable of mobilizing coarse sediment multiple times per year. Although landslides and debris flows are active in the area, most river reaches show strong evidence of being organized by bed load transport. The high frequency of cobble/boulder transport makes Luquillo an ideal location to study bed load transport in mountain streams. Tracer particles (375 total) were placed during the summers of 2010 and 2011 in three reaches within the Mameyes river catchment with slopes and drainage areas ranging from .007-.09 and .028-24.2 km2 respectively. Grain size distributions of the median grain diameter for the three study reaches range from 2-1100 mm. Grain size distributions of the tracer particles were picked to match that of the study reach grain size distribution greater than 50 mm. Hydrodynamic forcing was parameterized using a time series of Shields stress, estimated for each reach from nearby USGS stream gaging stations. Tracer particle transport distances were recorded following single events, and on a yearly basis. At the single-flood scale

  1. Case Studies of Ecological Integrative Information Systems: The Luquillo and Sevilleta Information Management Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Gil, Inigo; White, Marshall; Melendez, Eda; Vanderbilt, Kristin

    The thirty-year-old United States Long Term Ecological Research Network has developed extensive metadata to document their scientific data. Standard and interoperable metadata is a core component of the data-driven analytical solutions developed by this research network Content management systems offer an affordable solution for rapid deployment of metadata centered information management systems. We developed a customized integrative metadata management system based on the Drupal content management system technology. Building on knowledge and experience with the Sevilleta and Luquillo Long Term Ecological Research sites, we successfully deployed the first two medium-scale customized prototypes. In this paper, we describe the vision behind our Drupal based information management instances, and list the features offered through these Drupal based systems. We also outline the plans to expand the information services offered through these metadata centered management systems. We will conclude with the growing list of participants deploying similar instances.

  2. Stream Ammonium Uptake Across Scales in Headwater Catchments of a Tropical Rainforest, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brereton, R. L.; McDowell, W. H.; Wymore, A.

    2015-12-01

    Many tropical forest streams export high amounts of nitrogen relative to streams draining undisturbed watersheds of other biomes. With their low DOC concentrations and high rates of respiration, headwater streams in the Luquillo Mountains have been previously characterized as energy-limited, suggesting that NH4+ uptake is dominated not by N demand but by energy demand. In the Rio Icacos watershed, high concentrations of NH4+ (>1 mg N/L) are found in groundwater adjacent to the streams, making high inputs of NH4+ to the stream channel via groundwater seepage likely. Stream nutrient spiraling metrics can be used to quantify uptake and retention rates of specific nutrients, and can be measured by solute additions. Tracer Additions for Spiraling Curve Characterization (TASCC) is a recently developed method (Covino et al. 2010) for quantifying nutrient uptake with a single slug addition of nutrient and conservative tracer. Here we present NH4+ uptake metrics from TASCC additions in three Luquillo streams of different sizes, ranging from 2nd to 4th order: the Rio Icacos, a larger, 3rd order tributary and a smaller 2nd order tributary. Background NH4+ concentrations vary by up to an order of magnitude, with highest concentrations (27 μg N/L) found in the smaller tributary. Background DOC concentrations are uniformly low and show no difference between the three streams (500-600 μg C/L). The smaller tributary has the shortest uptake length (155 m) and highest uptake velocity (2.9 mm/min) of the three streams. Unexpectedly, the Rio Icacos has a higher uptake velocity (1.7 mm/min) than the larger tributary (1.0 mm/min), despite having an uptake length more than double (1400 m) that of the larger tributary (596 m). Overall, NH4+ uptake is substantial in all three streams and varies with background concentrations, not stream size.

  3. A landscape-scale assessment of nutrient limitation in the tropical forests of Luquillo, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, C. A.; Goldsmith, S. T.; Porder, S.

    2013-12-01

    The nature and extent of nutrient limitation in tropical forest primary production has been explored for decades, but empirical data of growth responses to nutrient additions remains sparse. Forest fertilization, while appropriate for exploring plot-scale limitation, has only been implemented in a few sites, and does not lend itself to assessment of the multiple gradients in soil fertility and forest community composition that typify most tropical landscapes. For this reason, little is known about how nutrient limitation varies across tropical landscapes, or how biotic and abiotic factors influence this variation. Here we report on the results of a fertilized root ingrowth core experiment deployed across contrasts in soil parent material and topographic position in the Luquillo Mountains of eastern Puerto Rico. In June 2012, we placed 480 fertilized ingrowth cores filled with a mixture of silica sand and perlite in 8 sub-watersheds in El Yunque National Forest--4 underlain by quartz diorite and 4 by volcaniclastic bedrock. We selected sites to control for forest community type and mean annual precipitation. Fertilizer was supplied by adding pre-loaded weak anion and cation resin beads loaded with NH4+ or PO43- to each core. This technique produced elevated levels of available N and P after two months in the field, and avoided the problem of adding a counter ion (typically Na or K) with the P fertilizer treatment. Within each sub-watershed, we placed 10 cores each of control and both nutrient treatments at each topographic position. We retrieved the cores in January 2013 and quantified the mass of roots (<2mm) that grew into each core. Our data show no significant root growth response to either nutrient relative to control. There are three possible interpretations of our results. First, root ingrowth in Luquillo may only be stimulated by the addition of N and P together. Second, addition of some other nutrient (K, Ca, etc.) might promote root ingrowth, but not N or

  4. Comparing Experimental and Simulated Pressure-Area Isotherms for DPPC

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Susan L.; Larson, Ronald G.

    2008-01-01

    Although pressure-area isotherms are commonly measured for lipid monolayers, it is not always appreciated how much they can vary depending on experimental factors. Here, we compare experimental and simulated pressure-area isotherms for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) at temperatures ranging between 293.15 K and 323.15 K, and explore possible factors influencing the shape and position of the isotherms. Molecular dynamics simulations of DPPC monolayers using both coarse-grained (CG) and atomistic models yield results that are in rough agreement with some of the experimental isotherms, but with a steeper slope in the liquid-condensed region than seen experimentally and shifted to larger areas. The CG lipid model gives predictions that are very close to those of atomistic simulations, while greatly improving computational efficiency. There is much more variation among experimental isotherms than between isotherms obtained from CG simulations and from the most refined simulation available. Both atomistic and CG simulations yield liquid-condensed and liquid-expanded phase area compressibility moduli that are significantly larger than those typically measured experimentally, but compare well with some experimental values obtained under rapid compression. PMID:18199666

  5. Iron reduction and carbon dynamics during redox fluctuations in soil slurries from Luquillo CZO (Puerto Rico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcellos, D.; Silver, W. L.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Thompson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Iron minerals play an important role in the dynamics of nutrients and soil carbon in tropical ecosystems. Because soils often experience fluctuations between oxic and anoxic conditions (redox fluctuations) the pool of reactive Fe(III) phases is under continuous flux. The oxidation of soluble Fe(II) during oxic conditions can generate Fe(III) phase of variable crystallinity with potentially different susceptibility to Fe(III) reduction during subsequent anoxic periods. We hypothesize that the coupled rates of iron reduction and carbon mineralization will respond to differences in the frequency of redox shifts and the length of the oxic and anoxic periods (Tao(oxic) and Tao(anoxic). To test this, we subjected soil from the upper 15 cm of the Bisley watershed in the Luquillo critical zone observatory (LCZO), Puerto Rico, to five redox fluctuations scenarios. The treatments included either a fixed anoxic period of 6 d with oxic periods of 8, 24, and 72 h (3 treatments); or a fixed anoxic period of 2 d with oxic periods of 8 or 24 h (2 treatments). Results from a preliminary experiment indicated iron reduction rates increased when the oxic period was decreased below 10 h. We are completing analysis of the full dataset from the experiment above and will present Fe(II) concentrations and gas phase concentrations (CO2 emissions). Results from this experiment will further constrain the type of redox dynamics that influence soil Fe reduction and carbon mineralization.

  6. Experimental area plans for an advanced hadron facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.W.; Macek, R.J.; Tschalear, C.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the current plans for an experimental area for a new advanced hadron facility for the exploration of nuclear and particle physics. The facility, LAMPF II, is presently visualized as consisting of the LAMPF linac sending 800 MeV protons to a 6 GeV booster ring followed by a 45 GeV main ring. Two experimental areas area planned. The first is intended to provide neutrinos via a pair of pulsed focusing horns. The other is designed to accommodate secondary beams that span the range of useful energies up to GeV/c. Beam specification goals are discussed with respect to source brightness, beam purity, and beam-line acceptance and length. The various beam lines are briefly described. Production cross sections and rates are estimated for antiproton production. Problems of thermal energy deposition in both components and targets and of effectiveness of particle separators are discussed. 9 refs. (LEW)

  7. Deducing mineral weathering reactions from solute profiles in highly leached regolith, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, H. L.; White, A. F.; Vivit, D. V.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Bullen, T. D.; Blum, A.; Schulz, M. S.; Dessert, C.; Gaillardet, J.

    2009-12-01

    Porewater solute fluxes are measured on a smaller spatial scale than watershed fluxes and can thus provide more information on the mechanisms of weathering and nutrient cycling processes as well as a more accurate estimate of mineral weathering rates. Mineral weathering reactions continue influence mineral nutrient cycles even in thick, highly leached regolith. As part of the USGS Water Energy and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) program and the Critical Zone Exploration Network, we are investigating mineral nutrient distributions and fluxes in depth profiles in the Bisley 1 catchment in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico for comparison to the nearby Rio Icacos catchment. Both watersheds are steep, rugged, humid, and tropical, have similar vegetation and land-use, and contain thick, well drained saprolites developed on igneous bedrock: a quartz diorite intrusion in the Rio Icacos, and a marine bedded, andesitic volcaniclastic in the Bisley. Depth distributions of physical parameters (density, porosity, water saturation) and chemistry of solids and solutes were determined. Vertical water infiltration rates in the Bisley watershed average about 4 m y-1, while infiltration rates in the Rio Icacos are about 1 m y-1 (White et al., 1998), and fluid residence times average 8 years in Rio Icacos versus 2 years in Bisley. Porosity in the Bisley regolith is slightly higher at most depths than in the Rio Icacos. The Bisley regolith is highly weathered and is depleted in primary minerals (except quartz) with respect to bedrock, while the Rio Icacos regolith contains residual biotite, which produces a Mg solute gradient with depth (White et al., 1998). The Bisley regolith also exhibits Mg solute gradients among others (notably Si); however, to date, no Mg-containing minerals have been identified in the regolith. Mg and Sr isotope ratios were measured in the pore waters at the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris. The Mg isotope ratios increase with increasing depth from δ26

  8. Nonpainful wide-area compression inhibits experimental pain

    PubMed Central

    Honigman, Liat; Bar-Bachar, Ofrit; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Granovsky, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Compression therapy, a well-recognized treatment for lymphoedema and venous disorders, pressurizes limbs and generates massive non-noxious afferent sensory barrages. The aim of this study was to study whether such afferent activity has an analgesic effect when applied on the lower limbs, hypothesizing that larger compression areas will induce stronger analgesic effects, and whether this effect correlates with conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Thirty young healthy subjects received painful heat and pressure stimuli (47°C for 30 seconds, forearm; 300 kPa for 15 seconds, wrist) before and during 3 compression protocols of either SMALL (up to ankles), MEDIUM (up to knees), or LARGE (up to hips) compression areas. Conditioned pain modulation (heat pain conditioned by noxious cold water) was tested before and after each compression protocol. The LARGE protocol induced more analgesia for heat than the SMALL protocol (P < 0.001). The analgesic effect interacted with gender (P = 0.015). The LARGE protocol was more efficient for females, whereas the MEDIUM protocol was more efficient for males. Pressure pain was reduced by all protocols (P < 0.001) with no differences between protocols and no gender effect. Conditioned pain modulation was more efficient than the compression-induced analgesia. For the LARGE protocol, precompression CPM efficiency positively correlated with compression-induced analgesia. Large body area compression exerts an area-dependent analgesic effect on experimental pain stimuli. The observed correlation with pain inhibition in response to robust non-noxious sensory stimulation may suggest that compression therapy shares similar mechanisms with inhibitory pain modulation assessed through CPM. PMID:27152691

  9. Nonpainful wide-area compression inhibits experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Honigman, Liat; Bar-Bachar, Ofrit; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Granovsky, Yelena

    2016-09-01

    Compression therapy, a well-recognized treatment for lymphoedema and venous disorders, pressurizes limbs and generates massive non-noxious afferent sensory barrages. The aim of this study was to study whether such afferent activity has an analgesic effect when applied on the lower limbs, hypothesizing that larger compression areas will induce stronger analgesic effects, and whether this effect correlates with conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Thirty young healthy subjects received painful heat and pressure stimuli (47°C for 30 seconds, forearm; 300 kPa for 15 seconds, wrist) before and during 3 compression protocols of either SMALL (up to ankles), MEDIUM (up to knees), or LARGE (up to hips) compression areas. Conditioned pain modulation (heat pain conditioned by noxious cold water) was tested before and after each compression protocol. The LARGE protocol induced more analgesia for heat than the SMALL protocol (P < 0.001). The analgesic effect interacted with gender (P = 0.015). The LARGE protocol was more efficient for females, whereas the MEDIUM protocol was more efficient for males. Pressure pain was reduced by all protocols (P < 0.001) with no differences between protocols and no gender effect. Conditioned pain modulation was more efficient than the compression-induced analgesia. For the LARGE protocol, precompression CPM efficiency positively correlated with compression-induced analgesia. Large body area compression exerts an area-dependent analgesic effect on experimental pain stimuli. The observed correlation with pain inhibition in response to robust non-noxious sensory stimulation may suggest that compression therapy shares similar mechanisms with inhibitory pain modulation assessed through CPM. PMID:27152691

  10. Experimentally Determined Interfacial Area Between Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, J; Hassanizadeh, S.M; Smith, Duane

    2008-01-01

    When multiple fluids flow through a porous medium, the interaction between the fluid interfaces can be of great importance. While this is widely recognized in practical applications, numerical models often disregard interactios between discrete fluid phases due to the computational complexity. And rightly so, for this level of detail is well beyond most extended Darcy Law relationships. A new model of two-phase flow including the interfacial area has been proposed by Hassarizadeh and Gray based upon thermodynamic principles. A version of this general equation set has been implemented by Nessner and Hassarizadeh. Many of the interfacial parameters required by this equation set have never been determined from experiments. The work presented here is a description of how the interfacial area, capillary pressure, interfacial velocity and interfacial permeability from two-phase flow experiments in porous media experiments can be used to determine the required parameters. This work, while on-going, has shown the possibility of digitizing images within translucent porous media and identifying the location and behavior of interfaces under dynamic conditions. Using the described methods experimentally derived interfacial functions to be used in larger scale simulations are currently being developed. In summary, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) by mapping a pore-throat geometry onto an image of immiscible fluid flow, the saturation of fluids and the individual interfaces between the fluids can be identified; (2) the resulting saturation profiles of the low velocity drainage flows used in this study are well described by an invasion percolation fractal scaling; (3) the interfacial area between fluids has been observed to increase in a linear fashion during the initial invasion of the non-wetting fluid; and (4) the average capillary pressure within the entire cell and representative elemental volumes were observed to plateau after a small portion of the volume was

  11. Push-pull tests to determine in-situ nitrogen processing in groundwaters of a tropical riparian forest, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brereton, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    Riparian zones are biogeochemical hot spots known to control the flux of dissolved nitrogen (N) from groundwater to surface waters by providing favorable conditions for N removal and retention. In many watersheds with agricultural or urban inputs, N enters groundwater after being leached from soils in the form of nitrate, which is then removed from solution by denitrification in the anoxic riparian groundwater. Certain tropical forested watersheds, however, display spatial patterns in groundwater N chemistry that cannot be explained by simple denitrification. High ammonium concentrations (>0.5 mg/L), in comparison to other reference watersheds, exist in groundwaters directly adjacent to streams carrying little or no ammonium. The N speciation is accompanied by dramatic shifts in redox conditions from hillslope to riparian zone to stream. A valuable ecosystem service is being provided by these tropical ecosystems but that service has not been adequately described by science. What is the source and fate of this ammonium? The push-pull test is a recently developed method to determine in-situ reaction rates by the addition of reactive substrates and a conservative tracer to groundwater, followed by an incubation period and sampling over time. In the Rio Icacos watershed in the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Rico, push-pull tests were conducted to determine the reaction pathways of ammonium production and consumption. Shallow groundwater wells (1-4 m below soil surface) in a riparian zone of a tributary the Rio Icacos were tested in two locations: immediately adjacent to the stream and at the topographic break between the hillslope and the floodplain. 10 L "push" solutions with ammonium, nitrate, or both and a chloride or bromide tracer were added and incubated over a 20-40 hr period (depending on the hydraulic conductivity of the individual well). Initial results were consistent with coupled nitrification-denitrification occurring at both the hillslope

  12. Spatially continuous characterization of the bedrock - regolith interface at the Rio Icacos Watershed (Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory) Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Comas, X.; Wright, W. J.; Recinos, E.; Hynek, S. A.; Brantley, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Joint processing of geophysical data can enhance data interpretation. This study focuses on spatially continuous multifrequency electro-magnetic (EM) data for near subsurface characterization. Recent advances in EM data processing allow for efficient inversion of multi-frequency data, utilization of calibration routines and additional constrains for better subsurface imaging. For this work the newly developed FEMIC (Frequency-Domain Electromagnetic Inversion Code) code was used to invert the EM data. High resolution electrical resistivity (ER) data were used to calibrate the EM process; additionally, available data from ground penetrating radar (GPR) and field observations were used to better constrain the inversions. The multistep EM processing allowed for improving characterization of the subsurface over long (i.e. Km scale) 2D transects. The aim of this work was to better understand the lateral extent of the bedrock-regolith interface in the Rio Icacos watershed of the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO), while providing evidence for changes in regolith thickness as related to proximity to the nickpoint. This research highlights the advantages of geophysical methods for critical zone studies and their potential for improving spatial characterization of the subsurface at multiples scales. Furthermore it shows the potential of EM methods for translating high resolution spatially limited point measurements (e.g. boreholes) to large (km) scales.

  13. Sr isotopes as a tracer of weathering processes and dust inputs in a tropical granitoid watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pett-Ridge, Julie C.; Derry, Louis A.; Kurtz, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Sr isotope data from soils, water, and atmospheric inputs in a small tropical granitoid watershed in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico constrain soil mineral development, weathering fluxes, and atmospheric deposition. This study provides new information on pedogenic processes and geochemical fluxes that is not apparent in watershed mass balances based on major elements alone. 87Sr/ 86Sr data reveal that Saharan mineral aerosol dust contributes significantly to atmospheric inputs. Watershed-scale Sr isotope mass balance calculations indicate that the dust deposition flux for the watershed is 2100 ± 700 mg cm -2 ka -1. Nd isotope analyses of soil and saprolite samples provide independent evidence for the presence of Saharan dust in the regolith. Watershed-scale Sr isotope mass balance calculations are used to calculate the overall short-term chemical denudation velocity for the watershed, which agrees well with previous denudation rate estimates based on major element chemistry and cosmogenic nuclides. The dissolved streamwater Sr flux is dominated by weathering of plagioclase and hornblende and partial weathering of biotite in the saprock zone. A steep gradient in regolith porewater 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio with depth, from 0.70635 to as high as 0.71395, reflects the transition from primary mineral-derived Sr to a combination of residual biotite-derived Sr and atmospherically-derived Sr near the surface, and allows multiple origins of kaolinite to be identified.

  14. Chemical weathering in a tropical watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico III: Quartz dissolution rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, M.S.; White, A.F.

    1999-01-01

    The paucity of weathering rates for quartz in the natural environment stems both from the slow rate at which quartz dissolves and the difficulty in differentiating solute Si contributed by quartz from that derived from other silicate minerals. This study, a first effort in quantifying natural rates of quartz dissolution, takes advantage of extremely rapid tropical weathering, simple regolith mineralogy, and detailed information on hydrologic and chemical transport. Quartz abundances and grain sizes are relatively constant with depth in a thick saprolite. Limited quartz dissolution is indicated by solution rounding of primary angularity and by the formation of etch pits. A low correlation of surface area (0.14 and 0.42 m2 g-1) with grain size indicates that internal microfractures and pitting are the principal contributors to total surface area. Pore water silica concentration increases linearly with depth. On a molar basis, between one and three quarters of pore water silica is derived from quartz with the remainder contributed from biotite weathering. Average solute Si remains thermodynamically undersaturated with respect to recently revised estimates of quartz solubility (17-81 ??M). Etch pitting is more abundant on grains in the upper saprolite and is associated with pore waters lower in dissolved silica. Rate constants describing quartz dissolution increase with decreasing depth (from 10-14.5-10-15.1 mol m-2 s-1), which correlate with both greater thermodynamic undersaturation and increasing etch pit densities. Unlike for many aluminosilicates, the calculated natural weathering rates of quartz fall slightly below the rate constants previously reported for experimental studies (10-12.4-10-14.2 mol m-2 s-1). This agreement reflects the structural simplicity of quartz, dilute solutes, and near-hydrologic saturation.

  15. D0 Experimental Area Emergency Backup Power and Generator Test

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1991-01-24

    The DO experimental area has a generator designated as emergency power. This generator provides power for critical loads and starts automatically upon loss of commercial power. This note concerns the testing of this generator. A list of loads is attached to this note. One of the loads on the emergency power grid is a 10KVA Uninterruptable Power Supply(UPS). The UPS powers the cryogenic controls and Oxygen deficiency hazard equipment(ODH) and has a minimum rating of 20 minutes while on its batteries(to cover the transfer time to/from the emergency generator). Jan 23,1991 at 1640 hrs this system was tested under the supervision of the Terry Ross, Marv Johnson, Dan Markley, Kelly Dixon, and John Urbin. The power feeder to the emergency power grid at DO was disconnected. The generator responded immediately and was supplying power to the emergency power grid in less than 10 seconds. During the 10 seconds that there was no power on the emergency grid the UPS switched on its inverter and provided uninterrupted power to the cryogenic control system and the ODH system. All of the motorized equipment shut off instrument air compressor, vacuum pumps 1 and 2, insulating vacuum blower, glycol cooling pumps, cooling tower fan, and Exhaust Fan 7(EF7). Upon reengagement of power to the grid from the emergency generator, all of the motorized loads started back up with the exception of vacuum pumps 1 and 2, and the UPS inverter turned off. Vacuum pumps 1 and 2 were delay started 20 seconds by the cryogenic control system as not to cause too large of a surge in power by all of the inductive loads starting at once. The DO building elevator which is also on emergency power was test run while the emergency generator was on line with all other emergency loads. The emergency generator current was 140 amps with all loads on line and running except the building elevator. This load of 140 amps is 27% of the generator's capacity. The cryogenic control and ODH system continued to function

  16. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... research natural areas. 251.23 Section 251.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... and research natural areas. The Chief of the Forest Service shall establish and permanently record a... a series of research natural areas, sufficient in number and size to illustrate adequately or...

  17. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... research natural areas. 251.23 Section 251.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... and research natural areas. The Chief of the Forest Service shall establish and permanently record a... a series of research natural areas, sufficient in number and size to illustrate adequately or...

  18. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... management of forest and range land in each forest region. Also, when appropriate, the Chief shall establish... experimental use, unless authorized by the Chief of the Forest Service. Petersburg Watershed...

  19. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for research or educational purposes, the important forest and range types in each forest region, as... research natural areas. 251.23 Section 251.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... and research natural areas. The Chief of the Forest Service shall establish and permanently record...

  20. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for research or educational purposes, the important forest and range types in each forest region, as... research natural areas. 251.23 Section 251.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... and research natural areas. The Chief of the Forest Service shall establish and permanently record...

  1. River Suspended Sediment and Particulate Organic Carbon Transport in Two Montane Catchments in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory of Puerto Rico over 25 years: 1989 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, K. E.; Plante, A. F.; Willenbring, J. K.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Gonzalez, G.; Stallard, R. F.; Murphy, S. F.; Vann, D. R.; Leon, M.; McDowell, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Physical erosion in mountain catchments mobilizes large amounts of sediment, while exporting carbon and nutrients from forest ecosystems. This study expands from previous studies quantifying river suspended sediment and particulate organic carbon loads in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, in Puerto Rico. We evaluate the influences on river suspended load due to i) underlying basin geology, ii) hillslope debris and biomass supply, and iii) hurricanes and large storms. In the Mameyes and Icacos catchments of the Luquillo Mountains, we estimate suspended sediment and particulate organic carbon yields over a 25-year period using streamflow discharge determined from stage measurements at 15-intervals, with estimates of discharge replacing gaps in data, and over 3000 suspended sediment samples. We estimate variation in suspended sediment loads over time, and examine variation in particulate organic carbon loads. Mass spectrometry was used to determine organic carbon concentrations. We confirm that higher suspended sediment fluxes occurred i) in the highly weathered quartz diorite catchment rather than the predominantly volcaniclastic catchment, ii) on the rising limb of the hydrograph once a threshold discharge had been reached, and iii) during hurricanes and other storm events, and we explore these influences on particulate organic carbon transport. Transport of suspended sediment and particulate organic carbon in the rivers shows considerable hysteresis, and we evaluate the extent to which hysteresis affects particulate fluxes over time and between catchments. Because particulate organic carbon is derived from the critical zone and transported during high flow, our research highlights the role of major tropical storms in controlling carbon storage in the critical zone and the coastal ocean.

  2. Experimental performance of a high-area-ratio rocket nozzle at high combustion chamber pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the thrust coefficient of a high-area-ratio rocket nozzle at combustion chamber pressures of 12.4 to 16.5 MPa (1800 to 2400 psia). A nozzle with a modified Rao contour and an expansion area ratio of 1025:1 was tested with hydrogen and oxygen at altitude conditions. The same nozzle, truncated to an area ratio of 440:1, was also tested. Values of thrust coefficient are presented along with characteristic exhaust velocity efficiencies, nozzle wall temperatures, and overall thruster specific impulse.

  3. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.150 Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy... beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

  4. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.150 Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy... beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

  5. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.150 Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy... beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

  6. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.150 Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy... beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

  7. Experimental Analyses of Yellow Tuff Spandrels of Post-medieval Buildings in the Naples Area

    SciTech Connect

    Calderoni, B.; Cordasco, E. A.; Lenza, P.; Guerriero, L.

