Science.gov

Sample records for area monitored natural

  1. Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

    2001-07-23

    Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

  2. Monitoring of Emissions from Natural Gas Production Facilities in Barnett Shale Area for Population Exposure Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinska, B.; Fujita, E.; Campbell, D.; Samburova, V.; Hendler, E.; Beskid, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    The Barnett Shale study was conducted in April-May 2010 to provide a better understanding of population exposure to air toxics associated with gas production operations in the Barnett Shale region of North Texas. The Barnett Shale is a geological formation that stretches form Dallas to west of Fort Worth and southward, covering 5,000 square miles and 18 counties in the Fort Worth Basin. Oil and gas experts have suggested that it may be the largest onshore natural gas field in the US, containing not only natural gas but also condensate and light oil. Gas production wells in the Barnett Shale area number in the thousands and are spread over a large areas of North Texas. Emissions can occur during various stages in the life of any single well and along various points of the production stream from extraction of raw gas at the well to distribution of commercial grade natural gas at central gathering and processing plants. In the first phase of this study we characterized the emissions from major gas production facilities in the area. An initial survey was performed using a mobile sampling vehicle to identify facilities with measurable emissions. Source-oriented volatile organic compounds (VOC) samples were collected at several facilities with confirmed emissions measured with our continuous survey monitors. In the second phase we conducted saturation monitoring (multiple fixed-ambient sampling locations using passive sampling systems) downwind of gas production areas. One location was near a well with emissions from condensate tanks that were well characterized during Phase 1. A single private residence was located a short distance downwind of this well and was away from other emission sources that might interfere with the measured gradient of emissions from the well. The measurement at this site serves as a case study of the pollutant gradient from a well characterized emission source at various distances downwind of the source relative to the upwind pollutant

  3. Large networks of artificial radar reflectors to monitor land subsidence in natural lowlying coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Luigi; Strozzi, Tazio; Teatini, Pietro

    2014-05-01

    Deltas, lagoons, estuaries are generally much prone to land subsidence. They are also very sensitive to land lowering due to their small elevation with respect to the mean sea level, also in view of the expected eustatic sea rise due to climate changes. Land subsidence can be presently monitored with an impressive accuracy by Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) on the large megacities that are often located on lowlying coastlands, e.g., Shanghai (China) on the Yangtze River delta, Dhaka (Bangladesh) on the Gange River delta, New Orleans (Louisiana) on the Mississippi river delta. Conversely, the land movements of the portions of these transitional coastlands where natural environments still persist are very challenging to be measured. The lack of anthropogenic structures strongly limits the use of PSI and the difficult accessibility caused by the presence of marshlands, tidal marshes, channels, and ponds yield traditional methodologies, such as levelling and GPS, both time-consuming and costly. In this contribution we present a unique experimental study aimed at using a large network of artificial radar reflectors to measure land subsidence in natural coastal areas. The test site is the 60-km long, 10-15 km wide lagoon of Venice, Italy, where previous PSI investigations revealed the lack of radar reflectors in large portions of the northern and southern lagoon basins (e.g., Teatini et al., 2011). A network of 57 trihedral corner reflectors (TCRs) were established between the end of 2006 and the beginning of 2007 and monitored by ENVISAT ASAR and TerraSAR-X acquisitions covering the time period from 2007 to 2011 (Strozzi et al., 2012). The application has provided general important insights on the possibility of controlling land subsidence using this approach. For example: (i) relatively small-size (from 0.5 to 1.0 m edge length) and cheap (few hundred euros) TCRs suffice to be clearly detectable from the radar sensors because of the low backscattering

  4. A Statewide Private Microwave Wide Area Network for Real-time Natural Hazard Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. C.; Kent, G.; Smith, K. D.; Plank, G.; Slater, D.; Torrisi, J.; Presser, R.; Straley, K.

    2013-12-01

    datalogger in our seismic network not only for data collection, but also for maintenance and quality control. This has resulted in several partnerships with other agencies. In addition to our seismic station network for earthquake monitoring, we currently manage ~400 more channels of data (many running at 500 Hz) for the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS) Source Physics Experiments, a series of chemical explosions at the Nevada National Security Site. Some of our mountaintop stations have been experimentally equipped with near-infrared high-definition fire cameras for wildfire monitoring, and have recently recorded the Bison and Pedlar fires in northwest Nevada. Data for the Nevada EPSCor climate program also utilizes the NSL WAN. Real-time access to data for these experiments greatly reduces the effort required for data archival, quality control, and monitoring equipment failures. Future plans include increasing density of stations in urban areas such as Reno and Las Vegas, and expanding coverage to Tahoe and eastern Nevada.

  5. Evaluation of the D-Area Expanded Operable Unit for Monitored Natural Attenuation of Inorganic Constituents of Concern: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, K.R.

    2003-01-08

    A comprehensive approach is being developed to evaluate SRS sites with inorganic constituents of concern (COCs) for potential implementation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation strategy. In order to invoke MNA, the operative, or controlling, attenuation mechanisms at a given site must be identified and demonstrated using a technically defensible approach and site-specific data. This report details ongoing research in the application of this approach at the D-Area expanded operable unit (DEXOU). Initial screening of the DEXOU described in this interim report indicates that natural attenuation of inorganic COCs (low pH, Cr, Ni, Se, and As) is occurring to a significant degree. This work is part of continuing efforts to characterize the natural attenuation processes, both abiotic and biotic, occurring at this location and likely occurring at other SRS sites with inorganic COCs.

  6. Use of ALOS/PALSAR imagery for monitoring areas damaged due to recent natural disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Masashi

    2006-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has the remarkable ability to examine the Earth's surface, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. A SAR-based remote sensing system can assess the damage to areas affected by large-scale disasters at an early stage. This can aid in recovery planning. On May 27, 2006 an earthquake struck Yogyakarta, Central Java, Indonesia, causing human suffering and severe building damage. PALSAR (Phased Array Type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar) onboard the Japanese ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) imaged the affected areas on the morning following the earthquake. The European satellite, Envisat, also imaged a wider area of central Java two days after the event. This paper applies a damage detection technique based on three time-series images from the SAR dataset covering the Mid Java earthquake. From a macroscopic point of view, the estimated damage distribution closely matched damage assessment derived from high-resolution satellite images and field surveys.

  7. Saving Natural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchinger, Maria

    This manual serves as a handbook for those involved in the art of land saving. The various topics in the booklet are dealt with in great detail since little has been published on the preservation of natural areas in international publications. Most of the document is derived from articles, books, and publications published by, or describing the…

  8. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  9. AREA RADIATION MONITOR

    DOEpatents

    Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

    1962-06-12

    S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

  10. Monitoring and analysis of natural vegetation in a special protected area of mountain Antichasia--Meteora, central Greece.

    PubMed

    Meliadis, Ioannis; Platis, Panagiotis; Ainalis, Apostolos; Meliadis, Miltiadis

    2010-04-01

    Natural ecosystems are renewable resources with special environmental, social, and economical attributes and characteristics. The increasing need of human beings for a better environment results in the use of new technologies that offer many advantages in detecting changes in the ecosystems. Remote sensing tools, technology, and the spatial analysis of the Geographic Information System were used in determining any changes in this study which attempts to classify land cover over a 10-year period. The study area is in Thessaly, central Greece, and has been classified as a Special Protection Area, because of its important wild fauna. The results have shown that current technologies can be used for modeling environmental parameters which improve our knowledge of the attributes, characteristics, situation, trends, and changes of natural ecosystems. The changes over time that have been observed result from the development of the vegetation or to anthropogenic and socioeconomic reasons. Rational range management will be a very comprehensive tool for farmers. This action will have a positive impact on flora in the rangelands. The core strategy is to combine forest, pasture, and livestock so that each component produces usable products. PMID:19377910

  11. Android Based Area Web Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanigoro, Bayu; Galih Salman, Afan; Moniaga, Jurike V.; Chandra, Eric; Rezky Chandra, Zein

    2014-03-01

    The research objective is to develop an application that can be used in the monitoring of an area by using a webcam. It aims to create a sense of security on the user's application because it can monitor an area using mobile phone anywhere. The results obtained in this study is to create an area with a webcam monitoring application that can be accessed anywhere as long as the monitoring results have internet access and can also be accessed through Android Based Mobile Phone.

  12. SIGNIFICANT NATURAL HERITAGE AREAS (NC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Parks and Recreation, Natural Heritage Program in cooperation with the NC Center for Geographic Information & Analysis, developed the Significant Natural Heritage Areas digital data to determine the a...

  13. Infrasound Monitoring of Natural Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrowsmith, S.

    2015-12-01

    Infrasound is generated by a wide variety of energetic natural and anthropogenic phenomena that originate in the solid earth, ocean, and atmosphere. Because the absorption of infrasound is low, it can propagate long distances through atmospheric waveguides, making it a valuable tool for remote monitoring of hazards. Advances in using infrasound for monitoring energetic events in the solid earth, oceans, and atmosphere are being driven by the wealth of new datasets in addition to advances in modeling source and propagation physics. This presentation provides an overview of recent advances in infrasound monitoring of natural hazards, focusing on selected hazards in the earth (earthquakes and volcanoes), ocean (tsunamis), and atmosphere (meteoroids).

  14. Wide area continuous offender monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshen, J.; Drake, G.; Spencer, D.

    1996-11-01

    The corrections system in the U.S. is supervising over five million offenders. This number is rising fast and so are the direct and indirect costs to society. To improve supervision and reduce the cost of parole and probation, first generation home arrest systems were introduced in 1987. While these systems proved to be helpful to the corrections system, their scope is rather limited because they only cover an offender at a single location and provide only a partial time coverage. To correct the limitations of first-generation systems, second-generation wide area continuous electronic offender monitoring systems, designed to monitor the offender at all times and locations, are now on the drawing board. These systems use radio frequency location technology to track the position of offenders. The challenge for this technology is the development of reliable personal locator devices that are small, lightweight, with long operational battery life, and indoors/outdoors accuracy of 100 meters or less. At the center of a second-generation system is a database that specifies the offender`s home, workplace, commute, and time the offender should be found in each. The database could also define areas from which the offender is excluded. To test compliance, the system would compare the observed coordinates of the offender with the stored location for a given time interval. Database logfiles will also enable law enforcement to determine if a monitored offender was present at a crime scene and thus include or exclude the offender as a potential suspect.

  15. Vegetation monitoring and estimation of evapotranspiration using remote sensing-based models in heterogeneous areas with patchy natural vegetation and crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpintero, Elisabet; Andreu, Ana; Gonzalez-Dugo, Maria P.

    2015-04-01

    The integration of remotely sensed data into models for estimating evapotranspiration (ET) has increased significantly in recent years, allowing the extension of these models application from point to regional scale. Remote sensors provide distributed information about the status of vegetation and allow for a regular monitoring of water consumption. Currently, there are two types of approaches for estimating ET based either on the soil water balance, or surface energy balance. The first one uses the reflectance of vegetated surfaces in the visible and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum (VIS / NIR) to characterize the vegetation and its role in the water balance (Gonzalez-Dugo and Mateos, 2008). On the other hand, thermal-based energy balance models use the radiometric surface temperature registered by the sensor on thermal infrared (TIR) bands as the primary boundary condition for estimating ET (Kustas and Norman, 1996). The aim of this work is to carry out, using Landsat-8 satellite images, a continuous monitoring of growth and evapotranspiration of the different vegetation types, both natural and cultivated, in a region located in Southern Spain during the season August 2013 / September 2014. The region, with about 13800 ha, is marked by strong contrasts in the physical environment, with significant altitudinal gradient combined with a great variety of soil types and vegetation. It is characterized by a variation of grassland, scrubs, conifers, oaks and irrigated crops. In this work, a daily soil water balance has been applied using the vegetation index-basal crop coefficient approach (RSWB). This model is based on FAO-56 methodology (Allen et al., 1998), which determines the evapotranspiration of vegetation with the concepts of crop coefficient and reference ET. The crop coefficient accounts for the influence of the plants on the evapotranspiration, considering the effect of changes in canopy biophysical properties throughout the growth cycle

  16. 7 CFR 650.23 - Natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Natural areas. 650.23 Section 650.23 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SUPPORT ACTIVITIES COMPLIANCE WITH NEPA Related Environmental Concerns § 650.23 Natural areas. (a) Background. (1) Natural areas...

  17. Sampling for natural resource monitoring: Book review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sampling for Natural Resource Monitoring provides a comprehensive introduction to natural resource sampling design for students, scientists and managers. The emphasis on cost analysis and optimization throughout the book is perhaps one of its greatest strengths. The explanations of two-phase and seq...

  18. REMOTE AREA RADIATION MONITORING (RARM) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON RL

    2008-07-18

    The Remote Area Radiation Monitoring (RARM) system will be used to provide real-time radiation monitoring information to the operations personnel during tank retrieval and transfer operations. The primary focus of the system is to detect potential anomalous (waste leaks) or transient radiological conditions. This system will provide mobile, real-time radiological monitoring, data logging, and status at pre-selected strategic points along the waste transfer route during tank retrieval operations. The system will provide early detection and response capabilities for the Retrieval and Closure Operations organization and Radiological Control personnel.

  19. Environmental monitoring for protected areas: Review and prospect.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, D S

    1992-04-01

    Monitoring activities in protected areas have a long history. Internal planning and management needs early led to ecological inventories. More recently the increasing number and awareness of external threats to parks has led to a variety of monitoring programs. Efforts to use protected areas, and especially biosphere reserves, as ecological baselines, have reinforced this trend. And as protected areas are increasingly recognized to be islands with complex internal and regional interactions, holistic, systems approaches to inventory, monitoring, and assessment of their state are being developed. This paper begins by reviewing threats to parks and the origins and importance of inventory and monitoring activities. A review of resource survey methods follows. Ecosystem science and environmental monitoring are introduced as a foundation for consideration of several newer approaches to monitoring and assessing the state of natural environments. These newer approaches are stress/response frameworks, landscape ecology, ecosystem integrity, and state of the environment reporting. A final section presents some principles for monitoring the state of protected areas. Examples are drawn from experience with Canadian national parks. PMID:24234344

  20. Monitored Natural Attenuation Case Study Evaluations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has been selected as a component of groundwater remedies at several sites with metals and/or radionuclide contamination. An overview of the site characterization effort and remedy performance will be provided for several sites where MNA was se...

  1. Monitored Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvent Plumes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter provides a synopsis of current applications of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remedy at hazardous waste sites, and reviews the expectations of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for MNA as a remedy. It provides a detailed case study of the application...

  2. 7 CFR 650.23 - Natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... their full range of genetic diversity of native plants and animals including threatened and endangered species. (b) Policy. NRCS will recognize natural areas, if so dedicated, as a land use, and will...

  3. 7 CFR 650.23 - Natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... their full range of genetic diversity of native plants and animals including threatened and endangered species. (b) Policy. NRCS will recognize natural areas, if so dedicated, as a land use, and will...

  4. 7 CFR 650.23 - Natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... their full range of genetic diversity of native plants and animals including threatened and endangered species. (b) Policy. NRCS will recognize natural areas, if so dedicated, as a land use, and will...

  5. Point Positioning Service for Natural Hazard Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Sever, Y. E.

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to improve natural hazard monitoring, JPL has invested in updating and enlarging its global real-time GNSS tracking network, and has launched a unique service - real-time precise positioning for natural hazard monitoring, entitled GREAT Alert (GNSS Real-Time Earthquake and Tsunami Alert). GREAT Alert leverages the full technological and operational capability of the JPL's Global Differential GPS System [www.gdgps.net] to offer owners of real-time dual-frequency GNSS receivers: Sub-5 cm (3D RMS) real-time, absolute positioning in ITRF08, regardless of location Under 5 seconds turnaround time Full covariance information Estimates of ancillary parameters (such as troposphere) optionally provided This service enables GNSS networks operators to instantly have access to the most accurate and reliable real-time positioning solutions for their sites, and also to the hundreds of participating sites globally, assuring inter-consistency and uniformity across all solutions. Local authorities with limited technical and financial resources can now access to the best technology, and share environmental data to the benefit of the entire pacific region. We will describe the specialized precise point positioning techniques employed by the GREAT Alert service optimized for natural hazard monitoring, and in particular Earthquake monitoring. We address three fundamental aspects of these applications: 1) small and infrequent motion, 2) the availability of data at a central location, and 3) the need for refined solutions at several time scales

  6. Experimental area power monitoring during shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Pathiyil, J.

    1989-03-01

    The power consumption at the site is increasing every year and the power consumption in the fixed target beam lines is constantly changing for each run. Since we do not have an energy monitoring program in effect in the experimental areas; we are not in a position to tell whether we are using the electrical energy efficiently. The purpose of this study is to find the summer and winter base load of the three experimental areas while the beamlines are off and also to identify what kind loads are on. The most important purpose was to find the base loads in each of the big experimental halls during the shutdown.

  7. Natural Radioactivity in Monitoring Waste Disposals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Meijer, R. J.; Limburg, J.; Venema, L. B.

    Monitoring large (underwater) surfaces, with strongly varying composition, requires a sampling density, exceeding the capabilities of standard techniques. These techniques involve sample collection and a number of treatments and measurements in laboratory; both steps are laborious, tedious and costly. This paper shows that a trailing detector system of natural γ-rays provides quantitative information on the dynamics at and around a waste disposal site. In this paper the technique is applied to monitor dumpsites of gold mines from an aircraft and the dispersal of dredge spoil from Rotterdam harbour dumped at the North Sea by vessel. The sea-floor monitoring has been conducted in detail, including the derivation of sediment composition and assessing by means of a mass-balance equation the transport directions and quantities in time.

  8. Wide-area continuous offender monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshen, Joseph; Drake, George; Spencer, Debra D.

    1997-02-01

    The corrections system in the U.S. is supervising over five million offenders. This number is rising fast and so are the direct and indirect costs to society. To improve supervision and reduce the cost of parole and probation, first generation home arrest systems were introduced in 1987. While these systems proved to be helpful to the corrections system, their scope is rather limited because they only cover an offender at a single location and provide only a partial time coverage. To correct the limitations of first- generation systems, second-generation wide area continuous electronic offender monitoring systems, designed to monitor the offender at all times and locations, are now on the drawing board. These systems use radio frequency location technology to track the position of offenders. The challenge for this technology is the development of reliable personal locator devices that are small, lightweight, with long operational battery life, and indoors/outdoors accuracy of 100 meters or less. At the center of a second-generation system is a database that specifies the offender's home, workplace, commute, and time the offender should be found in each. The database could also define areas from which the offender is excluded. To test compliance, the system would compare the observed coordinates of the offender with the stored location for a given time interval. Database logfiles will also enable law enforcement to determine if a monitored offender was present at a crime scene and thus include or exclude the offender as a potential suspect.

  9. Monitoring well systems in geothermal areas

    SciTech Connect

    Lofgren, B.E.; O'Rourke, J.; Sterrett, R.; Thackston, J.; Fain, D.

    1982-03-01

    The ability to monitor the injection of spent geothermal fluids at reasonable cost might be greatly improved by use of multiple-completion techniques. Several such techniques, identified through contact with a broad range of experts from the groundwater and petroleum industries, are evaluated relative to application in the typical geologic and hydrologic conditions of the Basin and Range Province of the Western United States. Three basic monitor well designs are suggested for collection of pressure and temperature data: Single standpipe, multiple standpipe, and closed-system piezometers. A fourth design, monitor well/injection well dual completions, is determined to be inadvisable. Also, while it is recognized that water quality data is equally important, designs to allow water sampling greatly increase costs of construction, and so such designs are not included in this review. The single standpipe piezometer is recommended for use at depths less than 152 m (500 ft); several can be clustered in one area to provide information on vertical flow conditions. At depths greater than 152 m (500 ft), the multiple-completion standpipe and closed-system piezometers are likely to be more cost effective. Unique conditions at each monitor well site may necessitate consideration of the single standpipe piezometer even for deeper completions.

  10. Wide Area Wind Field Monitoring Status & Results

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Marchant; Jed Simmons

    2011-09-30

    Volume-scanning elastic has been investigated as a means to derive 3D dynamic wind fields for characterization and monitoring of wind energy sites. An eye-safe volume-scanning lidar system was adapted for volume imaging of aerosol concentrations out to a range of 300m. Reformatting of the lidar data as dynamic volume images was successfully demonstrated. A practical method for deriving 3D wind fields from dynamic volume imagery was identified and demonstrated. However, the natural phenomenology was found to provide insufficient aerosol features for reliable wind sensing. The results of this study may be applicable to wind field measurement using injected aerosol tracers.

  11. Evaluation of Monitoring Approaches for Natural Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roll, L. L.; Labolle, E. M.; Fogg, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) can be a useful alternative to active remediation, however, firm conclusions regarding effectiveness of MNA may be elusive because of multiple processes that can produce similar, apparent trends in chemical concentrations in the heterogeneous subsurface. Current monitoring approaches need to be critically evaluated for typical field settings, such as heterogeneous alluvial aquifer systems, because spatially varying aquifer properties create non uniform flow fields that greatly influence transport processes, producing complex plume behavior that may not be adequately depicted by monitoring networks. Highly-resolved simulations of flow and conservative transport in a typical alluvial aquifer system facilitate a critical review of three monitoring approaches including estimation of mass balance from sampling along the plume centerline, estimation of mass balance from fine grid sampling, and estimation of mass flux from sampling along cross sections. The simulation procedure involves generation of unconditional transition-probability fields of hydrofacies distributions, simulation of steady state flow followed by simulation of conservative transport using a highly accurate random walk particle method (RWHET). The results elucidate limitations and potential pitfalls of the monitoring methods and use of simple models in typically heterogeneous systems. For example, simulations show that because of the system complexity, apparent concentration trends in space and time can be falsely attributed to biodegradation when none is occurring if simplistic models are used to interpret the data. Measured concentrations alone are likely insufficient to judge effectiveness of MNA.

  12. Modernizing Training Options for Natural Areas Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedl, Sarah E.; Ober, Holly K.; Stein, Taylor V.; Andreu, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    A recent shift in desires among working professionals from traditional learning environments to distance education has emerged due to reductions in travel and training budgets. To accommodate this, the Natural Areas Training Academy replaced traditionally formatted workshops with a hybrid approach. Surveys of participants before and after this…

  13. 7 CFR 650.23 - Natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... maintained for a variety of purposes including: (i) Furthering science and education. Natural areas provide sites for research and outdoor classrooms for study of plant and animal communities in environments with... a TSC plant sciences discipline leader to provide leadership, appropriate liaison, and assistance...

  14. INDIRECT MEASUREMENT OF BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY TO MONITOR NATURAL ATTENUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The remediation of ground water contamination by natural attenuation, specifically biodegradation, requires continual monitoring. This research is aimed at improving methods for evaluating the long-term performance of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA), specifically changes in ...

  15. Monitored Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents - Moving Beyond Reuctive Dechlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, K

    2006-04-10

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA), while a remedy of choice for many sites, can be challenging when the contaminants are chlorinated solvents. Even with many high quality technical guidance references available there continue to be challenges implementing MNA at some chlorinated solvent sites. The U.S. Department of Energy, as one organization facing such challenges, is leading a project that will incorporate developing concepts and tools into the existing toolbox for selecting and implementing MNA as a remediation option at sites with chlorinated solvents contamination. The structure and goals of this project were introduced in an article in the Winter 2004 issue of Remediation (Sink et al.). This article is a summary of the three technical areas being developed through the project: mass balance, enhanced attenuation, and characterization and monitoring supporting the first two areas. These topics will be documented in separate reports available from the US Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information at www.osti.gov.