    2008-07-08

    Experimental analyses have been carried out on tuff masonry specimens in order to investigate the structural behaviour of historical buildings in the Naples area (Southern Italy). Spandrels of post-medieval buildings (late XVI to early XX century) have been analysed, with emphasis on morphological characteristics according to chronological indicators. Results of the experimentation on scaled models (1:10) are discussed and the better behaviour of historical masonry typologies on respect to the modern one is highlighted. Comparison with theoretical formulations of ultimate shear resistance are provided too.

  8. An experimental investigation of internal area ruling for transonic and supersonic channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. B.; Vanrintel, H. L.; Rizvi, G.

    1982-01-01

    A simulated transonic rotor channel model was examined experimentally to verify the flow physics of internal area ruling. Pressure measurements were performed in the high speed wind tunnel at transonic speeds with Mach 1.5 and Mach 2 nozzle blocks to get an indication of the approximate shock losses. The results showed a reduction in losses due to internal area ruling with the Mach 1.5 nozzle blocks. The reduction in total loss coefficient was of the order of 17 percent for a high blockage model and 7 percent for a cut-down model.

  9. Experimental demonstration of phase bistability in a broad-area optical oscillator with injected signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Lorente, R.; Esteban-Martín, A.; Roldán, E.; Staliunas, K.; de Valcárcel, G. J.; Silva, F.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that a broad-area laserlike optical oscillator (a nondegenerate photorefractive oscillator) with structured injected signal displays two-phase patterns. The technique [de Valcárcel and Staliunas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 054101 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.054101] consists in spatially modulating the injection, so that its phase alternates periodically between two opposite values, i.e., differing by π .

  10. Understanding the architecture of the deep critical zone in the Rio Icacos watershed (Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico) using a combination of hydrogeophysical methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comas, X.; Wright, W. J.; Hynek, S. A.; Orlando, J.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Buss, H. L.; Brantley, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Rio Icacos watershed in the Luquillo Mountains (Puerto Rico) is characterized by rapid weathering rates and the accelerated development of a regolith mainly originated from the alteration of quartz diorite bedrock. Regolith materials create a blanket on top of the bedrock with a thickness that depends on its spatial distribution along the watershed (i.e. proximity to the river nickpoint in the southermost part of the watershed). Furthermore bedrock along the watershed is characterized by a system of heterogeneous fractures that apparently drive the formation of corestones and associated spheroidal fracturing and rindlets. In this study we used a combination of geophysical methods to better understand changes in regolith thickness and how the spatial distribution and density of fractures varies with topography and proximity to the nickpoint. Indirect and non-invasive geophysical methods included ground penetrating radar, GPR, terrain conductivity, and electrical resistivity imaging, ERI, and were constrained with direct methods (i.e. boreholes) already available from previous studies. Geophysical methods were consistent in imaging lateral changes in regolith distribution and fracture density along the watershed and showed the potential of multi-method approaches to better understand critical zone processes at multiple scales of measurement and high spatial resolution.

  11. An experimental and numerical investigation of velocity in an enclosed residential complex parking area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, Khosro; Motlagh, Majid Shafie Pour; Mousavi, Monireh Sadat; Niksokhan, Mohhamad hosein; Vosoughifar, Hamid Reza

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present research is analysis of velocity vector and magnitude in an enclosed residential complex parking in Tehran. Velocity parameters are key factor and can be helpful in proposing solutions to improve indoor air quality. Since The flow pattern determines that how and where the pollutants propagate. In this research at first, the proportion of vehicular exhaust emissions is estimated and then experimental and numerical analyses are performed. In experimental analysis, a full-scale experiment of parking area has been used; velocity is measured by calibrated measuring devices. Samples were performed in several times. In order to perform numerical calculation, a 3-dimensional model was created by Fluent software that solves flow equations with finite volume method. In this research, the flow condition is assumed to be incompressible and turbulent. Standard k-ɛ scheme was selected as turbulence modeling. In the Computational Fluid Dynamics technique the geometry of parking area is generated in ICEM-CFD software and hexahedral mesh type is used. Velocity vectors and magnitudes in an enclosed residential complex parking in Tehran are estimated. The findings obtained from numerical simulation are in complete accord with experimental results.

  12. Evaluation of the radiation field and shielding assessment of the experimental area of HIE-ISOLDE.

    PubMed

    Romanets, Y; Bernardes, A P; Dorsival, A; Gonçalves, I F; Kadi, Y; di Maria, S; Vaz, P; Vlachoudis, V; Vollaire, J

    2014-10-01

    The ISOLDE facility at CERN is one of the first facilities in the world dedicated to the production of the radioactive ion beams (RIB) and during all its working time underwent several upgrades. The goal of the latest proposed upgrade, 'The High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE' (HIE-ISOLDE), is to provide a higher performance facility in order to approximate it to the level of the next generation ISOL facilities, like EURISOL. The HIE-ISOLDE aims to improve significantly the quality of the produced RIB and for this reason the increasing of the primary beam power is one of the main objectives of the project. An increase in the nominal beam current (from 2 to 6 μA proton beam intensity) and energy (from 1.4 GeV to 2 GeV) of the primary proton beam will be possible due to the upgrade of CERN's accelerator infrastructure. The current upgrade means reassessment of the radiation protection and the radiation safety of the facility. However, an evaluation of the existing shielding configuration and access restrictions to the experimental and supply areas must be carried out. Monte Carlo calculations were performed in order to evaluate the radiation protection of the facility as well as radiation shielding assessment and design. The FLUKA-Monte Carlo code was used in this study to calculate the ambient dose rate distribution and particle fluxes in the most important areas, such as the experimental hall of the facility. The results indicate a significant increase in the ambient dose equivalent rate in some areas of the experimental hall when an upgrade configuration of the primary proton beam is considered. Special attention is required for the shielding of the target area once it is the main and very intensive radiation source, especially under the upgrade conditions. In this study, the access points to the beam extraction and beam maintenance areas, such as the mass separator rooms and the high voltage room, are identified as the most sensitive for the experimental hall from

  13. High-Area-Ratio Rocket Nozzle at High Combustion Chamber Pressure: Experimental and Analytical Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Smith, Timothy D.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained on an optimally contoured nozzle with an area ratio of 1025:1 and on a truncated version of this nozzle with an area ratio of 440:1. The nozzles were tested with gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants at combustion chamber pressures of 1800 to 2400 psia and mixture ratios of 3.89 to 6.15. This report compares the experimental performance, heat transfer, and boundary layer total pressure measurements with theoretical predictions of the current Joint Army, Navy, NASA, Air Force (JANNAF) developed methodology. This methodology makes use of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) nozzle performance code. Comparisons of the TDK-predicted performance to experimentally attained thrust performance indicated that both the vacuum thrust coefficient and the vacuum specific impulse values were approximately 2.0-percent higher than the turbulent prediction for the 1025:1 configurations, and approximately 0.25-percent higher than the turbulent prediction for the 440:1 configuration. Nozzle wall temperatures were measured on the outside of a thin-walled heat sink nozzle during the test fittings. Nozzle heat fluxes were calculated front the time histories of these temperatures and compared with predictions made with the TDK code. The heat flux values were overpredicted for all cases. The results range from nearly 100 percent at an area ratio of 50 to only approximately 3 percent at an area ratio of 975. Values of the integral of the heat flux as a function of nozzle surface area were also calculated. Comparisons of the experiment with analyses of the heat flux and the heat rate per axial length also show that the experimental values were lower than the predicted value. Three boundary layer rakes mounted on the nozzle exit were used for boundary layer measurements. This arrangement allowed total pressure measurements to be obtained at 14 different distances from the nozzle wall. A comparison of boundary layer total pressure profiles and analytical

  14. Radio propagation at 900 MHz in urban areas: Models with a fixed frequency and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, P.; Tiffon, J.

    1984-09-01

    Models which describe multipath propagation are examined in order to design a 900 MHz mobile communication system adapted to urban areas. A justification of the experimental data treatment is derived from this analysis. The measurements were made at a fixed 855 MHz frequency, transmitting from three locations. The fast fluctuations of the received signals are well represented by a Rayleigh process, which means that there are practically no paths of direct transmission. The coherence length is 1 m. The statistical distribution of the average field is Gaussian and the normal deviation decreases with the distance emitter-receiver. The empiric Okumura-Hata prediction model agrees well with the experimental results, giving an average cell field decreasing with distance with a logarithmic law.

  15. Design and construction of an experimental pervious paved parking area to harvest reusable rainwater.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ullate, E; Novo, A V; Bayon, J R; Hernandez, Jorge R; Castro-Fresno, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Pervious pavements are sustainable urban drainage systems already known as rainwater infiltration techniques which reduce runoff formation and diffuse pollution in cities. The present research is focused on the design and construction of an experimental parking area, composed of 45 pervious pavement parking bays. Every pervious pavement was experimentally designed to store rainwater and measure the levels of the stored water and its quality over time. Six different pervious surfaces are combined with four different geotextiles in order to test which materials respond better to the good quality of rainwater storage over time and under the specific weather conditions of the north of Spain. The aim of this research was to obtain a good performance of pervious pavements that offered simultaneously a positive urban service and helped to harvest rainwater with a good quality to be used for non potable demands. PMID:22020491

  16. Experimental investigation on the characteristics of a solar cell under different illumination intensities and shading areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, W. B.; Hu, F. Y.; He, X. D.; Zhang, H. M.; Wu, H. M.

    2015-06-01

    The characteristics of a solar cell, the short-circuit current ( I sc ), the open-circuit voltage ( V oc ), the maximum power point ( V m , I m ), the fill factor ( FF) and the photoelectric conversion efficiency ( η) under different illumination intensities and shading areas have been experimentally investigated. The work factor ω is given by ω = (1 - A/ A 0) × S/ S 0, where A 0 is the total solar cell area, A the shading area, S 0 the benchmark reference irradiation level, and S the new level of the irradiation, is introduced to take the light intensity and shading area into account. The results show that Isc and Im increase on an approximately linear increasing way with ω, but V oc and V m approach the saturation levels. The reason is that the current is a linear function of ω, and the relationship of the voltage to ω is logarithmic. We also found I sc ( V m ) to depend more on ω than I m ( V oc ). In addition, we observed that η tended to increase linearly with ω, but FF tended to converge to saturation. The reason for the behavior of η is the reduction in the contact resistance and in the electron-hole recombination with increasing ω. However, FF is mainly determined by V oc . The improvement in the solar cell performance with increasing ω results from an increase in the current, but not in the voltage or the fill factor.

  17. Experimental evaluation of heat transfer on a 1030:1 area ratio rocket nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacynski, Kenneth J.; Pavli, Albert J.; Smith, Tamara A.

    1987-01-01

    A 1030:1 carbon steel, heat-sink nozzle was tested. The test conditions included a nominal chamber pressure of 2413 kN/sq m and a mixture ratio range of 2.78 to 5.49. The propellants were gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen. Outer wall temperature measurements were used to calculate the inner wall temperature and the heat flux and heat rate to the nozzle at specified axial locations. The experimental heat fluxes were compared to those predicted by the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) computer model analysis program. When laminar boundary layer flow was assumed in the analysis, the predicted values were within 15% of the experimental values for the area ratios of 20 to 975. However, when turbulent boundary layer conditions were assumed, the predicted values were approximately 120% higher than the experimental values. A study was performed to determine if the conditions within the nozzle could sustain a laminar boundary layer. Using the flow properties predicted by TDK, the momentum-thickness Reynolds number was calculated, and the point of transition to turbulent flow was predicted. The predicted transition point was within 0.5 inches of the nozzle throat. Calculations of the acceleration parameter were then made to determine if the flow conditions could produce relaminarization of the boundary layer. It was determined that if the boundary layer flow was inclined to transition to turbulent, the acceleration conditions within the nozzle would tend to suppress turbulence and keep the flow laminar-like.

  18. Experimental evaluation of heat transfer on a 1030:1 area ratio rocket nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacynski, Kenneth J.; Pavli, Albert J.; Smith, Tamara A.

    1987-01-01

    A 1030:1 carbon steel, heat-sink nozzle was tested. The test conditions included a nominal chamber pressure of 2413 kN/sq m and a mixture ratio range of 2.78 to 5.49. The propellants were gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen. Outer wall temperature measurements were used to calculate the inner wall temperature and the heat flux and heat rate to the nozzle at specified axial locations. The experimental heat fluxes were compared to those predicted by the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) computer model analysis program. When laminar boundary layer flow was assumed in the analysis, the predicted values were within 15 percent of the experimental values for the area ratios of 20 to 975. However, when turbulent boundary layer conditions were assumed, the predicted values were approximately 120 percent higher than the experimental values. A study was performed to determine if the conditions within the nozzle could sustain a laminar boundary layer. Using the flow properties predicted by TDK, the momentum-thickness Reynolds number was calculated, and the point of transition to turbulent flow was predicted. The predicted transition point was within 0.5 inches of the nozzle throat. Calculations of the acceleration parameter were then made to determine if the flow conditions could produce relaminarization of the boundary layer. It was determined that if the boundary layer flow was inclined to transition to turbulent, the acceleration conditions within the nozzle would tend to suppress turbulence and keep the flow laminar-like.

  19. Influence of Soil Erosion and Landslide Occurrence on Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Loss in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dialynas, Y. G.; Bastola, S.; Bras, R. L.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Silver, W. L.; Arnone, E.; Noto, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical rainforests play a significant role in the global carbon (C) cycle. The Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO) in Puerto Rico is characterized by intense erosion and landslide occurrence, which have been historically influenced by human activity and land use change, and drive the redistribution and burial of soil organic C (SOC) across the landscape. Estimates of regional C budgets do not systematically account for linkages between hydrological, geomorphological, and biogeochemical processes, which control the fate of eroded SOC. We quantify the impacts of erosion and rainfall-triggered landslides on SOC oxidation and accumulation at the Mameyes and Icacos watersheds. We developed and calibrated a spatially-explicit model of SOC dynamics, i.e. tRIBS-ECO (Triangulated Irregular Network-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator-Erosion and Carbon Oxidation), based on a coupled physically-based hydro-geomorphic model. The model inputs we used include measurements of SOC content at different horizons, and SOC oxidation and production rates derived from SOC turnover characteristics. We demonstrate the extent to which depth-dependent SOC oxidation and production are altered at eroding hillslopes and at landslide locations, and how this is being moderated by management practices. We estimated the SOC deposition rates at the floodplains of Mameyes and Icacos rivers, part of which is fluvially transported out of the system. The contrasting lithology of the two watersheds leads to different hydro-geomorphological behavior which controls the redistribution and storage of SOC. Results showed that topography and heterogeneity of tropical vegetation lead to significant spatial variability of the erosion-induced soil CO2 flux to the atmosphere. We highlight the importance of the representation of SOC redistribution driven by local variation in lithological and geomorphological characteristics and hydroclimatic conditions in attempts to quantify watershed-scale soil C

  20. Slow erosional response of a steep wet tropical mountain to a pulse of rock uplift in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocard, G. Y.; Willenbring, J.; Scatena, F. N.

    2013-12-01

    The Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory occupies a 15-km-wide, 1100-m-tall isolated massif at the eastern tip of Puerto Rico. The site receives up to 5,000 mm of annual precipitation over very steep slopes, which are covered by mature primary forests. Remnants of an uplifted, regionally extensive shore platform are perched at mid-elevations around the massif (Fig.1). Rivers flowing over quartz diorite systematically exhibit dramatic knickpoints that separate an upland relict landscape characterized by a thick saprolite and transport-limited streams, from highly dissected lower slopes, thinner soils and detachment-limited rivers. The knickpoint lips lie at the elevation of the uplifted platform and therefore likely represent erosion waves that nucleated at the coast following the uplift the platform millions of years ago. Highly degraded fault scarps and lack of detectable recent coastal uplift suggest that rock uplift has ended. Low erodibility of the quartz diorite combined with fine bedload grain size may account for the slow transmission of the erosional signal and for the persistence of these conspicuous knickpoints. We used Be-10 concentrations in river-borne quartz to compare denudation rates above and below the knickpoints. Integrated over 10-100 kyr, denudation rates are up to three times higher downstream. The change in erosion rate is associated with a change in the dominant erosional processes. Upstream of the knickpoint we observe a strong decoupling between slope erosion and ridge top erosion, which is not observed downstream. The knickpoints separate an upland dominated by chemical weathering from a downstream landscape dominated by mechanical weathering. Figure 1: Correlation between the elevation of the platform and knickpoints on rivers flowing over the quartz diorite

  1. Edge Length and Surface Area of a Blank: Experimental Assessment of Measures, Size Predictions and Utility

    PubMed Central

    Dogandžić, Tamara; Braun, David R.; McPherron, Shannon P.

    2015-01-01

    Blank size and form represent one of the main sources of variation in lithic assemblages. They reflect economic properties of blanks and factors such as efficiency and use life. These properties require reliable measures of size, namely edge length and surface area. These measures, however, are not easily captured with calipers. Most attempts to quantify these features employ estimates; however, the efficacy of these estimations for measuring critical features such as blank surface area and edge length has never been properly evaluated. In addition, these parameters are even more difficult to acquire for retouched implements as their original size and hence indication of their previous utility have been lost. It has been suggested, in controlled experimental conditions, that two platform variables, platform thickness and exterior platform angle, are crucial in determining blank size and shape meaning that knappers can control the interaction between size and efficiency by selecting specific core angles and controlling where fracture is initiated. The robustness of these models has rarely been tested and confirmed in context other than controlled experiments. In this paper, we evaluate which currently employed caliper measurement methods result in the highest accuracy of size estimations of blanks, and we evaluate how platform variables can be used to indirectly infer aspects of size on retouched artifacts. Furthermore, we investigate measures of different platform management strategies that control the shape and size of artifacts. To investigate these questions, we created an experimental lithic assemblage, we digitized images to calculate 2D surface area and edge length, which are used as a point of comparison for the caliper measurements and additional analyses. The analysis of aspects of size determinations and the utility of blanks contributes to our understanding of the technological strategies of prehistoric knappers and what economic decisions they made

  2. Target experimental area and systems of the U.S. National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, M; Van Wonterghem, B; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, W; Kalantar, D; Lee, F D; Pittenger, L; Wong, K

    1999-12-17

    One of the major goals of the US National Ignition Facility is the demonstration of laser driven fusion ignition and burn of targets by inertial confinement and provide capability for a wide variety of high energy density physics experiments. The NIF target area houses the optical systems required to focus the 192 beamlets to a target precisely positioned at the center of the 10 meter diameter, 10-cm thick aluminum target chamber. The chamber serves as mounting surface for the 48 final optics assemblies, the target alignment and positioning equipment, and the target diagnostics. The internal surfaces of the chamber are protected by louvered steel beam dumps. The target area also provides the necessary shielding against target emission and environmental protection equipment. Despite its complexity, the design provides the flexibility to accommodate the needs of the various NIF user groups, such as direct and indirect drive irradiation geometries, modular final optics design, capability to handle cryogenic targets, and easily re-configurable diagnostic instruments. Efficient target area operations are ensured by using line-replaceable designs for systems requiring frequent inspection, maintenance and reconfiguration, such as the final optics, debris shields, phase plates and the diagnostic instruments. A precision diagnostic instrument manipulator (DIMS) allows fast removal and precise repositioning of diagnostic instruments. In addition the authors describe several activities to enhance the target chamber availability, such as the target debris mitigation, the use of standard experimental configurations and the development of smart shot operations planning tools.

  3. Experimental evaluation of the effects of quench rate and quartz surface area on homogeneous mercury oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Fry; Brydger Cauch; Geoffrey D. Silcox; JoAnn S. Lighty; Constance L. Senior

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a mercury oxidation data set suitable for validation of fundamental kinetic models of mercury chemistry and for mechanism development. Experimental facilities include a mercury reactor fitted with a 300-W, quartz-glass burner and a quartz reaction chamber. While operated with a temperature profile representative of a typical boiler, a residence time of 6 s was achieved. Participating reacting species (chlorine, mercury) were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. Speciated mercury measurements were performed using a Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a conditioning system. Homogeneous mercury reactions involving chlorine have been investigated under two different temperature profiles producing quench rates of -210 K/s and -440 K/s. The larger quench rate produced 52% greater total oxidation than the lower quench at chlorine concentrations of 200 ppm. The effect of reactor surface area on oxidation was also investigated. The quartz surfaces interacted with mercury only in the presence of chlorine and their overall effect was to weakly inhibit oxidation. The extent of oxidation was predicted using a detailed kinetic model. The model predicted the effects of quench rate and chlorine concentration shown in experimentation. 12 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted area. The waters of Severn River shoreward of a line beginning at the southeasternmost corner of the U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory sea wall and...

  5. A methodology for evacuation design for urban areas: theoretical aspects and experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, F.; Vitetta, A.

    2009-04-01

    of models for evacuation simulation; (c) to calibrate and validate system of model for evacuation simulation from a real experimentation. In relation to the proposed objectives in this paper: (a) a general framework about risk analysis is reported in the first part, with specific methods and models to analyze urban transportation system performances in emergency conditions when exogenous phenomena occur and for the specification of the risk function; (b) a formulation of the general evacuation problem in the standard simulation context of "what if" approach is specified in the second part with reference to the model considered for the simulation of transportation system in ordinary condition; (c) a set of models specified in the second part are calibrated and validated from a real experimentation in the third part. The experimentation was developed in the central business district of an Italian village and about 1000 inhabitants were evacuated, in order to construct a complete data-base. Our experiment required that socioeconomic information (population, number employed, public buildings, schools, etc.) and ‎transport supply characteristics (infrastructures, etc.) be measured before and during experimentation. The real data of evacuation were recorded with 30 video cameras for laboratory analysis. The results are divided into six strictly connected tasks: Demand models; Supply and supply-demand interaction models for users; Simulation of refuge areas for users; Design of path choice models for emergency vehicles; Pedestrian outflow models in a building; Planning process and guidelines.

  6. Soil Organic Matter Characterization by 13C-NMR and Thermal Analysis in Deep Tropical Soil Profiles from the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, A. F.; Hockaday, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forest soils store large quantities of carbon (C) as soil organic matter (SOM), a substantial proportion of which is stored deep (> 30 cm) in the soil profile. Characterization of tropical SOM remains difficult, in part due to the analytical challenges associated high iron and low C concentrations. In this study, we combined solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with analytical thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry, DSC; evolved CO2 gas analysis, CO2-EGA) to explore patterns in SOM composition in deep soil profiles from two contrasting soil types at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO) in northeast Puerto Rico. Prior to 13C NMR, soils were repeatedly demineralized with hydrofluoric acid (HF) to remove paramagnetic compounds and concentrate organic matter. Given the scant information on tropical subsoil OM, we also sought to evaluate the effect of HF acid treatments on tropical subsoil SOM. HF treatments effectively enriched sample C and removed paramagnetic compounds, allowing us to obtain high-quality NMR spectra for low-C subsoils. C:N ratios before and after HF treatment were nearly identical (mean = 16.6 ± 0.8), suggesting that the SOM pool was not substantially fractionated, though C recoveries were low and variable. Thermal analyses confirmed the loss of a substantial fraction of the soil mineral matrix, however, retention of several endothermic regions in post-HF Inceptisol soils indicated that not all minerals were completely solubilized. In addition, important differences in the DSC and CO2-EGA thermograms were observed in comparing samples before versus after HF treatments. These results suggest that the organo-mineral associations were substantially altered, though it is not immediately clear the degree to which alterations in chemical composition versus binding association have changed. In addition to these qualitative changes, quantitative interpretations of 13C-NMR results from low-C and high

  7. The San Niccolo' experimental area for studying the hydrology of coastal Mediterranean peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetto, Rudy; Barbagli, Alessio; Sabbatini, Tiziana; Silvestri, Nicola; Bonari, Enrico

    2015-04-01

    Starting from 1930, a large part of the Massaciuccoli Lake coastal area (Tuscany, Italy) has been drained for agricultural purposes by a complex network of artificial drains and pumping stations. In the drained areas, peat soils, with values of organic matter up to 50% in some cases, are largely present (Pistocchi et al., 2012). As a consequence of the human impact, environmental problems arose in the last 50 years: i. the eutrophication status of the Massaciuccoli lake caused by nutrient enrichment (N, P) in surface- and ground-water (Rossetto et al., 2010a); ii. the subsidence (2-3 m in 70 years) of the lake bordering areas due to soil compaction and mineralization (Rossetto et al., 2010b). As a potential solution to improve water quality and to decrease soil organic matter mineralization, a rewetted pilot experimental area of 15 ha with phyto-treatment functionalities has been set up. This pilot, adequately instrumented, now constitutes an open field lab to conduct research on the hydrology of coastal Mediterranean peatlands. Site investigation was performed and data on stratigraphy (from top on average: 1/2 m thick peat layer, 1/3 m organic matter-rich silt, 1/3 m stiff blue-gray clay, up to 30 m thick sand layer) and water (ground- and surface-water) quantity and quality were gathered and related to both local and regional groundwater flows. The inferred hydrological conceptual model revealed the pilot is set in a regional discharge area and the ground-water dependent nature of the agro-ecosystem, with mixing of waters with different origins. The site has been divided in three different phyto-treatment systems: a constructed wetland system, internally and externally banked in order to force water flow to a convoluted pattern where Phragmites australis L. and Thypha angustifolia L. constitute the sparse natural vegetation; a vegetation filter system based on the plantation of seven different no-food crops managed according to a periodic cutting and biomass

  8. Vast Area Detection for Experimental Radiochemistry (VADER) at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, Justin; Bettencourt, Ron; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Gharibyan, Narek; Talison, Bahram; Morris, Kevin; Smith, Cal

    2015-08-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the flux of neutrons and charged particles at peak burn in an inertial confinement fusion capsule induces measureable concentrations of nuclear reaction products in the target material. Radiochemical analysis of post-shot debris can be used to determine diagnostic parameters associated with implosion of the capsule, including fuel areal density and ablator-fuel mixing. Additionally, analysis of debris from specially doped targets can support nuclear forensic research. We have developed and are deploying the Vast Area Detection for Experimental Radiochemistry (VADER) diagnostic to collect shot debris and interact with post-shot reaction products at the NIF. VADER uses quick release collectors that are easily reconfigured for different materials and geometries. Collectors are located ~50 cm from the NIF target; each of up to 9 collectors views ~0.005-0.0125 steradians solid angle, dependent upon configuration. Dynamic loading of the NIF target vaporized mass was modelled using LS-DYNA. 3-dimensional printing was utilized to expedite the design process. Model-based manufacturing was used throughout. We will describe the design and operation of this diagnostic as well as some initial results.

  9. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Wide Area Blunt Impact Damage to Composite Aircraft Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi Ming

    Due to their high performance and weight efficiency, carbon fiber composites are increasingly being used in aircraft primary structure applications. Exposed composite structures (e.g., fuselage lower body) are susceptible accidental impacts by ground service equipment (GSE). The very high mass (over 10,000 kg) of GSE impact can involve high energy (over 1000 J) and thus can induce significant internal damage. Furthermore, the large contact area potentially involved with GSE impact can create significant internal delamination and fiber failure without leaving exterior-visible signs that any damage has occurred. The objectives of the research described herein are to: (1) conduct experimental investigation into the composite aircraft damage caused by GSE impact, (2) examine the small-scale failure modes in focused, element-level studies, (3) establish a finite element modeling methodology involving detailed simulation capability that is validated via small-scale tests, and (4) apply these modeling capabilities to accurately predict full-scale structural behavior without adjustment (e.g., tuning) of modeling input parameters.

  10. Water quality and quantity assessment of pervious pavements performance in experimental car park areas.

    PubMed

    Sañudo-Fontaneda, Luis A; Charlesworth, Susanne M; Castro-Fresno, Daniel; Andres-Valeri, Valerio C A; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Pervious pavements have become one of the most used sustainable urban drainage system (SUDS) techniques in car parks. This research paper presents the results of monitoring water quality from several experimental car park areas designed and constructed in Spain with bays made of interlocking concrete block pavement, porous asphalt, polymer-modified porous concrete and reinforced grass with plastic and concrete cells. Moreover, two different sub-base materials were used (limestone aggregates and basic oxygen furnace slag). This study therefore encompasses the majority of the materials used as permeable surfaces and sub-base layers all over the world. Effluent from the test bays was monitored for dissolved oxygen, pH, electric conductivity, total suspended solids, turbidity and total petroleum hydrocarbons in order to analyze the behaviour shown by each combination of surface and sub-base materials. In addition, permeability tests were undertaken in all car parks using the 'Laboratorio Caminos Santander' permeameter and the Cantabrian Portable Infiltrometer. All results are presented together with the influence of surface and sub-base materials on water quality indicators using bivariate correlation statistical analysis at a confidence level of 95%. The polymer-modified porous concrete surface course in combination with limestone aggregate sub-base presented the best performance. PMID:24718346

  11. Development and testing of a double length pets for the CLIC experimental area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, L.; Carrillo, D.; Gavela, D.; Lara, A.; Rodríguez, E.; Gutiérrez, J. L.; Calero, J.; Toral, F.; Samoshkin, A.; Gudkov, D.; Riddone, G.

    2014-05-01

    CLIC (compact linear collider) is a future e+e- collider based on normal-conducting technology, currently under study at CERN. Its design is based on a novel two-beam acceleration scheme. The main beam gets RF power extracted from a drive beam through power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The technical feasibility of CLIC is currently being proved by its Third Test Facility (CTF3) which includes the CLIC experimental area (CLEX). Two Double Length CLIC PETS will be installed in CLEX to validate their performance with beam. This paper is focused on the engineering design, fabrication and validation of this PETS first prototype. The design consists of eight identical bars, separated by radial slots in which damping material is located to absorb transverse wakefields, and two compact couplers placed at both ends of the bars to extract the generated power. The PETS bars are housed inside a vacuum tank designed to make the PETS as compact as possible. Several joint techniques such as vacuum brazing, electron beam and arc welding were used to complete the assembly. Finally, several tests such as dimensional control and leak testing were carried out to validate design and fabrication methods. In addition, RF measurements at low power were made to study frequency tuning.

  12. The San Niccolo' experimental area for studying the hydrology of coastal Mediterranean peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetto, Rudy; Barbagli, Alessio; Sabbatini, Tiziana; Silvestri, Nicola; Bonari, Enrico

    2015-04-01

    Starting from 1930, a large part of the Massaciuccoli Lake coastal area (Tuscany, Italy) has been drained for agricultural purposes by a complex network of artificial drains and pumping stations. In the drained areas, peat soils, with values of organic matter up to 50% in some cases, are largely present (Pistocchi et al., 2012). As a consequence of the human impact, environmental problems arose in the last 50 years: i. the eutrophication status of the Massaciuccoli lake caused by nutrient enrichment (N, P) in surface- and ground-water (Rossetto et al., 2010a); ii. the subsidence (2-3 m in 70 years) of the lake bordering areas due to soil compaction and mineralization (Rossetto et al., 2010b). As a potential solution to improve water quality and to decrease soil organic matter mineralization, a rewetted pilot experimental area of 15 ha with phyto-treatment functionalities has been set up. This pilot, adequately instrumented, now constitutes an open field lab to conduct research on the hydrology of coastal Mediterranean peatlands. Site investigation was performed and data on stratigraphy (from top on average: 1/2 m thick peat layer, 1/3 m organic matter-rich silt, 1/3 m stiff blue-gray clay, up to 30 m thick sand layer) and water (ground- and surface-water) quantity and quality were gathered and related to both local and regional groundwater flows. The inferred hydrological conceptual model revealed the pilot is set in a regional discharge area and the ground-water dependent nature of the agro-ecosystem, with mixing of waters with different origins. The site has been divided in three different phyto-treatment systems: a constructed wetland system, internally and externally banked in order to force water flow to a convoluted pattern where Phragmites australis L. and Thypha angustifolia L. constitute the sparse natural vegetation; a vegetation filter system based on the plantation of seven different no-food crops managed according to a periodic cutting and biomass

  13. Parametric experimental studies on mixing characteristics within a low area ratio rectangular supersonic gaseous ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick, S. K.; Rao, Srisha M. V.; Jagadeesh, G.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2016-07-01

    We use the rectangular gaseous supersonic ejector as a platform to study the mixing characteristics of a confined supersonic jet. The entrainment ratio (ER) of the ejector, the non-mixed length (LNM), and potential core length (LPC) of the primary supersonic jet are measures to characterize mixing within the supersonic ejector. Experiments are carried out on a low area ratio rectangular supersonic ejector with air as the working fluid in both primary and secondary flows. The design Mach number of the nozzle (MPD = 1.5-3.0) and primary flow stagnation pressure (Pop = 4.89-9.89 bars) are the parameters that are varied during experimentation. Wall static pressure measurements are carried out to understand the performance of the ejector as well as to estimate the LNM (the spatial resolution is limited by the placement of pressure transducers). Well-resolved flow images (with a spatial resolution of 50 μm/pixel and temporal resolution of 1.25 ms) obtained through Planar Laser Mie Scattering (PLMS) show the flow dynamics within the ejector with clarity. The primary flow and secondary flow are seeded separately with acetone that makes the LNM and LPC clearly visible in the flow images. These parameters are extracted from the flow images using in-house image processing routines. A significant development in this work is the definition of new scaling parameters within the ejector. LNM, non-dimensionalized with respect to the fully expanded jet height hJ, is found to be a linear function of the Mach number ratio (Mach number ratio is defined as the ratio of design Mach number (MPD) and fully expanded Mach number (MPJ) of the primary jet). This definition also provides a clear demarcation of under-expanded and over-expanded regimes of operation according to [MPD/MPJ] > 1 and [MPD/MPJ] < 1, respectively. It is observed that the ER increased in over-expanded mode (to 120%) and decreased in under-expanded mode (to 68%). Similarly, LNM decreased (to 21.8%) in over-expanded mode

  14. Experimental Monitoring of Mixed Sand and Mud Sediment in the Nearshore Area of Santa Cruz, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, S. G.; Greene, H. G.

    2001-12-01

    An experiment conducted in late March of 2001 along the beaches and nearshore of Santa Cruz, California consisted of three phases: pre-experiment, experiment, and post-experiment. In the pre- and post-experimental phases, high-resolution side scan sonar and multibeam bathymetry data were collected to produce maps describing surface sediments and depth changes of the seafloor near the Santa Cruz Harbor. Offshore and beach sediment samples were collected three weeks prior to and after the experiment to analyze for changes in grain size and to provide physical evidence of seafloor substrate. Experimental monitoring consisted of daily beach and offshore sediment sampling. Oceanographic data including swell direction, height, and period were obtained from buoys offshore. Rainfall and stream flow data from the nearby San Lorenzo River were recorded during all phases of the project. Our sedimentological studies of materials dredged from the upper Santa Cruz Harbor, California suggest that sediment containing approximately 40% sand and 60% mud can be disposed in the surf zone without adversely affecting the quality of neighboring beaches or offshore rocky habitats while simultaneously replenishing sand to eroding beaches downcoast. A small amount of the mud-rich material (about 2300 m3) was placed into the surf-zone during the winter of 2000-2001 to determine the retention of sands in the nearshore zone and the impact that fine-grain (mud) sediment may have on rocky habitats. The beaches and other nearshore environments near the disposal site of the Santa Cruz Small Craft Harbor appear to be unchanged by the disposed harbor sediments. The data indicates that little change in sediment grain size or distribution has occurred. This is most likely due to the high-energy nature of this coastline, which results in suspension of silts and clays until they reach lower energy, deeper water offshore outside of the study area. The sand fraction of the disposed sediment was likely

  15. Experimentally Measured Interfacial Area during Gas Injection into Saturated Porous Media: An Air Sparging Analogy

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    The amount of interfacial area (awn) between air and subsurface liquids during air-sparging can limit the rate of site remediation. Lateral movement within porous media could be encountered during air-sparging operations when air moves along the bottom of a low-permeability lens. This study was conducted to directly measure the amount of awn between air and water flowing within a bench-scale porous flow cell during the lateral movement of air along the upper edge of the cell during air injections into an initially water-saturated flow cell. Four different cell orientations were used to evaluate the effect of air injection rates and porous media geometries on the amount of awn between fluids. Air was injected at flow rates that varied by three orders of magnitude, and for each flow cellover this range of injection rates little change in awn was noted. A wider variation in awn was observed when air moved through different regions for the different flow cell orientations. These results are in good agreement with the experimental findings of Waduge et al. (2007), who performed experiments in a larger sand-pack flow cell, and determined that air-sparging efficiency is nearly independent of flow rate but highly dependent on the porous structure. By directly measuring the awn, and showing that awn does not vary greatly with changes in injection rate, we show that the lack of improvement to remediation rates is because there is a weak dependence of the awn on the air injection rate.

  16. Identifying Critical Areas for the Management of Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identifying fields that need attention is critical to ensure conservation programs improve water quality. Targeting critical management areas (CMAs) within fields is essential to maximize cultivation area while minimizing environmental impacts. The objective of this study was to develop a physicall...

  17. Experimental determination of the performance of a four-way diffuser with variable area

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, A.E.; Kirkpatrick, A.T.

    1998-10-01

    This paper examines how effectively a room air diffuser with a variable outlet area can produce a constant throw with varying flow rate. The diffuser for this study is a four-way diffuser with hinged surfaces providing a variable outlet area on two of its sides. The throws were measured downstream of one of the two fixed area outlets. Throw measurements for five fixed outlet areas were used to determine the outlet area variation with flow rate necessary for constant throw performance. These results were compared with the outlet area variation from measurements with a known spring restoring force on the surfaces to determine the variation of the restoring force needed for a constant throw. In order to provide this restoring force, a lever arm/counterweight mechanism was installed in the diffuser, and the diffuser throw performance was evaluated. In a given flow rate range (75 cfm to 160 cfm) the throw from the lever arm/counterweight diffuser was found to remain more constant than the stationary area or vertical spring throws.

  18. An Experimental Study of the Noise Due to Traffic in a Congested Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeetha, M.; Sankar, P.

    2016-03-01

    Noise pollution in an urban environment is an issue of serious concern in the major cities of India. There are various factors that contribute to the increase of noise levels in urban areas. The intensity of traffic is one of the factors which contributes to a drastic increase in environmental noise. The management of noise pollution has to be considered in the decision making process. In this paper, an attempt is made to study the existing noise level due to the traffic in Velachery which is declared as a sensitive area by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry (MoEF). The noise level data is collected using the MS6710 digital sound meter. The Custic simulation software version 3.2 is used for finding the propagation of noise. The spatial patterns of measurement were also calculated, in the sub-urban area of Velachery, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India. A means of transmitting this data to vehicles moving in the area, through a wireless medium is simulated using NCTUns 6.0 (network simulator), to enable drivers to understand the environmental conditions. A hardware was also designed which can be used to transmit and receive the noise data using the Zigbee module. A noise transmitting station is placed at a junction, so that it can transmit this noise data to the receivers which are fitted inside the vehicles.

  19. [Practice of the use of remote telemedical consultations in "experimental area of work"].

    PubMed

    Kalachev, O V; Plakhov, A N; Pershin, I V; Agapitov, A A; Andreev, A I; Yakovlev, A E

    2016-02-01

    The article presents experimental results of telehealth technology of "medical company--military hospital--central military hospital". Requirements for the equipment, which is used for telehealth consultations and software are specified. Throughout the test were practiced emergency consultations of "physician-physician" interface, including the use of mobile video call and portable terminals of videoconference, remote diagnosis with the use of medical equipment and devices. Data transmission features and video definition are received. The authors determined main types of telecommunication equipment, which are supposed to prospective for the Armed Forces. Prospects of implementation of telecommunication technologies are shown. PMID:27263204

  20. Soil-dependent uptake of 137Cs by mushrooms: experimental study in the Chernobyl accident areas.

    PubMed

    Kaduka, M V; Shutov, V N; Bruk, G Ya; Balonov, M I; Brown, J E; Strand, P

    2006-01-01

    The influence of agrochemical properties of forest soils and growth conditions on 137Cs aggregated transfer factors from soil to different species of forest mushrooms have been analysed. Statistically significant correlations between 137Cs soil to mushroom aggregated transfer factors and agrochemical soil properties have been revealed. The experimental data show that 137Cs aggregated transfer factors depend on the mushroom's trophic group, biological family, genus and species. They also strongly depend on forest soil properties and their values can be estimated with the use of multiple regression equations constructed from agrochemical soil parameters which most closely correlate with the 137Cs transfer parameters for particular mushroom groups. PMID:16835003

  1. An experimental and numerical study of boundary layer structure over areas of inhomogeneous sensible heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, S.; Doran, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    In June of 1992 a boundary-layer experiment was carried out near Boardman, Oregon. The campaigns were part of a program of studies under the auspices of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, whose goal is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer, particularly as affected by clouds, in general circulation models (GCMs) used for climate studies. One aspect of this program is concerned with the determination of appropriate lower boundary conditions for such models and the representation of subgrid-scale variability in regions where the surface conditions are not uniform. To study this problem, boundary-layer and surface properties were measured over a region of two sharply contrasting land types: a large, dry, sagebrush steppe area and irrigated farmland that formed the east, northeast, and western borders of the steppe. A combination of surface flux instrumentation, airsondes, sodars, and near-surface wind and temperature sensors was used. Measurements were carried out over the eastern portion of this region, which featured a well-defined boundary between the dry and irrigated areas. In this paper, the authors present some results from those observations and from a set of numerical simulations that address the effects of inhomogeneous surface fluxes on boundary-layer structure.

  2. Stable Isotopes (δ18O and δ2H) Help to Delineate Flow Paths and the Importance of Different Climate Patterns in Watersheds of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, M. A.; Shanley, J. B.; Scatena, F. N.

    2009-12-01

    Precipitation isotopic signatures can help determine the relative importance of different rainfall regimes in the interactions between water, soils, and ecosystems in watersheds. The tropical forest in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico can receive over 5000 mm of precipitation per year. Recent modeling studies indicate that global climate change or local land use changes may lead to a decline in precipitation amounts. Weather analysis showed that 29% of rain input to the Luquillo Mountains was trade-wind orographic rainfall, and 30% of rainfall could be attributed to easterly waves and low pressure systems, with the remainder from fronts, troughs, and isolated thunderstorms. Trade-wind orographic precipitation usually occurs as frequent, low-intensity and low-volume rain events, whereas easterly waves and low-pressure systems have higher volume and more intense rainfall. To help determine the importance of different precipitation types in the forest water cycle, monthly precipitation samples from a network of rain and cloud water collectors and stream samples from two watersheds were collected and analyzed for δ18O and δ2H. Weekly throughfall and rain samples were also collected at one site during five periods of different rainfall intensity to determine whether isotopic fractionation occurs when rain falls through the forest canopy. Seasonal rainfall sources have distinct isotopic signatures, partly due to differences in cloud height associated with the seasonal climate patterns. Monthly precipitation samples during the dry season had average isotopic values of -1.5‰ δ18O and +2.3‰ δ2H, associated with the weather pattern of trade-wind showers and fronts. Rainy season precipitation, from easterly waves and low pressure systems, had average monthly values of -3.7‰ δ18O and -16‰ δ2H. Precipitation during months with significant low pressure systems had average values of -5.9‰ δ18O and -36‰ δ2H. Isotopic composition of stream water at higher

  3. An analytical and experimental study of sound propagation and attenuation in variable-area ducts. [reducing aircraft engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Kaiser, J. E.; Marshall, R. L.; Hurst, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The performance of sound suppression techniques in ducts that produce refraction effects due to axial velocity gradients was evaluated. A computer code based on the method of multiple scales was used to calculate the influence of axial variations due to slow changes in the cross-sectional area as well as transverse gradients due to the wall boundary layers. An attempt was made to verify the analytical model through direct comparison of experimental and computational results and the analytical determination of the influence of axial gradients on optimum liner properties. However, the analytical studies were unable to examine the influence of non-parallel ducts on the optimum linear conditions. For liner properties not close to optimum, the analytical predictions and the experimental measurements were compared. The circumferential variations of pressure amplitudes and phases at several axial positions were examined in straight and variable-area ducts, hard-wall and lined sections with and without a mean flow. Reasonable agreement between the theoretical and experimental results was obtained.

  4. High surface area electrodes in ionic polymer transducers: Numerical and experimental investigations of the electro-chemical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, Barbar J.; Habchi, Wassim; Wallmersperger, Thomas; Akle, Etienne J.; Leo, Donald J.

    2011-04-01

    Ionomeric polymer transducer (IPT) is an electroactive polymer that has received considerable attention due to its ability to generate large bending strain (>5%) and moderate stress at low applied voltages (±2 V). Ionic polymer transducers consist of an ionomer, usually Nafion, sandwiched between two electrically conductive electrodes. A novel fabrication technique denoted as the direct assembly process (DAP) enabled controlled electrode architecture in ionic polymer transducers. A DAP built transducer consists of two high surface area electrodes made of electrically conducting particles uniformly distributed in an ionomer matrix sandwiching an ionomer membrane. The purpose of this paper is to investigate and simulate the effect of these high surface area particles on the electro-chemical response of an IPT. Theoretical investigations as well as experimental verifications are performed. The model used consists of a convection-diffusion equation describing the chemical field as well as a Poisson equation describing the electrical field. The two-dimensional model incorporates highly conductive particles randomly distributed in the electrode area. Traditionally, these kinds of electrodes were simulated with boundary conditions representing flat electrodes with a large dielectric permittivity at the polymer boundary. This model enables the design of electrodes with complicated geometrical patterns. In the experimental section, several transducers are fabricated using the DAP process on Nafion 117 membranes. The architecture of the high surface area electrodes in these samples is varied. The concentration of the high surface area RuO2 particles is varied from 30 vol% up to 60 vol% at a fixed thickness of 30 μm, while the overall thickness of the electrode is varied from 10 μm up to 40 μm at a fixed concentration of 45%. The flux and charge accumulation in the materials are measured experimentally and compared to the results of the numerical simulations. Trends of

  5. Experimental study of the response functions of direct-reading instruments measuring surface-area concentration of airborne nanostructured particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Sébastien; Witschger, Olivier; Gensdarmes, François; Thomas, Dominique

    2009-05-01

    An increasing number of experimental and theoretical studies focus on airborne nanoparticles (NP) in relation with many aspects of risk assessment to move forward our understanding of the hazards, the actual exposures in the workplace, and the limits of engineering controls and personal protective equipment with regard to NP. As a consequence, generating airborne NP with controlled properties constitutes an important challenge. In parallel, toxicological studies have been carried out, and most of them support the concept that surface-area could be a relevant metric for characterizing exposure to airborne NP [1]. To provide NP surface-area concentration measurements, some direct-reading instruments have been designed, based on attachment rate of unipolar ions to NP by diffusion. However, very few information is available concerning the performances of these instruments and the parameters that could affect their responses. In this context, our work aims at characterizing the actual available instruments providing airborne NP surface-area concentration. The instruments (a- LQ1-DC, Matter Engineering; b-AeroTrak™ 9000, TSI; c- NSAM, TSI model 3550;) are thought to be relevant for further workplace exposure characterization and monitoring. To achieve our work, an experimental facility (named CAIMAN) was specially designed, built and characterized.

  6. An experimental study of a minette from the Milk River area, southern Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, Sean P.; Luth, Robert W.

    2012-12-01

    Buhlmann et al. (Can J Earth Sci 37: 1629-1650, 2000) studied the minettes and xenoliths from the Milk River area of southern Alberta, Canada. Based on previous work, they hypothesized that the minettes were derived from a source containing phlogopite + clinopyroxene ± olivine, at pressures ≥1.7 GPa. To test this hypothesis, liquidus experiments were performed on a primitive minette between 1.33 and 2.21 GPa and between 1,300 and 1,400 °C to constrain the mineralogy of its source region. We found a multiple saturation point along the liquidus at 1.77 GPa and 1,350 °C, where the liquid coexists with orthopyroxene and olivine. Neither phlogopite nor clinopyroxene were found to be liquidus phases, which is inconsistent with Buhlmann et al.'s hypothesis. We suggest that our minette is not primary, but had re-equilibrated with harzburgitic mantle subsequent to formation. In such a scenario, partial melting of a veined source containing mica and clinopyroxene occurred at or near the base of the Wyoming craton (~200 km). Minimal heating or the introduction of hydrous fluids into the source would be required to induce partial melting. Rapid ascent rates, coupled with slow cooling rates, of the "primary minette magma" would preserve the high temperature observed in our experiments. At ~58 km, our "primary minette magma" likely stalled and re-equilibrated with the harzburgite surroundings.

  7. Man-made chemicals found in remote areas of the world: the experimental definition for POPs.

    PubMed

    Ballschmite, Karlheinz; Hackenberg, Rudolf; Jarman, Walter M; Looser, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    Members of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UN-ECE) signed a legally binding protocol on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in February 1998 under the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. A treaty that intends to control the production, import, export, disposal and use of toxic chemicals that persist for decades in the environment has been formally signed at a conference in May 2001 in Stockholm. The 2001 POP treaty, like the 1998 LRTAP POP protocol, contains a provision on adding further chemicals to the initial group of twelve or fifteen. The occurrence of a compound or a group of compounds in so called remote and pristine areas, e.g. in the Artic or in the Southern Hemisphere, proves its stability under the chemical and biological conditions of the environment. Compounds identified in this way, in samples taken primarily in very remote regions of the planet, are classified by their environmental fate and global distribution as persistent organic pollutants (POPs), regardless of any political assessments. PMID:12214720

  8. Experimental investigation on large-area dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric nitrogen and air assisted by the ultraviolet lamp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Gu, Biao; Wang, Wenchun; Wang, Dezhen; Peng, Xuwen

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, ultraviolet radiation produced by the ultraviolet lamp is employed to supply pre-ionization for the dielectric barrier discharge in N(2) or air at atmospheric pressure. The effect of the ultraviolet pre-ionization on improving the uniformity of the dielectric barrier discharge is investigated experimentally. The atmospheric pressure glow discharge of the large area (270 mm x 120 mm) is obtained successfully via the ultraviolet pre-ionization in atmospheric DBD in N(2) when the gas gap decrease to 3mm. Based on the emission spectra, the mechanism which ultraviolet pre-ionization improves the uniformity of the dielectric barrier discharge is discussed. PMID:19129005

  9. Hydrogeologic and water-quality data for the explosive experimental area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, E.C.; Bell, C.F.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogeologic and water-quality data were collected at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site at Dahlgren, Virginia, as part of a hydrogeologic assessment of the shallow aquifer system begun in 1993. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted this study to provide the U.S. Navy with hydrogeologic data to aid in the evaluation of the effects from remediation of contaminated sites and to protect against additional contamination. This report describes the ground-water observation- well network, hydrogeologic, and water-quality data collected between October 1993 and April 1995. The report includes a description of the locations and construction of 28 observation wells on the Explosive Experimental Area. Hydrogeologic data include lithologic logs, geophysical logs, and vertical hydraulic conductivity measurements of selected core intervals. Hydrologic data include synoptic and hourly measurements of ground-water levels, and observation-well slug tests to determine horizontal hydraulic conductivity. Water-quality data include analyses of major dissolved constituents in ground water and surface water.

  10. The impact of area-based initiatives on physical activity trends in deprived areas; a quasi-experimental evaluation of the Dutch District Approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous area-based initiatives (ABIs) have been implemented in deprived neighbourhoods across Europe. These large-scale initiatives aim to tackle the socio-economic and environmental problems in these areas that might influence physical activity (PA). There is little robust evidence of their impact on PA. This study aimed to assess the impact of a Dutch ABI called the District Approach on trends in leisure-time PA in deprived districts. Methods Repeated cross-sectional data on 48401 adults across the Netherlands were obtained from the Integrated Survey on Household Living Conditions (POLS) 2004–2011. 1517 of these adults resided in deprived target districts and 46884 adults resided elsewhere in the Netherlands. In a quasi-experimental interrupted time-series design, multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed to assess trends in leisure-time walking, cycling, and sports before and during the intervention. Trends in deprived target districts were compared with trends in various control groups. The role of the intensity of environmental interventions was also assessed. Results Deprived target districts showed a significantly positive change in walking trend between the pre-intervention and intervention period. The trend change in the deprived target districts was significantly larger compared to the rest of the Netherlands, but not compared to other deprived districts. For cycling and sports, neither deprived districts nor control districts showed a significant trend change. For all leisure-time PA outcomes, trend changes were not related to the intensity of environmental interventions in the deprived target districts. Conclusion Some evidence was found to suggest that ABIs like the District Approach have a positive impact on leisure-time PA in deprived districts, regardless of the intensity of environmental interventions. PMID:24612770

  11. An experimental study of Aurelia aurita feeding behaviour: Inference of the potential predation impact on a temperate estuarine nursery area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Rita; Teodósio, Maria Alexandra; Garrido, Susana

    2014-06-01

    Temperate estuaries are nursery areas for economically important fisheries resources. The common jellyfish Aurelia aurita is a resident species in many of these areas, where it can reach high abundances. This work aimed to determine the potential for predation of A. aurita on zooplanktonic organisms and early life stages of fishes, measuring feeding rates at concentrations that mimic those occurring for zooplankton, fish eggs and larvae in an estuarine nursery area. A set of experiments was aimed at determining the feeding selectivity of jellyfish when offered a mixture of fish eggs and larvae and wild plankton. Clearance rates varied markedly with prey availability and concentrations. When given mixtures of different prey types, jellyfish preferentially elected some taxa (copepods and fish eggs). Data obtained in the laboratory experiments were used to infer the potential impact of jellyfish predation upon zooplankton and ichthyoplankton in the Guadiana estuary (Southern Iberia). Repeated sampling of zooplankton, fish eggs and medusae was undertaken during the summer season of 2011. Abundance determinations were combined with experimentally estimated clearance rates of individual medusa to infer the potential jellyfish-induced mortality on prey in the area. In June and early August jellyfish-induced mortality rates were very high, and half-life times (t1/2) were consequently short for the zooplankton and ichthyoplankton. Although the potentially overestimation of our feeding rates typical of confined laboratory experiments, the results show high ingestion and clearance rates at high temperatures, typical from summer condition, and results also suggest that either by predation on early life stages of fish, or by competition for food resources, jellyfish may have a significant impact on estuarine communities and its nursery function.