  16. Estuarine monitoring programs in the Albemarle Sound study area, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moorman, Michelle; Kolb, Katharine R.; Supak, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify major natural resource management issues for the region, provide information on current monitoring activities occurring within the Albemarle Sound study area, determine how the current monitoring network fits into the design of the NMN, and determine what additional monitoring data are needed to address these issues. In order to address these questions, a shapefile and data table were created to document monitoring and research programs in the Albemarle Sound study area with an emphasis on current monitoring programs within the region. This database was queried to determine monitoring gaps that existed in the Albemarle Sound by comparing current monitoring programs with the design indicated by the NMN. The report uses this information to provide recommendations on how monitoring could be improved in the Albemarle Sound study area.

  17. UAV photogrammetry for topographic monitoring of coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, J. A.; Henriques, R.

    2015-06-01

    Coastal areas suffer degradation due to the action of the sea and other natural and human-induced causes. Topographical changes in beaches and sand dunes need to be assessed, both after severe events and on a regular basis, to build models that can predict the evolution of these natural environments. This is an important application for airborne LIDAR, and conventional photogrammetry is also being used for regular monitoring programs of sensitive coastal areas. This paper analyses the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) to map and monitor sand dunes and beaches. A very light plane (SwingletCam) equipped with a very cheap, non-metric camera was used to acquire images with ground resolutions better than 5 cm. The Agisoft Photoscan software was used to orientate the images, extract point clouds, build a digital surface model and produce orthoimage mosaics. The processing, which includes automatic aerial triangulation with camera calibration and subsequent model generation, was mostly automated. To achieve the best positional accuracy for the whole process, signalised ground control points were surveyed with a differential GPS receiver. Two very sensitive test areas on the Portuguese northwest coast were analysed. Detailed DSMs were obtained with 10 cm grid spacing and vertical accuracy (RMS) ranging from 3.5 to 5.0 cm, which is very similar to the image ground resolution (3.2-4.5 cm). Where possible to assess, the planimetric accuracy of the orthoimage mosaics was found to be subpixel. Within the regular coastal monitoring programme being carried out in the region, UAVs can replace many of the conventional flights, with considerable gains in the cost of the data acquisition and without any loss in the quality of topographic and aerial imagery data.

  18. Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system

    DOEpatents

    Budhraja, Vikram S.; Dyer, James D.; Martinez Morales, Carlos A.

    2011-11-15

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  19. Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system

    DOEpatents

    Budhraja, Vikram S.; Dyer, James D.; Martinez Morales, Carlos A.

    2013-03-19

    A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

  20. 36 CFR 62.6 - Natural landmark monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Natural landmark monitoring. 62.6 Section 62.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL NATURAL LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 62.6 Natural landmark monitoring. (a) Owner contact. The Field Offices of the NPS maintain periodic...

  1. 36 CFR 62.6 - Natural landmark monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Natural landmark monitoring... INTERIOR NATIONAL NATURAL LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 62.6 Natural landmark monitoring. (a) Owner contact. The Field Offices of the NPS maintain periodic contacts with the owners of designated national...

  2. PERFORMANCE MONITORING FOR NATURAL ATTENUATION REMEDIES IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental monitoring is the major component of any remedy that relies on natural attenuation processes. The objective of this document is to identify data needs and evaluation methods useful for designing monitoring networks and determining remedy effectiveness. Effective mon...

  3. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

  4. Monitored Natural Attenuation For Radionuclides In Ground Water - Technical Issues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of ground water contaminated with radionuclides may be achieved using attenuation-based technologies. These technologies may rely on engineered processes (e.g., bioremediation) or natural processes (e.g., monitored natural attentuation) within the subsurface. In gen...

  5. Applications of Monitored Natural Attenuation in the USA (Abstract)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is widely applied in the USA to control the risk associated with ground water contamination from chlorinated solvents such a tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). MNA relies on the natural processes of degradation, sorption an...

  6. Applications of Monitored Natural Attenuation in the USA (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is widely applied in the USA to control the risk associated with ground water contamination from chlorinated solvents such a tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). MNA relies on the natural processes of degradation, sorption an...

  7. Managing extreme natural disasters in coastal areas.

    PubMed

    Kesavan, P C; Swaminathan, M S

    2006-08-15

    Extreme natural hazards, particularly the hydro-meteorological disasters, are emerging as a cause of major concern in the coastal regions of India and a few other developing countries. These have become more frequent in the recent past, and are taking a heavy toll of life and livelihoods. Low level of technology development in the rural areas together with social, economic and gender inequities enhance the vulnerability of the largely illiterate, unskilled, and resource-poor fishing, farming and landless labour communities. Their resilience to bounce back to pre-disaster level of normality is highly limited. For the planet Earth at crossroads, the imminent threat, however, is from a vicious spiral among environmental degradation, poverty and climate change-related natural disasters interacting in a mutually reinforcing manner. These, in turn, retard sustainable development, and also wipe out any small gains made thereof. To counter this unacceptable trend, the M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation has developed a biovillage paradigm and rural knowledge centres for ecotechnological and knowledge empowerment of the coastal communities at risk. Frontier science and technologies blended with traditional knowledge and ecological prudence result in ecotechnologies with pro-nature, pro-poor and pro-women orientation. The rural communities are given training and helped to develop capacity to adopt ecotechnologies for market-driven eco-enterprises. The modern information and communication-based rural knowledge centres largely operated by trained semi-literate young women provide time- and locale-specific information on weather, crop and animal husbandry, market trends and prices for local communities, healthcare, transport, education, etc. to the local communities. The ecotechnologies and time- and locale-specific information content development are need-based and chosen in a 'bottom-up' manner. The use of recombinant DNA technology for genetic shielding of agricultural

  8. Managing extreme natural disasters in coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesavan, P. C.; Swaminathan, M. S.

    2006-08-01

    Extreme natural hazards, particularly the hydro-meteorological disasters, are emerging as a cause of major concern in the coastal regions of India and a few other developing countries. These have become more frequent in the recent past, and are taking a heavy toll of life and livelihoods. Low level of technology development in the rural areas together with social, economic and gender inequities enhance the vulnerability of the largely illiterate, unskilled, and resource-poor fishing, farming and landless labour communities. Their resilience to bounce back to pre-disaster level of normality is highly limited. For the planet Earth at crossroads, the imminent threat, however, is from a vicious spiral among environmental degradation, poverty and climate change-related natural disasters interacting in a mutually reinforcing manner. These, in turn, retard sustainable development, and also wipe out any small gains made thereof. To counter this unacceptable trend, the M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation has developed a biovillage paradigm and rural knowledge centres for ecotechnological and knowledge empowerment of the coastal communities at risk. Frontier science and technologies blended with traditional knowledge and ecological prudence result in ecotechnologies with pro-nature, pro-poor and pro-women orientation. The rural communities are given training and helped to develop capacity to adopt ecotechnologies for market-driven eco-enterprises. The modern information and communication-based rural knowledge centres largely operated by trained semi-literate young women provide time- and locale-specific information on weather, crop and animal husbandry, market trends and prices for local communities, healthcare, transport, education, etc. to the local communities. The ecotechnologies and time- and locale-specific information content development are need-based and chosen in a ‘bottom-up’ manner. The use of recombinant DNA technology for genetic shielding of agricultural

  9. Using Raman scattering for water areas monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, E. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Platonov, I. A.; Tregub, N. V.; Asadova, A. A.; Mukhanova, I. M.

    2016-04-01

    The results of studies on the effects of heavy metals on aquatic plants using the method of Raman spectroscopy (RS). Introduced optical coefficient, reflecting changes in chlorophyll and carotinoids in relation to the hemicellulose under the influence of heavy metals, defined as the ratio of the intensities of the RS on the wavenumbers 1547 cm-1, 1522 cm-1 to the intensity of the line 1734 cm-1. Was monitored waters of the Samara region on the basis of this coefficient.

  10. 43 CFR 8223.1 - Use of research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of research natural areas. 8223.1... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS PROCEDURES Research Natural Areas § 8223.1 Use of research natural areas. (a) No person shall use, occupy, construct, or maintain facilities in a...

  11. 43 CFR 8223.1 - Use of research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of research natural areas. 8223.1... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS PROCEDURES Research Natural Areas § 8223.1 Use of research natural areas. (a) No person shall use, occupy, construct, or maintain facilities in a...

  12. 43 CFR 8223.1 - Use of research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of research natural areas. 8223.1... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS PROCEDURES Research Natural Areas § 8223.1 Use of research natural areas. (a) No person shall use, occupy, construct, or maintain facilities in a...

  13. 43 CFR 8223.1 - Use of research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of research natural areas. 8223.1... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS PROCEDURES Research Natural Areas § 8223.1 Use of research natural areas. (a) No person shall use, occupy, construct, or maintain facilities in a...

  14. Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    COOPER, J.R.

    2000-04-17

    This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

  15. Nevada Test Site, 2006 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect

    David B. Hudson

    2007-06-30

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2006 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (U.S. Department of Energy, 2006; Warren and Grossman, 2007; National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure levels around the RWMSs are at or below background levels. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. There is no detectable man-made radioactivity by gamma spectroscopy, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits at the Area 3 RWMS. Measurements at the Area 5 RWMS show that radon flux from waste covers is no higher than natural radon flux from undisturbed soil in Area 5. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. Precipitation during 2006 totaled 98.6 millimeters (mm) (3.9 inches [in.]) at the Area 3 RWMS and 80.7 mm (3.2 in.) at the Area 5 RWMS. Soil-gas tritium monitoring continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Moisture from precipitation at Area 5 remains at the bottom of the bare-soil weighing lysimeter, but this same moisture has been removed from the vegetated weighing lysimeter by evapotranspiration. Vadose zone data from the operational waste pit covers show that evaporation continues to slowly remove soil moisture that came from the heavy precipitation in the fall of 2004 and the spring of

  16. TNX Area 1994 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    During 1994, samples from selected wells of well cluster P 26 and the TBG, TNX, XSB, and YSB well series at the TNX Area were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Nitrate and trichloroethylene exceeded the final PDWS most frequently. Five wells in this area currently are part of the Purge Water Containment Program due to high trichloroethylene concentrations. Carbon tetrachloride, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, and tetrachloroethylene were elevated sporadically in one or more wells during the year. Groundwater flow directions and rates in the Unconfined Aquifer were similar from quarter to quarter during the year.

  17. Central Nevada Test Area Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brad Lyles; Jenny Chapman; John Healey; David Gillespie

    2006-09-30

    Water level measurements were performed and water samples collected from the Central Nevada Test Area model validation wells in September 2006. Hydraulic head measurements were compared to previous observations; the MV wells showed slight recovery from the drilling and testing operation in 2005. No radioisotopes exceeded limits set in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan, and no significant trends were observed when compared to previous analyses.

  18. Local participation in natural resource monitoring: a characterization of approaches.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Finn; Burgess, Neil D; Balmford, Andrew; Donald, Paul F; Funder, Mikkel; Jones, Julia P G; Alviola, Philip; Balete, Danilo S; Blomley, Tom; Brashares, Justin; Child, Brian; Enghoff, Martin; Fjeldså, Jon; Holt, Sune; Hübertz, Hanne; Jensen, Arne E; Jensen, Per M; Massao, John; Mendoza, Marlynn M; Ngaga, Yonika; Poulsen, Michael K; Rueda, Ricardo; Sam, Moses; Skielboe, Thomas; Stuart-Hill, Greg; Topp-Jørgensen, Elmer; Yonten, Deki

    2009-02-01

    The monitoring of trends in the status of species or habitats is routine in developed countries, where it is funded by the state or large nongovernmental organizations and often involves large numbers of skilled amateur volunteers. Far less monitoring of natural resources takes place in developing countries, where state agencies have small budgets, there are fewer skilled professionals or amateurs, and socioeconomic conditions prevent development of a culture of volunteerism. The resulting lack of knowledge about trends in species and habitats presents a serious challenge for detecting, understanding, and reversing declines in natural resource values. International environmental agreements require signatories undertake systematic monitoring of their natural resources, but no system exists to guide the development and expansion of monitoring schemes. To help develop such a protocol, we suggest a typology of monitoring categories, defined by their degree of local participation, ranging from no local involvement with monitoring undertaken by professional researchers to an entirely local effort with monitoring undertaken by local people. We assessed the strengths and weaknesses of each monitoring category and the potential of each to be sustainable in developed or developing countries. Locally based monitoring is particularly relevant in developing countries, where it can lead to rapid decisions to solve the key threats affecting natural resources, can empower local communities to better manage their resources, and can refine sustainable-use strategies to improve local livelihoods. Nevertheless, we recognize that the accuracy and precision of the monitoring undertaken by local communities in different situations needs further study and field protocols need to be further developed to get the best from the unrealized potential of this approach. A challenge to conservation biologists is to identify and establish the monitoring system most relevant to a particular

  19. OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT. RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1983

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with s...

  20. Environmental monitoring of natural waters in Krasnodar and Stavropol Territories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyzina, T. S.; Matugina, E. G.; Bagamaev, B. M.; Tokhov, Yu M.; Kolbysheva, Yu V.; Gorchakov, E. V.; Sotnikova, T. V.; Shilova, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    The environmental monitoring of natural waters in Krasnodar (Uspensky and Novokubansky districts) and Stavropol (Kochubeyevsky District) Territories was conducted. In the course of study, various elements and compounds harmful to animals and humans, which exceed maximum permissible concentrations, were identified.

  1. The Natural Area: Teaching Tool and Community Catalyst

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Roger M.; Grimm, Floyd M., III

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the properties desirable in a natural area to be used as a teaching tool in college courses such as general biology, botany, zoology, entomology, and ecology. Describes the use of a natural area at Harford Community College, Maryland, and outlines the community involvement in planning and utilizing the area. (JR)

  2. First concept for a tropical area monitoring project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The first concept of a tropical area monitoring project is presented. The project would develop an operational system capable of monitoring land areas by machine processing of satellite data. LANDSAT images would be processed within a controlled isolable unit to detect changes in forest cover, rangeland, soil integrity, and other factors important to conservation of tropical ecology. An introductory developmental effort is described to demonstrate the use of LANDSAT data in this application. The independent unit, which functions as a user organization within the development project, assures that the technology will be transferable to a user organization through well defined, easily monitored interfaces with the rest of the world.

  3. Nevada Test Site 2005 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect

    David B. Hudson, Cathy A. Wills

    2006-08-01

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2005 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (U.S. Department of Energy, 2005; Grossman, 2005; Bechtel Nevada, 2006). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure levels around the RWMSs are at or below background levels. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. There is no detectable man-made radioactivity by gamma spectroscopy, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits at the Area 3 RWMS. Measurements at the Area 5 RWMS show that radon flux from waste covers is no higher than natural radon flux from undisturbed soil in Area 5. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. Precipitation during 2005 totaled 219.1 millimeters (mm) (8.63 inches [in.]) at the Area 3 RWMS and 201.4 mm (7.93 in.) at the Area 5 RWMS. Soil-gas tritium monitoring continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Moisture from precipitation at Area 5 has percolated to the bottom of the bare-soil weighing lysimeter, but this same moisture has been removed from the vegetated weighing lysimeter by evapotranspiration. Vadose zone data from the operational waste pit covers show that precipitation from the fall of 2004 and the spring of 2005 infiltrated past the deepest sensors at 188 centimeters (6.2 feet) and remains in the pit cover

  4. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... research natural areas. 251.23 Section 251.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... and research natural areas. The Chief of the Forest Service shall establish and permanently record a... a series of research natural areas, sufficient in number and size to illustrate adequately or...

  5. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... research natural areas. 251.23 Section 251.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... and research natural areas. The Chief of the Forest Service shall establish and permanently record a... a series of research natural areas, sufficient in number and size to illustrate adequately or...

  6. Nevada Test 1999 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 radioactive waste management sites

    SciTech Connect

    Yvonne Townsend

    2000-05-01

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels, whereas radon concentrations are not above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the alluvial aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorology data indicate that 1999 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 3.9 inches at the Area 3 RWMS (61 percent of average) and 3.8 inches at the Area 5 RWMS (75 percent of average). Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 1999 rainfall infiltrated less than one foot before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium data indicate very slow migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were insignificant. All 1999 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing as expected at isolating buried waste.

  7. Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Huff, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs). No nuclear weapons testing was conducted in 1996 due to the continuing nuclear test moratorium. During this period, R and IE personnel maintained readiness capability to provide direct monitoring support if testing were to be resumed and ascertained compliance with applicable EPA, DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no airborne radioactivity from diffusion or resuspension detected by the various EPA monitoring networks surrounding the NTS. There was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater and no radiation exposure above natural background was received by the offsite population. All evaluated data were consistent with previous data history.

  8. Evaluation of groundwater monitoring at offsite nuclear test areas

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, J.B.; Hokett, S.L.

    1991-03-01

    Groundwater quality has been monitored at nuclear test sites distant from the Nevada Test Site as part of the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) since 1972. Separate reports describing the monitoring programs recommended by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrologic Program Advisory Group were issued by the DOE for most of the offsite areas during the early 1980s, and the analytical results from the LTHMP have been regularly reported by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), but there has been little else published about the program. The LTHMP has continued to demonstrate the safety of drinking water supplies near the offsite areas and there have been very few modifications to the program initially mandated by the DOE in 1972. During this time, however, there have been many changes in the fields of hydrogeology and environmental monitoring. In 1988, the DOE requested the Desert Research Institute to perform a critical review of the LTHMP in light of the many technical and regulatory advances in groundwater monitoring in recent years. This report presents an evaluation of the offsite groundwater monitoring program and evaluations specific to the monitoring networks at each of the eight offsite test areas. Discussion of the overall program is presented first, followed by site-specific recommendations. References follow each section for the convenience of readers interested in particular sites. 63 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  9. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site flagging criteria and turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report.

  10. Groundwater monitoring plan for the 300 Area process trenches

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, J.W.; Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1995-05-23

    This document describes the groundwater monitoring program for the Hanford Site 300 Area Process Trenches (300 APT). The 300 APT are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulated unit. The 300 APT are included in the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, Permit No. WA890008967, and are subject to final-status requirements for groundwater monitoring. This document describes a compliance monitoring program for groundwater in the uppermost aquifer system at the 300 APT. This plan describes the 300 APT monitoring network, constituent list, sampling schedule, statistical methods, and sampling and analysis protocols that will be employed for the 300 APT. This plan will be used to meet groundwater monitoring requirements from the time the 300 APT becomes part of the Permit and through the postclosure care period until certification of final closure.

  11. Aquatic Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Baranski, Dr. Michael J.

    2011-04-01

    This report presents an assessment of the natural area value of eight Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and seven Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Anderson and Roane Counties in east Tennessee. It follows a previous study in 2009 that analyzed and evaluated terrestrial natural areas on the Reservation. The purpose of both studies was to evaluate and rank those specially designated areas on the Reservation that contain sensitive species, special habitats, and natural area value. Natural areas receive special protections through established statutes, regulations, and policies. The ORR contains 33,542 acres (13,574 ha) administered by the Department of Energy. The surface waters of the Reservation range from 1st-order to 5th-order streams, but the majority of the streams recognized as ANAs and ARAs are 1st- and 2nd-order streams. East Fork Poplar Creek is a 4th-order stream and the largest watershed that drains Reservation lands. All the waters of the Reservation eventually reach the Clinch River on the southern and western boundaries of the ORR. All available information was collected, synthesized, and evaluated. Field observations were made to support and supplement the available information. Geographic information system mapping techniques were used to develop several quantitative attributes about the study areas. Narrative descriptions of each ANA and ARA and tables of numerical data were prepared. Criteria for assessment and evaluation were developed, and eight categories of factors were devised to produce a ranking system. The evaluation factors used in the ranking system were: (A) size of area, (B) percentage of watershed protected, (C) taxa present with protected status, (D) overall biotic diversity, (E) stream features, (F) water quality and use support ratings, (G) disturbance regime, and (H) other factors. Each factor was evaluated on a 5-point ranking scale (0-4), and each area received a composite score, where 32 was the

  12. 2002 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Y. E. Townsend

    2003-06-01

    Environmental, subsidence, and meteorological monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)(refer to Figure 1). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater,meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada (BN) reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorological data indicate that 2002 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 26 mm (1.0 in) at the Area 3 RWMS and 38 mm (1.5 in) at the Area 5 RWMS. Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 2002 rainfall infiltrated less than 30 cm (1 ft) before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium monitoring data indicate slow subsurface migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were lower than in previous years. Special investigations conducted in 2002 included: a comparison between waste cover water contents measured by neutron probe and coring; and a comparison of four methods for measuring radon concentrations in air. All 2002 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility Performance Assessments (PAs).

  13. Analysis of area monitoring options for Westinghouse Hanford Company

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, G.J.; Hickey, E.E.; Durham, J.S.; Snyder, S.F.

    1993-10-01

    In June 1992, the Department of Energy issued DOE N 5480.6, Radiological Control Manual, which established practices for conducting radiological control activities at all DOE and DOE-funded sites that manage radiation or radioactive materials. To implement the RCM, each DOE facility was required to develop and approve their own radiological control manual, which described a phased approach to implementing the RCM over a period of time. This document, for the Hanford Site, is called the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual. The HSRCM was issued in December 1992 (RL 1992). This project relates to Article 514 in the RCM, which discusses establishing and maintaining a comprehensive area monitoring program for minimizing the number of areas requiring the issuance of personnel dosimeters and for verifying that doses next to Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. Three specific items in this article address the use of area monitoring dosimeters to (1) record and document radiation levels in routinely occuPied areas adjacent to areas where radiation or operations with radiation exist, (2) support dosimetry investigations, and (3) supplement the existing monitoring programs in Controlled Areas in the event of an emergency.

  14. Area Monitoring for Detection of Leaks and/or Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mian, Zahid F. (Inventor); Gamache, Ronald W. (Inventor); Glasser, Nick (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A solution for monitoring an area for the presence of a flame and/or a leak, such as from a pressurized fluid, is provided. An imaging device can be used that acquires image data based on electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths only corresponding to at least one region of the electromagnetic spectrum in which electromagnetic radiation from an ambient light source is less than the electromagnetic radiation emitted by at least one type of flame for which the presence within the area is being monitored. An acoustic device can be used that is configured to acquire acoustic data for the area and enhance acoustic signals in a range of frequencies corresponding to a leak of a pressurized fluid present in the area.

  15. MONITORING METHODS DEVELOPMENT IN THE BEAUMONT-LAKE CHARLES AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1978, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiated a study in the Beaumont, Texas-Lake Charles, Louisiana area (BLCA) as a preliminary step to develop, demonstrate and test methods for monitoring levels of chemicals, primarily in air and water, and to measure effects of ...

  16. Security warning system monitors up to fifteen remote areas simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusco, R. C.