  12. Status report of Area 15 experimental dairy farm: dairy husbandry January 1977-June 1979, agronomic practices January 1978-June 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    This is the final status report on the operation of the experimental dairy herd and farm in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site. Operation of the farm was transferred from the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas to a contractor in September of 1979. The dairy herd portion of the report covers the period from January 1977 to June 1979. Improvement and addition to the facilities, production and reproduction statistics for individual cows and the herd, the veterinary medicine practices employed, and summaries of the metabolism studies that involved the dairy herd are discussed. The agronomic portion of the report covers the period January 1978 to June 1979. Topics include irrigation, fertilization, weed and insect control, and forage production.

  13. EXPERIMENT FOR THE DESTRUCTIVE MECHANISM OF THE OVERFLOW LEVEE AND FLOODING AREA AT THE CHIYODA EXPERIMENTAL CHANNEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Tomonori; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Hirai, Yasuyuki; Miyake, Hiroshi

    The mechanism of three-dimensional levee breach by overflow (i.e., lateral overflow with consideration of river flow riverside land) has not been clarified in past studies. Elucidation of this mechanism is very important for disaster prevention as well as for the future progress of studies on levee breach by overflow. We conducted experiments of levee breach in three-dimensions by overflow using the Chiyoda Experimental Channel. The results of the experiment are as follows: Until the beginning of levee breach, phenomena near overflow area was similar to one by front overflow. It means that we can apply knowledge from anamnestic levee breach experiment involving front overflow to until the beginning of levee breach. After the beginning of levee breach, it related to unit width discharge and levee breach speed.

  14. The Experimental Lakes Area: Over 45 Years of Whole Ecosystem Monitoring and Manipulation Experiments and a Focus on the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerton, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The IISD Experimental Lakes Area is a unique facility which has existed since 1968 and consists of 58 lakes and their watersheds set aside for research purposes. The IISD-ELA also boasts an on-site water chemistry lab, accommodations and facilities for up to 60 personnel. Since its inception in 1968 over 50 whole ecosystem experiments have been conducted at the ELA including eutrophication, acidification of lakes, environmental mercury fates, hydro-electric reservoir impacts and much more. The recent partnership between IISD and ELA has allowed ELA to refocus on freshwater research and policy development in a time where the preservation of the earth's most precious resource is of the utmost concern. In addition to water quality monitoring, the ELA is also focused on autotrophic ecology, zooplankton community structures, fish population and behaviour and food-web interactions. Monitoring all of these disciplines and their inter-relationships gives the research facility a unique perspective and along with the long term dataset stretching back to 1968 the ELA can look at historical records to monitor long term changes in the environment.

  15. A study on the levels of radioactivity in fish samples from the experimental lakes area in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Rennie, Michael D; Sadi, Baki; Zhang, Weihua; St-Amant, Nadereh

    2016-03-01

    To better understand background radiation levels in country foods, a total of 125 fish samples were collected from three lakes (Lake 226, Lake 302 and Lake 305) in the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario of Canada during the summer of 2014. Concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides ((226)Ra, (210)Pb and (210)Po) as well as anthropogenic radionuclides ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) were measured. This study confirmed that (210)Po is the dominant contributor to radiation doses resulting from fish consumption. While concentrations of (210)Pb and (226)Ra were below conventional detection limits, (210)Po was measured in almost all fish samples collected from the ELA. The average concentration was about 1.5 Bq/kg fresh weight (fw). None of the fish samples analysed in this study contained any detectable levels of (134)Cs. An average (137)Cs level of 6.1 Bq/kg fw was observed in freshwater fishes harvested in the ELA, almost twice that of samples measured in the National Capital Region of Canada in 2014 and more than 20 times higher than the levels observed in marine fish harvested from the Canadian west coast in 2013 and 2014. However, it is important to note that the concentrations of (137)Cs in fish samples from these inland lakes are considered very low from a radiological protection perspective. The resulting radiation dose for people from fish consumption would be a very small fraction of the annual dose from exposure to natural background radiation in Canada. The results indicate that fishes from inland lakes do not pose a radiological health concern. PMID:26803403

  16. Experimental investigation of factors limiting slow axis beam quality in 9xx nm high power broad area diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Winterfeldt, M. Crump, P.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2014-08-14

    GaAs-based broad-area diode lasers are needed with improved lateral beam parameter product (BPP{sub lat}) at high power. An experimental study of the factors limiting BPP{sub lat} is therefore presented, using extreme double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structures emitting at 910 nm. Continuous wave, pulsed and polarization-resolved measurements are presented and compared to thermal simulation. The importance of thermal and packaging-induced effects is determined by comparing junction -up and -down devices. Process factors are clarified by comparing diodes with and without index-guiding trenches. We show that in all cases studied, BPP{sub lat} is limited by a non-thermal BPP ground-level and a thermal BPP, which depends linearly on self-heating. Measurements as a function of pulse width confirm that self-heating rather than bias-level dominates. Diodes without trenches show low BPP ground-level, and a thermal BPP which depends strongly on mounting, due to changes in the temperature profile. The additional lateral guiding in diodes with trenches strongly increases the BPP ground-level, but optically isolates the stripe from the device edges, suppressing the influence of the thermal profile, leading to a BPP-slope that is low and independent of mounting. Trenches are also shown to initiate strain fields that cause parasitic TM-polarized emission with large BPP{sub lat}, whose influence on total BPP{sub lat} remains small, provided the overall polarization purity is >95%.

  17. Source-receptor relationships for speciated atmospheric mercury at the remote Experimental Lakes Area, northwestern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, I.; Zhang, L.; Blanchard, P.; Graydon, J. A.; St. Louis, V. L.

    2012-02-01

    Source-receptor relationships for speciated atmospheric mercury measured at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), northwestern Ontario, Canada were investigated using various receptor-based approaches. The data used in this study include gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), mercury bound to fine airborne particles (<2.5 μm) (PHg), reactive gaseous mercury (RGM), major inorganic ions, sulphur dioxide, nitric acid gas, ozone, and meteorological variables, all of which were measured between May 2005 and December 2006. The source origins identified were related to transport of industrial and combustion emissions (associated with elevated GEM), photochemical production of RGM (associated with elevated RGM), road-salt particles with absorption of gaseous Hg (associated with elevated PHg and RGM), crustal/soil emissions, and background pollution. Back trajectory modelling illustrated that a remote site, like ELA, is affected by distant Hg point sources in Canada and the United States. The sources identified from correlation analysis, principal components analysis and K-means cluster analysis were generally consistent. The discrepancies between the K-means and Hierarchical cluster analysis were the clusters related to transport of industrial/combustion emissions, photochemical production of RGM, and crustal/soil emissions. Although it was possible to assign the clusters to these source origins, the trajectory plots for the Hierarchical clusters were similar to some of the trajectories belonging to several K-means clusters. This likely occurred because the variables indicative of transport of industrial/combustion emissions were elevated in at least two or more of the clusters, which means this Hg source was well-represented in the data.

  18. Source-receptor relationships for speciated atmospheric mercury at the remote experimental lakes area, Northwestern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, I.; Zhang, L.; Blanchard, P.; Graydon, J. A.; St. Louis, V. L.

    2011-12-01

    Source-receptor relationships for speciated atmospheric mercury measured at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), Northwestern Ontario, Canada were investigated using various receptor-based approaches. The data used in this study include gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), mercury bound to fine airborne particles (< 2.5 μm) (PHg), reactive gaseous mercury (RGM), major inorganic ions, sulphur dioxide, nitric acid gas, ozone, and meteorological variables, all of which were measured between May 2005 and December 2006. The source origins identified were related to transport of industrial and combustion emissions (associated with elevated GEM), photochemical production of RGM (associated with elevated RGM), road-salt particles with adsorption of gaseous Hg (associated with elevated PHg and RGM), crustal/soil emissions, and background pollution. Back trajectory modelling illustrated that a remote site, like the ELA, is affected by distant Hg point sources in Canada and the United States. The sources identified from correlation analysis, principal components analysis and K-means cluster analysis were generally consistent. The discrepancies between the K-means and Hierarchical cluster analysis were the clusters related to transport of industrial/combustion emissions, photochemical production of RGM, and crustal/soil emissions. Although it was possible to assign the clusters to these source origins, the trajectory plots for the Hierarchical clusters were similar to some of the trajectories belonging to several K-means clusters. This likely occurred because the variables indicative of transport of industrial/combustion emissions were elevated in at least two or more of the clusters, which means this Hg source was well-represented in the data.

  19. VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION IN FATHEAD MINNOWS AND PEARL DACE FROM CONTROL (NON-DOSED) AND LAKES DOSED WITH EE2 IN THE CANADIAN EXPERIMENTAL LAKES AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A whole-lake endocrine disruption experiment was conducted by Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in northwestern Ontario for three years beginning in 2001. This experiment examined population, organismal, biochemical and cellular-level effects in la...

  20. The Impact of Eutrophication on Mercury Cycling in Lake 227 at the Experimental Lakes Area in Northwestern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J.; Lehnherr, I.; Gleason, A.; St. Louis, V. L.; Muir, D.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a pollutant of global concern as concentrations of methyl mercury (MeHg), the toxic and bioaccumulative form of Hg, are often present in fish at levels high enough to pose health risks to consumers. Although we are beginning to understand the factors controlling MeHg production in freshwater lakes, the impacts of environmental disturbances, such as eutrophication, on Hg cycling are not known. As part of a larger project examining controls on eutrophication, we are studying Hg cycling and MeHg production in the artificially eutrophied Lake 227 at the Experimental Lakes Area in northwestern Ontario. In addition to 40 years of ancillary data, Lake 227 is ideal for this study as it has an anoxic hypolimnion which may be an important zone of microbial MeHg production. To determine sources and losses of inorganic Hg(II) and MeHg from the lake, we are using a mass balance approach including: detailed lake profiles to determine the water column pools of Hg(II) and MeHg, Hg(II) and MeHg inputs via precipitation, and losses of Hg(II) and MeHg from the lake via gaseous elemental Hg(0) evasion and MeHg photodemethylation, respectively. Rates of water column MeHg production are also being determined using Hg stable isotope tracer experiments. 2010-2011 water column profiles demonstrated that although total Hg (THg) and MeHg concentrations were fairly low in Lake 227 surface waters (2.42 ± 0.64 and 0.11 ± 0.06 ng/L, respectively), MeHg concentrations (1.08 ± 0.39 ng/L) and the % THg that was MeHg (16 ± 5%) were high in deep regions of the water column (6-9 m). The zone of elevated water column MeHg expanded throughout summers 2010-2011, closely following the zone of anoxia, suggesting MeHg is produced in the anoxic hypolimnion. The zone of high particulate-bound THg (62 ± 6%) also migrated with the zone of anoxia over the summer suggesting that particle sinking and sediment resuspension, which are controlled by the timing of algal blooms, are important

  1. The Influence of a Subslab Gravel Layer and Open Area on Soil-Gas and Radon Entry into Two Experimental Basements

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.; Sextro, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    Measurements of steady-state soil-gas and {sup 222}Rn entry rates into two room-sized, experimental basement structures were made for a range of structure depressurizations (0-40 Pa) and open areas (0-165 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}). The structures are identical except that in one the floor slab lies directly on native soil whereas in the other the slab lies on a high permeability gravel layer. The subslab gravel layer greatly enhances the soil-gas and radon entry rate into the structure. The radon entry rate into the structure with the subslab gravel layer is four times greater than the entry rate into the structure without the gravel layer with an open area of 165 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}; the ratio increases to 30 for an open area of 5.0 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}. Although open area is a poor indicator of radon and soil-gas entry into the experimental structure, the extension of the soil-gas pressure field created by structure depressurization is a good measure of the radon entry rate into the experimental structures. The measured normalized radon entry rate into both structures has the same linear relationship with the average subslab pressure coupling regardless of open area. The average subslab pressure coupling is a measure of the extension of the soil-gas pressure field. A three-dimensional finite-difference model correctly predicts the effect of a subslab gravel layer, and different open area configurations on radon and soil-gas entry rate; however, the model underpredicts the absolute entry rates into both structures by a factor of 1.5.

  2. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Area Suction for the Control of the Laminar Boundary Layer on an NACA 64a010 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braslow, Albert L; Burrows, Dale L; Tetervin, Neal; Visconti, Fioravante

    1951-01-01

    A low-turbulence wind-tunnel investigation was made of an NACA 64a010 airfoil having a porous surface to determine the reduction in section total-drag coefficient that might be obtained at large Reynolds numbers by the use of suction to produce continuous inflow through the surface of the airfoil (area suction). In addition to the experimental investigation, a related theoretical analysis was made to provide a basis of comparison for the test results.

  3. EXPERIMENTAL AND MODEL-COMPUTED AREA AVERAGED VERTICAL PROFILES OF WIND SPEED FOR EVALUATION OF MESOSCALE URBAN CANOPY SCHEMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous urban canopy schemes have recently been developed for mesoscale models in order to approximate the drag and turbulent production effects of a city on the air flow. However, little data exists by which to evaluate the efficacy of the schemes since "area-averaged&quo...

  4. The aspect of ultrastructural changes of the osteoblasts and surface areas of alveolar bone appearing in experimental tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Hirashita, A

    1976-12-01

    Molars of mature Wistar rats were moved experimentally by orthodontic elastic for four days. Then, the aspects of ultrastructural changes of the osteoblasts and structure of the alveolar bone surface which appeared in experimental tooth movement were studied. The following results were obtained. 1) These osteoblasts are classified into three groups according to their position. 2) The most active response to the orthodontic force is exhibited by the second group of cells with the ability of rapid production of abundant acid polysaccharide; i) Abundant rough surfaced endoplasmic reticulum with markedly dilated cisternae. ii) Well developed Golgi apparatus and electron opaque granules with a limiting membrane are found in the cytoplasm. Large granules are frequently seen to be secreted out of the cell. iii) The mitochondria are of large size and round shape with well developed cristae. 3) The surface of the new alveolar bone is covered with a belt-shaped structure consisting of small dense spherical-shaped structures. 4) Osteoclasts are rarely seen, but the original function of the cells appears to be almost inactive. PMID:1072189

  5. The influence of systemically administered oxytocin on the implant-bone interface area: an experimental study in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Am; Park, Sang-Hun

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of systemically administered oxytocin (OT) on the implant-bone interface by using histomorphometric analysis and the removal torque test. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 10 adult, New Zealand white, female rabbits were used in this experiment. We placed 2 implants (CSM; CSM Implant, Daegu, South Korea) in each distal femoral metaphysis on both the right and left sides; the implants on both sides were placed 10 mm apart. In each rabbit, 1 implant was prepared for histomorphometric analysis and the other 3 were prepared for the removal torque test (RT). The animals received intramuscular injections of either saline (control group; 0.15 M NaCl) or OT (experimental group; 200 µg/rabbit). The injections were initiated on Day 3 following the implant surgery and were continued for 4 subsequent weeks; the injections were administered twice per day (at a 12-h interval), for 2 days per week. RESULTS While no statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups (P=.787), the control group had stronger removal torque values. The serum OT concentration (ELISA value) was higher in the OT-treated group, although no statistically significant difference was found. Further, the histomorphometric parameter (bone-toimplant contact [BIC], inter-thread bone, and peri-implant bone) values were higher in the experimental group, but the differences were not significant. CONCLUSION We postulate that OT supplementation via intramuscular injection weakly contributes to the bone response at the implant-bone interface in rabbits. Therefore, higher concentrations or more frequent administration of OT may be required for a greater bone response to the implant. Further studies analyzing these aspects are needed. PMID:25551011

  6. Quantifying lithic microwear with load variation on experimental basalt flakes using LSCM and area-scale fractal complexity (Asfc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemp, W. James; Morozov, Mikhail; Key, Alastair J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Working load is one factor that affects wear on stone tools. Despite the recognition of the importance of the relationship between working load and the development of microwear on stone tools, there have been few attempts to quantify differences in wear due to changes in load. In a controlled experiment, we used 30 basalt flakes knapped from raw material collected in Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, Africa, to cut oak branches for the same number of strokes. For each flake, a different loading level was applied starting at 150 g and increasing by increments of 150 g to a maximum load of 4.5 kg. A laser scanning confocal microscope was used to mathematically document the surface texture of the flakes. The worn surface data were compared using area-scale fractal complexity (Asfc), calculated from relative areas, to determine the degree to which variation in loading significantly affected the amount of wear on the flake surfaces. Our results indicate that working load does play a role in the development of lithic microwear on these flakes and that discrimination of two worn flake surfaces, using mean square ratios of Asfc, based on variable load is consistently possible with load differences between ∼100 g and 4.5 kg. However, discrimination of microwear on flake surfaces was not consistent for all load level differences and discrimination became less consistent when working load differences were below ∼100 g.

  7. Experimental determination of turbulent fluxes over the heterogeneous LITFASS area: Selected results from the LITFASS-98 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyrich, F.; Richter, S. H.; Weisensee, U.; Kohsiek, W.; Lohse, H.; de Bruin, H. A. R.; Foken, Th.; Göckede, M.; Berger, F.; Vogt, R.; Batchvarova, E.

    During the LITFASS-98 experiment, local flux measurements were performed over five different types of underlying surface (grass, barley, triticale, pine forest, water) in a heterogeneous landscape using eddy covariance and profile techniques over a three week time period in June, 1998. Estimates of the area-integrated sensible heat flux during daytime were obtained from continuous measurements with a large aperture scintillometer (LAS) along a 4.7km path. The calculation of a mean diurnal cycle of the fluxes during the experiment revealed significant differences between the main land use classes. A land-use weighted average of the sensible heat flux was found to be in good agreement with the LAS based estimate, which in turn was supported by other regionally integrated flux estimates from budget considerations and aircraft measurements for a few case studies. The profiles of turbulent quantities measured along a 99m-tower significantly deviate from ``idealised'' profiles measured over homogeneous terrain. Peculiarities in the profile structure could be attributed to the heterogeneity of the terrain, namely to the differences in the surface characteristics of the footprint areas for the different tower levels.

  8. The Influence of a Subslab Gravel Layer and Open Area on Soil-Gas and Radon Entry into Two Experimental Basements

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Allen L.; Sextro, R.G.

    1995-03-01

    Measurements of steady-state soil-gas and {sup 222}Rn entry rates into two room-sized, experimental basement structures were made for a range of structure depressurizations (0-40 Pa) and open floor areas (0-165 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}). The structures are identical except that in one the floor slab lies directly on native soil whereas in the other the slab lies on a high-permeability gravel layer. The subslab gravel layer greatly enhances the soil-gas and radon entry rate into the structure. The radon entry rate into the structure with the subslab gravel layer is four times greater than the entry rate into the structure without the gravel layer with an open floor area of 165 x 10{sup -4}m{sup 2}; however the ratio increases to 30 for an open floor area of 5.0 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}. The relationship between open area and soil-gas entry rate is complex. It depends on both the amount and distribution of the open area as well as the permeability of the soil near the opening. The entry rate into the experimental structures is largely determined by the presence or absence of a subslab gravel layer. Therefore open area is a poor indicator of radon and soil-gas entry into the structures. The extension of the soil-gas pressure field created by structure depressurization is a good measure of the radon entry. The measured normalized radon entry rate into both structures has the same linear relationship with the average subslab pressure coupling regardless of open area or the presence or absence of a subslab gravel layer. The average subslab pressure coupling is an estimate of the extension of the soil-gas pressure field. A three-dimensional finite-difference model correctly predicts the effect of a subslab gravel layer and different open area configurations on radon and soil-gas entry rate; however, the model underpredicts the absolute entry rate into each structure by a factor of 1.5.

  9. Do trace metals select for darker birds in urban areas? An experimental exposure to lead and zinc.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Marion; Gasparini, Julien; Frantz, Adrien

    2016-07-01

    Trace metals from anthropogenic activities are involved in numerous health impairments and may therefore select for detoxification mechanisms or a higher tolerance. Melanin, responsible for the black and red colourations of teguments, plays a role in metal ion chelation and its synthesis is positively linked to immunity, antioxidant capacity and stress resistance due to pleiotropic effects. Therefore, we expected darker birds to (1) store higher amounts of metals in their feathers, (2) maintain lower metal concentrations in blood and (3) suffer less from metal exposure. We exposed feral pigeons (Columba livia) exhibiting various plumage darkness levels to low, but chronic, concentrations of zinc and/or lead, two of the most abundant metals in urban areas. First, we found negative and positive effects of lead and zinc, respectively, on birds' condition and reproductive parameters. Then, we observed positive relationships between plumage darkness and both zinc and lead concentrations in feathers. Interestingly, though darker adults did not maintain lower metal concentrations in blood and did not have higher fitness parameters, darker juveniles exhibited a higher survival rate than paler ones when exposed to lead. Our results show that melanin-based plumage colouration does modulate lead effects on birds' fitness parameters but that the relationship between metals, melanin, and fitness is more complex than expected and thus stress the need for more studies. PMID:27282322

  10. [The effect of transcardiac galvanization on energy metabolism and the size of the area of the heart muscle lesion in experimental myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Maslov, A G; Karpov, R S; Smirnov, V P; Laptev, B I; Metelkin, A V

    1995-01-01

    A study was made of effects of transcardiac galvanization (TCG) on activities of a panel of oxidation-reduction enzymes as well as on the cardiac muscle content of high energy substrates, and size of the lesion area, in experimental myocardial infarction (EMI) in 50 albino male rats. After two TCG procedures, and at 24-h EMI, augmentation was found of activities of succinic dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, NADH-dehydrogenase, beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, both in the area of profound ischemia and peri-infarction myocardium, this being accompanied with an increase in myocardial content of adenosine triphosphate, creatine phosphate, and glycogen, and reduction of the developing mass of necrosis. Stimulation of enzyme activity in the course on the enzyme complex and membrane-stabilizing action of this preformed physical factor. PMID:8846353

  11. Experimental and numerical investigation of contact-area-limited doping for top-contact pentacene thin-film transistors with Schottky contact.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kei; Wada, Yasuo; Toyabe, Toru

    2015-10-28

    Effects of contact-area-limited doping for pentacene thin-film transistors with a bottom-gate, top-contact configuration were investigated. The increase in the drain current and the effective field-effect mobility was achieved by preparing hole-doped layers underneath the gold contact electrodes by coevaporation of pentacene and 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ), confirmed by using a thin-film organic transistor advanced simulator (TOTAS) incorporating Schottky contact with a thermionic field emission (TFE) model. Although the simulated electrical characteristics fit the experimental results well only in the linear regime of the transistor operation, the barrier height for hole injection and the gate-voltage-dependent hole mobility in the pentacene transistors were evaluated with the aid of the device simulation. This experimental data analysis with the simulation indicates that the highly-doped semiconducting layers prepared in the contact regions can enhance the charge carrier injection into the active semiconductor layer and concurrent trap filling in the transistor channel, caused by the mitigation of a Schottky energy barrier. This study suggests that both the contact-area-limited doping and the device simulation dealing with Schottky contact are indispensable in designing and developing high-performance organic thin-film transistors. PMID:24922359

  12. [The effect of transcardiac galvanization on the function of the microcirculatory bed of the peri-infarct area in experimental myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Maslov, A G; Smirnov, V P

    1993-07-01

    The model of experimental myocardial infarction in rats was used to study the effect of procedures of transcardiac galvanization (the current power 4 mA, duration 60 min) on the condition of the peri-infarction zone microcirculatory bed. The morphometric studies of the microcirculatory bed were performed using PAS reaction with amylase using a net with equidistant points. Two runs of transcardiac galvanization by the end of the first 24 hours of myocardial infarction was shown to improve the condition of the capillary network, to increase the relative and absolute area of the capillaries, the number of opened reserve capillaries, to reduce the distance of oxygen and metabolites diffusion from capillaries to cardiomyocytes in the peri-infarction zone thereby creating favourable conditions for the remaining viable myocardium and for stabilization of the affected zone. PMID:8400196

  13. Component Performance Investigation of J71 Experimental Turbine. Part 2; Internal-Flow Conditions with 97-Percent-Design Stator Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebeske, John J., Jr.; Petrash, Donald A.

    1956-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the internal-flow conditions of a J71 experimental turbine equipped with 97-percent-design stator areas was conducted at equivalent design speed and near equivalent design work. The results of the investigation indicate that the stage work distribution closely approximates design, the actual distribution being 44.1, 33.4, and 22.5 percent for the first, second, and third stages, respectively. The first-, second-, and third-stage efficiencies were 0.894, 0.858, and 0.792, respectively. The first and second stages exhibited loss regions near the hub and tip at the rotor blade outlets. The hub loss region is attributed to stator secondary flows, and a contributing factor to the tip loss region may be the high design diffusion on the rotor blade suction surface near the tip. The loss in the third stage is appreciably greater than that in the first or second stage. The fact that the third rotor is unshrouded and has a nominal tip clearance of 0.120 inch may contribute to the higher loss in the tip region of the third stage.

  14. Six-circle diffractometer with atmosphere- and temperature-controlled sample stage and area and line detectors for use in the G2 experimental station at CHESS

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, D. E.; Blasini, D. R.; Vodnick, A. M.; Blank, B.; Tate, M. W.; Deyhim, A.; Smilgies, D.-M.; Abruna, H.; Gruner, S. M.; Baker, S. P.

    2006-11-15

    A new diffractometer system was designed and built for the G2 experimental station at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). A six-circle {kappa} goniometer, which provides better access to reciprocal space compared to Eulerian cradles, was chosen primarily to perform large angle Bragg diffraction on samples with preferred crystallographic orientations, and can access both horizontal and vertical diffraction planes. A new atmosphere- and temperature-controlled sample stage was designed for thin film thermomechanical experiments. The stage can be operated in ultrahigh vacuum and uses a Be dome x-ray window to provide access to all scattering vectors above a sample's horizon. A novel design minimizes sample displacements during thermal cycling to less than 160 {mu}m over 900 deg. C and the stage is motorized for easy height adjustments, which can be used to compensate for displacements from thermal expansion. A new area detector was built and a new line detector was purchased. Both detectors cover a large region in reciprocal space, providing the ability to measure time-resolved phenomena. A detailed description of the design and technical characteristics is given. Some capabilities of the diffractometer system are illustrated by a strain analysis on a thin metal film and characterization of organic thin films with grazing incidence diffraction. The G2 experimental station, as part of CHESS, is a national user facility and is available to external users by application.

  15. Hydrogeology and water quality of the shallow aquifer system at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    In October 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study to characterize the hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer system at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia, which is located on the Potomac River in the Coastal Plain Physiographic Province. The study provides a description of the hydrogeologic units, directions of ground-water flow, and back-ground water quality in the study area to a depth of about 100 feet. Lithologic, geophysical, and hydrologic data were collected from 28 wells drilled for this study, from 3 existing wells, and from outcrops. The shallow aquifer system at the Explosive Experimental Area consists of two fining-upward sequences of Pleistocene fluvial-estuarine deposits that overlie Paleocene-Eocene marine deposits of the Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit. The surficial hydrogeologic unit is the Columbia aquifer. Horizontal linear flow of water in this aquifer generally responds to the surface topography, discharging to tidal creeks, marshes, and the Potomac River, and rates of flow in this aquifer range from 0.003 to 0.70 foot per day. The Columbia aquifer unconformably overlies the upper confining unit 12-an organic-rich clay that is 0 to 55 feet thick. The upper confining unit conformably overlies the upper confined aquifer, a 0- to 35-feet thick unit that consists of interbedded fine-grained to medium-grained sands and clay. The upper confined aquifer probably receives most of its recharge from the adjacent and underlying Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit. Water in the upper confined aquifer generally flows eastward, northward, and northeastward at about 0.03 foot per day toward the Potomac River and Machodoc Creek. The Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit consists of glauconitic, fossiliferous silty fine-grained sands of the Nanjemoy Formation. Where the upper confined system is absent, the Nanjemoy-Marlboro confining unit is directly overlain by the Columbia aquifer. In some parts of

  16. Experimental Plan: 300 Area Treatability Test: In Situ Treatment of the Vadose Zone and Smear Zone Uranium Contamination by Polyphosphate Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Pierce, Eric M.; Oostrom, Mart; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2007-08-31

    The overall objectives of the treatability test is to evaluate and optimize polyphosphate remediation technology for infiltration either from ground surface, or some depth of excavation, providing direct stabilization of uranium within the deep vadose and capillary fringe above the 300 Area aquifer. Expected result from this experimental plan is a data package that includes: 1) quantification of the retardation of polyphosphate, 2) the rate of degradation and the retardation of degradation products as a function of water content, 3) an understanding of the mechanism of autunite formation via the reaction of solid phase calcite-bound uranium and aqueous polyphosphate remediation technology, 4) an understanding of the transformation mechanism, identity of secondary phases, and the kinetics of the reaction between uranyl-carbonate and –silicate minerals with the polyphosphate remedy under solubility-limiting conditions, 5) quantification of the extent and rate of uranium released and immobilized based on the infiltration rate of the polyphosphate remedy and the effect of and periodic wet-dry cycling on the efficacy of polyphosphate remediation for uranium in the vadose zone and capillary fringe, and 6) quantification of reliable equilibrium solubility values for autunite under hydraulically unsaturated conditions allowing accurate prediction of the long-term stability of autunite. Moreover, results of intermediate scale testing will quantify the transport of polyphosphate and degradation products, and yield degradation rates, at a scale that is bridging the gap between the small-scale UFA studies and the field scale. These results will be used to test and verify a site-specific, variable saturation, reactive transport model and to aid in the design of a pilot-scale field test of this technology. In particular, the infiltration approach and monitoring strategy of the pilot test would be primarily based on results from intermediate-scale testing. Results from this

  17. UAV-Based Estimation of Carbon Exports from Heterogeneous Soil Landscapes—A Case Study from the CarboZALF Experimental Area

    PubMed Central

    Wehrhan, Marc; Rauneker, Philipp; Sommer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The advantages of remote sensing using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are a high spatial resolution of images, temporal flexibility and narrow-band spectral data from different wavelengths domains. This enables the detection of spatio-temporal dynamics of environmental variables, like plant-related carbon dynamics in agricultural landscapes. In this paper, we quantify spatial patterns of fresh phytomass and related carbon (C) export using imagery captured by a 12-band multispectral camera mounted on the fixed wing UAV Carolo P360. The study was performed in 2014 at the experimental area CarboZALF-D in NE Germany. From radiometrically corrected and calibrated images of lucerne (Medicago sativa), the performance of four commonly used vegetation indices (VIs) was tested using band combinations of six near-infrared bands. The highest correlation between ground-based measurements of fresh phytomass of lucerne and VIs was obtained for the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) using near-infrared band b899. The resulting map was transformed into dry phytomass and finally upscaled to total C export by harvest. The observed spatial variability at field- and plot-scale could be attributed to small-scale soil heterogeneity in part. PMID:26907284

  18. UAV-based Estimation of Carbon Exports from Heterogeneous Soil Landscapes - A Case Study from the CarboZALF Experimental Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrhan, Marc; Rauneker, Philipp; Sommer, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The advantages of remote sensing using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are a high spatial resolution of images, temporal flexibility and narrow-band spectral data from different wavelengths domains. This enables the detection of spatio-temporal dynamics of environmental variables, like plant-related carbon dynamics in agricultural landscapes. In this paper we quantify spatial patterns of fresh phytomass and related carbon (C) export using imagery captured by a 12-band multispectral camera mounted on the fixed wing UAV Carolo P360. The study was performed in 2014 at the experimental area CarboZALF-D in NE Germany. From radiometrically corrected and calibrated images of lucerne (Medicago sativa), the performance of four commonly used vegetation indices (VIs) was tested using band combinations of six near-infrared bands. The highest correlation (R² = 0.88) between ground-based measurements of fresh phytomass of lucerne and VIs was obtained for the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) using near-infrared band 11 (899 nm). The resulting map was transformed into dry phytomass and finally upscaled to total C export by harvest. The observed spatial variability (75-225 g C m-2) at field- and plot-scale could be attributed to small-scale soil heterogeneity in part. Soil effects were suppressed by the nearly optimal weather conditions for plant growth in 2014.

  19. Development of experimental approach to examine U occurrence continuity over the extended area reconnoitory boreholes: Lostoin Block, West Khasi Hills district, Meghalaya (India).

    PubMed

    Kukreti, B M; Kumar, Pramod; Sharma, G K

    2015-10-01

    Exploratory drilling was undertaken in the Lostoin block, West Khasi Hills district of Meghalaya based on the geological extension to the major uranium deposit in the basin. Gamma ray logging of drilled boreholes shows considerable subsurface mineralization in the block. However, environmental and exploration related challenges such as climatic, logistic, limited core drilling and poor core recovery etc. in the block severely restricted the study of uranium exploration related index parameters for the block with a high degree confidence. The present study examines these exploration related challenges and develops an integrated approach using representative sampling of reconnoitory boreholes in the block. Experimental findings validate a similar geochemically coherent nature of radio elements (K, Ra and Th) in the Lostoin block uranium hosting environment with respect to the known block of Mahadek basin and uranium enrichment is confirmed by the lower U to Th correlation index (0.268) of hosting environment. A mineralized zone investigation in the block shows parent (refers to the actual parent uranium concentration at a location and not a secondary concentration such as the daughter elements which produce the signal from a total gamma ray measurement) favoring uranium mineralization. The confidence parameters generated under the present study have implications for the assessment of the inferred category of uranium ore in the block and setting up a road map for the systematic exploration of large uranium potential occurring over extended areas in the basin amid prevailing environmental and exploratory impediments. PMID:26164149

  20. UAV-Based Estimation of Carbon Exports from Heterogeneous Soil Landscapes--A Case Study from the CarboZALF Experimental Area.

    PubMed

    Wehrhan, Marc; Rauneker, Philipp; Sommer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The advantages of remote sensing using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are a high spatial resolution of images, temporal flexibility and narrow-band spectral data from different wavelengths domains. This enables the detection of spatio-temporal dynamics of environmental variables, like plant-related carbon dynamics in agricultural landscapes. In this paper, we quantify spatial patterns of fresh phytomass and related carbon (C) export using imagery captured by a 12-band multispectral camera mounted on the fixed wing UAV Carolo P360. The study was performed in 2014 at the experimental area CarboZALF-D in NE Germany. From radiometrically corrected and calibrated images of lucerne (Medicago sativa), the performance of four commonly used vegetation indices (VIs) was tested using band combinations of six near-infrared bands. The highest correlation between ground-based measurements of fresh phytomass of lucerne and VIs was obtained for the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) using near-infrared band b899. The resulting map was transformed into dry phytomass and finally upscaled to total C export by harvest. The observed spatial variability at field- and plot-scale could be attributed to small-scale soil heterogeneity in part. PMID:26907284

  1. Comparative biochemical changes in young Zebu cattle experimentally infected with Trypanosoma vivax from tsetse infested and non-tsetse infested areas of northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Dagnachew, Shimelis; Terefe, Getachew; Abebe, Getachew; Barry, Dave J; Goddeeris, Bruno M

    2014-10-15

    Trypanosomosis is a vector-borne protozoan disease of animals and humans in sub-Saharan Africa. In Ethiopia, particularly the northwest region is affected by both tsetse and non-tsetse transmitted trypanosomosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects and compare differences in virulence of Trypanosoma vivax infection between tsetse and non-tsetse infested areas of northwest Ethiopia on the basis of serum biochemical values in Zebu cattle. Eighteen cattles purchased from trypanosome free area and aged between 9 and 12 months were assigned into three groups of six animals (Group TT=infected with T. vivax from tsetse infested area, Group NT=infected with T. vivax from non-tsetse infested area and Group C=non-infected control). For each experimental animal 3 ml of blood from naturally infected cattle was inoculated intravenously at 10(6) trypanosomes/ml except the control. Blood sample was collected once a week for 8 consecutive weeks for analyzing serum biochemical values (glucose, total cholesterol, total protein, albumin, and enzymes including GOT, GPT and ALP) using a Humastar 80 clinical chemistry analyzer. Both T. vivax parasites caused an acute infection with parasites appearing in circulation on 6 and 12 days post-infection for NT and TT cattle, respectively. A significant reduction (P<0.001) in glucose levels was observed in infected groups compared with the control with mean values of 33.8 ± 3.6 mg/dl for TT, 34.3 ± 3.6 mg/dl for NT and 70.9 ± 3.0 mg/dl for control groups. A similar reduction was also seen in total cholesterol values (P=0.001) with 70.4 ± 10.6 mg/dl for TT and 78.0 ± 10.6 mg/dl for NT groups compared to 139.5 ± 8.7 mg/dl for the control group. No difference was observed for total serum protein between the three groups (P=0.260) whereas the mean albumin level was significantly (P<0.001) decreased (3.5 ± 0.1g/dl and 2.9 ± 0.1g/dl in TT and NT groups respectively) compared to that for control cattle (4.5 ± 0.1g

  2. VEGA: A low-power front-end ASIC for large area multi-linear X-ray silicon drift detectors: Design and experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahangarianabhari, Mahdi; Macera, Daniele; Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Malcovati, Piero; Grassi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and the first experimental characterization of VEGA, an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) designed to read out large area monolithic linear Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD's). VEGA consists of an analog and a digital/mixed-signal section to accomplish all the functionalities and specifications required for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy in the energy range between 500 eV and 50 keV. The analog section includes a charge sensitive preamplifier, a shaper with 3-bit digitally selectable shaping times from 1.6 μs to 6.6 μs and a peak stretcher/sample-and-hold stage. The digital/mixed-signal section includes an amplitude discriminator with coarse and fine threshold level setting, a peak discriminator and a logic circuit to fulfill pile-up rejection, signal sampling, trigger generation, channel reset and the preamplifier and discriminators disabling functionalities. A Serial Peripherical Interface (SPI) is integrated in VEGA for loading and storing all configuration parameters in an internal register within few microseconds. The VEGA ASIC has been designed and manufactured in 0.35 μm CMOS mixed-signal technology in single and 32 channel versions with dimensions of 200 μm×500 μm per channel. A minimum intrinsic Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) of 12 electrons r.m.s. at 3.6 μs peaking time and room temperature is measured and the linearity error is between -0.9% and +0.6% in the whole input energy range. The total power consumption is 481 μW and 420 μW per channel for the single and 32 channels version, respectively. A comparison with other ASICs for X-ray SDD's shows that VEGA has a suitable low noise and offers high functionality as ADC-ready signal processing but at a power consumption that is a factor of four lower than other similar existing ASICs.

  3. Analyzing Sustainable Energy Opportunities for a Small Scale Off-Grid Facility: A Case Study at Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggirala, Bhanu

    This thesis explored the opportunities to reduce energy demand and renewable energy feasibility at an off-grid science "community" called the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario. Being off-grid, ELA is completely dependent on diesel and propane fuel supply for all its electrical and heating needs, which makes ELA vulnerable to fluctuating fuel prices. As a result ELA emits a large amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) for its size. Energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies can reduce energy consumption and consequently energy cost, as well as GHG. Energy efficiency was very important to ELA due to the elevated fuel costs at this remote location. Minor upgrades to lighting, equipment and building envelope were able to reduce energy costs and reduce load. Efficient energy saving measures were recommended that save on operating and maintenance costs, namely, changing to LED lights, replacing old equipment like refrigerators and downsizing of ice makers. This resulted in a 4.8% load reduction and subsequently reduced the initial capital cost for biomass by 27,000, by 49,500 for wind power and by 136,500 for solar power. Many alternative energies show promise as potential energy sources to reduce the diesel and propane consumption at ELA including wind energy, solar heating and biomass. A biomass based CHP system using the existing diesel generators as back-up has the shortest pay back period of the technologies modeled. The biomass based CHP system has a pay back period of 4.1 years at 0.80 per liter of diesel, as diesel price approaches $2.00 per liter the pay back period reduces to 0.9 years, 50% the generation cost compared to present generation costs. Biomass has been successfully tried and tested in many off-grid communities particularly in a small-scale off-grid setting in North America and internationally. Also, the site specific solar and wind data show that ELA has potential to harvest renewable resources and produce heat and power at competitive

  4. Perspectives on Advertising Education: Curricula, Research--Descriptive, Research--Experimental, Industry/Educators' Cooperation, Special Interest Areas, and Instruction; Proceedings of the 1974 National Conference for University Professors of Advertising at the Univ. of Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeigler, Sherilyn K., Ed.

    This document contains all of the presentations given at the 1974 National American Academy of Advertising Conference in Newport, Rhode Island. The theme of the conference was "Perspectives on Advertising" and the areas of focus were curricula and instruction, descriptive and experimental research, cooperation between educators and the advertising…

  5. Experimental Study of the Effects of Finite Surface Disturbances and Angle of Attack on the Laminar Boundary Layer of an NACA 64A010 Airfoil with Area Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, Milton A; Braslow, Albert L

    1952-01-01

    A Langley low-turbulence wind-tunnel investigation of a porous NACA 64A010 airfoil section has been made to determine the effectiveness of area suction in maintaining full-chord laminar flow behind finite disturbances and at angles of attacks other than 0 degrees. Aero suction resulted in only a small increase in the size of a finite disturbance required to cause premature boundary-layer transition as compared with that for the airfoil without suction. Combined wake and suction drags lower than the drag of the plain airfoil were obtained through a range of low lift coefficient by the use of area suction.

  6. Comparison of theoretical and experimental thrust performance of a 1030:1 area ratio rocket nozzle at a chamber pressure of 2413 kN/m2 (350 psia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Tamara A.; Pavli, Albert J.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1987-01-01

    The joint Army. Navy, NASA. Air Force (JANNAF) rocket engine peformnace prediction procedure is based on the use of various reference computer programs. One of the reference programs for nozzle analysis is the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) Program. The purpose of this report is to calibrate the JANNAF procedure incorporated into the December l984 version of the TDK program for the high-area-ratio rocket engine regime. The calibration was accomplished by modeling the performance of a 1030:1 rocket nozzle tested at NASA Lewis Research Center. A detailed description of the experimental test conditions and TDK input parameters is given. The results show that the computer code predicts delivered vacuum specific impulse to within 0.12 to 1.9 percent of the experimental data. Vacuum thrust coefficient predictions were within + or - 1.3 percent of experimental results. Predictions of wall static pressure were within approximately + or - 5 percent of the measured values. An experimental value for inviscid thrust was obtained for the nozzle extension between area ratios of 427.5 and 1030 by using an integration of the measured wall static pressures. Subtracting the measured thrust gain produced by the nozzle between area ratios of 427.5 and 1030 from the inviscid thrust gain yielded experimental drag decrements of 10.85 and 27.00 N (2.44 and 6.07 lb) for mixture ratios of 3.04 and 4.29, respectively. These values correspond to 0.45 and 1.11 percent of the total vacuum thrust. At a mixture ratio of 4.29, the TDK predicted drag decrement was 16.59 N (3.73 lb), or 0.71 percent of the predicted total vacuum thrust.

  7. Effect of experimental crude oil contamination on abundance, mortality and resettlement of representative mud flat organisms in the mesohaline area of the elbe estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Bernem, K. H.

    After repeated experimental contamination with small doses of the crude oils Arabian light, Kuwait crude and Iranian light on a silty mud flat in the Elbe estuary, neither an increased mortality nor emigration was found in Macoma balthica or Nereis diversicolor. Oligochaetes increased in abundance. The entire population of Corophium volutator tried to leave the contaminated sediment. Most specimens came into contact with the oil coating of the sediment and were killed. Twelve weeks after the beginning of the contaminations the original community structure had reestablished. Different effects between the 3 crude oils tested were not significant.

  8. In vivo experimental drug resistance study in Trypanosoma vivax isolates from tsetse infested and non-tsetse infested areas of Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Dagnachew, Shimelis; Terefe, Getachew; Abebe, Getachew; Barry, Dave; McCulloch, Richard; Goddeeris, Bruno

    2015-06-01

    Ethiopia, particularly in the Northwest region, is affected by both tsetse fly and non-tsetse fly transmitted trypanosomosis with a significant impact on livestock productivity. The control of trypanosomosis in Ethiopia relies on either curative or prophylactic treatment of animals with diminazene aceturate (DA) or isometamidium chloride (ISM), respectively. However, since these two trypanocides have been on the market for more than 40 years, this may have resulted in drug-resistance. Therefore, in vivo drug resistance tests on two Ethiopian isolates of Trypanosoma vivax were completed, one from an area where tsetse flies are present and one from an area where tsetse flies are not present. Twenty four cattle (Bos indicus) aged between 6 and 12 months, purchased from a trypanosome-free area (Debre Brehan: Northcentral Ethiopia) and confirmed to be trypanosome-negative, were randomly assigned into four groups of six animals, which were infected with T. vivax isolated from a tsetse-infested or non-tsetse infested area, and in each case treated with curative doses of DA or ISM. Each animal were inoculated intravenously 3×10(6) trypanosomes from donor animals. Parasitaemia became patent earlier in infections with non-tsetse T. vivax (∼7 days post-infection) than tsetse (∼14 days post-infection). Both groups were treated at the highest peak parasitaemia with DA or ISM and nine cattle, four with non-tsetse T. vivax (two ISM- and two DA-treated) and five with tsetse T. vivax (three ISM- and two DA-treated) showed relapses of parasitaemia. Moreover, treatment did not improve diagnostic host markers of trypanosome infections in these animals. In conclusion, in vivo drug tests indicated the presence of resistant parasites (>20% of treated animals in each group relapsed) against recommended doses of both available trypanocidal drugs. PMID:25792418

  9. An experimental study on felsic rock artificial seawater interaction: implications for hydrothermal alteration and sulfate formation in the Kuroko mining area of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yasumasa; Shikazono, Naotatsu; Ishiyama, Daizo; Sato, Hinako; Mizuta, Toshio

    2005-03-01

    Experimental studies on the interactions between artificial seawater (ASW) and fresh rhyolite, perlite and weakly altered dacitic tuff containing a small amount of smectite suggest changing cation transfer during smectite-forming processes. Initially, dissolution of K from the rocks accompanies incorporation of Mg and Ca from ASW during both earlier (devitrification stage) and later smectite formation, whereas Ca incorporated with early smectite formation redissolves with progressive reaction. Barium mobility increases toward the later smectite-forming reactions. Therefore, the large amounts of barite, anhydrite and gypsum in Kuroko ore deposits are considered to have precipitated from hydrothermal solutions derived from the interaction with previously altered felsic rocks during late smectite formation, rather than by the reaction with fresh felsic rocks.

  10. Is the increase in oil pollution a possibility of the presence of diverse microorganisms? An experimental dataset on oil prevalent areas of Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Rekadwad, Bhagwan N; Khobragade, Chandrahaysa N

    2016-12-01

    Survey data and wet lab reports presented in this paper were collected from Western coastlines of India from Goan beaches. Oil polluted areas were captured on camera as evidence for oil and tar pollution. Several microorganisms showing diverse characteristics such as pigment producers, salt tolerant and hydrocarbon resistance were isolated and cultured in the laboratory. The dataset presented in this paper supports "A case study on effects of oil spills and tar-ball pollution on beaches of Goa (India)" (Rekadwad and Khobragade, 2015) [1] and "Microbial diversity of oil spills and tar resistant bacteria isolated from beaches of Goa (India)" (Rekadwad and Khobragade, 2016) [2]. PMID:27622205

  11. Effect of supply/regeneration section area ratio on the performance of desiccant wheels in hot and humid climates: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendehboudi, Alireza; Esmaeili, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    Desiccant cooling system is a suitable alternative option for conventional cooling system in humid climates. It is an environmental protection technique for cooling buildings. This study has investigated the effect of supply/regeneration section area ratio on the performance of desiccant wheels in hot and humid climates, using Silica Gel (WSG) and Molecular Sieve (LT3) desiccants. To this end, some parameters such as outlet air humidity ratio, process removed moisture, process outlet temperature, reactivation outlet temperature and reactivation outlet moisture have been examined as a function of rotational speed and inlet air humidity ratio in 1:3, 1:2 and 1:1 split. In this study, desiccant materials are regenerated using a constant regeneration temperature of 80 °C, wheel rotation speed range of 4-12 RPH (revolutions per hour) and variable humidity. The results show that a rise in area ratio causes an increase in process removed moisture, process outlet temperature, reactivation outlet temperature and a drop in reactivation outlet moisture and outlet humidity ratio of process air.

  12. Experimental investigation on the large-area fabrication of micro-pyramid arrays by roll-to-roll hot embossing on PVC film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yujun; Yi, Peiyun; Peng, Linfa; Lai, Xinmin; Lin, Zhongqin

    2014-04-01

    Large-area polymeric components with micro-pyramids have been widely applied in the fields of optics, optoelectronics, biology and chemistry, etc. Roll-to-roll (R2R) hot embossing is regarded as a promising approach to fulfil high throughput fabrication of patterned polymeric films. In this study, an R2R hot embossing system has been developed in-house and effective and continuous production of the polymeric component with micro-pyramids is demonstrated by R2R hot embossing. The influence of processing parameters has been firstly investigated by using the one-variable-at-a-time method. Afterwards, a series of experiments based on the central composite design approach have been conducted for the analysis of variance and the establishment of empirical models of the R2R hot embossing process. As a result, a 90 mm × 90 mm PVC sample with a feature height of 65 µm was successfully fabricated and the height consistency reached 94.5%. Additionally, a process window with a mold temperature of 150-160 °C, an applied force of 18-25 kgf and a feeding speed of 0.3-0.5 m min-1, was established to achieve 100% passable micro-pyramid arrays. The processing rules and the concrete ranges of parameter values can guide the process production of large-area micro-pyramids.

  13. Experimental constraints on the rheology and mechanical properties of lava erupted in the Holuhraun area during the 2014 rifting event at Bárðarbunga, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, Yan; Kendrick, Jackie; Wall, Richard; von Aulock, Felix; Kennedy, Ben; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn

    2015-04-01

    A fissure eruption began at Holuhraun on 16 August 2014, following magma drainage from the Bárðarbunga volcanic system (Iceland). Extrusion initiated as fire fountaining along a segment of the fracture and rapidly localised to a series of small, aligned cones containing a lava lake that over spilled at both ends, feeding a large lava field. The lava composition and flow behaviour put some constraints on its rheology and mechanical properties. The lava erupted is a nearly aphyric basalt containing approximately 2-3% plagioclase with traces of olivine and pyroxene in a quenched groundmass composed of glass and 20-25% microlites. The transition from fire fountaining to lava flow leads to lava with variable vesicularities; pyroclasts expelled during fire fountaining reach up to 80% vesicles whilst the lava contain up to 45% vesicles. Textures in the lava vary from a'a to slabby pahoehoe, and flow thicknesses from several meters to few centimetres. Tension gashes, crease structures and shear zones in the upper lava carapace reveal the importance of both compressive and tensional stresses. In addition, occasional frictional marks at the base of the lava flow as well as bulldozing of sediments along the flow hint at the importance of frictional properties of the rocks during lava flow. Flow properties, textures and failure modes are strongly dependent on the material properties as well as the local conditions of stress and temperature. Here we expand our field observation with preliminary high-temperature experimental data on the rheological and mechanical properties of the erupted lava. Dilatometric measurements are used to constrain the thermal expansion coefficient of the lava important to constrain the dynamics of cooling of the flow. Micropenetration is further employed to determine the viscosity of the melt at super-liquidus temperature, which is compared to the temperature-dependence of viscosity as constrained by geochemistry. Lastly, uniaxial compression and

  14. Mobility of Po and U-isotopes under acid mine drainage conditions: an experimental approach with samples from Río Tinto area (SW Spain).