    1966-01-01

    Security warning system consisting of 15 television cameras is capable of monitoring several remote or unoccupied areas simultaneously. The system uses a commutator and decommutator, allowing time-multiplexed video transmission. This security system could be used in industrial and retail establishments.

  17. THE ROLE FUNGI AND YEAST IN MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.; Abe, M.; Johnson, B.; Simpson, W.; Mckinsey, P.

    2010-01-26

    Fungi and yeast have been characterized as important components in the bioremediation of organic contaminants in soil and water including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); however, research into their ability to metabolize these compounds in extreme environments has been limited. In this work forty-three fungi and yeasts were isolated from a PAH-contaminated sludge waste lagoon in Poland. The lagoon was part of a monitored natural attenuation (MNA) study where natural reduction of PAHs and associated toxicity over time in non-disturbed areas of the sludge lagoon indicated MNA activity. The microorganisms were initially isolated on minimal medium containing naphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source. Fungal isolates were then maintained on MEA and identified based on microscopic examination and BIOLOG{reg_sign}. The analysis identified several of the fungal isolates as belonging to the genera Penicillium, Paecilomyces, Aspergillus, and Eupenicillium. Yeasts included Candida parapsilosis and C. fluvialitis. Further microbial characterization revealed that several isolates were capable of rowing on acidified media of pH 4, 3, and 2.5. Over twenty percent of the fungi demonstrated growth as low as pH 2.5. Of the 43 isolates examined, 24 isolates exhibited growth at 5 C. Nine of the fungal isolates exhibiting growth at 5 C were then examined for metabolic activity using a respirometer testing metabolic activity at pH 3. Microcosm studies confirmed the growth of the fungi on PAH contaminated sediment as the sole carbon and energy source with elevated metabolic rates indicating evidence of MNA. Our findings suggest that many of the Poland fungal isolates may be of value in the bioremediation processes in acidic waste sites in northern climates typical of Northern Europe.

  18. Idaho Habitat and Natural Production Monitoring : Annual Report 1989.

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

    1991-01-01

    Project 83-7 was established under the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) habitat improvement projects, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two subprojects: general and intensive monitoring. Primary objectives of the general monitoring subproject (Part 1) are to determine natural production increases due to habitat improvement projects in terms of parr production and to determine natural production status and trends in Idaho. The second objective is accomplished by combining parr density data from monitoring and evaluation of BPA habitat projects and from other Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) management and research activities. Primary objectives of the intensive monitoring subproject (Part 2) are to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production and to develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Field work began in 1987 in the upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). 22 refs., 10 figs., 17 tabs.

  19. Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Baranski, Micahel J

    2009-11-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Oak Ridge Reservation, encompassing 33,639 acres in the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province of East Tennessee, has long been known for its unfragmented forests and high biodiversity. Many areas on the Reservation have been recognized as important natural areas, but no comprehensive treatment has been performed to evaluate the relative significance and importance of these areas compared to each other. The present study was conducted to develop a set of guidelines for evaluating the natural value of specific areas, to evaluate all the terrestrial areas that are currently delineated, and to rank all areas according to their relative biodiversity importance. All available data, reports and site-specific information relevant to Reservation lands, including Tennessee Division of Natural Areas database information, were evaluated and field work was conducted. Methodologies and criteria for assessment and evaluation of areas were developed; categories of criteria were devised; and a ranking system for evaluation of natural areas was produced. There were 70 areas evaluated during the study. The system is flexible, dynamic and easily revised to reflect updated and new information and interpretations. Eight categories of evaluation factors were established and used to characterize each site. These were the following: size of area, number or status taxa present, number of Endangered and Threatened taxa present, rarity of the Endangered and Threatened taxa on the Reservation, community diversity, site integrity and quality, disturbance and threat levels, and other significant features and factors. Each category generally consisted of a 5-point ranking scale from 0-4, allowing for a possible composite score of 32, with higher ranked, more important, sites attaining higher scores. Highly ranked sites are representative of regional natural diversity; contain outstanding natural features, communities or geology and/or very rare taxa or other elements; are

  20. P-Area Reactor 1993 annual groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the water table at the following locations in P Area: well P 24A in the eastern section of P Area, the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin, the P-Area Coal Pile Runoff Containment Basin, the P-Area Disassembly Basin, the P-Area Burning/Rubble Pit, and the P-Area Seepage Basins. During 1993, pH was above its alkaline standard in well P 24A. Specific conductance was above its standard in one well each from the PAC and PCB series. Lead exceeded its 50 {mu}g/L standard in one well of the PDB series during one quarter. Tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene were detected above their final primary drinking water standards in one well of the PRP well series. Tritium was consistently above its DWS in the PDB and PSB series. Also during 1993, radium-228 exceeded the DWS for total radium in three wells of the PAC series and one well of the PCB series; total alpha-emitting radium exceeded the same standard in a different PCB well. These results are fairly consistent with those from previous years. Unlike results from past years, however, no halogenated volatiles other than trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene exceeded DWS in the PRP well series although gas chromatographic volatile organic analyses were performed throughout the year. Some of the regulated units in P Area appear to need additional monitoring by new wells because there are insufficient downgradient wells, sometimes because the original well network, installed prior to regulation, included sidegradient rather than downgradient wells. No monitoring wells had been installed through 1993 at one of the RCRA/CERCLA units named in the Federal Facilities Agreement, the Bingham Pump Outage Pits.

  1. Nevada Test Site 2009 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Radioactive Waste

    2010-06-23

    from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 90 centimeters (cm) (3 feet [ft]) before being removed by evaporation. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 30 cm (1 ft) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2009, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation or were vegetated, but water drained from the bare-soil Area 3 drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. Elevated tritium levels in plants and animals sampled from the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs show tritium uptake by the biota, but the low levels of other radionuclides do not indicate that there has been biota intrusion into the waste. All 2009 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  2. 12. VIEW OF NATURAL BRIDGE OVERLOOK PARKING AREA, FACING NORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF NATURAL BRIDGE OVERLOOK PARKING AREA, FACING NORTHEAST. NOTE DETERIORATION OF WALL AND USE OF AESTHETICALLY INTRUSIVE FENCING. - Bryce Canyon National Park Rim Road, State Highway 63 to Rainbow Point, Tropic, Garfield County, UT

  3. Assessment of Hexavalent Chromium Natural Attenuation for the Hanford Site 100 Area

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Sahajpal, Rahul; Zhong, Lirong; Lawter, Amanda R.; Lee, Brady D.

    2015-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) plumes are present in the 100 Area at the Hanford Site. Remediation efforts are under way with objectives of restoring the groundwater to meet the drinking-water standard (48 µg/L) and protecting the Columbia River by ensuring that discharge of groundwater to the river is below the surface-water quality standard (10 µg/L). Current remedies include application of Pump-and-Treat (P&T) at the 100-D, 100-H, and 100-K Areas and Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) at the 100-F/IU Area. Remedy selection is still under way at the other 100 Areas. Additional information about the natural attenuation processes for Cr(VI) is important in all of these cases. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to demonstrate and quantify natural attenuation mechanisms using 100 Area sediments and groundwater conditions.

  4. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, samples from the seven older KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, and other constituents. New wells FAC 8 and 9 received the first of four quarters of comprehensive analyses and GC/MS VOA (gas chromatograph/ mass spectrometer volatile organic analyses). Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are discussed in this report.

  5. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    During first quarter 1993, samples from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS only in well HAC 1 during first quarter 1993. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron was elevated in well HAC 1, 2, and 3. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard.

  6. TIOGA LAKE, HALL NATURAL AREA, LOG CABIN-SADDLEBAG, AND HORSE MEADOWS ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seitz, J.F.; Federspiel, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the geology and mineral resources of the Tioga Lake, Hall Natural Area, Log Cabin-Saddlebag, and Horse Meadows Roadless Areas in California indicate that parts of the Log Cabin-Saddlebag and Hall Natural Roadless Areas have a substantiated resource potential for gold and (or) silver resources, and a probable potential for tungsten and molybdenum resources. Tioga Lake Roadless Area has little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral resources and the Horse Meadows Roadless Area has a probable potential for low-grade tungsten, gold, and (or) silver resources. The geologic terrane in the roadless areas precludes the occurrence of organic fuel resources.

  7. Nevada Test Site 2007 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-06-01

    than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that evaporation continues to slowly remove soil moisture that came from the heavy precipitation in the fall of 2004 and the spring of 2005. The vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS effectively removes moisture from the cover by evapotranspiration. During 2007, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 feet) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation or were vegetated but water drained from the bare-soil Area 3 drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. Elevated tritium levels in plants and animals sampled from the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs show tritium uptake by the biota, but the low levels of other radionuclides do not suggest that there has been intrusion into the waste. All 2007 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  8. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for research or educational purposes, the important forest and range types in each forest region, as... research natural areas. 251.23 Section 251.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... and research natural areas. The Chief of the Forest Service shall establish and permanently record...

  9. 36 CFR 251.23 - Experimental areas and research natural areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for research or educational purposes, the important forest and range types in each forest region, as... research natural areas. 251.23 Section 251.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... and research natural areas. The Chief of the Forest Service shall establish and permanently record...

  10. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1994, Groundwater Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.A.

    1994-12-22

    During fourth quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P was dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were sampled for the first time during third quarter.

  11. Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the 2007 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 located in Churchill County, Nevada. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the PSA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to DOE-LM on October 1, 2006. Requirements for CAU 447, as specified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 2005) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and the State of Nevada, includes groundwater monitoring in support of site closure. This is the first groundwater monitoring report prepared by DOE-LM for the PSA.

  12. Natural Resource Monitoring of Rheum tanguticum by Multilevel Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Caixiang; Song, Jingyuan; Suo, Fengmei; Li, Xiwen; Li, Ying; Yu, Hua; Xu, Xiaolan; Luo, Kun; Li, Qiushi; Xin, Tianyi; Guan, Meng; Xu, Xiuhai; Miki, Eiji; Takeda, Osami; Chen, Shilin

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing has been extensively applied in agriculture for its objectiveness and promptness. However, few applications are available for monitoring natural medicinal plants. In the paper, a multilevel monitoring system, which includes satellite and aerial remote sensing, as well as ground investigation, was initially proposed to monitor natural Rheum tanguticum resource in Baihe Pasture, Zoige County, Sichuan Province. The amount of R. tanguticum from images is M = S*ρ and S is vegetation coverage obtained by satellite imaging, whereas ρ is R. tanguticum density obtained by low-altitude imaging. Only the R. tanguticum which coverages exceeded 1 m2 could be recognized from the remote sensing image because of the 0.1 m resolution of the remote sensing image (called effective resource at that moment), and the results of ground investigation represented the amounts of R. tanguticum resource in all sizes (called the future resource). The data in paper showed that the present available amount of R. tanguticum accounted for 4% to 5% of the total quantity. The quantity information and the population structure of R. tanguticum in the Baihe Pasture were initially confirmed by this system. It is feasible to monitor the quantitative distribution for natural medicinal plants with scattered distribution. PMID:25101134

  13. Nevada National Security Site 2011 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-07-31

    (2.55 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2011 is 47% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 RWMS operational waste covers was not done during 2011 due to construction of the final evapotranspiration cover at these monitoring locations. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 122 centimeters (4 feet) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2011, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 feet) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Ten percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2011 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  14. A natural walking monitor for pulmonary patients using mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Juen, Joshua; Cheng, Qian; Schatz, Bruce

    2015-07-01

    Mobile devices have the potential to continuously monitor health by collecting movement data including walking speed during natural walking. Natural walking is walking without artificial speed constraints present in both treadmill and nurse-assisted walking. Fitness trackers have become popular which record steps taken and distance, typically using a fixed stride length. While useful for everyday purposes, medical monitoring requires precise accuracy and testing on real patients with a scientifically valid measure. Walking speed is closely linked to morbidity in patients and widely used for medical assessment via measured walking. The 6-min walk test (6MWT) is a standard assessment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and congestive heart failure. Current generation smartphone hardware contains similar sensor chips as in medical devices and popular fitness devices. We developed a middleware software, MoveSense, which runs on standalone smartphones while providing comparable readings to medical accelerometers. We evaluate six machine learning methods to obtain gait speed during natural walking training models to predict natural walking speed and distance during a 6MWT with 28 pulmonary patients and ten subjects without pulmonary condition. We also compare our model's accuracy to popular fitness devices. Our universally trained support vector machine models produce 6MWT distance with 3.23% error during a controlled 6MWT and 11.2% during natural free walking. Furthermore, our model attains 7.9% error when tested on five subjects for distance estimation compared to the 50-400% error seen in fitness devices during natural walking. PMID:25935052

  15. P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, and parameters characterizing suitability as a drinking water supply. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During fourth quarter 1992, a sample from well PAC 6 exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Iron and manganese each exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells PAC 2, 5, and 6. No analytes exceeded the final PDWS in wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin during 1992.

  16. UAV-based hyperspectral monitoring of small freshwater area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pölönen, I.; Puupponen, H.-H.; Honkavaara, Eija; Lindfors, A.; Saari, H.; Markelin, L.; Hakala, T.; Nurminen, K.

    2014-10-01

    Recent development in compact, lightweight hyperspectral imagers have enabled UAV-based remote sensing with reasonable costs. We used small hyperspectral imager based on Fabry-Perot interferometer for monitoring small freshwater area in southern Finland. In this study we shortly describe the utilized technology and the field studies performed. We explain processing pipeline for gathered spectral data and introduce target detection-based algorithm for estimating levels of algae, aquatic chlorophyll and turbidity in freshwater. Certain challenges we faced are pointed out.

  17. 1998 Comprehensive TNX Area Annual Groundwater and Effectiveness Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1999-06-02

    Shallow groundwater beneath the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site has been contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds such as trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride. The Interim Action T-1 Air Stripper System began operation on September 16, 1996. A comprehensive groundwater monitoring program was initiated to measure the effectiveness of the system. The Interim Action is meeting its objectives and is capable of continuing to do so until the final groundwater remedial action is in place.

  18. Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Samples from the ZBG wells at the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Industrial Waste Permit IWP-217 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1995, no constituents were reported above final Primary Drinking Water Standards or Savannah River Site flagging criteria. In the past, tritium has been detected sporadically in the ZBG wells at levels similar to those detected before Z Area began radioactive operations.

  19. Performance test of personal RF monitor for area monitoring at magnetic confinement fusion facility.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Wang, Jianqing; Fujiwara, Osamu

    2012-02-01

    For safety management at a magnetic confinement fusion-test facility, protection from not only ionising radiation, but also non-ionising radiation such as the leakage of static magnetic and electromagnetic fields is an important issue. Accordingly, the use of a commercially available personal RF monitor for multipoint area monitoring is proposed. In this study, the performance of both fast- and slow-type personal RF monitors was investigated by using a transverse electromagnetic cell system. The range of target frequencies was between 10 and 300 MHz, corresponding to the ion cyclotron range of frequency in a fusion device. The personal RF monitor was found to have good linearity, frequency dependence and isotropic response. However, the time constant for the electric field sensor of the slow-type monitor was much longer than that for the fast-type monitor. Considering the time-varying field at the facility, it is found that the fast-type monitor is suitable for multipoint monitoring at magnetic confinement fusion test facilities. PMID:21441242

  20. Nevada National Security Site 2010 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-06-01

    evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 90 centimeters (cm) (3 feet [ft]) before being removed by evaporation. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 61 cm (2 ft) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2010, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Water drained from both the bare-soil drainage lysimeter and the invader species drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2010 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  1. L-Area Reactor - 1993 annual - groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the water table at the following locations in L Area: the L-Area Acid/Caustic Basin (four LAC wells), L-Area Research Wells in the southern portion of the area (outside the fence; three LAW wells), the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (four LCO wells), the L-Area Disassembly Basin (two LDB wells), the L-Area Burning/Rubble Pit (four LRP wells), and the L-Area Seepage Basin (four LSB wells). During 1993, tetrachloroethylene was detected above its drinking water standard (DWS) in the LAC, LAW, LCO, and LDB well series. Lead exceeded its 50 {mu}g/L standard in the LAW, LDB, and LRP series, and tritium was above its DWS in the LAW, LCO, and LSB series. Apparently anomalous elevated levels of the common laboratory contaminant bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate were reported during first quarter in one well each in the LAC series and LCO series, and during third quarter in a different LCO well. Extensive radionuclide analyses were performed during 1993 in the LAC, LAW, and LCO well series. No radionuclides other than tritium were reported above DWS or Flag 2 criteria.

  2. Natural resources as an area of the law

    SciTech Connect

    Getches, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    Increased commercial activity and legislative intervention have focused greater attention on the legal issues surrounding the discovery, development, regulation, use, and protection of natural resources. Anyone who wants to use or affect natural resources faces regulatory challenges. Non-profit organizations have forced the government to be more responsible, but have also increased the legal activity in technically complex areas. Law schools are responding by moving natural resources from specialty courses to a respected part of the curriculum. Several law foundations are promoting legal scholarship in the field with symposia which examine, interpret, and criticize natural resources law. 54 references. (DCK)

  3. Network Optimization for Induced Seismicity Monitoring in Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, T.; Husen, S.; Wiemer, S.

    2012-12-01

    With the global challenge to satisfy an increasing demand for energy, geological energy technologies receive growing attention and have been initiated in or close to urban areas in the past several years. Some of these technologies involve injecting fluids into the subsurface (e.g., oil and gas development, waste disposal, and geothermal energy development) and have been found or suspected to cause small to moderate sized earthquakes. These earthquakes, which may have gone unnoticed in the past when they occurred in remote sparsely populated areas, are now posing a considerable risk for the public acceptance of these technologies in urban areas. The permanent termination of the EGS project in Basel, Switzerland after a number of induced ML~3 (minor) earthquakes in 2006 is one prominent example. It is therefore essential to the future development and success of these geological energy technologies to develop strategies for managing induced seismicity and keeping the size of induced earthquake at a level that is acceptable to all stakeholders. Most guidelines and recommendations on induced seismicity published since the 1970ies conclude that an indispensable component of such a strategy is the establishment of seismic monitoring in an early stage of a project. This is because an appropriate seismic monitoring is the only way to detect and locate induced microearthquakes with sufficient certainty to develop an understanding of the seismic and geomechanical response of the reservoir to the geotechnical operation. In addition, seismic monitoring lays the foundation for the establishment of advanced traffic light systems and is therefore an important confidence building measure towards the local population and authorities. We have developed an optimization algorithm for seismic monitoring networks in urban areas that allows to design and evaluate seismic network geometries for arbitrary geotechnical operation layouts. The algorithm is based on the D-optimal experimental

  4. Tsunamis hazard assessment and monitoring for the Back Sea area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partheniu, Raluca; Ionescu, Constantin; Constantin, Angela; Moldovan, Iren; Diaconescu, Mihail; Marmureanu, Alexandru; Radulian, Mircea; Toader, Victorin

    2016-04-01

    NIEP has improved lately its researches regarding tsunamis in the Black Sea. As part of the routine earthquake and tsunami monitoring activity, the first tsunami early-warning system in the Black Sea has been implemented in 2013 and is active during these last years. In order to monitor the seismic activity of the Black Sea, NIEP is using a total number of 114 real time stations and 2 seismic arrays, 18 of the stations being located in Dobrogea area, area situated in the vicinity of the Romanian Black Sea shore line. Moreover, there is a data exchange with the Black Sea surrounding countries involving the acquisition of real-time data for 17 stations from Bulgaria, Turkey, Georgia and Ukraine. This improves the capability of the Romanian Seismic Network to monitor and more accurately locate the earthquakes occurred in the Black Sea area. For tsunamis monitoring and warning, a number of 6 sea level monitoring stations, 1 infrasound barometer, 3 offshore marine buoys and 7 GPS/GNSS stations are installed in different locations along and near the Romanian shore line. In the framework of ASTARTE project, few objectives regarding the seismic hazard and tsunami waves height assessment for the Black Sea were accomplished. The seismic hazard estimation was based on statistical studies of the seismic sources and their characteristics, compiled using different seismic catalogues. Two probabilistic methods were used for the evaluation of the seismic hazard, the Cornell method, based on the Gutenberg Richter distribution parameters, and Gumbel method, based on extremes statistic. The results show maximum values of possible magnitudes and their recurrence periods, for each seismic source. Using the Tsunami Analysis Tool (TAT) software, a set of tsunami modelling scenarios have been generated for Shabla area, the seismic source that could mostly affect the Romanian shore. These simulations are structured in a database, in order to set maximum possible tsunami waves that could be

  5. Nevada National Security Site 2012 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, David B.

    2013-09-10

    downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers show no evidence of precipitation percolating through the cover to the waste. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 60 centimeters (cm) (2 feet [ft]) in the vegetated final cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS, and moisture from precipitation and irrigation did not percolate below 45 cm (1.5 ft) on the 92-Acre Area final cover. Irrigation was applied to this cover for seed germination and plant growth. During 2012, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Twenty percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2012 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  6. Nevada National Security Site 2013 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, D. B.

    2014-08-19

    downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers show no evidence of precipitation percolating through the cover to the waste. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 60 centimeters (cm) (2 feet [ft]) in the vegetated final cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS, and moisture from precipitation and irrigation did not percolate below 45 cm (1.5 ft) on the 92-Acre Area final cover. Irrigation was applied to this cover for seed germination and plant growth. During 2013, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Twenty percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3-times natural precipitation. All 2013 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

  7. MNAtoolbox: A Monitored Natural Attenuation Site Screening Program

    SciTech Connect

    Borns, David J.; Brady, Patrick V.; Brady, Warren D.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Spalding, Brian P.; Waters, Robert D.; Zhang, Pengchu

    1999-07-12

    Screening of sites for the potential application and reliance upon monitored natural attenuation (MNA) can be done using MNAtoolbox, a web-based tool for estimating extent of biodegradation, chemical transformation, and dilution. MNAtoolbox uses site-specific input data, where available (default parameters are taken from the literature), to roughly quantify the nature and extent of attenuation at a particular site. Use of MNAtoolbox provides 3 important elements of site evaluation: (1) Identifies likely attenuation pathways, (2) Clearly identifies sites where MNA is inappropriate, and (3) Evaluates data requirements for subsequent reliance on MNA as a sole or partial corrective action.

  8. Monitoring Natural World Heritage Sites: optimization of the monitoring system in Bogda with GIS-based multi-criteria decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoguo; Du, Xishihui

    2016-07-01

    Natural World Heritage Sites (NWHSs) are invaluable treasure due to the uniqueness of each site. Proper monitoring and management can guarantee their protection from multiple threats. In this study, geographic information system (GIS)-based multi-criteria decision analysis (GIS-MCDA) was used to assess criteria layers acquired from the data available in the literature. A conceptual model for determining the priority area for monitoring in Bogda, China, was created based on outstanding universal values (OUV) and expert knowledge. Weights were assigned to each layer using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) based on group decisions, encompassing three experts: one being a heritage site expert, another a forest ranger, and the other a heritage site manager. Subsequently, evaluation layers and constraint layers were used to generate a priority map and to determine the feasibility of monitoring in Bogda. Finally, a monitoring suitability map of Bogda was obtained by referencing priority and feasibility maps.The high-priority monitoring area is located in the montane forest belt, which exhibits high biodiversity and is the main tourist area of Bogda. The northern buffer zone of Bogda comprises the concentrated feasible monitoring areas, and the area closest to roads and monitoring facilities is highly feasible for NWHS monitoring. The suitability of an area in terms of monitoring is largely determined by the monitoring priority in that particular area. The majority of planned monitoring facilities are well distributed in both suitable and less suitable areas. Analysis results indicate that the protection of Bogda will be more scientifically based due to its effective and all-around planned monitoring system proposed by the declaration text of Xinjiang Tianshan, which is the essential file submitted to World Heritage Centre to inscribe as a NWHS. PMID:27251219

  9. Indicators and protocols for monitoring impacts of formal and informal trails in protected areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, Jeffrey L.; Leung, Yu-Fai

    2011-01-01

    Trails are a common recreation infrastructure in protected areas and their conditions affect the quality of natural resources and visitor experiences. Various trail impact indicators and assessment protocols have been developed in support of monitoring programs, which are often used for management decision-making or as part of visitor capacity management frameworks. This paper reviews common indicators and assessment protocols for three types of trails, surfaced formal trails, unsurfaced formal trails, and informal (visitor-created) trails. Monitoring methods and selected data from three U.S. National Park Service units are presented to illustrate some common trail impact indicators and assessment options.

  10. Monitoring Of Landslide Hazard In Selected Areas Of Uzbekistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazecky, Milan; Balaha, Pavel; Khasankhanova, Gulchekhra; Minchenko, Venscelas

    2013-12-01

    Republic of Uzbekistan is situated in the heart of Central Asia. Dangerous phenomena such as drought, flooding, mud flows, landslides and others, that are becoming frequent in conditions of climate changes, increase instability of an agricultural production, and threaten rural livelihoods. In connection with weather and climate natural disasters, these phenomena become reasons of declining food production, water contamination, and economical damages. Within the Project granted by NATO: Science for Peace and Security programme, modern advanced remote sensing technologies will be applied to perform large scale monitoring of (early) slope deformations, including Satellite SAR Interferometry (InSAR) techniques, Ground Laser Scanning for in-situ refinement of detected movements or Multibeam Echosounding for monitoring slope deformation advancement into water objects. First results involving InSAR processing of selected sites in Uzbekistan are presented within this contribution.

  11. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S. C.; Grossman, R. F.; Mullen, A. A.; Potter, G. D.; Smith, D. D.

    1983-07-01

    A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982.

  12. OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT. RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify tre...

  13. Using ISERV and Commercial Satellite Imagery to Assess and Monitor Recovery Efforts in Urban Damaged Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jordan R.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Burks, Jason E.; McGrath, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Short-term Prediction, Research, and Transition (SPoRT) Center uses a wide array of satellites to monitor and assess the impacts of natural disasters, with support from NASA's Applied Sciences Program. One of the newest sensors SPoRT is utilizing in these activities is the International Space Station (ISS) SERVIR Environmental Research and Visualization System (ISERV) instrument. ISERV provides a unique view of the areas impacted and will play a big role in monitoring the recovery these areas. High-resolution commercial satellite data is also used to monitor urban areas that have been impacted by natural disasters. SPoRT is developing techniques to measure the extent of these disasters and to monitor recovery. Several of these techniques include semi-automatic feature detection and change as well as developing an experimental damage assessment based upon the visible damage observed by the satellites. Furthermore, throughout these activities SPoRT hopes to provide additional data to the NOAA National Weather Service Damage Assessment Toolkit, which will help to supplement those activities being performed in the field.

  14. An advanced open path atmospheric pollution monitor for large areas

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.; Suhre, D.; Mani, S.

    1996-12-31

    Over 100 million gallons of radioactive and toxic waste materials generated in weapon materials production are stored in 322 tanks buried within large areas at DOE sites. Toxic vapors occur in the tank headspace due to the solvents used and chemical reactions within the tanks. To prevent flammable or explosive concentration of volatile vapors, the headspace are vented, either manually or automatically, to the atmosphere when the headspace pressure exceeds preset values. Furthermore, 67 of the 177 tanks at the DOE Hanford Site are suspected or are known to be leaking into the ground. These underground storage tanks are grouped into tank farms which contain closely spaced tanks in areas as large as 1 km{sup 2}. The objective of this program is to protect DOE personnel and the public by monitoring the air above these tank farms for toxic air pollutants without the monitor entering the tanks farms, which can be radioactive. A secondary objective is to protect personnel by monitoring the air above buried 50 gallon drums containing moderately low radioactive materials but which could also emit toxic air pollutants.

  15. Development and application of an ecosystem management approach for protected natural areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajeunesse, Denyse; Domon, Gérald; Drapeau, Pierre; Cogliastro, Alain; Bouchard, André

    1995-07-01

    Preservation of small natural areas is not in itself a sufficient measure to maintain the integrity of the ecosystems for which they were initially set aside. Intense pressure from recreational use is just one of the many human-caused stresses that may degrade natural areas. Therefore, land-use planning and management from an ecological perspective is necessary to assess, ensure, and in some cases increase, the ecological integrity of protected natural areas. An ecosystem management approach for small protected natural areas with high recreational use is presented, based on three interrelated components: an ecological evaluation procedure of ecosystems, the implementation of management interventions on ecosystems, and the development of a monitoring scheme of ecosystem components. The ecological evaluation procedure combines two concepts: the biotic value of vegetation and wildlife and the abiotic fragility of the soils. This combined evaluation process results in the creation of a sensitivity map that can be used as a management tool for planners and managers. Management interventions, the second component of the management approach, are derived from concepts of ecological succession. Intentional human interventions are used to maintain the ecological integrity of ecosystems or in some cases to restore degraded sites. For the third component, only the basic principles of the monitoring program will be discussed. A pilot project in one of the Montreal urban community protected areas is presented to illustrate aspects of the proposed ecosystem management approach.

  16. MONITORING OF LARGE INSTABLE AREAS: system reliability and new tools.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leandro, G.; Mucciarelli, M.; Pellicani, R.; Spilotro, G.

    2009-04-01

    The monitoring of unstable or potentially unstable areas is a necessary operation every time you can not remove the conditions of risk and apply to mitigation measures. In Italian Apennine regions there are many urban or extra-urban areas affected by instability, for which it is impracticable to remove hazard conditions, because of size and cost problems. The technological evolution exportable to the field of land instability monitoring is particularly lively and allows the use of warning systems unthinkable just few years ago. However, the monitoring of unstable or potentially unstable areas requires a very great knowledge of the specific problems, without which the reliability of the system may be dangerously overestimated. The movement may arise, indeed, in areas not covered by instrumentation, or covered with vegetation that prevents the acquisition of both reflected signals in the multi-beam laser techniques and radar signals. Environmental conditions (wind, concentrated sources of light, temperature changes, presence of animals) may also invalidate the accuracy of the measures, by introducing modulations or disturbance at a level well above the threshold of alarm signal, leading consequently to raise the values of the warning threshold. The Authors have gained long experience with the observation and monitoring of some large landslides in the Southern Apennine (Aliano, Buoninventre, Calciano, Carlantino, etc.) and unstable areas also at regional scale. One of the most important experiences is about the case of landslides of extensive areas, where unstable and stables zones coexist along transverse and longitudinal axis. In many of these cases you need the accurate control of the movement at selected points to evaluate the trend of displacement velocity, which can be achieved by means of a single-beam laser. The control of these movements, however, does not provide information on stress pattern into the stable areas. Among the sensitive precursors, acoustic

  17. Urban Area Monitoring using MODIS Time Series Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devadiga, S.; Sarkar, S.; Mauoka, E.

    2015-12-01

    Growing urban sprawl and its impact on global climate due to urban heat island effects has been an active area of research over the recent years. This is especially significant in light of rapid urbanization that is happening in some of the first developing nations across the globe. But so far study of urban area growth has been largely restricted to local and regional scales, using high to medium resolution satellite observations, taken at distinct time periods. In this presentation we propose a new approach to detect and monitor urban area expansion using long time series of MODIS data. This work characterizes data points using a vector of several annual metrics computed from the MODIS 8-day and 16-day composite L3 data products, at 250M resolution and over several years and then uses a vector angle mapping classifier to detect and segment the urban area. The classifier is trained using a set of training points obtained from a reference vector point and polygon pre-filtered using the MODIS VI product. This work gains additional significance, given that, despite unprecedented urban growth since 2000, the area covered by the urban class in the MODIS Global Land Cover (MCD12Q1, MCDLCHKM and MCDLC1KM) product hasn't changed since the launch of Terra and Aqua. The proposed approach was applied to delineate the urban area around several cities in Asia known to have maximum growth in the last 15 years. Results were verified using high resolution Landsat data.

  18. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters indicating suitability as drinking water, and other constituents. New wells KAC 8 and 9 also were sampled for GC/MS VOA (gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer volatile organic analyses). Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in wells KAC 6 and 7, and specific conductance exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in new well KAC 9. No samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard.

  19. H-area acid/caustic basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, samples from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin of Savannah River Plant were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria and turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the PDWS in HAC 1, 2, 3, and 4 during first quarter 1992. Tritium activities in upgradient well HAC 4 appeared similar to tritium levels in well HAC 1, 2, and 3. Specific conductance and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in wells HAC 2 and 3, respectively. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard.

  20. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1991, samples from the HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin of Savannah River Plant were analyzed for indicator parameters, turbidity, major ions, volatile organic compounds, radionuclides, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria and turbidity standards during the quarter, with summary results for the year, are the focus of this report. Tritium activities exceeded the PDWS in 4 wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in 1 well, and specific conductance exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well HAC 2. No priority pollutant (EPA, 1990) exceeded the PDWS or Flag 2 criteria in 2 wells. None of the HAC wells exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Elevated tritium activities were found in all four HAC wells every quarter. Elevated total radium occurred in well HAC 2 during third quarter.

  1. Valuing nature-based recreation in public natural areas of the Apalachicola River region, Florida.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Ram K; Stein, Taylor V; Clark, Julie

    2007-12-01

    As more people visit natural areas for tourism and recreation purposes, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the value they place on these natural resources. Specifically, tourists to Florida have been increasingly interested in visiting natural areas, forests, parks, and preserves-highlighting the importance of this new and growing phenomenon. We analyze visitors' demand for nature-based recreation in the Apalachicola River region of Florida using the travel cost method. The results from a count data regression model reveal that on average visitors would pay 74.18 dollars per visit-day for nature-based recreation resulting in a total economic value of 484.56 million dollars attributable to nature-based recreation in the Apalachicola River region. Results of this study provide useful information for natural resources management in the region and a rationale to preserve Florida's unique ecosystems. PMID:17275161

  2. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1991, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin of Savannah River Plant were analyzed for indicator parameters, turbidity, major ions, volatile organic compounds, radionuclides, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria and turbidity standards during the quarter, with summary results for the year, are presented in this report. No constituents exceeded the PDWS at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin. Iron and total organic halogens exceeded Flag 2 criteria in sidegradient-to-downgradient well KAC 7 but not in other KAC wells. No priority pollutants (EPA, 1990) exceeded the PDWS or the Flag 2 criteria in wells KAC 1 and 3. None of the KAC wells exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Lead exceeded the PDWS in well KAC 7 during first quarter. No other constituent exceeded the PDWS at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin during the year.

  3. Natural resources inventory and monitoring in Oregon with ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonson, G. H.; Paine, D. P.; Poulton, C. E.; Lawrence, R. D.; Sherzog, J. H.; Murray, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Multidiscipline team interpretation of ERTS satellite and highflight imagery is providing resource and land use information needed for land use planning in Oregon. A coordinated inventory of geology, soil-landscapes, forest and range vegetation, and land use for Crook County, illustrates the value of this approach for broad area and state planning. Other applications include mapping fault zones, inventory of forest clearcut areas, location of forest insect damage, and monitoring irrigation development. Computer classification is being developed for use in conjunction with visual interpretation.

  4. Determining management strategies for the Sarikum Nature Protection Area.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Sevgi

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, many environmental problems have become important factors in promoting the economic need to develop tourist activity: climate change such as energy wars, increasing hunger and aridity, population increases in urban areas, excessive and unthinking use of natural resources, difficult international relations, economic competition, and increasing environmental stress. Trends in global tourism have changed with changes in culture and our attitude to nature. Changes in both the profile and consumption patterns of tourists have called for the need to balance the use of natural and cultural assets with the need to adequately protect them. In this study, the Sarikum Nature Protection Area (SNPA) was selected as a case study because of its significance as a Turkish wetland area and the variety of different ecosystems coexisting within it. The study focussed on management strategies, but also provides a broader strategy for an area that currently has no management plan. Strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analyses of the area were gathered and analyzed using R'WOT analysis (ranking + SWOT), a multi-criteria assessment method, in order to determine strategies, obtain the participation of interest groups, and assess their opinions and attitudes. The analysis showed the following: the rich biological diversity and the existence of endemic species were the reserve's most significant strength; the presence of natural areas in surrounding regions was the most significant opportunity; the shortage of infrastructure and lack of legal regulation of ecotourism was the most significant weakness; and the lack of a management plan was the most immediate threat. PMID:25678353

  5. R-Area Reactor 1993 annual groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the following locations in R Area: Well cluster P20 east of R Area (one well each in the water table and the McBean formation), the R-Area Acid/Caustic Basin (the four water-table wells of the RAC series), the R-Area Ash Basin/Coal Pile (one well of the RCP series in the Congaree formation and one in the water table), the R-Area Disassembly Basin (the three water-table wells of the RDB series), the R-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (the four water-table wells of the RRP series), and the R-Area Seepage Basins (numerous water-table wells in the RSA, RSB, RSC, RSD, RSE, and RSF series). Lead was the only constituent detected above its 50{mu}g/L standard in any but the seepage basin wells; it exceeded that level in one B well and in 23 of the seepage basin wells. Cadmium exceeded its drinking water standard (DWS) in 30 of the seepage basin wells, as did mercury in 10. Nitrate-nitrite was above DWS once each in two seepage basin wells. Tritium was above DWS in six seepage basin wells, as was gross alpha activity in 22. Nonvolatile beta exceeded its screening standard in 29 wells. Extensive radionuclide analyses were requested during 1993 for the RCP series and most of the seepage basin wells. Strontium-90 in eight wells was the only specific radionuclide other than tritium detected above DWS; it appeared about one-half of the nonvolatile beta activity in those wells.

  6. Unobstructive Body Area Networks (BAN) for Efficient Movement Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Felisberto, Filipe; Costa, Nuno; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Pereira, António

    2012-01-01

    The technological advances in medical sensors, low-power microelectronics and miniaturization, wireless communications and networks have enabled the appearance of a new generation of wireless sensor networks: the so-called wireless body area networks (WBAN). These networks can be used for continuous monitoring of vital parameters, movement, and the surrounding environment. The data gathered by these networks contributes to improve users' quality of life and allows the creation of a knowledge database by using learning techniques, useful to infer abnormal behaviour. In this paper we present a wireless body area network architecture to recognize human movement, identify human postures and detect harmful activities in order to prevent risk situations. The WBAN was created using tiny, cheap and low-power nodes with inertial and physiological sensors, strategically placed on the human body. Doing so, in an as ubiquitous as possible way, ensures that its impact on the users' daily actions is minimum. The information collected by these sensors is transmitted to a central server capable of analysing and processing their data. The proposed system creates movement profiles based on the data sent by the WBAN's nodes, and is able to detect in real time any abnormal movement and allows for a monitored rehabilitation of the user. PMID:23112726

  7. A/M Area Vadose Zone Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kupar, J.; Jarosch, T.R.; Jackson, D.G. Jr.; Looney, B.B.; Jerome, K.M.; Riha, B.D.; Rossabi, J.; Van Pelt, R.S.

    1998-03-01

    Characterization and monitoring data from implementation and the first two and one half years of vadose zone remediation operations indicate that this activity has substantially improved the performance of the A/M Area Groundwater Corrective Action Program. During this period, vadose zone remediation removed approximately 225, 000 lbs (100,000 Kg) of chlorinated solvents (CVOCs) from the subsurface. Further, vadose zone remediation system operation increased the overall CVOC removal rate of the A/M Area Groundwater Corrective Action by 300% to 500% during this period versus the groundwater pump and treat system along. Various support activities have been performed to support operation and documentation of performance of the vadose zone remediation system. These activities address performance of existing systems (contaminant distributions, zone of influence, and process monitoring data), evaluation of suspect sources, evaluation of alternative/enhancement technologies, and initial development of remediation goals. In particular, the most recent A/M vadose zone remediation support activities (described in WSRC-RP-97-109) were completed and the results provide key documentation about system performance.

  8. Unobstructive Body Area Networks (BAN) for efficient movement monitoring.

    PubMed

    Felisberto, Filipe; Costa, Nuno; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Pereira, António

    2012-01-01

    The technological advances in medical sensors, low-power microelectronics and miniaturization, wireless communications and networks have enabled the appearance of a new generation of wireless sensor networks: the so-called wireless body area networks (WBAN). These networks can be used for continuous monitoring of vital parameters, movement, and the surrounding environment. The data gathered by these networks contributes to improve users' quality of life and allows the creation of a knowledge database by using learning techniques, useful to infer abnormal behaviour. In this paper we present a wireless body area network architecture to recognize human movement, identify human postures and detect harmful activities in order to prevent risk situations. The WBAN was created using tiny, cheap and low-power nodes with inertial and physiological sensors, strategically placed on the human body. Doing so, in an as ubiquitous as possible way, ensures that its impact on the users' daily actions is minimum. The information collected by these sensors is transmitted to a central server capable of analysing and processing their data. The proposed system creates movement profiles based on the data sent by the WBAN's nodes, and is able to detect in real time any abnormal movement and allows for a monitored rehabilitation of the user. PMID:23112726

  9. Natural radionuclide analysis in chattarpur area of southeastern coastal area of Odisha, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautela, Bhagwat; Gusain, Gurupad; Yadav, Manjulata; Sahoo, Sarat; Tokonami, Shinji; Ramola, Rakesh

    2013-08-01

    The energy released in a spontaneous decay process of natural radionuclides is the main source of the total radiation dose to human beings. Natural radionuclides are widely distributed in soil, rocks, air, and groundwater. In present investigation, the analysis of terrestrial radionuclides such as 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K in soil and sand of Chattarpur area of southeastern coast of Odisha has been carried out using NaI(Tl) gamma ray detector. The higher activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides have been reported from the study area. The gamma radiationdose originating from the terrestrial radionuclides was found to vary from 95 to 1813 nGy/h with an average of 700 nGy/h. This study is important to generate a baseline data of radiation exposure in the area. Health hazard effects due to natural radiation exposure are discussed in details.

  10. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Part II: Intensive Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

    1992-04-01

    Project 83-7 was established under the Northeast Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 704 (d) (1) to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration habitat improvement project, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two sub-projects: general and intensive monitoring. Results of the intensive monitoring sub-project are reported here. Results from the general monitoring sub-project will be reported in a separate document. The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production, and develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects. Field work began in 1987 in upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). Methods include using weirs to trap adults, conducting ground and aerial redd counts, snorkeling to estimate parr populations, PIT-tagging juveniles to determine parr-tosmolt survival, trapping fall and spring downstream emigrants with scoop traps, and outplanting adults to determine juvenile carrying capacity. PIT tags also provide a wide range of other information such as migration timing, effects of flow and passage conditions on smolt survival, other factors affecting smolt survival, and growth.

  11. Persistent Scatterer InSAR monitoring of Bratislava urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakon, Matus; Perissin, Daniele; Papco, Juraj; Lazecky, Milan

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of this research is to monitor the ground stability of Bratislava urban area by application of the satellite radar interferometry. Bratislava, the capital city of Slovakia, is situated in its south-west on the borders with Austria and Hungary and only 62 kilometers from the border with Czech Republic. With an exclusive location and good infrastructure, the city attracts foreign investors and developers, what has resulted in unprecedented boom in construction in recent years. Another thing is that Danube River in the last five hundred years caused a hundred of devastating floods, so therefore flood occurs every five years, on average. From geological point of view, the Little Carpathians covers the main part of study area and are geologically and tectonically interesting. The current state of relief and spatial distribution of individual geological forms is the result of vertical geodynamic movements of tectonic blocks, e.g., subsiding parts of Vienna Basin and Danubian Basin or uplifting mountains. The Little Carpathians horst and the area of Vienna Basin contains a number of tectonic faults, where ground motions as a result of geodynamic processes are mostly expected. It is assumed that all the phenomena stated above has an impact on the spatial composition of the Earth's surface in Bratislava urban area. As nowadays surface of the Little Carpathians is heavily eroded and morphology smoothed, question of this impact cannot be answered only by interpreting geological tectonic maps. Furthermore, expected changes have never been revealed by any geodetic measurements which would offer advantages of satellite radar interferometry concerning temporal coverage, spatial resolution and accuracy. Thus the generation of ground deformation maps using satellite radar interferometry could gather valuable information. The work aims to perform a series of differential interferograms and PSInSAR (Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

  12. Risk-based monitored natural attenuation--a case study.

    PubMed

    Khan, F I; Husain, T

    2001-08-17

    The term "monitored natural attenuation" (MNA) refers to a reliance on natural attenuation (NA) processes for remediation through the careful monitoring of the behavior of a contaminant source in time and space domains. In recent years, policymakers are shifting to a risk-based approach where site characteristics are measured against the potential risk to human health and the environment, and site management strategies are prioritized to be commensurate with that risk. Risk-based corrective action (RBCA), a concept developed by the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), was the first indication of how this approach could be used in the development of remediation strategies. This paper, which links ASTM's RBCA approach with MNA, develops a systematic working methodology for a risk-based site evaluation and remediation through NA. The methodology is comprised of seven steps, with the first five steps intended to evaluate site characteristics and the feasibility of NA. If NA is effective, then the last two steps will guide the development of a long-term monitoring plan and approval for a site closure. This methodology is used to evaluate a site contaminated with oil from a pipeline spill. The case study concluded that the site has the requisite characteristics for NA, but it would take more than 80 years for attenuation of xylene and ethylbenzene, as these chemicals appear in the pure phase. If fast remediation is sought, then efforts should be made to remove the contaminant from the soil. Initially, the site posed a serious risk to both on-site and off-site receptors, but it becomes acceptable after 20 years, as the plume is diluted and drifts from its source of origin. PMID:11489527

  13. Monitoring of Soil Remediation Process in the Metal Mining Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Ko, Myoung-Soo; Han, Hyeop-jo; Lee, Sang-Ho; Na, So-Young

    2016-04-01

    Stabilization using proper additives is an effective soil remediation technique to reduce As mobility in soil. Several researches have reported that Fe-containing materials such as amorphous Fe-oxides, goethite and hematite were effective in As immobilization and therefore acid mine drainage sludge (AMDS) may be potential material for As immobilization. The AMDS is the by-product from electrochemical treatment of acid mine drainage and mainly contains Fe-oxide. The Chungyang area in Korea is located in the vicinity of the huge abandoned Au-Ag Gubong mine which was closed in the 1970s. Large amounts of mine tailings have been remained without proper treatment and the mobilization of mine tailings can be manly occurred during the summer heavy rainfall season. Soil contamination from this mobilization may become an urgent issue because it can cause the contamination of groundwater and crop plants in sequence. In order to reduce the mobilization of the mine tailings, the pilot scale study of in-situ stabilization using AMDS was applied after the batch and column experiments in the lab. For the monitoring of stabilization process, we used to determine the As concentration in crop plants grown on the field site but it is not easily applicable because of time and cost. Therefore, we may need simple monitoring technique to measure the mobility or leachability which can be comparable with As concentration in crop plants. We compared several extraction methods to suggest the representative single extraction method for the monitoring of soil stabilization efficiency. Several selected extraction methods were examined and Mehlich 3 extraction method using the mixture of NH4F, EDTA, NH4NO3, CH3COOH and HNO3 was selected as the best predictor of the leachability or mobility of As in the soil remediation process.