    PubMed

    Barbero, L; Gázquez, M J; Bolívar, J P; Casas-Ruiz, M; Hierro, A; Baskaran, M; Ketterer, M E

    2014-12-01

    Under acid mine drainage (AMD) conditions, the solubilities and mobilities of many elements are vastly different from conditions prevailing in most natural waters. Studies are underway in the Río Tinto area (Iberian Pyrite Belt), in order to understand the behavior and mobility of long-lived U-series radionuclides under AMD conditions. A set of leaching experiments utilizing typical country rocks from the Tinto River basin, waste rock pile composite materials, iron-rich riverbed sediments and gossan (weathered naturally rock) were performed towards this purpose. Initial leaching experiments using distilled water kept in contact with solid material for 300, 100, 50 and 1 h resulted in very low concentrations of U with (234)U/(238)U activity ratios close to equilibrium and activity concentrations of (210)Po < 0.03 mBq/g. Leaching experiments performed with sulfuric acid media (0.1 and 0.01 M), and contact times between the solid and solution for 24 h were conducted to quantify the amount of U-isotopes and (210)Po leached, and the radioactive disequilibria generated between the radionuclides in the leachate. These experiments show that Po mobility in acidic conditions (pH around 1-2) is very low, with (210)Po activity in the leachate to be 6% in average for the solid sample. By contrast, mobility of U-isotopes is higher than that of Po, around 1.2%. PMID:24308958

  15. Experimental study of effectiveness of four radon mitigation solutions, based on underground depressurization, tested in prototype housing built in a high radon area in Spain.

    PubMed

    Frutos Vázquez, Borja; Olaya Adán, Manuel; Quindós Poncela, Luis Santiago; Sainz Fernandez, Carlos; Fuente Merino, Ismael

    2011-04-01

    The present paper discusses the results of an empirical study of four approaches to reducing indoor radon concentrations based on depressurization techniques in underground sumps. The experiments were conducted in prototype housing built in an area of Spain where the average radon concentration at a depth of 1 m is 250 kBq m(-3). Sump effectiveness was analysed in two locations: underneath the basement, which involved cutting openings into the foundation, ground storey and roof slabs, and outside the basement walls, which entailed digging a pit alongside the building exterior. The effectiveness of both sumps was likewise tested with passive and forced ventilation methods. The systems proved to be highly efficient, lowering radon levels by 91-99%, except in the solution involving passive ventilation and the outside sump, where radon levels were reduced by 53-55%. At wind speeds of over 8 m/s, however, passive ventilation across an outside sump lowered radon levels by 95% due to a Venturi effect induced drop in pressure. PMID:21382656

  16. [Occurrence and treatment of monogenoides in fingerlings of florida pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) cultivated experimentally in the north area of the state of São Paulo].

    PubMed

    Sanches, Eduardo G; Ostini, Sergio; Rodrigues, Vivian Carolina Dos S

    2007-01-01

    This work had as objective tests therapeutic treatments seeking the monogenea eradication in fingerlings Florida Pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) servants in cage net in the area of Ubatuba, State of São Paulo. The fingerlings presented an accentuated weigh loss and strong discoloration and through observation of scraped of gills under light microscope were identified a high amount of monogenea. Three treatments were tested in form of baths: T1 (fresh water for 5 minutes); T2 (formalin: 1:1.000 for 20 minutes) and T3: (formalin: 1:4.000 for 30 minutes). The treatments were appraised through scraped of gills, mounted among you laminate and lamínulas and observed to the light microscope. It was observed that in the tested conditions all of the treatments were efficient in the elimination of the monogenea without presenting lethality to the fish. The treatment is recommended T1 (take a bath in fresh water for 5 minutes) for the facility in the application and for the absence of use of chemical products. PMID:17588314

  17. Sandstone compaction under actively controlled uniaxial strain conditions - an experimental study on the causes of subsidence in the Dutch Wadden Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hol, Sander; Mossop, Antony; van der Linden, Arjan; Zuiderwijk, Pedro; Makurat, Axel; van Eijs, Rob

    2016-04-01

    In the Wadden Sea, a tidal-flat area located between the North Sea and the Dutch mainland shore, and UNESCO World Heritage site, subsidence could potentially impact the ecological system. To guide the licensing process governing gas extraction for the area by a solid understanding of the system's response to production, Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij (NAM) has carried out a study on the magnitudes, timing, and mechanisms of subsidence related to gas production. As part of this study program, we address the effect of production-induced reservoir compaction, using core samples from the Moddergat field located at the Wadden Sea coastline, from a depth of ~3800 m TVDSS, to assess the nature of the compaction mechanisms that operate. In this contribution, we focus on the uniaxial strain response of Permian, Aeolian sandstone to pore pressure depletion. As the majority of experiments reported in the literature are conducted under triaxial stress conditions, this data set is somewhat unique, and can help confirm the validity of micromechanical processes found for triaxial stress conditions. We report over 30 data sets of experiments carried out using 1.0 and 1.5 inch diameter plugs, sub-sampled from the extracted sandstone core material. The experiments start at in-situ conditions of pore pressure (Pf=~57 MPa), stress (Sv=~80 MPa, Sh=~67 MPa) and temperature (T up to 100 °C), and deplete to a pore pressure of 3 MPa, under actively controlled lateral constraint boundary conditions (i.e. uniaxial strain). Care was taken to systematically vary porosity and sample morphology to ensure representation of the intra-reservoir variability. Our laboratory data show that pressure-depletion results in a strain in the range of 5·10-3-1·10-2 over the total duration of the experiments of 5-12 weeks, with approximately 80% of the total strain response being close to instantaneous, and 20% developing over time. The total strain response develops during depletion as a result of

  18. The effect of minimum impact education on visitor spatial behavior in parks and protected areas: An experimental investigation using GPS-based tracking.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Abigail M; Monz, Christopher; D'Antonio, Ashley; Manning, Robert E; Reigner, Nathan; Goonan, Kelly A; Jacobi, Charles

    2015-10-01

    The unmanaged impacts of recreation and tourism can often result in unacceptable changes in resource conditions and quality of the visitor experience. Minimum impact visitor education programs aim to reduce the impacts of recreation by altering visitor behaviors. Specifically, education seeks to reduce impacts resulting from lack of knowledge both about the consequences of one's actions and impact-minimizing best practices. In this study, three different on-site minimum impact education strategies ("treatments") and a control condition were applied on the trails and summit area of Sargent Mountain in Acadia National Park, Maine. Treatment conditions were designed to encourage visitors to stay on marked trails and minimize off-trail travel. Treatments included a message delivered via personal contact, and both an ecological-based message and an amenity-based message posted on signs located alongside the trail. A control condition of current trail markings and directional signs was also assessed. The efficacy of the messaging was evaluated through the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking of visitor spatial behavior on/off trails. Spatial analysis of GPS tracks revealed statistically significant differences among treatments, with the personal contact treatment yielding significantly less dispersion of visitors on the mountain summit. Results also indicate that the signs deployed in the study were ineffective at limiting off-trail use beyond what can be accomplished with trail markers and directional signs. These findings suggest that personal contact by a uniformed ranger or volunteer may be the most effective means of message delivery for on-site minimum impact education. PMID:26225933

  19. The Communities First (ComFi) study: protocol for a prospective controlled quasi-experimental study to evaluate the impact of area-wide regeneration on mental health and social cohesion in deprived communities

    PubMed Central

    White, James; Greene, Giles; Dunstan, Frank; Rodgers, Sarah; Lyons, Ronan A; Humphreys, Ioan; John, Ann; Webster, Chris; Palmer, Stephen; Elliott, Eva; Phillips, Ceri J; Fone, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recent systematic reviews have highlighted the dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of regeneration on health and health inequalities. ‘Communities First’ is an area-wide regeneration scheme to improve the lives of people living in the most deprived areas in Wales (UK). This study will evaluate the impact of Communities First on residents’ mental health and social cohesion. Methods and analysis A prospective controlled quasi-experimental study of the association between residence in Communities First regeneration areas in Caerphilly county borough and change in mental health and social cohesion. The study population is the 4226 residents aged 18–74 years who responded to the Caerphilly Health and Social Needs Study in 2001 (before delivery) and 2008 (after delivery of Communities First). Data on the location, type and cost of Communities First interventions will be extracted from records collected by Caerphilly county borough council. The primary outcome is the change in mental health between 2001 and 2008. Secondary outcomes are changes: in common mental disorder case status (using survey and general practice data), social cohesion and mental health inequalities. Multilevel models will examine change in mental health and social cohesion between Communities First and control areas, adjusting for individual and household level confounding factors. Further models will examine the effects of (1) different types of intervention, (2) contamination across areas, (3) length of residence in a Communities First area, and (4) population migration. We will carry out a cost-consequences analysis to summarise the outcomes generated for participants, as well as service utilisation and utility gains. Ethics and dissemination This study has had approval from the Information Governance Review Panel at Swansea University (Ref: 0266 CF). Findings will be disseminated through peer-review publications, international conferences, policy and practice partners in

  20. Does Artificial Ascites Induce the Heat-Sink Phenomenon during Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of the Hepatic Subcapsular Area?: an in vivo Experimental Study Using a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the heat-sink phenomenon induced by artificial ascites on the size of the ablation zone during percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation of the hepatic subcapsular area in an in vivo rabbit model. Materials and Methods A total of 21 percutaneous rabbit liver RF ablations were performed with and without artificial ascites (5% dextrose aqueous solution). The rabbits were divided into three groups: a) control group (C, n = 7); b) room temperature ascites group (R, n = 7); and c) warmed ascites group (W, n = 7). The tip of a 1 cm, internally cooled electrode was placed on the subcapsular region of the hepatic dome via ultrasound guidance, and ablation was continued for 6 min. Changes in temperature of the ascites were monitored during the ablation. The size of the ablation zones of the excised livers and immediate complications rates were compared statistically between the groups (Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, linear-by-linear association, p = 0.05). Results One rabbit from the "W" group expired during the procedure. In all groups, the ascites temperatures approached their respective body temperatures as the ablations continued; however, a significant difference in ascites temperature was found between groups "W" and "R" throughout the procedures (39.2±0.4℃ in group W and 33.4±4.3℃ in group R at 6 min, p = 0.003). No significant difference was found between the size of the ablation zones (782.4±237.3 mL in group C, 1,172.0±468.9 mL in group R, and 1,030.6±665.1 mL in group W, p = 0.170) for the excised liver specimens. Diaphragmatic injury was identified in three of seven cases (42.9%) upon visual inspection of group "C" rabbits (p = 0.030). Conclusion Artificial ascites are not likely to cause a significant heat-sink phenomenon in the percutaneous RF ablation of the hepatic subcapsular region. PMID:19182502

  1. Blois V: Experimental summary

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.G.

    1993-09-01

    The author gives a summary talk of the best experimental data given at the Vth Blois Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering. He addresses the following eight areas in his talk: total and elastic cross sections; single diffractive excitation; electron-proton scattering; di-jets and rapidity gaps; areas of future study; spins and asymmetries; high-transverse momentum and masses at the Tevatron; and disoriented chiral condensates and cosmic radiation.

  2. FURSMASA: a new approach to rapid scoring functions that uses a MD-averaged potential energy grid and a solvent-accessible surface area term with parameters GA fit to experimental data.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, David A; Rao, B Govinda; Charifson, Paul

    2008-05-15

    correlation coefficient. We also find that the FURSAMA function is able to reliably predict the water solubility for 1032 compounds from the Syracuse Research solubility database with a cross-correlated PI of 0.84 and a correlation coefficient R(2) of 0.69. This prediction, which is based solely on a term derived from the atom-based solvent-accessible surface areas, compares favorably with the best prediction methods in the literature, most of which are more complex and/or require experimental data. Finally, as a rigorous test of the applicability to database screening, we apply FURSMASA to large active/decoy ligand databases for IMPDH (400 actives vs. 10,000 decoys), p38 (502 actives vs. 10,000 decoys), and HIV (787 actives vs. 10,000 decoys) used in earlier work to critically evaluate many popular scoring functions, and find that FURSMASA performs surprisingly well for IMPDH and HIV. PMID:18300249

  3. Experimental Pi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corris, G.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of pi by means of experimental methods. Polygon circle ratios, Archimedes' method, Buffon's needles, a Monte Carlo method, and prime number approaches are used. Presents three BASIC programs for the calculations. (YP)

  4. Sensitive Small Area Photometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, M. D.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a simple photometer capable of measuring small light intensities over small areas. The inexpensive, easy-to- construct instrument is intended for use in a student laboratory to measure the light intensities in a diffraction experiment from single or multiple slits. Typical experimental results are presented along with the theoretical…

  5. Experimental philosophy.

    PubMed

    Knobe, Joshua; Buckwalter, Wesley; Nichols, Shaun; Robbins, Philip; Sarkissian, Hagop; Sommers, Tamler

    2012-01-01

    Experimental philosophy is a new interdisciplinary field that uses methods normally associated with psychology to investigate questions normally associated with philosophy. The present review focuses on research in experimental philosophy on four central questions. First, why is it that people's moral judgments appear to influence their intuitions about seemingly nonmoral questions? Second, do people think that moral questions have objective answers, or do they see morality as fundamentally relative? Third, do people believe in free will, and do they see free will as compatible with determinism? Fourth, how do people determine whether an entity is conscious? PMID:21801019

  6. SPHINX experimenters information package

    SciTech Connect

    Zarick, T.A.

    1996-08-01

    This information package was prepared for both new and experienced users of the SPHINX (Short Pulse High Intensity Nanosecond X-radiator) flash X-Ray facility. It was compiled to help facilitate experiment design and preparation for both the experimenter(s) and the SPHINX operational staff. The major areas covered include: Recording Systems Capabilities,Recording System Cable Plant, Physical Dimensions of SPHINX and the SPHINX Test cell, SPHINX Operating Parameters and Modes, Dose Rate Map, Experiment Safety Approval Form, and a Feedback Questionnaire. This package will be updated as the SPHINX facilities and capabilities are enhanced.

  7. Animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Millions of animals are used every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Legislation of animal experimentation in modern societies is based on the supposition that this is ethically acceptable when certain more or less defined formal (e.g. logistical, technical) demands and ethical principles are met. The main parameters in this context correspond to the "3Rs" concept as defined by Russel and Burch in 1959, i.e. that all efforts to replace, reduce and refine experiments must be undertaken. The licensing of animal experiments normally requires an ethical evaluation process, often times undertaken by ethics committees. The serious problems in putting this idea into practice include inter alia unclear conditions and standards for ethical decisions, insufficient management of experiments undertaken for specific (e.g. regulatory) purposes, and conflicts of interest of ethics committees' members. There is an ongoing societal debate about ethical issues of animal use in science. Existing EU legislation on animal experimentation for cosmetics testing is an example of both the public will for setting clear limits to animal experiments and the need to further critically examine other fields and aspects of animal experimentation. PMID:16501652

  8. Pigeon homing from unfamiliar areas

    PubMed Central

    Wallraff, Hans G

    2014-01-01

    The conclusion that pigeons and other birds can find their way home from unfamiliar areas by means of olfactory signals is well based on a variety of experiments and supporting investigations of the chemical atmosphere. Here I argue that alternative concepts proposing other sources of geopositional information are disproved by experimental findings or, at least, are not experimentally supported and hardly realistic. PMID:25346789

  9. Experimental macroevolution.

    PubMed

    Bell, Graham

    2016-01-13

    The convergence of several disparate research programmes raises the possibility that the long-term evolutionary processes of innovation and radiation may become amenable to laboratory experimentation. Ancestors might be resurrected directly from naturally stored propagules or tissues, or indirectly from the expression of ancestral genes in contemporary genomes. New kinds of organisms might be evolved through artificial selection of major developmental genes. Adaptive radiation can be studied by mimicking major ecological transitions in the laboratory. All of these possibilities are subject to severe quantitative and qualitative limitations. In some cases, however, laboratory experiments may be capable of illuminating the processes responsible for the evolution of new kinds of organisms. PMID:26763705

  10. Experimental macroevolution†

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The convergence of several disparate research programmes raises the possibility that the long-term evolutionary processes of innovation and radiation may become amenable to laboratory experimentation. Ancestors might be resurrected directly from naturally stored propagules or tissues, or indirectly from the expression of ancestral genes in contemporary genomes. New kinds of organisms might be evolved through artificial selection of major developmental genes. Adaptive radiation can be studied by mimicking major ecological transitions in the laboratory. All of these possibilities are subject to severe quantitative and qualitative limitations. In some cases, however, laboratory experiments may be capable of illuminating the processes responsible for the evolution of new kinds of organisms. PMID:26763705

  11. Final report submitted to the US Department of Energy (8/15/96 to 8/14/00). [Experimental and theoretical investigation of dual laser ablation for stoichiometric large-area multi-component film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Witanachchi, Sarath; Mukherjee, Pritish

    2000-08-01

    This research involves a systematic study of the dual-laser ablation process to understand the underlying mechanisms of the process, and to investigate the applicability of this technique to the growth of multi-component thin films. In this study, time-of-flight ion probe, emission spectroscopy, and species resolved CCD imaging methods have been used as in-situ diagnostic techniques to investigate experimentally the effect of the process parameters on the plasma ionization, ion spatial distribution, species velocity distribution profiles and expansion profiles for single component systems as well as individual elements of the multi-component material system Cu(InGa)Se{sub 2}. A theoretical model that is consistent with the experimental observations has been developed. Following tasks outlined in the proposal were successfully completed in the time period 8/15/96 to 8/14/00.

  12. Experimental tectonophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Handin, J.; Logan, J.M.

    1981-07-01

    Because virtually all tectonophysical processes are marked by the overburden, or occur to slowly for adequate observation in anthropocentric time, or both, they must be studied in carefully controlled laboratory experiments that simulate the natural environment as realistically as is practicable. Extrapolations of laboratory data in space and time are invalid unless the experimental and natural phenomenologies are essentially the same. The size of conventional specimens is of the order of 10 cm, whereas the discontinuities (defects in a continuum) in real rock-masses are often much larger, of the order of 1 m or more. Furthermore, such discontinuities as macrofractures (joints) may well dominate the mechanical and fluid-transport properties in nature. Adequate sampling of rock-mass properties will probably always require in-situ testing, but testing machines much larger than any now available could provide useful data at least at intermediate scale.

  13. Transfer of contaminants from surface to hands: experimental assessment of linearity of the exposure process, adherence to the skin, and area exposed during fixed pressure and repeated contact with surfaces contaminated with a powder.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, D H; Kroese, R; Van Hemmen, J J

    1999-04-01

    Estimation of dermal exposure in the workplace resulting from contact with contaminated surfaces is important in risk assessment. Models have been developed to describe the process of exposure due to transfer, but for major input parameters--that is, contact area surface and adherence--defaults are used. This study examines the effect of one single-hand press contact and repeated contacts with a contaminated glass plate on both skin area exposed and loading of the skin for three volunteers. A fluorescent whitening agent was used to study the process of exposure and to determine the increase of the area exposed as well as the adherence of the compound to the skin surface after 1 to 12 consecutive contacts by a video imaging technique. In addition, loading of the skin after 12 contacts was compared to loading of a cotton glove monitor with similar hand pressures. The results show that after one single-hand contact only 4 to 16 percent of the total surface of the palm of the hand was exposed, whereas after 12 contacts this was increased to about 40 percent. The efficiency of transfer was < or = 2 percent of the contamination of the surface. The adherence to the skin was 1.07 micrograms/cm2 after 12 contacts and tended to increase non-linearly with increase in contacts. Because defaults of adherence for use in exposure models are generally a factor 500 to 5,000 higher, and the area exposed is assumed to be the total surface of the hand, overestimation of dermal exposure due to a single hand-surface contact in workplaces may occur. Therefore, additional studies on multi-contact exposure scenarios are indicated to adjust defaults for hand-surface transfer processes. PMID:10457645

  14. Experimental Tachyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soli, George

    2008-05-01

    In the physics of potential superluminal information transfer, causality is preserved by the experimental identification of the CMB (Cosmic Microwave Background) rest frame, as the preferred inertial frame in which potential superluminal information transfer is isotropic [Rembielinski] (http://arxiv.org/PScache/quant-ph/pdf/0010/0010026v2.pdf). Potential superluminal information transfer is engineered by tunneling through two successive barriers [Olkhovsky] (http://arxiv.org/PScache/quant-ph/pdf/0002/0002022v5.pdf). In our experiment we use two meter wavelength photons tunneling through two water-tank barriers, separated by an air-gap length [Soli] (http://www.siderealdilaton.com/). The data presented in this talk demonstrates that if the air-gap length is adjusted for subluminal information transfer, then the democracy of inertial frames is recovered, and no preferred frame is measured. The one-way subluminal tunneling group velocity of light is shown to be isotropic to accuracy below the CMB rest frame velocity. It has already been argued in the literature that Einstein's special relativity with tachyons predicts the existence of antimatter [Recami] (http://arxiv.org/PScache/arxiv/pdf/0709/0709.2453v1.pdf). We conjecture that the dilaton scalar particle is discovered by any sidereal data producible by this instrument.

  15. Experimental Model of the L-Area Outfall

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.S.

    2001-07-17

    A once-through cooling lake has been chosen to provide for thermal mitigation of the reactor effluent cooling water. This alternative provides satisfactory cooling performance and thermal buffering, with moderate construction time, cost, and maintenance. In the event that the cooling lake fails to meet South Carolina environmental requirements during the summer months, SRP will reduce reactor power until supplemental cooling can be provided. To minimize this further expense and delay, it is desirable to realize the best performance possible from the cooling lake.

  16. Experimental cultivation of cannabis plants in the Mediterranean area.

    PubMed

    Cortis, G; Luchi, P; Palmas, M

    1985-01-01

    In research carried out in 1982, which included the cultivation of cannabis plants with low, medium and high levels of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the authors have determined the parameters for individualization and classification of cannabis plants according to their intoxicant potential. This can help to provide courts of law with valid supportive expertise on cannabis trafficking cases. The parameters are the percentages of THC in cannabinoids and in the dried substance of a plant, as well as the percentage of cannabinoids in the dried substance. On the basis of these parameters, the authors have found that a cannabis plant in which the percentage of THC exceeds 50 per cent of the total amount of cannabinoids of the extractable resin and 0.3 per cent of the total amount of dried substance, and in which the amounts of resin and cannabinoids are substantial, has a considerable intoxicant potential and is liable to be used for illicit production of cannabis for abuse. On the contrary, a plant with a THC level below 50 per cent of the cannabinoids and 0.3 per cent of the dried substance, in addition to a low level of total cannabinoids, has low intoxicant potential and can be used in industry for the production of oil and rope. On the basis of these parameters it is also possible to predict the intoxicant potential of a young cannabis plant harvested at a relatively early stage of its development. PMID:3011161

  17. Experimental Summary and Outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Bosted

    2005-02-01

    A brief experimental overview of the workshop is given, with emphasis on polarized targets from the experimental equipment perspective, and kinematic coverage, precision, and newly investigated channels from the experimental results perspective.

  18. Arcjet nozzle area ratio effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  19. Arcjet Nozzle Area Ratio Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Birkner, Bjorn W.; Kwasny, James

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of nozzle area ratio on the operating characteristics and performance of a low power dc arcjet thruster. Conical thoriated tungsten nozzle inserts were tested in a modular laboratory arcjet thruster run on hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. The converging and diverging sides of the inserts had half angles of 30 and 20 degrees, respectively, similar to a flight type unit currently under development. The length of the diverging side was varied to change the area ratio. The nozzle inserts were run over a wide range of specific power. Current, voltage, mass flow rate, and thrust were monitored to provide accurate comparisons between tests. While small differences in performance were observed between the two nozzle inserts, it was determined that for each nozzle insert, arcjet performance improved with increasing nozzle area ratio to the highest area ratio tested and that the losses become very pronounced for area ratios below 50. These trends are somewhat different than those obtained in previous experimental and analytical studies of low Re number nozzles. It appears that arcjet performance can be enhanced via area ratio optimization.

  20. Divide and conquer: strategic decision areas

    PubMed Central

    Kolling, Nils; Hunt, Laurence T

    2016-01-01

    Human decisions are often strategic, but this can prove difficult to study experimentally. The board game shogi is used to investigate the functional neuroanatomy of strategic decisions, revealing different brain areas to other forms of choice. PMID:25919959

  1. 47 CFR 5.304 - Area of operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Area of operations. 5.304 Section 5.304 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE Program Experimental Radio Licenses § 5.304 Area of operations. Applications must specify, and the Commission will grant authorizations for, a geographic area that...

  2. 47 CFR 5.404 - Area of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Area of operation. 5.404 Section 5.404 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE Medical Testing Experimental Radio Licenses § 5.404 Area of operation. Applications must specify, and the Commission will grant authorizations for, a geographic area...

  3. Experimental realization of invisibility cloaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchelokova, A. V.; Melchakova, I. V.; Slobozhanyuk, A. P.; Yankovskaya, E. A.; Simovski, C. R.; Belov, P. A.

    2015-02-01

    Advances in the studies of metamaterials have pushed the development of invisibility cloaks, which suppress scattering by objects within certain frequency ranges. During recent years, there has been a transition from a purely theoretical consideration of the cloaking effect to its practical implementation. This paper is an overview of the current state of the art in the area of invisibility cloaks. Special emphasis is put on experimental realizations of such devices.

  4. Experimental medicine 1000 years ago

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Halim, Rabie E.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the state of experimentation in the field of medicine during the Medieval Islamic era. With few exceptions, most of the contemporary sources on history of medicine propagate the idea that the roots of experimental medicine in its modern form, including clinical trials and drug-potency studies, first started during the European Renaissance in the 16th to the 18th centuries. This study is part of an ongoing multidisciplinary primary-source investigation of the original Arabic works of 11 Islamic medical scholars who lived and practiced between the 9th and the 13th centuries. The study critically evaluated and documented their contributions to the development of the scientific method and experimental medicine during that medieval Islamic era in several areas including critical appraisal of previous knowledge, clinical observations and case reports, clinical therapeutic trials, drug potency trials, experimentation on animals, dissection and dissection experiments as well as postmortem examinations. In each of the above-mentioned areas, significant contributions were made during the Medieval Islamic era from as early as the ninth century AD. PMID:21747591

  5. Experimental medicine 1000 years ago.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, Rabie E

    2011-05-01

    Little is known about the state of experimentation in the field of medicine during the Medieval Islamic era. With few exceptions, most of the contemporary sources on history of medicine propagate the idea that the roots of experimental medicine in its modern form, including clinical trials and drug-potency studies, first started during the European Renaissance in the 16(th) to the 18(th) centuries. This study is part of an ongoing multidisciplinary primary-source investigation of the original Arabic works of 11 Islamic medical scholars who lived and practiced between the 9(th) and the 13(th) centuries. The study critically evaluated and documented their contributions to the development of the scientific method and experimental medicine during that medieval Islamic era in several areas including critical appraisal of previous knowledge, clinical observations and case reports, clinical therapeutic trials, drug potency trials, experimentation on animals, dissection and dissection experiments as well as postmortem examinations. In each of the above-mentioned areas, significant contributions were made during the Medieval Islamic era from as early as the ninth century AD. PMID:21747591

  6. Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottrell, Edward B.