  14. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1989 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels, and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether the testing is in compliance with existing radiation protection standards, and to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of both animals and humans. To implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any release of radioactivity, personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each test. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to NTS activities. Trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas and Tritium, Milk Surveillance, TLD, and PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program. 35 refs., 68 figs., 32 tabs.

  15. [Forestry Law and the conservation of natural areas and wildlife].

    PubMed

    Villacrés, V; Suárez, M; Tafur, V

    1996-04-01

    The Forest Law of Ecuador consists of 107 articles, whereas its regulations contain 269 articles. They are related to forestry resources, forestry patrimony protection, forests and vegetation, forest production and benefits, the control and mobilization of the forestry resources, research and capacitation, and the forestry industry protection; to natural areas, wild flora and fauna, their patrimony, conservation, and economic support; and to the violation of the law and its judgment. PMID:9213612

  16. Study of Natural Background Radiation around Gurvanbulag Uranium Deposit Area

    SciTech Connect

    Enkhbat, N.; Norov, N.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Otgooloi, B.; Bat-Erdene, B.

    2009-03-31

    In this work, we will show the study of natural background radiation level around the Gurvanbulag (GB) uranium deposit area in the eastern part of Mongolia. We collected environmental soil samples from 102 points around GB Uranium deposit. Collected samples were measured by HPGe gamma spectrometer at Nuclear Research Center, National University of Mongolia. The averaged activity concentrations of Ra-226, Th-232, K-40, and Cs-137 were 37.1, 29, 939, and 17.7 Bq/kg, respectively.

  17. OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT: RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with s...

  18. OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT: RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with s...

  19. POSTCLOSURE GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION AND MONITORING AT THE SANITARY LANDFILL, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TRANSITIONING TO MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J; Walt Kubilius, W; Thomas Kmetz, T; D Noffsinger, D; Karen M Adams, K

    2006-11-17

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements for hazardous waste facilities include 30 years of post-closure monitoring. The use of an objective-based monitoring strategy allows for a significant reduction in the amount of groundwater monitoring required, as the groundwater remediation transitions from an active biosparging system to monitored natural attenuation. The lifecycle of groundwater activities at the landfill has progressed from detection monitoring and plume characterization, to active groundwater remediation, and now to monitored natural attenuation and postclosure monitoring. Thus, the objectives of the groundwater monitoring have changed accordingly. Characterization monitoring evaluated what biogeochemical natural attenuation processes were occurring and determined that elevated levels of radium were naturally occurring. Process monitoring of the biosparging system required comprehensive sampling network up- and down-gradient of the horizontal wells to verify its effectiveness. Currently, the scope of monitoring and reporting can be significantly reduced as the objective is to demonstrate that the alternate concentration limits (ACL) are being met at the point of compliance wells and the maximum contaminant level (MCL) is being met at the surface water point of exposure. The proposed reduction is estimated to save about $2M over the course of the remaining 25 years of postclosure monitoring.

  20. 1997 Comprehensive TNX Area Annual Groundwater and Effectiveness Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1998-04-01

    Shallow groundwater beneath the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and carbon tetrachloride. In November 1994, an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) was agreed to and signed by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the South Carolina Department of Health {ampersand} Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The Interim Record of Decision requires the installation of a hybrid groundwater corrective action (HGCA) to stabilize the plume of groundwater contamination and remove CVOCs dissolved in the groundwater. The hybrid groundwater corrective action included a recovery well network, purge water management facility, air stripper, and an airlift recirculation well. The recirculation well was dropped pursuant to a test that indicated it to be ineffective at the TNX Area. Consequently, the groundwater corrective action was changed from a hybrid to a single action, pump-and-treat approach. The Interim Action (IA) T-1 air stripper system began operation on September 16, 1996. a comprehensive groundwater monitoring program was initiated to measure the effectiveness of the system. As of December 31, 1997, the system has treated 32 million gallons of contaminated groundwater removed 32 pounds of TCE. The recovery well network created a `capture zone` that stabilized the plume of contaminated groundwater.

  1. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Borgland, A.W.; Charles, E.; /SLAC

    2007-10-16

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration & Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground.

  2. DEVELOPING TOOLS FOR MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS AT LAKE HARTWELL, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated sediments pose a risk to human health and the environment . The management of this risk is currently limited practically to three technologies: dredging, capping, and natural recovery. Monitored natural recovery relies on the natural burial and removal mechanisms to...

  3. Remote and terrestrial ground monitoring techniques integration for hazard assessment in mountain areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinellato, Giulia; Kenner, Robert; Iasio, Christian; Mair, Volkmar; Mosna, David; Mulas, Marco; Phillips, Marcia; Strada, Claudia; Zischg, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    In high mountain regions the choice of appropriate sites for infrastructure such as roads, railways, cable cars or hydropower dams is often very limited. In parallel, the increasing demand for supply infrastructure in the Alps induces a continuous transformation of the territory. The new role played by the precautionary monitoring in the risk governance becomes fundamental and may overcome the modeling of future events, which represented so far the predominant approach to these sort of issues. Furthermore the consequence of considering methodologies alternative to those more exclusive allow to reduce costs and increasing the frequency of measurements, updating continuously the cognitive framework of existing hazard condition in most susceptible territories. The scale factor of the observed area and the multiple purpose of such regional ordinary surveys make it convenient to adopt Radar Satellite-based systems, but they need to be integrated with terrestrial systems for validation and eventual early warning purposes. Significant progress over the past decade in Remote Sensing (RS), Proximal Sensing and integration-based sensor networks systems now provide technologies, that allow to implement monitoring systems for ordinary surveys of extensive areas or regions, which are affected by active natural processes and slope instability. The Interreg project SloMove aims to provide solutions for such challenges and focuses on using remote sensing monitoring techniques for the monitoring of mass movements in two test sites, in South Tyrol (Italy) and in Grisons Canton (Switzerland). The topics faced in this project concern mass movements and slope deformation monitoring techniques, focusing mainly on the integration of multi-temporal interferometry, new generation of terrestrial technologies for differential digital terrain model elaboration provided by laser scanner (TLS), and GNSS-based topographic surveys, which are used not only for validation purpose, but also for

  4. Iron-rich Oklahoma clays as a natural source of chromium in monitoring wells.

    PubMed

    Scott, Dane; Apblett, Allen; Materer, Nicholas F

    2011-12-01

    Water samples, drawn from groundwater monitoring wells located southeast of Oklahoma City, OK, were found to contain elevated concentrations of total chromium with an apparent source localized to the area surrounding each well. Since these monitoring wells are located in areas with no historic chromium usage, industrial sources of chromium were ruled out. Water testing was performed on twelve monitoring wells in the area that historically had elevated total chromium concentrations ranging from 10-4900 micrograms per litre. Filtered water samples were found to be free of chromium contamination, indicating that the source of the chromium is the suspended solids. Analysis of these solids by acid digestion and a sequential extraction technique revealed that the chromium was primarily associated with iron-containing solids. X-ray diffraction identified goethite, an iron oxide hydroxide, as the dominant iron-containing phase in the suspended solids. The mineralogy in this region is dominated by interbedded red-bed sandstone and mudstone whose mineral content includes mixed-layer illite-smectite, hematite, goethite, gypsum and dolomite. Elemental analysis of soil samples collected as a function of depth in the locale of the monitoring wells indicated that the iron rich clays contain a natural source of chromium. The elevated levels of total chromium are most likely due to the dissolution of silica and alumina from the chromium containing iron clays in the basic well water, resulting in the release of fine suspended solids that naturally have high chromium concentrations. These results should be applicable to other areas containing iron-rich clays. PMID:22027925

  5. Monitoring Indicators for Mediterranean Wetland and Agricultural Area Using ALOS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandridis, T. K.; Topaloglou, C. A.; Pardalis, I.; Tsakoumis, G.; Vogiatzis, M.; Andrianopoulos, A.; Takavakoglou, V.; Vougioukas, S.; Bochtis, D.; Zalidis, G. C.; Silleos, N. G.

    2008-11-01

    Agricultural and other human activities are a pressure to several Mediterranean wetland ecosystems. Monitoring the pressures and the state of the ecosystem is an important input to management activities. The aim of this work was to select and implement indicators for monitoring the natural and agricultural environment of a Mediterranean wetland using Earth Observation (EO), and specifically the recently launched ALOS satellite images. Multiple levels of data were collected and integrated: remote sensing data (ALOS AVNIR-2 and PALSAR), unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images, and observations during field surveys. EO and GIS methods used during monitoring of the study area involved preprocessing of the satellite images, enhancement of information, information extraction, and derivation of indicators. Geographic overlay comparison with results derived from the area in 2003 using a Terra/ASTER image was used to identify the changes that occurred during the last years. The methodology was applied in the wetland and surrounding agricultural area of Ramsar Convention site "lakes Koronia-Volvi" (Greece). Resulting thematic maps revealed and quantified the intensity of pressures in the vicinity of the protected wetland, the state of the wetland ecosystem, as well as the seasonal and long term temporal trends.

  6. Determine utility of ERTS-1 to detect and monitor area strip mining and reclamation. [southeastern Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. H. (Principal Investigator); Pettyjohn, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Computer techniques were applied to process ERTS tapes acquired over coal mining operations in southeastern Ohio on 21 August 1972 and 3 September 1973. ERTS products obtained included geometrically correct map overlays showing stripped earth, partially reclaimed earth, water, and natural vegetation. Computer-generated tables listing the area covered by each land-water category in square kilometers and acres were produced. By comparing these mapping products, the study demonstrates the capability of ERTS to monitor changes in the extent of stripping, success of reclamation, and the secondary effects of mining on the environment.

  7. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Hennessey, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (OREMP) conducted during 1997 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPAs), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling and analyzing milk, water, and air; by deploying and reading thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) to measure ambient gamma exposure rates with a sensitivity capable of detecting low level exposures not detected by other monitoring methods.

  8. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

  9. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This progress report from the Savannah River Plant for second quarter 1992 includes discussion on the following topics: description of facilities; hydrostratigraphic units; monitoring well nomenclature; integrity of the monitoring well network; groundwater monitoring data; analytical results exceeding standards; tritium, nitrate, and pH time-trend data; water levels; groundwater flow rates and directions; upgradient versus downgradient results.

  10. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This progress report from the Savannah River Plant for first quarter 1992 includes discussion on the following topics: description of facilities; hydrostratigraphic units; monitoring well nomenclature; integrity of the monitoring well network; groundwater monitoring data; analytical results exceeding standards; tritium, nitrate, and pH time-trend data; water levels; groundwater flow rates and directions; upgradient versus downgradient results.

  11. CASE STUDIES IN WELLHEAD PROTECTION AREA DELINEATION AND MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground-water monitoring is one of many management options for Wellhead Protection Program implementation. round-water parameters are monitored (1) to assess source-control measures, (2) to monitor compliance with drinking water standards at sites other then the wellhead, and (3) ...

  12. STATISTICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE DESIGN AND ANALYSIS ON NATURAL RESOURCE MONITORING PROGRAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural resource monitoring includes a wide variation in the type of natural resource monitored as well as in the objectives for the monitoring. Rather than address the entire breadth, the focus will be restricted to programs whose focus is to produce state, regional, or nationa...

  13. Quality in Public Spaces: Monitoring Green Areas in Milan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, F.; Pasquinelli, A.; Privitera, A.

    2013-05-01

    The city of Milan gained a lot of experience in management and conservation of urban green spaces: the set goal is to come to a high quality standard of the green areas, to be realized not only downtown, but all over the city. All the activities related to this issue has been outsourced to a specific Consortium through three-yearly contracts based on a Global Service model and the management structure implemented since 2004 has been set up on GIS technologies and open source applications: this structure has evolved over the years following an increasingly integration of the different operative phases and paying close attention to the update of the geographical data. With the contribution of the academic world and the support of technical experts in webGIS applications field, Milan today can count on a management system in which cartographical aspects are perfectly integrated with maintenance activities executed by operators on site and check inspections carried out by municipal controllers, ensuring a high level of the geo-database updating. The focus now is on the arrangement of a performance monitoring system, aimed to control the achievement of the quality standard fixed by contract with the Consortium. In the research here introduced we want to describe how the unification of the workflows - related to the upkeep schedules on the one hand and to the control activities on the other hand- together with the use of GPS technologies contributed in improving efficiency in practical intervention in case of warnings sent by controllers, in daily works and data update, producing as a consequence an enhancement of the maintenance service provided. In this way the "Green GIS" can now be used for further qualitative upgrade in management of green areas in Milan, with new challenges related to the concept of "smart city".

  14. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, the groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) was monitored in compliance with South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, R61-79.265, Subpart F. Eighty-five wells provided samples from the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Post-Closure Care Permit Application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control in December 1990. Historically, as well as currently, tritium, nitrate, gross alpha, total alpha-emitting radium, cadmium, and lead are the primary constituents observed above final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater at the FASB. Nonvolatile beta has consistently exceeded its drinking water screening level. Other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also have exceeded the final PDWS in the groundwater at the FASB. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB[sub 2] (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB[sub 1], (Barnwell/McBean) wells. However, several Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells also contain elevated levels of constituents, primarily tritium. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/ activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units for first and fourth quarters 1992. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the FASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  15. A multi-disciplinary approach for the structural monitoring of Cultural Heritages in a seismic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria; Musacchio, Massimo; Guerra, Ignazio; Porco, Giacinto; Stramondo, Salvatore; Casula, Giuseppe; Caserta, Arrigo; Speranza, Fabio; Doumaz, Fawzi; Giovanna Bianchi, Maria; Luzi, Guido; Ilaria Pannaccione Apa, Maria; Montuori, Antonio; Gaudiosi, Iolanda; Vecchio, Antonio; Gervasi, Anna; Bonali, Elena; Romano, Dolores; Falcone, Sergio; La Piana, Carmelo

    2014-05-01

    In the recent years, the concepts of seismic risk vulnerability and structural health monitoring have become very important topics in the field of both structural and civil engineering for the identification of appropriate risk indicators and risk assessment methodologies in Cultural Heritages monitoring. The latter, which includes objects, building and sites with historical, architectural and/or engineering relevance, concerns the management, the preservation and the maintenance of the heritages within their surrounding environmental context, in response to climate changes and natural hazards (e.g. seismic, volcanic, landslides and flooding hazards). Within such a framework, the complexity and the great number of variables to be considered require a multi-disciplinary approach including strategies, methodologies and tools able to provide an effective monitoring of Cultural Heritages form both scientific and operational viewpoints. Based on this rationale, in this study, an advanced, technological and operationally-oriented approach is presented and tested, which enables measuring and monitoring Cultural Heritage conservation state and geophysical/geological setting of the area, in order to mitigate the seismic risk of the historical public goods at different spatial scales*. The integration between classical geophysical methods with new emerging sensing techniques enables a multi-depth, multi-resolution, and multi-scale monitoring in both space and time. An integrated system of methodologies, instrumentation and data-processing approaches for non-destructive Cultural Heritage investigations is proposed, which concerns, in detail, the analysis of seismogenetic sources, the geological-geotechnical setting of the area and site seismic effects evaluation, proximal remote sensing techniques (e.g. terrestrial laser scanner, ground-based radar systems, thermal cameras), high-resolution aerial and satellite-based remote sensing methodologies (e.g. aeromagnetic surveys

  16. NDIR Gas Sensor for Spatial Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Naturally Ventilated Livestock Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Luciano B.; Ogink, Nico W. M.; Edouard, Nadège; van Dooren, Hendrik Jan C.; Tinôco, Ilda de Fátima F.; Mosquera, Julio

    2015-01-01

    The tracer gas ratio method, using CO2 as natural tracer, has been suggested as a pragmatic option to measure emissions from naturally ventilated (NV) barns without the need to directly estimate the ventilation rate. The aim of this research was to assess the performance of a low-cost Non-Dispersive Infra-Red (NDIR) sensor for intensive spatial field monitoring of CO2 concentrations in a NV dairy cow house. This was achieved by comparing NDIR sensors with two commonly applied methods, a Photo-Acoustic Spectroscope (PAS) Gas Monitor and an Open-Path laser (OP-laser). First, calibrations for the NDIR sensors were obtained in the laboratory. Then, the NDIR sensors were placed in a dairy cow barn for comparison with the PAS and OP-laser methods. The main conclusions were: (a) in order to represent the overall barn CO2 concentration of the dairy cow barn, the number of NDIR sensors to be accounted for average concentration calculation was dependent on barn length and on barn area occupation; and (b) the NDIR CO2 sensors are suitable for multi-point monitoring of CO2 concentrations in NV livestock barns, being a feasible alternative for the PAS and the OP-laser methods to monitor single-point or averaged spatial CO2 concentrations in livestock barns. PMID:25985166

  17. NDIR Gas Sensor for Spatial Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Naturally Ventilated Livestock Buildings.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luciano B; Ogink, Nico W M; Edouard, Nadège; van Dooren, Hendrik Jan C; Tinôco, Ilda de Fátima F; Mosquera, Julio

    2015-01-01

    The tracer gas ratio method, using CO2 as natural tracer, has been suggested as a pragmatic option to measure emissions from naturally ventilated (NV) barns without the need to directly estimate the ventilation rate. The aim of this research was to assess the performance of a low-cost Non-Dispersive Infra-Red (NDIR) sensor for intensive spatial field monitoring of CO2 concentrations in a NV dairy cow house. This was achieved by comparing NDIR sensors with two commonly applied methods, a Photo-Acoustic Spectroscope (PAS) Gas Monitor and an Open-Path laser (OP-laser). First, calibrations for the NDIR sensors were obtained in the laboratory. Then, the NDIR sensors were placed in a dairy cow barn for comparison with the PAS and OP-laser methods. The main conclusions were: (a) in order to represent the overall barn CO2 concentration of the dairy cow barn, the number of NDIR sensors to be accounted for average concentration calculation was dependent on barn length and on barn area occupation; and (b) the NDIR CO2 sensors are suitable for multi-point monitoring of CO2 concentrations in NV livestock barns, being a feasible alternative for the PAS and the OP-laser methods to monitor single-point or averaged spatial CO2 concentrations in livestock barns. PMID:25985166

  18. Preliminary studies for a high energy neutron area monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, R.T.; Hsu, H.H.

    1998-12-01

    Track etch detectors were exposed to neutrons produced by a spallation target struck by a beam of 800 MeV protons. The fields were filtered by 0, 10, and 40 centimeters of polyethylene. The track etch dosimeters were exposed on a polyethylene phantom. The dosimeters were exposed bare and behind lead filters of 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 1.25 and 1.50 cm of lead with the face of the dosimeter perpendicular to the beam and bare and behind lead filters of 0.50, 1.0, and 1.5 cm of lead with angle of incidence 45{degree} and 75{degree}. Monte Carlo calculations of these experimental configurations were done using MCNP and LAHET with input from the calculated spectra. These results are compared with the experimental results to understand the basic processes involved in the production of tracks with high energy neutrons and develop a high energy neutron area monitor.

  19. Multi-disciplinary monitoring of the Hutubi underground natural gas storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.

    2015-12-01

    Underground natural Gas Storage (UGS) can balance the gas demand and supply through injecting gas into or withdraw gas from the subsurface rock formation. UGS has been wildly established all over the world to face the complicated international energy system. In 2013, the Hutubi underground natural gas storage was put into production, which was one of the largest UGS in China. In the Hutubi UGS, the pressurized natural gas is injected into and extracted from an obsolete gas reservoir during summer and winter time, respectively. The repeatable in and out going high pressure gas may change the stress state and material properties of the underground rock formation, which may in turn cause surface deformation and alter the seismic hazard in this region. To understand the physical process of the periodic loading and unloading, we established a multi-disciplinary monitoring system composed of a geodetic network, a seismic network, and an active source monitoring system. The position and level of 13 spots around and above the UGS area are measured every three to six months with Global Position System (GPS) and short base-line leveling. More than 30 portable broad band three component seismic stations were deployed in study area to continuously monitor the background and possible triggered seismicity. These seismic stations together with a 12000 in3 airgun source, are also used to monitor the seismic velocity change associated with the gas injection and extraction. Preliminary results indicate that seismic velocity change correlates well with the injection pressure; seismicity decays with the lapse time after the startup of Hutubi UGS; small but detectable surface deformation associated with the gas activities is observed.

  20. Natural hazards monitoring and forecast using the GNSS and other technologies of the ionosphere monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, S. A.; Davidenko, D.

    2013-12-01

    It is well established now that Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling is provided through the local changes of the Global Electric Circuit parameters. Main agent - is column conductivity, modulated mainly at the altitudes of the Global Boundary Layer. We demonstrate the ionospheric effects for different types of natural hazards including volcano eruptions, dusty storms from Western Africa, ionospheric effects from tropical hurricanes, multiple earthquakes. We consider the important role of air ionization from natural (natural ground radioactivity and galactic cosmic rays) and artificial sources (nuclear weapon tests in atmosphere and underground, nuclear power stations and other nuclear enterprises emergencies). We rise also important question that such effects of the ionosphere variability are not taken into account by any ionospheric model and their correct recognition is important not only from the point of view the disasters monitoring but for navigation itself because the magnitude of the ionospheric effects sometimes exceeds the effects from strong magnetic storms and other severe space weather conditions. Some effects like ionospheric effects from tropical hurricanes have more complex physical nature including the formation of streams of neutral atmosphere over the hurricane eye and formation of the strong positive plasma concentration anomaly at the altitude near 1000 km. Some plasma anomalies registered over the tropical depressions before hurricane formation give hope on predictive capabilities of plasma observations over the tropical depressions.

  1. Nevada Test Site 2000 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Yvonne Townsend

    2001-06-01

    Environmental monitoring data, subsidence monitoring data, and meteorology monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (refer to Figure 1). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels, whereas radon concentrations are not above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorology data indicate that 2000 was an average rainfall year: rainfall totaled 167 mm (6.6 in) at the Area 3 RWMS (annual average is 156 mm [6.5 in]) and 123 mm (4.8 in) at the Area 5 RWMS (annual average is 127 mm [5.0 in]). Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 2000 rainfall infiltrated less than one meter (3 ft) before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium monitoring data indicate slow subsurface migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were lower than in previous years. All 2000 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing well at isolating buried waste.