    With an emphasis on the problems of control of extraneous variables and threats to internal and external validity, the arrangement or design of experiments is discussed. The purpose of experimentation in an educational institution, and the principles governing true experimentation (randomization, replication, and control) are presented, as are…

  7. Weathering of the Rio Blanco Quartz Diorite, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: Coupling Oxidation, Dissolution, And Fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, H.L.; Sak, P.B.; Webb, S.M.; Brantley, S.L.

    2009-05-12

    In the mountainous Rio Icacos watershed in northeastern Puerto Rico, quartz diorite bedrock weathers spheroidally, producing a 0.2-2 m thick zone of partially weathered rock layers ({approx}2.5 cm thickness each) called rindlets, which form concentric layers around corestones. Spheroidal fracturing has been modeled to occur when a weathering reaction with a positive {Delta}V of reaction builds up elastic strain energy. The rates of spheroidal fracturing and saprolite formation are therefore controlled by the rate of the weathering reaction. Chemical, petrographic, and spectroscopic evidence demonstrates that biotite oxidation is the most likely fracture-inducing reaction. This reaction occurs with an expansion in d (0 0 1) from 10.0 to 10.5 {angstrom}, forming 'altered biotite'. Progressive biotite oxidation across the rindlet zone was inferred from thin sections and gradients in K and Fe(II). Using the gradient in Fe(II) and constraints based on cosmogenic age dates, we calculated a biotite oxidation reaction rate of 8.2 x 10{sup -14} mol biotite m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Biotite oxidation was documented within the bedrock corestone by synchrotron X-ray microprobe fluorescence imaging and XANES. X-ray microprobe images of Fe(II) and Fe(III) at 2 {micro}m resolution revealed that oxidized zones within individual biotite crystals are the first evidence of alteration of the otherwise unaltered corestone. Fluids entering along fractures lead to the dissolution of plagioclase within the rindlet zone. Within 7 cm surrounding the rindlet-saprolite interface, hornblende dissolves to completion at a rate of 6.3 x 10{sup -13} mol hornblende m{sup -2} s{sup -1}: the fastest reported rate of hornblende weathering in the field. This rate is consistent with laboratory-derived hornblende dissolution rates. By revealing the coupling of these mineral weathering reactions to fracturing and porosity formation we are able to describe the process by which the quartz diorite bedrock disaggregates and forms saprolite. In the corestone, biotite oxidation induces spheroidal fracturing, facilitating the influx of fluids that react with other minerals, dissolving plagioclase and chlorite, creating additional porosity, and eventually dissolving hornblende and precipitating secondary minerals. The thickness of the resultant saprolite is maintained at steady state by a positive feedback between the denudation rate and the weathering advance rate driven by the concentration of pore water O{sub 2} at the bedrock-saprolite interface.

  8. Weathering of the Rio Blanco quartz diorite, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: Coupling oxidation, dissolution, and fracturing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buss, H.L.; Sak, P.B.; Webb, S.M.; Brantley, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    In the mountainous Rio Icacos watershed in northeastern Puerto Rico, quartz diorite bedrock weathers spheroidally, producing a 0.2-2 m thick zone of partially weathered rock layers (???2.5 cm thickness each) called rindlets, which form concentric layers around corestones. Spheroidal fracturing has been modeled to occur when a weathering reaction with a positive ??V of reaction builds up elastic strain energy. The rates of spheroidal fracturing and saprolite formation are therefore controlled by the rate of the weathering reaction. Chemical, petrographic, and spectroscopic evidence demonstrates that biotite oxidation is the most likely fracture-inducing reaction. This reaction occurs with an expansion in d (0 0 1) from 10.0 to 10.5 A??, forming 'altered biotite'. Progressive biotite oxidation across the rindlet zone was inferred from thin sections and gradients in K and Fe(II). Using the gradient in Fe(II) and constraints based on cosmogenic age dates, we calculated a biotite oxidation reaction rate of 8.2 ?? 10-14 mol biotite m-2 s-1. Biotite oxidation was documented within the bedrock corestone by synchrotron X-ray microprobe fluorescence imaging and XANES. X-ray microprobe images of Fe(II) and Fe(III) at 2 ??m resolution revealed that oxidized zones within individual biotite crystals are the first evidence of alteration of the otherwise unaltered corestone. Fluids entering along fractures lead to the dissolution of plagioclase within the rindlet zone. Within 7 cm surrounding the rindlet-saprolite interface, hornblende dissolves to completion at a rate of 6.3 ?? 10-13 mol hornblende m-2 s-1: the fastest reported rate of hornblende weathering in the field. This rate is consistent with laboratory-derived hornblende dissolution rates. By revealing the coupling of these mineral weathering reactions to fracturing and porosity formation we are able to describe the process by which the quartz diorite bedrock disaggregates and forms saprolite. In the corestone, biotite oxidation induces spheroidal fracturing, facilitating the influx of fluids that react with other minerals, dissolving plagioclase and chlorite, creating additional porosity, and eventually dissolving hornblende and precipitating secondary minerals. The thickness of the resultant saprolite is maintained at steady state by a positive feedback between the denudation rate and the weathering advance rate driven by the concentration of pore water O2 at the bedrock-saprolite interface. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Definition of "experimental procedures".

    PubMed

    2009-11-01

    This Practice Committee Opinion provides a revised definition of "experimental procedures." This version replaces the document "Definition of Experimental" that was published most recently in November 2008. PMID:19836733

  10. Microexperiencia Educativa (Microeducational Experimentation).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton Meis, Roberto

    1970-01-01

    Experimentation for educational reform in Argentina is limited to specifically designated schools which are to be in a permanent state of experimentation. This article presents the official statements designating the experimental schools and includes remarks covering administration, evaluation, and supervision. (VM)

  11. Students' Epistemologies about Experimental Physics: Validating the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Student learning in instructional physics labs represents a growing area of research that includes investigations of students' beliefs and expectations about the nature of experimental physics. To directly probe students' epistemologies about experimental physics and support broader lab transformation efforts at the University of Colorado Boulder…

  12. Land use, population dynamics, and land-cover change in eastern Puerto Rico: Chapter B in Water quality and landscape processes of four watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, William A.; Martinuzzi, Sebastián; Pares-Ramos, Isabel K.; Murphy, Sheila F.; Stallard, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed current and historic land use and land cover in the Luquillo Mountains and surrounding area in eastern Puerto Rico, including four small subwatersheds that are study watersheds of the U.S. Geological Survey's Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) program. This region occupies an area of 1,616 square kilometers, about 18 percent of the total land in Puerto Rico. Closed forests occupy about 37 percent of the area, woodlands and shrublands 7 percent, nonforest vegetation 43 percent, urban development 10 percent, and water and natural barrens total less than 2 percent. The area has been classified into three main land-use categories by integrating recent census information (population density per barrio in the year 2000) with satellite image analyses (degree of developed area versus natural land cover). Urban land use (in this analysis, land with more than 20 percent developed cover within a 1-square-kilometer area and population density greater than 500 people per square kilometer) covered 16 percent of eastern Puerto Rico. Suburban land use (more than 80 percent natural land cover, more than 500 people per square kilometer, and primarily residential) covers 50 percent of the area. Rural land use (more than 80 percent natural land cover, less than 500 people per square kilometer, and primarily active or abandoned agricultural, wetland, steep slope, or protected conservation areas) covered 34 percent of the area. Our analysis of land-cover change indicates that in the 1990s, forest cover increased at the expense of woodlands and grasslands. Urban development increased by 16 percent during that time. The most pronounced change in the last seven decades has been the shift from a nonforested to a forested landscape and the intensification of the ring of urbanization that surrounds the long-protected Luquillo Experimental Forest.

  13. Experimental impact crater morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufresne, A.; Poelchau, M. H.; Hoerth, T.; Schaefer, F.; Thoma, K.; Deutsch, A.; Kenkmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    The research group MEMIN (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Impact Modelling Research Network) is conducting impact experiments into porous sandstones, examining, among other parameters, the influence of target pore-space saturation with water, and projectile velocity, density and mass, on the cratering process. The high-velocity (2.5-7.8 km/s) impact experiments were carried out at the two-stage light-gas gun facilities of the Fraunhofer Institute EMI (Germany) using steel, iron meteorite (Campo del Cielo IAB), and aluminium projectiles with Seeberg Sandstone as targets. The primary objectives of this study within MEMIN are to provide detailed morphometric data of the experimental craters, and to identify trends and characteristics specific to a given impact parameter. Generally, all craters, regardless of impact conditions, have an inner depression within a highly fragile, white-coloured centre, an outer spallation (i.e. tensile failure) zone, and areas of arrested spallation (i.e. spall fragments that were not completely dislodged from the target) at the crater rim. Within this general morphological framework, distinct trends and differences in crater dimensions and morphological characteristics are identified. With increasing impact velocity, the volume of craters in dry targets increases by a factor of ~4 when doubling velocity. At identical impact conditions (steel projectiles, ~5km/s), craters in dry and wet sandstone targets differ significantly in that "wet" craters are up to 76% larger in volume, have depth-diameter ratios generally below 0.19 (whereas dry craters are almost consistently above this value) at significantly larger diameters, and their spallation zone morphologies show very different characteristics. In dry craters, the spall zone surfaces dip evenly at 10-20° towards the crater centre. In wet craters, on the other hand, they consist of slightly convex slopes of 10-35° adjacent to the inner depression, and of sub-horizontal tensile

  14. Experimental lithium system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kolowith, R.; Berg, J.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1985-04-01

    A full-scale mockup of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system was built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). This isothermal mockup, called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS), was prototypic of FMIT, excluding the accelerator and dump heat exchanger. This 3.8 m/sup 3/ lithium test loop achieved over 16,000 hours of safe and reliable operation. An extensive test program demonstrated satisfactory performance of the system components, including the HEDL-supplied electromagnetic lithium pump, the lithium jet target, the purification and characterization hardware, as well as the auxiliary argon and vacuum systems. Experience with the test loop provided important information on system operation, performance, and reliability. This report presents a complete overview of the entire Experimental Lithium System test program and also includes a summary of such areas as instrumentation, coolant chemistry, vapor/aerosol transport, and corrosion.

  15. Area contingency plan Wisconsin area. (COTP Milwaukee)

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-30

    The Area Contingency Plan, mandated under the Oil Pollution Act, was developed by the Eastern Wisconsin Area Committee, which is chaired by the Coast Guard and consists of local, state, federal, and private members. The plan prepares in advance for an oil or hazardous substance spill in the COTP Milwaukee Coastal Zone.

  16. Area contingency plan Chicago area. (COTP Chicago)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Area Contingency Plan, mandated under the Oil Pollution Act, was developed by the Chicago Area Committee, which is chaired by the Coast Guard and consists of local, state, federal, and private members. The plan prepares in advance for an oil or hazardous substance spill in the COTP Chicago Coastal Zone.

  17. Experimentation in software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, V. R.; Selby, R. W.; Hutchens, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Experimentation in software engineering supports the advancement of the field through an iterative learning process. In this paper, a framework for analyzing most of the experimental work performed in software engineering over the past several years is presented. A variety of experiments in the framework is described and their contribution to the software engineering discipline is discussed. Some useful recommendations for the application of the experimental process in software engineering are included.

  18. Innovation investment area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

  19. Automatic emotional expression analysis from eye area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkoç, Betül; Arslan, Ahmet

    2015-02-01

    Eyes play an important role in expressing emotions in nonverbal communication. In the present study, emotional expression classification was performed based on the features that were automatically extracted from the eye area. Fırst, the face area and the eye area were automatically extracted from the captured image. Afterwards, the parameters to be used for the analysis through discrete wavelet transformation were obtained from the eye area. Using these parameters, emotional expression analysis was performed through artificial intelligence techniques. As the result of the experimental studies, 6 universal emotions consisting of expressions of happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, anger and fear were classified at a success rate of 84% using artificial neural networks.

  20. Mainstreaming Caenorhabditis elegans in experimental evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Jeremy C.; Cutter, Asher D.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evolution provides a powerful manipulative tool for probing evolutionary process and mechanism. As this approach to hypothesis testing has taken purchase in biology, so too has the number of experimental systems that use it, each with its own unique strengths and weaknesses. The depth of biological knowledge about Caenorhabditis nematodes, combined with their laboratory tractability, positions them well for exploiting experimental evolution in animal systems to understand deep questions in evolution and ecology, as well as in molecular genetics and systems biology. To date, Caenorhabditis elegans and related species have proved themselves in experimental evolution studies of the process of mutation, host–pathogen coevolution, mating system evolution and life-history theory. Yet these organisms are not broadly recognized for their utility for evolution experiments and remain underexploited. Here, we outline this experimental evolution work undertaken so far in Caenorhabditis, detail simple methodological tricks that can be exploited and identify research areas that are ripe for future discovery. PMID:24430852

  1. 47 CFR 5.404 - Area of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Area of operation. 5.404 Section 5.404 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE Medical Testing Experimental... experimentation will be conducted and that is under the applicant's control. Applications also may specify,...

  2. 47 CFR 5.304 - Area of operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Area of operations. 5.304 Section 5.304 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE Program Experimental Radio... experimentation will be conducted and that is under the applicant's control. If an applicant wants to...

  3. RATTLESNAKE ROADLESS AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, C.A.; Mayerle, Ronald T.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, and geophysical surveys of the Rattlesnake Roadless Area in Montana identified a small area of substantiated resource potential for a low-grade stratabound copper occurrence along the northwest border of the area. A demonstrated barite (BaSO//4) resource of 45 tons and a demonstrated limestone resource suitable for cement production are present in the southern part of the roadless area. Limestone, silica in quartz veins, and sand and gravel deposits are known in the southern part of the area but similar deposits occur widely outside the study area. There is little promise for the occurrence of energy resources in the Rattlesnake Roadless Area.

  4. Questioning and Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutanen, Arto

    2014-01-01

    The paper is a philosophical analysis of experimentation. The philosophical framework of the analysis is the interrogative model of inquiry developed by Hintikka. The basis of the model is explicit and well-formed logic of questions and answers. The framework allows us to formulate a flexible logic of experimentation. In particular, the formulated…

  5. 7. VIEW WEST, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST WELL HOUSE, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW WEST, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST WELL HOUSE, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST BUNKHOUSE, FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST GARAGE, AND FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST RESIDENCE. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  6. The Experimental Hydrology Wiki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Theresa; van Meerveld, Ilja; Graeff, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The "Experimental Hydrology Wiki" is a forum for hydrologists to learn about, recommend, question and discuss new and established, basic and advanced methods and equipment for hydrological research. As a database of "lessons learned" it does not only contain short descriptions of specific experimental equipment but also information on encountered errors and problems and recommendations on how to deal with them. This makes valuable personal field experience accessible to a wider audience. The Wiki allows experimentalists to share and find solutions for common problems and thus helps us in not making the same mistakes others have made before us. At the same time modellers can use this platform to find information on sources of error and uncertainty in the data they use for model validation and calibration. The general idea and layout of the Experimental Hydrology Wiki is presented here along with an invitation to all experimental hydrologists to contribute their knowledge and experiences! http://www.experimental- hydrology.net/

  7. Experimental nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An earlier study of unusual electromagnetic decays in (sup 86)Zr was extended in order to make comparisons with its isotone (sup 84)Sr and with (sup 84)Zr. The K=14 (t(sub 1/2) = 70 ns) high-spin isomer in (sup 176)W was found to have a 13 percent branch directly to the K=O ground-state band, one of the strongest violations of K-selection rules known. A new program to search for a predicted region of oblate deformation involving neutron deficient isotopes in the Rn/Fr/Ra region was begun. In the area of nuclear astrophysics, as part of a study of the onset of the rp-Process, a set of measurements searching for possible new resonances for (sup 14)O+(alpha) and (sup 17)F+p reactions was completed and a coincidence experiment measuring the (sup 19)F ((sup 3)He,t) (sup 19)Ne(alpha) (sup 15)O and (sup 19)F ((sup 3)He,t) (sup 19)Ne(p) (sup 18)F reactions in order to determine the rates of the (sup 18)F(p,(alpha)) (sup 15)O and (sup 18)F(p,(gamma)) (sup 19)Ne reactions was begun. Experimental measurements of (beta)n(alpha) coincidences from the (sup 15)N(d,p) (sup 16)N((beta)- (nu)) (sup 16)O((alpha)) (sup 12)C reaction have also been completed and are currently being analyzed to determine the rate of the (sup 12)C((alpha),(gamma)) reaction. In the APEX collaboration, we have completed the assembly and testing of two position-sensitive Na barrels which surround the axial silicon detector arrays and serve as the e(sup +) triggers by detecting their back-to-back annihilation quanta were completed. The HI@AGS and RHIC collaborations, construction and implementation activities associated with the space-time-tracker detector and in the design of the central detector for the PHENIX experiment were carried out. Operation of the ESTU tandem accelerator has been reliable, delivering beam on target at terminal voltages as high as 19.3 MV and running for as long as 143 days between tank openings. Fabrication and bench testing of a new negative ion source system have been completed.

  8. [Experimental nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    An earlier study of unusual electromagnetic decays in {sup 86}Zr was extended in order to make comparisons with its isotone {sup 84}Sr and with {sup 84}Zr. The K=14 (t {sub {1/2}} = 70 ns) high-spin isomer in {sup 176}W was found to have a 13% branch directly to the K=O ground-state band, one of the strongest violations of K-selection rules known. A new program to search for a predicted region of oblate deformation involving neutron deficient isotopes in the Rn/Fr/Ra region was begun. In the area of nuclear astrophysics, as part of a study of the onset of the rp-Process, a set of measurements searching for possible new resonances for {sup 14}O+{alpha} and {sup 17}F+p reactions was completed and a coincidence experiment measuring the {sup 19}F({sup 3}He,t){sup 19}Ne({alpha}){sup 15}O and {sup 19}F({sup 3}He,t){sup 19}Ne(p){sup 18}F reactions in order to determine the rates of the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O and {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}){sup 19}Ne reactions was begun. Experimental measurements of {beta}n{alpha} coincidences from the {sup 15}N(d,p){sup 16}N({beta}{sup {minus}}{nu}){sup 16}O({alpha}){sup 12}C reaction have also been completed and are currently being analyzed to determine the rate of the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}) reaction. In the APEX collaboration, we have completed the assembly and testing of two position-sensitive Na barrels which surround the axial silicon detector arrays and serve as the e{sup +} triggers by detecting their back-to-back annihilation quanta were completed. The HI@AGS and RHIC collaborations, construction and implementation activities associated with the space-time-tracker detector and in the design of the central detector for the PHENIX experiment were carried out. Operation of the ESTU tandem accelerator has been reliable, delivering beam on target at terminal voltages as high as 19.3 MV and running for as long as 143 days between tank openings. Fabrication and bench testing of a new negative ion source system have been completed.

  9. CUCAMONGA ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Peters, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical surveys and an investigation of mines, prospects, and mineralized areas, the Cucamonga Roadless Areas in California have two areas of probable mineral-resource potential. An area of probable mineral-resource potential for low-grade tungsten and gold resources is located in the northern part of the roadless areas, and an area of similar potential for small deposits of silver, lead, and zinc is located in the southwestern part of the roadless areas. An interpretation of an aeromagnetic survey of the Cucamonga Roadless Areas showed magnetic anomalies and patterns closely related to magnetic variation in rock units, but indicated no unknown areas of mineral-resource potential.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic generator experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, E. S.

    1972-01-01

    The results for an experimental study of a one wavelength MHD induction generator operating on a liquid flow are presented. First the design philosophy and the experimental generator design are summarized, including a description of the flow loop and instrumentation. Next a Fourier series method of treating the fact that the magnetic flux density produced by the stator is not a pure traveling sinusoid is described and some results summarized. This approach appears to be of interest after revisions are made, but the initial results are not accurate. Finally, some of the experimental data is summarized for various methods of excitation.

  11. Experimental Semiotics: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Galantucci, Bruno; Garrod, Simon

    2010-01-01

    In the last few years a new line of research has appeared in the literature. This line of research, which may be referred to as experimental semiotics (ES; Galantucci, 2009; Galantucci and Garrod, 2010), focuses on the experimental investigation of novel forms of human communication. In this review we will (a) situate ES in its conceptual context, (b) illustrate the main varieties of studies thus far conducted by experimental semioticians, (c) illustrate three main themes of investigation which have emerged within this line of research, and (d) consider implications of this work for cognitive neuroscience. PMID:21369364

  12. Broca's area - thalamic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Bohsali, Anastasia A; Triplett, William; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Gullett, Joseph M; McGregor, Keith; FitzGerald, David B; Mareci, Thomas; White, Keith; Crosson, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Broca's area is crucially involved in language processing. The sub-regions of Broca's area (pars triangularis, pars opercularis) presumably are connected via corticocortical pathways. However, growing evidence suggests that the thalamus may also be involved in language and share some of the linguistic functions supported by Broca's area. Functional connectivity is thought to be achieved via corticothalamic/thalamocortical white matter pathways. Our study investigates structural connectivity between Broca's area and the thalamus, specifically ventral anterior nucleus and pulvinar. We demonstrate that Broca's area shares direct connections with these thalamic nuclei and suggest a local Broca's area-thalamus network potentially involved in linguistic processing. Thalamic connectivity with Broca's area may serve to selectively recruit cortical regions storing multimodal features of lexical items and to bind them together during lexical-semantic processing. In addition, Broca's area-thalamic circuitry may enable cortico-thalamo-cortical information transfer and modulation between BA 44 and 45 during language comprehension and production. PMID:25555132

  13. SUGARLOAF ROADLESS AREA, NEVADA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Edwin H.; Schmauch, Steven W.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey local areas in and near the western edge of the Sugarloaf Roadless Area, Nevada have probable resource potential for silver and small amounts of associated lead, zinc, and gold.

  14. Designing an Experimental "Accident"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picker, Lester

    1974-01-01

    Describes an experimental "accident" that resulted in much student learning, seeks help in the identification of nematodes, and suggests biology teachers introduce similar accidents into their teaching to stimulate student interest. (PEB)

  15. Nuclear test experimental science

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Bucciarelli, G.; Carter, J.; Cherniak, J.; Donohue, M.L.; Kirvel, R.D.; MacGregor, P.; Reid, S.

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory under the following topics: prompt diagnostics; experimental modeling, design, and analysis; detector development; streak-camera data systems; weapons supporting research.

  16. TATOOSH ROADLESS AREA, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and geochemical surveys of the Tatoosh Roadless Area in Washington were conducted. The results indicate that none of the four parts comprising the roadless area are likely to contain mineral or energy resources. The geology of this part of the Cascade Range is poorly known, and a regionally focussed program of geologic mapping and geochemical sampling might discover areas of promising mineralization perhaps extending into the roadless area beneath the surface.

  17. RATTLESNAKE ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlstrom, Thor N.V.; McColly, Robert

    1984-01-01

    There is little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the Rattlesnake Roadless Area, Arizona, as judged from field studies. Significant concentrations of minerals within the roadless area are not indicated by geologic mapping, geochemical sampling, or aeromagnetic studies. Basalt, volcanic cinders, sand and gravel, and sandstone that may be suitable for construction materials occur in the area, but are more readily accessible outside the roadless area boundary.

  18. CYPRESS ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, George L.; Capstick, Donald O.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral surveys of the Cypress Roadless Area, located in the southern part of the Sierra Nevada, California, were conducted. On the basis of these investigations, the eastern part of this roadless area has probable resource potential for gold with associated silver in quartz veins. This area has been extensively prospected. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of energy resources.

  19. Developing Environmental Study Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wert, Jonathan M.

    This publication is designed to help the teacher in developing environmental study areas. Numerous examples of study areas, including airports, lakes, shopping centers, and zoos, are listed. A current definition of environmental study areas is given and guidelines for their development and identification are included. The appendix, which comprises…

  20. Research in high speed fiber optics local area networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobagi, F. A.

    1986-02-01

    The design of high speed local area networks (HSLAN) for communication among distributed devices requires solving problems in three areas: the network medium and its topology, the medium access control, and the network interface. Considerable progress was already made in the first two areas. Accomplishments are divided into two groups according to their theoretical or experimental nature. A brief summary is given.

  1. 99. ARAIII. Overall view of drilling area in reactor pit. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    99. ARA-III. Overall view of drilling area in reactor pit. Bridge over pit in use for operations. Shows water in pool, reactor, hoist, operators, and general view of interior of reactor pit area. August 12, 1963. Ineel photo no. 63-4454. Photographer: Benson. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. 142. ARAIII General plan of GCRE area, including electrical distribution ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    142. ARA-III General plan of GCRE area, including electrical distribution plan for power and lighting. Includes detail of floodlight and security lighting poles and fixtures. Aerojet-general 880-area/GCRE-406-1. Date: February 1958. Ineel index code no. 063-0406-00-013-102539. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. CHATTAHOOCHEE ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Arthur E.; Welsh, Robert A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey indicates that the Chattahoochee Roadless Area, Georgia, offers little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources even though gold, mica, sillimanite, soapstone, dunite, chromite, and nickel have been mined nearby, and source rocks for these commodities are present in the roadless area. Granite gneiss, gneiss, schist, and metasandstone in the roadless area are suitable for stone, crushed rock, or aggregate; however, other sources for these materials are available outside the roadless area, closer to present markets. The potential for the occurrence of hydrocarbons (probably gas) beneath the thick regional thrust sheets in this area cannot be adequately evaluated from available data.