  2. Nevada Test Site 2001 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Y. E. Townsend

    2002-06-01

    Environmental monitoring data, subsidence monitoring data, and meteorology monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (refer to Figure 1). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada (BN) reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorology data indicate that 2001 was an average rainfall year: rainfall totaled 150 mm (5.9 in) at the Area 3 RWMS and 120 mm (4.7 in) at the Area 5 RWMS. Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 2001 rainfall infiltrated less than one meter (3 ft) before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium monitoring data indicate slow subsurface migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were lower than in previous years. All 2001 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility performance assessments.

  3. Real-time monitoring of natural gas pipelines: A feasibility study. Topical report, July 1993-August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, C.P.; Tian, J.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this report are: (1) to demonstrate the feasibility of monitoring the integrity of natural gas pipeline integrity in real time by mass balance, and by transient flow simulations, (2) to identify the areas of further research so that the methodologies explored can be fully developed.

  4. MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE SUBSURFACE: APPLICATIONS: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA-00329 Azadpour-Keeley**, A., Keeley, J.W., Russell, H.H., and Sewell*, G.W. Monitored Natural Attenuation of Contaminants in the Subsurface: Applications. Ground Water Monitoring and Reme...

  5. Review of monitoring wells exhibiting elevated pH in F and H Area

    SciTech Connect

    Blackmer, G.C.

    1988-07-01

    Several of the monitoring wells installed at the Savannah River Plant in the past few years exhibit pH values of 8 or higher. These pHs are significantly higher than average values for the aquifers involved and are also higher than expected for natural waters. They are also inconsistent with observations in nearby wells. It is therefore suspected that the high pHs are not representative of true aquifer conditions. Two previous studies conducted at SRP (Price, 1984; Schreeder, 1986) conclude that high pH readings in M-Area monitoring wells and Z-Area piezometers are the result of contact between groundwater and grout. Price bases his conclusion on water chemistry. Schreeder`s evidence is the relationship between pH and amount of water withdrawn from the piezometers--an initially high pH drops as more water is removed. This conclusion is supported by laboratory measurements on water samples collected from cement-bentonite grout which show pH values of 13. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate contamination by grout and drilling fluid as a possible cause of elevated pH in monitoring wells at SRP and to develop techniques to rehabilitate the affected wells. FSB and HSB wells were used in this study.

  6. Multitemporal analysis of landscape metrics for monitoring forested patterns in coastal and mountainous areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carone, M. T.; Imbrenda, V.; Lanfredi, M.; Macchiato, M.; Simoniello, T.

    2009-04-01

    The role of forested areas for the maintaining of an acceptable landscape balance is crucial. As an example, they contribute to higher biodiversity levels directly and to cleaner fluvial waters indirectly, thus, the degradation of such ecosystems has strong repercussions on many ecological processes. In order to preserve their natural stability, monitoring forest temporal dynamics is very important for a correct management, particularly, in fragile Mediterranean environments that are highly vulnerable to both natural and human-induced perturbations. For analysing the evolution of forested patterns, especially in areas with a strong human presence, landscape metrics are a basilar tool since they allow for evaluating the structure of landscape patterns at different spatio-temporal scales and the relationship between natural environment and human environment. Starting from this premise, we selected a set of Landscape Metrics to evaluate the temporal dynamics of forested covers in two different environments (coastal and mountainous) located in Basilicata Region, Southern Italy. The first one (area A) is located along the Ionian coast and is largely characterized by evergreen forests; in such an area, even if many sites are protected by the European Community (SCI), forests are subjected to a strong incidence of human activities mainly linked to agriculture and tourism as well as to frequent fire events and coastal erosion processes that favour salt-water intrusion. The second one (area B) is a high heterogeneous mountainous area, which also comprehends alluvial planes. The particular configuration of the territory allows for the presence of a very rich faunal and vegetation biodiversity; thus, it is partially under the protection of a National Park, but there are also many critical anthropical activities (e.g. oil drilling, agriculture, etc.). The landscape ecology analyses were performed on multi temporal land cover maps, obtained from hybrid classifications of a time

  7. Urban areas of Carbonia (Sardinia, Italy): anthropogenic and natural sinkhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mureddu, A.; Corda, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    This work aims to contribute to knowledge on the phenomena of sinkholes in the urban area of Carbonia, primed mostly as a result of mining in underground coal Sulcis, as well as natural causes, in the hills and valleys structurated on the bedrock of Cambrian area, in the localities of Cannas and Serbariu. During the exploitation of the coal deposits, (so called Lignitifero), mines of the Sulcis Area, in over a century of mining, have produced large underground excavations, which were extracted more than 50 million tons of coal and large quantities of tailings. On older crops of mineral minings centers of Serbariu, Cortoghiana and Bacu Abis, the mining operations reached the depth of 300 meters from the surface of the country, over 100 meters below sea level. In the late of 1960, following the closure of the mines, were manifested in the temporal effects of the disruptions caused by the collapse of underground voids, affecting a much wider area of the below mining cultivations. The first signs of instability are occurred with the sudden opening of large potholes and structural damage to buildings up area of Bacu Abis, in neighboring areas to the Mine of Serbariu, intended for production facilities ("Su Landiri Durci"), and along certain streets service. In the case of mine "Serbariu" located on the outskirts of the urban west Carbonia, exploited in the period between 1940 and 1964, the cultivation of the layers of coal left in place, at short depth from the surface level, consisting of empty mines, with more than 5 km of galleries. So, have been found important effects of instability of the soil in urban areas and in the recently built road infrastructure linking lots of settlements. The area affected by mining operations has an area of over 4 square kilometers, is covered in part by the built environment and road infrastructure of regional and state level. In the mining center, now converted to craft and commercial area, have continued various undergrounds mining

  8. Natural Oil Seepages : Detection, Monitoring and Relationships with Submarine Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhont, D.; Jatiault, R.; Dubucq, D.; Longépé, N.; Nhunfat, B.; Lucas, M.

    2014-12-01

    Detection of hydrocarbon shows in marine areas is of primary importance for oil and gas exploration since they confirm hydrocarbon generation and prove the presence of an active petroleum system. The use of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images serves as an ideal technology for the imaging of hydrocarbon seeps as it is cost effective, provides large ground coverage with continuous acquisitions and operates day and night and in all weather conditions. Here, we present results on the interpretation of radar images for seepage detection on the West African margin. Long-term monitoring of 150 SAR scenes during 20 years allowed the recognition of more than 1400 oil seepages. Seabed morphologies associated to oil leakage correspond to clusters of small sized pockmarks, 50 to 200 m in diameter, and high-reflectivity mounds. The correlation between the location of the impact point of the oil plume at the sea surface with the seabed features reveals that oceanic drift of the oil is less than 1000 m through a water column of 1800 m, with a rising speed of 10 cm/s. In order to address the question of the seeps lifetime, we set up a short-term monitoring through the acquisition of one radar scene every 12 hours during 10 days in a specific area recognized for active oil leaking. Our main observations are: (i) the number of detected seeps varies spatially and temporally, and (ii) oil seep dissipation is effective in less than 12 hours. The variation of the hydrostatic pressure in the water column associated to the oscillation of the tide has been firstly considered as a possible mechanism controlling the expulsion of oil at the seafloor in relation with the number of seeps detected on each image. However, the correlation between the regional mean wind field and the amount of oil seeps strongly suggests that the wind is a primary factor to be considered for seepage detection. In addition, the age of the seepage on the sea surface is undetermined when the SAR imagery

  9. Mineral resource potential map of the Natural Area Roadless Area, Baker County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathcart, James B.; Patterson, Sam H.; Crandall, Thomas M.

    1983-01-01

    The Natural Area Roadless Area, which is in the Osceola National Forest in Baker County, Fla., is underlain by sedimentary rocks containing phosphate deposits that are not a potential mineral resource by todays standards. The region has a low potential for oil and gas and virtually no potential for other valuable minerals. The phosphate deposits are either slightly low in tonnage and P2O5 content, high in MgO and/or Fe2O3 + Al2O3, or the ratio of CaO to P2O5 is too high for deposits that can be mined profitably at the present time. A low potential for oil and gas is indicated by the numerous dry holes in the region and the absence of the formations that contain these hydrocarbons in southern and westernmost Florida. The only mineral material that has been produced in the study area is clayey sand, used in stabilizing Forest Service roads. This type of clayey sand has no particular value because there are virtually unlimited quantities in the surrounding region. The peaty material in the area is too high in ash content to be mined. Large quantities of limestone underlie the area but are too deeply buried to be quarried. Heavy-mineral and clay deposits, which are mined elsewhere in northern peninsular Florida, are not present in the study area.

  10. PERFORMANCE MONITORING FOR NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CONTAMINANTS IN AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring of hazardous waste sites serves a variety of very distinct purposes. The initial phase of monitoring is designed to determine whether there is a problem at a site (remedial investigation). If a problem exists, the next phase of monitoring is designed to select a reme...

  11. Natural Areas, Regions, and Two Centuries of Environmental Change on the Great Plains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishart, David J.

    2006-01-01

    A careful reading of recent issues of the "Natural Areas Journal," the publication of the Natural Areas Association, will leave you with the conclusion that humans are not a part of natural areas. When humans do appear, it is either as disturbing agents, disrupting the naturalness through, for example, the introduction of exotic plants and…

  12. 77 FR 8275 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Rio Grande Natural Area Commission was established in the Rio Grande Natural...

  13. 76 FR 73657 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management ] (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Rio Grande Natural Area Commission was established in the Rio Grande Natural...

  14. 77 FR 21584 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Rio Grande Natural Area Commission was established in the Rio Grande Natural...

  15. 78 FR 9729 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as indicated below.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Rio Grande Natural Area Commission was established in the Rio Grande Natural...

  16. New findings: a very high natural radiation area in Afra hot springs, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali; Abdelsalam, Manal; Abu-Haija, Osama; Joudeh, Bassam

    2009-01-01

    A high natural radiation zone was investigated for the first time in Afra hot springs of Jordan. The radiation levels were measured using a portable Geiger-Muller counter and an Na(Tl) detector. The measured absorbed dose rates in air ranged from 10 to 1800 nGy h(-1), suggesting that the concentration of natural radioactive materials is very high compared with their normal abundance in crustal rocks. A single high-radiation zone was also found in a nearby area where a gamma radiation dose rate of 4.0 mGy h(-1) was measured. On the basis of this measurement, the area was marked as a high-radiation zone. This region is far from tourist areas and not easily reached. No intervention measures are needed to protect people because the spa area is not well inhabited, having only daily visitors (average frequency of 10 days per year per individual). The dose received by workers in the spa area should be considered and the worker should be monitored by personal radiation dosimeters, such as thermoluminescent dosimeters. PMID:19297533

  17. Infrared Laser System for Extended Area Monitoring of Air Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowman, L. R.; Gillmeister, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution monitoring system using a spectrally scanning laser has been developed by the General Electric Company. This paper will report on an evaluation of a breadboard model, and will discuss applications of the concept to various ambient air monitoring situations. The system is adaptable to other tunable lasers. Operating in the middle infrared region, the system uses retroreflectors to measure average concentrations over long paths at low, safe power levels. The concept shows promise of meeting operational needs in ambient air monitoring and providing new data for atmospheric research.

  18. Monitored Natural Attenuation For Inorganic Contaminants In Ground Water - Technical Issues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of ground water contaminated with radionuclides may be achieved using attenuation-based technologies. These technologies may rely on engineered processes (e.g., bioremediation) or natural processes (e.g., monitored natural attenuation) within the subsurface. In gene...

  19. EVALUATING MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR RADIONUCLIDE AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for inorganic contaminants is dependent on naturally occurring processes in the subsurface that act without human intervention to reduce the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume or concentration of contaminants. EPA is developing a technical refer...

  20. EVALUATING MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR RADIONUCLIDE & ORGANIC CONTAMINATION IN GROUNDWATER (SALT LAKE CITY, UT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for radionuclides and inorganic contaminants is dependent on naturally occurring processes in the subsurface that act without human intervention to reduce the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume or concentration of contaminants. EPA is developing ...

  1. Agricultural area impacts within a natural area: Cades cove, a case history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratton, Susan Power; Mathews, Raymond C.; White, Peter S.

    1980-09-01

    Agricultural management in Cades Cove, an historic district in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, has affected natural resources both within the district and in the adjoining natural areas. Aquatic impacts of haying and cattle grazing included increases in water temperatures, turbidity, nutrient loading, and bacterial counts and decreases in benthic macroinvertebrate density and fish biomass. Wildlife populations, including groundhogs, wild turkeys, and white-tailed deer, have increased in the open fields and around the periphery of the historic district. Intensive deer foraging has removed deciduous seedlings and saplings from woodlots, lowering species diversity and favoring coniferous reproduction. Cades Cove has limestone habitats unique in the park, and both deer browse and cattle grazing may have disturbed populations of rare plant species. Effects on water quality are detectable at a campground 15 stream km from the agricultural area, and the effects of deer foraging extend about 1 km beyond the open fields. Since “historic landscape” preservation is presently a goal of the park, managing for open vistas in Cades Cove will require some sort of continuing disturbance. Conversion of cattle pastures to hayfields would reduce aquatic impacts but the deer herd might increase as a result of reduced competition for forage. Retarding old field succession would increase populations of native plant species dependent on sunlight, but would require government-funded mowing. Other options are discussed. Completely eliminating the effects of the historic district on adjoining areas may be impossible, at least under present economic constraints.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING OF NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS IN GROUNDWATER: A SYSTEMS APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B; Michael Heitkamp, M; Gary Wein , G; Christopher Bagwell, C; Karen Vangelas, K; Karen-M Adams, K; Tyler Gilmore; Norman Cutshall; David Major; Mike Truex; Todd Wiedemeier; Francis H. Chapelle; Tom Early; Jody Waugh; David Peterson; Mark Ankeny; Claire H. Sink

    2006-08-10

    The objective of this document is to examine the use of a phased approach to characterizing and monitoring (C&M) natural attenuation processes and enhanced attenuation processes and to identify promising tools and techniques by which to accomplish the C&M. We will investigate developing techniques, such as molecular-based assessment tools, and existing tools that traditionally have not been used for monitoring the performance of environmental remediation technologies. Case studies will be used to provide examples of how non-traditional methods are being employed as characterization and monitoring tools to support MNA and EA. The document is not focused on a specific group of readers but rather is broadly directed with the intent that readers may gain information useful to their purposes. Thus, regulators may see some future characterization and monitoring techniques; end users may find novel ways to make MNA or EA more effective or efficient at their site; researchers may identify new areas for development or new and better combinations of existing methods. One consequence of this broad approach is that some readers may find certain sections either too rudimentary or too advanced for their needs. Hopefully, all will be able to use at least some of the document.

  3. Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility groundwater monitoring report. First and second quarters 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This report contains groundwater monitoring results from the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility at the Savannah River Site. Appendix A contains the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control proposed groundwater monitoring standards and final primary drinking water standards. Appendix B contains the Savannah River Site Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section flagging criteria for groundwater constituents.

  4. Monitored Natural Attenuation of ino9rganic Contaminants Treatability Study Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Crapse, K

    2004-05-19

    The identification and quantification of key natural attenuation processes for inorganic contaminants at D-Area is detailed herein. Two overarching goals of this evaluation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation strategy were (1) to better define the availability of inorganic contaminants as potential sources for transport to groundwater and uptake by environmental receptors and (2) to understand the site-specific mechanisms controlling attenuation of these inorganic contaminants through tandem geochemical and biological characterization. Data collected in this study provides input for more appropriate site groundwater transport models. Significant natural attenuation is occurring at D-Area as evidenced by relatively low aqueous concentrations of constituents of concern (COCs) (Be, Ni, U, and As) at all locations characterized and the decrease in groundwater concentrations with increasing distance from the source. The observed magnitude of decrease in groundwater concentrations of COCs with distance from the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin (DCPRB) could not be accounted for by the modeled physical attenuation processes of dilution/dispersion. This additional attenuation, i.e., the observed difference between the groundwater concentrations of COCs and the modeled physical attenuation, is due to biogeochemical processes occurring at the D-Area. In tandem geochemical and microbiological characterization studies designed to evaluate the mechanisms contributing to natural attenuation, pH was the single parameter found to be most predictive of contaminant attenuation. The increasing pH with distance from the source is likely responsible for increased sorption of COCs to soil surfaces within the aquifer at D-Area. Importantly, because the sediments appear to have a high buffering capacity, the acid emanating from the DCPRB has been neutralized by the soil, and these conditions have led to large Kd values at the site. Two major types of soils are present at

  5. New instruments for plant area and personnel monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R. B.; Hawthorne, A. R.; Vo-Dinh, T.; Schuresko, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    Advances in portable monitoring instruments and simple luminescence techniques for analyzing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNAs) are reported. A small, derivative ultra-violet absorption spectrometer is suitable for multipollutant real-time monitoring of several mono- and bicyclic aromatic vapors. A non-compound selective fluorescence spill spotter and lightpipe luminoscope are active instruments for measuring general surface and skin contamination, respectively. A small passive integrating filter paper exposure device that responds to PNA vapors such a pyrene is a very promising and recent development. Synchronous luminescence and room temperature phosphoresence are two attractive and simple to use analytical methodologies for the rapid assaying of major PNA compounds. Their potential for analyzing the cyclohexane extract of particulate matter, or incorporation into a device for the continuous monitoring of select PNAs in aerosols in near-real-time, are discussed.

  6. 2012 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 447

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-01

    The Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Nevada was the site of a 12-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1963. Although the surface of the site has been remediated, investigation of groundwater contamination resulting from the test is still in the corrective action process. Annual sampling and hydraulic head monitoring are conducted at the site as part of the subsurface corrective action strategy. Analytical results from the 2012 monitoring are consistent with those of the previous years, with tritium detected only in well HC-4. The tritium concentration in groundwater from well HC-4 remains far below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-established maximum contaminant level of 20,000 picocuries per liter. Concentrations of total uranium and gross alpha were also detected during this monitoring period, with uranium accounting for nearly all the gross alpha activity. The total uranium concentrations obtained from this monitoring period were consistent with previous results and reflect a slightly elevated natural uranium concentration, consistent with the mineralized geologic terrain. Isotopic ratios of uranium also indicate a natural source of uranium in groundwater, as opposed to a nuclear-test-related source. Water level trends obtained from the 2012 water level data were consistent with those of previous years. The corrective action strategy for the PSA is currently focused on revising the site conceptual model (SCM) and evaluating the adequacy of the current monitoring well network. Some aspects of the SCM are known; however, two major concerns are the uncertainty in the groundwater flow direction and the cause of rising water levels in site wells west of the shear zone. Water levels have been rising in the site wells west of the shear zone since the first hydrologic characterization wells were installed in 1996. While water levels in wells west of the shear zone continue to rise, the rate of increase is less than in previous years. The SCM will be revised, and an

  7. Rehabilitation of invasive-tree degraded natural areas through biological control: a slow but steady process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural areas invaded by invasive exotic plants can develop into monocultures as native plants are displaced. The Australian tree Melaleuca quinquenervia (melaleuca) impacts natural areas in this manner in southern Florida. Environmental plasticity coupled with fire resistance, high reproductive po...

  8. Nevada Test Site 2008 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-06-23

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2008 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities.

  9. Experience of the multi-parameters electromagnetic monitoring in the area of Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, A.; Antaschuk, K.; Simakov, A.

    2013-12-01

    Development of the multi-parameters electromagnetic (EM) monitoring technology in frequency range 0.1 Hz - 1 MHz is carried out in the area of Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan). The technology includes registration of such EM earthquake precursors, as apparent resistivity variations, ULF magnetic and electrotelluric anomalies, electromagnetic emission and ionosphere disturbances. Two types of equipment are used for the EM monitoring: the audiomagnetotelluric system ACF-4M (0.1-1000 Hz) and the radiomagnetotelluric system RMT-F (1-1000 kHz). The equipment ensure time series registration of electric and magnetic field components, robust data processing, spectral parameters calculations, apparent resistivity and impedance phase determination. The integrated multi-parameters monitoring of the considered precursors is carried out simultaneously and obtaining of informative parameters is differed by methods of measured time series data processing only. For the apparent resistivity variations monitoring we apply the audiomagnetotelluric sounding method in frequency range 7-300 Hz with the sufficiently large investigation depth for decreasing of seasonal and daily factors influence, temperature changes and other weather conditions. In this frequency range natural EM fields are quite stable for reliable data obtaining in any time of day and season with accuracy 0.3 % for apparent resistivity. For ULF magnetic, electrotelluric and electromagnetic emission anomalies study we use the wide-band registration of time-series of electric and magnetic fields in frequency range from 0.1 Hz up to 1 MHz. Ionosphere disturbances are studied in radio (observations of remote radio transmitter's signals) and audio (Schumann resonances observations) frequency ranges. EM emission anomaly was registered before the earthquake of M=3.3 on 4 April 2013 in the monitoring station at 100 km distance to the West from the earthquake epicenter (Issyk-Kul lake area). In the dynamic spectrum of magnetic field

  10. Wide area network monitoring system for HEP experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Cottrell, Les; Logg, Connie; /SLAC

    2004-12-01

    Large, distributed High Energy Physics (HEP) collaborations, such as D0, CDF and US-CMS, depend on stable and robust network paths between major world research centers. The evolving emphasis on data and compute Grids increases the reliance on network performance. Fermilab's experimental groups and network support personnel identified a critical need for WAN monitoring to ensure the quality and efficient utilization of such network paths. This has led to the development of the Network Monitoring system we will present in this paper. The system evolved from the IEPM-BW project, started at SLAC three years ago. At Fermilab this system has developed into a fully functional infrastructure with bi-directional active network probes and path characterizations. It is based on the Iperf achievable throughput tool, Ping and Synack to test ICMP/TCP connectivity. It uses Pipechar and Traceroute to test, compare and report hop-by-hop network path characterization. It also measures real file transfer performance by BBFTP and GridFTP. The Monitoring system has an extensive web-interface and all the data is available through standalone SOAP web services or by a MonaLISA client. Also in this paper we will present a case study of network path asymmetry and abnormal performance between FNAL and SDSC, which was discovered and resolved by utilizing the Network Monitoring system.

  11. Wide Area Network Monitoring System for HEP Experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, M.

    2004-11-23

    Large, distributed High Energy Physics (HEP) collaborations, such as D0, CDF and US-CMS, depend on stable and robust network paths between major world research centres. The evolving emphasis on data and compute Grids increases the reliance on network performance. Fermilab's experimental groups and network support personnel identified a critical need for WAN monitoring to ensure the quality and efficient utilization of such network paths. This has led to the development of the Network Monitoring system we will present in this paper. The system evolved from the IEPM-BW project, started at SLAC three years ago. At Fermilab this system has developed into a fully functional infrastructure with bi-directional active network probes and path characterizations. It is based on the Iperf achievable throughput tool, Ping and Synack to test ICMP/TCP connectivity. It uses Pipechar and Traceroute to test, compare and report hop-by-hop network path characterization. It also measures real file transfer performance by BBFTP and GridFTP. The Monitoring system has an extensive web-interface and all the data is available through standalone SOAP web services or by a MonaLISA client. Also in this paper we will present a case study of network path asymmetry and abnormal performance between FNAL and SDSC, which was discovered and resolved by utilizing the Network Monitoring system.

  12. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-03-01

    This progress report for fourth quarter 1991 and 1992 summary from the Savannah River Plant includes discussion on the following topics: groundwater monitoring data; analytical results exceeding standards; upgradient versus downgradient results; turbidity results exceeding standards; water elevations, flow directions, and flow rates.

  13. The Nature of Lightning Augmentation Within Urbanized Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. L.; Stallins, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    Lightning property damage is often less spectacular and more dispersed in time than other weather phenomena such as hurricanes or tornadoes. Consequently, lightning has been under recognized in its potential to generate large economic losses. Recent studies have found that heat generated from large urban areas may alter the local distribution of lightning strikes. However, little is known about the characteristics of this lightning and how surface properties and land-use trends influence its damage potential. Geographic studies of lightning property damage conducted to date cast lightning risk as linear and assume only one causal factor. For example, trends in lightning property damage can be attributed to background thunderstorm regime, a control imposed by the physical environment. Other studies emphasize that these loss trends are caused by an increasing societal sensitivity to thunderstorms. This investigation is unique in that there is simultaneous consideration of the physical environment and the societal template as interacting causal agents. The study region, Atlanta, GA, provides an ideal setting to investigate how these interactions shape lightning hazards. Evidence suggests that the highly populated suburban counties to the northeast of downtown Atlanta have lightning strike densities approaching those along the northern Gulf Coast of Florida. This flash density hotspot is collocated with a zone of high-density land use indicative of urban flash augmentation. In addition, a lightning tracking algorithm was developed to examine the nature of individual thunderstorm tracks creating the hotspot. Increases in lightning flash production were noted in storms passing over high-density urban land use.

  14. A Framework for Assessing the Sustainability of Monitored Natural Attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Novak, John; Parker, John; Campbell, Bruce G.; Widdowson, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    The sustainability of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) over time depends upon (1) the presence of chemical/biochemical processes that transform wastes to innocuous byproducts, and (2) the availability of energy to drive these processes to completion. The presence or absence of contaminant-transforming chemical/biochemical processes can be determined by observing contaminant mass loss over time and space (mass balance). The energy available to drive these processes to completion can be assessed by measuring the pool of metabolizable organic carbon available in a system, and by tracing the flow of this energy to available electron acceptors (energy balance). For the special case of chlorinated ethenes in ground-water systems, for which a variety of contaminant-transforming biochemical processes exist, natural attenuation is sustainable when the pool of bioavailable organic carbon is large relative to the carbon flux needed to drive biodegradation to completion. These principles are illustrated by assessing the sustainability of MNA at a chlorinated ethene-contaminated site in Kings Bay, Georgia. Approximately 1,000 kilograms of perchloroethene (PCE) was released to a municipal landfill in the 1978-1980 timeframe, and the resulting plume of chlorinated ethenes migrated toward a nearby housing development. A numerical model, built using the sequential electron acceptor model code (SEAM3D), was used to quantify mass and energy balance in this system. The model considered the dissolution of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) as the source of the PCE, and was designed to trace energy flow from dissolved organic carbon to available electron acceptors in the sequence oxygen > chlorinated ethenes > ferric iron > sulfate > carbon dioxide. The model was constrained by (1) comparing simulated and measured rates of ground-water flow, (2) reproducing the observed distribution of electron-accepting processes in the aquifer, (3) comparing observed and measured concentrations of

  15. 77 FR 66479 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as... hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Rio Grande Natural Area Commission was established in the...

  16. 78 FR 25097 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

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  17. 78 FR 52783 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  19. 78 FR 69127 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  20. 76 FR 55416 - Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... relating to non-Federal land in the Rio Grande Natural Area, as directed by law. Planned agenda topics... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Meeting, Rio Grande Natural Area Commission AGENCY: Bureau of Land.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet...

  1. The Natural Background Gamma Radiation Exposure in the Metropolitan Area of the Valley of Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Mary Feild

    Measurements of the natural background radiation have been made at numerous places throughout the world. Very little work in this field has been done in developing countries. In Mexico the natural radiation to which the population is exposed has not been assessed. This dissertation represents a pioneer study in this environmental area. The radiation exposure which occupants within buildings receive as a result of naturally occurring radionuclides present in construction materials is the principal focus. Data were collected between August 1979 and November 1980. Continuous monitoring was done with TLDs placed on site for periods of 3 to 6 months. The instrumentation used for "real-time" measurements was a portable NaI (Tl) scintillation detector. In addition, radiometric measurements were performed on construction materials commonly used in Mexican homes. Based on TLD readings taken within 75 dwellings, the typical indoor exposure for a resident of the study area is 9.2 (mu)Rh('-1). The average reading of the 152 indoor scintillometer surveys was 9.5 (mu)Rh('-1), the outdoor reading 7.5 (mu)Rh('-1). Results of one-way and multi-way analyses of the exposure data to determine the effect due to building materials type, geologic subsoil, age of dwelling, and elevation are also presented. The results of 152 indoor scintillometer surveys are described.

  2. Characteristics of Urban Natural Areas Influencing Winter Bird Use in Southern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Paul G. R.

    2007-03-01

    Characteristics of urban natural areas and surrounding landscapes were identified that best explain winter bird use for 28 urban natural areas in southern Ontario, Canada. The research confirms for winter birds the importance of area (size) and natural vegetation, rather than managed, horticultural parkland, within urban natural areas as well as percent urban land use and natural habitat in surrounding landscapes. Alien bird density and percent ground feeding species increased with percent surrounding urban land use. Higher percent forest cover was associated with higher percentages of forest, bark feeding, small (<20 g) and insectivorous species. Natural area size (ha) was related to higher species richness, lower evenness and higher percentages of insectivorous, forest interior, area-sensitive, upper canopy, bark feeding, and non-resident species. Higher number of habitat types within natural areas and percent natural habitat in surrounding landscapes were also associated with higher species richness. Common, resident bird species dominated small areas (<6.5 ha), while less common non-residents increased with area, indicative of a nested distribution. Areas at least 6.5 ha and more generally >20 ha start to support some area-sensitive species. Areas similar to rural forests had >25% insectivores, >25% forest interior species, >25% small species, and <5% alien species. Indicator species separated urban natural areas from rural habitats and ordination placed urban natural areas along a gradient between urban development and undisturbed, rural forests. More attention is needed on issues of winter bird conservation in urban landscapes.

  3. Special Issue "Natural Hazards' Impact on Urban Areas and Infrastructure" in Natural Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostenaru Dan, M.

    2009-04-01

    In 2006 and 2007, at the 3rd and 4th General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union respectivelly, the session on "Natural Hazards' Impact on Urban Areas and Infrastructure" was convened by Maria Bostenaru Dan, then at the Istituto Universitario di Studi Superiori di Pavia, ROSE School, Italy, who conducts research on earthquake management and Heidi Kreibich from the GFZ Potsdam, Germany, who conducts research on flood hazards, in 2007 being co-convened also by Agostino Goretti from the Civil Protection in Rome, Italy. The session initially started from an idea of Friedemann Wenzel from the Universität Karlsruhe (TH), Germany, the former speaker of the SFB 461 "Strong earthquakes", the university where also Maria Bostenaru graduated and worked and which runs together with the GFZ Potsdam the CEDIM, the Center for Disaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology. Selected papers from these two sessions as well as invited papers from other specialists were gathered for a special issue to be published in the journal "Natural Hazards" under the guest editorship of Heidi Kreibich and Maria Bostenaru Dan. Unlike the former special issue, this one contains a well balanced mixture of many hazards: climate change, floods, mountain hazards like avalanches, volcanoes, earthquakes. Aim of the issue was to enlarge the co-operation prospects between geosciences and other professions in field of natural hazards. Earthquake engineering and engineering seismology are seen more frequently co-operating, but in field of natural hazards there is a need to co-operate with urban planners, and, looking to the future, also in the field of integrated conservation, which implies co-operation between architecture and urban planning for the preservation of our environment. Integrated conservation is stipulated since the 1970s, which are the years when the participatism, and so the involvment of social sciences started.

  4. Citizen radiation monitoring program for the TMI area

    SciTech Connect

    Baratta, A.J.; Gricar, B.G.; Jester, W.A.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the program was to develop a system for citizens to independently measure radiation levels in and around their communities. This report describes the process by which the Program was developed and operated. It also presents the methods used to select and train the citizens in making and interpreting the measurements. The test procedures used to select the equipment for the program are described as are the results of the testing. Finally, the actual monitoring results are discussed along with the citizens' reactions to the program.

  5. Hydrology of and Current Monitoring Issues for the Chicago Area Waterway System, Northeastern Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duncker, James J.; Johnson, Kevin K.

    2015-01-01

    The Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS) consists of a combination of natural and manmade channels that form an interconnected navigable waterway of approximately 90-plus miles in the metropolitan Chicago area of northeastern Illinois. The CAWS serves the area as the primary drainage feature, a waterway transportation corridor, and recreational waterbody. The CAWS was constructed by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRDGC). Completion of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (initial portion of the CAWS) in 1900 breached a low drainage divide and resulted in a diversion of water from the Lake Michigan Basin. A U.S. Supreme Court decree (Consent Decree 388 U.S. 426 [1967] Modified 449 U.S. 48 [1980]) limits the annual diversion from Lake Michigan. While the State of Illinois is responsible for the diversion, the MWRDGC regulates and maintains water level and water quality within the CAWS by using several waterway control structures. The operation and control of water levels in the CAWS results in a very complex hydraulic setting characterized by highly unsteady flows. The complexity leads to unique gaging requirements and monitoring issues. This report provides a general discussion of the complex hydraulic setting within the CAWS and quantifies this information with examples of data collected at a range of flow conditions from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gaging stations and other locations within the CAWS. Monitoring to address longstanding issues of waterway operation, as well as current (2014) emerging issues such as wastewater disinfection and the threat from aquatic invasive species, is included in the discussion.

  6. Monitoring and modeling of runoff from a natural and an urbanized part of a small stream catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalicz, P.; Kucsara, M.; Gribovszki, Z.; Erős, M.; Csáfordi, P.

    2012-04-01

    Runoff processes in natural catchments are significantly different compared to urbanized areas. Human impacts are manifested in high amount of paved surfaces like roofs, roads, parking plots and the compacted soils of quasi natural areas like public gardens and parks. Decay of permeability and storage capacity both induce higher amount of runoff. The common practice to treat the increased volume of runoff is to collect in pipes and drain to a stream as soon as possible. These interventions induce flash floods with smaller time of concentration and higher flood peaks as normal food waves therefore strongly load discharge capacity of stream channel. Streams in urban areas are strongly modified and regulated. Sometimes the stream channel are dredged out to increase the discharge capacity. In worst case some smaller brooks are crowded with lid to increase urbanized habitat. Many climate change scenarios predict higher probability of heavy storm events, therefore increasing volume of runoff induces higher demands of strongly modified and enormous concrete channels. This study presents one year monitoring of a small stream comparing runoff from natural, rural and urban sections. In this paper we also introduce the process of a model setup and an evaluation to investigate the weak points of a stream section in urbanized areas. The pilot area of this research is the Rák Brook which is the second largest stream of city Sopron (western Hungary). The natural headwater catchment is long-term research area of Hidegvíz Valley Project, therefore we had a good basis to extend the research catchment monitoring in the direction of urbanized lower part of the stream. Seven monitoring points are established along the longitudinal section of the stream. In each point the water stage is recorded continuously beside several other water quality parameters. These data sets help the later validation of the hydrodynamic model.

  7. Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; 1995-1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Contor, Craig R.; Kissner, Paul; Volkman, Jed

    1997-08-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPME) from September 30, 1995 to September 29, 1996. This program was funded by Bonneville Power Administration and was managed under the Fisheries Program, Department of Natural Resources, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. The goal was to evaluate the implementation of the Umatilla River Basin fisheries restoration plan with respect to natural production, adult passage, and tribal harvest. An estimated 56.1 river miles (RM) of habitat was inventoried on the lower Umatilla River (RM 0--56.1) from June 4, to August 1, 1996. The majority of the lower River was found to be too polluted and physically altered to provide suitable rearing or migration habitat for salmonids during the summer. High water temperatures, irrigation withdrawals, altered channels, and urban and agricultural pollution all contributed to degrade the lower Umatilla River. Small springs provided cooler waters and created small areas that were suitable for salmonid rearing. The river below the mouth of Mckay Creek (RM 27.2 to 50.6) was also cooler and more suitable to salmonid rearing when water was released from Mckay Dam. Two hundred sixty-three of 1,832 (14.4%) habitat units were electrofished from June 19 to August 29, 1996. The number of natural juvenile salmonids captured between RM 1.5--52.4 follow: (1) 141 juvenile steelhead (including resident rainbow trout; Oncoryhnchus mykiss), (2) 13 mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni, including adults), (3) four chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), and (4) two coho salmon (O. kisutch). The expanded population estimate for the areas surveyed was 2,445 salmonids. Mean density was 0.147 salmonids/100 square meter. Mean density of fast water habitat types was 4.5 times higher than slow water types (0.358 and 0.079 s/100 m{sup 2}).

  8. Continued seismic monitoring of the Geysers, California geothermal area

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwin, R.S.; Bufe, C.G.

    1980-01-01

    Probable effects of geothermal development on seismicity at the Geysers are shown by the spatial coherence of decreases in gravity and pressure with maximum geodetic deformation and seismic moment sum along a line through the most developed area of the geothermal field. Increases in the mean number of events per day and in the magnitude of largest annual event correlate with increases in steam production. The two largest earthquakes in the steam field occurred near the two injection wells most distant from production wells, and large events (M/sub c greater than or equal to 2.5) occurred most frequently during months of peak injection. Spatial seismic clusters in proximity to injection wells have occurred soon after injection began. Preliminary data also indicate an increase in seismicity in a previously aseismic area near plant 15 following the beginning of power production at that plant in 1979.

  9. TNX-Area groundwater monitoring report. 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    During 1993, samples from well cluster P 26 and the TBG, TNX, XSB, and YSB well series at the TNX Area were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Seven parameters exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Dichloromethane (methylene chloride), a common laboratory contaminant, nitrate, and trichloroethylene exceeded PDWS most frequently. Four wells in this area currently are part of the Purge Water Contaminant Program due to high trichloroethylene concentrations. Carbon tetrachloride, gross alpha, lead, and tetrachloroethylene were elevated sporadically in one or more wells during the year. Groundwater flow directions and rates in the Unconfined Aquifer were similar from quarter to quarter during the year.

  10. H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    During second quarter 1995, samples from monitoring wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) samples were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 12,076. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. There were no constituents which exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. There were also no constituents which were above the SRS Flag 2 criteria in any well at the three sites during second quarter 1995.

  11. Monitoring Neural Activity with Bioluminescence during Natural Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Eva A.; Kampff, Adam R.; Prober, David A.; Schier, Alexander F.; Engert, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Existing techniques for monitoring neural activity in awake, freely behaving vertebrates are invasive and difficult to target to genetically identified neurons. Here we describe the use of bioluminescence to non-invasively monitor the activity of genetically specified neurons in freely behaving zebrafish. Transgenic fish expressing the Ca2+-sensitive photoprotein GFP-apoAequorin (GA) in most neurons generated large and fast bioluminescent signals related to neural activity, neuroluminescence, that could be recorded continuously for many days. To test the limits of this technique, GA was specifically targeted to the hypocretin-positive neurons of the hypothalamus. We found that neuroluminescence generated by this group of ~20 neurons was associated with periods of increased locomotor activity and identified two classes of neural activity corresponding to distinct swim latencies. Thus, our neuroluminescence assay can report, with high temporal resolution and sensitivity, the activity of small subsets of neurons during unrestrained behavior. PMID:20305645

  12. 43 CFR 8224.1 - Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... paleontological study, excavation, and interpretation. (j) The regulations in 43 CFR part 7 apply to the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural... Research Natural Area § 8224.1 Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area. (a) Fossils may be...

  13. TNX area groundwater monitoring report. 1996 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    During 1996, samples from selected wells of well cluster P 26 and the TBG, TIR, TNX, TRW, XSB, and YSB well series at the TNX Area of the Savannah River Plant were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Sixteen parameters exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Trichloroethylene exceeded the final PDWS most frequently. Antimony, arsenic beryllium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, copper, dichloromethane, gross alpha, lead, mercury, nitrate, nitrate-nitrite, tetrachloroethylene, or trichloroethylene were evaluated in one or more wells during the year. Groundwater flow directions and rates in the Unconfined Aquifer were similar from quarter to quarter during the year.

  14. Wind Monitoring Report for Fort Wainwright's Donnelly Training Area

    SciTech Connect

    Orrell, Alice C.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2011-01-18

    Using the wind data collected at a location in Fort Wainwright’s Donnelly Training Area (DTA) near the Cold Regions Test Center (CRTC) test track, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the gross and net energy productions that proposed turbine models would have produced exposed to the wind resource measured at the meteorological tower (met tower) location during the year of measurement. Calculations are based on the proposed turbine models’ standard atmospheric conditions power curves, the annual average wind speeds, wind shear estimates, and standard industry assumptions.

  15. Assessment groundwater monitoring plan for single shell tank waste management area B-BX-BY

    SciTech Connect

    Caggiano, J.A.

    1996-09-27

    Single Shell Tank Waste Management Area B-BX-BY has been placed into groundwater quality assessment monitoring under interim-status regulations. This document presents background and an assessment groundwater monitoring plan to evaluate any impacts of risks/spills from these Single Shell Tanks in WMA B-BX-BY on groundwater quality.

  16. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report, third quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    During third quarter 1992, samples from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report.

  17. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report, third quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    During third quarter 1992, samples from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report.

  18. Optical Remote-sensing Monitoring and Forecasting of Atmospheric Pollution in Huaibei Area, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Su-wen; Xie, Pin-hua; Jiang, En-hua; Zhang, Yong; Dai, Hai-feng

    2012-12-01

    Huaibei is an energy city. Coal as the primary energy consumption brings a large number of regional pollution in Huaibei area. Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) as optical remote sensing technology has been applied to monitor regional average concentrations and inventory of nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and ozone. DOAS system was set up and applied to monitor the main air pollutants in Huaibei area. Monitoring data were obtained from 7 to 28 August, 2011. Monitoring results show measurements in controlling pollution are effective, and emissions of pollutants are up to the national standard in Huaibei area. Prediction model was also created to track changing trend of pollutions. These will provide raw data support for effective evaluation of environmental quality in Huaibei area.

  19. Monitoring natural and anthropogenic induced variations in water availability across Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M.; Sultan, M.; Wahr, J. M.; Yan, E.

    2014-12-01

    Africa, the second-driest continent in the world after Australia, is one of the most vulnerable continents to climate change. Understanding the impacts of climatic and anthropogenic factors on Africa's hydrologic systems is vital for the assessment and utilization of Africa's water resources. In this study, we utilize the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and land surface models (LSM; GLDAS and CLM4.5) in conjunction with other readily-available temporal climatic and remote sensing, geological and hydrological datasets for monitoring the spatial and temporal trends in Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS) over a time period of 10 years (01/2003-12/2012) over the African continent and to investigate the nature (e.g., climatic and/or human pressures-related) of, and the controlling factors causing, these variations. Spatial and temporal (i.e., time series analysis) correlations of the trends extracted from GRACE-derived (TWSGRACE) and LSM-derived (TWSLSM) TWS indicate the following: (1) Large (≥ 90 % by area) sectors of Africa are undergoing statistically significant TWSGRACE and TWSLSM variations due to natural and anthropogenic causes; (2) a general correspondence between TWSGRACE and TWSLSM over areas (e.g., Niger and Mozambique NE basins in eastern and western Africa) largely controlled by natural (i.e., increase/decrease in precipitation and/or temperature) causes; (3) discrepancies are observed over areas that witnessed extensive anthropogenic effects measured by TWSGRACE but unaccounted for by TWSLSM. Examples include: (a) strong (compared to that observed by TWSLSM) negative TWSGRACE trends were observed over areas that witnessed heavy groundwater extraction (e.g., Western, Desert, Egypt); (b) strong (compared to that observed by TWSLSM) positive TWSGRACE over Lake Volta reservoir; and (c) strong (compared to that observed by TWSLSM) negative trends over areas undergoing heavy deforestation (e.g., northern and NW Congo Basin); (4) additional

  20. Site Characterization To Support Use Of Monitored Natural Attentuation For Remediation Of Inorganic Contaminants In Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical recommendations have recently been published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to address site characterization needed to support selection of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for cleanup of inorganic contaminant plumes in groundwater. Immobilization onto ...

  1. TOOLS FOR ASSESSING MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses many challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches at this time for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how we...

  2. Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents at Area 6, Dover Air Force Base: Groundwater biogeochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witt, M.E.; Klecka, G.M.; Lutz, E.J.; Ei, T.A.; Grosso, N.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2002-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has recently emerged as a viable groundwater remediation technology in the United States. Area 6 at Dover Air Force Base (Dover, DE) was chosen as a test site to examine the potential for MNA of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater and aquifer sediments. A "lines of evidence" approach was used to document the occurrence of natural attenuation. Chlorinated hydrocarbon and biogeochemical data were used to develop a site-specific conceptual model where both anaerobic and aerobic biological processes are responsible for the destruction of PCE, TCE, and daughter metabolites. An examination of groundwater biogeochemical data showed a region of depleted dissolved oxygen with elevated dissolved methane and hydrogen concentrations. Reductive dechlorination likely dominated in the anaerobic portion of the aquifer where PCE and TCE levels were observed to decrease with a simultaneous increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethene, and dissolved chloride. Near the anaerobic/aerobic interface, concentrations of cis-DCE and VC decreased to below detection limits, presumably due to aerobic biotransformation processes. Therefore, the contaminant and daughter product plumes present at the site appear to have been naturally attenuated by a combination of active anaerobic and aerobic biotransformation processes. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents at Area 6, Dover Air Force Base: groundwater biogeochemistry.

    PubMed

    Witt, Michael E; Klecka, Gary M; Lutz, Edward J; Ei, Tom A; Grosso, Nancy R; Chapelle, Francis H

    2002-07-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has recently emerged as a viable groundwater remediation technology in the United States. Area 6 at Dover Air Force Base (Dover, DE) was chosen as a test site to examine the potential for MNA of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater and aquifer sediments. A "lines of evidence" approach was used to document the occurrence of natural attenuation. Chlorinated hydrocarbon and biogeochemical data were used to develop a site-specific conceptual model where both anaerobic and aerobic biological processes are responsible for the destruction of PCE, TCE, and daughter metabolites. An examination of groundwater biogeochemical data showed a region of depleted dissolved oxygen with elevated dissolved methane and hydrogen concentrations. Reductive dechlorination likely dominated in the anaerobic portion of the aquifer where PCE and TCE levels were observed to decrease with a simultaneous increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethene, and dissolved chloride. Near the anaerobic/ aerobic interface, concentrations of cis-DCE and VC decreased to below detection limits, presumably due to aerobic biotransformation processes. Therefore, the contaminant and daughter product plumes present at the site appear to have been naturally atteuated by a combination of active anaerobic and aerobic biotransformation processes. PMID:12143993

  4. Methylmercury monitoring study in Karakuwacho peninsula area in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junxia; Inoue, Kayoko; Asakawa, Akihiro; Harada, Kouji H; Watanabe, Takao; Hachiya, Noriyuki; Koizumi, Akio

    2014-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a worldwide concern owing to its adverse health effects. To explore MeHg exposure burdens and the potential contributing factors in different subpopulations in a peninsula area (Karakuwacho) in Japan, a cross-sectional survey was performed. This study included 189 individuals from 102 families. The geometric means of total hair mercury (THg) were 5.74, 3.78 and 2.37 μg/g for adult males, females and children, respectively, of which 56.5 %, 30.9 % and 12.9 % had hair THg exceeding 5 μg/g, respectively. Tuna and mackerel were the common fish species that were positively correlated with hair THg levels in different subpopulations (standardized coefficient ranged from 0.20 to 0.58, p < 0.05). Frequent consumption of these fish species and a large amount of fish intake are likely major contributors of MeHg exposure in this area. Local-scale risk evaluation and risk communication should be highlighted in future studies. PMID:24599146

  5. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, tritium, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226), gross alpha, antimony, mercury, lead, tetrachloroethylene, arsenic, and cadmium exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) at the Savannah River Site. This report presents and discusses the groundwater monitoring results in the H-Area for first quarter 1992.