  4. Experimental cochlear hydrops in cats.

    PubMed

    Eby, T L

    1986-11-01

    An experimental model of cochlear hydrops was created in cats. Ten cats underwent surgical procedures to obliterate the saccule, and their temporal bones were studied by light microscopy after sacrifice at 10 weeks. In one group the saccules were destroyed by maceration and aspiration. However, in these ears the saccular lumens were not obliterated and endolymphatic hydrops did not develop. Obliteration of the saccules was achieved in the second group after fascia was introduced into the area of the injured saccules. Cochlear endolymphatic hydrops was a consistent finding in these ears except when a fistula of the membranous labyrinth was present. However, in addition to fibrosis and new bone formation in the vestibules there were also degenerative changes in the hair cells, tectorial membranes, and striae vasculares of these cochleae. The results supported the longitudinal flow theory of endolymph and are consistent with the reported examples of cochlear endolymphatic hydrops in man. PMID:3812642

  5. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C.

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  6. Overview of Experimental Capabilities - Supersonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of experimental capabilities applicable to the area of supersonic research. The contents include: 1) EC Objectives; 2) SUP.11: Elements; 3) NRA; 4) Advanced Flight Simulator Flexible Aircraft Simulation Studies; 5) Advanced Flight Simulator Flying Qualities Guideline Development for Flexible Supersonic Transport Aircraft; 6) Advanced Flight Simulator Rigid/Flex Flight Control; 7) Advanced Flight Simulator Rapid Sim Model Exchange; 8) Flight Test Capabilities Advanced In-Flight Infrared (IR) Thermography; 9) Flight Test Capabilities In-Flight Schlieren; 10) Flight Test Capabilities CLIP Flow Calibration; 11) Flight Test Capabilities PFTF Flowfield Survey; 12) Ground Test Capabilities Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics (LITA); 13) Ground Test Capabilities Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV); 14) Ground Test Capabilities Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV); and 15) Ground Test Capabilities EDL Optical Measurement Capability (PIV) for Rigid/Flexible Decelerator Models.

  7. Experimental scattershot boson sampling

    PubMed Central

    Bentivegna, Marco; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Vitelli, Chiara; Flamini, Fulvio; Viggianiello, Niko; Latmiral, Ludovico; Mataloni, Paolo; Brod, Daniel J.; Galvão, Ernesto F.; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Boson sampling is a computational task strongly believed to be hard for classical computers, but efficiently solvable by orchestrated bosonic interference in a specialized quantum computer. Current experimental schemes, however, are still insufficient for a convincing demonstration of the advantage of quantum over classical computation. A new variation of this task, scattershot boson sampling, leads to an exponential increase in speed of the quantum device, using a larger number of photon sources based on parametric down-conversion. This is achieved by having multiple heralded single photons being sent, shot by shot, into different random input ports of the interferometer. We report the first scattershot boson sampling experiments, where six different photon-pair sources are coupled to integrated photonic circuits. We use recently proposed statistical tools to analyze our experimental data, providing strong evidence that our photonic quantum simulator works as expected. This approach represents an important leap toward a convincing experimental demonstration of the quantum computational supremacy. PMID:26601164

  8. Interfacial area transport in bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; Revankar, S.T.

    1997-12-31

    In order to close the two-fluid model for two-phase flow analyses, the interfacial area concentration needs to be modeled as a constitutive relation. In this study, the focus was on the investigation of the interfacial area concentration transport phenomena, both theoretically and experimentally. The interfacial area concentration transport equation for air-water bubbly up-flow in a vertical pipe was developed, and the models for the source and sink terms were provided. The necessary parameters for the experimental studies were identified, including the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interfacial velocity, liquid velocity and turbulent intensity. Experiments were performed with air-water mixture at atmospheric pressure. Double-sensor conductivity probe and hot-film probe were employed to measure the identified parameters. With these experimental data, the preliminary model evaluation was carried out for the simplest form of the developed interfacial area transport equation, i.e., the one-dimensional transport equation.

  9. Experimental approach to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Leifels, Yvonne

    2014-05-09

    The equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter is of fundamental importance in many areas of nuclear physics and astrophysics In the laboratory, there are different means to study the nuclearmatter equation of state and its density dependence in particular: nuclear masses, neutron skins, pygmy resonance, and nuclear structure at the drip line give access to nuclear matter properties at densities lower than and at saturation density ρ0. Heavy ion reactions at energies above 0.1 AGeV are the only means to study nuclear matter at densities larger than normal nuclear matter density ρ0. In the beamenergy range of 0.1 to 2A GeV nuclear matter is compressed upto three times ρ0. Access to nuclear matter properties is achieved by simulating nuclear collisions by means of microscopic transport codes, or statistical or hydrodynamicalmodels. Characteristics of heavy-ion collisions are discussed, and experimental observables which allow to constrain nuclear matter properties by comparing experimental results with those of transport codes are presented. Special emphasis will be given to the density dependence of the symmetry energy which is the most relevant connection between neutron stars and heavy ion collisions.

  10. SAA drift:experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Kudela, K.; Romashova, V. V.; Drozdov, A. Yu.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth's magnetic field connected with magnetic momentum changing. Besides these variations affects on the trapped belt South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations including Space Shuttle short-time flights approved the existence SAA westward drift with speed 0.1-1.0 (deg/year) and northward drift with speed approximately 0.1 (deg/year). In this work we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in SINP MSU in 1972-2003 from different satellites. There were analyzed the fluxes of protons with energy > 50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy > 500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1-1.0 MeV in SAA area and their maxima location. The data about fluxes were obtained onboard the orbital stations ``Salut-6'' (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the identical experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact of the SAA westward drift. Moreover the same analysis of maximum flux location of electrons with hundreds keV energy (satellites ``Kosmos-484'' (1972), ``Interkosmos-17'' (1977) and ``Activny'' (``Interkosmos-24'', 1991)) confirmed not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  11. Experimental probes of axions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Aaron S.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Experimental searches for axions or axion-like particles rely on semiclassical phenomena resulting from the postulated coupling of the axion to two photons. Sensitive probes of the extremely small coupling constant can be made by exploiting familiar, coherent electromagnetic laboratory techniques, including resonant enhancement of transitions using microwave and optical cavities, Bragg scattering, and coherent photon-axion oscillations. The axion beam may either be astrophysical in origin as in the case of dark matter axion searches and solar axion searches, or created in the laboratory from laser interactions with magnetic fields. This note is meant to be a sampling of recent experimental results.

  12. Questioning and Experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutanen, Arto

    2014-08-01

    The paper is a philosophical analysis of experimentation. The philosophical framework of the analysis is the interrogative model of inquiry developed by Hintikka. The basis of the model is explicit and well-formed logic of questions and answers. The framework allows us to formulate a flexible logic of experimentation. In particular, the formulated model can be interpreted realistically. Moreover, the model demonstrates an explicit logic of knowledge acquisition. So, the natural extension of the model is to apply it to an analysis of the learning process.

  13. Area scalable optically induced photorefractive photonic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wentao; Xue, Yan Ling; Jiang, Dongdong

    2016-07-01

    A convenient approach to fabricate area scalable two-dimensional photonic microstructures was experimentally demonstrated by multi-face optical wedges. The approach is quite compact and stable without complex optical alignment equipment. Large-area square lattice microstructures are optically induced inside an iron-doped lithium niobate photorefractive crystal. The induced large-area microstructures are analyzed and verified by plane wave guiding, Brillouin-zone spectroscopy, angle-dependent transmission spectrum, and lateral Bragg reflection patterns. The method can be easily extended to generate other more complex area scalable photonic microstructures, such as quasicrystal lattices, by designing the multi-face optical wedge appropriately. The induced area scalable photonic microstructures can be fixed or erased even re-recorded in the photorefractive crystal, which suggests potential applications in micro-nano photonic devices.

  14. CORNPLANTER ROADLESS AREA, PENNSYLVANIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesure, Frank G.; Welsh, Robert A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The Cornplanter Roadless Area is on the west shore of Allegheny Reservoir, Pennsylvania, in an area containing flat-lying sedimentary rocks of Devonian and Mississippian age. Based on mineral-resource studies, these rocks have a substantiated potential for natural gas and a probable potential for oil in the roadless area. Other identified mineral resources include various rocks suitable for crushed rock, conglomeratic sandstone suitable for high silica uses, and shale suitable for production of clay products.

  15. SUGARLOAF ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Robert E.; Campbell, Harry W.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical investigations and a survey of mines, quarries, and prospects the Sugarloaf Roadless Area, California, has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or energy resources. Units of carbonate rock and graphitic schist have demonstrated resources of magnesian marble and graphite. Sand, gravel, and construction stone other than carbonate rock are present in the roadless area, but similar or better quality materials are abundant and more accessible outside the area.

  16. SAVANNAH ROADLESS AREA, FLORIDA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, Sam H.; Crandall, Thomas M.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey the Savannah Roadless Area in Florida was appraised to offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. The commodities identified in the area are deposits of sand and gravel; however, they are deeply buried, far from potential markets, and more readily accessible material exists outside the roadless area. The possibility that oil and gas might occur in the Jurassic Smackover Formation or in other formations at depth cannot be ruled out.

  17. Phoenix Lander Work Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander Robotic Arm work area with an overlay. The pink area is available for digging, the green area is reserved for placing the Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) instrument. Soil can be dumped in the violet area.

    Images were displayed using NASA Ames 'Viz' visualization software.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MAINTENANCE

    DOEpatents

    Finkel, M.P.

    1962-01-22

    A method of housing experimental animals such as mice in individual tube- like plastic enclosures is described. Contrary to experience, when this was tried with metal the mice did not become panicky. Group housing, with its attendant difficulties, may thus be dispensed with. (AEC)

  19. Communicating Uncertain Experimental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alexander L.; Fischhoff, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Four experiments examined when laypeople attribute unexpected experimental outcomes to error, in foresight and in hindsight, along with their judgments of whether the data should be published. Participants read vignettes describing hypothetical experiments, along with the result of the initial observation, considered as either a possibility…

  20. Experimental fluvial geomorphology

    SciTech Connect

    Schumm, S.A.; Mosley, M.P.; Weaver, W.

    1987-01-01

    The authors bring together the results of several years of experimental work in drainage basin evolution, hydrology, river-channel morphology, and sedimentology. These investigations are related to real-world applications, particularly geological exploration and mapping. This text shows how awareness of natural phenomena can improve management of the natural environment, such as the control of rivers and eroding gullies.

  1. Administrative Aspects of Human Experimentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, George W.

    1992-01-01

    The following administrative aspects of scientific experimentation with human subjects are discussed: the definition of human experimentation; the distinction between experimentation and treatment; investigator responsibility; documentation; the elements and principles of informed consent; and the administrator's role in establishing and…

  2. Teaching experimental design.

    PubMed

    Fry, Derek J

    2014-01-01

    Awareness of poor design and published concerns over study quality stimulated the development of courses on experimental design intended to improve matters. This article describes some of the thinking behind these courses and how the topics can be presented in a variety of formats. The premises are that education in experimental design should be undertaken with an awareness of educational principles, of how adults learn, and of the particular topics in the subject that need emphasis. For those using laboratory animals, it should include ethical considerations, particularly severity issues, and accommodate learners not confident with mathematics. Basic principles, explanation of fully randomized, randomized block, and factorial designs, and discussion of how to size an experiment form the minimum set of topics. A problem-solving approach can help develop the skills of deciding what are correct experimental units and suitable controls in different experimental scenarios, identifying when an experiment has not been properly randomized or blinded, and selecting the most efficient design for particular experimental situations. Content, pace, and presentation should suit the audience and time available, and variety both within a presentation and in ways of interacting with those being taught is likely to be effective. Details are given of a three-day course based on these ideas, which has been rated informative, educational, and enjoyable, and can form a postgraduate module. It has oral presentations reinforced by group exercises and discussions based on realistic problems, and computer exercises which include some analysis. Other case studies consider a half-day format and a module for animal technicians. PMID:25541547

  3. Experimental strategies for frost analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Daniel D.

    An area of increasing importance in the field of refrigeration is the study of frosting and defrosting. Frosting poses a concern to many refrigeration systems, as frost growth both obstructs airflow through low temperature heat exchangers and increases heat transfer resistance. Drastic decreases in system efficiency result from the compounding of these problems, and because it is difficult to prevent the frosting process, refrigeration systems must be defrosted periodically to restore optimal operating conditions. A deeper understanding of the complex physical processes of frosting and defrosting will lead to more efficient refrigeration system designs; an idea which has driven a rise in frost growth research over recent decades. Although research has shown great progress, there remain significant challenges associated with predicting the frosting and defrosting processes accurately under wide ranges of conditions. The equations governing such behavior still remain insoluble by exact analytical methods. Numerical approaches have shown the most promising results, but are yet in an early stage of development. Most research has instead been concerned with developing correlations for frost properties and growth, though few are applicable to varying conditions. The most commonly used correlations are shown to have widely different results, perhaps owing to different experimental methods used to acquire data and a lack of deeper level analysis. A new thickness correlation is proposed which attempts to reconcile to some degree the gap between theory and application. Broader ranges of data are used for fitment which enables the application of the correlation to a wider range of conditions. To improve the consistency of results in frost research, it is suggested that new forms of data acquisition be explored. Proposed alternative methods utilize high magnification imaging equipment in combination with computer based measurements, which are shown to be capable of improving

  4. KSC Technology Area 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Marc A.

    2012-01-01

    Tracking, Timing, Communications and Navigation are critical to all NASA missions. Accurate weather prediction is critical to KSC launch activities. KSC is involved with and in several cases leading research and development in many exciting areas and with partners. We welcome new partners in all of these areas!

  5. OLALLIE ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Neumann, Terry R.

    1984-01-01

    The Olallie Roadless Area, Oregon, is devoid of mines and mineral prospects, and a mineral-resource evaluation of the area did not identify any mineral-resource potential. There is no evidence that fossil fuels are present in the roadless area. Nearby areas in Clackamas, Marion, Jefferson, and Wasco Counties are characterized by higher-than-normal heat flow and by numerous thermal springs, some of which have been partly developed. this may indicate that the region has some, as yet undefined, potential for the development of geothermal energy. Lack of thermal springs or other evidence of localized geothermal anomalies within the roadless area may be the result of masking by young, nonconductive rock units and by the flooding out and dilution of rising thermal waters by cool meteoric water.

  6. PYRAMID ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, Augustus K.; Scott, Douglas F.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and mineral survey was conducted in the Pyramid Roadless Area, California. The area contains mineral showings, but no mineral-resource potential was identified during our studies. Three granodiorite samples on the west side of the roadless area contained weakly anomalous concentrations of uranium. Two samples of roof-pendant rocks, one metasedimentary rock and one metavolcanic rock, contain low concentrations of copper, and of copper and molybdenum, respectively. Although none was identified, the geologic terrane is permissive for mineral occurrences and large-scale, detailed geologic mapping of the areas of metasedimentary and metavolcanic roof pendants in the Pyramid Roadless Area could define a mineral-resource potential for tungsten and precious metals.

  7. Geoengineering as Collective Experimentation.

    PubMed

    Stilgoe, Jack

    2016-06-01

    Geoengineering is defined as the 'deliberate and large-scale intervention in the Earth's climatic system with the aim of reducing global warming'. The technological proposals for doing this are highly speculative. Research is at an early stage, but there is a strong consensus that technologies would, if realisable, have profound and surprising ramifications. Geoengineering would seem to be an archetype of technology as social experiment, blurring lines that separate research from deployment and scientific knowledge from technological artefacts. Looking into the experimental systems of geoengineering, we can see the negotiation of what is known and unknown. The paper argues that, in renegotiating such systems, we can approach a new mode of governance-collective experimentation. This has important ramifications not just for how we imagine future geoengineering technologies, but also for how we govern geoengineering experiments currently under discussion. PMID:25862639

  8. Experimental Neutrino Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Walter, Chris [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States

    2010-01-08

    In this talk, I will review how a set of experiments in the last decade has given us our current understanding of neutrino properties.  I will show how experiments in the last year or two have clarified this picture, and will discuss how new experiments about to start will address remaining questions.  I will particularly emphasize the relationship between various experimental techniques.

  9. Structural femtochemistry: experimental methodology.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, J C; Zewail, A H

    1991-01-01

    The experimental methodology for structural femtochemistry of reactions is considered. With the extension of femtosecond transition-state spectroscopy to the diffraction regime, it is possible to obtain in a general way the trajectories of chemical reactions (change of internuclear separations with time) on the femtosecond time scale. This method, considered here for simple alkali halide dissociation, promises many applications to more complex reactions and to conformational changes. Alignment on the time scale of the experiments is also discussed. Images PMID:11607189

  10. MSFC Skylab experimenter's reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The methods and techniques for experiment development and integration that evolved during the Skylab Program are described to facilitate transferring this experience to experimenters in future manned space programs. Management responsibilities and the sequential process of experiment evolution from initial concept through definition, development, integration, operation and postflight analysis are outlined in the main text and amplified, as appropriate, in appendixes. Emphasis is placed on specific lessons learned on Skylab that are worthy of consideration by future programs.

  11. SAA drift: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Romashova, V. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth’s magnetic field connected with magnetic moment changing. These variations affect on the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations approved the existence of the SAA westward drift rate (0.1 1.0 deg/year) and northward drift rate (approximately 0.1 deg/year). In this work, we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) onboard different Earth’s artificial satellites (1972 2003). The fluxes of protons with energy >50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy >500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1 1.0 MeV in the SAA region have been analyzed. The mentioned above experimental data were obtained onboard the orbital stations Salut-6 (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the similar experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact that the SAA drifts westward. Moreover the analysis of fluxes of electrons with energy about hundreds keV (Cosmos-484 (1972) and Active (Interkosmos-24, 1991) satellites) verified not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  12. Protected areas and poverty

    PubMed Central

    Brockington, Daniel; Wilkie, David

    2015-01-01

    Protected areas are controversial because they are so important for conservation and because they distribute fortune and misfortune unevenly. The nature of that distribution, as well as the terrain of protected areas themselves, have been vigorously contested. In particular, the relationship between protected areas and poverty is a long-running debate in academic and policy circles. We review the origins of this debate and chart its key moments. We then outline the continuing flashpoints and ways in which further evaluation studies could improve the evidence base for policy-making and conservation practice. PMID:26460124

  13. Extremes of the nuclear landscape: experimental studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, W.

    2011-03-01

    Increasingly more intense beams of radioactive isotopes allow moving into unknown areas of the nuclear chart and exploring the limits in nuclear binding and proton-to-neutron ratio. New aspects of nuclear structure and important results for nuclear astrophysics are obtained. The paper provides some overview of experimental developments, facilities and research results; and is intended to set the stage for the many exciting examples of research presented in these proceedings.

  14. Optimal Experimental Design for Model Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Models of a psychological process can be difficult to discriminate experimentally because it is not easy to determine the values of the critical design variables (e.g., presentation schedule, stimulus structure) that will be most informative in differentiating them. Recent developments in sampling-based search methods in statistics make it possible to determine these values, and thereby identify an optimal experimental design. After describing the method, it is demonstrated in two content areas in cognitive psychology in which models are highly competitive: retention (i.e., forgetting) and categorization. The optimal design is compared with the quality of designs used in the literature. The findings demonstrate that design optimization has the potential to increase the informativeness of the experimental method. PMID:19618983

  15. Police. An Experimental Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otero, George G.

    This unit examines four topic areas related to police: rules and enforcement, police discretion, variety of police tasks, and police differences among societies as products of certain social pressures. High-school students learn about the police as an institution that responds to social and historical pressures. Students study police systems in…

  16. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    BORGHESE JV

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  17. BUTTERMILK ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Edwin H.; Iverson, Stephen R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of geologic, geochemical, and mining activity and production surveys made in the Buttermilk Roadless Area indicate little or no promise for the discovery of metallic or energy resources in the area. Glacial till and other types of surficial alluvium cover the bedrock to a depth of tens and probably hundreds of feet preventing examination and evaluation of possible minerals that might be present in the bedrock. No mining claims are known to be in the area and the nearest mining activity is too far removed to reasonably project mineralization into the buried bedrock of the roadless area. The glacial till has little promise for placer deposits because the eroded debris has had little or no sorting and concentration by natural hydraulic action.

  18. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  19. Quantifying disbond area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowden, D. W.

    1992-10-01

    Disbonds simulated in a composite helicopter rotor blade were profiled using eddy currents. The method is inherently accurate and reproducible. An algorithm is described for calculating disbond margin. Disbond area is estimated assuming in-service disbondments exhibit circular geometry.

  20. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black

  1. Electrodeless Experimental Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Brainerd, Jerome J.; Reisz, Al

    2009-03-16

    An electrodeless experimental electric thruster has been built and tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The plasma is formed by Electron-Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) absorption of RF waves (microwaves). The RF source operates in the 1 to 2 kW range. The plasma is overdense and is confined radially by an applied axial dc magnetic field. The field is shaped by a strong magnetic mirror on the upstream end and a magnetic nozzle on the downstream end. Argon is used as the propellant. The velocity profile in the exhaust plume has been measured with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). An unusual bimodal velocity profile has been measured.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Finkel, M.P.

    1964-04-01

    A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

  3. Electric propulsion: Experimental research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, W. M.; Friedly, V. J.; Keefer, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes experimental electric propulsion research which was carried out at the University of Tennessee Space Institute with support from the Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research. Specifically, a multiplexed laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for obtaining vector velocities, Doppler temperatures, and relative number densities in the exhaust plumes from electric propulsion devices is described, and results are presented that were obtained on a low power argon arcjet. Also, preliminary Langmuir probe measurements on an ion source are described, and an update on the vacuum facility is presented.

  4. Electric Propulsion: Experimental Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, W. M.; Friedly, V. J.; Keefer, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes experimental electric propulsion research which was carried out at the University of Tennessee Space Institute with support from the Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research. Specifically, a multiplexed LIF technique for obtaining vector velocities, Doppler temperatures, and relative number densities in the exhaust plumes form electric propulsion devices is described, and results are presented that were obtained on a low power argon arcjet. Also, preliminary Langmuir probe measurements on an ion source are described, and an update on the vacuum facility is presented.

  5. Experimental turbine VT-400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitek, Pavel; Milčák, Petr; Noga, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The experimental air turbine VT400 is located in hall laboratories of the Department of Power System Engineering. It is a single-stage air turbine located in the suction of the compressor. It is able to solve various problems concerning the construction solution of turbine stages. The content of the article will deal mainly with the description of measurements on this turbine. The up-to-now research on this test rig will be briefly mentioned, too, as well as the description of the ongoing reconstruction.

  6. 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    CARRELL, R.D.

    2000-03-15

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements define administrative controls and design features required to ensure safe operation during receipt and storage of canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. This document is based on the 200 Area Interim Storage Area, Annex D, Final Safety Analysis Report which contains information specific to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area.

  7. Highlight area inpainting guided by illumination model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifan; Jiang, Zhiguo; Shi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed a two-step algorithm based on the combination of the exemplar-based algorithm and the illumination model to deal with specular images, especially those contain saturated pixels in the highlight areas. First the proposed modified exemplar-based algorithm is employed to process the unsaturated specular pixels under the supervision of illumination model. Then we inpaint the rest regions in which the pixels are saturated with original exemplar-based algorithm to obtain the final result. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm performs better on the images with saturated pixels in the highlight areas compared with classical highlight removal and image inpainting algorithms.

  8. Large-area mercuric iodide photodectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markakis, J.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.; Iwanczyk, J.; Dabrowski, A.

    1983-07-01

    The limits of the active area of mercuric iodide photodetectors imposed by the size of available crystals, electronic noise, and the uniformity of charge carrier collection are discussed. Theoretical calculations of the photodetector electronic noise are compared with the experimental results. Different entrance contacts were studied including semitransparent palladium films and conductive liquids. HgI2 photodetectors with active area up to 4 sq cm are matched with NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals and are evaluated as gamma radiation spectrometers.

  9. Experimental myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj; Joison, Julio; Gilmour, David P.; Molokhia, Farouk A.; Pegg, C. A. S.; Hood, William B.

    1971-01-01

    The hemodynamic effects of tachycardia induced by atrial pacing were investigated in left ventricular failure of acute and healing experimental myocardial infarction in 20 intact, conscious dogs. Myocardial infarction was produced by gradual inflation of a balloon cuff device implanted around the left anterior descending coronary artery 10-15 days prior to the study. 1 hr after acute myocardial infarction, atrial pacing at a rate of 180 beats/min decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure from 19 to 8 mm Hg and left atrial pressure from 17 to 12 mm Hg, without change in cardiac output. In the healing phase of myocardial infarction 1 wk later, atrial pacing decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure from 17 to 9 mm Hg and increased the cardiac output by 37%. This was accompanied by evidence of peripheral vasodilation. In two dogs with healing anterior wall myocardial infarction, left ventricular failure was enhanced by partial occlusion of the circumflex coronary artery. Both the dogs developed pulmonary edema. Pacing improved left ventricular performance and relieved pulmonary edema in both animals. In six animals propranolol was given after acute infarction, and left ventricular function deteriorated further. However the pacing-induced augmentation of cardiac function was unaltered and, hence, is not mediated by sympathetics. The results show that the spontaneous heart rate in left ventricular failure of experimental canine myocardial infarction may be less than optimal and that maximal cardiac function may be achieved at higher heart rates. Images PMID:4395910

  10. Experimental immunogenic rubeosis iridis.

    PubMed

    Shabo, A L; Maxwell, D S; Shintaku, P; Kreiger, A E; Straatsma, B R

    1977-04-01

    We have developed a primate model of rubeosis iridis in monkeys systemically sensitized to crystalline beef insulin. After intravitreal insulin injection, the dose-related immunogenic inflammation includes cells, flare, fibrin, and blood in the anterior chamber. With more severe inflammation, posterior synechiae, iris bombé, and cataracts occur. Of particular importance, new blood vessels develop within the stroma and on the anterior surface of the iris. Following injection of small amounts of insulin, the anterior surface vessels may regress over time, and the iris regains its normal appearance and coloration. However, the new stromal vessels persist and are cuffed by inflammatory cells including plasma cells. After injection of large amounts of insulin, more extensive structural alterations develop as noted above in conjunction with persistent iris anterior surface and stromal neovascularization. The relationship of rubeosis iridis to clinical inflammatory syndromes and to previous laboratory studies is discussed. Stromal neovascularization was a consistent finding in this experimental model even when anterior surface vessels regressed. On the basis of these experimental data and a review of publications describing human pathology, we believe that a broadening of the classic definition of rubeosis iridis is waranted to include a recognition of the stromal component of the clinical and pathologic findings. PMID:403154