  6. Monitoring of Land Surface Displacements within the Areas with Intensnsive Oil Production Using Satellite Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugmanov, Ilmir; Olga, Chernova

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the informative value of differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR) as applied to estimation of modern crustal movements within the oil-producing regions of the Republic of Tatarstan (RT). For the first time in the RT, the earth’s surface displacement maps were created using ERS and ALOS PALSAR data for different time periods in order to show possibility of using radar data to monitor urban areas. Interferometry results were then compared with geodetic leveling data. It is obvious that DInSAR resolution is incomparably greater than resolution of traditional methods used for monitoring of the earth's surface displacements. In the authors’ opinion, the technology of using radar data to monitor the earth’s surface displacements can become a principal approach to forecasting and prevention of industrial and natural disasters any time soon.

  7. Monitoring Mechanism in Preservation of Monuments in Hot and Wet Climate Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. C.; Tsai, Y. L.; Lin, M. L.; Hang, L. W.; Chen, C. Y.

    2015-08-01

    Historic monuments and buildings are critical cultural assets which cannot be presented by again by human beings. Longer affected by natural climate, environment and biological behavior (including human), resulting in damage and the need for repair. Therefore, UNESCO proposed periodic reporting and reactive monitoring in 2007, in order to achieve "early detection, early repair". This study discusses about suitable preservation monitoring methods for Taiwan. To shed light on damage and impact factors of historical buildings and cultural relics, the study is based on impact and sensor, monitoring method, monitoring period and maintenance personnel in order to propose standard operating procedures of monitoring method. To reduce the rate of the human and sensor monitoring, with the long-term monitoring data analysis, it is calculated that 30 minutes is the best period of data collecting. Besides, the study is adopted regression analysis to select temperature variable only then calculate humidity variable function. This study provides a reference monitoring method for monitoring personnel and maintenance personnel, and establishes a long-term monitoring data based information for damage and destroy in the future. Monitoring period and maintenance personnel can follow the data based to find out the damage points and problems, to keep the value of cultural assets.

  8. Continuous monitoring of the stimulated area in multifocal ERG.

    PubMed

    Seeliger; Narfstrom; Reinhard; Zrenner; Sutter

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Multifocal electroretinography (MF-ERG) is widely used in the detection of local retinal dysfunction. However, the position of the stimulus on the retina and the stability of fixation are usually not directly accessible. Thus, devices have been designed for a continuous fundus visualization during recording. METHODS: MF-ERGs were recorded with a RetiScan system connected to two different Scanning-laser ophthalmoscopes (SLOs) that use either a red (633 nm) or green (415 nm) laser for stimulation, and a VERIS 4 system connected to a piggyback stimulator prototype that added the stimulus to the optical pathway of the SLO by means of a wavelength-sensitive mirror. Fundus visualization was achieved with the infrared lasers of the SLOs (780 and 835 nm). RESULTS: The most extensive study so far with a green laser stimulus in a cat model of retinal degeneration demonstrated the capability of the device to detect retinal landmarks and the different stages of degeneration. Also, the advantages of exactly reproducible stimulus positioning for averaging within and comparison between disease groups became apparent. The results with the same setup in transgenic mice suggest a pure cone origin of the responses. In humans, recordings show that fixation is sufficiently good in most subjects. It is not clear yet whether red or green laser stimulation (or both) is preferable. The results with the prototype were very similar to the MF-ERGs obtained with a standard CRT screen. CONCLUSIONS: All three devices allowed us to record MF-ERGs with continuous fundus monitoring. Although further refinements are necessary, it is obvious that fundus controlled methods will improve the reliability of MF-ERG in future research on glaucoma, transplantation studies, and evaluation of gene therapy. PMID:11117444

  9. Monitoring Natural Events Globally in Near Real-Time Using NASA's Open Web Services and Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boller, Ryan A.; Ward, Kevin Alan; Murphy, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Since 1960, NASA has been making global measurements of the Earth from a multitude of space-based missions, many of which can be useful for monitoring natural events. In recent years, these measurements have been made available in near real-time, making it possible to use them to also aid in managing the response to natural events. We present the challenges and ongoing solutions to using NASA satellite data for monitoring and managing these events.

  10. Remote sensing monitoring study for water area change of Fuxian Lake in last 40 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Wang, Jinliang; Duan, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Fuxian Lake located in the middle of Yunnan Province is second deepest lake in china. The water level of Fuxian Lake descends and its water area reduces in recent years owing to the climate changing. Therefore, it is crucial for rational utilization of lake resources to study the change trend of Fuxian Lake's area. Landsat images from 1974 to 2014 were used to monitor Fuxian Lake's area change. Monitoring results show that there are four apparent features of Fuxian Lake's area: (1) Years in which Fuxian Lake's area are larger are concentrated in 2006 to 2009. (2) From 1974 to 1990, Fuxian Lake's area change has a trend of decrease. (3) From 1990 to 2005, Fuxian Lake's area change shows a rise trend on the whole. (4) From 2005 to 2014, there is an obvious decrease trend of Fuxian Lake's area change.

  11. Dynamics in urban water quality: monitoring the Amsterdam city area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Vlugt, Corné; Yu, Liang; Rozemeijer, Joachim; van Breukelen, Boris; Ouboter, Maarten; Stuurman, Roelof; Broers, Hans Peter

    2014-05-01

    Urban water quality is influenced by a large number of heterogeneous sources. We aimed to identify solute pathways from different sources in the urban area of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The city is situated in the Dutch delta, and largely below mean sea level. The water system of the centre of the city is connected to the large fresh water lake Ijsselmeer, but suburbs are mainly located within reclaimed lake and polder areas where water is pumped out in order to maintain the water levels, which are generally 1 tot 4 m. below sea level. Sources of water include: urban storm runoff, inlet water from the Ijsselmeer and surrounding areas, groundwater seepage and possibly also leaking sewage systems. The temporal dynamics and spatial patterns related to these flow routes and sources were largely unknown to date. Water quality is measured at those pumping stations systematically each month. We analysed the pumping discharge data and the concentration data to calculate daily water balances and annual load estimates for HCO3,Ca, Cl, Na, SO4, Ptot, Ntot ,NH4, NH3 and NO3. Chloride appears to be a good tracer to identify inlet water and bicarbonate and DIC were effective to estimate the groundwater contribution to the surface water outflow to the regional system. We were able to improve the solute balances by calibrating the measured temporal patterns of chloride and DIC using known concentrations from the individual sources. Subsequently the water balances where used to identify periods where one of the sources was dominant and by doing so we improved our understanding of the dynamics of N, P and S fluxes and the relations with dry and wet meteorological conditions. It appeared that N and P were largely related to groundwater outflow , whereas S was mainly related to dry periods and shallow flow routes influenced by sewage, urban storm runoff and shallow groundwater flow . The results are used to optimize urban water management which benefits from the improved insight in

  12. Nitrogen multitemporal monitoring through mosses in urban areas affected by mud volcanoes around Mt. Etna, Italy.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen emissions were assessed by using mosses as bioindicators in a densely inhabited area affected by mud volcanoes. Such volcanoes, locally called Salinelle, are phenomena that occur around Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy), and are interpreted as the surface outflow of a hydrothermal system located below Mt. Etna, which releases sedimentary fluids (hydrocarbons and Na-Cl brines) along with magmatic gases (mainly CO2 and He). To date, N emissions from such mud volcanoes have been only quantitatively assessed, and no biomonitoring campaigns are reported about the cumulative effects of these emissions. This study analyzed N concentrations in moss, water and soil samples, collected in a 4-year monitoring campaign. The bryophyte Bryum argenteum, a species widely adopted in surveys of atmospheric pollution, was used as a biological indicator. N concentrations in biomonitors showed relatively low values in the study sites. However, the results of this study suggest that N emissions from Salinelle may have an impact on surrounding ecosystems because N values in moss and water showed a significant correlation. N oxides, in particular, contribute to acidification of ecosystems, thus multitemporal biomonitoring is recommended, especially in those areas where N emitting sources are anthropogenic and natural. PMID:23479119

  13. OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT: RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1980

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas continued its Offsite Radiological Safety Program for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other sites of past underground nuclear tests. For each test, the Laboratory provided airborne ...

  14. Radiological Monitoring Equipment For Real-Time Quantification Of Area Contamination In Soils And Facility Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    M. V. Carpenter; Jay A. Roach; John R Giles; Lyle G. Roybal

    2005-09-01

    The environmental restoration industry offers several sys¬tems that perform scan-type characterization of radiologically contaminated areas. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed and deployed a suite of field systems that rapidly scan, characterize, and analyse radiological contamination in surface soils. The base system consists of a detector, such as sodium iodide (NaI) spectrometers, a global positioning system (GPS), and an integrated user-friendly computer interface. This mobile concept was initially developed to provide precertifica¬tion analyses of soils contaminated with uranium, thorium, and radium at the Fernald Closure Project, near Cincinnati, Ohio. INL has expanded the functionality of this basic system to create a suite of integrated field-deployable analytical systems. Using its engineering and radiation measurement expertise, aided by computer hardware and software support, INL has streamlined the data acquisition and analysis process to provide real-time information presented on wireless screens and in the form of coverage maps immediately available to field technicians. In addition, custom software offers a user-friendly interface with user-selectable alarm levels and automated data quality monitoring functions that validate the data. This system is deployed from various platforms, depending on the nature of the survey. The deployment platforms include a small all-terrain vehicle used to survey large, relatively flat areas, a hand-pushed unit for areas where manoeuvrability is important, an excavator-mounted system used to scan pits and trenches where personnel access is restricted, and backpack- mounted systems to survey rocky shoreline features and other physical settings that preclude vehicle-based deployment. Variants of the base system include sealed proportional counters for measuring actinides (i.e., plutonium-238 and americium-241) in building demolitions, soil areas, roadbeds, and process line routes at the Miamisburg

  15. Environmental radiation monitoring plan for depleted uranium and beryllium areas, Yuma Proving Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-05-11

    This Environmental Radiation Monitoring Plan (ERM) discusses sampling soils, vegetation, and biota for depleted uranium (DU) and beryllium (Be) at Yuma Proving Ground (YPG). The existing ERM plan was used and modified to more adequately assess the potential of DU and Be migration through the YPG ecosystem. The potential pathways for DU and Be migration are discussed and include soil to vegetation, soil to animals, vegetation to animals, animals to animals, and animals to man. Sample collection will show DU deposition and will be used to estimate DU migration. The number of samples from each area varies and depends on if the firing range of interest is currently used for DU testing (GP 17A) or if the range is not used currently for DU testing (GP 20). Twenty to thirty-five individual mammals or lizards will be sampled from each transect. Air samples and samples of dust in the air fall will be collected in three locations in the active ranges. Thirty to forty-five sediment samples will be collected from different locations in the arroys near the impact areas. DU and Be sampling in the Hard Impact and Soft Impact areas changed only slightly from the existing ERM. The modifications are changes in sample locations, addition of two sediment transport locations, addition of vegetation samples, mammal samples, and air sampling from three to five positions on the impact areas. Analysis of samples for DU or total U by inductively-coupled mass spectroscopy (ICP/MS), cc spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis (NAA), and kinetic phosphorimetric analysis (KPA) are discussed, and analysis for Be by ICP/MS are recommended. Acquiring total U (no isotope data) from a large number of samples and analysis of those samples with relatively high total U concentrations results in fewer isotopic identifications but more information on U distribution. From previous studies, total U concentrations greater than about 3 times natural background are usually DU by isotopic confirmation.

  16. Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This document presents the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and on subsequent discussions with regulators, a decision was made to defer implementing source control remedial measures at the WAG. The alternative selected to address the risks associated with WAG 6 involves maintenance of site access controls prevent public exposure to on-site contaminants, continued monitoring of contaminant releases determine if source control measures are required, and development of technologies that could support the final remediation of WAG 6. Although active source control measures are not being implemented at WAG 6, environmental monitoring is necessary to ensure that any potential changes in contaminant release from the WAG are identified early enough to take appropriate action. Two types of environmental monitoring will be conducted: baseline monitoring and annual routine monitoring. The baseline monitoring will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the WAG, confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COCs), and gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model. The baseline monitoring is expected to begin in 1994 and last for 12--18 months. The annual routine monitoring will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COCs to determine off-WAG contaminant flux and risk, identify mills in releases, and confirm the primary contributors to risk. The annual routine monitoring will continue for {approximately} 4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring.

  17. Monitoring Plan for Fiscal Year 1999 Borehole Logging at 200 East Area Specific Retention Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, D.G.

    1999-07-12

    The Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project's vadose zone monitoring effort for fiscal year (FY) 1999 involves monitoring 30 boreholes for moisture content and gamma-ray emitting radionuclides. The boreholes are associated with specific retention trenches and cribs in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The facilities to be monitored are the 216-A-2, -4, and -7 cribs, the 216-A-18 trench, the 216-B-14 through -19 cribs, the 216-B-20 through -34, -53A, and -58 trenches, the 216-B-35 through -42 trenches, and the 216-C-5 crib. This monitoring plan describes the facilities and the vadose zone at the cribs and trenches to be monitored; the field activities to be accomplished; the constituents of interest and the monitoring methods, including calibration issues; and the quality assurance and quality control requirements governing the monitoring effort. The results from the FY 1999 monitoring will show the current configuration of subsurface contamination and will be compared with past monitoring results to determine whether changes in contaminant distribution have occurred since the last monitoring effort.

  18. 105KE Basin Area Radiation Monitor System (ARMS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    KINKEL, C.C.

    1999-12-14

    This procedure is intended for the Area Radiation Monitoring System, ARMS, that is replacing the existing Programmable Input-Output Processing System, PIOPS, radiation monitoring system in the 105KE basin. The new system will be referred to as the 105KE ARMS, 105KE Area Radiation Monitoring System. This ATP will ensure calibration integrity of the 105KE radiation detector loops. Also, this ATP will test and document the display, printing, alarm output, alarm acknowledgement, upscale check, and security functions. This ATP test is to be performed after completion of the 105KE ARMS installation. The alarm outputs of the 105KE ARMS will be connected to the basin detector alarms, basin annunciator system, and security Alarm Monitoring System, AMS, located in the 200 area Central Alarm Station (CAS).

  19. Area detectors technology and optics—Relations to nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pełka, Jerzy B.

    2005-10-01

    Relations between natural vision and the artificial 2D imaging systems are discussed. A variety of animal vision as well as its main functional parts are briefly reviewed and compared with the artificial vision equivalents. An increasing advancement observed in human constructions of imaging devices due to recent rapid progress in science and technology is shown to resemble some sophisticated natural solutions formed by evolution in biological systems. The issues of the similarities and differences between the two kinds of vision are discussed. Main focus is put on optical systems forming the image, with special examples of the imaging systems designed to work in the region of the X-ray radiation. Examples of bio-inspired technological vision devices are presented.

  20. Framework for Site Characterization for Monitored Natural Attenuation of Volatile Organic Compounds in Ground Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is unique among remedial technologies in relying entirely on natural processes to achieve site-specific objectives. Site characterization is essential to provide site-specific data and interpretations for the decision-making process (i.e., to ...

  1. MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION AND RISK MANAGEMENT OF MTBE IN GROUND WATER (MONTEREY, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored natural attenuation (as U.S. EPA defines the term) is a remedy, where natural processes bring the concentration of MTBE to an acceptable level in a reasonable period of time. The longevity of the plume is its critical property. The rate of attenuation is typically con...

  2. MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION AND RISK MANAGEMENT OF MTBE IN GROUND WATER (LOS ANGELES, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored natural attenuation (as U.S. EPA defines the term) is a remedy, where natural processes bring the concentration of MTBE to an acceptable level in a reasonable period of time. The longevity of the plume is its critical property. The rate of attenuation is typically con...

  3. MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION AND RISK MANAGEMENT OF MTBE IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored natural attenuation (as U.S. EPA defines the term) is a remedy, where natural processes bring the concentration of MTBE to an acceptable level in a reasonable period of time. The longevity of the plume is its critical property. The rate of attenuation is typically con...

  4. MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION AND RISK MANAGEMENT OF MTBE AND TBA IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored natural attenuation (as U.S. EPA defines the term) is a remedy, where natural processes bring the concentration of MTBE or TBA to an acceptable level in a reasonable period of time. The longevity of the plume is its critical property. The rate of attenuation is typica...

  5. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hall-Griswold, J.A.; Petrosky, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring trends in juvenile spring and summer chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and steelhead trout, O. mykiss, populations in the Salmon, Clearwater, and lower Snake River drainages for the past 12 years. This work is the result of a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric power plants on the Columbia River. Project 91-73, Idaho Natural Production Monitoring, consists of two subprojects: General Monitoring and Intensive Monitoring. This report updates and summarizes data through 1995 for the General Parr Monitoring (GPM) database to document status and trends of classes of wild and natural chinook salmon and steelhead trout populations. A total of 281 stream sections were sampled in 1995 to monitor trends in spring and summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout O. mykiss parr populations in Idaho. Percent carrying capacity and density estimates were summarized for 1985--1995 by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon, and natural spring and summer chinook salmon. The 1995 data were also summarized by subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s 1992--1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan.

  6. Local seismic network for monitoring of a potential nuclear power plant area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiira, Timo; Uski, Marja; Kortström, Jari; Kaisko, Outi; Korja, Annakaisa

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a plan for seismic monitoring of a region around a potential nuclear power plant. Seismic monitoring is needed to evaluate seismic risk. The International Atomic Energy Agency has set guidelines on seismic hazard evaluation and monitoring of such areas. According to these guidelines, we have made a plan for a local network of seismic stations to collect data for seismic source characterization and seismotectonic interpretations, as well as to monitor seismic activity and natural hazards. The detection and location capability of the network were simulated using different station configurations by computing spatial azimuthal coverages and detection threshold magnitudes. Background noise conditions around Pyhäjoki were analyzed by comparing data from different stations. The annual number of microearthquakes that should be detected with a dense local network centered around Pyhäjoki was estimated. The network should be dense enough to fulfill the requirements of azimuthal coverage better than 180° and automatic event location capability down to ML ˜ 0 within a distance of 25 km from the site. A network of 10 stations should be enough to reach these goals. With this setup, the detection threshold magnitudes are estimated to be ML = -0.1 and ML = 0.1 within a radius of 25 and 50 km from Pyhäjoki, respectively. The annual number of earthquakes detected by the network is estimated to be 2 (ML ≥ ˜ -0.1) within 25 km radius and 5 (ML ≥ ˜-0.1 to ˜0.1) within 50 km radius. The location accuracy within 25 km radius is estimated to be 1-2 and 4 km for horizontal coordinates and depth, respectively. Thus, the network is dense enough to map out capable faults with horizontal accuracy of 1-2 km within 25 km radius of the site. The estimation is based on the location accuracies of five existing networks in northern Europe. Local factors, such as seismic noise sources, geology and infrastructure might limit the station configuration and detection and

  7. 2005 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    2006-02-01

    This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2005 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. In additon to providing groundwater monitoring results, this report also includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Ny County, Nevada.

  8. Natural disaster reduction applications of the Chinese small satellite constellation for environment and disaster monitoring and forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sanchao; Fan, Yida; Gao, Maofang

    2013-10-01

    The Small Satellite Constellation for Environment and Disaster Monitoring and Forecasting (SSCEDMF) is an important component of Chinese satellites earth observation system. The first stage of SSCEDMF is composed by "2+1" satellites. The 2 optical satellites (HJ-1-A and HJ-1-B) and 1 S band microwave satellite (HJ-1-C) were successful launched on September 6, 2008 and November 19, 2012 respectively. This article introduced SSCEDMF characteristic and the disaster reduction application system and satellites on-orbit test works, and also analyzed the application capacity in natural disasters included flood, ice flooding, wild fire, severely drought, snow disasters, large area landslide and debris flow, sea ice, earthquake recovering, desertification and plant diseases and insect pests. Furthermore, we show some cases of China's and other countries' new natural disasters forecasting, monitoring, assessment and recovery construction.

  9. Z-Area saltstone disposal facility groundwater monitoring report. First and second quarters 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater sampling during the first and second quarters of 1997 in the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility. This report presents only the data for sampling during the first half of 1997 as required by industrial Solid Waste Permit No. 025500-1603. For a detailed discussion of groundwater monitoring in the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility, consult the 1996 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Annual Report. Appendix A presents the proposed South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Proposed Groundwater Monitoring Standards. Flagging criteria are described in Appendix B. In May 1997 SCDHEC granted approval for seven hydrocone sampling.

  10. Monitoring of Land degradation in the mining impacted areas of Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, T.; Renchin, T.

    2012-12-01

    Nowadays, environmental issue is very important and complicated problem in Mongolia. Mongolia has long suffered from poor mining legislation and almost no regulation of its production . There is a need to undertake analyses of land degradation and land use in Mongolia as an important factor of Environment. Land degradation has been identified as one the priority concerns. Causes of land degradation can be divided into two categories natural and human induced in Mongolia. The second hand level mining contributes to land degradation increased small to large-scale mining, as well as illicit activity resulting in exploitation of the country's mineral resources. In the last decade Mongolia has been developing the mining sector and due to the great number of exploitations the related territories were ecologically damaged. The rivers and lakes are drained, the earth is defiled and all these damages brought the environmental problems. This study aims to monitor land degradation processes in the study area Ongi River Basin of the central region of Mongolia. This area is affected by mining activities and desertification processes. The main reason of drying up Ongiriver and Ulaannuur is definitely changed the Onggi riverbed due to the mining of gold placer deposit and never making technical and biological reclamation. About 60 thousand people and over one million livestock who one living around Onggi river one getting defective of drink water and pasture because of Onggi river and UlaanLake's evaporation. We applied change detection technique and supervised classification using Satellite data. This study contributes to the research which involves policy makers and stakeholders to define and negotiate relevant scenarios in participatory approaches in the local area and to the studies about linking people to pixels. This case study will enable our researchers to plan for the future by making more educated decisions in issues stemming from mining, land degradation, water